Media Mining Digest 233 – Apr 29, 2016: Alzheimer’s Factors, Antibiotic Resistance, Aviation Careers, Bean Diet, Bechtel Corporation, British Monarchs, Broadband on Farms, Campaign Finance Reform, Cannabidiol, Car Technology, Celebrating Failure, China’s Five Year Plan, Citrus Fruit, Class Action Suits, Climate Change Signs, Coal Pollution, College Counseling, Columbia Gold Mining, Community vs Individual Rights, Concussion Test and Sit Ups, Creep Catchers, Cuban Infrastructure, Democracy Now, Design Thinking, Diabetes DIY Treatment, Discrimination by States, Doctors Stories, Drone Kill List, Education Solutions, El Salvador Murders, Equal Rights in Australia, Exercise Insights, Expert Training, Failure Book, Fallacy Begging the Question, Fatherhood, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, Financial Technology, Forest Gardens, Fungi and Mushrooms, Geek Tends, Girls and Sex, Guaranteed Income, Guide Dogs on Planes, Hamilton Play, Harriet Tubman, Health Technology, Heart Research, Hiring Process, Humanitarian Aid Dangers, Immunotherapy, Income Tax Transparency, Invisible Problems, Iran Economy, IRS ID Theft, ISIS Most Wanted, Jail Problems, Judaism in America, Library of Congress Hearing, Life Expectancy, Lusitania Book, Mt Tambora Eruption, Obesity Control, Oncolytic Viruses, Opioid Overdose Death, Orwell, Periodical Publishing Trends, Profession Restructuring, Public Radio Disruption, Racism, Ransomeware Attacks, Refugee Debate, Refugee Scams, Research Animal Sex, Rubber Research, Schools with Slave Heritage, Science Sexism, Set Top Box Issue, Singapore, Sleep Revolution, Sound Engineer, Space Medicine, TED Talks, Ted Williams, Theranos Problem, Transcrainial Magnetic Stimulation, Trauma Aftermath, Travel Importance, UN Role Today, Viagra for Women, Voter Psychology, Voting Rights, Wheat Allergies, White Collar Digital Disruption, Women in Politics, Zika Hazards

The best 101 podcasts from a larger group of 292 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 280 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Alzheimer’s Risk Factors 64 mins – “Patricia Spilman, Senior Scientist, Drug Discovery Laboratory, UCLA, and in the Bredesen Lab, Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato In the absence of a truly effective disease-altering treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, methods for decreasing the risk of developing Alzheimer’s become extremely important. Many people were introduced to “familial AD” through reading the book or viewing the film Still Alice written by Lisa Genova. However, many—but not all—of the risk factors for late-onset Alzheimer’s are not genetic and are potentially modifiable; that is, they can be identified, addressed and reduced. Patricia Spilman speaks from results of the scientific work in a laboratory setting to inform you of the top risk factors that are potentially modifiable.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Resistance 30 mins – “Antibiotics have saved millions of lives, but their misuse and overuse is making them less effective as bacteria develop resistance. Despite scientists’ warnings, antibiotic prescriptions in many countries continue to soar and antibiotic use in farming is at record levels. As a result, doctors are now seeing infections they can no longer treat. Are we facing the end of modern medicine? An antibiotic apocalypse that takes medicine back to the Dark Ages? Or will researchers outwit the incredibly clever bacteria and find novel ways to beat resistance?” At the link right-click the “MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aviation Careers 72 mins – “Welcome to episode 106 of the podcast where we help you move toward your career goal. Hearing your stories of achieving your career goal keeps us motivated and helps inspire others. Please keep sharing your success stories including your challenges along the way toward your goal. In this episode we answer your questions. You will notice many focus on supporting family while working on completing your ratings, degrees, and finding a job. This can be challenging to say the least but we have some encouraging news: You can do it! We relate some of our own experiences and those of our listeners to help you keep motivated while in the challenging position of supporting a family and moving toward your career goal.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bean Diet 30 mins – “For 2016, the International Year of Pulses, our Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science is looking at the many opportunities provided by pulses—edible seeds like dried, lentils, and chickpeas. Pulses provide a non-animal source of protein, appear to be healthy for the gut microbiome, and help replenish the soil where they are grown. In this podcast we’ll talk to scientists studying the benefits of pulses about their research and also how we might solve the challenge of moving these important foods from millions of small-scale farmers in India and Latin America to consumers worldwide.” At the link find the title, “Little Beans, Big Opportunities,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up men.

Bechtel Corporation 59 mins – “Author Sally Denton discusses her book, [The Profiteers], which looks at the Bechtel Corporation, the largest civil engineering company in the United States. To read the Bechtel statement on this program, see more information on this program below.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Sally Denton, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436095.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Monarchs 27 mins – “To salute the 90th birthday of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, David Cannadine, eminent professor of History at Princeton University explores the worldwide role and significance of the British monarchy.” At the link find the title, “A Global Queen, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03rmfwg.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband on Farms 36 mins – “When we launched this podcast in 2012, we kicked it off with an interview from Minnesota’s farm country, Sibley County. We were excited at their passion for making sure every farm was connected with high quality Internet access. After the project took a turn and became a brand new cooperative, we interviewed them again in 2014 for episode 99, but they hadn’t finished financing. They broke ground 2015 and today we discuss the model and the new Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR) case study that details how they built it.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file…” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campaign Finance Reform 38 mins – “When I first met Richard Painter some months ago, I thought he must be the loneliest man in the Republican Party. He’s a conservative, and, of course, I’m not. But he believes, as I do, that there’s too much money in politics. Political insiders know Richard Painter well as President George W. Bush’s White House counselor and chief ethical advisor. He’s now teaching law at the University of Minnesota, and he’s causing heads to turn with a book advocating that we reduce the power of big money in politics. Its title is Taxation Only With Representation: The Conservative Conscience and Campaign Finance Reform. There’s a lot to learn from it, and I urge you to read it, because it is rare today to find a conservative who will admit, as Mr. Painter does, that money corrupts politics, and then makes his case with so much passion and logic. His book is also timely because the issue has reached a boiling point this year. Thousands of people descended on Washington just last week in a movement they call Democracy Spring, deliberately getting arrested to protest on behalf of cleaner politics and a government liberated from Big Money. Every poll I’ve consulted reveals a deep and substantial support in this country for those objectives….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cannabidiol 42 mins – “Marijuana has been a hot topic since states like Colorado and Washington have legalized the plant. In the discussion surrounding marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the plant’s principal psychoactive cannabinoid, has gotten most of the limelight. But there’s another cannabinoid that deserves attention: Cannabidiol, also known as CBD. Let’s get one thing clear right off the bat: Supplemental CBD is derived from industrial hemp, which is perfectly legal throughout the U.S. (unlike marijuana). It’s a close chemical analog to endocannabinoids, naturally occurring compounds within the human body, and it interacts with some of the same neuronal receptor-sites that the human body’s own endocannabinoids would interact with.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Technology 46 mins – “Everybody talks about the future of self-driving cars, but the reality of almost self-driving cars is already here. In our laps. On the road. Lots of cars — and not just fancy Teslas — are now rolling out with an array of semi-autonomous powers that almost do the driving. They’ve got cameras and radar sensors and night vision. They’ll steer you, keep you in your lane, brake for you, park for you, look out for you. This hour On Point, Car Talk‘s Ray Magliozzi and more on the almost self-driving car is here.” (3 guests) At the link right-click “Download this story and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Celebrating Failure 59 mins – “Astro Teller, director of Alphabet’s moonshot factory, X, describes how smart bets on world-changing innovations are aided by a culture that celebrates only the most audacious projects and rewards teams for showing the courage to find the biggest flaws. He also discusses how innovation can be systematized regardless of business type, resources or role at your company.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right side of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China’s Five Year Plan 60 mins – “Experts discuss China’s domestic economic policies and provide their perspectives on China’s influence in Asia and around the world.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Citrus Fruit 46 mins – “…The citrus fruits we find in the grocery store today are all descended from four highly promiscuous ancestors: the citron, the pomelo, the pepeda, and the mandarin. From their origins in northern India, southwestern China, and Malaysia, these prized golden fruits accompanied travelers along the Silk Road, migrating to the Middle East and, eventually, Europe and the Americas. Over time, citrus colonized the world, transforming local cuisines in the process: the citron was incorporated into Jewish religious ritual; sour oranges became the dominant flavor of medieval European cuisine; and orange trees laid the foundation for California’s second gold rush.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Class Action Suits 21 mins – “The modern class action was created on a typewriter in the back of a car. (Sort of.) Now, thousands of these lawsuits are filed every year. How did we get here? Is this really a good way to do things?” At the link find the title, “#696: Class Action,” right-click “Media files 20160415_pmoney_podcast041516v2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Signs 60 mins – “Signs climate has entered abrupt shift. Includes Dr. James Hansen’s video abstract of new science. Special report on smoke pollution from Indonesian peat fires by correspondent Yew Jin Lee, with 3 experts. Sample from “Unwelcome Guests” #726 “The Flight from Death”.” At the link right-click Lo-Fi near the download options.

Coal Pollution 7 mins – “It is estimated pollution causes 3 million deaths each year worldwide, mostly caused by heart and lung diseases. Most deaths occur in developing countries with China and India at the top of the list. The biggest source of pollution is from the burning of coal, mostly in power plants. The estimate is 400,000 deaths each year in China caused by the burning of coal. China is moving away from coal as a source of energy, although the process is likely to take decades to complete. India continues to build coal-fired power stations.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Counseling 45 mins – “Freshly minted graduates will soon take their degrees and set out into the workplace. But the path from college to career is not as obvious as it once was. Over the last few decades, unemployment among young college graduates has gone up while wages have gone down. Today, nearly half are underemployed. Add the burden of student debt and life post-graduation can seem pretty scary. A longtime chronicler of higher education says it doesn’t need to be that way. In a new book, he lays out a blue print for navigating the transition. A panel of experts joins him – and us – to discuss life after college.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Columbia Gold Mining 4 mins – “But over the past decade, as gold prices have soared, cartels have increasingly turned to illegally mining the metal to earn cash. In Peru and Colombia, they’re now making more money exporting illegal gold than cocaine. Eighty percent of the gold mined in Colombia and up to 90 percent of the gold mined in Venezuela is produced illegally. That’s according to a recent report from The Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime, which outlines the impact this crush of illegal mining is having on displaced communities, forced-labor miners and sex workers who are trafficked to serve this burgeoning industry. “When you arrive in these illegal mines, you just realize that there is like a chain of victimization,” the report’s author, Livia Wagner, said in an interview with PRI’s The World….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Community vs Individual Rights 53 mins – “Journalist Colin Woodard says there’s a theme running through disagreements in American history: the struggle between individual rights and the good of the community. It started when the Mayflower limped onto shore and continues in today’s political rancor. Woodard argues though that democracy works best when we find the “sweet spot” between libertarianism and collectivism. Wednesday, he joins us to talk about these two impulses in our character and the risks of moving too far to either extreme.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concussion Test and Sit Ups 27 mins – “American doctors say they’re just five years away from a pitch-side blood test to spot concussion – which is an injury caused by a bang to the head or a sudden, strong jolt to the brain. It’s a hot topic at the moment as experts debate when sportspeople should and shouldn’t be allowed back onto the pitch after a head injury. At the moment doctors still have to rely on looking out for symptoms such as vomiting, blurred vision, loss of balance or disorientation when considering a diagnosis of concussion. But researchers at the Orlando Regional Medical Centre in Florida have detected two substances which are released into the blood stream after a brain injury. Through this finding they hope to develop a simple blood test – a bit like those used by diabetics to test their glucose levels. Emergency physician Dr Linda Papa says that type of test could be just five years away and could help to decide whether to scan a patient’s brain. …The sit up – which has long been a mainstay of military and leisure exercise programmes – is having a makeover. Stuart McGill is a professor of spine biomechanics at the University of Waterloo in Canada. He’s recently written the book, the Back Mechanic, and has been researching the impact of sit ups on the spine for many years. He says that the ‘standard’ sit up – where the hands are placed behind the head and the lower spine is ‘pushed’ into the floor – puts the back under a lot of strain. This increases the risk of injury and potential back pain – and those with thicker spines like rugby players being particularly at risk. Professor McGill suggests instead that the hands should be placed, palm-down, under the lower back, and bending just one leg – keeping the other straight. Only then should the head be lifted up, by a tiny amount…. ” At the link find the title, “Concussion Test,” right-click “Media files p03rngfw.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creep Catchers 17 mins – “They call themselves Creep Catchers. And, across the country, they’re taking the law into their own hands by posing online as minors to lure in would-be sexual predators. They say police aren’t doing enough to expose people who abuse children.” At the link find the title, “’Creep Catcher’ vigilantes confront alleged pedophiles, say police not doing enough – Apr,” right-click “Media files current_20160418_48266.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Infrastructure 119 mins – “Life in Cuba, Facebook Bots, UC Davis’ mistakes, Google Changelog, Magic Leap, and more…” (Cuba only covers the first 24 mins.) At the link click “Download options,” right-click “audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Now 72 mins – “…In 1996 Amy Goodman started a radio show called “Democracy Now!” to focus on the issues that were underreported or ignored by mainstream media. This year the show is celebrating its 20th anniversary and is the only public media in the U.S. that airs simultaneously on satellite and cable television, radio and the Internet. Goodman will share stories about the remarkable leaders and crusaders that have appeared on her show and the lasting impact they have all made in the ongoing fight for peace and justice.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Design thinking 54 mins – “Bernard Roth, co-founder and academic director of Stanford University’s d.school, [design school] shares design-thinking tools for reframing life’s stubborn problems and unlocking solutions. Professor Roth, author of the book “The Achievement Habit,” also engages audience members in exercises meant to cut through the excuses we tell ourselves that hold us back from accomplishing our goals.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diabetes DIY Treatment 38 mins – “In this week’s episode we met a woman whose pancreas is changing medicine. Dana Lewis has Type 1 diabetes, and when it was clear that medical manufacturers were behind on creating the device she needed to manage her disease, she hacked together her own artificial pancreas. Now, over 50 people have built versions of Dana’s system, OpenAPS (Open Artificial Pancreas System).” At the link click the circle with three dots on the sound bar, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Discrimination by States 44 mins – “In 1993, President Bill Clinton signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act into law. But the Act didn’t apply to the states. So in the decades that followed, more than 20 states passed their own so-called “Religious Freedom” laws. The latest is Tennessee, where lawmakers last week approved a bill that allows therapists to refuse treatment to LGBT clients. Similar bills have passed in Kansas and Mississippi. Supporters say these laws protect first amendment rights. But opponents argue they allow businesses to discriminate against LGBT persons. Guest host Indira Lakshmanan and guests discuss debate over controversial religious freedom laws in the states.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Doctors Stories 39 mins – “Note: In this week’s episode we asked doctors about the patients who changed their lives. It was a basic question, and an obvious one – so obvious that we weren’t prepared for how good the responses would be. The stories were powerful and intimate, and a peek into the world we don’t always see. A big part of a doctor’s job is listening. They listen to our symptoms, pain and life situations. They listen for what patients aren’t telling them. They listen to heartbeats. But give them a mic, like the Annals of Internal Medicine did, and you’ll find out they also have plenty to say. This week we hear from three doctors in what we call a “Doctor Story Slam” – like a poetry slam, except with more stethoscopes and medical degrees. We often hear about how doctors change patients’ lives. We wanted to know: how do patients change their lives? These are the kind of stories you never hear during your routine check-ups….” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Kill List 25 mins – “The so-called U.S. kill list determines who’s targeted with drone strikes. Names on the list are secret. Malik Jalal, a tribal elder in Pakistan, says he’s escaped drones attacks and believes he’s on the list. Jalal is pleading for help to clear his name.” At the link find the title, “Pakistani man Malik Jalal asks to be taken off US drone ‘kill list’ – Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160419_75308.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Solutions 30 mins – “Today on Sea Change Radio we continue our discussion with Zoe Weil, education reformer and environmentalist.The post Zoe Weil: Sustainable Education, Part II appeared first on Sea Change Radio.” At the link find the title, “Zoe Weil: Sustainable Education, Part II,” right-click “Media files SC-2016-04-19.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

El Salvador Murders 47 mins – “NPR’s Kelly McEvers went to El Salvador — to find out how violent street gangs are terrorizing a whole country for the podcast “Embedded.” She joins us. Plus, the latest on Brazil’s political crisis.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equal Rights in Australia 56 mins – “Newly appointed Sex Discrimination Commissioner Kate Jenkins addresses the National Press Club.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Kate Jenkins, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_KateJenkins_2004_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exercise Insights 49 mins – “When it comes to fitness and exercise…Sal di Stefano wants to give it to you straight, no bullshit. “The fitness industry is one of the most full-of-shit industries you’ll ever run into.” …After 18 years as a personal trainer, di Stefano knows all the myths propagated by the fitness industry: … He was fed up with it, and decided to start the MindPump podcast with two other personal trainers to start dispelling these myths. …Proper exercise will improve the way your brain functions. …The Best Exercise For Your Brain …For the biggest cognition boost, di Stefano recommends complex movement, as opposed to repetitive movement like running, since by moving in multiple ways, you’re encouraging the brain to adapt and grow. Harder Does Not Mean Better and Stronger – The fitness magazine headlines scream “Beast Mode!” and “the hardest workout you’ll ever do.” But although intensity is an important factor in improving cognition via exercise, higher intensity is not the be-all and end-all. The human body responds well to appropriate intensity, but it also responds to frequency. In fact, frequency may be more important for longevity, long term health, and cognitive function than simple intensity… Note: “intensity” is an individual assessment. What’s high intensity for a sedentary office worker is low for a professional athlete, to use one extreme example. So how hard should you work out? Challenge yourself, but you don’t want to feel like you just got beat up. If you can barely move for two days, or you need to take a nap after a workout session, you’ve overdone it….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Expert Training 55 mins – “For more than thirty years psychologist Anders Ericsson, an expert on the field of professional development, has studied the people who stand out as specialists in their fields. In fact, Ericsson’s research was used as the basis for Malcolm Gladwell’s “10,000 Hour Rule” – which essentially states that it takes on average 10,000 hours of doing something to become an expert. In reality, Ericsson’s research shows that there is nothing magical about the number of hours you put in, but over time he has come to understand that we are all capable of extraordinary feats. In this interview, Ericsson explains what the research actually says about the infamous “10,000 hour rule” and how that number can be greatly decreased (or increased) depending on the type of practice you are doing. Specifically, by utilizing deliberate practice with the help of a trained professional, one can drastically improve their results. Deliberate practice can be applied equally well to everything ranging from business skills and sales to sports and music…and it works! Anders recently wrote an incredible book on the topic titled, PEAK: Secrets From The New Science Of Expertise. If you like the interview, you’ll love the book!” At the link right-click ‘Download” and select “Save Link As” the pop-up menu.

Failure Book 115 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Dickson DespommierGuest: Stuart FiresteinStuart joins Vincent and Dickson to talk about his sequel to Ignorance, a book called Failure, which seeks to make science more appealing by revealing its faults.” At the link right-click beside “Download [on] TWiV 385” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fallacy Begging the Question 35 mins – “If you believe something is bad because it is…bad, or that something is good because, well, it’s good, you probably wouldn’t use that kind of reasoning in an argument, yet, sometimes, without realizing it, that’s exactly what you do. In this episode three experts in logic and rationality explain how circular reasoning leads us to “beg the question” when producing arguments and defending our ideas, beliefs, and behaviors.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:…” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fatherhood 46 mins – “Journalist Ron Fournier turns the tables on himself for a soul-searching meditation on fatherhood now. What it is. How it’s changing. Ron Fournier was a big time Washington reporter who wasn’t paying full-enough attention as a father. When he figured that out, he changed. Recommitted. Came to see his children on their own terms. Especially his young son Tyler– a marvelous boy, a boy with Asperger syndrome. They hit the road. Learned about life and each other. And the American presidency. At the link right-click “Listen to this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome 18 mins – “Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder is a debilitating, lifelong condition that cuts across Canadian society. But it hits very hard inside indigenous communities and could be why many indigenous offenders seem stuck in a revolving-door with the justice system.” At the link find the title, “Proposed bill takes FASD into account when sentencing offenders – Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160415_58463.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Technology 8 mins – “The emergence of fintech companies has put traditional banking services under threat. But that doesn’t mean banks are going to disappear, says Stanley Pignal” At the link find the link, “Special report: International banking, May, 2015,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forest Gardens 70 mins – “What is a food forest or a forest garden. A quick review of the seven layers of a forest: Canopy, Sub Canopy, Shrub, Herbacious, Vine, Ground Cover, Rhizome – Roots… Things that are different from typical food forestry:The layers are scaled down; The number of support species are reduced; There are few “sacrificial plantings” They don’t require swales or chickens but both are welcome; Small ponds and barrels are easily fed with roof catchment. Special Considerations that Open Your Options Up: Shape isn’t critical, do what works; Put in more irrigation then you think you will ever need; Consider ponds, please consider ponds; Think about power (solar first but grid is better then nothing); You can plant a LOT closer and a LOT more dense then you think; If you have animals design in their nutrient flow; In a larger space build “glades” and maximize the edges; Build structures for your vines they can otherwise dominate a small system; Fertilize (organically) a lot early on; Mulch and chop and drop like crazy….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fungi and Mushrooms 64 mins – “Peter McCoy is an original founder of Radical Mycology, a grassroots organization and open-source movement that teaches the skills needed to work with mushrooms and other fungi for personal, societal, and ecological resilience. Peter is the lead cultivation expert for the Amazon Mycorenewal Project and Open Source Ecology and the author of the new book, Radical Mycology: A Treatise on Seeing and Working With Fungi. Hey joins us today to answer to discuss what he calls “The Missing Fungal Functions” – how fungi can and should be integrated into all aspects of life. He also answers questions like, what is the ecological significance of the fungal kingdom? What are some ways the people commonly disrupt the fungal communities in their soil and plants? What is going in in the world of cultivating mycorrhizal fungi? What are endophytic fungi that live inside of plants and can we cultivate those? And above all for those of us that just want to grow mushrooms, what would be the easiest way to start a mushroom farm?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geek Trends 94 mins – “The Creator of Tetris Alexey Pajitnov, the animator who brings life to vintage photos Alexey Zakharov, Leo and Padre answer your tech questions.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Girls and Sex 45 mins – “It’s always been hard for parents to talk to their kids about sex. But author Peggy Orenstein says, particularly with daughters, it’s more important than ever. For her new book, “Girls & Sex: Navigating the Complicated New Landscape”, Orenstein interviewed over 70 girls and young women — and from the pressures of social media to the impact of online pornography — what she found disturbed her. Orenstein says that while girls have more opportunities today than ever, when it comes to sex, they’re getting mixed messages. Diane and her guests discuss the complicated and contradictory messages young girls are getting about sex. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Guaranteed Income 36 mins – “A lot of full-time jobs in the modern economy simply don’t pay a living wage. And even those jobs may be obliterated by new technologies. What’s to be done so that financially vulnerable people aren’t just crushed? It may finally be time for an idea that economists have promoted for decades.” At the link click the circle with three dots, then right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guide Dogs on Planes 20 mins – “In order to fly, guide dogs must have the correct paperwork, but EasyJet admit to us that they got it wrong recently with one passengers and his dog. They apologise and say they’ll be more flexible in future. And when does helping become interfering? We’ve come across a new situation where well-meaning strangers are tapping on your smart phones, thinking they’re off when actually you’re using a privacy setting called a screen curtain. So what should you do? Tom Walker reports.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hamilton Play 47 mins – “It’s hard to say Alexander Hamilton anymore without hearing music. Hip hop music fused with American revolutionary history from the super smash Broadway hit show “Hamilton.” “Bastard, orphan, son of a whore,” sings his fatal enemy Aaron Burr. But Alexander Hamilton was a founding father with a huge impact on the design of the new nation. And the Tupac of his day, some now say. There’s a wild fever for the show. Up next On Point: Hamilton mania and American history.” At the link right-click “Download this story and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Harriet Tubman 12 mins – “Harriet Tubman is set to be the new face of the twenty dollar bill. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew announced yesterday that President Andrew Jackson’s image will move to the back of the bill, and for the first time in a century a woman’s face will appear on the front of American paper currency. It’s the first time ever that an African-American will hold the spot. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Isabel Wilkerson joins us to talk about what it means to have abolitionist Harriet Tubman on one of the most widely circulated bills in the world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Health Technology 60 mins –What if doctors no longer played God and you became CEO of your own health? What if medicine were tailor-made for your own DNA? What will the world be like when people start living to 150 – or even forever?If only the wealthy can afford super-longevity, will the growing gap between rich and poor lead to a new form of social inequality? These are some of the questions Intelligence Squared explored in The Future of Health: When Death Becomes Optional. Massive change is already under way. New tools, tests and apps are taking healthcare away from the professionals and into the hands of the individual. Wearable devices which monitor our fitness and activities are already ubiquitous. Before long they will be superseded by ‘insideables’ – chips planted just under our skin – and ‘ingestibles’ – tiny sensor pills that we swallow. The plummeting cost of DNA profiling means we will soon be entering the era of truly personalised medicine – the right drug for the right person at the right time – instead of the same drug for everybody. All this means that we will be living longer, healthier lives. Some of the world’s top scientists believe that ageing itself can be treated as a disease, and the race is on to find a ‘cure’. Google and other Silicon Valley giants are pouring billions into longevity research, hoping that they can find the elusive cause of ageing and deactivate it, putting an end to the age-related diseases such as cancer, heart disease and Alzheimers that we tend to die of. If they succeed, the first person to live to 150 may have already been born. And an elite handful of very wealthy tech entrepreneurs have even more ambitious dreams: to make death just another medical problem which technology will sooner or later disrupt….We were joined by Dr Daniel Kraft, Faculty chair for the Medicine and Exponential Medicine program at Singularity University; João Pedro de Magalhães, senior lecturer at the University of Liverpool, where he leads the Integrative Genomics of Ageing Group; and Professor Tony Young, the NHS’s National Clinical Director for Innovation (known as ‘the NHS’s disrupter-in-chief’). The event was chaired by documentary maker and award-winning science journalist. Dr Michael Mosley.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Research 49 mins – “We talk to Dr. Greg Marcus, the Director of Clinical Research for the UCSF Division of Cardiology about heart disease and how things like smart watches might help us learn more about it.” At the link find the title, “129 Greg Marcus – Understanding Heart Disease With Big Data,” right-click “Media files 0ad2ddf8-5fc8-47f5-b12b-f8343d7d27cd.mp3” and select “Sve Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hiring Process 21 mins – “When you’re an employer looking at a giant stack of resumes, you have to find some way to quickly narrow the field. How do you do that fairly? And what happens when your good intentions backfire?” At the link find the title, “#697: Help Wanted,” right-click “Media files 20160422_pmoney_podcast042216v3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Humanitarian Aid Dangers 45 mins – “When humanitarian aid workers go to an area devastated by war, disease, or natural disaster, they put their own lives in danger. But in recent decades, the risks they face have grown: The leading cause of death for medical humanitarians and other aid workers used to be traffic accidents. Today it’s violent attacks. Now the doctor behind the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative is sounding the alarm. He says our modern age of terror has threatened the principle of neutrality at the heart of humanitarian work, and that formalized training is more essential than ever for those providing aid to people caught in complex conflicts worldwide. Dr. Michael VanRooyen discusses this urgent moment for what he calls ‘the world’s emergency room’.”. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Immunotherapy 36 mins – “Immunotherapy—using the body’s own immune defenses to fight cancer—has already shown significant promise. Now, the latest research says new immunotherapy drugs could dramatically increase survival rates for difficult-to-treat cancers like deadly melanomas, and may be effective in dozens of other cancers including those driven by viruses. This news comes as Vice President Joe Biden’s nationwide “moonshot” initiative to beat cancer is gaining momentum, and spurring more private funding for research. A look at promising developments in the treatment of cancer using immunotherapy.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Income Tax Transparency 24 mins – “The British PM, David Cameron, admits he owned shares but sold them off. It’s the kind of admission political leaders are being forced to make in the wake of the Panama Papers. What if politicians’ tax returns were put on public display automatically?” At the link find the title, “Should elected officials have to make their tax returns public? – Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160415_56600.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous Health 26 mins – “Ian Anderson and Romlie Mokak discuss a new analysis of health indicators across 28 indigenous populations, with implications for future health services planning worldwide.” At the link find the title, “Indigenous health: The Lancet: April 20, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20april.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Invisible Problems 56 mins – “Physicists tell us that perhaps there are parallel universes. Is there a parallel universe of the heart, where we might find the real values that make us tick? Maybe it’s not law and government that makes a Good Society, maybe it’s something far deeper.” At the link find the title, “The Discovery of the Heart, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas 20160413_62189.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran Economy 59 mins – “Valiollah Seif discusses Iran’s economy. – The C. Peter McColough Series on International Economics brings the world’s foremost economic policymakers and scholars to address members on current topics in international economics and U.S. monetary policy. This meeting series is presented by the Maurice R. Greenberg Center for Geoeconomic Studies.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IRS ID Theft 103 mins – “IRS Commissioner John Koskinen and officials from the Treasury Department and the Government Accountability Office testify at a Senate Finance Committee hearing on cybersecurity and taxpayer information.” At the link find the title, “Hearing on Cybersecurity and Taxpayer Data, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.438604.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Most Wanted 27 mins – “Chloe Hadjimatheou tells the astonishing story of a group of young men from Raqqa in Syria who chose to resist the so-called ‘Islamic State’, which occupied their city in 2014 and made it the capital of their ‘Caliphate’. These extraordinary activists have risked everything to oppose ISIS; several have been killed, or had family members murdered. IS has put a bounty on the resistance leaders’ heads forcing them to go into hiding. But the group continues its work, under the banner ‘Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently’. Chloe meets the group’s founders, who are now organising undercover activists in Raqqa from the relative safety of other countries. Producer: Rob Walker Editor: Richard Knight” At the link find the title, “‘Islamic State’s’ Most Wanted, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03rndlv.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jail Problems 47 mins – “Inside a major push to reduce jail populations and fix racial disparities in the justice system. Eleven major cities are all in.Criminal justice issues all over lately. A new report out of Chicago on all-too-obvious trust and race problems with the Chicago Police. Bill Clinton, grilled on his 1990s anti-crime push and our packed prisons. Black Lives Matter raging, ever since Ferguson. A new initiative looks to go local for a fix. To our local jails. They too are packed with the poor. And the channels in and out have everything to do with the big picture. Up next On Point: race, poverty and fixing jail.” At the link right-click “Download this story and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Judaism in American 59 mins This month, Jewish communities across the country celebrate Passover, a holiday that marks the end of the Israelites’ enslavement by the Egyptians. Only about 2% of the U.S. population is Jewish, but the influence of American Jews far outweighs their relatively small demographic size. In this episode of BackStory, the Guys explore the history of Judaism in America, from George Washington’s famous letter to the Jewish congregation of Newport, Rhode Island, to efforts to establish a Jewish city of refuge, near Buffalo, New York in the l820’s, and the importance of delis in Jewish American culture.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Library of Congress Hearing 80 mins – “President Obama’s nominee to be the next librarian of Congress, Carla Hayden, testifies at a Senate Rules and Administration confirmation hearing. If confirmed, she will succeed James Billington who served from 1987 to 2015.” At the link find the title, “Librarian of Congress Nominee Carla Hayden Confirmation Hearing, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.439503.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Life Expectancy 44 mins – “Wealthy people typically live longer than poor people: this idea has long been studied and supported by research. But new work is deepening our understanding of differences in life expectancy across the U.S. A study published yesterday tells us not only that the gap in lifespan between the rich and poor has increased notably in recent years, but that for poor Americans, where you live in the U.S. plays a key role in determining how long you live. And new work from The Washington Post adds another layer, pointing to decaying health and earlier death for white women in particular. Life expectancy in America: how it’s linked to income, location and gender.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Lusitania Book 53 mins – “When it set sail from New York on May 1, 1915, the Lusitania bore a full manifest of passengers and the ingenuity and hubris of its era. It was immense and luxurious, the fastest civilian ship in service. It was also under threat. The Germans declared that British ships sailed “at their own risk,” a risk the Lusitania’s operators perilously defied. They claimed theirs was the safest ship at sea. Tuesday, the writer Erik Larson joins us to recount the disastrous tale of the Lusitania’s last crossing…Erik Larson is the author of the books In the Garden of Beasts, Thunderstruck, The Devil in the White City, and Isaac’s Storm. His latest book, Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania was recently released in paperback.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mt Tambora Eruption 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the impact of the eruption of Mt Tambora, in 1815, on the Indonesian island of Sambawa. This was the largest volcanic eruption in recorded history and it had the highest death toll, devastating people living in the immediate area. Tambora has been linked with drastic weather changes in North America and Europe the following year, with frosts in June and heavy rains throughout the summer in many areas. This led to food shortages, which may have prompted westward migration in America and, in a Europe barely recovered from the Napoleonic Wars, led to widespread famine.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obesity Control 49 mins – “Mary O’Connell explores the “Adverse Childhood Experiences” or ACE study and how its findings are being integrated into medical practice today.” At the link find the title, “All In The Family, Part 1, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160407_80330.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oncolytic Viruses 57 mins – “Something a bit different this episiode. Last month, we joined Jesse Noar, host of the excellent Bacteriophiles podcast to record an episode about oncolytic viruses (viruses that blow up cancer cells). We hope you enjoy it, then head on over to microbe world and subscribe to Jesse’s podcast.” At the link find the title, “Episode 20 – Bacteriophiles with Jesse Noar,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Overdose Deaths 25 minshttp://ecorner.stanford.edu/podcasts/4053/Celebrating-Failure-Fuels-Moonshots – “B.C. has declared a state of emergency over fentanyl deaths. Opioid abuse is so severe in Canada that more people die of opioid overdoses than in car crashes. And many of those addictions start not with an illicit street purchase but with a prescription.” At the link find the title, “B.C. declares public health emergency after 200 overdose deaths in 2016 – Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160421_26748.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Orwell P2 and P3 106 tot mins – “He was one of the most influential writers of our time. His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us ‘big brother’, ‘thoughtcrime’, ‘doublethink’, whose name looms so large in this era of mass surveillance?” At the link find the title, “The Orwell Tapes, Part 2, Apr, 2016, right-click “Media files ideas_20160411_97386.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for “The Orwell Tapes, Part 3, Apr, 2016” and “Media files ideas_20160418_67912.mp3”.

Periodical Publishing Trends 49 mins – “Oh, To Be in England, Now That April’s There!” This month, the book business sets course for London and the city’s annual Book Fair. Copyright Clearance Center hosts special book fair programming on “The Next Wave” for Open Access publishing and examines “The Data Dilemma.” You are invited to join the discussion about Rights Licensing, Big Data, Open Access and more! In 2016, in a lively, interactive discussion with CCC’s Chris Kenneally, thought leaders and executives from across the scholarly publishing world addressed how revolutionary changes – propelled by Open Access business models – have begun to touch every aspect of publishing. New customers. New operations. New compliance requirements. New problems.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Profession Restructuring 47 mins – “Tech disruption heads for the professions. Doctors, lawyers, accountants now face real digital competition. We know what’s happened to so many blue collar jobs in America. If they haven’t gone abroad, they’ve been automated away. Taken over by machines. Now that same smart machine takeover is lining up to hit the professions, say my guests today. To hit lawyers and doctors. Accountants, consultants, architects, educators, journalists. All they say, are lined up to take a hit. It may be good for spreading knowledge around.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Radio Disruption 49 mins – “With an aging listenership and the rise of podcasts, the future of NPR is thrown into question. Bob digs into the recent conversation about how the public broadcasting giant is reacting to changes in the industry, and what member stations want from the network. Then, a work of lewd satire has strained Germany’s understanding of free speech — and highlighted an uneasy relationship with Turkey. And, twenty-five years ago, the testimony of Anita Hill turned the Supreme Court confirmation hearings of Clarence Thomas into must-see TV. A new HBO movie, “Confirmation” portrays the history, and reopens old wounds. Plus: the curious world of the novelization industry.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism 4 mins – “Stephen Jay Gould revisits the old arguments for racism — a subject we’ve tried to deal with on moral, not rational grounds, as if race equity couldn’t stand up to logic. Well, that’s a serious miscalculation. Gould deals with two common threads of argument, one based on genealogy, one on geography. Genealogy dominated the arguments as 19th-century thinkers tried to keep white supremacy intact. One notion was that, after God created perfect Adam and Eve, all branches of the human species deteriorated. Some branches deteriorated more than others. The other idea was that Biblical creation produced only the white race. Other races were produced by separate and lesser creations…. Since the Biblical accounts were written by tribes of the Eastern Mediterranean, that’s where 19th-century scholars thought the human species arose. When the first australopithecine skull turned up in South Africa, in 1924, scientists, who’d been looking for human origins in Asia, rejected the find. But Asia provided nothing old enough to be first, and Africa kept yielding very old human remains. Science finally had to concede the human species arose in Africa. Still, as late as 1962, a noted anthropologist wrote, “If Africa was the cradle of mankind, it was only an indifferent kindergarten. Europe and Asia were our principal schools.” He was voicing a last-ditch, thinly-veiled claim that it was the northern races who learned to be fully human.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 1150,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ransomeware Attacks 46 mins – “At first it seemed like the nightmare of a very unlucky few. But now the wave of “ransomware” attacks on computers across America is growing. In all of last year, says the FBI, companies paid $25 million in ransom to retrieve data locked up by remote ransomware pirates. In the first three months of this year that number is over $200 million and mounting. And it’s not just big companies being attacked. It’s home computers, phones, more. This hour On Point, the ransomware nightmare.” At the link right-click “Download this story and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Debate 90 mins – “U.K. Independence Party Leader Nigel Farage and author Mark Steyn debate former U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Louise Arbour and historian Simon Schama on dealing with the global refugee crisis in the semi-annual Munk Debate in Toronto” At the link find the title, “Munk Debate on the Global Refugee Crisis,” Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.437079.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Scams 18 mins – “There is nothing stopping immigration consultants from charging a fee to Syrians who want to come to Canada. But those who offer their consulting and legal services for free question the ethics. The CBC’s Laura Lynch brings us this story.” At the link find the title, “Immigration consultant fees to help Syrian refugees come to Canada unethical, say critics – Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160419_84089.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Research Animal Sex 24 mins – “As many as 80 per cent of the mice used in biomedical research are male. And of the ten major drugs pulled from the shelves over the last 20 years, eight have posed greater health risks for women. The Current explores the push for more balanced research.” At the link find the link, “Of Mice and Women: Scientists push to fix gender gap in lab rats for research – Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160420_99686.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rubber Research 44 mins – “Could the lowly dandelion solve a crisis? If Key Gene CEO Dr. Arjen van Tunen and associates are correct, this yard pest may be the basis of sustainable and highly profitable rubber production. A growing middle class worldwide has produced a need for high-quality rubber, mostly for tires. Rubber tree (the genus Havea) plantations in Southeast Asia are threatened by climate change, disease, and sustainable harvesting is costly and labor intensive. However, the dandelion produces latex, just not in huge amounts. Scientists at KeyGene have identified a high production version in Kazakhstan and combined its genetics with those of the larger, common dandelion. The result is a plant that could revolutionize the rubber industry and provide a new high-value, easy-to-grow crop for farmers. Environmental impacts are also discussed. In the process, the scientists at KeyGene also identified genes related to apomixis, the ability to produce seeds without fertilization, essentially clones of the parent. Understanding these genes could dramatically change agriculture, as any plant could potentially be made to produce clonal seeds from the mother plant. In the second part of the podcast, correspondent Vern Blazek talks to Dr. Curt Hannah who answers a listener question about corn varieties and just how much genetic variation there is in modern modern hybrids. Plus some thoughts on the Borlaug CAST Agriculture Communications Award” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Schools with Slave Heritage 48 mins “In 1838, Georgetown University sold 272 of the school’s slaves who worked the Jesuit owned plantations in Maryland. They were put on a ship in Alexandria, Virginia and sent to New Orleans. Georgetown needed an influx of cash to keep it afloat – and the sale, for over 3 million dollars in today’s dollars – did just that. Today, college campuses across the country are struggling with issues of race and the legacy of slavery. At Georgetown, confronting this history includes tracking down the descendants of these slaves sold nearly one hundred and eighty years ago. Diane and her guests discuss how Georgetown University once relied on the slave trade and efforts to reconcile with its past.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Science Sexism 23 mins – This month we discuss Why science is sexist by Nicola Gaston. That science is sexist isn’t a question Nicola Gaston entertains – it is. Rather, she wants to know why a field that prides itself in being rational should behave so illogically.We discuss the research she presents on unconscious bias, in both men and women. And we talk about whose responsibility it is to address the problems of sexism, and what indeed they should do to address them. Hear an extract from the book, an interview with Nicola Gaston, and the views of the Chemistry World team in this month’s podcast.” At the link right-click “Download: Why science is sexist.mp3” at the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Set Top Box Issue 30 mins – “Consumer advocate Mark Cooper and economist George Ford discuss the Federal Communication Commission’s proposal to open the set-top box market to competition by allowing consumers to buy their own set-top boxes.” At the link find the title, “Communicators Discussion on Set-Top Boxes, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.438900.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Singapore 9 mins – Description of Singapore by The Economist. At the link find the title, “Special report: Singapore, Jul 2015right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep Revolution 45 mins – “As co-founder and editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post, for many years Arianna Huffington led a fast-paced, under-slept life. Then one day, she fainted from exhaustion, seriously injuring herself. With that she began a journey to learn about the importance of sleep — and why our current culture seems to prize sleep deprivation as a symbol of busyness and achievement. In a new book, she argues for a total overhaul of our relationship with sleep, and points to the many areas in which its value is being rediscovered, from education to politics.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Sleep Revolution 60 mins – “Arianna Huffington, Co-founder and Editor in Chief, the Huffington Post Media Group, Author, The Sleep Revolution: Transforming Your Life, One Night at a Time In Conversation with Sheryl Sandberg, COO, Facebook In today’s 24/7 fast-paced world, the hunger for sleep is only getting stronger. Sleep deprivation affects our health, decision making, and relationships both personally and professionally. Huffington takes on sleep from every angle and offers the latest scientific recommendations and expert tips to achieve a better night’s sleep.” At the linkr ight-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Sound Engineer 71 mins – “Matthew Wood is the supervising sound editor at Skywalker Sound. He has worked on all three of the Star Wars prequels and also was the voice of numerous characters such as Bib Fortuna, Ody Mandrell, Seboca, and Magaloof. Matthew was the voice actor for General Grievous. Wood also received two Academy Awards nominations for Sound Editing.” At the link click on “Download options,: right-click Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space Medicine 30 mins – “Sheyna Gifford has an unusual claim to fame—she is the first doctor ever to work on Mars. Not the planet Mars, of course, but Mauna Loa, a volcano in Hawaii, whose dusty, rust coloured landscape is probably the closest on earth to the red planet. She is serving on the Hi-Seas programme, a mission run the University of Hawaii and funded by NASA, whose purpose is to simulate a three year voyage to Mars and back. Since last August Gifford and six other scientists have been living in a 1000 square foot solar powered dome, which they rarely leave. The project is treated as a real mission to Mars so the crew have all the supplies for their year long stay and, because of the time delay between Mars and Earth, they cannot speak to the outside world. They can, however, communicate by email, so Sheyna sent The BMJ this voice file to answer 15 of our questions.” At the link find the title, “Doctors in spaaaaaace, Apr 2016,” right-click “Play Nowand select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

TED Talks 49 mins – “Thirty years ago, a famous architect and designer summoned three hundred of his friends to Monterey, California to discuss technology, entertainment and design. In the years that followed, these “TED Talks” featured influential speakers to an invitation-only audience. But in the late 1990s, the conference was struggling and on the verge of collapse. Then in 2001, publishing entrepreneur Chris Anderson bought it and began posting TED Talks online. The speeches went viral and today, those videos are being watched millions of times a day. Diane talks with the president of TED about making knowledge accessible, and the do’s and don’ts of public speaking.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Ted Williams 28 mins – “Richard Ben Cramer’s masterful profile of Ted Williams from 1986 is often cited as one of the greatest magazine stories of all time. It’s about a sports idol who wanted fame but hated celebrity, who shouted louder than anyone but demanded privacy, who wanted to be the best at everything, always, and thus wanted to be immortal. Former Esquire editor David Hirshey joins host David Brancaccio to discuss the enigmatic and bigger-than-life Teddy Ballgame and the journalist who finally uncovered his essence.” At the link find the title, “What Do You Think of Ted Williams Now?” right-click beside “Enclosure:…” at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Theranos Problem 44 mins – “Slate Money with Margit Wennmachers on Theranos, Silicon Valley, and German company culture.” At the link find the title, “The Dubious Values Edition, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM3191131755.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation 45 mins – “As someone with autism spectrum disorder, John Elder Robison knows what it’s like to feel emotionally removed from situations. Robison tells Fresh Air‘s Terry Gross that throughout his life people have told him, “There’s this emotional language you’re missing. There are stories in people’s eyes. There are messages.” Robison didn’t fully understand what they meant until he received transcranial magnetic stimulation, a noninvasive procedure in which areas of the brain are stimulated with electromagnetic fields to alter its circuitry. Neurologist Alvaro Pascual-Leone, who treated Robison, explains TMS as a “tool that allows us to introduce a small amount of current into specific parts of the brain without having to use surgery to do so. … By introducing current in it, we can probe the function of certain parts of the brain [and] we can even modify how different parts of the brain work.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trauma Aftermath 55 mins – “Trauma is not a story about the past — it lives in the present: in both the mind and body. Left untreated, it has no expiration date, whether it’s trauma arising from childhood abuse or PTSD suffered as an adult.” At the link find the title, “All In The Family, Part 3, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160421_33467.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Travel Importance 45 mins – “Acclaimed writer, psychologist, traveler Andrew Solomon the importance of getting out- way out- into the world.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

UN Role Today 61 mins – “Esther Brimmer, CFR’s adjunct senior fellow for international institutions, discusses the evolution of the United Nations over the past seventy years and its role in the world today, as part of CFR’s Academic Conference Call series.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Viagra for Women 19 mins – “Last August, Flibanserin — or “Addyi” — became the first FDA-approved drug aimed at treating sexual dysfunction in women. Sprout, the company that developed the so-called “female Viagra” was understandably excited, and even more so the next day when they were bought by pharmaceutical giant Valeant, for one billion dollars. But after a rocky year, Valeant announced Monday that they had dismissed the entire sales force associated with Flibanserin and would reintroduce the drug later in the year. When Flibanserin first hit the shelves last year, we took a deep dive into its marketing message and the nebulous world of prescription drugs and female desire.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voter Psychology 42 mins – “The historian Rick Shenkman is editor and publisher of the indispensable website History News Network. I’m a fan and recently had the pleasure of reading his latest book, Political Animals: How Our Stone-age Brain Gets in the Way of Smart Politics. Shenkman himself possesses quite a highly evolved brain, but he nonetheless admits he has his own share of stone-age brain cells. However, there is no club in his hand at the moment, just this book, which frankly, packs all the wallop he needs. If you want to know why this is the year of Trump, you’ve got to read it. If you want to know why millions of Republicans still believe Barack Obama is a Muslim, you’ve got to read it. Even if you want to hold on and remain an optimist, you’ve got to read it. This week, I sat down with Rick Shenkman to talk about the brain of the American voter, and what is firing its synapses during this extraordinary primary season.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Voting Rights 63 mins – “Previously, Michael Waldman traced the ongoing argument on gun rights from The Bill of Rights to the current day. Now, in The Fight to Vote, Waldman takes a succinct and comprehensive look at an even more crucial struggle: the past and present effort to define and defend government based on “the consent of the governed.” From the writing of the Constitution, and at every step along the way, as Americans sought the right, others have fought to stop them. This is the first book to trace the entire story from the Founders’ debates to today’s restrictions: gerrymandering, voter ID laws, the flood of money unleashed by the nonprofit Citizens United, making voting difficult for the elderly, the poor and the young, by restricting open polling places.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wheat Allergies 48 mins – “Dietary reactions to wheat are on the rise, and science is grasping for answers. One approach to work around the genetic basis of the reaction, and that is well understood. With that information, scientists like Dr. Chris Miller at the Kansas Wheat Innovation Center are searching for innovative solutions. Current concepts seek to breed modern wheat with other historical varieties featuring low reactivity. Future methods suggest that genetic engineering and gene editing might be especially effective solutions to the problem. Co-Hosted by Kevin Klatt, Graduate Student in Molecular Nutrition, Cornell University Twitter: @Nutrevolve” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White Collar Digital Disruption 47 mins – “We know what’s happened to so many blue collar jobs in America. If they haven’t gone abroad, they’ve been automated away. Taken over by machines. Now that same smart machine takeover is lining up to hit the professions, say my guests today. To hit lawyers and doctors. Accountants, consultants, architects, educators, journalists. All they say, are lined up to take a hit. It may be good for spreading knowledge around. But the fallout? Up next On Point: when machines take on the professions.” (2 guests) At the link right-click “Download this story and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Politics 56 mins – “Emily’s List founder Ellen Malcolm discusses the rise in elected women in public office. She is interviewed by Representative Maxine Waters (D-CA).” At the link find the title, “After Words with Ellen Malcolm, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.434090.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Politics 67 mins – “Previously, Michael Waldman traced the ongoing argument on gun rights from The Bill of Rights to the current day. Now, in The Fight to Vote, Waldman takes a succinct and comprehensive look at an even more crucial struggle: the past and present effort to define and defend government based on “the consent of the governed.” From the writing of the Constitution, and at every step along the way, as Americans sought the right, others have fought to stop them. This is the first book to trace the entire story from the Founders’ debates to today’s restrictions: gerrymandering, voter ID laws, the flood of money unleashed by the nonprofit Citizens United, making voting difficult for the elderly, the poor and the young, by restricting open polling places.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Hazards 46 mins – “New warnings from the federal Centers for Disease Control this week that the mosquito-born Zika virus is scarier and more dangerous even than we thought. Birth defects. Brain problems in full-grown adults. Sexual transmission. The mosquito that can carry it is all over the Gulf Coast and can range as far north as New York. Zika is coming, say the headlines.  A potentially devastating health crisis, we’re told. Are we ready?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select ‘Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus Study 45 mins – “In the last one to two years the Zika virus has infected more than a million people. Most have mild or no symptoms, but a pregnant woman can transmit the virus to her developing fetus leading to possible birth defects, stunted brain development and premature birth. The mosquito which can carry this virus is in about 30 states. Health officials say there’s no crisis now but that preparedness is essential. In February the Obama administration asked Congress for $1.9 billion in emergency funding, but so far, Congress has yet to act. Please join us to talk about the health risks posed by Zika and efforts to contain its spread.”(4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 232 – Apr 22, 2016: Aboriginal Imprisonment in Australia, Afro-Mexicans, Alzheimers Caregivers, American Commerce, American Turbulence, Art Market Today, Asylum Conditions in Europe, Battery Disposal Hazard, Bayes Theorem, Bicycle Advocate, Black Voters, Blind Echolocation, Boko Haram Abductions, Brain Mapping, Breast Cancer Doctor, Broadband Point to Point Radio, Climate Agreement Measures, Climate Politics, Computer Programmer, Corporate Income Taxes, Corporate Inversions, Credit Card History, DAPA Program Issues, Doctor-Assisted Deaths, Drones in New Hampshire, Dunning-Kruger Effect, Education Goals, Electric Cars in Canada, Environmental Justice, Ethiopian Drought, European Concerns, Female Judge, Flight Test Engineer, Food Health, Food Waste Restaurant, GMO Crops, Graphene, Hair, Ham Nation, Hollerith Cards, Home Theater History, Immigrant Organizer, Indian Planned Parenthood, Investment Diversification, Lucky Breaks, Marijuana Risks, Migraines, Minimum Wages, Myanmar, Neutrons, Octopus, Opiate Use, Palliative Care, Perceptions, Podcast Evolution, Population Control, Property Brothers, Publishing for Smartphones, Railroad Crossing Accidents, Refugee Children in Sweden, Rust Belt Innovation, School Improvement Project, Science Games, Sex Assault Response, Simple Bank Card, Suicides in Canada, Tax Avoidance, Teaching Profession, Terrorist Survivors, Voice Science, Voting Fraud, W. Kamu Bell, Water in Colorado, Zika Impact

The best 104 podcasts from a larger group of 228 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 280 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Aboriginal Imprisonment in Australia 58 mins – “Prominent Indigenous leader and Australian Labor Senate nominee Pat Dodson addresses the National Press Club.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Pat Dodson, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_PatDodson_1304_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Afro-Mexicans 45 mins – “Many black people in Mexico’s remote Costa Chica area near the Pacific ocean feel ignored and neglected by the state. A lot of Mexicans don’t even know the Afro-Mexicans exist. Outside their towns, they often get stopped by police who don’t believe they can be Mexican. Some have even been deported, despite having Mexican ID papers. So who are the black Mexicans? Lucy Duran meets members of this ethnic community that is struggling for identity and recognition. They use their culture, such as the characteristic Dance of the Devils or Chilena music, to assert their identity and fight for their rights. Activists want the state to accept black people as a separate ethnic minority, distinct from indigenous people, but with the same rights. It is not only about being able to hold your head high. It’s also about money. Those fighting for official recognition say that they’re not eligible for the special kind of financial support that similarly isolated indigenous communities get. They blame their poverty on this lack of funding. Dr Lucy Duran meets black Mexicans ranging from a cowboy to a singer-songwriter and explores how they identify themselves, why even those who do not obviously look as though they are of African descent describe themselves as black, and why their identity has become a political issue. Producer: Arlene Gregorius Consultant and translator: Dr Sergio Navarrete Pellicer.” At the link find the title, “The Afro-Mexicans, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03qg56f.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimers Caregivers 44 mins – “An estimated 5.4 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s. Caring for patients with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia is estimated to cost the nation as much as $215 billion. According to a new national survey, a third of family members and friends caring for a loved one with the disease reduced their work hours or quit. And 28% of caregivers eat less or go hungry. The report was released right before an Alzheimer’s conference that begins here in Washington today. Diane Rehm and a panel of guests discuss why Alzheimer’s is one of the most costly diseases for families and the nation.” (5 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

American Commerce 59 mins – “Penny Pritzker, secretary of commerce, joins Richard N. Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, to discuss the United States’ global commercial approach as it relates to exerting influence on world markets and trading partners. Delving into the domestic effects of globalization and digitization, Pritzker discusses how a growing wave of public antagonism toward free trade and new trade agreements can be addressed and mitigated.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Turbulance 42 mins – “Republican presidential candidates are calling for Washington to get tougher on an assertive China and reduce the size of the U.S. government. In a media call, contributors to the upcoming May/June issue of Foreign Affairs make the opposite case, calling for patience with China and a significant public role in boosting the domestic economy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Art Market Today 60 mins – “Today’s global art market is reminiscent of a roller coaster – even as it rotates and retrenches – the ride continues to propel, excite and surprise. With a tenfold increase in buyers over the last decade, unprecedented numbers of influencers are playing a part in work being made, seen and sold. Art has inextricably become dominated by the market. Private collectors on museum boards have become the new curators, driving acquisitions and dictating exhibition content. Advisors and dealers are conditioning the next “hot” artists, who in turn, capitulate to the feeding frenzy, churning out works only to be dropped when the next fad takes hold. Galleries priorities and promote sales of commercial-friendly paintings.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asylum Conditions in Europe 72 mins – “The pressure brought by the recent mass influx of migrants and refugees to Europe has drawn attention to the need for systems to receive and house new arrivals that can adapt to unpredictable numbers, remain cost-efficient, and meet national and EU standards. But what does it take to set up and manage a reception system that can simultaneously meet the demands of flexibility, quality, and efficiency? Michael Kegels, Fedasil Belgium’s Director of Operational Services and author of the recent MPI Europe report, Getting the Balance Right: Strengthening Asylum Reception Capacity at National and EU Levels, discusses how to devise a more responsive asylum reception system at national and EU levels that upholds common standards. He is joined by representatives from the Austrian Ministry of Interior and EASO to reflect on the practical challenges of meeting asylum-seeker reception demand, the prospects of greater cooperation, and the place of asylum reception policy at the heart of the Common European Asylum System.” At the link right-click “Download” nd select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battery Hazard 3 mins – “Batteries in electric cars could lead to unforeseen environmental problems.” At the link find the title, “Episode 623 – April 11 2016,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_April11_2016.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bayes Theorem 91 mins – “We don’t treat all of our beliefs equally. For some, we see them as either true or false, correct or incorrect. For others, we see them as probabilities, chances, odds. In one world, certainty, in the other, uncertainty. In this episode you will learn from two experts in reasoning how to apply a rule from the 1700s that makes it possible to see all of your beliefs as being in “grayscale,” as neither black nor white, neither 0 nor 100 percent, but always somewhere in between, as a shade of gray reflecting your confidence in just how wrong you might be…given the evidence at hand.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bicycle Advocate 46 mins – “Making it easy for people to get from Point A to Point B is a big concern in urban areas. Here in Utah most people simply drive. Urban designer Mikael Colville-Andersen wants that to change. He wants more people to bike and walk, not for their health, but because they’re the easiest ways to get around. They aren’t, yet, but Colville-Andersen wants to change that, too. He joins us Wednesday to discuss how better designed cities can make it effortless for people to get from here to there without driving. Mikael Colville-Andersen is an urban designer and an urban-mobility expert. He’s the CEO and founder of the Copenhagenize Design Co. Team, which consults with cities on bicycle culture, planning, traffic, and communications. He blogs at Copenhagenize.com. He was in Salt Lake City this week as a guest of Bike Utah.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Voters 38 mins – “Has Donald Trump forever crushed the Republican party’s hopes of wooing the Black electorate? This week on the Remix host Dr. James Peterson speaks with Republican analyst Joe Watkins about the GOP strategy to reach out to the black voters. Joe Watkins is the Pastor of Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church in Philadelphia. He was a White House aide under President George W. Bush, and ran as the Republican candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania in 2009. He has appeared as a political commentator on MSNBC, CNBC, and Al Jazeera, and is the Senior Vice President of External Affairs for the social media platform ElectedFace.com. You can hear James Peterson and Joe Watkins discuss the Wisconsin primaries on WHYY’s Radio Times with host Marty Moss-Coane.” At the link find the title, “Joe Watkins on Black voters and the Republican party, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files watkins-web.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Navigation 20 mins – “Hull has just introduced a charter which spells out how the city is easier for blind people to get around. We go and find out if it’s working. And we speak to the journalist and crime novelist, Susie Steiner, about her eye condition, retinitis pigmentosa. Is her failing sight fuelling her creativity or just frustrating to manage?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Boko Haram Abductions 9 mins – “Two years ago, 276 Nigerian girls were abducted by Boko Haram from a secondary school in Chibok, Nigeria. Over 200 schoolgirls are still missing. #BringBackOurGirls founder says the international community has not followed up on their promise to help.” At the link find the title, “Failing them is failing humanity,’ says #BringBackOurGirls founder,” right-click “Download ‘Failing them is failing humanity,’ says #BringBackOurGirls founder – April 14, 2016” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Mapping 25 mins – “Take a three year-old to the zoo, and she intuitively knows that the long-necked creature nibbling leaves is the same thing as the giraffe in her picture book. That superficially easy feat is in reality quite sophisticated. The cartoon drawing is a frozen silhouette of simple lines, while the living animal is awash in color, texture, movement and light. It can contort into different shapes and looks different from every angle. Humans excel at this kind of task. We can effortlessly grasp the most important features of an object from just a few examples and apply those features to the unfamiliar. Computers, on the other hand, typically need to sort through a whole database of giraffes, shown in many settings and from different perspectives, to learn to accurately recognize the animal.” At the link find the title, “Mapping the Brain to Build Better Machines,” right-click “Media files Episode33.mp3”

Breast Cancer Doctor 40 mins – “Dr Liz O’Riordan is a Consultant Oncoplastic Breast Surgeon in the UK. In 2015 she was diagnosed with the very illness she has spent her life treating and has chosen to chronicle her experiences in her truly wonderful blog liz.oriordan.co.uk. This episode is a truly special one as it touches on so many of the issues that we fear as physicians; seeing yourself as a patient with the disease you know so much about to the challenges of choosing your own doctor, when almost all of them are your friends of colleagues.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Issues 32 mins – “Matt Polka, president of the American Cable Association, and Robert Gessner, chairman of the association’s board, discuss the future of the cable industry, the potential for “skinny bundle” packages, and the set-top box market.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Matt Polka and Robert Gessner, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436170.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Point to Point Radio 27 mins – “San Franciso is one of the rare cities that has multiple high quality ISPs competing for market share, though the vast majority of people still seem to be stuck choosing only between Comcast and AT&T. This week, we talk to a rising ISP, Webpass, about their success and challenges in expanding their model. Charles Barr is the President of Webpass and Lauren Saine is a policy advisor – both join us for episode 197 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Agreement Measures 64 mins – “In Professor Michael Finus’ inaugural lecture he highlights how economic theory, in particular game theory, can be used to analyze international agreements to tackle climate change.” At the link right-click ‘Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Politics 57 mins – Frederic C. Rich – one of the world’s leading corporate lawyers who is at the same time a prominent environmental leader – has written a book which diagnoses why the American environmental movement has stalled. He argues that in order to move forward, Republicans must reclaim their forgotten pro-environment heritage and Green must learn to again appeal to conservatives. Tune in as we talk to Mr. Rich about how his ideas could play out, given the unique Presidential primary season we are experiencing.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Programer 84 mins – “James Gosling is a Canadian computer scientist known as the father of Java programming language. Gosling was with Sun Microsystems from 1984 to 2010. He also worked at Oracle, Google, and Liquid Robotics and is currently an adviser at Scala.” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corporate Income Tax 5 mins – “Corporate Income Tax, Apr, 2016 – Audio interview by GAO staff with Jessica Lucas-Judy, Director, Strategic Issues” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corporate Inversions 45 mins – “The U.S. Treasury Department issued new rules this week [Alpr 2016] designed to discourage corporate inversions. These are deals in which U.S. companies move their legal headquarters to a foreign country to reduce their tax burden. This is often achieved by merging with a smaller foreign firm. President Obama has called the practice unpatriotic. In what was viewed as a victory for the president, yesterday the U.S. drug maker Pzifer abandoned a multibillion-dollar foreign merger. But critics of the new tax rules say companies will find ways around them as long as the U.S. corporate tax rate remains one of the highest in the world.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Credit Card History 18 mins – “Credit cards with chips in them have been around for four decades. So why is America only getting them now? And now that they are here, why are so few places using them?” At the link find the title, “#695: Put A Chip On It, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160413_pmoney podcast041316.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DAPA Program Issues 71 mins – “On April 18, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in U.S. v. Texas, the Obama administration’s appeal of a lower federal court order suspending DAPA implementation. How the court rules in this legal challenge filed by 26 states will have both economic and social impacts on the population of eligible parents, their families, and the communities in which they reside. MPI experts explore who makes up the affected population, analyzing the legal arguments presented to the court, and examining the potential immediate and long-term implications of this case.” At the link right-click “Download” nd select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doctor-Assisted Dying 27 mins“…Over the last five years, someone has died at a rail crossing every other day. But the list of 500 most dangerous crossings in Canada has not been shared with the cities where they are. Dave Seglins shares the results from CBC’s investigation.” At the link right-click “CBC investigation uncovers Canada’s most dangerous railway crossings,” right-click “Download CBC investigation uncovers Canada’s most dangerous railway crossings – April 13, 2016” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dones in New Hampshire 2016 57 mins – “New Hampshire is among many states attempting to navigate the brave new world of these unmanned flying machines, addressing privacy and safety concerns. Meanwhile, the federal government could swoop in and make all these measures moot as lawmakers on Capitol Hill consider legislation that would allow the FAA to trump state laws.” (5 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dunning – Kruger Effect 65 mins – “In this episode, we explore why we are unaware that we lack the skill to tell how unskilled and unaware we are. The evidence gathered so far by psychologists and neuroscientists seems to suggest that each one of us has a relationship with our own ignorance, a dishonest, complicated relationship, and that dishonesty keeps us sane, happy, and willing to get out of bed in the morning. Part of that ignorance is a blind spot we each possess that obscures both our competence and incompetence called the Dunning-Kruger Effect. It’s a psychological phenomenon that arises sometimes in your life because you are generally very bad at self-assessment. If you have ever been confronted with the fact that you were in over your head, or that you had no idea what you were doing, or that you thought you were more skilled at something than you actually were – then you may have experienced this effect. It is very easy to be both unskilled and unaware of it, and in this episode we explore why that is with professor David Dunning, one of the researchers who coined the term and a scientist who continues to add to our understanding of the phenomenon.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Echolocation 21 mins – “The blind man leading the blind to see – how echolocation is redefining our understanding of vision. Daniel Kish is blind but his ability to “see using sound” is remarkable. His use of echolocation to effortlessly get around using mouth clicks has earned him the nickname “Batman”. Now researchers are getting a clearer picture on the way his brain turns sounds into images and it’s redefining our understanding of vision. ” At the link right-click “mp4” beside “download video” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Goals 20 mins – “What’s the purpose of schooling? Reading, writing and ‘rithmetic, right? Well, our guest today begs to differ. Zoe Weil, author and the founder of the Institute for Humane Education, argues that the obligation of education is to cultivate a generation of “solutionaries” – kind, just, and socially conscious people who will protect the environment and promote human rights. We talk about her new book, The World Becomes What We Teach, and touch upon educational equity issues like implicit bias, summer learning loss, the resurgence of school segregation, and how Common Core fits into her vision for meaningful change.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Cars in Canada 27 mins – “Consumers are getting all charged up over a new generation of electric cars. But Canada’s infrastructure may be lagging behind drivers’ enthusiasm. The Current takes the on-ramp towards the future for electric cars, stopping at speed bumps along the way.” At the link find the title, “Future looks bright for electric cars but Canada’s infrastructure is lacking,” right-click “Download Future looks bright for electric cars but Canada’s infrastructure is lacking – April 12, 2016” and and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Justice 61 mins – “Sally G. Bingham, president and founder of Interfaith Power and Light, discusses the role of faith communities in promoting environmental justice, as part of CFR’s Religion and Foreign Policy Conference Call series.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethiopian Drought 20 mins – “Hundreds-of-thousands of children in Ethiopia are malnourished as famine and a drought grip the country’s eastern rim. And as the government appeals for help, there are questions about why after devastating famines in past decades this is happening again.” At the link find the title, “Ethiopia government under fire for slow response to worst drought in 50 years,” right-click “Media files current_20160414_63408.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

European Concerns 53 mins – “This week we feature a discussion presented by the Boston University Center for the Study of Europe, titled “Bad Neighborhoods: Europe’s Crisis and the Challenges of its Peripheries.” Our speakers are College of Europe in Bruges, Belgium Visiting Professor, Jacques Rupnik, and Yale University Visiting Professor of Political Science, Jolyon Howorth.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Judge 24 mins – “For all the power they wield in the justice system, we don’t often hear frank talk from judges, in part because they seldom step down from their prestigious posts. But judge Marie Corbett retired early and is opening up about the life she left behind.” At the link find the title, “Retired judge Marie Corbett reflects on feeling ‘powerless over crime’,” right-click “Download Retired judge Marie Corbett reflects on feeling ‘powerless over crime’ “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flight Test Engineer 81 mins – “ …Our guest for this episode is aerospace engineer Eric Becker, a flight test engineer for the Naval Air Warfare Center in Patuxent River, Maryland. We refer once more to cartoon character Dilbert having “The Knack.” Eric’s first helicopter ride was on a Sikorsky CH-53E Super Stallion. Carmen offers the helpful insight that spaghetti bridges work best when the pasta remains uncooked. One of our guest’s early engineering classes was a course in descriptive geometry. According to Eric, a flight test engineer does “anything and everything to get data showing the aircraft is meeting is requirements.” A flight card is used to specify each aircraft maneuver and its associated setup conditions. Brian and Eric discuss the misery of writing software to meet the DO-178B standard. Eric mentions a prior episode, Career Planning, in which we with talked with Patrick Riordan about working with Designated Engineering Representatives (DERs). Our guest worked an an operations engineer on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). A brief discussion breaks out concerning the differences between scientists and engineers. Risks are future events with an occurrence probability and a potential for loss. A risk matrix can be useful in evaluating potential operational problems. …A recent best-selling book, The Checklist Manifesto, is referenced by Eric. Our guest’s advice to individuals not following the typical engineering career path is “if you want it, just do it.” Eric can be reached via email: eric -=+ at +=- internal dot org. Also, feel free to follow Eric on Twitter as @ericnbecker.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Health 68 mins – “This program is underwritten by The California Wellness Foundation. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, more than 48.1 million people in America are food insecure: they do not have access to fresh, affordable, healthy food. This is the result of many interconnected factors: lack of access to grocery stores in rural communities; an abundance of fast food chains and convenience stores in inner-city communities; and a culture that subsidizes high-calorie, low-nutrient leisure foods instead of produce. As our health suffers as a national community, we are witnessing obesity, heart disease, diabetes become the public health epidemics of this generation. How can we create communities where healthy food is accessible, appealing and affordable? Join our panel of experts as they discuss the current state of the American food system, its impact on our health and on our most vulnerable populations.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Waste Restaurant 5 mins – “Head to the far side of the 19th arrondissement in Paris, on metro line 7. Walk across a large, grimy square and look for a tall set of metal doors under the highway overpass. When you see the bright green painted pony, you’ll know you’ve arrived at the Freegan Pony restaurant. It’s clearly not your usual Parisian dining locale. In fact, it’s an illegal squat, set in a cavernous dark space. It’s as urban-gritty as it gets, furnished with long wooden tables, sofas and cushions, dimmed lights and occasional loud music….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Crops 5 mins – “Genetically Engineered Crops, Apr, 2016 – Audio interview by GAO staff with Steve Morris, Director, Natural Resources and Environment” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graphene 27 mins – “Materials scientists are researching fascinating materials that can revolutionize technology. Matteo Pasquali, Professor of Chemistry and Biomolecular Engineering & Chemistry at Rice University, tells us about graphene – a single layer of carbon atoms that can conduct electricity faster than most metals, and it is thin enough that it can even be sewn into clothing as a fiber to create wearable tech! Graphene can also be “painted” on surfaces, and may eventually help repair damaged tissue with no risk of scarring or rejection.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Hair Business 27 mins – “Justine Lang embarks on a journey to find out why women in India sacrifice their natural hair and why an increasing number of South African women want to buy it.” At the link find the title, “Trading Hair,Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03qvsyl.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hair Salons 46 mins – “Everything is up for discussion in the salon, where intimate and frank conversations take place between a woman and her hairstylist. Whether you view a haircut as a luxury or a necessity, a hair salon is at the frontline of how we think about female identity. Six journalists from around the world pay visits to salons across the world, from Tokyo to Johannesburg to Beirut and back. We’ll hear how women view issues of race, class, wealth, sexuality and beauty through the hair on their heads. Step inside the salon, where every haircut tells a story.” At the link find the title, “The Salon, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03qh0rs.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ham Nation 85 mins – “Hosted by Bob Heil, Gordon West, George Thomas, Don Wilbanks, Valerie Hotzfeld, Amanda Alden Val, Ray and Tim are in studio with Leo, Gordo shows how to build a loop antenna, this weeks solar forecast, George shows how to solder a PL259, Bob clears up RFI, CTU Contest University and more!” (Lots of visual aids in the video version.) At the link click “Download options,” then right-click “audio” or one of the video downloads.

Hollerith Cards 3 mins – “…Weaving a pattern into cloth is no easy matter. Different shuttles, carrying the weft strands, have to be threaded through the warp strands in a precise order to give the weave its pattern. In 1805 a French engineer named Jacquard invented means for automating that process. He passed a chain of cards, with holes punched in them, in front of a mechanism. The mechanism reached through wherever a hole let it, and picked up a thread. We’ve used the Jacquard loom principle in textile mills ever since. Five years later, in 1810, the young Englishman Charles Babbage went to Cambridge to study math and mechanics. In 1816, when he was only 25, he was made a fellow of the Royal Society for his work on calculating-machines and methods. In 1834 he conceived a machine that could be told how to carry out a sequence of calculations. He conceived of programmable computation. He never completed this “analytical engine,” as he called it, but he set down all the essential principles of today’s digital computers. Now, back to Jacquard’s loom. The key to operating any computer lies in transmitting sequences of on-off commands. Babbage used Jacquard-style punched cards. The presence or absence of a hole communicated a simple on-off command to the machine. But Babbage’s idea went fallow for a long time. Meanwhile, another bright young man, Herman Hollerith, joined the Census Office — a world of endless copying and tallying. Suppose someone asked, “What percent of our population are Irish immigrants?” How do you get an answer from millions of data sheets?….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Home Theater History 80 mins – “Guests Leo Laporte, and Dick DeBartolo join Scott for a great recap of the past 6 years in home theater. They discuss the past, present, and future of home theater.” At the link click “Download options,” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Organizer 69 mins – “Gabriel Thompson, Steinbeck Fellow in Creative Writing, San Jose State University; Author, America’s Social Arsonist This program is part of the Good Lit series, underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation. Gabriel Thompson’s is the first biography of Fred Ross, who believed a good labor organizer should fade into the crowd. But the mentor of Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta is hard to forget. In America’s Social Arsonist, Thompson provides a full picture of this complicated and driven man. Raised by conservative parents, Fred Ross disappointed them by becoming a very influential community organizer. His activism began alongside Dust Bowl migrants when he managed the same labor camp that was fictionalized in The Grapes of Wrath. During World War II, Ross worked for the release of interned Japanese Americans, and after the war he dedicated his life to building the political power of Latinos across California, which succeeded after Ross knocked on the door of a young Cesar Chavez and encouraged him to become an organizer.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Planned Parenthood 20 mins – “A new study shows the practice of sex selection with a preference for boys in the Indo-Canadian community. In a country where abortion is legal, how can those who believe in the right to choose confront those who use sex selection to abort females?” At the link find the title, “Indo-Canadian couples choosing sons over daughters: study – April 13, 2016,” right-click “Download Indo-Canadian couples choosing sons over daughters: study” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Diversification 37 mins – “In this audio version from Chapter 6 from Paul’s book, “Financial Fitness Forever,he discusses the long-term impact of diversifying beyond large cap companies to include both U.S. and International small cap and value asset classes, as well as REITs and emerging markets. While he makes no promises about the future, the evidence from over 40 years of performance suggests the possibilities of doubling the long-term return for you and your heirs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lucky Breaks 72 mins – “This week, EconTalk host Russ Roberts sat down with Cornell’s Robert Frank to discuss his new book, Success and Luck: Good Fortune and the Myth of Meritocracy. As in past episodes with Frank as a guest, it was a spirited conversation, with several good-natured points of disagreement. So where do you stand? Is luck responsible for a larger share of our success than we’re willing to admit? Or is luck, as Branch Rickey said, merely “the residue of design” of the result of good old-fashioned effort?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Risks 33 mins – “What has convinced some researchers that the risks of heavy cannabis use now warrant public health campaigns to warn people of potential harm? .How real is the risk of psychosis among vulnerable users of the drug? And why has the number of young people receiving treatment for cannabis-related problems seemingly been on the rise in the UK? Ian Sample is joined by Sir Robin Murray, professor of psychiatric research at King’s College London, Suzi Gage, senior research associate in the MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at Bristol University and Ian Hamilton, a mental health lecturer at the University of York.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migraines 44 mins – “Severe, throbbing head pain, sensitivity to light, nausea…these are just some of the symptoms the 36 million migraine sufferers in the U.S. regularly endure. The WHO still ranks migraine among the most debilitating conditions worldwide. And yet it has remained difficult to treat. Patients have long relied on medication meant for other illnesses to manage migraine headaches, sometimes with limited success. But that could be changing: New drugs are being tested that target a chemical involved with the brain’s pain signaling during migraines. And while questions remain, the drugs show promise. Why some experts say it’s a new era for our understanding of migraine and how to treat it.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Minimum Wages 44 mins – “Yesterday, the governors of California and New York signed laws that would gradually raise the minimum wage in those states to $15 an hour. The new laws were cheered by labor unions and other advocates for low-wage earners. They say the increase is necessary for workers trying to pay the high cost of living expenses. But business groups warn that higher minimum wages will cost thousands of jobs and lead to higher prices for consumers. Diane and a panel of guests discuss the debate over raising minimum wages in the states and what it could mean for consumers, businesses and the 2016 presidential race. (4 guests)

Myanmar 61 mins – “Priscilla A. Clapp, senior advisor to the United States Institute for Peace, discusses Myanmar’s newly elected government and offers recommendations for how the United States and other international actors can support its democratic transition, as part of CFR’s Academic Conference Call series.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neutrons 40 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the neutron, one of the particles found in an atom’s nucleus. Building on the work of Ernest Rutherford, the British physicist James Chadwick won the Nobel Prize for Physics for his discovery of the neutron in 1932. Neutrons play a fundamental role in the universe and their discovery was at the heart of developments in nuclear physics in the first half of the 20th century. With Val Gibson Professor of High Energy Physics at the University of Cambridge and fellow of Trinity College Andrew Harrison Chief Executive Officer of Diamond Light Source and Professor in Chemistry at the University of Edinburgh And Frank Close Professor Emeritus of Physics at the University of Oxford.” At the link find the title, “The Neutron, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03r0gbr.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Octopus Book 25 mins – “Inky the octopus made news this week for escaping a New Zealand aquarium through a drain pipe to freedom. The Current explores the mind of the octopus and asks why it is that we’re consistently wowed by stories of animal intelligence. Aquarium manager Rob Yarrall says the lid to the octopus’ tank was left slightly ajar after maintenance one night. He found this rather tempting, climbed out,” Yarrall says, “and he managed to make his way to one of the drain holes that go back to the ocean, and off he went, and didn’t even leave us a message, just off and went!” At the link find the title, “Inky the octopus’s tenacious escape reveals intelligent, soulful creature,” right-click “Download Inky the octopus’s tenacious escape reveals intelligent, soulful creature – April 15, 2016,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Octopus Escapes 3 mins – “A well-loved octopus named Inky escaped recently from the National Aquarium in New Zealand. This story is based on a radio interview. Listen to the full interview.

Opiate Use 57 mins – “State lawmakers, doctors, and others in the medical profession have been hammering out new guidelines for prescribing these drugs to tackle the issue of over-use and alleviate the addiction crisis. We’ll get the latest on this discussion and also find out how New Hampshire’s approach compares with other states.” (4 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Palliative Care 115 mins – “At the end of our lives, what do we most wish for? And how can knowing this help you live better lives now? BJ Miller, MD (@zenhospice) knows. BJ is a palliative care physician at Zen Hospice Project in San Francisco, where he thinks deeply about how to create a dignified, graceful end of life for his patients. He is an expert in death, but he’s also learned how we can dramatically improve our own lives, often with very small changes. When you consider that he has guided or been involved with ~1,000 deaths, it’s not surprising that he’s spotted patterns we can all learn from. BJ is also a triple amputee, and his 2015 TED Talk, “Not Whether But How,” is a moving reflection on his vision to make empathic end-of-life care available to all, ranked among the top-15 most viewed TED talks of the year. If you want to know what being around death can teach you about living, you’ll want to listen to this.I LOVED this conversation, and I hope you do as well. Enjoy.” At the link find the title, “The Man Who Studied 1,000 Deaths to Learn How to Live, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files Tim Ferriss Show, BJ Miller.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Perceptions 40 mins – “The older and wiser we get, the more bewildering our past decisions can seem. This week, people revisit those decisions — and we revisit a story we aired a year ago with new, fascinating updates about a groundbreaking study that turned out to be false. A year ago, we did a story about a study that found that a simple 20-minute conversation could change someone’s mind about controversial issues like gay marriage and abortion. But a few weeks after we aired the story, the study was discredited. A couple of researchers decided to redo the experiment the right way, and released their results this week. (3 minutes) The story from the prologue continues, with the researchers re-doing the canvassing experiment. And the results are even more surprising this time around. (27 minutes) Comedian Chris Gethard has a new podcast called Beautiful Stories from Anonymous People, where people can call in to talk to him about anything for an hour. Our editor, Joel Lovell, tells us about his favorite episode thus far — featuring a man who calls in desperately seeking Chris’ guidance. (15 minutes) Senior Producer Brian Reed tells Ira about a book entitled “Now I Know Better,” where children write cautionary tales recounting horrific accidents they’ve endured. He also interviews one of the book’s contributors about his childhood mishap. (9 1/2 minutes)” At the link right-click “Download’ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcast Evolution 40 mins – “Kelly McEvers, co-host of NPR’s “All Things Considered,” talks about hosting the award-winning afternoon newsmagazine and her past work covering hot spots around the globe. She will also talk about her new podcast “Embedded” which takes stories from the news and takes you to where they are happening.” At the link find the title, “NPR’s Kelly McEvers on Covering Global Conflict, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files IM_20160402.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Population Control 60 mins – “With what we know about climate change, should anyone add another child into that future? We’ll get two points of view from women who write about it: Madeline Ostrander and Alisha Graves. Then we hear recent science from Dr. Marcus Donat proving extreme rainfall events, and extreme drought will continue and get worse as the planet warms. I’m Alex Smith. Buckle up, and off we go, in this week’s Radio Ecoshock.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” in “Download or listen to this Radio Ecoshock show in CD Quality (56 MB) or Lo-Fi (14 MB)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Property Brothers 63 mins – “Jonathan and Drew Scott have taken HGTV by storm with their four hit shows, “Property Brothers,” “Property Brothers at Home,” “Buying & Selling,” and “Brother vs. Brother.” The talented duo share the ins and outs of buying, selling, and renovating your home and offer helpful tips to stay on time and on budget.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publishing for Smart Phones 15 mins – “”In Thailand, according to the latest available figures for the first quarter of 2014, mobile telephone subscriptions outnumbered landlines by more than 15 to 1. Among 18-24 year olds, daily Internet access is now nearly a universal habit, and Thais make up the third largest population of Facebook users in the world. A more digital nation is difficult to find. Yet when it comes to digital publishing in the national language, Thailand confronts a challenge over one thousand years old: Thai has a unique written script, with 44 consonant letters and 15 vowel symbols. Unlike for languages that have adopted the Roman alphabet, the move from print to digital can be daunting. “For Thailand, because we have our own alphabet, it’s very complicated,” explains Trasvin Jittidecharak, founder of Silkworm Books, based in her hometown of Chiang Mai, northern Thailand. “For Vietnamese or Bahasa Indonesia and Bahasa Malay that use the Roman alphabet, to transform into digital books, it’s easier. This [difficulty] also applies for the Myanmar (Burmese) language, Cambodian, and Laotian.” Around the globe, and especially in developing economies, the explosion of smartphone technology has led to the rise of self-publishing as a do-it-yourself distribution channel for self-expression and information. Jittidecharak currently sits on the Executive Committee of the International Publishers Association (IPA), where her experience adds an important measure of perspective….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Railway Crossing Accidents 21 mins – “Over the last five years, someone has died at a rail crossing every other day. But the list of 500 most dangerous crossings in Canada has not been shared with the cities where they are. Dave Seglins shares the results from CBC’s investigation. After reviewing accident records of the Transportation Safety Board, a CBC investigation discovered that over the past five years, there are on average 179 rail crossing accidents every year: One every two days. There have been at least 463 people killed at railway crossings since 2000. And most of 16,000 railway crossings in Canada don’t have automated arms. The list of 500 most dangerous crossings in the Canada has not been shared with the cities, or jurisdictions, where they’re located.At the link find the title, “CBC investigation uncovers Canada’s most dangerous railway crossings,” right-click “Download CBC investigation uncovers Canada’s most dangerous railway crossings – April 13, 2016” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Children in Sweden 54 mins – “ In a collaboration with The Bureau of Investigative Journalism in the United Kingdom and KQED in California, this episode of Reveal tells the stories of children crossing borders alone. You’ll hear about the wars they’re fleeing, where they’re trying to go and what happens to them when they get there. We followed migrants who traveled from Afghanistan to Sweden to London, from El Salvador and Mexico to California, and we found that kids seeking safe harbor in Europe and the U.S. often confront years of uncertainty and insecurity when they arrive.” At the link find the title, “Kids crossing borders – alone, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files Kids-crossing-borders-alone podcast master.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rust Belt Innovation 45 mins – “For decades Americans have watched as blue-collar workers lost their jobs in droves to cheap labor overseas. The nation’s once-thriving industrial heartland became known as the Rust Belt, marked by abandoned factories, population decline and urban decay. But a new book points to a renaissance occurring in some Rust-Belt cities like Akron, Ohio, and Albany, N.Y. The authors – an economist and a journalist – argue that by focusing on how to make things in ways that are smarter, instead of cheaper, some former Rust Belt areas are becoming “Brain Belts.” Join Diane and her guests to learn about some new and unlikely hotspots of global innovation. bilitating conditions worldwide. And yet it has remained difficult to treat. Patients have long relied on medication meant for other illnesses to manage migraine headaches, sometimes with limited success. But that could be changing: New drugs are being tested that target a chemical involved with the brain’s pain signaling during migraines. And while questions remain, the drugs show promise. Why some experts say it’s a new era for our understanding of migraine and how to treat it.” (2 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

School Improvement Project 45 mins – “This year some of the largest school districts in California will begin testing students on these and other so-called social-emotional skills – and incorporate the results into school assessments. Educators around the country are paying close attention. A recent update to federal law requires states to include at least one nonacademic measure in evaluating school performance. And they are looking to these districts as a potential model. But even advocates of teaching these skills warn the tests are unreliable, and the skills themselves need further definition.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Science Games 21 mins – “From NOVA Education, we welcome outreach coordinator Ralph Bouquet to showcase NOVA Labs – a free digital platform featuring games that foster authentic scientific exploration. With engaging interactives and informative videos, NOVA Labs allows students to participate in an area of active research where they can analyze and play with the same data that scientists use. Listen to the show to see how your students can participate in science by tracking cloud movements, designing biomolecules, or defending against sophisticated cyber attacks.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Assault Response 6 mins – “Sexual Assault Response, Apr, 2016 – Audio interview by GAO staff with Katherine Iritani, Director, Health Care.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Simple Card Bank 60 mins – “The International Edition – On this episode of Slate Money, hosts Cathy O’Neil of mathbabe.org, Felix Salmon of Fusion, and Slate Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann discuss money going global with Simple CEO Josh Reich. Topics discussed on today’s show include: Josh’s story of how he started a mobile banking company. Can the financial tech industry save banking? The bigger story behind the Panama Papers.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicides in Canada 21 mins – “Attawapiskat is a community in crisis. Aboriginal youth in northern Ontario take their own lives at a rate 50 times the national average. Those trying to save them are begging for help, calling for national action to deal with the mental health emergency.” At the link find the title, “Dying from hopelessness’: Attawapiskat desperate to stop suicide pandemic,” right-click “Download ‘Dying from hopelessness’: Attawapiskat desperate to stop suicide pandemic – April 12, 2016” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tax Avoidance 12 mins – “The leak of the Panama Papers shows a link between the sums siphoned out of developing nations into tax havens and away from basic public services for citizens. It adds up to an estimated $200 billion U.S. a year. The Current connects the dots.” At the link find the title, “Panama Papers expose human costs of global tax avoidance,” right-click “Download Panama Papers expose human costs of global tax avoidance – April 11, 2016” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teaching Profession 26 mins – “Can Technology Save the Teaching Profession? – There are few people who know teachers and the art of teaching as well as Barnett Berry. He’s the founder and CEO of the Center for Teaching Quality, a national nonprofit that advances a high-quality public education system for all students, driven by the bold ideas and expert practices of teachers. Barnett’s two books, Teaching 2030 and Teacherpreneurs, frame his bold vision for the teaching profession’s future. But is it too bold? Perhaps downright impossible? A few weeks ago, The Center for Teaching Quality put out a new paper commissioned by the Ford Foundation, all about the concept of “deeper learning.” Barnett stopped by EdSurge to share some of the papers’ findings, but we wanted more. Barnett and his team make the argument in the paper that if we want to achieve deeper learning in the classroom, we need to do a better job developing teacher leaders. But does that mean they have to leave the classroom to become administrators? And where does technology play a role in all of this?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorist Survivors 44 mins – “Terror attacks always grab the headlines when they happen, but after days or weeks the world’s attention moves on. The Current speaks with survivors of three terror attacks – in Paris, Kenya, and Oklahoma City – about their experiences and how they cope.” At the link find the title, “‘I don’t know why I survived’: Survivors reflect on coping after a terror attack,” right-click “Download ‘I don’t know why I survived’: Survivors reflect on coping after a terror attack – April 11, 2016” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voice Science 25 mins – “…The Voder was invented by an engineer and speech scientist named Homer Dudley, who worked at Bell Labs, a research facility owned by AT&T. During the 1920s and 1930s, Bell Labs was doing all kinds of research into the human voice, exploring how to synthesize, digitize, and compress speech for long-distance transmission. The Voder was a novelty off-shoot connected to Dudley’s broader research, but it’s closely connected to a number of Bell Labs inventions that continue to shape our world today. Their influence can be seen in the realm of digital media, but also in the workings of the internet more fundamentally. And on top of all that, Dudley’s inventions helped win a war…..” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title, “Vox Ex Machina” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Fraud .60 mins – “Former U.S. Civil Rights Commission Chair Mary Frances Berry talks about illegal voting practices. She is interviewed by Spencer Overton, president of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Mary Frances Berry, Apr, 2016, right-click “Media files program.432379.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

W Kamu Bell 49 mins – “Comic W. Kamau Bell is taking his political and social satire to CNN, where he’s hosting a new docu-series called ‘United Shades of America.’ He describes himself as having made a living finding humor in the parts of America he doesn’t understand. Kevin Whitehead reviews jazz guitarist Julian Lage’s album ‘Arclight.’ Comics Nadia Manzoor and Radhika Vaz play Muslim immigrants dealing with speed dating, cat calls and other aspects of life in secular New York in their sketch-comedy series ‘Shugs & Fats.’ “ At the link find the title, “Apr 2016 Best Of: W. Kamau Bell / ‘Shugs & Fats’,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water in Colorado 25 mins – “Host Beth Bennett interviews Bob Crifasi, author of A Land Made of Water (starts at 4’55”). Bob works in water management and planning and is an environmental scientist with over 25yr experience. He was the Water Resources Administrator for the city of Boulder’s Open Space and Mountain Parks Dept. He has served on board of directors of 11 ditch companies and as the president of several, supervising all aspects of ditch operation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. We discuss the Webpass model, which uses fixed wireless and fiber to serve high density apartment buildings where they are allowed in by the landlord. Unfortunately, they have been locked out of many of these buildings and are looking to the city of San Francisco to adopt better policies to ensure a single provider like AT&T cannot monopolize the building. Though the FCC has made exclusive arrangement unenforceable, the big providers are still finding ways to lock out competition. e also talk a little about the role of fiber and fixed wireless technologies, chokepoints more generally, and why Webpass is so sure it could succeed if residents were all able to to choose the ISP they wanted. At the link right-click “…download this mp3 fiel…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Impact 44 mins – Laurie Garrett, CFR’s senior fellow for global health, discusses the domestic and international ramifications of the Zika virus outbreak, as part of CFR’s Religion and Foreign Policy and State and Local Officials Conference Call series.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

 

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Media Mining Digest 231 – Apr 15, 2016: 3D Printed Tissue, Alcohol Prices and Mortality, Amputee Story, Apple Engineer, Artificial Intelligence, Bank Robbery Shootout, Bat Fungus Spread, Behavior Science in Design, Black Power, Blindness for Beginners, Braille Orbit 20 Reader, Breast Cancer, Business Trends, Childhood Abuse and Obesity, Christmas Restrictions, Climate Warming, Mechanics, Clinton Email Case, Coffee Production, Communications Legislation, Concussions, Consciousness, Cooking from Scratch, Copyright Fair Use, Coral Bleaching, Corruption in Iceland, Counter Terrorism NYC, DNA First Crystallography, End of Life Talks, Female Firefighter, Financial Risk Taking, Food for Military, Food, Gay Children Rights, Glyphosate Tests, Gun Industry, Honey Bee Smells, Income Inequality, India Democracy Debate, Internet Access Progress, Interstate Highways in Cities, Islamic State, James Brown Book, Jim Harrison Author, Laid Off Recovery, Live Streaming Impact, Medical Imaging and Overtesting, Meldonium Ban, Merl Haggard, Methane Reduction, Minimum Wage Solution, NC Backlash to LGBT Bill, Octopi, Oculus Rift Test, OODA Loops, Open Access Publishing, Oral Medicine, Orwell, Panama Papers, Pavlov, Payday Loans, Peregrine Falcons, PFOA Chemical, Pharmaceuticals and Doctors, Police Use of Glocks, Psychiatry, Public Transport Decline, Refugee Aid, Religious Freedom, Rhino Conservation, Robot Farming, Russian Librarian Case, Samantha Bee, Sea Level Rises, Sex Cases in Canadian Courts, Sikh Empire, Silicon Valley, Sovereign Citizens, Stories and Symbols, Suicide Ethics, Teeth, Terrorism in Europe, Testing History, Transfusion Restrictions, Transhumanism, U.S. Progress Decline, Underground Railways, Uranium Dioxide, Vikings, Virtual Reality, Voting Access, Waco Raid, Whales, Women in Politics, Women Police Officers, Work Trends Workers Comp Fraud, Writing Career

The best 104 podcasts from a larger group of 228 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 280 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

3D Printed Tissue  3 mins – “Engineered tissue could lead to better drug testing, liver disease treatments.” At the link find the title, “Episode 624-Apr 2016,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_April13_2016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcohol Prices and Mortality  24 mins – “Alcohol consumption has been a perennial problem, but recently The economic downturn and rises in alcohol taxation seem to have stemmed the persistent rise in associated mortality. Nick Sheron, head of clinical herpetology at Southampton university, and one of the authors of an analysis article, explains how government fiscal policy has the ability to immediately reduce alcohol related deaths.” At the link find the title, “Budget decisions can decrease alcohol deaths in less than 18 months,” right-click “Media files 257986066-bmjgroup-budget-decisions-can-decrease-alcohol-deaths-in-less-than-18-months.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amputee Story  54 mins – “Joyce welcomes John Register to the show. Owner of Inspired Communications International, LLC, John has never allowed adversity hold him back. He hurdled his adversity in leaps and bounds, and challenges his audiences to do the same as they create their new normal. During the show, John will share his amazing journey from All-American track star to amputee to Paralympics medalist and the events that have led him to motivate and inspire other people with disabilities.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apple Engineer  42 mins – “Part 1 of a mega-interview with Bill Atkinson .As a member of the original Macintosh team at Apple Computer, Bill Atkinson designed much of the initial Macintosh user interface and wrote the original QuickDraw, MacPaint and HyperCard software.” At the link “Download options, right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence  44 mins – “Our concept about what computers can do recently got a bit grander: in a match watched by hundreds of thousands online earlier this month, Google’s DeepMind computer program, AlphaGo, bested its human opponent in a complex ancient Chinese board game. The win was a surprise because many had believed it would take another decade before a computer could beat a professional player of the game. Some say the win points to how quickly so-called deep learning and machine intelligence will be transforming just about every major industry. Join us to talk about how big data and increasingly sophisticated algorithms are changing our world.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Artificial Intelligence Future  33 mins – “Okay, you asked for it, and I finally did it. Today’s episode is about conscious artificial intelligence. In this episode we talk about everything from what artificial intelligence and consciousness even mean, whether you’ll ever have a moral obligation to pay Siri, and what happens when your intelligent secretary needs a therapist.” At the link find the title, “Rude Bot Rises, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bank Robbery Shootout  28 mins – “Officer John Caprarelli was one of the first Los Angeles Police Department officers to arrive at the scene of the Bank of America in North Hollywood on Feb. 28, 1997. Officer Caprarelli gives a personal first-hand account of the 44-minute gun battle with two heavily armed suspects in his new book, “Uniform Decisions.” Officer Caprarelli discusses other events during his 27-year LAPD career.” At the link find the title, “The North Hollywood Bank Robbery, Feb, 2012,” right-click “Media files uniform-decisions.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bat Fungus Spreads  8 mins – “Scientists were already worried about a disease killing bats in the east, now it’s on the move towards the west. The Current first told you about White Nose Syndrome in 2008 – so destructive it brought researchers to tears. Today we have an update.” At the link find the title, “Scientists concerned for bats as white nose syndrome moves West – April 7, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160407_45312.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Behavioral Science in Design  43 mins – “Dr Jeremy Watson, Chief Scientist & Engineer at BRE presents the Third Biennial Lecture for the Department of Architecture & Civil Engineering on sustainability and ethics in the built environment.” At the link right-click ‘Download” and select “Save Link A” From the pop-up menu.

Black Power 34 mins – “In the late 1960s, a civil rights leader named Floyd B. McKissick, at one time the head of CORE (the Congress on Racial Equality) proposed an idea for a new town. He would call this town Soul City and it would be a place built for and by black people—a land of black opportunity in rural North Carolina. Katie Mingle has the story.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blindness for Beginners  20 mins – “…three people of different ages and different backgrounds discuss the things they found most useful when they went blind, and the things they found most frustrating. Listen to their candid conversation about losing your sight when you’re an adult.” At the link right-click “Downnload MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Braille Orbit 20 Reader  20 mins – “A new electronic braille reader called The Orbit Reader 20 has been unveiled in California. When it eventually comes on to the market it promises to be more affordable than anything currently available. We get our hands on one of the prototypes and test it out. Plus, we get very rare access to the high-security prison Full Sutton near York, where prisoners have been making braille books for the last twenty years. Peter White talks to them about the challenges of transcribing books into braille, and the job satisfaction they get from it” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Breast Cancer  64 mins – “Breast cancer is among America’s most feared diseases, and also one of its most politicized. Decades of public education have encouraged women to get annual mammograms, and diagnoses typically trigger surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. But not everyone agrees that this conventional approach serves women best. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force no longer recommends annual screening for all women in their 40s, a change roundly criticized by patient advocates and rejected by Medicare and private insurers. Some surgeons now advise a “wait and see” strategy for women with specific breast cancer diagnoses. Is it possible that we’re harming ourselves with too many tests and treatments? Dr. Laura Esserman, a breast cancer surgeon, wrestles with these issues on a daily basis. She conducts pioneering research in the areas of screening based on personalized risk assessment and the benefits of “watchful waiting,” and even has suggested re-labeling for some forms of breast cancer. Dr. Esserman will discuss the sometimes surprising research that can assist women in making these personal and important decisions.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Business Trends  45 mins – “Champions of American capitalism celebrate the U.S.A. as the land where competition gets things done. Brings everybody the most for the least. But look around. American corporations’ profits are now at super-high levels compared to our GDP. Way higher here, at home, than their return on investment abroad. Big chunks of the economy just ruled by a handful of firms. Critics are saying the game is rigged. We need more competition. This hour On Point, where’s the competition in the U.S. economy?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood Abuse and Obesity  54 mins – “At the time, it seemed to be a medical mystery. Dr. Vincent Felitti was running a clinic in San Diego in the 1980’s for the morbidly obese. Under his supervision, many patients lost 200 to 400 pounds — only to gain it all back again. Or lose the weight then drop out of the program. These results puzzled Dr. Felitti. One day, while interviewing a new patient, he asked her when she’d become sexually active. The patient looked down and said, “four years old”. A lightbulb went on. Could childhood trauma trigger not only obesity, but a whole host of psychological and physiological illnesses?….” At the link find the title, “All In The Family, Part 1,April, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160407_80330.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Christmas Restrictions  9 mins – “Once upon a time, in the good old days, Americans celebrated Christmas in their public schools. They sang hymns, hung stockings and decorated trees. And nobody complained. Then along came the big, bad American Civil Liberties Union and other left-leaning fellow travelers, who bludgeoned educational officials into restricting or even removing the holiday from our schools. And the rest, as they say, is history….” At the link find the title, “Christmas in the classroom – still controversial,” right-click “Media files xmas-th-web.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming Mechanics  60 mins – “From the Netherlands, green lawyer Roger Cox: “Is Revolution Justified?” From UK, Glacier specialist Thomas Bauska on the last big temperature jump in a warm world like ours. Plus, scientist Paul Beckwith warns we are in a climate emergency.beside “Download…right-click “Lo-Fiand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clinton Email Case  44 mins – “Former U.S. Attorney General for the District of Columbia Joseph diGenova examines the investigation into emails sent to and from Hillary Clinton’s personal email server during her time as Secretary of State.” At the link find the title, “Washington Journal: Joseph diGenova on Hillary Clinton’s Emails, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.434401.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coffee Production  57 mins – “When we think of the plants that are important to us, we might think right past the magical shrub that gives us coffee berries. Coffee underpins major economies in the world, has an interesting history, and its sustainable production is threatened. We’re joined by Hanna Neuschwander from World Coffee Research. Hanna describes what coffee is, its natural history, species in the wild, and breeding efforts to improve coffee. We also discuss the major challenges that stand to harm coffee production in the future.” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Legislation  28 mins – “Judiciary Committee Chair, Representative Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), discusses several key issues in the technology space, including encryption, privacy, and surveillance. Representative Goodlatte is also the co-chair of the Internet Caucus.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Representative Bob Goodlatte, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.435816.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concussions  57 mins – “ With the NFL recently admitting that repeated blows to the head can cause degenerative brain disease, we take a time-out to scan the research on brain trauma, including innovations in reducing incidents and assessing concussions.  But is what we’re learning discouraging participation in contact sports? And is rising concern over brain injury backed by science?” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. The Exchange…

Consciousness  39 mins – “In his book “Consciousness and the Social Brain,” Princeton neuroscientist Dr. Michael Graziano lays out his compelling Attention-Schema Theory explains how conscious awareness might arise from the mechanistic processes of low-level neuroscience. Has he solved the “Hard Problem” of Consciousness?” At the link find the title, “Has Dr. Michael Graziano “Solved” Consciousness? Apr, 2016” right-click “Media files SDS123.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cooking from Scratch  46 mins – “Cooking — really cooking, in the kitchen, with pots and pans, and a nice recipe and good fresh ingredients — can be a joy. Healthy. Not too expensive if you do it right. A way to slow down, engage and live. But many people barely do it anymore. There’s takeout. Or some prepackaged glob popped in the microwave. Or pizza … you name it. And cooking can look daunting, or like a time challenge. We want to help you over that hump. This hour On Point, the joy of getting you cooking.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Copyright Fair Use  10 mins – “The US Congress writes the copyright laws of the land, and the interpretation is left to the courts. “Fair use” is a potential defense where copyright infringement is charged, and a judge must measure four explicit factors when assessing possible harm. Fair use gets a fair amount of attention in the Digital Age, and this week is no exception. “In her 220-page remand decision in Cambridge University Press v. Patton (known as the GSU e-reserves case), Judge Orinda Evans found that 41 of 48 alleged infringements considered at trial—and reconsidered on remand—were protected by fair use, and for a second time, she declared GSU the prevailing party in the case, reports Andrew Albanese, Publishers Weekly senior writer. Meanwhile, a shorthanded US Supreme Court may have signaled its own interest in another longstanding case where “fair use” is the defense – the so-called “Google Books” case….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coral Bleaching  11 mins – “As has been reported this week, a massive worldwide coral bleaching event is underway spanning the globe from Hawaii to the Indian Ocean. Some marine ecologists fear more than 12,000 square kilometres of coral may be lost. Coral bleaching, a reaction to very warm sea water, was unknown prior to the industrial revolution. This is now the third global bleaching. It is partly the result of El Nino, the change in ocean currents which brings warmer currents. But it is also a clear sign we are experiencing a warming planet. It is thought more than 40% of reefs have been lost globally in recent decades. The Caribbean has lost more than 80% of its coral reefs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up men.

Corruption in Iceland 20 mins – “Iceland’s Prime Minister promised to protect Iceland from what he called vulture foreign creditors and pledged to keep Iceland’s assets in the country. But the Panama Papers leak suggest he was privately embracing what he publicly denounced.” At the link find the title, “Panama Papers pummel Iceland’s PM after revelations of offshore funds – April 6, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160406_46503.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from th epop-up menu.

Counter Terrorism NYC  31 mins –New York City has long been a breeding ground for spies, saboteurs, and terrorists who view it as a top target. In his “Battleground New York City,” Thomas Reppetto covers post-9/11 police strategies and recounts law enforcement’s efforts to thwart terrorists and covert operators since 1861. Reppetto focuses on the coordinated efforts of the NYPD, Secret Service, and FBI to counter these threats.” At the link find the title, “Battleground NYC: Countering Terrorism, Mar, 2012” right-click “Media files battleground-nyc.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA First Crystallography  15 mins – “Everyone knows that Watson and Crick published a seminal paper on the structure of DNA. But fewer know that two other papers on DNA were published in the same issue of Nature. Learn more in the first of a new podcast series: the Nature PastCast. [First published April 2013]At the link find the title “REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast – April 1953 [originally aired April 2013], right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

End of Life Talks  43 mins – End of Life Conversations are Hard. We stumble, we stutter, we say things that derail the discussion when we have a patient at the end of life. But how do we learn to do better? We model good behavior. But in order to do that we need to hear good discussions. I listened to Ashley Shreve’s amazing SMACC Chicago talk: SMACC Talk: What is a Good Death? After listening, I wanted to bring Ashley back on to really get into the nitty-gritty of the semantics of End of Life discussions. Ashley has been on the EMCrit podcast before discussing Critical Care Palliation. Now lets hear from here again… Tidbits I pulled out of the Podcast – The three patients that will spur Ashley to try to have these discussions: 1. Advanced Cancer or Terminal Disease with Instability 2. Advanced Frailty/Dementia with Instability 3. Advanced Physiological Age (>85 y/o) with Instability….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Firefighter  90 mins – “Caroline Paul (@carowriter) is a blast and can also probably kick my ass… seriously. Caroline is the author of four published books. Her latest is the New York Times best seller The Gutsy Girl: Escapades for Your Life of Epic Adventure. Once a young scaredy-cat, Caroline decided that fear got in the way of the life she wanted–of excitement, confidence, and self-reliance. She has since flown planes, rafted big rivers, climbed tall mountains, and fought fires as one of the first female firefighters in San Francisco. In this episode, we discuss various types of fear and how to overcome them, using stories, habits, and tactics….” At the link find the title, “How to Overcome Fear – Lessons from Firefighter and Luger, Caroline Paul. Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files Tim_Ferriss_Show-Caroline_Paul.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Risk Taking  34 mins – “In “How much risk will you take?” Paul discusses the difficult topic of identifying and accepting the normal risk of investing. This audio chapter from his book, Financial Fitness Forever, also addresses the often overlooked risks of owning both stocks and bonds.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food for the Military  60 mins – “This week, we’re looking at how food — and the containers it comes in — have changed over time, and some of the factors that have influenced these changes. We’ll speak with Anastacia Marx de Salcedo about her new book “Combat-Ready Kitchen: How the U.S. Military Shapes The Way You Eat” about the ways military needs have influenced the food we all eat. And we’ll speak with statistician Patrick McKnight about the BPA controversy, and how statistics can be used and misused in scientific studies.” At the link find the title, “#364 Combat-Ready Kitchen, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files Science_for_the_People_364_Combat-Ready_Kitchen.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Storage  82 mins – [10m mark start] Today is a show about one of the fundamentals of modern survival philosophy, food storage. Food storage is actually something that at one time was simply something everyone did. Every home in America at one time seemed to have a root cellar full of canned goods. Today though food storage and the concept of survivalism or prepping is sensationalized and largely misunderstood. Many tend to hear survivalist and at once envision a guy sitting on a ten year supply of military rations in a basement or bunker somewhere. This image is hyped by media who simply wish to sell a story and worse is made up of journalists that live in a bubble of “the government will fix our problems”. The reality is that the bunker approach of military rations is both inaccurate and impractical. To worsen matters as preparedness has become more of a hot industry long term food has become a product marketed largely on fear vs. on the practical benefits it offers. The reality is food storage doesn’t even require specially packaged 25 year stable products, though they can be useful in your food storage program. The simple truth is that a simple 60-90 day supply of food in your home can help the average family deal with every day occurrences and most disasters they might ever expect to encounter.“ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu. Survival podcast

Food Theft  40 mins – “t’s easy to assume that burglars and thieves are always after conventional valuables: cash, jewels, or high-end electronics. But some of the most memorable heists actually involve food. Inspired by Geoff Manaugh’s new book, A Burglar’s Guide to the City, we dive into the ancient history and detective science behind food crime. From Spartan hunger games to the McDonald’s burglar, food is a surprisingly popular target (and tool) for thieves. Who knew that four percent of all the cheese produced in the world is destined to be stolen, or that Scandinavian burglars use potatoes to bust open vaults? In this episode, we talk to agricultural detective Rocky Pipkin about nut rustlers, cherry skims, and bee hive heists. With the price of almonds up at half a million dollars per trailer-load, thieves in California’s Central Valley have begun setting up elaborate schemes to strip an entire orchard or boost a truck—and farmers are fighting back with military technology. As regular Gastropod listeners will know, maple syrup is another valuable commodity: a barrel of the sweet stuff can be worth thirteen times more than crude oil. Journalist Brendan Borrell tells us the story of the Great Canadian Maple Syrup Heist of 2012,…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gay Children Rights  53 mins – “Alex Cooper was 15 when she told her Mormon parents she was gay. She knew that it would be difficult, but she couldn’t have expected what happened next. They sent her stay with a couple in St. George who promised to “save” Alex from homosexuality. What the “treatment program” relied on though was verbal, psychological and physical abuse. Thursday, our guest is scholar Joanna Brooks. She co-authored Alex’s memoir, and joins us to talk about how this happened and what it really took to save Alex. Alex Cooper’s memoir is called Saving Alex….. It was co-authored with Joanna Brooks, scholar of religion in American life and professor of English at San Diego State University.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Glyphosate Tests  70 mins – “Recent unpublished reports are popping up on the internet that suggest that the herbicide glyphosate is showing up at dangerous levels in a variety of places. These range from breast milk, to beer, to wine, to potato chips. There are a number of laboratories and kit manufacturers that are excited to provide a means for such analysis. In the hands of the untrained, such kits and data are nothing more than in invitation for misinterpretation or misuse.In this week’s podcast we talk to two experts that routinely measure rare compounds. Dr. Shelley McGuire discusses her findings as a lactation specialist, describing the results in her recent paper on glyphosate in breast milk. Dr. Thomas Colquhoun speaks about the methods and kits, along with what the alleged findings in wine really mean.” (Montsanto’s involvement, noted here, may raise questions, so here’s a link to a New Yorker magazine article with seventeen researchers who agree.) At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Industry  25 mins – “Guns are so omnipresent in our society we don’t talk about them. But when Iain Overton started counting the number of guns on the planet, he hit the billion mark. The Current looks at the global destruction and cultural significance of the gun.” At the link find the title, “Roughly a billion guns in the world, author shares startling facts on firearms – April 5, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160405_83949.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Safety Problem  20 mins – “Imagine a safer kind of gun. Imagine a company with a plan to build it. Imagine customers ready to buy it. Imagine what could go wrong. “ At the link find the title, “A whole lot.#694: The Gun That Wouldn’t Shoot, Apr 2016right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honey Bee Smells 11 mins – “Lavender is a powerful smell, but could it be even more powerful than we think? New Australian research reveals that not only can the smell of lavender help bees make new memories, but that it can also change their mood, and even change their DNA. Could it do the same for humans? “ At the link right-click “mp4” beside “download video:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Income Inequality  65 mins – “It is argued by many that the American Dream is vanishing, and that the cause is rising income inequality. Are tax hikes and raising the minimum wage solutions to saving the American Dream? Or do they symbolize what free market advocate Yaron Brook calls “a war on success”? Join Dr. Brook and economist Dr. Alan Auerbach in a spirited discussion of the significance of inequality in America and the best approaches to nurturing individual success.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Democracy Debate  60 mins – “We assume that democracy is what every country should have. But what has democracy done for India? Easy. It has stimulated corruption on a massive scale, and if you want to get rich in India the most direct way is to run for parliament and reap the payoffs businesses are obliged to make to the local MP. Caste, that Indian curse, becomes more entrenched as politicians exploit caste allegiances to win votes. Bombay may be booming but it’s hardly Shanghai. A country that is striving to be an economic powerhouse is being pulled down by its political system. Democracy is India’s Achilles’ heel. So say the pundits but what would they put in democracy’s place? Would they prefer India to be ruled by a Mubarak or an Indian version of the Beijing politburo? Democratic politics is always messy and often corrupt but it is the inevitable price of seeking the will of the people, which will always be preferable to the will of the dictator. Speaking in favour of the motion in this debate from September 2011 were Patrick French, writer, historian and author of ‘India: A Portrait’; and Suhel Seth, author, columnist and Managing Partner of Counselage India, a strategic brand management and marketing consultancy. Arguing against them were William Dalrymple, an author and historian who has lived in Delhi for 25 years; and Mani Shankar Aiyar, former government minister and member of the Indian National Congress.” At the link find the title, “Democracy is India’s Achilles’ heel, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files 257998399-intelligence2-democracy-is-indias-achilles-heel.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Access Progress   20 mins – “They said it couldn’t be done: Internet in space. The dream of a totally connected world is still out of reach. Companies like OneWeb and SpaceX think a global swarm of satellites is the answer. The idea failed before — does it stand a chance today?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interstate Highways in Cities  44 mins – “U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx has a message for Americans this week and it’s an unusual one for someone in his position. When the country’s urban freeways were constructed, they were often routed through low income, minority neighborhoods. Instead of connecting us to each other, Foxx says many of these highways were intentionally built to separate us. He says it’s a legacy the country has struggled to address and it’s one Foxx hopes to begin to repair. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx joins Diane to discuss helping isolated, poor and minority communities get access to reliable and safe transportation – and a panel of experts react to his proposals.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Islamic State  44 mins – “Since June of 2014 ISIS-inspired terrorists have been linked to more than 75 attacks outside of Syria and Iraq. At least 1200 people have been killed and many hundreds more injured. Some say the deadly assaults in Western Europe, Turkey, the U.S. and elsewhere are linked to the group’s diminishing local power, but no one expects it to give up on a strategy that brings worldwide attention and outrage. Belgian investigators with help from other European countries and the U.S. continue to try to identify the perpetrators of attacks earlier this month in Brussels. Please join us to talk about the global reach of ISIS and its effect on the future of the Middle East.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

James Brown  48 mins – “Everybody knows James Brown. Godfather of Soul. The hardest working man in show biz. The shine, the blazing smile, the hair, the voice – and the electric moves that just knocked you out. My guest today, novelist and memoirist James McBride, says there is not one piece of American pop that doesn’t have James Brown in it. He also says Brown was the most misunderstood African-American figure of the last 300 years.  This hour On Point, James McBride on the real James Brown.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jim Harrison Author  52 mins – “Jim Harrison was a literary legend. In his bountiful works of fiction, essays, and poetry he displayed an insatiable zest for life and unending passion for the natural world. He passed away last weekend at age 78. Friday, we’re rebroadcasting a conversation he had with independent radio producer Scott Carrier back in 2007. Harrison was in Salt Lake City, and he spoke with Carrier about art, writing, the pleasures of life, and the nature of death.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Live Streaming Impact  46 mins – “Live-streaming looks set to be the next turn of the wheel in our digital, mobile culture. Last year, it was an app called Periscope. Now comes Facebook Live. Celebrities and just-folks are starting to livestream. Media companies are trying to make it work for them. And once again, it may mean more big changes in the way we communicate with each other. This hour On Point, Facebook Live and the new world of livestreaming.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Imaging  82 mins – “Improvements in diagnostic imaging – US, CT, MRI, PET – have been spectacular and the use of imaging has soared over the last two decades driven by a combination of patient and physician demand. Dr. Rebecca Smith-BindmanIs looks at the potential harm associated with radiation exposure and what you should do about it. Recorded on 02/23/2016. (#30672)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Overtesting  44 mins – “One threat to healthcare value is doing too much. Dr. R. Adams Dudley of UCSF discusses low value care in the form of unnecessary testing prior to cataract surgery. He says it occurs frequently, despite clear guidelines recommending against it. Then he looks at the value of telemedicine from commercial e-visit websites. He says There is substantial variation in performance among commercial e-visit sites which could affect you. Recorded on 02/09/2016. (#30669)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meldonium Ban  24 mins – “Tennis star Maria Sharapova is just one of many Russian athletes linked to the banned substance called meldonium this year. The Current looks at meldonium and its effects – on athletes and sports.” At the link find the title, “Meldonium makers say banned drug helps athletes, not performance – April 8, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160408_73968.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Merle Haggard then Underground Railway  50 mins – ““I was, to say the least, probably the most incorrigible child you can think of,” Haggard told Terry Gross in 1995. The country legend died Wednesday morning in California. It was his 79th birthday. Historian Eric Foner recently won the American History Book Prize from the New York Historical Society for ‘Gateway to Freedom,’ about the Underground Railroad. He discussed the book in 2015.” At the link find the title, “April 8, 2016 Remembering Merle Haggard,” click the three-dot button, then right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Methane Reduction  27 mins – “When it comes to fighting climate change, both Canada and the U.S. face an uphill battle. Gina McCarthy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator and Catherine McKenna, the Canadian Environment and Climate Change Minister talk strategies.” At the link find the title, “Environment minister, EPA head share climate strategy in Ottawa – April 7, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160407_45356.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minimum Wage Solution   13 mins -”A California mall straddles the border between two cities — and the minimum wage is higher on one side.” At the link find the title, “#562: A Mall Divided, Apr 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160406 pmoney podcast040616.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

NC Backlash to LGBT Bill  9 mins – “The anti-LGBT laws passed in the southern U.S. has created a backlash on the part of corporate America. The bill blocks local governments from enacting laws with anti-discrimination protections for LGBT people. We look at the optics for corporate America.” At the link find the title, “Corporate America embraces gay rights in light of anti-LGBT legislation – April 7, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160407_52717.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Octopi  35 mins – “We talk to naturalist and author Sy Montgomery about her latest book The Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder of Consciousness.” At the link find the title, “128 Sy Montgomery – The Soul of an Octopus,” right-click “ “Media files 53f51ed9-1f31-4d65-bcc9-3765357ddb9e.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

OODA Loops  39 mins – “My keynote lecture at SMACC-Chicago [Social Media and Critical Care] was on OODA loops [Observe-Orient-Decide-Act] and the supremacy of System I [Intuitive] for resuscitation. The lecture was plagued by AV-wankers to the point that I thought the talk was a shambles. I am rerecording the lecture here for EMCrit and the SMACC site. I hope you enjoy–SDW.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Access Publishing  43 mins – “In 2016, the challenge for scholarly publishing is less about access for articles and more than ever about success for authors, individually and collaboratively….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oral Medicine  75 mins – “Oral medicine deals with the diagnosis and management of diseases affecting the oral mucosa, salivary glands, and related oral structures and functions at interface of Dentistry and Medicine. Caroline Shiboski, Department of Orofacial Sciences at UCSF, explores what an oral medicine specialist does and shows some oral conditions and how they are diagnosed. Recorded on 11/19/2015. (#30148) At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Orwell  45 mins – “He was one of the most influential writers of our time. His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us ‘big brother’, ‘thoughtcrime’, ‘doublethink’, whose name looms so large in this era of mass surveillance?” At the link find the title, “The Orwell Tapes, Part 1, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160404_11240.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panama Papers  24 mins – “The so-called Panama Papers may have revealed more truth about the lifestyles of the rich and famous than TV host Robin Leach ever did. The Current goes inside the minds of the one per cent and looks at how money changes psychology.” At the link find the title, “Studies reveal super-rich suffer from anxiety, lack of empathy – April 8, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160408_92182.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panama Papers   27 mins – “This week’s massive leak of confidential documents from the Panamanian law firm, Mossack Fonseca, has given unprecedented access to the way the rich and powerful have used tax havens to hide their wealth. But within the eleven and a half million documents, there is also evidence of how some of the shell companies set up by the firm, or the individuals that owned them, have been the subject of international sanctions and have been used by rogue states and oppressive regimes including North Korea and Syria. Simon Cox reveals details from the leaked papers and travels to the British Virgin Islands where a small office run by Mossack Fonseca was used to create more than 100,000 companies. One of them was a front for a North Korean Bank that was later sanctioned by the United States for supporting the regime’s illicit nuclear and ballistic missile programme. According to the US, the BVI based front company managed millions of dollars in transactions in support of North Korea. Other companies set up by on the island were used by a billionaire businessman who is a cousin of Syrian President Bashar Al Assad and who was sanctioned by the US for using “intimidation and his close ties to the Assad regime at the expense of ordinary Syrians.” Mossack Fonseca has said it never knowingly allowed the use of its companies by individuals with any relationship with North Korea or Syria and says it has operated beyond reproach for 40 years and has never been charged with criminal wrong-doing. Reporter: Simon Cox Producer: James Melley “ At the link find the title, “The Panama Papers, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03q7lm4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panama Papers  32 mins – “One week after the Panama Papers thrust the shadowy world of the ultra-rich into the spotlight, the massive trove of data is still being sifted as world leaders scramble to explain-away offshore accounts. How 400 journalists from 76 countries worked in secret for over a year to decipher the largest leak ever, and how we got here in the first place…The Panama Papers is by sheer volume of documents the largest whistle-blower leak in history. With over 100 news organizations from over 80 countries involved it is also the largest journalistic collaboration ever. And it has already claimed its first scalp. On Tuesday, Iceland Prime Minister Sigmundur Gunnlaugsson resigned over revelations of undisclosed investments in three of Iceland’s failed banks. But the 11.5 million documents from the Panama law-firm Mossack Fonseca also expose shadowy dealings surrounding dictators and kleptocrats worldwide — with 99% of the iceberg still submerged. The material has been scrutinized by some 400 reporters for the past year, under the coordination of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. Bob speaks with the consortium’s director, Gerard Ryle, about how the global investigation came together.” At the link find the title, “Rolling In It, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files otm040816pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panama Papers  46 mins – “Everybody’s talking about the Panama Papers. The biggest leak of financial data in history, and it’s all about the shadowy world of hidden offshore money. Wealth. Terabytes of data lighting up the hidden finances of presidents and prime ministers. Celebrities. Soccer stars. FIFA. A cellist who is the best friend of Vladimir Putin and two billion offshore dollars. The prime minister of Iceland has resigned. This hour On Point, hidden wealth, and the story told by the Panama Papers.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pavlov  3 mins – “Born in 1849, Pavlov attended church school in his home town of Ryazan before moving on to a local theological seminary. But at age twenty-one he changed course and left to study in the department of math and physics at the university in Saint Petersburg. There he developed an interest in the natural sciences — physiology in particular. Our understanding of the human body was in its infancy. Pavlov was fascinated and wanted to know more….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Payday Loans  49 mins – “Critics — including President Obama — say short-term, high-interest loans are predatory, trapping borrowers in a cycle of debt. But some economists see them as a useful financial instrument for people who need them. As the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau promotes new regulation, we ask: who’s right?” At the link click the three dots inside the circle near “Listen” then right-click “Download this audio” and and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peregrine Falcons  13 mins – “For the past 20 years, peregrine falcons have shared the cliffs in Rumney with the rock-climbing community, and Chris Martin has been directing the monitoring of these birds since they arrived. In addition to tracking the progress of the falcons as they emerged from their endangered status, Chris and the Forest Service work closely with the climbing community to support recreation and maintain the safety of the falcons….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PFOA Chemical  57 mins – “After the Flint, Michigan water crisis, many around the country started taking a closer look their own water systems. And with a recent contamination scare in southern New Hampshire by the chemical PFOA  – the concerns have become local.  We’ll look at the state’s sources for drinking water, and the challenges to delivering it free from contaminants.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pharmaceuticals and Doctors  21 mins – “A select number of drug companies are moving towards transparency by divulging their payments to doctors. The voluntary program aims to address the public perception between drug companies and doctors. Critics saying they aren’t moving far enough.” At the link find the title, “Pharma launches voluntary guidelines for payment disclosures – April 4, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160404_16709.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Use of Glocks  35 mins – “Paul Barrett, a firearms industry reporter, discusses his book, “Glock: The Rise of America’s Gun.” Barrett tells the story of the obscure Austrian curtain-rod maker who produced an innovative gun that was reliable and easy to operate. He explains how and why Glock became the dominant police sidearm.” At the link find the title, “Glock: Rise of America’s Gun, Jan, 2012,” right-click “Media files rise-of-glock.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychiatric Research  27 mins – “Dr. Jean King has a number of impressive titles: Associate Provost for Biomedical Science Research…Professor of Psychiatry, Radiology and Neurology…and Director, Center for Comparative NeuroImaging, University of Massachusetts Medical School. She talks with us about neuroimaging, which involves looking at the chemistry of the brain in a non-invasive manner. Research includes having subjects perform specific tasks and performing no tasks at all. The brain of someone with a psychiatric or neurological disorder will react differently to these experiments than those with no disorder. Plus, Dr. King will share with us her views on how women can become successful scientists while still raising a family, and why diversity is key in scientific research.

Psychiatry Applied  60 mins – “This week, we’re looking back at a previous episode to get a gripping first person account of the challenges involved in mental health diagnosis and treatment. We’ll spend the hour with Dr. Christine Montross, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, and the Director of Counseling Resources at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, to talk about her book “Falling Into the Fire: A Psychiatrist’s Encounters with the Mind in Crisis.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Transport Decline  30 mins – “If you live in the US, chances are you have at some point been frustrated that our public transit systems don’t do a great job linking urban centers with suburbs, can’t get you to the airport or work in a reasonable amount of time (or at all), and cost way too much. You don’t have to travel to Tokyo, or Zurich, or Paris to see that public transportation in the US is not what it could be, but our guest today on Sea Change Radio has done just that. He is John Rennie Short, a public policy professor at the University of Maryland and he recently published an article in The Conversation detailing the paltry state of public transit in the US, and how we got here. He discusses how the political landscape has affected infrastructure development, and the many costs associated with the decline of our country’s public transportation system, which can be measured in terms of lower GDP, wasted fuel, and lost time, not to mention the terrible environmental toll.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Aid  39 mins – “When the body of three-year-old Alan Kurdi washed up on a beach in September 2015, it sent the world into uproar about the tragic plight of Syrian refugees. Shortly afterwards, Canadians – and their newly elected government – responded by opening up their communities to accept 25,000 Syrian refugees. This presented both an opportunity for Canadians to lend support and a challenge for authorities in settling thousands of large and vulnerable families, many of whom didn’t speak English or French.

 In Ottawa, Louisa Taylor recognized both need and opportunity. Within three weeks she went from conception to launch with a new organization, Refugee 613. But not without many growing pains. In this episode, Louisa Taylor, Director of Refugee 613, discusses with host Tina Barton: How to build a team or organization in real time to respond to a critical need; Essential communications infrastructure to put in place; How to recruit and manage volunteers successfully; Strategies for maximizing public awareness and engagement; [and] The question of an exit strategy Connect with {Rufugee613} at www.refugee613.ca and on Twitter. This episode was produced by Tina Barton, and Ashlea McGrath of Thornley Fallis Communications. “ At the link right click beside “Direct download: The_Voice_ep97_FINAL.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Religious Freedom  53 mins – Tuesday, we’re broadcasting our conversation from a conference on religious liberty hosted by Claremont Graduate University over the weekend. Doug was joined by guests to tackle questions at the heart of the debate over the role of religion in the public square: what fears are driving both sides? What does the constitution guarantee? What does that mean in the public and private arenas? And finally, how do we find common ground for discussing faith and governance in a fractured society?” (4 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rhino Conservation  60 mins – “Fewer than 5,000 black rhinos remain in the wilds of sub-Saharan Africa. Few if any laymen like Warner have been invited to care for them in the wild, some of the most dangerous volunteer fieldwork around. It gave him the opportunity to pursue and refine his emerging philosophy of radical conservationism, to cultivate partnerships between local communities and private landowners in Africa, and to export the lessons about land and wildlife management back home to the United States.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Farming  24 mins – “From milking the cows, to driving the tractors, to picking the lettuce, robotic technology is changing farms and farm work. The Current’s Julian Uzielli heads to a dairy farm where the cows get in line for the robots.” At the link find the title, “Robots change farms from robotic milking machines to self-driving tractors – April 5, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160405_65265.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Librarian Case  24 mins – “She’s accused of inciting ethnic hatred and violating human dignity. Natalya Sharina is a 58-year-old Russian librarian in Moscow and though the Russian government says she’s not on the Kremlin’s radar, someone thinks she and her books are a threat.” At the link find the title, “Librarian under house arrest in Moscow accused of anti-Russian propaganda – April 4, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160404_77868.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Samantha Bee then Laid Off Recovery  50 mins – “Bee, who was the longest-serving ‘Daily Show’ correspondent, has a new political satire show called ‘Full Frontal’ on TBS. Ken Tucker reviews a new album from Robbie Fulks. Dan Lyons was in his 50s when he was laid off from Newsweek and went to work for a start-up. He says it was part frat house, part cult. He wrote for the HBO series ‘Silicon Valley,’ and his new memoir is ‘Disrupted.’“ At the link find the title, “April 8, 2016 Best Of: Samantha Bee / Inside The Start-Up Bubble,” click the three-dot circle, then right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sea Level Rise  46 mins – “Six feet of sea level rise by 2100. It seems unfathomable. A big new study, sophisticated new computer modeling shows that this could indeed be where we’re headed. Some of the planet’s biggest cities drowning. Can we innovate our way out of this? We’ve got the biggest minds in the field gaming out solutions: carbon-scrubbing, rebuilding the glaciers, making it snow above Antarctica. This hour On Point, stopping the rising calamity.” (3 guests) At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Cases in Canadian Courts  24 mins – “Criminal defence lawyer Marie Henein underlined the acquittal of her client Jian Ghomeshi on sexual assault charges proves Canada’s justice system works as it should. Other criminal lawyers are persistent for change to the system in sexual assault cases.” At the link find the title, “Legal experts call to rectify sexual assault laws after Ghomeshi acquittal – April 4, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160404_23601.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sikh Empire  43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the rise of the Sikh Empire at the end of the 18th Century under Ranjit Singh, pictured above, who unified most of the Sikh kingdoms following the decline of the Mughal Empire. He became Maharaja of the Punjab at Lahore in 1801, capturing Amritsar the following year. His empire flourished until 1839, after which a decade of unrest ended with the British annexation. At its peak, the Empire covered the Punjab and stretched from the Khyber Pass in the west to the edge of Tibet in the east, up to Kashmir and down to Mithankot on the Indus River. Ranjit Singh is still remembered as “The Lion of the Punjab.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. In Our Time

Silicon Valley  44 mins – “How are the ethics, philosophy and lifestyles of the internet pioneers determining the way we all live? Do we have any choice but to live the way they live, or rage against what? The machine? David Baker travels to Silicon Valley to find out what shapes those who are shaping the way we live.” At the link find the title, “Default World, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03prcg3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sovereign Citizens  32 mins – “Two North Carolina detectives discuss sovereign citizens with POLICE and give patrol officers suggestions about how to recognize and deal with these police haters. Rob Finch and Kory Flowers are detectives in the Criminal Intelligence Unit of the Greensboro Police Department. For more, read their feature, “Sovereign Citizens: A Clear and Present Danger.” At the link find the title, “Sovereign Citizens, Nov 2012,” right-click “Media files sovereign-citizens.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stories Ceremonies and Symbols  53 mins – “To be a great leader, you have to first be a great communicator. Think about any historical figure you admire….I bet they had a seemingly innate ability to motivate people. However, the ability to motivate through strong communication is actually a skill that can be easily acquired, with the right knowledge! As a leader, you have the same potential to not only anticipate the future and invent creative initiatives, but to also inspire those around you to support and execute your vision. By harnessing the power of persuasive communication you, too, can turn your idea into a movement. In this episode we speak with two incredible women – Nancy Duarte, CEO of Duarte, Inc., and Patti Sanchez, Chief Strategy Officer at Duarte, Inc. We are talking with them about their brand new book, Illuminate: Ignite Change Through Speeches, Stories, Ceremonies, and Symbols, and Nancy and Patti are going to equip you with the same communication tools that great leaders like Jobs, Howard Schultz, and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. used to move people. Duarte and Sanchez lay out a plan to help you lead people through the five stages of transformation using speeches, stories, ceremonies, and symbols.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide Ethics  52 mins – “Questions surrounding suicide have been with us for at least as long as we’ve had written record, and the answers are as varied as the times and places where they were discussed. Wednesday, Doug sits down with philosophy scholar Margaret Battin. She’s spent her career collecting the works of religious and secular thinkers regarding suicide. It has been considered noble, immoral, heroic and cowardly, and we’ll talk about what all of those views teach us about end-of-life issues today.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teeth  9 mins – “Fossilised teeth can reveal the diets of extinct animals. Larger teeth are useful for chewing plant material all day. Meat eaters need their teeth to tear and chew, but there is less eating and less chewing due to the higher energy contained in their food and so teeth can be smaller. The size of teeth in humans tracks our evolution. As we developed tools and began to cook our food, our need for big jaws full of big teeth lessened, leading to smaller jaws with fewer, smaller teeth. Alistair Evans at Monash University is studying the evolution, development and function of the teeth of mammals over their 200 million year history, including fossil and modern species.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up men.

Terrorism in Europe  26 mins – “The so-called Islamic State has brought terror to the streets of Paris and Brussels, killing hundreds of civilians and wounding many more. But how does the organisation operate in Europe? And who has masterminded the deadly attacks? The mastermind of the attacks in the French capital was a man called Abdelhamid Abaaoud. During the course of the programme Peter Taylor unveils how this man recruited and trained radicalised young men to carry out attacks. And he also details how the western intelligence services were engaged in a desperate race to stop Abaaoud from bringing terror to streets of Europe.” At the link find the title, “Europe’s Terror Networks, Apr 06, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03q6qrs.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Testing History  52 mins – “In this episode of BackStory, we explore the history of testing in America. The Guys go back to the eighteenth-century and look at how elite colleges replaced social status with merit and behavior as a way to grade students. We uncover the links between President James Garfield’s 1881 assassination and the civil service test, and look at how officials created the first, “white,” affirmative action program by waiving the test for WWII veterans. The Guys explore the long and troubled history of how Americans have used tests to both exclude and include people from the citizenry.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right side of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transfusion Restrictions  26 mins – “Everyone knows blood is powerful. The ancient Greeks realized it, Jesus understood it, Dracula certainly recognized it, and your doctor still knows it today. And everybody knows, says hematologist and historian of medicine Jacalyn Duffin, that if we lose a lot of blood, we’re going to die. Jehovah’s Witnesses’ beliefs have led them to refuse blood transfusions—to the consternation of many inside the medical profession. But the religious group still wants medical care, says reporter Alex Ashley, and their advocacy has helped propel a new movement in medicine in which doctors perform surgeries without transfusing blood. Remarkably, it has turned out better for everyone, suggesting that religion and medicine might be less at odds than they sometimes seem.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transhumanism  71 mins – “Will our brains ever be uploaded into a computer? Will we live forever? Richard Jones, physicist at the University of Sheffield and author of Against Transhumanism, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about transhumanism–the effort to radically transform human existence via technology. Jones argues that the grandest visions of the potential of technology–uploading of brains and the ability to rearrange matter via nanotechnology are much more limited and unlikely than proponents of these technologies suggest. The conversation closes with the role of government in innovation and developing technology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

U.S. Progress Decline  45 mins – “Robert Gordon, professor of economics at Northwestern University, discusses his book, [The Rise and Fall of American Growth], in which he looks at the growth in the American standard of living between 1870 and 1970 and whether we’ll see it again.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Robert Gordon,” Mar, 2016” right-click “Media files program.434404.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uranium Dioxide  7 mins – “…Curie had discovered radium, along with polonium, in pitchblende obtained from the mineral-rich Joachimsthal region on the German-Czech border. To obtain radium, first for experimental use and medical applications and later for a whole range of risky glow-in-the-dark products, vast quantities of ore were refined down to produce a tiny amount of the radioactive element – several tonnes of uraninite were required to produce just a gram of radium. This meant that plenty of uranium ore, primarily uranium dioxide, was available as a cheap by-product, and so from the 1920s, the use of uranium dioxide based glazes soared. The result was the spread of products that not only looked striking, but were faintly radioactive. Some estimates put the percentage of tiles and similar products from the 20s and 30s that are radioactive at over 20 per cent. Although at least one health physicist considers uranium oxide glazed tiles to be a health risk, the general feeling is that the radiation levels are such that exposure does not constitute a significant risk unless the material is kept in long-term contact, or is allowed to leach into food or drink. This is also the case with the most famous application of uranium dioxide glaze, the bold red-orange American pottery known as Fiestaware…. “ At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Uranium_dioxide.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vikings in Britain  23 mins – “On 864 or 865, a great Scandinavian fleet of Dragon ships, or Drakkars, beached themselves at Thanet in Kent. For the people of the south, this would have been terrifying It had been scarcely more than a decade since the last fleet of Drakkars landed in Thanet, and the army exploded forth from those ships went on to raid Canterbury, London, and may have taken Winchester had they not been stopped by King AEthelwulf and AEthelbald. And here they were again… but now King AEthelwulf was dead, as was his son, AEthelbald… all of the South was in threat. Where would the Vikings go this time? Would they strike Canterbury again? Loot the treasure chest of the south, London? Unless something was done, everyone was vulnerable. The nobility, likely under King AEthelberht’s leadership, tried to head off the disasterand sent emissaries to the Vikingr army. These emissaries promised vast sums of money in exchange for peace. This tribute would become known as the Danegeld… the Dane Payment. It was exactly what it sounds like. A bribe for peace. The hope being that, if they could just give the opportunistic raiders what they were after, material wealth, then they might stay in their camp…why risk your life if you can get paid for sitting on the beach? But there were two problems with the Danegeld. The first problem was one of simple economics. The south was no stranger to troubles, they had suffered numerous raids over the years, sometimes winning, sometimes losing. But even victorious battles have a cost and these raids were straining the Southern economy. In fact, shortly after the last great fleet landed in Thanet in 851, coin production halted entirely … and then suddenly AEthelstan, the crown prince and previous ruler of Kent, vanished. We don’t know what exactly happened, but the interruption and sudden disappearance of the crown prince is suspect. While the Chronicler’s are quick to laud the royal family’s military success at places like Aclea (which was described as the greatest slaughter of a heathen army ever seen) and the naval successes in battles like Sandwich, this sudden quiet in the record suggest there were significant troubles underlying the story… and Wessex (and it’s subkingdom of Kent) was getting stretched thin. Wessex may have been outmatched by their Scandinavian enemies.” At the link find the title, “198 – The Great Heathen Army Begins, April, 2016,” right-click “Media files 198.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vikings in Canada  4 mins – “Evidence at an archaeological site in southern Newfoundland suggests it may once have been inhabited by a group of the seafaring Scandinavians. If borne out by further research, this would be only the second Viking site in North America, and the first uncovered in more than 50 years. “You can explain away one site,” said Sarah Parcak, the archaeologist from the University of Alabama at Birmingham who led the discovery. “It’s a one-off. But I think if there’s two, there’s definitely more.” Parcak first discovered the ancient ruin in a thoroughly modern fashion: through satellite images taken hundreds of miles above earth. Her team scanned the coastline of eastern Canada and northern New England using Google Earth to search for evidence of past human settlements….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virtual Reality  59 mins – “Derek Belch, co-founder and CEO of Strivr Labs, a startup that uses virtual reality to train athletes, describes the passion necessary for entrepreneurship and the features that give his business a competitive edge in a rising-tide industry. The former Stanford football player is candid about the personal sacrifices entailed in putting your all into your venture.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Voting Access  44 mins – “In an election season already full of firsts, here’s another: this will be the first presidential election since the Supreme Court struck down a key part of the Voting Rights Act in 2013. And in 16 states new voting restrictions will be in place for the first time. Recently, thousands stood in line for hours waiting to cast their primary ballots in states like Utah, Arizona and Idaho. Some warn this is a sign of what’s to come in the general election and beyond: roadblocks to voting that disproportionately affect minorities and the most vulnerable Americans. Others argue we’re closer now to a fair system. A look at access to voting across the U.S.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Waco Raid Review  67 mins –Four ATF agents were killed during the botched search warrant raid on the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas, on Feb. 28, 1993. For the 20th anniversary, ATF agents on the ground spoke publicly about the raid, lessons learned, and changes in the agency. Three retired ATF agents joined a Feb. 7 panel discussion hosted by the National Law Enforcement Museum in its “Witness to History” lecture series. Audio is courtesy of NLEOMF. Read “Lessons Learned from the ATF Waco Raid.” At the link find the title, “Waco Raid: 20 Years Later,” Feb, 2013,” right-click “Media files waco-witness-to-history.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whales 6 mins – Rare and endangered North Atlantic White Wales are spotted off of Cape Cod and Philip Hoare, author of “The Sea Inside,” talks about swimming with them. The source isn’t identified, but may be from New Hampshire Public Radio. The podcast is included in the blog archive.

Women in Politics  51 mins – “Historian Nancy Cohen looks at women leaders in politics and the advances they are making in the political arena. She is interviewed by Kim Azzarelli, co-author of [Fast Forward].” At the link find the title, “After Words with Nancy Cohen, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.432506.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up.

Women Police Officers  20 mins – “John Wills, a retired Chicago Police officer, talks to POLICE Magazine about his “Women Warriors: Stories from the Thin Blue Line,” an edited collection of stories about female officers told in their own words. The stories include a dispatcher trying to remain calm while her husband is involved in a gun battle, a search for a missing child in a storm, and an officer staring down the barrel of a gun inside a crowded department store.” At the link find the title, “Women Warriors, Nov, 2012,” right-click “Media files women-warriors.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Work Trends  33 mins – “Slate Money on the gig economy, Spotify’s financing plan, and the Starwood Hotels deal.” At the link find the title, “The Time’s Up Edition, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM9168144065.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Workers Comp Fraud  44 mins – “California’s workers’ compensation program covers 15 million workers across the state. If you get hurt on the job – fall off a ladder, for instance – it’s the system you turn to. Most employers are required to carry workers’ comp insurance, which helps cover medical bills and lost wages for injured employees. But Reveal reporter Christina Jewett has discovered serious fraud in the system after reviewing thousands of documents. They show that in the last decade, more than 80 people have been accused of cheating California’s workers’ comp medical system out of $1 billion.” At the link find the title, “Billion-dollar scam, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files Billion-dollar-scam_PODCAST_master.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Writing Career  60 mins – “Ever dreamed of walking into a bookstore and seeing your own work up on a shelf? There are two ways of going about accomplishing that dream. The easiest one is simply walking in and putting something you made right up on a shelf, and then walking out. Honestly, I’d do this with my mixtape, but then I’d get arrested for arson. So lets focus on the second option – actually doing the work of getting published….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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Media Mining Digest 230 – Apr 8, 2016: Abolition Movement, Ada Lovelace, Grippina the Younger, Anatomy Classes, Antifreeze for Animals, Apple vs FBI, Architect Zaha Hadid, Artificial Intelligence, Baidu Founder, Birth Control Law, Brussels Bombing Investigation, Buddhism, Cancer Drugs, Chef Dan Barber, Climate Warming, Cold Cases, Colleges, Cons and Scams, Conservation, Copyright Conundrum, Corruption in South Carolina, Crisis Intervention, Cuba, Cyber Security, Dirty Tricks, Disabled Advocate, Disaster Responders, Dogs as Tools, Drinking Water Issues, Education Best Practices, Elements of Power, Encryption Advocate, Facial Recognition, Fix the Court.com, FOIA, Food Technology, Fracking, Free Speech, Gangster Squad, Gender Pay Gap, Girls and Sex, Graffiti and Taggers, Gun Control, Hand Tools, Health Care Problems, High Risk Hostage Encounters, Hudson River Tunnel Project, Indian Women Guard Forest, Intensive Care Unit, International Turmoil, Iran Politics, Iraq War, Karl Rove, LabDoor, Latin Learning, Liberal Issues, Lifeline Program, Lipstick at Crime Scenes, Local Politics, Man Hunt, Marijuana Quality Control, Mass Spectrometers, Medical Treatment Issues, Mexican Drug Cartels, Mining Science, MOMS Demand Action, New York City Police History, Non Believers, Northwest Passage, Oklahoma City Bombing, Opioid Epidemic, Paraguay, Patient Secrets, Police Patrol Leadershiip., Political Conventions, Political Issues, Premature Birth, Presidential Power, Problems Are Opportunities, Programming with Minecraft, Puerto Rican Bonds, Reconciliation in Canada, Refugee Processing, Right to Bear Arms, Salaries, Saudi Arabia and Iran, Scaling Startups, Self Driving Car, Siege of Leningrad, Single Line Power, Sleep, Small Towns, South Korea, Spanish Civil War, Sun Mechanics,Tax Plan Proposals, Technology Trends, Terorist Cartels, Thing Explainer, Trans Pacific Partnership, Trump Impact, Tug Design and Operation, Violence Control, Virus Book, Website Design, Whale Research, Women in Science, World War One Novel

The best 113 podcasts from a larger group of 218 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 280 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Abolition 48 mins – “In 1863, Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This freed most of the country’s 4 million slaves. Three years later, Congress ratified the Thirteenth Amendment, finally ending the practice of slavery in the United States. These are defining and celebrated moments in American history. But some argue the people who made those moments possible have been left out of the story. A new book traces the history of the abolition movement. It brings together stories of the men and women, blacks and whites who fought America’s “peculiar institution” – and whose legacy can be seen in later social reform movements like women’s suffrage and Black Lives Matter.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Ada Lovelace 48 mins – “Ada Lovelace is remembered as the world’s first computer programmer. In 1842 she wrote a set of instructions for the analytical engine, the world’s first computer, designed, but not built by Charles Babbage. Should Ada Lovelace be held up as a role model for women? As a stereotype? Is it realistic to refer to the world of the late nineteenth century? We begin with some observations about the challenges women face in pursuing a career in science today. Then we hear an excerpt of a portrait of Ada Lovelace, as heard earlier on The Science Show. Finally we join a panel at Oxford University late in 2015 which gathered for Ada Lovelace Day, celebrating Ada’s birthday on 10th December.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agrippina the Younger 42 mins – “Agrippina the Younger was one of the most notorious and influential of the Roman empresses in the 1st century AD. She was the sister of the Emperor Caligula, a wife of the Emperor Claudius and mother of the Emperor Nero. Through careful political manoeuvres, she acquired a dominant position for herself in Rome. In 39 AD she was exiled for allegedly participating in a plot against Caligula and later it was widely thought that she killed Claudius with poison. When Nero came to the throne, he was only 16 so Agrippina took on the role of regent until he began to exert his authority. After relations between Agrippina and Nero soured, he had her murdered. With: Catharine Edwards Professor of Classics and Ancient History at Birkbeck, University of London Alice König Lecturer in Latin and Classical Studies at the University of St Andrews Matthew Nicholls Associate Professor of Classics at the University of Reading Producer: Victoria Brignell.” At the link find the title, “Agrippina the Younger, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03pl833.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anatomy Classes 29 mins – “When the first-year medical students at Table 4 met their male cadaver, they weren’t pleased.The group was in the home stretch of anatomy class at NYU School of Medicine, and the final exam was a couple weeks away. They had dozens of vessels, nerves, and organ components to memorize. And this cadaver was an interloper. They had grown attached to the first body they were dissecting — an elderly woman whose chest cavity was nice and neat, but whose intestines were so ravaged by cancer there was no point in working on her anymore. But this new body on Table 4 proved more challenging, they said. “Now we can’t see anything in our new body [in the chest], and we can’t refer back to that first work we did,” said student Samantha Ayoub, expressing the frustration of her six-person group. Medical school instructors often refer to the cadavers as the students’ “first patient.” There are about 20,000 of them donated to U.S. medical schools each year, according to the Harvard Business School….” At the link click the three dot circle beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antifreeze for Animals 4 mins – “The North American Wood Frog has developed an impressive strategy for surviving cold New England winters. It doesn’t seek warmth as other animals do. The wood frog goes with the cold and actually freeze in the winter months. Come spring, it thaws out, ready for mating season….” At the link right click the play button beisde “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apple vs FBI 4 mins – “Apple refused. The Feds sued. And now the FBI has managed to get into the phone, possibly with help from an Israeli digital forensics company. David Sanger, the National Security correspondent for the New York Times, says it’s possible that an Israel-based company called Cellebrite assisted the FBI….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apple vs FBI 47 mins – “Fred Kaplan, author of ‘Dark Territory,’ traces the history of cyber defense and discusses the current heated debate between the FBI and Apple over the encryption of the iPhone.” At the link find the title, “The ‘Secret History’ Of Cyber War And Security,” right-click the three dots in a circle beside “Listen,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Architect Zaha Hadid 49 mins “Zaha Hadid was the first woman and first Muslim to win the Pritzker Prize, architecture’s highest honour. She designed the whale-like London Aquatics Centre for the 2012 Olympics Games and the extraordinary Maaxi Museum in Rome. Her designs were challenging and innovative and she was at the forefront of changing tastes in architecture and design today. After years of failing to get her designs built, her distinctive work became highly sought after, all over the world from Germany to the USA and from China to Iraq. Zaha Hadid talked to Razia Iqbal and an audience in London at the Royal Institute of British Architects about her work and the future of architecture. This programme was orginally broadcast in June 2013.” At the link find the title, “Zaha Hadid – Dream Builder, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03pq3kk.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence 60 mins – “With the recent rise of the machines and robots – could an artificially intelligent robot take your job any time soon? And could they then take over the world, terminator-style? Join Graihagh Jackson as she journeys into the world of cyborgs to see if Skynet, Ex Machina and the realms of science fiction could turn into science fact and if so, when? And what can we do about it?” At the link right-click “Download as mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Baidu Founder 53 mins – “Robin Li, CEO of Baidu, speaks in detail about the launch and growth of the company and the search engine. He discusses how its intimate understanding of Chinese language and culture – and a unique social approach to search – have allowed it to succeed where many North American search giants have faltered.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Birth Control Law 40 mins – “This week, SCOTUS heard arguments in Zubik v Burwell, the latest challenge to Obamacare. In it, a group of religious nonprofits are challenging the govt.’s workaround for employers who don’t want anything to do with getting birth control to their workers.” At the link find the title, “The Contraceptive Mandate, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM2713142462.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brussels Bombing Investigation 47 mins – “An intense manhunt is under way for the people involved in this week’s bombing of the airport and metro in Brussels, Belgium. We’ll catch up with the state of the investigation and the tightening coordination among national intelligence agencies, and we’ll look at the rising scrutiny of the refugees pouring into Western Europe, and the countries taking a second look at Borderless Europe. This hour On Point, Brussels and its aftermath.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Buddhism 27 mins – “An unholy spat is stirring the Sangha, Thailand’s top Buddhist authority – who will become the next Supreme Patriarch, Thailand’s most senior monk? Meanwhile, allegations of ‘cheque-book Buddhism’, cronyism and corruption abound – including allegations about tax-evasion on an imported vintage Mercedes car. In Thailand, where the majority of the population profess Buddhism, seeking ordination isn’t unusual. But salacious stories about monks who commit serious crimes – everything from sex offences to wildlife trafficking – continue to shock. Watching quietly from the side-lines is the Venerable Dhammananda – female, and a Buddhist monk since 2003. Although the Sangha bars women from ordination, there are now around 100 bhikkhunis, as female monastics are known, in Thailand. And their growing acceptance by some Buddhist believers might partly be explained by a widespread disillusionment with the behaviour of some male monks. Linda Pressly explores the rifts and sexual politics challenging Thai Buddhism and its devotees.” At the link find the title, “Thai Buddhism – Monks, Mercs and Women, Mar, 2016,” right-click “”Media files p03pj4lw.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Drugs 24 mins – “Cisplatin is a commonly used cancer drug, but use its use in children sometimes leads to permanent hearing loss. Tim Hanson, Professor of Statistics, Department of Statistics, University of South Carolina, joins us to tell us how statistics is making it possible for health professionals to determine whether the drugs are indeed harmful and whether alternative treatment is preferable for these young patients.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chef Dan Barber 40 mins – “In this latest episode of Gastropod, chef and author Dan Barber takes listeners on a journey around the world in search of great flavor and the ecosystems that support it, from Spain to the deep South. You’ll hear how a carefully tended landscape of cork trees makes for delicious ham, and about a squash so cutting edge it doesn’t yet have a name, in this deep dive into the intertwined history and science of soil, cuisine, and flavor. It’s hard to imagine now, but there was a time before refrigerators, before long-distance trucks and ships. Most people had to survive on food from their immediate surroundings, no matter how poor the soil or challenging the terrain. They couldn’t import apples from New Zealand and potatoes from Peru, or rely on chemical fertilizer to boost their yields. From within these constraints, communities around the world developed a way of eating that Dan Barber calls “ecosystem cuisines.” Barber, the James Beard-award-winning chef of Blue Hill restaurant and author of the new book The Third Plate, spoke to Gastropod about his conviction that this historically-inspired style of cuisine can be reinvented, with the help of plant-breeders, his fellow chefs, and the latest in flavor science, in order to create a truly sustainable way to eat for the twenty-first century.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming Increase 60 mins – Global heat Jan & Feb hits hard, worries scientists. Bob Henson from Weather Underground explores the loss of normal. Australian scientist Ben Hankamer on new study: world will warm faster than you think. Radio Ecoshock 160323 The jolt. That’s what scientists are calling the absolute heat records set around the world in January and February of 2016. Expert meteorologist and climate science writer Bob Henson takes us on a tour of the new normal.But hang around too for our second interview, with Australian scientist Ben Hankamer. He’s co-author of a new peer-reviewed paper that says warming will happen much faster than you think.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming Models 60 mins – “In the Guardian newspaper on the 21st of March, we find this headline: “Carbon emission release rate ‘unprecedented’ in past 66m[illion] years.” It then says “Researchers calculate that humans are pumping out carbon 10 times faster than at any point since the extinction of the dinosaurs.” To understand what this staggering situation means, we go to a new paper published the same day in the journal Nature Geoscience. The title is “Anthropogenic carbon release rate unprecedented during the past 66 million years.” The lead author is Dr. Richard E. Zeebe. He’s published or co-authored about 75 scientific papers since the 1990’s. Richard is a Professor at the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at the University of Hawaii.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cold Cases 20 mins Jack and Mary Branson have collaborated on “Delayed Justice,” which takes readers inside the minds of several of the most dogged cold-case investigators, who worked with active officers to solve cases in the book including the homicides of a 29-year-old Atlanta teacher in 1988 and 42-year-old Kentucky man found in a wooded lot.” At the link find the title, “Delayed Justice: Cold Cases, Sep, 2011,” right-click “Media files delayed-justice.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Problems 47 mins – “Who’s happy with America’s colleges and universities? Between the byzantine admissions process — the jaw-dropping prices for tuition and room and board — the creation of a cossetted class of tenured teachers and a sea of struggling adjuncts, you’ll hear plenty of complaints. At the same time most of the world’s top-rated schools are in the United States. One veteran professor has a prescription. This hour On Point, toward a more perfect university.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Sports 51 mins – “In this episode, the American History Guys unpack the origins of college sports and the ways universities originally justified athletics on campus. The U.S. is the only country in the world that combines big money sports teams and higher education. From the first collegiate PHYS ED program at Amherst College to the little-known story about the integration of the University of Alabama’s football team, Peter, Ed and Brian discover why college sports even exist in the first place.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cons and Scams 48 mins – “[starts at 15 mins]We talk to Maria Konnikova about her new book The Confidence Game: Why We Fall for It . . . Every Time.” At the start is five minutes about a marijuana study from UC Davis. At the link find the title, “126 Maria Konnikova – The Science of Why We Fall for Cons, Mar, 2016” right-click “Media files cc0271a4-bb80-4c1b-8c34-aecd52d3dbe9.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conservatism 60 mins – Thomas Frank, Author, What’s the Matter with Kansas? and Listen, Liberal: Or, What Ever Happened to the Party of the People? Come hear the best-selling author of What’s the Matter with Kansas? echo that question as it relates to the Democratic Party. Frank says liberals like to believe that if only Democrats can continue to dominate national elections, if only those awful Republicans are beaten into submission, then the country will be on the right course. But he says this view fundamentally misunderstands the modern Democratic Party. Frank says that the Democrats have in fact done little to advance traditional liberal goals: expanding opportunity, fighting for social justice, and ensuring that workers get a fair deal. Indeed, he argues that Democrats have occupied the White House for 16 of the last 24 years, and yet the decline of the middle class has only accelerated, Wall Street gets its bailouts, wages keep falling, and the free-trade deals keep coming. In this critical election year, Frank recalls the Democrats back to their historic goals—what he says is the only way to reverse the ever-deepening rift between the rich and the poor in America. A former columnist for The Wall Street Journal and Harper’s, Frank is the founding editor of The Baffler and writes regularly for Salon.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Copyright Conundrum 24 mins – “Publishing today confronts a paradox: The digital revolution has transformed the act of copying from complicated to commonplace; yet authors and publishers must rely upon copyright – essentially, control over copy-making and distribution of their works – as the essential basis for conducting business. An industry built upon creativity, inspiration and innovation now stands accused of holding to outmoded models purely for survival’s sake. Is there any way out of the “copyright conundrum?” At the link right-click “Download” andselect “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in South Carolina 32 mins – “Alexia Jones Helsley explores the history of crime and vice in a renowned South Carolina city in “Wicked Columbia: Vice and Villainy In the Capital.” She tells POLICE Magazine about a deadly duel over a piece of trout, prostitution taxis from Fort Jackson, and the murder of the county coroner by a former officer.” At the link find the title, “Wicked Columbia, Apr, 2013,” right-click “Media files wicked-columbia.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crisis InterventionPatrick Arbore, M.A., Ed.D, Director, CESP Being Mortal, Atul Gawande’s book and “Frontline” documentary, tells the story of a physician learning how to think about death and dying in the context of being a healer and a doctor. Join Dr. Arbore in a community discussion of Dr. Gawande’s Being Mortal. Explore concerns about life, death, loss, grief and the context and meaning of the recently passed California legislation legalizing physician assisted suicide in California.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuba Reengagement 36 mins – “President Obama and President Raul Castro declared a “new day” of openness between the United States and Cuba yesterday in Havana. But old disputes over human rights are clearly visible during Obama’s historic trip to the island. It’s the first time a sitting U.S. president has visited Cuba in 88 years. The visit comes after Obama announced in 2014 that the U.S. would establish diplomatic relations with Cuba. But many think re-engaging with the dictatorship is a mistake. And most lawmakers do not want to lift the economic embargo of Cuba. Guest host Katherine Lanpher and a panel of guests talk about the debate over what a new era of relations with Cuba could mean for commerce, human rights and politics.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Cuban Medicine 5 mins – “Jose DiFabio, who was Cuba’s representative for the Pan American Health Organization, says the isolated Communist country invested in medical research out of neccessity. “Cuba considered medical science as a responsibility it had to move into and that’s why it created a very large medical and scientific workforce,” says DiFabio. A major driver was the US embargo, which limited Cuba’s ability to import medicine, he says. “The priority was to have the medicines required and also the vaccines required and the biotechnology products required for the population.” One effort yielded Cuba’s own hepatitis B vaccine in the 1980s. “Almost all of the country’s population has been vaccinated,” he says. “Probably Cuba will be the first country to eliminate hepatitis B.” Currently Cuba has long been developing a vaccine for lung cancer, CimaVax, which many US researchers are interested in testing….” At the link right-clcik the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security 107 mins – “In this discussion, Sean Kanuck — National Intelligence Officer (NIO) for Cyber Issues within the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and former senior analyst for the Central Intelligence Agency’s Information Operations Center — highlights the technology trends that are transforming cybersecurity and the future of intelligence. Assessing strategic developments in international relations and its implications for deterring malicious activity in cyberspace, his analysis focuses on the (in) applicability of existing arms control mechanisms and deterrence principles to modern information and communication technologies.” At the link right-click “Download the audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dirty Tricks 9 mins – “…here’s one thing you won’t hear Cruz’s foes say: dirty tricks have become a hallmark of the modern Republican Party. Over the past half-century, the GOP has perfected the dark art of the underhanded smear. It used to be much more bipartisan tradition. In the 19th century, Democrats insinuated that Abraham Lincoln was secretly black. They did the same thing to Warren Harding in the 1920s. And Franklin D. Roosevelt instructed his aides to spread rumors about marital infidelity by his 1940 Republican opponent, Wendell Wilkie….” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Disabled Advocate 47 mins “Joyce welcomes Christine Griffin, chair of the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) to the show. AAPD is the largest cross-disability membership organization in the United States. AAPD organizes the disability community to be a powerful voice for change. Ms Griffin will discuss her plans for the organization and her career as an advocate for people with disabilities.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Responders 36 mins – “In this episode of the Disaster Podcast we bring back listener LN (pronounced “ellen”) with part two of her series of questions sent in to the team here at the podcast. LN asked about how she could find a job in the disaster response space and what training she might need to find that job. Hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and Sam Bradley were joined by regular guest Dr. Joe Holley to talk about these questions with LN and to answer any other questions she might have, too. This turned into a great episode and stretched into two parts.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dogs as Tools 36 mins – We talk to Cat Warren about her memoir “What the Dog Knows: The Science and Wonder of Working Dogs.” Warren explains how she and her German shepherd Solo have assisted several North Carolina law enforcement agencies. Solo has become a skilled cadaver dog and Warren explains how canine noses can be trained to locate missing people, drowning victims 200 feet below the water surface and unmarked Civil War graves” At the link find the title, “What the Dog Knows, Sep, 2013,” right-click “Media files what-the-dog-knows.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drinking Water Issues 54 mins – “On today’s episode of Go Green Radio, we will talk to Marc Yaggi, Executive Director of Waterkeeper Alliance (www.waterkeeper.org), about how- in 21st century America- a town of 100,000 people in Flint, Michigan was exposed to extremely high levels of lead in their drinking water. We will talk about the public policy failures, the actions taken by policymakers, how individual residents will be affected, and lessons that every community in America should learn from this disaster. Waterkeeper Alliance is the world’s fastest growing environmental movement, with over 270 Waterkeeper Organizations protecting rivers, lakes and coastal waterways on 6 continents. The organization’s President is Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Best Practices 27 mins – “What will the world economy look like 30 years from now? And, how should we be preparing British schoolchildren today to find employment in it? Robert Peston travels to three cutting edge schools that claim to provide the way forwards for secondary education. Should the focus be on languages and cultural knowledge for an increasingly globalised world? Should we be striving to create more of the engineers and programmers that so many employers are crying out for? Or, with the unstoppable march of the robots gobbling up ever more human jobs, should we be preparing kids with the social skills to be future entrepreneurs, employing their own personal fleets of automatons?” At the link find the title, “What Should We Teach Our Kids? Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03pcqmb.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elements of Power 23 mins – “This month we discuss The Elements of Power by David Abraham. New technologies like smart phones and wind turbines are increasing the diversity of elements that humanitiy is ustilising. Amongst them are the rare metals, which may not acutually be rare, but they often occur in such small amounts that the mining of them is often unprofitable. Some of them occur in only a very small number of mines. All this results in the use of them posing novel economic and environmental problems. These problems are the subject of Abraham’s book.” At the link right-click “Download: Chemistry World Book Club the Elements of Power.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Encryption Advocate 65 minsDavid Kaye, U.N. Special Rapporteur on the Promotion and Protection of the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression; Author, HRC 2015—Report on Encryption and Anonymity in Digital Communications In conversation with Jacob Foster, Attorney, Kasowitz, Benson, Torres & Friedman LLP; Served in the Office of the Chief Prosecutor, International Criminal Court. A vibrant debate has arisen over whether encryption and anonymity online are essential to free expression or a threat to national security. While law enforcement contends that technological backdoors to encryption are necessary to prevent terrorists from “going dark,” the Report by Special Rapporteur Kaye concludes that the right to free expression depends on freedom from electronic surveillance. Join us for a discussion of the future of online privacy in light of the Snowden disclosures, the rise of ISIS, and the encryption debate.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facial Recognition 9 mins – “There is little doubt that facial recognition software is going to play a large role in the technological landscape of the future. It’s already in use by law enforcement, by social media platforms, and in personal gadgets like digital cameras. Increasingly, facial recognition and other biometrics are also being considered as replacements for the increasingly outmoded written password. But this software, thus far, has had some very disconcerting side effects, and not everybody is getting recognized equally.” At the link find the title, “The Bias of Facial Recognition,” right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fix the Court.com 60 mins – “Gabe Roth, executive director of Fix the Court, discusses the process of nominating U.S. Supreme Court justices and the current court vacancy left by Justice Antonin Scalia.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Gabe Roth, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.433451.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

FOIA 50 mins – “This week President Obama criticized journalistic irresponsibility in a speech, but critics note that he has consistently worked to block press access. We take a look at the plight of public information under an opaque administration. Plus, the ethics of reading the news; dissecting the notion of “momentum” in election seasons; seeking posthumous fame for a cult filmmaker; and a Ghanaian undercover journalist fights for justice using every tool, and disguise, at his disposal.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Technology 68 mins – “How bad is pink slime? Are free-range chickens happier? Can robots cook? Jayson Lusk of Oklahoma State University and the author of Unnaturally Delicious talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about these questions and more from his new book. Lusk explores the wide-ranging application of technology to farming, cooking, protein production, and more.” At the link right-click Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking Regulation Problems 5 mins – “Drinking Water Safety and Oil and Gas Production, March 28, 2016: Audio interview by GAO staff with Alfredo Gomez, Director, Natural Resources and Environment” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Speech 44 mins – “It’s not easy to get under Dan’s normally flexible, see-things-from-multiple-angles skin, but Donald Trump’s stated willingness to cross traditional American moral fault lines has done just that.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gangster Squad 48 mins – “Los Angeles of the 1940s and ’50s is the setting for “Gangster Squad,” which tells the story of the Los Angeles Police Department’s covert unit of eight officers that targeted gangsters such as Mickey Cohen, Bugsy Siegel, Jack Dragna and others. The unit created a hostile climate for gangsters to prevent East Coast organized crime from taking root in the city. Warner Bros. plans to release a movie based on the book in January.” At the link find the title, “Gangster Squad, Jul, 2012,” right-click “Media files gangster-squad.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Pay Gap 47 mins – “You can’t argue that women don’t deserve equal pay for equal work. And yet, we’ve got a persistent gender gap in pay. Seventy-nine cents on the dollar for women says the Census Bureau. Better for some. Worse for others. You can find all kinds of reasons, but a new wave of innovators is saying ‘let’s just close the gap.” They’re using new data, and new approaches to power, and more to get that done. This hour On Point, a new push on the gender wage gap in America.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Girls and Sex 38 mins – “Author Peggy Orenstein says that when it comes to sexuality, girls hear that “they’re supposed to be sexy, they’re supposed to perform sexually for boys, but … their sexual pleasure is unspoken.” Orenstein discusses the effect hook-up culture, porn, and pop stars have had on girls’ lives. Then, commentator Sarah Hepola says after years of complaining about hate on the Internet, she became part of the problem.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graffiti and Tagging 20 mins – “San Bernardino (Calif.) Police Sgt. Dwight Waldo, one of law enforcement’s foremost graffiti enforcement investigators, discusses the five types of graffiti, explains how to gather intel to identify messages, and tells patrol officers what they need to include in a vandalism report. Sgt. Waldo’s book, “Taggers and the Graffiti Culture,” is proprietary training material.” At the link find the title, “Taggers and Graffiti Culture, “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Control 20 mins – “Adam Winkler, a constitutional law professor at UCLA, documents America’s shift away from a radical gun-control agenda that dominated the political landscape in the 1960s and ’70s in “Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms In America.” In the book, Winkler traces Second Amendment battles back to the Colonial Era and explains how U.S. Supreme Court’s overturning of the handgun ban in D.C. with the Heller decision reframed the debate.” At the link find the title, “Gunfight: The Right to Bear Arms, Oct, 2011,” right-click “Media files gunfight.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guns Across the Boarder 47 mins – “Mike Detty, a one-time POLICE contributor, talks about “Guns Across the Border,” a first-hand account of his involvement in an ATF “gun walking” operation that preceded Fast & Furious. As a firearms dealer, Detty sold guns to Mexican cartel operatives at the direction of ATF special agents in Arizona. Detty says he was motivated by patriotic duty, and betrayed by the agency he worked for.” At the link find the title, “Guns Across the Border, May, 2013,” right-click “Media files guns-across-the-border.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hand Tools 48 mins – “Danial is the founder of permaculturetools.com.au – the US version of the site is at USA.Permaculturetools.com.au a long held dream centered on offering quality hand tools to the permaculture community worldwide with on the ground education in hand tools use, earth works hydrology and rural skills…. He joins us today to discuss hand tools for agricultural and homestead work.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” fro the pop-up menu.

Health Care Problems 47 mins – “Nortin Hadler, MD, has been doctoring for a long time. He’s old school. Loves a rich doctor-patient relationship, where the whole person – patient – is seen and comprehended. Treated in full. But these days, he says, doctors who care are burning out, retiring early, pulling their hair out. “Today,” he writes, “health is a commodity, disease is a product line and physicians are a sales force in the employ of a predatory enterprise.” Ok! This hour On Point, Dr. Nortin Hadler on how to heal American health care.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

High Risk Hostage Encounters 38 mins – “Dr. Bill Lewinski of the Force Science Institute offers his thoughts on high-risk hostage encounters following the accidental shooting of a college student by a Nassau County (N.Y.) Police Department officer. Bill explains high-stress decision making, how tell when you can no longer engage a suspect with rapport, and the importance of time as a factor in an officer’s ability to react to these complex situations. Read our profile of Lewinski here.” At the link findthe title, “High-Risk Hostage Encounters, May, 2013,” right-click “Media files high-risk-hostage-encounters.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hudson River Tunnel Project 21 mins – “The Gateway Program is a collaboration between Amtrak, the states of New York and New Jersey, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and the U.S. Department of Transportation to address the rail bottleneck between New Jersey and New York, the busiest rail passenger corridor in the U.S. At the core of this program is construction of new twin rail tunnels under the Hudson River. These will supplement the 108 year old existing rail tunnels, which were damaged during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, and which have insufficient capacity to meet the growing demand. In this discussion we learn about the Gateway Program and plans for these new rail tunnels from Andrew Galloway, Chief of Corridor Development at Amtrak.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Women Guard Forest 6 mins – “Even the monsoon rains don’t keep the women of Ghunduribadi, a tiny tribal village in India’s eastern state of Odisha, from patrolling the nearby forest at dawn. Clad in colorful saris and armed with sticks and machetes, they file in the rain through rice fields and onto a muddy path that leads into 500 acres of wooded hills in the Nayagarh district. They’re looking for intruders that come to cut down their trees without permission. Not long ago these women would have been considered trespassers here. Nearby, there are heavy stone markers laid down by the British in the 1800s when the government declared this forest its own. But now, under India’s landmark 2006 Forest Rights Act, tribal villages like Ghunduribadi can claim title to their ancestral lands, some 150,000 square miles of forest all across India. That’s an area almost the size of California, making it one of the largest land reforms in India’s history….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intensive Care Units 19 mins – “Does a more humane hospital make a safer hospital? That’s a question Johns Hopkins is grappling with — and Dr. Peter Pronovost believes the answer is yes. Dr. Pronovost is a critical care physician at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He’s known best for innovating an approach to patient safety a decade ago with something really simple: checklists. Preventable death rates at hospitals are high. Infections from central lines, the catheters inserted into major veins to let doctors administer drugs and draw blood more easily, are estimated to account for more than 60,000 deaths per year — about as many as breast and prostate cancer deaths combined. Dr. Pronovost created a checklist of five simple precautions to follow — such as washing hands, draping the patient in a sterile sheet — and brought the infections rate down to almost zero. Now, Dr. Pronovost wants to tackle all preventable risks in the hospital, such as ventilator-related infections, blood clots, and delirium. Johns Hopkins is calling this experiment Project Emerge….” At the link click the three dots beside “Listen,” right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

International Turmoil 57 mins – “European Union leaders declared this week’s attack in Brussels an act of war; one former ISIS hostage says those declarations play into the terrorist group’s game plan. We look at what’s behind an unprecedented crackdown on press freedom in Turkey, and examine the significance of President Obama’s “other” Latin America trip– to Argentina. Plus, a special On the Media guide to how not to cover Cuba.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran Politics 17 minsThey harassed her, intimidated her and jailed her but nothing Iranian intelligence could do would dent Shirin Ebadi’s determination to speak up for human rights for Iranian citizens. Shirin Ebadi tells The Current why she’ll never give up the fight.” At the link fin d the title, “Shirin Ebadi: My Fight for Human Rights in Iran – March 29, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160329_37485.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iraq War 17 mins – Bill Graham was the Liberal minister of defence, and foreign minister, as Canada’s bloodiest conflict in decades – the mission in Afghanistan – deepened. He reflects on the road to Afghanistan and his decision not to join the American attack on Iraq.Bill Graham navigates war, peace and trade in his political memoir.” At the link find the title, “Bill Graham navigates war, peace and trade in his political memoir – March 31, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160331_10404.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Karl Rove 40 mins – “Karl Rove discusses the amazing life and election of William McKinley. From his time as a soldier in the Civil War to his campaign in 1896, Karl Rove makes the case that McKinley was not only an effective campaigner for president but also someone who brought the nation together during a divisive time.” At the link find the title, “Karl Rove on the election of 1896, Feb, 2016” right-click “Media files 20160222-rove.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

LabDoor 32 mins – “If you’re a Smart Drug Smarts listener, odds are good that you’ve spent a significant amount of time researching what should be in your nutritional supplement tool-belt. What’s worth it? What’s not? What would you rather get from your diet? All those first-string questions. Quality Assurance is a topic often saved for later. It’s pretty frustrating, then, that not all supplements actually contain what they claim to on their labeling. Normally this means less of the biologically active ingredients than the manufacturer claims. Sometimes it might even mean undesirable additives…Neil Thanedar, our guest in Episode #121, is the founder and CEO of a company called LabDoor, an innovative web business that guides consumer decisions based on its in-house chemical analysis of off-the-shelf supplements.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latin Learning 16 mins – “A classic scholar has given new life to a dead language by translating ancient world manuals on how to learn Latin. She’s the first to investigate these centuries-old language manuals and what she reveals about life in the ancient world may surprise you.” At the link find the title, “Translations of ancient Latin give unique insights into Roman culture – April 1, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160401_59326.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liberal Issues in U.S. 46 mins – “The Democratic Party of the 20th century helped rally the nation during the Great Depression, championed organized labor, and government action to relieve the sufferings of poverty and the injustice of discrimination. Author Thomas Frank has published a scathing critique of this latest Democratic Party, version 2.0 you might say. He concludes that old Party is dead. This hour On Point, do today’s liberals really care about working people?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lifeline Program 28 mins – “Amina Fazlullah and Daniel Lyons discuss the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) Lifeline program, which subsidizes phone service for poorer Americans. FCC Chair Tom Wheeler has proposed expanding the program to include broadband.” At the link find the title, “Communicators on FCC Lifeline Program, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.435275.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lipstick at Crime Scenes 4 mins – “New technique could help analyze lipstick smears found at crime scenes.” At the link find the title, “Episode 619,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_March31_2016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Local Politics 58 mins – “As the presidential candidates continue their contentious path to the White House, it’s easy to overlook what’s happening at the local level. For this episode of BackStory, the Guys take a break from the race for the White House and examine local power brokers; from big city political bosses and small town sheriffs to some of the social reformers who’ve shaped their communities from the ground up.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Man Hunt 28 mins – “Dan Schultz recounts the 1998 manhunt for the three men responsible for killing Cortez (Colo.) Police Officer Dale Claxton in “Dead Run.” More than 500 officers from at least 75 local, state, and federal agencies searched for the suspects, who appeared to have vanished into the desert near the Four Corners region. The suspects were eventually found, most recently in 2007.” At the link find the title, “Dead Run Mar, 2013,” right-click “Media files dead-run.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Quality Control 4 mins – “Researchers seek to more accurately measure active ingredients in marijuana munchies.” At the link find the title, “Episode 617, March 2016,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_March28_2016.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu

Mass Spectrometers 142 mins – “Mass spectrometers are devices for measuring the mass-to-charge ratio of molecules and ions. They use many different measurement principles and are used in various areas of science. Our guest Alexander Makarov works as a Director Global Research for Thermo Fisher‘s Life Sciences Division and has invented the Orbitrap principle used widely in modern mass spectrometers. We talk about mass spectrometry in general, the different measurement principles, engineering challenges, the invention of the Orbitrap, use cases for mass spectrometers and the different machines sold by Thermo Fisher.” At the link right-click “Download” half way down the page and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Treatment Issues 39 mins – “If some medical care is good, more must be better. Right? Unfortunately, this is often not the case. Dr. Christopher Moriates says that as much as one third of healthcare may not make patients healthier. Recorded on 02/09/2016. (#30668)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexican Drug Cartels 35 mins –This month, we’re providing an interview with Sylvia Longmire about her book, “Cartel: The Coming Invasion of Mexico’s Drug Wars,” which you can experience in print and online. In her book, the former senior intelligence analyst gives concrete examples of how violence caused by Mexico’s drug war has landed on American soil. Longmire explains the fundamental problem and gives examples of the cross-border violence….” At the link find the title, “Cartel: Invasion of Mexico’s Drug Wars, Nov, 2011” right-click “Media files cartel.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mining Science 48 mins – “Cultural Anthropologist Stuart Kirsch discusses the questionable science that the mining industry uses to justify their destructive activities.” At the link find the title, “Mining Science, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160324_65609.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

MOMS Demand Action 68 minsShannon Watts is a mother of five who, prior to founding Moms Demand Action, was a stay-at-home mom and former communications executive. The day after the Sandy Hook tragedy, Shannon started a Facebook group with the message that all Americans can and should do more to reduce gun violence. That online conversation turned into a grassroots movement of American mothers fighting for public safety measures that both respect the Second Amendment and protect people from gun violence. Together with Everytown for Gun Safety, Moms Demand Action is the leading gun violence prevention organization in the country, with more than 3.5 million members and chapters in all 50 states.Since its founding, Moms Demand has taken the fight for new and stronger gun laws to the states, passing background check laws in six states and battling gun bills that it thinks would undermine public safety. It persuaded corporations such as Starbucks, Target and Chipotle to adopt “gun sense” policies that put the safety of their employees and customers first. It’s shaping the conversation about responsible gun ownership in America through its Be SMART campaign, which encourages responsible gun storage. And now, Moms Demand is building on these victories by making gun violence prevention a political priority in the upcoming 2016 elections. Join INFORUM for a relevant and engaging discussion with Shannon about this important topic.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New York City Police History 30 mins – “Three authors, including a retired detective, tell the history of the New York Police Department using more than 196 images including an illustration of mid-19th Century uniforms and photos of vintage vehicles, riot response, dramatic resues, and the first African-American and female officers. “New York City Police” also includes a forward by current Police Commissioner Ray Kelly.” At the link find the title, “History of the NYPD, Nov, 2012,” right-click “Media files police-history-nypd.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Non Believers 47 mins – “When opinion researchers ask about religious affiliation, they lay out the obvious choices — Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu. If you check “No Affiliation,” or “None,” what do we call you? The n-o-n-e, or “Nones,” are the fastest-growing faith group in the country, and a major Democratic Party constituency. After decades of religiously flavored politics, and culture, how will America change? This hour On Point, the rise of the nones.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Northwest Passage 18 mins – “For centuries, explorers sought out the northwest passage at great personal peril. This summer, you can sail through the Arctic seaway aboard an ultra-luxury cruise ship. Critics warn cruise ships in the Northwest Passage is a disaster waiting to happen.” At the link find the title, “Cruise ship set to sail Northwest Passage prompts safety, environmental concern – April 1, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160401_91179.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oklahoma City Bombing 37 mins – “A deeper look at the Oklahoma City Bombing on April 19, 1995 is provided by Andrew Gumbel and Roger G. Charles in “Oklahoma City: What the Investigation Missed and Why It Still Matters.” The authors construct a detailed account of the attack on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building by Timothy McVeigh and others, as well as giving new details about one of the most wide-ranging federal law enforcement investigations in history.” At the link find the title, “Oklahoma City Bombing, May, 2012, right-click “Media files oklahoma-city-bombing.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Epidemic 47 mins – “The news exploded out of what once would have seemed the most unlikely location: an opioid and HIV epidemic blowing up in a sleepy little Indiana town. The big guns of media swarmed into Austin, Indiana. Gave us a glimpse of hell, then moved on. NPR’s Kelly McEvers went back, for a new reporting series called “Embedded.” Settled in to the drugged disarray. Right there with the needles and despair. This hour On Point, Kelly McEvers, “embedded” in Austin, Indiana.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paraguay 42 mins – “In 2008 Fernando Lugo came to power in Paraguay promising a ‘new dawn’ based on social justice, democracy and greater empowerment of the country’s poor but just four years later, with his reform programme in tatters. In his inaugural lecture, Professor Peter Lambert examines the failure of Lugo’s reform programme through analysis of both immediate causes and wider factors related to domestic power relations and political culture. This in turn raises questions about the very nature of Paraguay’s ongoing transition to democracy.” At the link find the title, “Professor Peter Lambert inaugural lecture: The Priest, the Coup and the Party, Feb, 2015,” right-click Media files 256725159 uniofbath professor Peter Lambert inaugural lecture the priest the coup and the party.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patient Secrets 29 mins – “…When we hide things from our doctors, are they onto us? “I wouldn’t call it lying,” said Dr. Henry Lodge, an internist at Columbia University Medical Center. “It’s very hard to share things that we feel uncomfortable about.” In this episode, we go to that uncomfortable place, and hear stories from patients — as well as doctors — as they discuss the mistakes, mishaps, and near fatal errors that happen between doctor and patients.” At the link click the three dot circle beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Patrol Leadership 47 mins – “POLICE Magazine’s Associate Editor Dean Scoville, a retired Los Angeles County Sheriff’s sergeant, interviews his former commander, Capt. Linda Healy, about female leadership, diversity hiring and promotion, and rising up the ranks as a female deputy.” At the link find the title, “Female Leadership and Rising Up the Ranks, Sep, 2012,” right-click “Media files patrol-podcast-linda-healy.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Conventions 53 mins – Tuesday, with Utahns headed to the caucuses to choose presidential nominees, we’re looking ahead to the national political conventions in July. That’s where the Democrats and Republicans will confirm their respective candidates. The national conventions are now seen mostly as coronation ceremonies, but in the past they featured quite a bit of drama and high-stakes competition. We’ll sift through the colorful history of the national political conventions and ask what we’re in store for later this year.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Issues 2016 46 mins- “Day after day you hear about a country that’s angry, short on hope. unsure about the future and that those sentiments are driving this presidential primary season. Two Washington Post reporters hit the road to test those propositions — criss-crossing the country and listening to what all kinds of people had to say about how the country, and the race, looks to them. This hour On Point, reporter’s notebook: “Looking for America.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Premature Birth 63 mins – “An update on Juniper French, a tiny baby, born at 23 Weeks and 6 days — roughly halfway to full term. And a whole universe of medical and moral questions. Technology has had a profound effect on how we get pregnant, give birth, and think about life and death. The decision to become parents was not an easy one for Kelley and Tom. Even after they sorted out their relationship issues and hopes for the future, getting pregnant wasn’t easy. But, thanks to a lot of technology, they found a way to a baby. Then, about halfway through the pregnancy, the trouble began. Neonatal nurse practitioner Diane Loisel describes helping Kelley and Tom make the most important decision of their lives. And Nita Farahany helps Jad and Robert understand the significance of viability, and how technology has influenced its meaning…making a difficult idea even harder to pin down….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Power 62 mins – “Law Professor John Yoo discusses the growth of the federal government and presidential power during the Obama administration. Professor Yoo is interviewed by attorney Victoria Toensing.” At the link find the title, “After Words with John Yoo, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.432148.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link find the title, “After Words with John Yoo, Mar 2016,” right-click “Media files program.432148.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Problems Are Opportunities 52 mins – “Stanford Technology Ventures Program’s Executive Director Tina Seelig shares rich insights in creative thinking and the entrepreneurial mindset. Her talk, based on her 2009 book, What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20, cites numerous classroom successes of applied problem-solving and the lessons of failure.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right side of the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Programming with Minecraft 65 mins –Learn to Program with Minecraft, users can ] learn how to build a palace in the blink of an eye. All this and more can be done with Python, a free language used by millions of programmers. Simple Python lessons can teach you to modify Minecraft to product instant and awesome results. Craig Richardson is a trainee Computing and ICT teacher originally from the North East of England and working in East London. Guest: Craig RichardsonAt the link click download,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Puerto Rican Bonds 15 mins – “Puerto Rico is part of the United States, but not one of the United States. And this limbo status has brought a world of economic trouble.” At the link find the title, “#693: Unpayable, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160401_pmoney_podcast040116.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reconciliation in Canada 14 mins -”For centuries, the relationship between the Christian church and indigenous Canadians has been fraught. Even after the residential schools era, a majority of aboriginal people identify as Christian, fusing religion with their own beliefs and traditions.” At the link find the title, “Majority of indigenous Canadians remain Christians despite residential schools – April 1, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160401_74680.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Processing 70 mins – “MPI Europe convened a discussion to examine the outcomes of the conference, and provide an analysis of how states and civil society can work together to realize the intensifying calls for new pathways to support the safe and legal migration—and successful integration—of refugees in practice. Speakers consider what initiatives already exist to facilitate the legal mobility of refugee groups, and critically assess the potential and pitfalls that come with each. The discussion also examines new and creative ideas that have emerged in the wake of the Syria crisis.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “download” again and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Right to Bear Arms 20 mins –Adam Winkler, a constitutional law professor at UCLA, documents America’s shift away from a radical gun-control agenda that dominated the political landscape in the 1960s and ’70s in “Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms In America.” In the book, Winkler traces Second Amendment battles back to the Colonial Era and explains how U.S. Supreme Court’s overturning of the handgun ban in D.C. with the Heller decision reframed the debate.” At the link find the title, “Gunfight: The Right to Bear Arms, Oct, 2011,” right-click “Media files gunfight.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salaries 20 mins – “What would it be like if everyone at your office knew what everyone else earned? On today’s show, we hear about a company where salaries aren’t secret.” At the link find the title, “#550: When Salaries Aren’t Secret, Oct, 2015,” right-click “Media files 20151021_specials_pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Arabia and Iran 60 mins –Banfsheh Keynoush, Ph.D., Foreign Affairs Scholar; Author; Educator Jonathan Curiel, Award-winning Journalist; Author; Former Reuters Foundation Scholar, Oxford University—Moderator Keynoush, a foreign affairs scholar and educator, was a former interpreter for four Iranian presidents. She is an advisor to policy centers on the Middle East and to American companies doing business in the region. Keynoush earned her Ph.D. at Tufts University and was a visiting scholar at the King Faisal University Center for Islamic Studies and Research. She will discuss the topic of her latest book, Saudi Arabia and Iran: Friends or Foes.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scaling Startups 58 mins – “Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg shares her trilogy of ideas for a successful start-up and a fulfilling career. Her thoughts include building an enterprise with scalable vision, building personalized, scalable products, and the ability to scale your own connections and capabilities.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the drop down menu.

Self Driving Car 26 mins – “The glamour of the limousine is undeniable – who wouldn’t want to be shuttled about town without a care in the world? Traffic, parking, sobriety? Somebody else’s problem! With the introduction of the self-driving car, limo luxury could become pretty commonplace. As with many new technologies, though, self-driving cars bring up myriad sustainability, legal. and ethical questions. These questions notwithstanding, it appears that the self-driving car is coming, and coming soon: the Obama administration recently announced that the US government will be pledging to invest nearly $4 billion in autonomous driving technology over the next decade. Meanwhile, deep-pocketed companies like Google, Toyota, Über and General Motors have made their own investments into self-driving vehicles. This week on Sea Change Radio, we learn more about this emerging technology from Reuters Transportation Technology Correspondent, Alexandria Sage.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Siege of Leningrad Siege P4 24 mins – “Leningraders volunteer in such numbers that the Stavka orders several divisions to be organized, to resist the German invaders. Yet the men are thrown in untrained, mostly weaponless, armed only with a desire for revenge.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode160 32716_6.33_PM.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

Single Line Power 64 mins – “Chris and Dave blank on generators, hear about surface wave transmission, give advice on business, hear from past guests and prescribe new product development tips.” (A proposal is made to power drones with a single wire!) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep P2 37 mins – “People who sleep better earn more money. Now all we have to do is teach everyone to sleep better.” At the link click the dots-in-circle bside “Listen,” right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Small Towns 49 mins – “In the 1930s, the American South was two-thirds rural, and half of all southerners were farm workers. Now it’s more than two-thirds urban and only 2 percent work on farms. Those are some of the facts shared by the novelist Lee Smith in her new memoir about growing up in a small town in the Appalachian mountains. But it’s through stories, not facts, that Smith reveals an intimate knowledge of her corner of the South – Grundy, Virginia. Smith says much has changed about the South since her childhood, but one thing never will – and that’s a southerner’s love of telling stories. A memoir of southern life and literature.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

South Korea P2 27 mins – “Rana Mitter meets South Korean pop producers, noise musicians and TV directors, to find out what has been driving the Korean Wave. He discovers how, as freedom and wealth bed down, South Koreans are breaking from the conformity that helped them pull off an economic miracle towards a more raucous, more individualist culture.” At the link find the title, “South Korea: The Silent Cultural Superpower – Part Two, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03pf435.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. core, the sun is as hot as you’d imagine: over 15 million degrees. But why does light take so long to reach the sun’s surface? How does the sun produce light and heat? And how does the sun’s weather affect our lives on Earth? Professor Lucie Green is a solar physicist at UCL’s Mullard Space Science Laboratory. Her new book, 15 Million Degrees: A Journey to the Centre of the Sun, tells you everything you might want to know about our star, from what it sounds like to the journey taken by a photon of light.” At the link right-click Download MP3” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Spanish Civil War 48 mins – “According to Adam Hochschild, about 2,800 Americans fought in the Spanish Civil War, and some were bombed by Nazis years before the U.S. entered World War II. His new book is ‘Spain in Our Hearts.’ John Powers reviews the French film ‘My Golden Days.’ “ At the link find the title, “The Spanish Civil War And The Fight Against Fascism, Mar, 2016,” click three dots incircle right of “Listen,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tax Plans 47 mins – “The 2016 campaign has plenty of trash talk flying around. But one of these people is likely to be president, so you’d better know their plans. Today, we’re looking at their tax plans. There are huge differences. Huge. Hillary Clinton is pretty steady. No earthquake. Trump and Cruz would cut taxes bigtime for the rich. Increase the deficit by trillions. Bernie Sanders would go for the biggest peacetime tax hike in US history – but says you’ll love it. This hour On Point, the tax plans, 2016.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Trends 119 mins – “Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Robert Scoble talk about Oculus VR shipping, its incoming reviews, the man behind Sundar Pichai, email encryption, Google’s Moonshots, and more…” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorist Cartels 38 mins –“International drug cartels have been forming alliances with terror groups and other organized criminal organizations in what our own gang expert Richard Valdemar calls “the unholy alliance.” A new book, “The Terrorist-Criminal Nexus,” explores these connections. Author Jennifer Hesterman joined us to discuss her book.” At the link find the title, “The Terrorist-Cartel Nexus, Aug, 2013,” right-click “Media files the-terrorist-cartel-nexus.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thing Explainer 24 mins – “This month we discuss Thing explainer by Randall Munroe. In this book the xkcd creator attempts to explain things as diverse as the International Space Station and the human body, using only the most common ten hundred words in the English language (‘thousand’ is not one of those words). See if you can guess the objects from the extracts we read out and hear about our experiences of imposing the rules on our own writing. Finally, take up our challenge and have a go yourself using the xkcd simple writer.” At the link right-click “Download: Chemistry World Book Club Thing Explainer.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Pacific Partnership 63 minsRobert Holleyman, Deputy U.S. Trade Representative George Scalise, Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors; Former President, Semiconductor Industry Association; Former Chief Administrative Officer, Apple—Moderator The current set of rules within the global trading system that impact the technology industry were put in place a generation ago—before the Internet was of critical commercial significance, when cross-border digital trade was a fraction of what it is now, mobility was limited and “cloud” architecture unknown. How will new rules within the global trading system open opportunities and propel the growth of the technology industry? How will these 21st-century rules combat “data nationalism” and the balkanization of the internet? How does the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) embrace cutting-edge rules to combat these trends and preserve a single, global, digital marketplace? Ambassador Holleyman will speak to the urgency around efforts to preserve a single, global digital marketplace. He will describe these new rules—“The Digital Two Dozen”— and how he believes TPP will foster digital entrepreneurship and drive the growth of the technology sector.At the link right-click “Play Now and Select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Impact 47 mins – “Has the media made this year’s presidential campaign cycle a zoo? A circus? President Obama seemed to say as much this week, calling out an obsession with “sideshows and carnival barkers.” Saying candidates aren’t being held accountable for unworkable plans. But did the media really make Donald Trump? Bury Bernie Sanders? Hold back Hillary? Crown Cruz? Unleash the craziness of name-calling and fisticuffs? This hour On Point, the media and the like-no-other-we-can-remember 2016 campaign.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tug Design and Operation 147 mins – “In this 200th episode of omega tau we cover a topic that has been on our list for a long time: harbour tugs. We start out with a conversation with Lex van der Schaaf, the COO of Port Towage Amsterdam, who gives us a general introduction to port towage. Markus then joins Arno, Jan and Andrey on their tug Thetis for a day of towing in the port of Amsterdam. In the last conversation, Markus speaks with Baldo Dielen about the design of modern tugs, using the EDDY tug as a representative example.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Violence Control 21 mins – “Sgt. Rory Miller, a retired Multnomah County (Ore.) Sheriff’s corrections deputy, wrote “Facing Violence: Preparing for the Unexpected” as a follow-up to his earlier “Meditations on Violence.” In his interview with POLICE, he explains “the monkey dance,” provides a counter-ambush strategy, and discusses how officers can break “the freeze” that may occur when engaging a violent suspect.” At the link find the title, “Facing Violence, Jun, 2012,” Right-click “Media files facing-violence.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Book 36 mins – “We talk to science writer and New York Times columnist Carl Zimmer about viruses. Viral fragments make up 8% of our entire genome—how much do we actually know about them?” At the link find the title, “127 Carl Zimmer – The Mysterious World of Viruses, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files 306fb044-2a81-46b0-905e-cb90584e6c89.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Website Design 62 mins – “Aarron Walter and Jeffrey Zeldman discuss launching a design education initiative at InVision, building a UX practice at MailChimp, putting design at the heart of strategy, managing teams, the secret life of Walt Disney, and more. Aarron is the VP of Design Education at InVision. He founded the UX practice at MailChimp and is the author of Designing for Emotion and other books about design.” At the link right-click “MP3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Whale Research 17 mins –“In an unprecedented study, Canadian marine biologist Shane Gero has been following and decoding a group of sperm whale families for more than a decade. Shane Gero explains what sperm whales are talking about and what he’s learned about their society.” At the link find the title, “Whale Talk: Canadian researcher reveals how sperm whales communicate – March 29, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160329_40653.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Science 58 mins – “Professor Emma Johnston, Professor Nalini Joshi and Professor Tanya Monro appear in a special Women Of Science event at the National Press Club.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Women of Science, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_WomenScience_3003_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One Novel 50 mins – “We’re in the village of Rye – in Sussex, England – and the year is 1914. It’s one of the most beautiful summers in memory. But storm clouds are gathering. This is where Helen Simonson’s new novel “The Summer Before the War” begins. Simonson is the author of the bestselling book “Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand”, and her new work is again a comedy of social manners, a love story, and a look at what it means to be an outsider. But this time, the setting is Edwardian England on the precipice of upheaval…and the stakes are high for her characters forced into a new reality. British-American Author Helen Simonson on her new novel and how World War I forever changed the role of women in society.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 229 – Apr 1, 2016: Airbnb Creator, Albumin, AM and FM Modulation, Antifreeze for Animals, Arctic Camels, Australian Detention Centers, Authoritarianism, Back Pain Treatment, Banana Diseases, Bhutan Is Carbon Negative, Brave vs Perfect Women, Bt Toxin, Bulesque and Vaudeville Stories, Caffeine,Cancer, Carl Zimmer, Chemsex, Chicago Sewer System, Commodities Trading, Communicating Well, Corruption in Malawi, Desomorphine, Down Syndrome Immigrants, Drinking Water, Drought in California, Drug Interaction Research, E-Book Status, Energy Use in New Hampshire, Food Shoots, Gender Neutral Bathroom, Gender Violence, Human Interface Research, Infectious Disease Comments, Internet Future, Islamic Future, Linux on Thinkpad T420, Medical Late Bloomer, Microbiology Conference, Mindfulness and Habits, Mosul Dam Hazard, Music Selection by Algorithm, Muslims of Value, Obesity Epidemic, Open Web Issue, P Values in Research, Pain Control, Physical Activity Needs, Physician Assisted Death, Planet Building, Political Women, Rainforest Action Network, Refugee Children Integration, Refugees in Sweden, Roadkill Research, Roger Corman, Romanian Sheep, Sleep Impact, Social Media and Poltiics, South Korea, Sphero Product, Squalene, Stalin, Stethescope Replacement, Supreme Court Operation, Suzuki on Science, TATP Explosive, Thought Experiments, Turkey Human Rights, UN Peace Keeper Sex Crime, Waste to Fuel, Work Focus, World War One, WWII in Crete, WWII in Greece

The best 75 podcasts from a larger group of 250 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 280 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Airbnb Creator 16 mins – “Joe Gebbia, the co-founder of Airbnb, bet his whole company on the belief that people can trust each other enough to stay in one another’s homes. How did he overcome the stranger-danger bias? Through good design. Now, 123 million hosted nights (and counting) later, Gebbia sets out his dream for a culture of sharing in which design helps foster community and connection instead of isolation and separation.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Albumin 5 mins – “Albumin – the protein with an i – should not be confused with albumen with an e. Historically albumen with an e referred to any water soluble protein and is still used to refer to things like egg white. Albumin with an i refers to a specific protein found in blood plasma. Let’s clear up some of this confusion. In the 17th century it was recognised that blood consisted of two things: something that clotted to stop wounds from bleeding, and serum: the watery substance left behind after a blood clot forms. Within this ‘serum’, scientists of the day found protein – or albumen (that’s with the e again, sorry). By the 19th century scientists had recognised that these water soluble proteins – these albumen – must be vital for life as they were found everywhere….” At the link right-click “Download: CIIE_Albumin.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AM and FM Modulation 60 mins – “Pragmatic returns to talk about a recent melding of traditional radio technology and software that are now dominating the telecommunications world.” At the link right-click “Download it” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Antifreeze for Animals 6 mins – “Icy waters that surround Antarctica are inhabited by fish that don’t freeze. That’s despite the fact that the water is usually around minus 1.8°C, cold enough to turn most fish into a solid block of ice. So, what stops the Antarctic fish from freezing? That was the question scientists began investigating in the 1950s. The hunt was on for some sort of antifreeze that would explain the fishes’ ability to thrive in subzero conditions. And it wasn’t until the 1960s that a molecule was found that fit the bill. It came from the blood of an Antarctic icefish, a common denizen of the Southern Ocean, and became known as antifreeze glycoprotein or AFGP….” At the link right-click “Download: CIIE_AFGP.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arctic Camels 12 mins – “Camels are so well adapted to the desert that it’s hard to imagine them living anywhere else. But what if we have them pegged all wrong? What if those big humps, feet and eyes were evolved for a different climate and a different time? In this talk, join Radiolab’s Latif Nasser as he tells the surprising story of how a very tiny, very strange fossil upended the way he sees camels, and the world.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australia Detention Centers 16 mins – “However well intentioned, working in detention centres amounts to complicity in torture, says David Berger, a district medical officer in emergency medicine at Broome Hospital in Australia. However, Steven Miles, chair in bioethics at the University of Minnesota thinks that they play an important role in telling the world about conditions in these camps.” At the link find the title, “Should doctors boycott working in Australia’s immigration detention centres?” right-click “Media files 254833948-bmjgroup-should-doctors-boycott-working-in-australias-immigration-detention-centres.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Authoritarianism 53 mins – “The media has struggled for months to explain how Donald Trump has become so wildly popular so quickly with the country’s electorate. In a new article, the journalist Amanda Taub proposes a rather frightening answer. The rise of Trump, she says, parallels the rise of American authoritarianism, the belief in radical policies and the desire for a strongman leader to implement them. Taub joins guest host Terry Gildea on Wednesday to explain how authoritarianism is transforming the GOP and the dynamics of national politics.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Back Pain Treatment 28 mins – “Back pain – almost all of us has either had it or will experience it in our life time. In fact, four million Australians may be suffering from low back pain right now, and for around 40% of people that pain will persist and become chronic with devastating effects. But what if you could end the agony? Catalyst investigates recent advances in science and medical engineering that are transforming our understanding of chronic back pain and opening the door to new treatments in the hope of bringing relief to so many people.” At the link right-click “MP4” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Banana Diseases 42 mins – “Dr. Leena Tripathi is a leader in banana biotechnology, working at IITA in Nairobi, Kenya. He has been publishing prolifically on a number of solutions for banana disease resistance using genetic engineering. In this episode of Talking Biotech she discusses the disease threats to banana production in Africa, and the solutions she has identified. She also touches on the social climate, farm structure, and attitudes toward the technology. You’ll hear many thoughts that will surprise you!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bhutan Is Carbon Negative 19 mins “Deep in the Himalayas, on the border between China and India, lies the Kingdom of Bhutan, which has pledged to remain carbon neutral for all time. In this illuminating talk, Bhutan’s Prime Minister Tshering Tobgay shares his country’s mission to put happiness before economic growth and set a world standard for environmental preservation.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brave vs Perfect Women 13 mins – “We’re raising our girls to be perfect, and we’re raising our boys to be brave, says Reshma Saujani, the founder of Girls Who Code. Saujani has taken up the charge to socialize young girls to take risks and learn to program — two skills they need to move society forward. To truly innovate, we cannot leave behind half of our population, she says. “I need each of you to tell every young woman you know to be comfortable with imperfection.” At the link click “Download,” right-click Download audio” nd select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bt Toxin 59 mins – “If you tell a stranger that something called “delta endotoxin” is as close as it gets to a miracle, they’d likely respond in one of two ways. They’d either want you to seek counseling, or find out if they can get it injected into their faces. Humans have love-hate relationships with toxic compounds, and delta endotoxin, or “Bt toxin” is no exception. This natural protein is toxic to a specific suite of pests, namely caterpillars that consume ag crops. It has been understood for decades and is widely used in organic farming. It also is the protein used to protect corn and cotton from insect damage, and now is being used in eggplant in Bangladesh. The use of this natural insecticide has massively cut the use of broad-spectrum insecticides. Today on the podcast it is a pleasure to talk to Dr. Fred Perlak. Dr. Perlak worked with Bt from the beginning. From understanding its role in insect physiology to identifying the gene, to helping introduce it to plants, he knows this topic as well as anyone. We discuss history and applications.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burlesque and Vaudeville Stories 90 mins – “Best-selling author and pop culture historian Kliph Nesteroff joins Gilbert and Frank (along with former guest Drew Friedman) for an informative (and frequently hilarious) analysis of topics covering ten decades of popular entertainment, including: the dark secrets of vaudeville, the tragic childhood of Eddie Cantor, the phenomenon of Martin & Lewis and the strange death of “Parkyakarkus.” Also, Bob Hope dons blackface, Jack Benny swipes his stage name, Don Knotts sends up Hugh Hefner and the mob releases a comedy album. PLUS: Batman & Rubin! “The Baileys of Balboa”! Rodney Dangerfield vs. the feds! Aunt Esther goes electric! And the angriest man in showbiz history!” At the link find the title, “#95: Kliph Nesteroff,” right-click beside “Enclosure:…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Caffeine 43 mins – “A tablespoon of it will kill you, but most of us feel like death without it: we’re talking about caffeine this episode. Inspired by a listener question — does green tea have more or less caffeine than black? and what about yerba mate? — Cynthia and Nicky explore the history and science of the world’s most popular drug. Listen in as we discover the curious effect of birth control pills on how our bodies process it, calculate how much of an edge it gives athletes, and learn what dolphin dissection and the American Constitution have to do with each other, and with caffeine….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer 73 mins – “Cancer is the number two cause of death in the US and can affect anyone at any age. Federico Viticci joins John to talk about the history of the disease, what it is, how we fight it and Federicos first-hand experience with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.” At the link right-click “Download it” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carl Zimmer 79 mins – Carl Zimmer joins the TWiV team to talk about his career in science writing, the real meaning of copy-paste, science publishing, the value of Twitter, preprint servers, his thoughts on science outreach, and much more.” At the link right-click “Download TWIV 381” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chemsex 50 mins – “In recent years a new, extreme sub-culture of sex and drugs has become a way of life for a growing minority of gay men. The so-called chemsex scene involves an unholy trinity of drugs – Mephedrone, GHB/GBL and Crystal Meth – and together they can keep men awake for days. These relatively new drugs are taken to enhance one thing in particular – sex. Mobeen Azar travels to San Francisco – one of the first cities to see the ‘party and play’ scene emerge – and London, where chemsex is a relatively new phenomenon and speaks frankly to men involved in the lifestyle.” At the link find the title, “Chemsex, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03n27yg.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chicago Sewer System 20 mins – “Chicago’s biggest design achievement probably isn’t one of its amazing skyscrapers, but the Chicago River, a waterway disguised as a remnant of the natural landscape. But it isn’t natural, not really. It’s hard to tell when you see the river, but it’s going the wrong way. It should flow into Lake Michigan, but instead fresh water from Lake Michigan flows backwards, into the city. The Chicago River is, in large part, a carefully-designed extension of the city’s sewer system. Reporter Dan Weissmann talked with Richard Cahan (author of “The Lost Panoramas: When Chicago Changed its River and the Land Beyond”) about the amazing lengths the city went to, over the course of several decades, to carry away the sewage that threatened to drown.” At the link find the title, “Chicago.86- Reversal of Fortune,” right-click “Media files 86-Reversal-of-Fortune.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Commodities Trading 26 mins -”Note: Today’s show is a rerun. It originally ran on July 2013. On today’s show, we talk to commodities traders to answer one of the most important questions in finance: What actually happens at the end of Trading Places? We know something crazy happens on the trading floor. We know that Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd get rich and the Duke brothers lose everything. But how does it all happen? And could it happen in the real world? Also on the show: The “Eddie Murphy Rule” that wound up in the the big financial overhaul law Congress passed in 2010. Today’s special guest co-host is Roman Mars, host of 99% Invisible. (Check out their episode on the design of U.S. currency.)” At the link find the title, “#471: The Eddie Murphy Rule, July, 2014,” right-click “Media files npr_328469303.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communicating Well 12 mins – “When your job hinges on how well you talk to people, you learn a lot about how to have conversations — and that most of us don’t converse very well. Celeste Headlee has worked as a radio host for decades, and she knows the ingredients of a great conversation: Honesty, brevity, clarity and a healthy amount of listening. In this insightful talk, she shares 10 useful rules for having better conversations. “Go out, talk to people, listen to people,” she says. “And, most importantly, be prepared to be amazed.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in Malawi 47 mins – “You know those Planet Aid clothing donation boxes you see on the side of the road? Those clothes and over $100 million in U.S. grant money are supposed to help people in southern Africa. But when Reveal went to Malawi to find out what actually happened, people told us that some of the projects didn’t pan out. Our investigation finds that the U.S. government knew an international fugitive was linked to the projects, but kept the money flowing. Reveal goes behind the bin and across an ocean to find out what’s going on.” At the link find the title, “Alleged cult leader plays shell game with US foreign aid,Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files Alleged cult leader plays shell game with US foreign aid_PODCAST_master.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Desomorphine 5 mins – “Desomorphine or dihydrodesoxymorphine is an opioid, like morphine or heroin. That means it is a powerful painkiller, but like morphine and heroin it is also highly addictive. It was originally synthesized in 1932 and patented in 1934 by American chemist Lyndon Frederick Small. …Clinical studies of desomorphine showed that the drug was eight to 10 times more potent than morphine, requiring lower doses for pain relief, muscle-relaxation, sedation and euphoria, as well as decreasing the nausea and respiratory depression associated with the use of morphine. Although these were positive outcomes from the research, use of the drug also quickly leads to addiction – in fact it showed an increased potential for dependence compared with morphine. Desomorphine was briefly commercially produced by Roche in the 1940s under the trade name Permonid and was used for post-operative pain relief due to its quick onset and decreased respiratory depression, but was found to have a short shelf life and was removed from the market in 1952. That might have been it for desomorphine, as these problems left little reason to invest and market such a product. But the story doesn’t end there. In recent years, desomorphine has emerged as a substitute for heroin in Russia….” At the link right-click “Download: CIIE_Desomorphine.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Down Syndrome Immigrants 25 mins – “Felipe Montoya and his family have been denied permanent residency in Canada because his 13-year-old son has Down syndrome. The Current shatters misconceptions with a reality check on the misunderstanding of the abilities of those with Down syndrome.” At the link find the title, “Down syndrome discrimination based on misinformation, prejudice – March 22, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160322_48125.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drinking Water 26 mins – “Susan Richardson is the Arthur Sease Williams Professor of Chemistry and Environmental Science in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of South Carolina. Richardson studies drinking water quality. The water that we drink is treated with agents that kill harmful pathogens, but those agents will often oxidize with organic matter to transform into equally-harmful Disinfection Byproducts (DBPs). Richardson will discuss the research that goes into controlling these DBPs in our drinking water.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought in California 66 mins – “Dr. Brian Green, Assistant Director of Campus Ethics, Markkula Center for Applied Ethics; Assistant Director of Engineering, Santa Clara University Jim Fiedler, Chief Operating Officer of Water Utility, Santa Clara Valley Water District Barbara Marshman, Editorial Page Editor, San Jose Mercury News—Moderator In Parzybok’s eco-fiction novel Sherwood Nation, he speculates about what an American city would be like if an extended drought limited water rations to one gallon of water per person a day. Hoarding, riots, neighborhoods filled with abandoned homes and businesses, fires left to burn themselves out, power outages—residents quickly devolve into survival mode of doing whatever they think is necessary to stay alive. How far-fetched is this disturbing “what if” story? Would the infrastructure, water policies and human kindness of Silicon Valley be up to the challenge of losing unlimited access to the precious resource we take for granted: water?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Interaction Research 14 mins – “If you take two different medications for two different reasons, here’s a sobering thought: your doctor may not fully understand what happens when they’re combined, because drug interactions are incredibly hard to study. In this fascinating and accessible talk, Russ Altman shows how doctors are studying unexpected drug interactions using a surprising resource: search engine queries.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

E-Book Status 10 mins – “What lies behind the decline in e-book sales is hardly mysterious – one of the big 5 publishers has flatly pointed to “new retail sales terms” – yet sharp fall in children’s e-book sales goes far beyond price. “Clearly price is certainly playing a role here. With the new contracts publishers have struck with Amazon and other distributors, e-book prices have indeed risen,” notes Andrew Albanese, senior writer for Publishers Weekly. “With regard to children’s books, the format has just not taken off—and as a parent to two kids, I think I understand why,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “Kids e-books are apps. They are games, essentially. And they fall under screen time, rather than reading.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Use in New Hampshire 57 mins – “Granite State businesses have long bemoaned New Hampshire’s high energy costs, complaining they discourage expansion here and even tempt some firms to leave the state.  Last fall, the Business and Industry Association launched a new campaign called Energize NH to focus attention on what it calls a crisis: the high price of energy and the need for more infrastructure and supply to lower those costs. The Energize NH campaign comes at a key time, when the Granite State seems engaged in a huge discussion about energy over pipelines and powerlines, and whether other approaches and other ways of thinking are in order, including better efficiency, a smarter grid, and an emphasis on those power sources that don’t contribute to climate change.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Shoots 18 mins – “The last hundred years or so of food advertising have been shaped by this one simple fact: real food usually looks pretty unappetizing on camera. It’s static and boring to look at, and it tends to wilt under the glare of hot studio lights. So advertisers have had to walk a fine line between enhancement and fakery, trying all kinds of tricks to get food to look good. Then, in the 1970s, food advertising took a radical turn. Food started moving, which opened the door to all the fancy tricks we see in advertising today: shrimp executing acrobatic flips, lobster claws cracking open in slow-motion, french fries bouncing across a table. An ad director named Elbert Budin developed this new aesthetic Flying Food.” At the link find the title, “205- Flying Food, March, 2016,” right-click “Media files 205-Flying-Food.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Neutral Bathroom 12 mins – “There are a few things that we all need: fresh air, water, food, shelter, love … and a safe place to pee. For trans people who don’t fit neatly into the gender binary, public restrooms are a major source of anxiety and the place where they are most likely to be questioned or harassed. In this poetically rhythmic talk, Ivan Coyote grapples with complex and intensely personal issues of gender identity and highlights the need for gender-neutral bathrooms in all public places.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Violence 20 mins – “The judge has ruled Jian Ghomeshi is not guilty of all charges claiming inconsistencies in complainants’ stories that prompted reasonable doubt. Judge Horkins did add that does not mean the events did not occur. Our panelists react to the judgement.” At the link find the title, “Jian Ghomeshi not guilty on all charges due to ‘reasonable doubt’ – March 24, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160324_71165.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Interface Research 9 mins – “What will the world look like when we move beyond the keyboard and mouse? Interaction designer Sean Follmer is building a future with machines that bring information to life under your fingers as you work with it. In this talk, check out prototypes for a 3D shape-shifting table, a phone that turns into a wristband, a deformable game controller and more that may change the way we live and work.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infectious Disease Comments 31 mins – “A review of the Infectious Disease literature with commentary.” At the link find the title, “Puscast: March 1 to 15, 2016,” right-click “Media files mara16.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Future 65 mins – “We’ve created a world where information technology permeates our economies, social interactions, and intimate selves. The combination of mobile, cloud computing, the Internet Things, persistent computing, and autonomy are resulting in something different. This World-Sized Web promises great benefits, but is also vulnerable to a host of new threats. Threats from users, criminals, corporations, and governments. Threats that can now result in physical damage and even death. In this talk Bruce Schneier — author and internationally renowned security technologist — looks back at what we’ve learned from past attempts to secure these systems, and forward at what technologies, laws, regulations, economic incentives, and social norms we need to secure them in the future.” At the link right-click “Download the MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islamic Future 52 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Institute for Philosophy and Religion, and the Boston University Center for the Humanities. Our speaker is Charles Kimball, Presidential Professor and Director of Religious Studies at the University of Oklahoma. Professor Kimball’s lecture is titled Faith, Doubt, and the Future of Islam.‘” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linux on Thinkpad T420 32 mins- “In this episode, Larry speaks with Charles Tendell about Linux on ThinkPad computers. Charles is an ethical hacker and has successfully adopted the 5 year old ThinkPad T420 as an economical substitute for a new Macbook Pro for his business — without sacrificing performance or capabilities!” At the link right-click “Downloamp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Late Bloomer 39 mins – “In this episode, Ryan talks with Kain who is not your average nontrad, being academically disqualified from college, taking his undergrad at 38 years old, taking the MCAT late, having less than stellar GPA, and yet, he got interviews to medical schools and has now been accepted to University of Central Florida where he will begin his medical school journey at 42 years old. Listen in as Kain shares with us his interesting journey, going to college with his son and taking the same classes, leaving his engineering career over medical school, and finally getting the acceptance that he wanted to pursue his dream of becoming a doctor.” At the link find the title, “Session 174,” right-click “ Media files PMY174.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbiology Conference 29 mins – “In the modern world, the spread of diseases like MERS, SARS, avian flu, Ebola, and Zika virus seems almost unavoidable. But to stop outbreaks spiralling out of control into global disasters, researchers, doctors and public health professionals need to know what’s happening and where in real time. That’s where ProMED comes in. PROMED is an online early warning system for emerging diseases that can be used by anyone in the world. People in the field report on disease outbreaks that are happening close to them, so that information about new threats can be rapidly disseminated online, and people at all levels can start to take the steps that could ultimately save lives. Ben spoke to the editor of ProMed, Dr Larry Madoff, about how the system is used, why disease outbreaks seem to be happening more frequently, and what we can do to stop them.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mindfulness and Habits 9 mins – “Can we break bad habits by being more curious about them? Psychiatrist Judson Brewer studies the relationship between mindfulness and addiction — from smoking to overeating to all those other things we do even though we know they’re bad for us. Learn more about the mechanism of habit development and discover a simple but profound tactic that might help you beat your next urge to smoke, snack or check a text while driving.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosul Dam Hazard 27 mins – “The largest dam in Iraq, the Mosul Dam, is in danger of collapsing according to a number of reports. It has been plagued with problems from the start as the dam was built on layers of limestone and gypsum – not only are these soluble but cavities form between the layers. The dam therefore needs constant grouting – the filling in of these cavities with a mixture of cement, clay and silicon – to stop it from collapsing. When ISIS took control of the dam they destroyed much of this grouting equipment and many staff did not return once local forces had regained control of the dam. . Professor Nadhir al-Ansari from the Lulea Technical University in Sweden explains what could happen if the dam collapses. ” At the link find the title, “Mosul Dam warning,” right-click “Media files p03n58ql.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Selection by Algorithm 24 mins – “They said it couldn’t be done: Teaching robots good taste. “Actuality” visits Spotify, where algorithms tell 75 million users what to listen to. Then, Tim and Sabri talk with a world-touring musician and a critic to see if this trend will save the arts — or doom them.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and seelct “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muslims of Value 16 mins – “When you look at Muslim scholar Dalia Mogahed, what do you see: a woman of faith? a scholar, a mom, a sister? or an oppressed, brainwashed, potential terrorist? In this personal, powerful talk, Mogahed asks us, in this polarizing time, to fight negative perceptions of her faith in the media — and to choose empathy over prejudice.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obesity Epidemic 58 mins – “…Recent studies show that one in every three Californians currently has diabetes or pre-diabetes, thus creating a need for a new generation of doctors with knowledge to treat the obese patient. Osteopathic physicians and educators from Touro University California will address this need at in this program. Traditional treatments for obesity have been ineffective in addressing this epidemic. For this reason, the university’s highly knowledgeable team will address issues with obesity, including altering diet, incorporating exercise, addressing associated metabolic abnormalities, and even environmental factors such as air pollution and climate change and how they all relate to resolution. The approach taken by researchers at Touro’s new Translational Research Clinic is focused on overall health as opposed to weight and incorporates patient demographics, communication skills and lessons from public health into the training of new physicians.” At the link right-click Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Web Issue 71 mins – “We’re on the cusp of the next wave of the web, where information will come to people, versus people seeking it out. This “big reverse” of the web poses all sorts of issues: ranging from policy, to personal privacy, to standardization across devices. In this talk Dries Buytaert — open Source developer, and founder and project lead of Drupal — discusses what it will take to navigate a web that doesn’t look or feel anything like what we know today.” At the link right-click “Download the audio MP3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

P Values in Research 26 mins – “Misused statistics, the latest gossip on Google’s Go-playing AI, and watching mathematicians win prizes.” At the link find the title, “Nature Extra: Backchat March 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Control 31 mins – “What do we know about the way we experience pain? What purpose does it serve, and could we be close to dealing with the kind of chronic pain not yet treatable with medicine? Scientists at University College London have made a discovery which makes mice pain-free, and have reversed painlessness in a woman with a rare condition. Nicola Davis is joined by Dr Natasha Curran, Consultant in Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine at University College London Hospitals, and by Professor John Wood, lead author of the study and a neuroscientist at UCL.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physical Activity Needs 55 mins – “In his inaugural lecture, Professor Dylan Thompson, highlights why physical activity today is more important than ever. The podcast covers some of the new approaches that are being used to determine the amount of exercise required for good health and points towards some practical recommendations that can help you today.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link find the title, “Professor Dylan Thompson inaugural lecture: Why do we need physical activity and how much is enough?” right-click “Media files 254546561-uniofbath-professor-dylan-thompson-inaugural-lecture-why-do-we-need-physical-activity-and-how-much-is-enough.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physician Assisted Death 25 mins – “As Canada moves closer to permit physician-assisted death, those doctors willing to take part are educating themselves on everything from procedures, to drug protocols, to learning which other health professionals will be legally able to assist them.” At the link find the title, “Assisted dying: Doctors struggle with how to help patients end their lives – March 22, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160322_23339.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Planet Building 60 mins -”Patrick Mchale makes his triumphant return to the show! Astrophysicists Catherine Neish and Brian Jackson explain how planets form around stars, and why the planets we see around other stars are so weird.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Ep_63_Worldbuilding.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Women 69 mins – “Ellen R. Malcolm, Founder, EMILY’s List; Author, When Women Win: EMILY’s List and the Rise of Women in American Politics [and] Christine Bronstein, Founder, Nothing But the Truth Publishing; Author; Mother—Moderator In 1985 Ellen R. Malcolm launched EMILY’s List, which has grown into a powerhouse political organization over three million members strong, focused on creating change by electing pro-choice women to office. When EMILY’s List began, there were only 12 Democratic women in the House and none in the Senate; today, EMILY’s List has played a vital role in helping to elect 19 female senators, 11 governors and 110 Democratic women to the House. Malcolm’s new book, When Women Win: EMILY’s List and the Rise of Women in American Politics, includes interviews with some of today’s most celebrated Democratic female politicians, including Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi, Tammy Baldwin and others. The book also recounts some of the most daunting political challenges for Democratic female candidates over the past three decades, including the historic election of Barbara Mikulski as the first female Democratic U.S. senator elected in her own right, the defeat of Todd Akin by Claire McCaskill, and Elizabeth Warren’s hard-fought victory over Scott Brown. Join us for a lively discussion with Ellen R. Malcolm about the evolution of EMILY’s List, the brave women who have successfully navigated our nation’s tough political landscape and what the future holds for women in politics.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rainforest Action Network 60 mins – “On March 3, activists led by Rainforest Action Network (RAN) held simultaneous protests in front of Citigroup’s New York City and San Francisco offices on to demand the company stop funding coal mining. According to RAN, Citigroup is looking to finance the purchase of coal mines in New Mexico and Colorado, despite having a policy on its books to sunset these harmful investments. On today’s episode, we’ll be joined by Ben Collins, Senior Research and Policy Campaigner for RAN, to discuss the outcome of the protests and why this issue is so critical.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Children Integration 67 mins -”On this webinar, MPI analysts and experts in the field discuss the results of an analysis comparing young children of refugees to other U.S. children on several key indicators of well-being. This analysis is based on U.S. Census Bureau data with MPI’s unique assignments of refugee status to the foreign-born population, as well as administrative data on refugee arrivals from the U.S. Department of State, Department of Homeland Security, and Office of Refugee Resettlement. Key indicators to be discussed include geographic resettlement patterns, languages spoken, English proficiency, family structure, parental education and employment, poverty rates, use of public benefits, […]” At the link find the title, “How Well Are Young Children of Refugees Integrating into the United States?” right-click “Media files 2016 3 23 Young Children of Refugees webinar.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in Sweden 27 mins – “Sweden received more asylum seekers per capita than any other country last year. But an open borders policy was slowly rowed back as accommodation started to run out and the authorities struggled to cope with the arrival of so many newcomers. In the Swedish town of Ange, 1,000 asylum seekers are starting new lives within a community of 9,000 locals. Keith Moore finds out how locals and asylum seekers are getting on.” At the link find the title, “A Swedish Tale, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03nkl3c.mp3 (MP3 – File)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roadkill Research 60 mins – “This week we’re looking at the surprisingly robust science research that can be done with animals that have died along our highways. We’ll speak with Sarah Perkins, an ecologist at Cardiff University in Wales, about the Project Splatter, a citizen science project tracking roadkill on UK roads. And we’ll speak with Kyle Elliott, an ecologist at McGill University in Montréal about his work studying the toxicology of birds of prey in urban environments. This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News. You can also read her article on roadkill at Student Science.” At the link find the title, “#362 Roadkill, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files Science for the People 362_Roadkill.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roger Corman 65 mins – “Legendary B-movie king ROGER CORMAN has produced and directed over 400 films, giving early career breaks to actors like Robert De Niro, Sandra Bullock, Bruce Dern, Charles Bronson and Dennis Hopper and helping to launch the directing careers of Ron Howard, Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese and Peter Bogdanovich (among others). Gilbert and Frank phoned Roger in his Hollywood home to learn more about his life and fabled career, including where/how he first met longtime friend and collaborator Jack Nicholson, why the Hell’s Angels threatened to murder him AND take him to court, and why “a monster should always be bigger than a leading lady.” Plus: “The Beast with (not quite) a Million Eyes”! Roger experiments with LSD! Peter Lorre messes with Boris Karloff’s head! The “acceptable level of insanity”! And the enduring mystery of “The Terror”!” At the link find the title, “#24: Roger Corman, Nov, 2014, right-click beside “Enclosure:…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Romanian Sheep 27 mins – “Lucy Ash meets the sheep farmers who took on the government because of what they claim is a threat to their traditional way of life.” At the link find the title, “Romania: The Shepherds’ Revolt, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03ntwv4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep Impact P1 45 mins – “Could a lack of sleep help explain why some people get much sicker than others?” At the link click the icon with dots beside “listen,” right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the the pop-up menu.

Social Media and Politics 7 mins – “ At the link find the title, “ The signal and the noise, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160323_sp_final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Korea P1 27 mins – “From movies and TV to K-Pop, South Korean culture manages to punch far above its weight – across East Asia, and beyond. But how did this happen, and why is it so important to Koreans? Rana Mitter investigates.” At the link find the title, “South Korea: The Silent Cultural Superpower – Part One,” right-click “Media files p03nq3k9.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sphero Product 67 mins – “Leo Laporte talks with Ian Bernstein, founder and CTO of Sphero, about robotics, software, smartphones, BB-8, and the origins of his company.” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Squalene 5 mins – “…Squalene is used as what’s known as an adjuvant, an effect originally discovered in the 1920s by French researcher Gaston Ramon. He found that adding certain substances to vaccines produced a stronger immune response and he called them adjuvants after the Latin verb adjuvare, to help. Ramon developed adjuvants based on aluminium salts, mainly aluminium hydroxide, which is still used for all sorts of vaccines from meningitis to rabies.In the 1990s researchers at Novartis developed a new vaccine adjuvant, MF59 which incorporates squalene, and it’s used in various flu vaccines including against swine flu. It’s not exactly clear how adjuvants work, but they have the effect of attracting immune cells to the site where the vaccine is injected and promotes the uptake of vaccine antigens into immune cells, boosting the immune response. And by doing that, it means that a lower dose of the antigen can still be effective. A controversy flared up over the alleged use of MF59 in anthrax vaccines given to military personnel fighting the Persian Gulf War in the nineties. There were claims that squalene in the vaccine was linked to so-called Gulf War syndrome reported by combat veterans who suffered from a range of unexplained chronic symptoms; a study found more antibodies against squalene in veterans reporting these symptoms compared to those who were in good health. But, it was later uncovered that the anthrax vaccines hadn’t in fact been used with squalene….” At the link right-click “Download: CIIE_Squalene.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stalin P4 31 mins – “Ioseph Jughashvili, AKA Stalin, leaves the seminary under mysterious circumstances. Following the path of his mentor Lado Ketskhoveli, Soso becomes a revolutionary and learns the joy of mentoring the people but also to fear the police. Seeking refuge for himself, Stalin goes underground, after serving his first long prison sentence.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode159_31916_11.12_PM.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stethoscope Replacement 11 mins – “Eric Topol discusses the use of hand-held ultrasound devices – could they one day usurp the stethoscope?” At the link find the title, “To truly look inside: The Lancet: March 24, 2016,” right-click “Media files 24march.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Operation 60 mins – “Virtually Speaking Sundays is a counterpoint to the weekly gasbags who air on Sundays. This week we talk about SCOTUS and the Real Donald Trump. Dave Johnson — Senior Fellow with Campaign for America’s Future. Read Dave at Seeing the Forest, Campaign for America’s Future, Huffington Post and other outlets. With more than 20 years of technology industry experience, Dave’s earlier career included technical positions, including video game design at Atari and Imagic. He was a pioneer in design and development of productivity and educational applications of personal computers. He helped co-found a company developing desktop systems to validate carbon trading in the US. Follow @DCJohnson Cliff Schecter — A public relations, political and digital strategist , Cliff is President of Libertas, LLC and a columnist at The Daily Beast and Contributor to The Huffington Post and semi-regularly to the Cincinnati Enquirer op-ed page. Cliff sits on the Boards of We Act Radio, the Ohio Innocence Project and Planned Parenthood of Southwest Ohio. http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/republicans-scotus-nom-flake-inhofe-kirk-ayotteAt the link find the title, “Dave Johnson and Cliff Schecter Virtually Speaking Sundays, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files dave-johnson-and-cliff-schecter-virtually-speaking-sundays.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suzuki on Science 25 mins – “David Suzuki has been passionate about the planet for decades. Now he is 80, an age where in his words you enter the death zone and are compelled to speak from the heart. David Suzuki joins Anna Maria to talk science, celebrity, family and mortality.” At the link find the title, “David Suzuki, 80, reflects on eco-morality and personal mortality – March 23, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160323_69248.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

TATP Explosive 9 mins – “A substance known as TATP, used in this week’s Brussels attacks, has become the Islamic State’s signature explosive. Chemist Jimmie Oxley says TATP bombs are volatile and easy to assemble which makes them an attractive option to suicide bombers.” At the link find the title, “ISIS’ signature bombs are unstable, easy to make, says chemist – March 24, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160324_68958.mp3” and select “Save Link Aas” from the pop-up menu.

Thought Experiments 11 mins – “Philosophers often use elaborate thought experiments in their writing. Are these anything more than rhetorical flourishes? Or do they reveal important aspects of the questions under discussion. Julian Baggini, editor of The Philosophers’ Magazine and author of a book which surveys some of the most interesting and imaginative thought experiments philosophers have used discusses thought experiments with Nigel Warburton for this episode of Philosophy Bites. David Edmonds introduces the interview.” At the link find the title, “Julian Baggini on Thought Experiments, Dec, 2007,“ right-click “Media files BagginiMixSes.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkey Human Rights 24 mins – “Turkey’s fighting an internal battle against Kurdish separatists, facing international rebuke on human rights violations and struggling to help Syrian refugees within its borders. We speak to the Turkish ambassador on his country’s geopolitical labyrinth.” At the link find the title, “Turkish ambassador defends human rights record – March 24, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160324_97040.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

UN Peace Keeper Sex Crimes 24 mins – “He was one man investigating 1200 cases of fraud, theft and sexual assault and misconduct. The Current speaks to Canadian Robert Hotston on the frustrations of trying to hold UN peacekeepers accountable.” At the link find the title, “UN peackeepers betrayed trust of the public, says former UN investigator – March 24, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160324_97292.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Waste to Fuel 30 mins – “You know that sick feeling when you look at a smokestack belching noxious gases into the air? Well, what if you knew that the gas waste coming from that smokestack was getting turned into a usable, liquid fuel? That’s the technology that an MIT professor, Gregory Stephanopoulos, and his colleagues are working on and so far, the results have been quite promising. This week on Sea Change Radio, we learn more about this ground-breaking technology from Prof. Stephanopoulos and the promise that it holds. Then, we hear from entrepreneur Todd Thorner about independent power producers and the potential of home battery storage technology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Work Focus 43 mins – “…With so many distractions surrounding us, most of spend more time than we’d like giving into their temptations. This results in an unfocused, ineffective style of working which takes far too long to get anything done. The opposite of that is deep work, which is the topic of today’s podcast episode. I’m once again talking with Cal Newport, who is a professor of computer science at Georgetown University, the author of five books, and a massive proponent of doing deep work. Cal defines deep work as the practice of focusing for a long time (well over an hour) on a cognitively demanding task without giving into any distractions whatsoever. One thing that Cal stresses in the episode is that deep work is a skill, and it must be acquired through practice.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One P3 237 mins – “The war of maneuver that was supposed to be over quickly instead turns into a lingering bloody stalemate. Trench warfare begins, and with it, all the murderous efforts on both sides to overcome the static defenses.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One P4 236 mins – “Machine guns, barbed wire and millions upon millions of artillery shells create industrialized meat grinders at Verdun and the Somme. There’s never been a human experience like it and it changes a generation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WW II in Crete 50 mins – “The Germans begin, Operation Mercury, their attack on the island, to further confuse Russia and keep the British away from Hitler’s oil fields. Yet as the transport planes take off, the number of defenders on the island has be recalculated from 12,000 to 48,000.” At the link find the title, “Episode 120-Crete, Part 1,” right-click “Media files Episode120 21415 11.10 PM.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Arctic Camels

WW II in Greece 25 mins – “The Germans continue to drive south, the Greeks throw in the towell and the Allies make plans to evacuate. But wanting more Gen. Von List of the German 12th Army uses Airborne troops for a daring raid of Cornith, in trying to cut off some of the Allied troops in retreat.” At the link find the title, “Episode 115-Operation Marita Part III,” right-click “Media files Episode115.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 228 – Mar 25, 2016: Abusive Relationships, Active Shooter Drills, Addiction, Argentina Finances, Artificial Intelligence, Bedlam, Bioengineering Ethics, Blind Service Ends, Broadband Infrastructure in Louisville, Campaign Money, Cancer in the Family, Career Changes, Cherry Domestication, Citizenship Changes, Coal Jobs, Community Living, Corruption in Brazil, Creativity, Cyber Security, Debating, Dental Implants, Desalinization in Calif, Dreams of India, Ecoshock Trends, Elephants and Whales, Endurance Science, Engineer Work Cycles, Ethics, Fasting Value, Financial Fitness, First Nations Suicides, Fluorescein, Food Production Issues, Food Shoots, Free Trade, Genomics, Growth Rate Changes, Hip and Knee Pain, Homeless in Canada, Immunity Research, Infection Diseases, Investments, Ivory Trade Shame, Ketchup War, Latino Activist, Lebanon Novel Excerpts, Mercenary History, Micro-Plastics, Mid Life Issues, Mosquitoes Background, Music Prodigies, Neighborhood Names, Oil Price Impact, Pet Ethics, Physics Speculations, Placebo Effect, Poker Pros, Police Cameras, Political Cartoons, Politics and Class-isim, Politics in Movies, Poverty Evictions, Primary Care Losses, Rare Metals, Refugees, Retiremnent Savings, Russian Life, Senate Value, Sex Assault Laws, Sex Education, Siege of Leningrad, Social Media Application, Solar Panels, Sprint Process, Syrian Life, Terrorism Handbooks, Trains, Trumps, Turkish Politics, UN Peace Keeper Sex Crimes, VA Crisis Recovery, YouTube Fame, Zika Virus Study

The best 86 podcasts from a larger group of 222 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 280 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Abusive Relationships 25 mins – “Canada’s troubling responses to domestic violence are exposed in a new documentary and how the judicial system fails when charging in cases of gender-based violence.” At the link find the title, “The War At Home: documentary looks at Canada’s failure to help women flee partner violence,” right-click “Media files current_20160317_61154.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Active Shooter Drills 37 mins – “Disaster Podcast hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley sat down after EMS Today 2016 to talk more about the excellent Active Shooter Drill conducted at the conference. Sam and Jamie were joined by Dr. Joe Holley to discuss how the event was perceived by the students and what future students and attendees can do to prepare and learn the most from the conference sessions that Paragon Medical Education Group puts on. The Paragon Active Shooter Drill at the conference included a little bit of classroom time, a cadaver lab, and time going over new tools on the market like hemorrhage control devices and other trauma treatment devices. Then the drill itself was run with both live and cadaver victims to lend realism to the situation….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Addiction Cure 44 mins – “The Centers for Disease Control this week issued the first national guidelines on prescribing opioids. Abuse of these powerfully addictive painkillers has become a public health crisis. More than 40 Americans die every day from overdoses related to prescription opioids. And the drugs have fueled a nationwide heroin epidemic. Congress and some states are attempting to address the crisis through legislation. The non-binding CDC guidelines were welcomed by many in the medical community as a step in the right direction. But addiction specialists say more needs to be done. Join our discussion on efforts to stem the abuse of prescription painkillers.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Addiction in Canada 22 mins – “As the number of methadone patients grows, some say the cure is becoming worse than the disease — do recovering addicts need another treatment option?” At the link find the title, “Methadone treatment overused in Ontario, addiction experts warn,” right-click “Media files current_20160318_30129.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Argentina Finances 16 mins – “Argentina decided that it could take on the world. They had a bunch of debt and said, ‘we’re not paying.’ Then a group of hedge funds took the entire country to court.” AT the link find the title, “#689: A Hedge Fund, A Country, And A Big Sailboat, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160311_pmoney_podcast031116.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence 27 mins – “Like all change, Artificial Intelligence brings with it dangers and opportunities. But does the increasing capacity of computers to approximate human thinking mark a possibly catastrophic change too far? Stephen Hawking is very worried. He has said that Artificial Intelligence could spell the end of the human race. It may sound far off and fanciful, but before we reach that terminal point might AI more immediately herald the end of work, and even social care?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Banana Fungus 42 mins – “Fifty years ago, a deadly fungus attacked banana plants around the globe, wiping out the Gros Michel, what was then the most popular export banana. Luckily, growers had a replacement at the ready – the Cavendish, which was resistant to the disease. Though considered by many an inferior fruit, the Cavendish took over as the commercial banana of choice. Now, a new strain of the fungus is infecting banana plants throughout Asia and has made the jump to Africa and the Middle East. Experts say if the fungus reaches Latin America, the banana that fills our supermarket shelves may be no more. A look at the uncertain future of the world’s most popular banana. (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Bedlam 47 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the early years of Bedlam, the name commonly used for the London hospital of St Mary of Bethlehem outside Bishopsgate, described in 1450 by the Lord Mayor of London as a place where may “be found many men that be fallen out of their wit. And full honestly they be kept in that place; and some be restored onto their wit and health again. And some be abiding therein for ever.” As Bethlem, or Bedlam, it became a tourist attraction in the 17th Century at its new site in Moorfields and, for its relatively small size, made a significant impression on public attitudes to mental illness. The illustration, above, is from the eighth and final part of Hogarth’s ‘A Rake’s Progress’ (1732-3), where Bedlam is the last stage in the decline and fall of a young spendthrift,Tom Rakewell. With Hilary Marland Professor of History at the University of Warwick Justin Champion Professor of the History of Early Modern Ideas at Royal Holloway, University of London and President of the Historical Association And Jonathan Andrews Reader in the History of Psychiatry at Newcastle University Producer: Simon Tillotson.” At the link find the title, “Bedlam,” right-click “Media files p03n0nz6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bioengineering Ethics 46 mins – “Researchers are now capable of creating a human embryo from the DNA of three people. A scientific panel recently concluded it is ethically permissible to pursue further research – aimed at helping women with defective genes produce healthy babies. Others oppose the panel’s findings, saying the risks are too great. They’re concerned new genetic material might inadvertently create diseases that could be passed down for generations. And some view it as an unwelcome step toward creating designer babies. The FDA is reviewing the panel’s report, but is not allowed to approve new research at present. A discussion about the science, ethics and politics of three-person embryos.” (4guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Blind Service Ends 20 mins – “Peter White speaks to the RNIB [Royal Institute of blind People] about the closure of its talking newspaper and magazine service in Heathfield, East Sussex. We explore the world of accessible computer gaming with listener Daisy and her family.” At the link right-click “Download MLP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Infrastructure in Louisville 26 mins – “When we asked Ted Smith, Chief Innovation Officer of Louisville, Kentucky, to join us for episode 193 of the Community Broadband Bits Bits podcast, we expected to talk about the one touch make ready policy they had enacted (and AT&T has since sued to stop). We did, but we ended with a focus on how networking is already improving the city.We start off by focusing on the problem of adding new fiber networks to existing poles (many of which are owned by telephone company incumbents that are not particularly inclined to make life easy for new competitors). One touch make ready simplifies the process, resulting in many benefits for communities in addition to lowering the cost to build new networks. We explore that topic to start. But at the end of the discussion, Ted and I discuss what Susan Crawford has termed a responsive city approach – Louisville is using all kinds of network attached devices to improve city services in some of the lowest income neighborhoods.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3 file….”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campaign Money 52 mins – “Money in U.S. politics was once a straightforward thing, but we’re now in the era of dark money. The dollars changing hands run well into the billions, and corporations and hedge fund moguls spend freely behind a veil of secrecy. Enter Mad Men: This heap of money is fueling a barrage of political ads. Messages, which have cost more than $300 million so far, are being designed specifically for you – popping up in your Facebook feed or streaming into your living room during commercial breaks. In this hour of Reveal, we collaborate with The Center for Public Integrity’s campaign finance reporting team and WAMU in Washington to look at who’s spending, how much, where the money’s flowing and what it’s paying for.” At the link find the title, “When Mad Men meet dark money, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files, When Mad Men meet dark money, podcast_master_v2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer in the Family 20 mins – “Oncologist Theodora Ross discusses the hereditary nature of cancer and her own predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer, which led her to have a double mastectomy and to have her ovaries removed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Career Changes 47 mins – “Maybe it’s just me, but right now I have people I care about in their 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s, all thinking about reinventing their lives, their work, their careers. For some, it’s a new economy forcing change.  For some, it’s dreams on hold. For some, it’s just an itch that “there must be something better.” How do people make those transitions? Successfully? That’s our subject. This hour On Point, reconfiguring, reinventing, your life, your career.”At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up panel.

Cherry Domestication 42 mins -”Cherries are a perennial favorite fruit. However, they are a tree, so their genetic improvement is slow. Episode 27 features Dr. Amy Iezzoni, as she discusses cherry genetic origins and efforts to improve cherry through traditional breeding. In part two, your questions are answered, namely questions about reports of glyphosate in urine, breastmilk and Germans.” At the link right-click “Download” and select” save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Citizenship Changes 47 mins – “Slate Money with Stacey Vanek-Smith on buying citizenship, women on investor boards, and why we work so much.” At the link right-click “The Professional Identity Edition, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM3746731020.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Jobs 57 mins – “Ohio’s coal workers are hanging up their hard hats and learning new trades as layoffs pile up in Appalachia’s coal mines. International Business Times Energy and Environment Reporter, Maria Gallucci, examines the human side of our nation’s shift away from coal. She joins us on Go Green Radio today to discuss how coal miners and their families are coping with job loss, and what the future holds for fossil fuel industry workers. You can read her article here.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Community Living 25 mins – “Millennials are attracting attention for their creative living arrangements, which have been popping up in big cities across North America. Are these community homes millennial communes?’ At the link find the title, “Are millennials hacking housing with community homes? Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160314_89830.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in Brazil 28 mins – “Over a million Brazilians have taken to the streets this week to protest President Dilma Rousseff for what they say is the biggest corruption scandal in the country, which has cost the population jobs.” aT the link find the title, “Brazilians protest against ‘corrupt’ government, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160318_51870.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity 40 mins – “Dr. David Burkus is a highly regarded and increasingly influential business school professor who challenges many of the established principles of business management. Drawing on decades of research, Burkus has found that not only are many of our fundamental management practices wrong and misguided, but they can be downright counterproductive. These days, the best companies are breaking the old rules. At some companies, e-mail is now restricted to certain hours, so that employees can work without distraction. Netflix no longer has a standard vacation policy of two to three weeks, but instructs employees to take time off when they feel they need it. In this episode. Dr. Burkus explains why companies are leaving behind decades-old management practices and implementing new ways to enhance productivity and morale. His new book is Under New Management: How Leading Organizations Are Upending Business as Usual.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security 58 mins – “Podnutz – The Computer Repair Podcast #174 – Morgan Wright/CyberSecurity Expert A Show for Your Computer Repair Business Jeff Halash from TechNutPC.com Interviews Experts in the Computer Repair Field. Morgan Wright is an internationally recognized authority on cyberterrorism, cybersecurity, identity theft and US law enforcement.” At the link right-click ““Direct MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Debating 58 mins – “Unclasp your briefcase. It’s time for a showdown. In competitive debate future presidents, supreme court justices, and titans of industry pummel each other with logic and rhetoric. But a couple years ago Ryan Wash, a queer, Black, first-generation college student from Kansas City, Missouri joined the debate team at Emporia State University. When he started going up against fast-talking, well-funded, “name-brand” teams, it was clear he wasn’t in Kansas anymore. So Ryan became the vanguard of a movement that made everything about debate debatable. In the end, he made himself a home in a strange and hostile land. Whether he was able to change what counts as rigorous academic argument … well, that’s still up for debate.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dental Implants 89 mins – “Loss of teeth has many associated problems. Arun Sharma, BDS, explores the implications of lost teeth and different implant strategies that might help. Recorded on 10/29/2015. (#30145)” (Impressive visual aids in the video version.) At the link right-click “Download MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Desalination in Calif 27 mins – “Transforming ocean water into potable drinking water seems so remarkably cool on so many levels. But alas, desalination remains both expensive and energy intensive. Up to this point, it has only been tried in relatively wealthy, arid nations like Israel, Saudi Arabia, and Australia. But with the serious threat that the ongoing drought poses to the nation’s breadbasket, it’s possible that desalination technology could soon be arriving on the golden shores of California. This week on Sea Change Radio, host Alex Wise speaks with energy reporter from The Desert Sun, Sammy Roth. He recently researched a piece about efforts to make desalination more commonplace in California.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dreams of India 21 mins – “ZBS is a not-for-profit arts organization. We have been in existence since 1970. For 35 years we’ve been producing radio/audio stories. These are comic and cosmic adventures, science fiction, mystical mysteries – some with spiritual wisdoms woven within. Our intention has always been to raise consciousness by using the media, radio and audio. Of course, some of these stories are just down right fun, fine family entertainment. Laughter is a great healer, as you know. We’re all living in the Cosmic Joke, and one day we may actually “get” the punch line. But in the meantime, remember, kindness to others, people, plants, animals, even the earth and the clouds, we can all do. It makes us feel better, it probably even makes the clouds feel better. We hope you enjoy our stories. Please consider making a tax deductable donation to ZBS Foundation.” At the link right-click “Episode 29” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Ecoshock Trends 60 mins – “Hey kids, let’s go out to the garage and make some new life forms! Get ready, because it’s already happening. We’ll talk with Pat Mooney, founder of the ETCgroup about crazy new technology on the loose. Then well-known journalist Steven Kotler takes us on a tour of ecopsychology in ten easy steps. Is it a diversion for comfortable coffee shops or “the answer”. Radio Ecoshock 160316” At the link right-click either “Lo-Fi” or the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elephants and Whales 4 mins – “…Whales and elephants have the largest brains of any creature. (By the way, large brains don’t necessarily go with large body sizes. Dinosaurs had much smaller brains than whales or elephants. So too does the huge rhinoceros.) A recent article in the American Scientist magazine tells us that whale and elephant behavior is not only complex, it’s also alike in both species. ….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Endurance Science 53 mins – “Professor Tim Noakes is one of the most widely respected authorities on exercise and fitness, and he’s built his career by challenging conventional beliefs, including his own. The idea of carb-loading before endurance races: he came up with that. These days he promotes a high-fat low-carb diet, even for athletes. And he’s not a big fan of sports drinks. Noakes joins us Thursday to talk about eating better, drinking less, and running against the grain to achieve better athletic performance. Timothy Noakes is the retired Discovery Health professor of exercise and sport science at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, where he is currently professor emeritus. He is also the founder of the Noakes Foundation and the author of several books, including The Lore of Running, Waterlogged, and his latest, Real Meal Revolution”. At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineer Work Cycles 93 mins – “…Our guest for this episode is Mike O’Connor, a retired civil engineer who spent over four decades in the fields of construction and project management, working in both the private and public sectors… A bet between a foreman and his crew led to Mike’s introduction to the construction business. Of all things, learning about concrete specifications ignited a desire within Mike to become an engineer… As Mike was graduating with his engineering degree in 1975, computer automation was emerging with the Georgia Tech Structural Design Language (STRUDL)… Mike notes that each engineer has a “shelf life,” and one has to be aware of the decreasing interest companies will have in older individuals. Everyone makes career missteps; our guest estimates it takes 3 to 5 years to recover from each such course correction… In the early 1990s, Mike shifted his career trajectory once again, overseeing contracts for the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) commuter transportation system. Paraprofessionals are already integrated into other professional fields, such as medicine and law; our guest believes they will soon start being introduced into the engineering industry… Having an interest in engineering preservation, our guest has started the Fredrick and Pennsylvania Line Railroad Museum. Mike can be reached via email: Mike -=+at+== fplmuseum dot org….” At the link find the title, “Episode 104 — Downturn,” right-click “Media files TheEngineeringCommons-0104-Downturn.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethics 46 mins – “If you are reading this post, chances are good that you have tried a cognition enhancing substance, or at least considered it. (Heck, for the sake of inclusiveness, this could even include caffeine.) I wonder, before you popped that little brain booster — did you consider the ethics of your action? Did it matter that your performance-enhanced brain was operating at a higher level than that of your non-enhanced peers? As the popularity of smart drugs and cognitive enhancement technologies becomes more widespread, questions of fairness rise to the surface. We remember that along with the scientific question of can we is the ethical sibling question should we? This week, Jesse and Professor-Philosopher Rebecca Roache — who lectures at Royal Holloway, University of London — explore the ethics of cognitive enhancement, beginning with questions of access to these new technologies.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fasting Value 42 mins – “We’ve all heard the striking statistic that your humble brain, weighing in at just 2-3% of your total body weight, consumes almost a quarter of your energy expenditures. For an organ that’s such an energy hog, it’s surprising to learn that cutting off your incoming energy supply — in the form of food — can offer significant benefits. But the brain is full of surprises and counterintuitive or not, the cognitive benefits of Intermittent Fasting seem to be real. (Animal studies certainly lend evidence in this direction.) In Episode #120, I speak with Dr. Mark Mattson, a neurologist at Johns Hopkins University and the National Institute of Health (NIH) about his decades of work in the fields of nutrition and brain health, and the complex interplay between diet, exercise, “feeding windows” (we’re not talking McDonald’s drive-thru), and macronutrient ratios.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Fitness 26 mins – “Paul reads from Financial Fitness Forever, “Will You Try to Beat the Market?”, which focuses on how trying to beat the market has had a terrible impact on investors’ returns. This Chapter 4 includes important studies, from DALBAR and Morningstar, suggesting that more than half of all investor returns are lost to bad personal behavior, like being influenced by natural feelings of fear and hope (some call greed). Much of Financial Fitness Forever is dedicated to Paul’s attempt to protect investors from their own unproductive behavior. The evidence in this chapter should help investors see how serious this problem can be. We hope you will share this podcast with friends and family who might have experienced this challenging behavior.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Nation Suicides 28 mins – “A mental health crisis is taking place in indigenous communities as the number of suicides grow alongside calls for support from the government to address the issue.” At the link find the title, “Indigenous communities call for a national strategy as suicides rise. Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160316_61848.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fluorescein 5 mins – “…Similar in its properties to naturally-occurring fluorescent molecules made by certain species of bacteria, fluorescein was first artificially synthesised by Nobel prize-winning German chemist and dye wizard Adolf von Baeyer in 1871. Since then, it’s been widely used in all kinds of applications ranging from lab research to healthcare, oilfields to air-sea rescue. In fact, if you’re a contact lens wearer, you’ve probably had fluorescein – or at least its salt, fluorescein sodium – put in your eyes when you go for your checkup at the optician, usually by gently touching a piece of blotting paper steeped in the stuff against your eye. What they’re looking for are tiny scratches on the surface of the eyeball. And because fluorescein pools in these marks, they show up as green traces when seen under blue light (UV isn’t used here, because it’s too damaging to your vision)…It’s fluorescein’s ability to dissolve easily in water that also makes it suitable for applications on a much larger scale. Because there’s a certain amount of UV in the sun’s rays, it will glow green in regular sunlight, as well as under the beams of a UV lamp. So it’s used to trace the flow of water in drains and other water courses, as well as highlighting leaks of nasty stuff like sewage. In world war two, Nazi planes were equipped with fluorescein ‘flares’ – small packages of the chemical that would be released if the plane crashed into water – revealing the location of the wreckage. In the 1960s, spacecraft splashing down in the ocean released fluorescein tracers, enabling rescuers to spot the craft – and its astronaut occupants – bobbing on the waves.” At the link right-click beside “Download:…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Production Issues 53 mins – “Want to get people fired up and yelling for no reason – mention raw milk…which we did here and this episode dissects the fun that follows. But before we got to that conversation we talked about spring planting plans and the beehives!” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Shoots 26 mins – “Gluten-free? Olive or coconut oil for cooking? Mediterranean or paleo? If nutrition is a science, why does the research vary so wildly, and why all the zany correlations between who we are and what we eat? On today’s show, faith, party affiliation and other fictions from food science. Plus, truth in advertising? Think again. From TV ads, to menus and billboards, we all know food photography looks too good to be edible- today we’ll hear the truth behind those perfectly crisped turkeys, immaculately sculpted ice cream cones, and more.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Trade 73 mins – “David Autor of MIT talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the fundamentals of trade and his research on the impact on workers and communities from trade with China. Autor’s research finds large and persistent effects on manufacturing jobs and communities where those jobs once were. Autor and Roberts discuss whether these results capture the full impact of increased trade with China and what the policy response might be that could help workers hurt by trade.” At the link find the title, “David Autor on Trade, China, and U.S. Labor Markets, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files Autortrade.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genomics 33 mins- “There are over 2 metres of DNA inside every one of our cells, encoding roughly 20,000 genes. They’re the “recipes” instructing cells how to make the building blocks of life, along with control switches to turn them on and off at the right time. It’s a major challenge to explore how it all works, and one person tackling it head on is Kat Arney in her new book, Herding Hemingway’s Cats. Kat joins Nicola Davis in the studio. Speaking from Edinburgh is Chris Ponting from the Medical Research Council. And from Cambridge is Ewan Birney, joint Director of the European Bioinformatics Institute, and previously part of the Encode consortium, the research project aiming to identify all the functional elements in the human genome.” At the link right-click “DownloadMP3” and select”Save Link As”from the pop-up menu.

Growth Rate Changes 33 mins – “As sexy as the digital revolution may be, it can’t compare to the Second Industrial Revolution (electricity! the gas engine! antibiotics!), which created the biggest standard-of-living boost in U.S. history. The only problem, argues the economist Robert Gordon, is that the Second Industrial Revolution was a one-time event. So what happens next?” At the link click the dots beside “Listen,” right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hip and Knee Pain 8 mins – “Sven Trelle discusses a meta-analysis which aims to shed light on the best non-steroidal anti-inflammatory treatments for common knee and hip pain….Among maximally approved daily doses, diclofenac 150 mg/day (ES −0·57, 95% credibility interval [CrI] −0·69 to −0·46) and etoricoxib 60 mg/day (ES −0·58, −0·73 to −0·43) had the highest probability to be the best intervention, both with 100% probability to reach the minimum clinically important difference. ” At the link find the title, “NSAIDs for osteoarthritic knee and hip pain: The Lancet: March 17, 2016,” right-click “Media files 17march.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in Canada 24 mins – “Montreal’s homeless have been ticketed by the local police for years, but this punitive act is more common than you may think across the country.” At the link find the title, “Homeless in Montreal charged thousands of dollars in tickets. Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160315_51058.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immunity Research 76 mins – “In this episode, how parasitic worms alter in immunomodulatory effects of the gut microbiome. Also, Kate expresses her distaste for large datasets and animal experiments, and Matt proposes a weight loss company that will only market to identical twins.” At the link right-click “Download” at the right side of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infectious Diseases 8 mins – “In the modern world, the spread of diseases like MERS, SARS, avian flu, Ebola, and Zika virus seems almost unavoidable. But to stop outbreaks spiralling out of control into global disasters, researchers, doctors and public health professionals need to know what’s happening and where in real time. That’s where ProMED comes in. PROMED is an online early warning system for emerging diseases that can be used by anyone in the world. People in the field report on disease outbreaks that are happening close to them, so that information about new threats can be rapidly disseminated online, and people at all levels can start to take the steps that could ultimately save lives.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Strategies 47 mins – “Paul explores the question, “How much can you take out of your investments in retirement?”  He focuses on people who want to invest with an amount of money that will last a lifetime but is just “enough.”  This scenario is often considered by people who are eager to retire, even if it means living on less.  There are five tables that should be downloaded to view while listening to the podcast. These are the Fine Tuning Your Asset Allocation Tables and Table 1 (3% distribution), Table 2 (4% distribution), Table 3 (5% distribution) and Table 4 (6% distribution).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Withdrawal Types 39 mins – “Paul compares the fixed distribution strategy he discussed in the last podcast with the flexible distribution strategy. Generally, the flexible strategy is for investors who have saved more than they need to meet the minimum financial needs in retirement. The key points to consider are: How much have you have saved for retirement? What combination of equities and fixed income investments do you hold? How much will you take out of your investments in retirement? How you take more when you need it can make millions of dollars in difference between how much you have to spend and how much you have to leave to others.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ivory Trade Shame 40 mins – “Wildlife crime is the fourth largest transnational organised crime in the world. It comes in after trade in weapons, drugs and human trafficking. The trade is worth about $20 billion annually. It comes from the slaughter of 50,000 African elephants each year. Just 450,000 elephants remain in Africa….The major market for ivory is Japan where despite a worldwide there is wholesale open trade. The country has over 300 ivory manufacturers, nearly 900 wholesalers and over 8,000 retailers of ivory products. Certificates for legally acquired ivory are openly traded and swapped, making any authenticity worthless. Japan’s failure to control its ivory trade is thought to be at the heart of the problems facing elephants in Africa.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ketchup War 25 mins – “This week Canada got a glimpse into the marketing behind the products with prime spots on supermarket shelves after the pulling and restocking of French’s ketchup in Loblaws stores.” At the link find the title, “French’s, Loblaws ketchup war reveals complex battle for shelf space, Mar, 2016” right-click “Media files current_20160318_93386.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latino Activist 44 mins – “After years of reading the headlines on the nightly news, Jorge Ramos became a headline last summer when he challenged Donald Trump over his plan to deport illegal migrants — and got thrown out of a press conference. It was the first time many Americans heard of Ramos, but Latino audiences have known him for decades. Ramos anchors Univision’s nightly news with a viewership that rivals – and often beats — the English-language competition. Probably the most influential Latino journalist in the United States, he’s an outspoken critic of U.S. immigration policy and works on a project to get out the Latino vote. In a new book, he says reporters aren’t doing their duty if they don’t take a stand.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Lebanon Novel Excerpts 52 mins – “This week we have a reading and conversation with Elias Khoury, Global Distinguished Professor of Middle Eastern and Arabic Studies at New York University.  Moderating is Jocelyne Cesari, Professor of Religion and Politics at the University of Birmingham, UK, and, Senior Research Fellow at Georgetown University’s Berkley Center on Religion, Peace and World Affairs. Our talk is presented by the Boston University Center for the Study of Europe, and is co-sponsored by the Institute for Iraqi Studies, the Institute for the Study of Muslim Societies and Civilizations, the Middle East and North African Studies Program, and the literary journal AGNI.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mercenary History 28 mins – “When we left off last week we spoke about King AEthelberht’s ascension to the throne of Wessex in 860 and how, despite the insistence of the Chroniclers that his rule was marked by peace and tranquility, on that same year we had records of a Viking raid that struck the heart of the Kingdom of Wessex, Winchester…The Vikings managed to successfully loot the wealthy town, and they may have pushed into Berkshire Downs… but their success also slowed them down. That loot was heavy – and what’s the point of victory if you don’t do a bit of celebrating? This delay gave Ealdorman Osric time to raise the warriors of Hampshire to his banner, and Ealdorman AEthelwulf of Berkshire (who was Mercian), time to raise his warbands. Ealdorman Osric was no stranger to defeating Viking bands. He had long experience fighting with the Northmen, having defeated a Danish army in Dorset over a decade earlier. And before the Vikings could reach their ships and escape, the combined forces of Berkshire and Hampshire swooped down on them. It was likely a great victory for the Anglo Saxons, a feather for the caps of these two Ealdormen, and a glorious moment for Wessex. I imagine for the warbands it would have felt pretty awesome. But feeling awesome is different from feeling peaceful and tranquil, which is what the Chronicle is trying – really hard – to convince us was the state of the South. So why the contradiction?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Micro-Plastics 29 mins – “Although microbeads from rinse off cosmetics have received a lot of attention lately, the tiny plastics most often being found in our seafood is a different kind of synthetic. We look into marine life in the US and Australia, to find out what plastics escape our household drains and what kind of damage they can do.” At the link right-click, “MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mid Life Issues 53 mins – “After a visit to the ER coincided with the death of her father, journalist Barbara Bradley Hagerty had a sudden realization. She was at the bottom of life’s U curve, sagging between a dying generation and a younger one raring to go. In other words, she’d reached midlife. It’s a time supposedly defined by crisis. But as Hagerty learned during a two-year exploration, midlife is really a time of renewal, a time to shift gears. She joins us Tuesday to discuss the science, art, and opportunity of midlife. Barbara Bradley Hagerty spent nearly 20 years as a correspondent for NPR, covering law and religion. Her new book is called Life Reimagined: The Science, Art, and Opportunity of Midlife…. ” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosquitoes Background 54 mins – “We talk to Anthony James, distinguished professor of molecular biology and biochemistry at UC Irvine about the most deadly animal to human beings: the mosquito.” At the link find the title, “125 Anthony James – How Deadly Are Mosquitoes?,” right-click “Media files 5dde6676-fca1-4225-b07e-7ef13d4ef33b.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Prodigies 27 mins – “Follow Ethan, a 10-year-old blind musician as he learns echolocation from Daniel Kish, a method used for navigating around objects using sound.” At the link find the title, “Batman and Ethan,” right-click “Media files p03mp86r.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neighborhood Names 19 mins – “In San Francisco, the area South of Market Street is called SoMa. The part of town North of the Panhandle is known as NoPa. Around the intersection of North Oakland, Berkeley and Emeryville, real estate brokers are pitching properties as part of NOBE. An area of downtown Oakland is being branded as KoNo, short for Koreatown Northgate. But no one actually calls it that, or at least, not yet. There is not really a name for this naming convention. They are not quite acronyms, not quite portmanteaus, and not just abbreviations. We at 99% Invisible have been calling them acronames.” At the link right right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Price Impact 45 mins – “Oil prices have plunged more than 70% over the past two years. U.S. stockpiles of crude are at record levels and a slowing global economy is keeping demand for oil low. A proposal by a few members of OPEC to freeze production has gone nowhere and many economists say it wouldn’t significantly alter the oil glut. Several states dependent on oil revenue are facing strained budgets and job losses as the price crash continues. And a number of U.S. companies are at high risk of defaulting on loans, raising the specter of another financial crisis. Guest host Indira Lakshmanan and a panel of experts discuss the oil price crash and what it could mean for the global economy, geopolitics and efforts to limit carbon emissions.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Pet Ethics 28 mins – “Today we travel to a future without pets. What would it take for us to give up our fuzzy, slithery, fishy friends? Should our pets get more rights? And if we didn’t have dogs or cats, would we domesticate something else to take their place?” At the link find the title, “Unpawful,, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physics Speculations 48 mins – “Some physicists claim that we may have reached the end of what physics can discover about the origins and structure of the universe. Neil Turok believes that the universe “invites” us to figure it out, by giving us clues about its composition.Some physici At the link find the title, “The Ultimate Simplicity of Everything, Mar, 2016,” right-click Media files ideas_20160314_46045.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Placebo Effect 25 mins – “Mind+Body Science (start time: 4:52): If you’ve ever struggled  to decide whether to see a Western conventional doctor or an “alternative” medical practitioner for ailments ranging from a compromised immune system to irritable bowel syndrome, you are aware of a deep divide between the two camps. Dr. Jo Marchant, a British geneticist and science writer, has delved into the science and politics of mind-body connections in her new book. It’s called Cure: A Journey into the Science of Mind Over Body. She discusses this journey with host Susan Moran.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poker Pros 18 mins – “We talk to a professional poker player who lost on the first day of poker’s most famous tournament–but went on to get a huge payout. Turns out there’s a game behind the game.” At the link find the title, “#690: All In, Mar, 2016” right-click “Media files 20160318 pmoney podcast031816.mp3 “and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Cameras 46 mins – “Police body cameras have been around for a number of years but it was after the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in the summer of 2014 when interest in them really took off. President Obama promoted body cameras as a way to increase police transparency and accountability. Groups as disparate as police chiefs and civil libertarians see their value and many are advocating for wider adoption. But even those who support more police body cameras say implementing them in a way that gets it right is tricky — particularly when it comes to protecting people’s privacy. Guest host Tom Gjelten and his guests discuss the growing use of police body cameras.(4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Political Cartoons 56 mins – “Way back to the times when corrupt party bosses like William Tweed of New York’s Tammany Hall, American politicians have known to beware of cartoonists lampooning their greed and missteps. And while nowadays, constituents are more literate and able to read probing newspaper articles than they were in the nineteenth century, the power of editorial cartoons remains: as proved by routine imprisonment of cartoonists in some places of the world, as well as the grim killings at the French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris last January. And since then, there’s been greater global attention and awareness to the role political cartoons still play and the controversy they spark. And this week in the Granite State, New Hampshire Humanities is taking up the topic this week at an event called “Can’t Take a Joke?” that explores editorial cartoons, and the subjects of artistic freedom, first amendment rights, and censorship.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politics and Class-ism 50 mins – “For the first months of the Trump campaign, the media wondered incredulously, “What kind of person thinks he can act like that and get elected?” Now that Trump is the presumptive Republican nominee, a new question has arisen: “What kind of people could support a person who acts like that?” We take a look at how the media have attempted to understand (and suppress) the mythical Trump supporter — and how some of the more damning conclusions reflect a deep-seated discomfort with class in America. Plus, how a “broken” campaign finance system perpetually enriches the consultant class and how Trump 2016 is being received around the world.” (An interesting phrase, “Educational Industrial Complex”, is used!) At the link click the dots beside “Listen” right click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politics in Movies 20 mins – “Do you ever get the feeling that you’ve seen the dizzying rise of Donald Trump before? You’re not alone — Hollywood’s history of populist politicians on screen and what we can learn from the celluloid of the last century.” At the link find the title, “The rise of the great American dictator, coming to a theatre near you. Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160314_17146.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty Evictions 44 mins – “Being evicted used to be rare decades ago. But today, millions of Americans are forced out of their homes each year for not paying the rent. This, according to Matthew Desmond, a sociology professor with the Justice and Poverty Project at Harvard. Desmond lived in a trailer park and a rooming house in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to document what happens to people after they are evicted. He witnessed families forever changed as they were forced into shelters, lost jobs and taken out of school. Guest host Tom Gjelten talks with Desmond about how the lives of eight families were transformed by eviction and what they tell us about the relationship between poverty and housing in America.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Primary Care Losses 11 mins – “Gareth Iacobucci talks to Candace Imison, director of policy at The Nuffield Trust, about the problems facing GPs, and how primary care could be changed.” At the link find the title, “’We’re pulling the rug out from under the feet of [Gps]’,” right-click “Media files 251790908-bmjgroup-were-pulling-the-rug-out-from-under-the-feet-of-gps.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rare Metals 23 mins – “New technologies like smart phones and wind turbines are increasing the diversity of elements that humanitiy is ustilising. Amongst them are the rare metals, which may not acutually be rare, but they often occur in such small amounts that the mining of them is often unprofitable. Some of them occur in only a very small number of mines. All this results in the use of them posing novel economic and environmental problems. These problems are the subject of Abraham’s book.” At the link right-click “Download:…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Summit in Europe 46 mins – “Thirteen thousand refugees are currently trapped at the closed border between Greece and Macedonia. Yesterday, European leaders met with the prime minister of Turkey in a mini summit aimed at addressing the migrant crisis. The EU wants Turkey to help reduce the flow of migrants into Europe. Turkey wants more money in exchange for cooperating, plus visa-free travel for its citizens. While German Chancellor Angela Merkel is pressing for an agreement that would preserve her open-door refugee policy, Austria has closed its border and Britain says it might leave the EU altogether. Guest host Tom Gjelten and guests discuss the ongoing migrant crisis and what it means for the future of Europe.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Refugees Locally 27 mins – “Maria Margaronis examines Hungary’s hardline response to migration in Europe and asks if it’s a symptom on the country’s troubled history and politics.” At the link find the title, “Hungary at the Cutting Edge, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03msxn6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Retirement Savings 46 mins – “On average, Americans are living longer than ever before, and yes, this is good news, but the bad news is that we have to figure out how to make sure our money doesn’t come to an end before we do. Long time personal finance expert Jane Bryant Quinn says although there is a lot of bad advice out there, there is also a growing body of research on the best ways to fill the gap between your expenses income during your later years, and she says, the plans can be quite simple. Jane Bryant Quinn joins us to explain the strategies that work and those that don’t and easy ways for people of all ages to make their money last for life.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Russian Life 48 mins – “Veteran NPR correspondent Anne Garrels takes us deep inside Russia, where citizens struggle with a shaky economy and widespread corruption, but seem supportive of their controversial president. Her book is ‘Putin Country.’ Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews ‘Hidden Voices’ from Aruán Ortiz.” At the link find the title, “March 16, 2016 A Glimpse Inside ‘The Real Russia’,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Senate Value 41 mins – “From members of Congress more concerned about reelection than debating the real problems to a president espousing post-constitutional ideas, Americans need a renewed understanding of the Constitution. Senator Sasse discusses the issues plaguing Congress and how the current president ignores the Constitution when it suits him. However serious the challenges that America is facing, Senator Sasse believes it is not too late to restore the Constitution and thus Congress.” AT the link find the title, “Restoring the Constitution,” right-click “Media files 20160222.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Assault Laws 44 mins – “Many victims of sexual assault do not immediately report the crime. In the allegations against Bill Cosby, his accusers came forward years later. And in the child sex abuse scandal within the Catholic Church, many victims did not come forward until decades after the fact. For most of these cases, the time to prosecute has run out. Now, a growing number of states are extending the time limits to allow cases to be heard in court. But criminal defense attorneys warn this will lead to innocent people being put behind bars. Diane Rehm talks with a panel of guests about the debate over extending the statutes of limitations for sexual crimes.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Sex Education 60 mins – “This week we’re talking about sex education: why we started teaching it in schools in the first place, how it’s changed over the years, and what it might – or should – look like in the future. We’ll speak with Jonathan Zimmerman, professor of education and history at New York University, about his new book “Too Hot to Handle: A Global History of Sex Education”. And we’ll speak with sex advice columnist, activist, and author Dan Savage about what sex education in schools should include and how advice columns, websites, youtube channels, podcasts, and other online sex education resources try…” At the link find the title, “#361 Too Hot To Handle, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files Science for the People 361, Too Hot To Handle CLEAN.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Siege of Leningrad 3 29 mins – “The people of Leningrad take an affront to Nazi Germany invading their country. The men volunteer in droves for military service, the women are sent off to dig trenches. Though many of the men will die that summer of 1941, the Soviet Red Banner Baltic Fleet will undergo its own “Dunkirk” as a fleet of 228 vessels flee from Tallinn, Estonia, facing shore batteries, Finnish torpedo boats and miles of mines.” At the link right-click beside “Direct Download:…” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Application 45 mins – “ In her inaugural lecture, Professor Julie Barnett from the University’s Department of Psychology examines what can we learn from social media content and the way social media is used by individuals and organizations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Panels 47 mins – “Gliding out of what we now know was the warmest winter in the recorded meteorological history of the United States, a lot of people are wondering what next for energy policy. How we get off the global warming train. At a time of record low oil and gas prices, there’s no way alternative energy can compete with fossil fuels, right? Well, wrong. The way things are put together right now, solar is booming. On rooftops and by roadways and all over the place. This hou On Point, the warm winter, the solar boom.” (3 guests) At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up panel.

Sprint Process 78 mins – “Hosted by Leo Laporte: Leo talks with Jake Knapp, the author of Sprint Designer Jake Knapp created the five-day sprint process at Google, a unique formula for solving tough problems, proven at more than a hundred companies.” At the link click “Download Options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Life 28 mins – “Peace negotiations in Syria are at a critical do-or-die point as those living through the conflict are in dire need of humanitarian aid and security for the future.” At the link find the title, “Peace deal urgently needed as Syria’s humanitarian crisis persists. Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160315_55937.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Handbook 52 mins – “Amid the emotion, fear, and confusion following an attack, a Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook for the coverage of terrorism. Plus, the semantics surrounding acts of war and terror, and a look back at lessons learned, and forgotten, in the years since 9/11.” At the link click the dots beside “Listen,” then right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trains 49 mins – “Trains and roads look like they have lots in common but the trade-offs in signalling and network design are completely different, and horrendously inconsistent.” At the link right-click “Download it” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump 27 mins – “Before he announced he would run to become the Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump was already known around the world. He had amassed a fortune through his real estate company and his career in reality TV which had made him famous. But what about his politics? The BBC’s former North America Editor Justin Webb has been to New York to explore Donald Trump’s political roots. How does an Ivy League educated billionaire manage to appeal to people from across the political spectrum? Justin hears from Mr Trump’s friends and former colleagues including the woman who built Trump Tower. “ At the link find the title, “Donald Trump: The People’s Billionaire,” right-click “Media files p03mbnw3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkish Politics 20 mins – “Turkey enters another dark chapter in its history as attacks escalate and the government cracks down, which raises questions about how Canada should manage its ties to the NATO ally.” At the link find the title, “Will Turkey’s growing troubles affect Canadian relations with the NATO ally? Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160315_32765.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

UN Peace Keeper Sex Crimes 21 mins – “The counsel for the Independent Panel on Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by International Peacekeeping believes the new United Nations report on sexual assault by peacekeepers is inadequate as it does not address the culture that contributed to the scandal.” At the link find the title, “UN report on stopping peacekeeper sex crimes fails, say critics. Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160314_96056.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

VA Crisis Recovery 4 mins – “Overhauling the health care system for Americans who answered the call of duty by serving in the military is a national priority. In the spring of 2014, the Veterans Health Administration (VA) faced a crisis with regard to veterans’ access to care. Systemic problems in scheduling processes had been exacerbated by leadership failures and ethical lapses. Demand for services was outstripping capacity. The result was that veterans did not have timely access to the health care they had earned….” At the link right-click “Download” below the author’s photo and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

YouTube Fame 29 mins – “Today, what’s the point of being internet famous if you can’t pay the bills? We’ll talk to a YouTube star about the sad economics of internet celebrity. Plus, “Cash for Your Warhol”, the story of a fake business that became surprisingly real.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus Study 28 mins – “’Juliet’, a woman living in London, was diagnosed with a mysterious illness in November 2015, Ian Cropley, a consultant in infectious disease from The Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, was there to investigate. In this podcast, we find out how Zika, once a little known virus causing a rash and fever, has subsequently become a global health emergency. How the infection is linked to microcephaly, and what we still need to understand to control the disease.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 227 – Mar 18, 2016: Adobe System Creator, Al Gore on Climate Warming, Alan Alda on Science, Alcohol Use, Apple vs FBI, Arctic Warming, Aristotle on Best Form of Government, Astronomy Introduction, Atomic Bomb Beginning, Beatles Producer, Beyonce Incident, Big Data, Black Holes, Bleach, Book Trends, Broadband Competition, Brominated Vegetable Oil, Chiropractor Rant, Classroom Bicycles, Classroom Diversity, Climate Resilient Cities, Collaboration, Computers for Kids, Democracy Discovery, Dental Medicine, Digital Design Engineer, Dutch East India Company, Ecology, Emergency Medicine Stress, Eugenics Movement, Fallacy of the Texas Sharpshooter, Federalist Papers, Food Future, Food Sounds, Fukushima, Functional Medicine, Gaming Research, Gender Balance in Australia, Genome Manipulation, Giftshranks, Girard, Government Spending Control, Gravity Waves Discovery, Hearing Problem, Heroin Addiction, Humor, Hurricane Threats, ICU in the Emergency Dept, Incest, Index Funds Creation, Indian Youth, Investment Withdrawals, Iran Revolution, ISIS Children, Journalist Fussman Interview, Keep It in the Ground Bill, Kidnapped in Mexico, Kill Chain, Laser Optics, Lasers in Dentistry, Lithium Damages Kidneys, Maple Syrup, Marijuana Medicine, Maya Civilization, MCAT Mistakes, Memorizing, Mezcal, Millennial Wage Gap, Monarch Butterfly Status, Money Laundering, Moral Limits of Markets, MS370 Crash, Music Boosts Endorphins, Musical Medicine, Newfoundland Financial Crisis, Ocean Archaelology, Oppenheimer on Science Advisors, Pat Conroy, Predicting Crime Spots, Prodigies, Race and Research, Research Funding in Australia, Restaurant Revolution, Science Research, Sepsis 3.0, Sexual Arousal, Ship Salvage, South Africa Drought, Space travel, Stalins Boyhood, Stroke Victim Story, Supreme Court Comments, Terrorism, Turmeric, Turkish Newspaper Takeover, Uterine Transplants, War Correspondent, Workforce Changes

The best 112 podcasts from a larger group of 242 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 280 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Adobe System Creator 98 mins – “Leo Laporte talks with Russell Brown, a Senior Creative Director at Adobe and tutorial-maker with a focus on Photography, Digital Photography, and Graphic Design.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Al Gore on Climate Warming 28 mins – “In this brand-new slideshow (premiering on TED.com), Al Gore presents evidence that the pace of climate change may be even worse than scientists recently predicted. He challenges us to act.” At the link click the “Download” button, right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Alan Alda on Science 63 mins – “MASH star and science advocate, Alan Alda, speaks at the National Press Club about the importance of communicating science.” At the link find the title, “Actor Alan Alda addresses the National Press Club” right-click “Media files NPCc_AlanAlda2_1003_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcohol Use 35 mins – “Are you part of Generation Peak Booze? In this episode, we dive into the factors behind the ups and downs in alcohol consumption in the U.K. and the U.S. over the course of the twentieth century, we explore the long-term health effects of peak booze, and we get a sneak peek at the synthetic alcohol of the future. Cheers!” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apple vs FBI 29 mins – “During the investigation of the San Bernardino shooting the FBI obtained a company iPhone that was used by Syed Farook, one of the assailants. The investigators obtained a warrant to search the phone, but it’s currently locked and the FBI hasn’t been able to access the encrypted data. This prompted the agency to request assistance from Apple to bypass the phone’s security features, but Apple has refused. Does the FBI have the authority to compel a company to re-engineer its own product in order to undermine the security of its own customers? In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech Privacy and Technology Project Director and principal legal advisor to Edward Snowden Ben Wizner about the legal battle between Apple and the FBI. Wizner begins by explaining The All Writs Act and how it’s being used to coerce Apple, the FBI’s potential objectives in making this request, and what dangers might be present if the FBI prevails. The conversation then shifts to the global implications for all tech companies if the the precedent is set that Apple must aid in helping the FBI get the contents of this phone and what that might mean for the national security of the United States of America – and the privacy of its citizens. Wizner then gives some insights into what it has been like to be the principal advisor for Edward Snowden and what the case has been like for him as a lawyer.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apple vs FBI 54 mins – “Slate Money with Guan Yang on Apple and the FBI, Sci-Hub, and Argentina.” At the link find the title, “The Breaking the Law Edition, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM5177607996.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arctic Warming 60 mins – “SUMMARY: Abrupt warming in Arctic could lead to catastrophic consequences says top scientist Dr. Peter Gleick, ICCI Director Pam Pearson, and the founder of Paleoceanography, Dr. James Kennett. Three must-listen interviews. “What is happening in the Arctic now is unprecedented & possibly catastrophic.” That’s the Tweet heard around the world at the end of February. It was picked up by the Independent newspaper in the UK, and many other places in the alternative and climate-savy media. Robert Hunziker did a strong piece about it in CounterPunch called “The Arctic Turns Ugly”. The Tweeter is a world-known scientist. Dr. Peter Gleick is a member of the US National Academy of Science, he’s a MacArthur Fellow, and President of the Pacific Institute. He was a guest on Radio Ecoshock in March 2014 “ At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aristotle on Best Form of Government 101 mins – “Aristotle provides both a taxonomy of the types of government, based on observations of numerous constitutions of the states of his time, and prescriptions on how to best order a state. These are meant to be practical; though he does spend some time on the “ideal” government, he recognizes that that’s going to be very rare, given that it requires those in charge to be virtuous according to his stringent standards. He provides advice for all the types, whether rule by one, or the few, or the many, to help keep them stable and from drifting into their corrupt forms. He sees the state as a natural outgrowth of human nature, and that one can characterize the health of a state in much the way one can describe the health (i.e. virtue, happiness) of an individual. Yes, he’s a major league elitist, but there’s still some good stuff here, applicable even to modern times.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronomy Introduction 55 mins – “In this public lecture, astrophysicist Dr Chris North takes its audience on a journey through space to understand the most distant stars and galaxies, exploring the findings of the Herschel Space Observatory. Dr North has worked on a number of space missions and is currently part of the Herschel Observatory team, looking at far-infrared light from stars forming in our galaxy and across the Universe.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atom Bomb Beginning 4 mins – “Today, we ask about Germany and the atom bomb in WW-II. The University of Houston’s College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them. Physicist Jonothan Logan tells a strange tale that begins in 1945, soon after Germany surrendered. Fifteen of Germany’s greatest physicists have been taken to an English country house and asked to write an account of German science during the war.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 1127” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beatles Producer Dies 48 mins – “When you hear the Beatles, in all their joyful, sassy, creative glory, you hear John and Paul and George and Ringo. You also hear the inventive, eclectic, classically-trained genius of their legendary producer, George Martin. They wore beads. He wore sport coats. He saw their magic. They valued his. Together, they made some of the most amazing music ever. It’s worth digging in to how they did that. This hour On Point, Sir George Martin, dead at 90, and his way with the Beatles.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beyonce Incident 23 mins – “Sorry to break the news to The Beyhivé, but not everyone loved Beyoncé’s “Formation.” Host James Peterson spoke with Philadelphia journalist Ernest Owens, who lays out his critique of the popular song and video in the Huffington Post. Owens gave his frank opinions on everything from slut shaming to the lack of diversity in Hollywood to why there should be a Bayard Rustin biopic — with him in the title role.” At the link right-click find the title, “Throwing shade at Beyoncé’s ‘Formation,’ slut shaming, and the Oscars,” right-click “Play Now”

Big Data 13 mins – “Information is the new petroleum. Just as oil and its by-products, including gasoline, drove innovation and development in the 20th century, information will spearhead change across the decades of the 21st century. Industry analyst Doug Laney has defined infonomics as the study of the production and consumption of information. In this view, information is accounted for and managed as a business asset. As publishers remake themselves into information providers for the Digital Age, they should abandon the notion of content as their product, says Grace Hong, Vice President of Strategic Markets & Development and General Manager of Learning Solutions for Wolters Kluwer’s Tax & Accounting division. Instead of content in the traditional sense, she explains, publishers must move to the marketplace that Big Data has opened up. “When it comes to big data – and especially when we think about organizations like traditional publishing organizations – data in and of itself is not valuable. It’s really about the insights and the problems that you’re able to solve,” Hong tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Back Holes Collide 22 mins – “On Sept. 14, 2015, at almost the exact same me that a pair of sprawling gravitational-wave detectors heard the last gasp of a collision between two black holes, another, more perplexing observation took place. Over 500 kilometers above the surface of the Earth, the orbiting Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope logged a passing burst of gamma rays, a high-energy form of light. The signal was so slight that the NASA scientists who run the satellite didn’t notice it at first. “[The gravitational-wave detector] LIGO saw a bright event, clear in their data, and we found a little blip in our data that’s really only credible because it happened so close in time to the gravitational wave,” said Valerie Connaughton, a member of the Fermi team. A satellite spotted a burst of light just as gravitational waves rolled in from the collision of two black holes. Was the flash a cosmic coincidence, or do astrophysicists need to rethink what black holes can do?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bleach 7 mins – “Should bored chemists decide to spend a wet weekend looking through the contents of their store cupboards at home, they would find few products that depend almost entirely on a single compound. In the food cupboard there’d be the inevitable sodium chloride, but more subtly, amongst the cleaning products, the chances are high that there would be a solution of sodium hypochlorite – because it is better known as bleach. This simple inorganic compound is just NaClO – the only distinction from that common salt is that instead of a chloride ion it has hypochlorite with an added oxygen atom, but the transformation in the substance is striking. Outside of the lab we don’t usually come across anything other than a solution of sodium hypochlorite, but it does form a white powder, which can decompose dramatically when heated, or a yellowish hydrated solid that melts at room temperature….” At the link right-click beside “Download:” at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Trends 9 mins – “A special hour on the publishing industry and the resurgence of print–from Amazon’s flirtation with brick-and-mortar bookstores to the success of wholesale suppliers shilling books by the foot as decorative objects. Plus, South Korea’s well-funded quest for a Nobel Prize in Literature, the subversive history of adult coloring books, and more.” At the link find the title, “Print Is Back, Back Again, right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Competition 16 mins – “This week we welcome Gigi Sohn, Counselor to Chairman Wheeler of the Federal Communications Commission, to Community Broadband Bits for episode 192. Before joining the FCC, Gigi was a founder of Public Knowledge. Gigi discusses the pro-competition agenda that Chairman Wheeler has advanced, including the efforts to ensure communities can decide locally whether to build a municipal network or partner. We also discuss other elements of FCC action to encourage competition in the Internet access market, even how television set-top boxes fit in. Echoing some of the comments I regularly hear from some thoughtful listeners, I asked if competition was the best approach given the argument that telecom, and particularly fiber, has the characteristics of a natural monopoly….” At the link right-click “...download this Mp3 fileand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brominated Vegetable Oil 7 mins – “You may have heard about sweet, fizzy drinks making people, children in particular, hyperactive. But there’s a compound in many fizzy drinks that can have quite the opposite effect, as Raychelle Burks explains, “Coke, Pepsi, Dr. Pepper, Mt. Dew, Fanta… Some doctors and dentists say we’re drinking too much soda-pop, resulting in too many unwanted pounds and cavities. For one American man in the late 1990s, too much cola resulted in a visit to the emergency department of his local hospital. He complained of headache, fatigue, confusion, and an inability to control bodily movements (called ‘ataxia;). It wasn’t the sugar or caffeine that landed him in emergency care, it was the bromide….” At the link right-click beside “Download:” at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chiropractor Rant 14 mins – Naturopaths and chiropractors lack the education, the training, and the understanding of medicine and neurology to diagnose and treat concussion. Their therapies are at best useless and can result in strokes in one of our most vulnerable populations, children. Perfect for taking care of childhood concussion. Not.” At the link right-click “Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Classroom Bicycles 25 mins – “A number of Canadian elementary schools have added stationary bikes in classrooms to help students focus on learning. Teachers have seen attention span increase in class. Today, we look into into the philosophy of “self-regulation” behind the program.” At the link find the title, “Classroom stationary bikes encourage kids to blow off steam while learning – March 11, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160311_27682.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Classroom Diversity 22 mins – “Men are definitely in the minority when it comes to teaching, especially in elementary schools. But how important is that fact for our children’s education? We look at a program that wants to recruit more men teachers as part of their diversity quotients.” At the link find the title, “Diversity program for teachers draws criticism for leaving out men – March 8, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160308_90494.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Resilient Cities 57 mins – “In his Jan. 2015 State of the City address, Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia announced that he wanted to make Long Beach a model of a climate resilient city. He asked the Aquarium of the Pacific to take a lead in assessing the primary threats that climate change poses to the city, to identify the most vulnerable neighborhoods and segments of the population, and to provide a preliminary assessment of options to reduce those vulnerabilities. The Aquarium has released a report detailing assessments of the five main threats of climate change to our community (drought, extreme heat, sea level rise and coastal flooding, deteriorating air quality, and public health and social vulnerability), and providing recommendations on actions and steps the city can take to make Long Beach a model of a climate resilient city. Given the City’s size, population demographics, infrastructure, geographical location, and regional economic impact, it has the opportunity to become a model of resiliency.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Collaboration 11 mins – “Listen Up! Day 5: Yes, And… ! Friday, November 20, 2015 12:00 AM It’s day five of Only Human’s Listen Up! bootcamp week. You’ve made it to our final challenge, which ties together everything you’ve learned from this past week. If you’re here for the first time, you can catch up on our previous challenges here. The Challenge: First have a conversation where every response starts with “No.” Then, have another conversation and start every response with “Yes, but.” Finally, have a “Yes, and” conversation. When you’re in a situation where you have to collaborate with other people, it’s easy to get stuck in a sludge of unproductivity. We all have ideas, suggestions, and strong opinions–and everyone wants the opportunity to voice their own. But the way we respond to the ideas of others — down to the very words we choose — can make all the difference. So we’re borrowing an exercise from the world of improv comedy, “Yes, And… ,” which is used to keep conversation flowing. Instead of shutting down the other person’s ideas with “no” or “but,” you build upon them… We’d love to know if this leads to any great or ridiculous conversations! We might include them in our next podcast. Tweet us @onlyhuman or leave us a voicemail at (803) 820-WNYC.” At the link find the title, “Listen Up! Day 5: Yes, And… !,” right-click “Media files onlyhuman112015 cms551616_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computers for Kids 65 mins – “Anna Adam and Helen Mowers are the creators of Tech Chick Tips, a podcast with tips for educators about using technology in instruction to engage students. Both of us work in Central Texas as the Digital Learning Specialists of Killeen ISD. Anna spent the last 15 years in elementary campuses as a campus instructional technologist. Helen’s 19 years of experience include being a science teacher, instructional technologist, and professional developer.” In this episode they discuss the use of Ozobot, Dash & Dot, Osmo, Tiggly, Make your Face in 3D, Buying a 3D Printer, Dremel, Formlab, Mattel, Pen Pal Schools, and The Internet Ruined my Life. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Discovery 55 mins – “Democracy seems to be in peril. There are challenges to the idea of what a society should be, and who has the right to govern, as well as serious questions about the idea of shared values. Guests: John Ralston Saul, Doug Saunders, and Angela Sterritt.” At the link find the title, “The Discovery of Democracy,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160308_64163.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dental Medicine 86 mins – “Mark Ryder, DMD, looks at conditions, diseases and medications that may negatively impact your oral health and oral conditions that may affect the rest of your body. Recorded on 10/15/2015. (#30143)” At the link “Audi MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Design Engineer 93 mins “Electrical engineer Dave Vandenbout guides us through a survey of programmable logic devices, and offers advice for young engineers wanting to succeed in the world of digital design.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dutch East India Company 46 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie or VOC, known in English as the Dutch East India Company. The VOC dominated the spice trade between Asia and Europe for two hundred years, with the British East India Company a distant second. At its peak, the VOC had a virtual monopoly on nutmeg, mace, cloves and cinnamon, displacing the Portuguese and excluding the British, and were the only European traders allowed access to Japan. With Anne Goldgar Reader in Early Modern European History at King’s College London; Chris Nierstrasz Lecturer in Global History at Erasmus University, Rotterdam, formerly at the University of Warwick, and Helen Paul Lecturer in Economics and Economic History at the University of Southampton Producer: Simon Tillotson.” At the link find the title, “The Dutch East India Company, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03lc0mk.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ecological Networks 41 mins – “Animals affect plants and other animals in their shared ecosystems through both direct and indirect connections. Dr. Robert Pringle and colleagues study these connections by setting up experimental plots of land from which they exclude different sizes of animals and then measure and compare the effects on various plots. They have documented a large number of both positive and negative effects. To interpret the data and determine the net effects on ecosystems, Dr. Pringle enlisted the help of mathematical modeler Dr. Corina Tarnita.” At the link find the title, “ 2015 Ecology Lecture 5,” right-click “Media files 15Lect5_1000.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eological Use of Camera Traps 80 mins – 2 parts “Discussion of camera traps and citizen science projects, with Alexandra Swanson, PhD, University of Oxford, and Roland Kays, PhD, North Carolina State University.” are covered in Discussion One of twenty-four minutes. Discussion Two of fifty-sixminutes continues with cameras, then into related twenty, including marine habitat use, effect on wildlife, use with birds, field experiences, challenges, other survey methods, use of GPS collars, tourism impact and remote-sensing technology to study termites. At the link find the titles, 2015 Ecology Discussion 1,” and “…Discussion 2,” right-click “Media files 15Discussion1_1000.mp4” and “Media files 15Discussion2_1000.mp4” and select “Save Link(s) As” from the pop-up menu.

Ecosystem Restoration 25 mins – “Many large animals are in danger of extinction and, because they have substantial effects on their ecosystems, their potential loss has important ramifications. This has lead to conservation and restoration efforts around the world. One example is Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique. Most large animal populations in Gorongosa were decimated as a result of decades of war. Now, as the park begins to recover, ecologists are devising experiments to understand how the restored ecosystem will be similar to, or different from, the pre-war ecosystem.” At the link find the title, “2015 Ecology Lecture 6,” right-click “Media files 15Lect6_1000.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emergency Medicine Stress 35mins – “So I was at the Blood & Sand conference a few weeks ago in the Bahamas. The highlight of the course was a lecture by Mike Mallin. The lecture is now on EMCrit–I’m sure you’ll enjoy it. Thoughts I had during the Talk & Meta Stuff: Sympathetics lead to/augment: fight, flight, freeze, or shout; We need to get Mike on to do a book club on Deep Survival by Laurence Gonzales. Since I’ve started speaking about crics, I’ve received more than 50 emails from people who heard a lecture or a podcast and it gave them a boost to get the job done. That’s why I keep putting up lectures like this one.” At the link right-click “Download “and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eugenics Movement 46 mins – “In the first half of the 20th century, American eugenicists used forced sterilization to “breed out” traits they considered undesirable. Adam Cohen tells the story in his new book, ‘Imbeciles.’ Also, John Powers reviews Sonny Liew’s new graphic novel ‘The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye.’” At the link find the title, “March 7, 2016 The Supreme Court Ruling That Led To 70,000 Forced Sterilizations,” right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fallacy of the Texas Sharpshooter 44 mins – “Does the Bermuda Triangle seem quite as mysterious once you know that just about any triangle of that size drawn over the globe just about anywhere will contain as many, if not more, missing planes? When you desire meaning, when you want things to line up, when looking for something specific, you tend to notice patterns everywhere, which leads you to ask the question, “What are the odds?” Usually, the odds are actually pretty good. Though some things in life seem too amazing to be coincidence, too odd to be random, too similar to be chance, given enough time (and enough events) randomness will begin to clump in places. You are born looking for clusters where chance events have built up like sand into dunes. Picking out clusters of coincidence is a predicable malfunction of a normal human mind, and it can lead to the Texas Sharpshooter Fallacy.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federalist Papers 120 mines – “On Alexander Hamilton/James Madison’s Federalist Papers (1, 10-12, 14-17, 39, 47-51), published as newspaper editorials 1787-8, plus Letters III and IV from Brutus, an Anti-Federalist. What constitutes good government? These founding fathers argued that the proposed Constitution, with its newly centralized–yet also separated-by-branch–powers would be a significant improvement on the Articles of Confederation, which had left states as the ultimate sovereigns. Hear Dylan, Mark, and Seth here rap about factions: Does our current system prevent the abuse of power by interest groups in the way Madison predicted it would? (Hint: no.) If we want to argue for change, we have to diagnose what went wrong in this and other instances: is it that Madison’s/Hamilton’s predictions were simply wrong in some areas, or have the contextual facts (e.g. education and technology levels) changed the situation, and/or do we simply have different central concerns now than we did then? For instance, their fresh-from-the-revolution audience was worried about kingly tyranny, and European powers were skeptical of any democracy, while we face new challenges like the rise of corporations that apparently have personhood according to our Supreme Court.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Future 16 mins – “What if we could grow delicious, nutrient-dense food, indoors anywhere in the world? Caleb Harper, director of the Open Agriculture Initiative at the MIT Media Lab, wants to change the food system by connecting growers with technology. Get to know Harper’s “food computers” and catch a glimpse of what the future of farming might look like.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Sounds 26 mins – “’Sound is the forgotten flavor sense,’ says experimental psychologist Charles Spence. In this episode, we discover how manipulating sound can transform our experience of food and drink, making stale potato chips taste fresh, adding the sensation of cream to black coffee, or boosting the savory, peaty notes in whiskey….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fukushima Fifth Year P1 5 mins – “Five years after the Fukushima nuclear meltdown, the radiation in the ocean off the coast of Japan is thousands of times lower than it was the month after the disaster, but water contaminated by the power plant is still slowly seeping into the ocean. Radioactive isotopes from Fukushima have been detected off America’s West Coast, but in levels so low they don’t pose a health risk. “If you get up every day and go swimming in those waters for an entire year, you have (an) additional dose, but it turns out to be about 1,000 times smaller than a single dental X-ray,” said Ken Buesseler, a radiochemist with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. “I’m not concerned about swimming in the ocean or eating fish from our side of the Pacific.” …Buesseler is critical of the fact that there is no US federal agency responsible for studies of radioactive contaminants in the ocean. “EPA monitors air and drinking water, why aren’t we monitoring our oceans for radioactivity?” Buesseler asked.” At the link find the title, “Fukushima radiation still seeping into the Pacific,” right-click “Media files 03112016_05.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fukushima Fifth Year P2 8 mins – “…Crews at the nuclear facility are building tanks to hold the tons of water that needs to be piped into the damaged reactors every day to keep nuclear material cool. “The most striking thing is the enormous amount of water tanks that are now on-site,” said journalist Steve Featherstone, who visited the plant last fall while reporting for Popular Science. “If we’re looking at the most immediate problem in the near-term, it’s this water, because it can’t all be captured.” In addition to the cooling water, hundreds of tons of groundwater flows underneath the Fukushima Daiichi site and gets contaminated by nuclear material…. About 167,000 people fled their homes during the nuclear meltdown. Today, about 100,000 people are still displaced, 80,000 of them because they are not allowed to return to their homes. But Featherstone said he was surprised by the reasons keeping some people from moving back to the Fukushima region….” At the link find the title, “Five years after Fukushima, the clean-up has just begun,, March 10, 2016,” right-click “Media files 03102016_08.mp3” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Fukushima Survivor 27 mins – “Sixty-five-year-old Hiromitsu Shinkawa survived the 2011 Tsunami by riding the tin roof of a destroyed home. He spent two days alone and adrift at sea on his makeshift raft before rescue. Shortly afterwards he met Miwako Ozawa, a young Japanese translator hired by a journalist to interview him. Five years on, Hiromitsu’s remarkable story of survival and renewal is told through the two halves of their unlikely friendship.” At the link find the title, “Found in Translation, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03ltm6n.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Functional Medicine 63 mins – “Sara Gottfried, M.D., Author, The Hormone Cure and The Hormone Reset Diet The Epic Mission: Upgrade Your Brain, Outsmart Your DNA, and Reset Your Hormones Naturally Groundbreaking science now shows that approximately 10 percent of disease is genetic and 90 percent is due to environmental exposures such as the way you eat, move, think and supplement. Gottfried practices functional medicine, a systems-based approach to address health from your DNA to your daily habits. Learn how to optimize brain function and improve wellness and resilience to stress.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gaming Research 48 mins – “Dr Adam Gazzaley is Director of the Gazzaley Lab and Professor of Neuroscience, Physiology and Psychiatry at UCSF. His work as a cognitive researcher has reached international acclaim with publications in Nature, The New York Times, TIME, Discover, WIRED and has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors. He wrote and hosted the PBS documentary ‘The Distracted Mind” and continues to do cutting edge research in the area of cognitive neuroscience with a particular interest in how gaming influences cognitive processes. Having completed his MD PhD at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, research fellowships at UC Berkeley and now sits on the frontier of neuroscience cognitive gaming research, he has walked an incredibly unique path in medicine. This is an exciting conversation I have wanted to have for a long time and we touch on issues related to the gamification of medicine, meditation neuroscience and if there is a scientific basis to enlightenment.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Balance in Australia 64 mins – “Federal Minister for Women Senator Michaelia Cash delivers a National Press Club address to mark International Women’s Day.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Michaelia Cash, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_Michaelia Cash 0803_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genome Management 42 mins – “The team look at the rapid rise of genome editing procedures and the power scientists now have to tinker with human DNA. Where’s the technology going? And where should it stop?” At the link find the title, “Should we genetically engineer humans? – podcast,” right-click “Media files gdn.science.150430.sb.science-weekly-genetics.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Giftschranks 21 mins – “After the war, many copies were discarded and, for a time, the book was banned. But, not wanting to be seen on par with the book-burning Third Reich, the outright ban on Mein Kampf was only temporary. Ultimately, the issue became a question of how to limit access to the book without outlawing it. The rights to Mein Kampf were given to the Bavarian government, which decided not to publish any new German editions, and worked to ensure the existing copies held by libraries were only used for scholarship, not politics. Fortunately, Germany had a centuries-old system in place for just such a nuanced approach: the Giftschrank….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Girard P1 55 mins – “French thinker René Girard’s ideas influenced social scientists over his long career as a writer and teacher, until his death in the fall of 2015. In this classic IDEAS series, David Cayley explores the thought of René Girard.” At the link find the title, “The Scapegoat: The Ideas of René Girard, Part 1 (Encore March 5. 2001),” right-click “Media files ideas_20160303_84879.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Girard P2 55 mins – “French thinker René Girard’s ideas influenced social scientists over his long career as a writer and teacher, until his death in the fall of 2015. In this classic IDEAS series, David Cayley explores the thought of René Girard.” At the link find the title, “The Scapegoat: The Ideas of René Girard, Part 2 (Encore March 6, 2001),” right-click “Media files ideas_20160304_80648.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Girard P3 55 mins – “French thinker René Girard’s ideas influenced social scientists over his long career as a writer and teacher, until his death in the fall of 2015. In this classic IDEAS series, David Cayley explores the thought of René Girard.” At the link find the title, “The Scapegoat: The Ideas of René Girard, Part 3 (Encore March 7, 2001),” right-click “Media files ideas_20160310_22105.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Girard P4 55 mins – “French thinker René Girard’s ideas influenced social scientists over his long career as a writer and teacher, until his death in the fall of 2015. In this classic IDEAS series, David Cayley explores the thought of René Girard.” At the link find the title, “The Scapegoat: The Ideas of René Girard, Part 4 (Encore March 8, 2001)” right-click “Media files ideas_20160311_12391.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Spending Control 58 mins -”Thomas Schatz, president of Citizens Against Government Waste, discusses his organization’s efforts to bring attention to the issue of government inefficiency and waste.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Thomas Schatz,” right-click “Media files program.430398.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gravity Waves Discovery 35 mins – “Ripples in space-time caused by the violent mergers of black holes have been detected, 100 years after these “gravitational waves” were predicted by Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity and half a century after physicists set out to look for them. The landmark discovery was reported today by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO) team, confirming months of rumors that have surrounded the group’s analysis of its first round of data. Astrophysicists say the detection of gravitational waves opens up a new window on the universe, revealing faraway events that can’t be seen by optical telescopes, but whose faint tremors can be felt, even heard, across the cosmos.” At the link find the title, “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gravity Waves Discovery 11 mins – “More than a billion years ago, two black holes in a distant galaxy locked into a spiral, falling inexorably toward each other, and collided. “All that energy was pumped into the fabric of time and space itself,” says theoretical physicist Allan Adams, “making the universe explode in roiling waves of gravity.” About 25 years ago, a group of scientists built a giant laser detector called LIGO to search for these kinds of waves, which had been predicted but never observed. In this mind-bending talk, Adams breaks down what happened when, in September 2015, LIGO detected an unthinkably small anomaly, leading to one of the most exciting discoveries in the history of physics.” At the link click the “Download” button, right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Hearing Problem 22 mins “When Rose* was growing up, she knew something wasn’t quite right about how she heard the world. She says it felt like she was isolated by an invisible wall. But when she got typical hearing tests at an audiologist’s office? She aced them, every time. Rose’s problem was particularly bad in noisy places. “It doesn’t take much,” she says. “It could be five computers in a room and a bunch of shuffling around — you lose me at that point.” It took Rose years, and plenty of doctors’ visits, to figure out what was happening. And when she did find out, it was thanks to the persistence of Professor Nina Kraus. Kraus runs an auditory neuroscience laboratory at Northwestern University. For decades, Kraus has been conducting research on Rose and other patients like her to learn just how vital our brains are to understanding sound. And she discovered how hearing difficulties can be a marker for all types of neurological issues — autism, dyslexia, learning delays — that have nothing to do with our ears. *not her real name How our brain translates sound can have a profound impact on how we understand the world around us. Find out more here.‘ At the link find the title, “Your Brain On Sound, Dec, 2015,” right-click “Media files onlyhuman120115 cms554073_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heroin Addiction 48 mins – “At the height of her addiction to heroin, Tracey Helton Mitchell lived in an alley and sold her body. Now she works as an addiction specialist helping others. Her new memoir is ‘The Big Fix.’ Also, Milo Miles reviews the debut album from percussionist Roman Diaz.” At the link find the title, “ March 8, 2016 Recovering Addict Finds ‘Hope After Heroin’,” right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Humor Discussed 104 mins – “On Bergson’s Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic (1900) – What is humor? Bergson says that, fundamentally, we laugh as a form of social corrective when others are slow to adapt to society’s demands. Other types of humor are derivative from this: just as the clown falls on his face because of a (pretended) physical flaw, as if he’s a machine that doesn’t work and so becomes noticeable as a machine, in satire, we poke fun at society’s breaking down, and in wordplay it’s as if the language is breaking down, and in a sit-com featuring unlikely coincidences, it’s like fate itself is breaking down into senseless patterns of repetition. Mark, Seth, Wes, and Dylan are joined by comedienne Jennifer Dziura, using Bergson as a jumping-off point to throw around lots of theories and questions: is it the unexpected that makes something funny (which would make timing key), or our identification with the funny situation, which would go against Bergson’s notion that you need some distance from the person you’re laughing at, or else you grasp him as an individual and get sucked into the breakdown as tragic? Can deformities be hilarious, as Bergson thinks? What about dark humor, or self-deprecating humor, or the laughter of delight or being tickled?”. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Threats 54 mins – “Texas is home to the Houston Ship Channel, one of the world’s busiest maritime waterways. Also in Houston, and along the channel, are oil refineries and chemical plants that make up the nation’s largest refining and petrochemical complex. It’s a major economic hub. But what would happen to the area if a big hurricane hit? …Then Satija uses Katrina to help frame the potential deadly outcomes of another hurricane and discusses the preventative measures that aren’t being taken to protect the Houston area from a massive oil or chemical spill.” At the link find the title, “Mighty Ike, Mar, 2016, “ right-click “Media files Mighty-Ike_pcast_master_rev2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ICU in the Emergency Department 32 mins – “A few years ago, I wrote an article about ED Intensivists and EDICUs. In the article, I discussed the hypothetical stand-alone EDICU. It is hypothetical no more. Kyle Gunnerson, with the support of his chair Bob Neumar, has created the EC3 at University of Michigan. Last week, I visited the unit–it was absolutely incredible! I invited Kyle to our RESUSCITATE NYC conference to discuss the great work he and his team have done.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Incest 55 mins – “McGill University is a world leader in the research and practice of transcultural psychiatry. David Gutnick steps into a world where treatment relies less on medication and more on talk and understanding.” At the link find the title, “Like I Was Talking to Myself in the Mirror,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160302_41325.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Index Funds Creation 17 mins – “A million-dollar bet pits a bunch of really smart money managers against the simplest investment idea in the world.” At the link find the title, “March 4, 2016 #688: Brilliant vs. Boring” right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Youth 46 mins – “Ten million people enter adulthood every year in India. They are hungry to participate in India’s growing riches. There are obstacles in their way: political corruption, poor education, lack of social mobility. A roiling stew for the world’s largest democracy. With global consequences. This hour On Point, hope and fury for India’s young. Plus, we’ll remember First Lady Nancy Reagan.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Withdrawals 47 mins – “Paul explores the question, “How much can you take out of your investments in retirement?” He focuses on people who want to invest with an amount of money that will last a lifetime but is just “enough.” This scenario is often considered by people who are eager to retire, even if it means living on less. There are five tables that should be downloaded to view while listening to the podcast. These are the Fine Tuning Your Asset Allocation Tables and Table 1 (3% distribution), Table 2 (4% distribution), Table 3 (5% distribution) and Table 4 (6% distribution).At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran Revolution 55 mins – “When Marina Nemat was 16 she was arrested at gunpoint and sentenced to life in Iran’s most notorious prison. She now lives just north of Toronto, and argues that the best way to combat evil in the world is through small acts of kindness.” At the link find the title, “Hope Within Horror: Marina Nemat,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160301_49463.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Children 26 mins – “Caliphate cubs is what ISIS calls its many child soldiers. The Current looks into a generation that’s known nothing but the so-called Caliphate. Plus we hear from retired Lieutenant-General Roméo Dallaire on Canada’s role in new tactics to defeat them.” At the link find the title, “ISIS defeat impossible without help for indoctrinated child soldiers, says Roméo Dallaire – March 11, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160311_36735.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalist Fussman Interview 202 mins – “…This episode is very special to me and features a verbal Jedi who never gets interviewed himself: Cal Fussman. Cal (@calfussman) is a New York Times bestselling author and a writer-at-large for Esquire Magazine, where he is best known for being a primary writer of the “What I Learned” feature. The Austin Chronicle has described Cal’s interviewing skills as “peerless.” He has transformed oral history into an art form, conducting probing interviews with the icons who’ve shaped the last 50 years of world history: Mikhail Gorbachev, Jimmy Carter, Ted Kennedy, Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson, Jack Welch, Robert DeNiro, Clint Eastwood, Al Pacino, George Clooney, Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hanks, Bruce Springsteen, Dr. Dre, Quincy Jones, Woody Allen, Barbara Walters, Pelé, Yao Ming, Serena Williams, John Wooden, Muhammad Ali, and countless others. Born in Brooklyn, Cal spent 10 straight years traveling the world, swimming over 18-foot tiger sharks, rolling around with mountain gorillas in Rwanda, and searching for gold in the Amazon. He has also made himself a guinea pig — Cal has boxed against world champion Julio Cesar Chavez and served as a sommelier atop of the World Trade Center…. ” His recommended reading is “Between the World and Me,” by Ta-Nehisi Coates At the link find the title, “The Interview Master: Cal Fussman and the Power of Listening,” right-click “Media files Tim Ferriss Show-Cal Fussman.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Keep It In the Ground Bill 57 mins – “On Feb. 11, 2016, 350.org Co-Founder Bill McKibben and grassroots leaders joined Congressman Jared Huffman (D-CA) and 16 other members of Congress to introduce the “Keep It In the Ground Bill,” in the U.S. House of Representatives. This legislation would prohibit new leases for coal, oil, and gas on all federal lands and waters, halting new leases for offshore drilling in the Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico, and permanently protecting the Arctic and Atlantic coasts. Today we’ll be joined by Bill McKibben and Tara Houska, the National Campaigns Director of Honor the Earth and a Native American advisor to the Bernie Sanders campaign.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kidnapped in Mexico 27 mins – “Mexico, with its history of drug-war violence and corrupt police, has one of the highest kidnapping rates in the world. Official figures for 2015 state that just over 1500 people were taken. Unofficially the figures are said to be much higher…..running into the tens of thousands. In the past the crime tended to target the rich but now it has become much more egalitarian…- shopkeepers, taxi drivers, service employees and people working in Mexico’s informal economy. Victims tend to be young – students with parents willing to pay ransoms, are frequently targeted. Kidnapping and ransom operations form a large part of drug cartels’ criminal portfolio. With a lack of trust in the authorities there’s been a significant rise in the number of private negotiators who deal with the ransom negotiations. The BBC’s Vladmir Hernandez has obtained exclusive access into the world of these private negotiators and tells their rarely told story….” At the link find the title, “Kidnapped in Mexico, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03m1zb1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kill Chain 51mins – “Assassination by drone is a subject of deep and enduring fascination. Yet few understand how and why this has become our principal way of waging war. This week we speak with Andrew Cockburn, author of the new book, Kill Chain: The Rise of the High-Tech Assassins, as he helps uncover the real and extraordinary story about drone warfare and the ways in which the technology works and, despite official claims, does not work. Additionally, we discuss what has really happened when the theories underpinning the strategy — and the multi-billion dollar contracts they spawn — have been put to the test. Drawing on sources deep in the military and intelligence establishments, Andrew Cockburn unveils the true effects, as demonstrated by bloody experience, of assassination warfare….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Laser Optics 73 mins – “Mark Morin of Nufern joins us to speak about lasers, optics, obsolete components, books and available jobs.”At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lasers in Dentistry 58 mins – “Drilling with out a drill? Peter Rechmann, DMD, talks about the world of laser dentistry, what it can do and how it works. Recorded on 10/22/2015. (#30144)” At the link “Audi MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lithium Damages Kidneys 24 mins – “Your Sanity or Your Kidneys This week we’re revisiting the story of a woman making a very difficult decision. Jaime Lowe started taking lithium when she was 17, after a manic episode landed her in a psychiatric ward. She was diagnosed with bipolar disorder,and for more than 20 years, the drug has been her near-constant companion. She’s taken it for so long that she can’t say for sure where she ends and lithium begins. “It’s hard to know if lithium is actually — like, if it dampens my personality, or if it normalizes my personality, or if it allows me to just sort of be who I am,” she says. Jaime tried to go off of lithium only once, in her mid-20s, and the result was not good. She developed grand delusions. She would start an organization to defend the First Amendment. She would marry a friend she only recently met. She would change the world. She sent wild emails to would-be employers, adorned herself with glitter and stacks of necklaces, and barely slept. When she finally pulled herself back together again, Jaime made a resolution. She’d stick with lithium. And that worked — until she learned last year that her long-term lithium use has taken a physical toll. It’s damaged her kidneys. Now, she faces a choice that’s not much of choice at all: an eventual kidney transplant, or going off the drug that has kept her sane all these years.” At the link find the title, “Your Sanity or Your Kidneys,” right-click “Media files onlyhuman030116_cms579631_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maple Syrup 38 mins – “Many people only think of maple syrup at the breakfast table, when they’re facing down a stack of hot, fluffy pancakes or some French toast. They’re missing out. Maple is undergoing a major boom, newly ascendant in beverage aisles, Asian kitchens, and even biomedical research laboratories. In this episode, we visit sugar shacks and talk to the experts to find out why tree sap is so hot right now—and whether it can live up to the hype. For some of its advocates, maple represents something of a Holy Grail: a healthy sweetener. As it turns out, the use of maple as a health tonic goes back to Native American tradition. And today’s maple boom is not the first either: for the colonists in New England who learned the trick of tapping maples from those Native Americans, maple sugar was the sweetener of choice, as an economic weapon against slavery. By the early 1900s, however, the maple harvest had become a nostalgic regional tradition—an old-school winter treat, rather than an industry….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Medicine 60 mins – “This week, we’re taking a closer look at the medical marijuana controversy. How effective is medical marijuana and for what conditions is it a suitable treatment? In our attempt to separate evidence from anecdote we’re joined by a panel of three: Dr. David Casarett, a palliative care physician and author of the book “Stoned: A Doctor’s Case for Medical Marijuana”; Dr. Robert Wolff, a systematic reviewer for Kleijnen Systematic Reviews and coauthor of a recent systematic review to assess benefits and harms of cannabis for medical use; and Dr. Marcel Bonn-Miller, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry….” At the link find the title, “#360 Medical Marijuana, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files Science for the People 360 Medical Marijuana.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maya Civilization 47 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the Maya Civilization, developed by the Maya people, which flourished in central America from around 250 AD in great cities such as Chichen Itza and Uxmal with advances in mathematics, architecture and astronomy. Long before the Spanish Conquest in the 16th Century, major cities had been abandoned for reasons unknown, although there are many theories including overpopulation and changing climate. The hundreds of Maya sites across Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico raise intriguing questions about one of the world’s great pre-industrial civilizations. With Elizabeth Graham Professor of Mesoamerican Archaeology at University College London; Matthew Restall Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Latin American History and Anthropology at Pennsylvania State University, and Benjamin Vis Eastern ARC Research Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Kent. Producer: Simon Tillotson.” At the link find the title, “The Maya Civilization, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03m4k6z.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MCAT Mistakes 39 mins – “172: Common MCAT Prep Mistakes Premeds Make and How to Avoid Them – Another great discussion today as we bring in, Ken, a Princeton Review instructor, tutor, and a premed himself at one point. Preparing for the MCAT basically starts once you set foot on college campus. Today, they talk about the common mistakes premed students make as they prepare for the MCAT. Listen in to gain new insights and advice so hopefully, you won’t make these mistakes discussed on the show….” At the link right-click the icon beside “172” episode number beside the title, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memorizing 8 mins – “Listen Up! Day 4: Memorize This! It’s Day Four of our Listen Up! bootcamp week. Today we’re putting your memory to the test. And if you’re here for the first time, you can catch up on our previous challenges here. Today’s Challenge: Listen to our podcast with today’s guest Joshua Foer. Then apply Foer’s memory trick in our quiz at the bottom of the page. It includes a video, where you’ll be introduced to several people, and questions about them. And if you’ve got an occasion today to meet lots of people, try it out in real life. Let us know how you do! If you have to make something memorable, you have to make it weird. At least for information lacking much context — like meeting a lot of new people at once…The good news is that memory can be learned, and it’s a skill you can work on. But Foer also reminds us of the importance of paying attention, and — remember yesterday’s episode? — caring a little more. How did you do? What was the weirdest mental image you came up with to memorize a name? Tweet us @onlyhuman or leave us a voicemail at (803) 820-WNYC.” At the link find the title, “Listen Up! Day 4: Memorize This!” right-click “Media files onlyhuman111915_cms550679_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mezcal 60 mins – “It’s nearly the Day of the Dead in Mexico, which gives us the perfect excuse to get familiar with the country’s national spirit: tequila. Or wait, should that be mezcal? And what’s the difference, anyway? In this episode of Gastropod, Cynthia and Nicky travel to Mexico to explore the history and science of distilled agave, and get tangled up in a complex story of controversies, clones, and culture….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Millennial Wage Gap 17 mins – “Last year, millennials – those born between 1981 and 2000– overtook Baby Boomers as the largest generation in the U.S. The largest share of the voting-age population. Yet a new report says, despite their numbers, millennial wages have remained mostly stagnant since the 80s. With employers less willing to raise the pay. What is going on with millennials’ wages? On Point was joined today by Brendan Duke, the associate Director of Economic Policy at the Center for American Progress, and Alicia Sasser Modestino, professor of economics and public policy at Northeastern University, to talk wage growth, wage stalls and the millennial economy.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monarch Butterfly Status 3 mins – “There’s some good news for monarch butterflies this winter. The iconic black and orange-yellow migratory butterflies have been dying off over the past several years due to habitat loss. But this winter, the number of monarchs hibernating in southern Mexico has rebounded, according to a December survey. Winter colonies covered about 10 acres of forest this winter, up from around three last winter… The migratory population of monarchs is among the longest travellers in the insect world, flying as much as 2,800 miles from Canada or the US to Mexico in the fall. The flight back north takes four or five generations, and it’s not known how butterfly offspring find their way back to the winter sanctuary in Mexico each year. “It’s biologically a very unique migration,” Rickards says. “It’s also iconic; it binds all three countries and it’s a symbol of cooperation.” At the link find the title, “The monarch butterfly, a symbol of North American cooperation, rebounds this winter,” right-click “Media files 03072016_04.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Money Laundering 17 mins –One day in the early 1990s, a man walked into the U.S. embassy in Ecuador. He said he had information on how to go after some of most powerful drug traffickers in the world.” At the link find the title, “#418: The Government’s Fake Bank For Drug Money,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moral Limits of Markets 88 mins – “On his book What Money Can’t Buy: the Moral Limits of Markets (2012), and also bringing Sandel into the discussion begun without him in our last episode about his first book, Liberalism and the Limits of Justice. Free economic transactions are supposed to benefit both the buyer and the seller, so why not allow prostitution, vote buying, pay-to-immigrate, selling ad space on your house or body, and premium versions of everything for those willing to pay more? Sandel thinks that these practices are degrading even if uncoerced, and argues that classical liberalism–by trying to maintain neutrality on philosophical questions like “what is the good?”–doesn’t have the resources to prevent rampant and undesirable commodification.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MS370 Crash Search 4 mins – “It’s two years to the day since Malaysia Airlines flight 370 mysteriously went off course and disappeared over the Indian Ocean. It remains one of the world’s greatest aviation mysteries. The search for MH370 continues, though, and it will go on at least until the southern winter sets in, in June. That search is costing a small fortune, upward of $120 million…The big fear is that if this was a mechanical or electrical failure, then it could happen to other planes. “It really is essential for this undersea search to be successful.” At the link find the title, “Two years after flight MH370 went missing, the search continues, March 08, 2016,” right-click “Media files 03082016_09.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Boosts Endorphins 18 mins – “It is common to observe monkeys and apes grooming each other. It is bonding behaviour. But there is a drawback. Time limits the number of individuals with whom you can bond. Robin Dunbar argues singing and dancing are used in the same way by humans but with the advantage of bonding larger groups than can our nit-picking ancestors. Singing and dancing are intensely social and highly synchronised activities. The synchronicity and low level stress triggers pleasure hormones, endorphins. Singing is thought to have originated close to 500,000 years ago, followed by anatomical changes which then allowed language to develop between 200,000 and 100,000 years ago.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Musical Medicine 30 mins – “If you had to make a playlist of your life, what would be on it? And if, toward the end of your life, your mind and memories were fading away, would this soundtrack help bring them back? Catalyst takes you inside an extraordinary new program which is revealing that personalised playlists can re-awaken the brains of people with advanced dementia … and even allow people with severe Parkinsons to unfreeze and move. Along the way we look more deeply at the power of music in all our lives – why is it so emotional, so memorable and so powerful that even when much of the brain is gone, music can bring it alive?” At the link right-click “download video mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Newfoundland Financial Crisis 25 mins – “It’s all money and politics in the legislature of Newfoundland and Labrador. We speak to Finance Minister Cathy Bennett who is quick to blame the former government for much of the province’s problems and ask how she plans to solve this financial crisis.” At the link find the title, “N.L. needs $15.4B by 2020 to get out of deficit, says finance minister – March 10, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160310_59698.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Archaeology 11 mins -“Hundreds of meters below the surface of the ocean, Laura Robinson probes the steep slopes of massive undersea mountains. She’s on the hunt for thousand-year-old corals that she can test in a nuclear reactor to discover how the ocean changes over time. By studying the history of the earth, Robinson hopes to find clues of what might happen in the future.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oppenheimer on Science Advisors 126 mins – “Discussing Lynda Walsh’s book Scientists as Prophets: A Rhetorical Genealogy (2013) with the author, focusing on Robert J. Oppenheimer. We also read a speech from 1950 he gave called “The Encouragement of Science.” What is the role of the science adviser? Should scientists just “stick to the facts,” or can only someone with technical knowledge make decisions about what to actually do? After leading the atomic bomb project during WWII, Oppenheimer thought that scientists needed to become politicians themselves to make sure that the power of technology wasn’t abused. His views about openness (sharing weapons tech with other governments) didn’t go over well with the Eisenhower administration, and he was stripped of his security clearance. Lynda’s book is not philosophy, exactly, but about rhetoric. Her thesis is that the social role of preacher-scientists like Oppenheimer is comparable to that of ancient prophets like the Oracle at Delphi: they serve to bring about political certainty by providing knowledge inaccessible to ordinary citizens…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pat Conroy Dies 46 mins – “Conroy, who died last week, was the author of several books, two of which — ‘The Great Santini’ and ‘The Prince of Tides’ — were made into feature films. He spoke to Terry Gross in 1987, 1995 and 2002. Also, rock historian Ed Ward tells the story of Billy Ward and the Dominoes.” At the link find the title, “March 11, 2016 Remembering Author Pat Conroy,” right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Predicting Crime Spots 11 mins – “Jeff Brantingham used crime data and a team of maths modellers to plot crime in Los Angeles and other US cities. The models reveal patterns allowing crime to be predicted. This is then used by police in allocation of resources. A visible police presence helps in reducing crime.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prodigies 59mins – “We talk to Joanne Ruthsatz and Kimberly Stephens, authors of The Prodigy’s Cousin: The Family Link Between Autism and Extraordinary Talent.” At the link find the title, “124 Joanne Ruthsatz & Kimberly Stephens – Is There a Link Between Prodigy and Autism?” right-click “Media files 48ed9af9-a502-4731-91d6-1daeb9bd23e7.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race and Research 15 mins – “Social justice advocate and law scholar Dorothy Roberts has a precise and powerful message: Race-based medicine is bad medicine. Even today, many doctors still use race as a medical shortcut; they make important decisions about things like pain tolerance based on a patient’s skin color instead of medical observation and measurement. In this searing talk, Roberts lays out the lingering traces of race-based medicine — and invites us to be a part of ending it. “It is more urgent than ever to finally abandon this backward legacy,” she says, “and to affirm our common humanity by ending the social inequalities that truly divide us.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Restaurant Revolution 44 mins – “The restaurant business model is warped: kitchen wages are too low to hire cooks, while diners are put in charge of paying the waitstaff. So what happens if you eliminate tipping, raise menu prices, and redistribute the wealth? New York restaurant maverick Danny Meyer is about to find out.” At the link find the title, “The No-Tipping Point, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files freakonomics_podcast030916.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Research 57 mins – Australia’s Chief Scientists, Dr Alan Finkel, addresses the National Press Club in Canberra about the country’s science research. At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Alan Finkel, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_AlanFinkel_0203_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sepsis 3.0 P1 27 mins – “Hear from the lead author of the new Sepsis 3.0 definitions… Sepsis is not just an inflammatory response to an infection.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sepsis 3.0 P2 27 mins – “Cliff Deutschman, coauthor of the Sepsis 3.0 overview paper, reached out to me because he had additional thoughts he wanted to add to Merv Singer on Podcast 169. He also did not want Merv’s mustache getting all of the sepsis attention.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Arousal 25 mins – “The only sexual education Nicole Prause had growing up in a small town in Texas was how to practice abstinence. Then she went to college at Indiana University and started working at a sex laboratory at the famed Kinsey Institute. But the subject was still taboo at home. Prause would start talking about her job and her stepmom would say, “Not at the dinner table.” That hush-hush attitude only served to convince the sex researcher and neuroscientist that women learn about sexuality the wrong way – with an emphasis on the risk of pregnancy or STIs, never on sexual pleasure or desire. When a “female Viagra”, called Addyi, was introduced last year to rev up women’s sex drives, it was received with far less enthusiasm than its male counterpart. Mainly it’s because the drug isn’t all that effective: it only helped 10 percent more people than the placebo. The drug also comes with caveats: like not being able to drink alcohol or combine it with other medication. Addyi wasn’t the first attempt to address female libido through medication, and it probably won’t be the last. But Prause is more interested in an element of desire that the drugs can overlook. “If you take a Viagra and your partner is still very unattractive to you, or being mean to you, the Viagra will not be effective,” Prause says. Her mission is not to create a new, more effective drug, but to understand the mechanism of desire. She’s focusing a lot on stimulating the brain to figure out what makes people want to have pleasurable sex. Prause has used several tools to dissect this misunderstood science – from transcranial magnetic stimulation, a much milder shock therapy, to devices like an anal pressure gauge that she designed herself. Nicole Prause uses devices to stimulate sexual pleasure in her studies. And while the scientist is focused on her laboratory, Liberos, she says the conversation around female sexuality needs to shift, especially in heterosexual relationships. Women often sacrifice their own desire to cater to, or “keep up”, with their partners. And men are not on the same wave length. “To continually kind of deny that we have an interest in sexuality and make those demands…you really need to slow down [and communicate],” Prause said. “And then we will have better partners.” At the link find the title “The Science of Turning Her On, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files onlyhuman030816_cms582149_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ship Salvage Operations 91 mins – “When ships have an engine casualty, run aground or have a fire on board they need to be salvaged or their wreck removed. Specialised companies, like Ardent, focus on salvaging ships or removing wrecks. These tasks are sometimes challenging from an engineering perspective, and always interesting from the business side. In this episode we talk with Ardent‘s Bram Sperling, a senior salvage master, about both these aspects of salvage and wreck removal operations.” At the link find the title, “198 – Ship Salvage,” right-click “Media files omegatau-198-shipSalvage.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South African Drought 5 mins – “In my little garden here in Pretoria, sprinklers automatically go off every morning at 8. They’re doing a good job. My cucumbers have outgrown their trellis, I can’t keep up with all the spinach, and, as usual, mint and morning glories are trying to take over. Without the irrigation system, my garden would look very different. It would look more like my friend Mavis’ garden — a dusty patch of seedlings. Mavis lives in the township of Mamelodi. She’s a domestic worker who cleans homes in neighborhoods like mine to support her five children and seven grandchildren. As usual, she’s put in cucumbers, spinach and green beans in her garden next to her small cement house. But this year, she says, “it’s not working.”It’s not working because South Africa is suffering through its worst drought in more than 35 years… The crisis has led Zimbabwe’s government to declare a state of disaster. Orr says it’s especially important to do these things now, because while the current drought is likely tied to the temporary global El Niño event, climate scientists predict that southern Africa will be generally hotter and drier in the future. The ins and outs of El Niño and climate change are a little abstract to Mavis, but she knows something’s wrong. “I think it’s a change of weather, I don’t know,” she says. “Because everything now is changing.” Since she was a girl, Mavis says, she’s waited for the weeklong soft rain known as Nedupi to plant her crops. Nedupi just didn’t come this year. But she’s holding out hope that the prayers for rain will still be answered. “I want rain every day,” Mavis says….” At the link find the title, “For one South African house cleaner, this year’s big drought means crying, hungry children,” right-click “Media files 03072016_05.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space Travel 47 mins – “Astronaut Scott Kelly is back on Earth after 340 days in space, and being poked and prodded and tested every which way by NASA to learn the effect on the human body of all that time out there. He’s a great subject to study because he has an identical twin, Mark Kelly, who was on Earth all that time. This all matters because the body – and maybe mind – change plenty in space. And the US is committed to going to Mars in the 2030s. That’s a long trip. This hour On Point, space and the human body.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stalin’s Boyhood 25 mins – “Young Stalin begins the process of moving away from the Seminary and towards the life of a revolutionary.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stroke Victim Story 30 mins – “In this Designability lecture, Kate Allatt shares an inspiring story of about self-management, patient engagement, dignity and future assistive technology opportunities. Kate’s motto is to never lower patient recovery expectations because there are no promises, just possibilities. She is the author of ‘Running Free – Breaking out of Locked In Syndrome’ and ‘Extraordinary Woman Winner 2011’.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Comments 56 mins – “Justice Scalia of the Supreme Court dies and CEO Tim Cook and Apple go toe-to-toe with the U.S. Government over privacy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism 106 mins – “We’re joined by an international terrorism expert to discuss how to define terrorism and whether it can ever be ethical. We read: -Donald Black’s “The Geometry of Terrorism” (2004) -J. Angelo Corlett’s “Can Terrorism be Morally Justified?” (1996) -Igor Primoratz’s article on terrorism in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2007, revised 2011); -Karl Heinzen’s Murder and Freedom (1853) -Bhagat Singh’s “The Philosophy of the Bomb: A Brief Response to Gandhi” (1930), and Carl von Clausewitz’s On War (introduction) (1816ish). Jon advises the U.S. government and has written textbooks on terrorism. He puts al-Qaeda in historical perspective, helps work through definitions from Black’s “pure terrorism” (which has an “upwards” social geometry requiring both geographic access and cultural difference) to Corlett’s attempt to construct a definition that doesn’t automatically rig the moral question. Primoratz helps us ask whether harming innocents (e.g. in a war where you’re threatened with extinction) is ever justified, and Heinzen and Singh preach violence against violence, where the state itself, being founded on violence, can’t be effectively fought through “soul force” alone. We also discuss how the philosophical questions relate to the practical ones: do we even need a definition, or is a practical scheme of classification sufficient for all practical purposes? Plus, a bit on gun control and the state’s monopoly on force.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Insights 55 mins – “For the past 15 years, the West has been preoccupied by security and how to deal with the threat posed first by al-Qaeda and its offshoots, and now by ISIS. What makes terrorists tick and is it possible to divert them from their violent ideology?” At the link find the title, “The Enright Files – What makes terrorists tick?” right-click “Media files ideas_20160307_50582.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turmeric, etc 46 mins – “Turmeric does not actually appear in Frank Herbert’s beloved novel, Dune. But in that novel something called “the spice” is apparently the coolest thing the galaxy has to offer. It’s kind of like the ultimate nootropic combined with MDMA, giving its users the wisdom of Solomon, the grooviness of the Beatles, and the soul of James Brown. (All with no hangover.) No such spice exists on Earth, unfortunately. But as spices go, our world is not totally out of luck. We have turmeric: a readily-available plant that has been a mainstay of Indian and Asian cooking for millenia. Turmeric root is chock-full of bioactive curcuminoid compounds that have been shown to provide benefits from reducing oxidative stress to reducing psychological stress. Turmeric can even reduce the stress of knowing how to make a tasty dinner. Rare among the compounds we talk about on Smart Drug Smarts, turmeric tastes amazing.

Turkish Newspaper Takeover 20 mins – “The Turkish government has taken over one of the country’s largest top media outlets as part of a wider crackdown. But will the West – which needs Turkey onside to deal with the refugees and ISIS – stand up for press freedom in that nation.” At the link find the title, “Turkey’s government tramples on press freedom with newspaper takeover, critics say – March 8, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160308_49925.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uterine Transplants 47 mins – “News this week of the first transplanted uterus in the United States. It seemed like a shocking idea, but there was the young woman, talking about her dreams coming true. Then yesterday, news that the transplant has failed. But globally, this is happening. Five children, already born in Sweden from transplanted uteri. More are planned here. This hour On Point, the how and why and “should we” of uterus transplantation. And the latest on a big advance in kidney transplants.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Correspondent 9 mins – “When New York Times book critic Michiko Kakutani reviewed reporter Kim Barker’s 2011 memoir, The Taliban Shuffle, she described Barker as “a sort of Tina Fey character, who unexpectedly finds herself addicted to the adrenaline rush of war.” That line piqued the interest of a certain actress and producer; not long after, Paramount Pictures acquired the rights to The Taliban Shuffle. The resulting movie, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, stars Fey as a journalist named “Kim Baker.” Bob talks with Kim Barker about how she learned the ropes as a conflict journalist in the early days of war in Afghanistan, and what it’s like to have Tina Fey play you in a movie.” At the link find the title, “ A War Reporter Played By Tina Fey,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Workforce Changes P1 18 mins – “Jobs in the Burin Peninsula are drying up and forcing workers in the region to rethink their futures. This unprecedented fiscal situation has seen the number of employed drop from over a thousand to five. We hear how workers are surviving this situation.” At the link find the title, “Burin Peninsula workers face hardship as jobs evaporate – March 9, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160309_44662.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Workforce Changes P2 24 mins – “Newfoundlanders have been leaving from home to work for generations, but all that is changing. With the workforce looking towards an uncertain future, people in the area tell us how they’re handling the economic downturn.” At the link find the title, “Newfoundland tradition of working away from home reverses amid Alberta’s downturn – March 9, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160309_53889.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Workforce Changes P3 24 mins – “Today’s 30-somethings who left for school and work, returned when Newfoundland’s economy boomed. Now they’re in the same boat as older residents, with an unknown future.” At the link find the title, “The generation that returned to a booming Newfoundland worries for their future – March 9, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160309_92794.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

Thanks for stopping by.

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