Media Mining Digest 476: Covid Economic Costs, Diamonds Cost, Dr Anthony Fauci, Electoral College Abolishment, Hank Azaria, Homelessness, Inequality, James McBride, John Prine, Mitch McConnell, Mohammed bin Salman, Octavia Spencer, Paramedic History, RuPaul, Stephen Sondheim, Valley of the Fallen

Exercise your ears: the 23 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 401 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Covid Economic Costs 30 mins – “While health workers fight to restrain the spread of the COVID-19 virus itself, economic policymakers are examining the monetary and fiscal options for reducing the length and depth of the economic downturn that will follow in the wake of the virus. The Federal Reserve has already engaged many of its tools to ease the strain on the financial system, including some of the emergency mechanisms last used during the Great Recession, while Congress has passed a massive aid package for businesses and workers. On Tuesday, April 7, Brookings will host an online discussion with former Federal Reserve Chair Ben Bernanke, now at the Hutchins Center at Brookings, on the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic, how governments have responded so far, and what further options are available to soften the blow and help speed an economic recovery.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diamonds Cost 22 mins – “Diamonds represent value, in all its multiple meanings: values, as in ethics, and value as in actual price. But what are these rocks actually worth? The ethics and costs of diamond rings have shifted with society, from their artificial scarcity perpetuated by DeBeers to their artificial creation in labs.” At the link you can listen,but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Dr Anthony Fauci 27 mins – “President Trump’s daily briefings on the COVID-19 pandemic have introduced millions of Americans to Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. At times, the specialist in infectious diseases has differed with the president during the briefings, correcting him on the seriousness of the virus or on the timeline for developing a vaccine. That’s fueled speculation that Fauci’s tenure might be cut short. But New Yorker writer Michael Specter doesn’t think Fauci needs to worry about job security. “Trump can’t fire him,” Specter says. “He can kick him off the coronavirus task force … but he can’t fire him from his job.” Specter has known Fauci for decades — covering his work and the way he’s handled the role of presidential adviser through six different U.S. presidents and the AIDS epidemic. Specter chronicles those ups and downs in the New Yorker article, ‘How Anthony Fauci Became America’s Doctor.’” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electoral College Abolishment 33 mins – “Electoral College ‘Not Carved In Stone:’ Author Advocates Rethinking How We Vote” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Hank Azaria 33 mins – “Azaria plays a colorful baseball announcer in the IFC comedy series ‘Brockmire,’ which is now in its 4th and final season. Azaria spoke with ‘Fresh Air’ about sobriety, his flamboyant character in ‘The Birdcage,’ and why he doesn’t voice the Indian American convenience store owner Apu on ‘The Simpsons’ anymore. Also, John Powers reviews the Hulu series ‘Little Fires Everywhere,’ starring Kerry Washington and Reese Witherspoon.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homelessness 31 mins – “If homelessness is the problem, housing is the solution. But it’s not always that simple. Kate Cody has been living in her encampment community for a long time. And there’s no guarantee she’ll be able to make the transition inside, even with the golden ticket. The way homelessness has exploded in California over the last decade, you’d think there was no system in place to address it. But there is one – it just wasn’t designed to help everyone. Katie Mingle’s According to Need is a documentary podcast in 5 chapters from 99% Invisible that asks: what are we doing to get people into housing? If you’ve enjoyed this series and were moved by the stories you heard, we’ve compiled a list of Bay Area organizations that you can support.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Inequality 33 mins – “Nelson Schwartz, author of ‘The Velvet Rope Economy,’ says special privileges for the super-rich are dividing America: “The result is less sympathy, less empathy and a sort of a harder-edge society.” Schwartz talks about private helicopter rides to the airport, concierge doctors, and elite college counseling — and their impact on our society. Schwartz writes about economics for the ‘New York Times.’ Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan recommends a few titles for troubled times: ‘The Women in Black,’ ‘The Colossus of New York,’ ‘Last Night at the Lobster,’ ‘Are You An Echo?’ and ‘Everything Is Under Control.’” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

James McBride 33 mins – “James McBride’s new novel, ‘Deacon King Kong,’ takes place in 1969, in a Brooklyn housing project similar to the one he grew up in. “In this book and in this community, people generally love each other,” he says. McBride is best known for his ’95 memoir ‘The Color of Water: A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother.’” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

John Prine 34 mins – “Legendary songwriter, singer and guitarist John Prine died Tuesday from complications of the coronavirus. He was 73. Prine’s best-known songs include “Angel from Montgomery,” “Paradise,” “Sam Stone,” and “Hello in There.” Among the many people who recorded his songs are Johnny Cash, Bonnie Raitt, and Bette Midler. Last year he was inducted into the Songwriting Hall of Fame. Terry Gross spoke to him in 2018 after the release of his album ‘The Tree of Forgiveness,’ his first album of new songs in 13 years. He was touring at the time, and had made a remarkable comeback from two bouts with cancer. We begin with rock critic Ken Tucker’s salute to Prine.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mitch McConnell 33 mins – “New Yorker writer Jane Mayer says the Senate majority leader has thrown his support behind the president — despite the fact that “behind Trump’s back, he says he detests him, can’t stand him.” This is FRESH AIR. I’m Terry Gross. President Trump’s enabler in chief is Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, according to a new article by my guest, Jane Mayer, in The New Yorker. She writes that McConnell’s refusal to rein in Trump is looking riskier than ever for McConnell and has cost him the respect of some powerful people who have known him the longest.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mohammed bin Salman 33 mins – “’New York Times’ Beirut Bureau Chief Ben Hubbard says Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is full of contradictions: He ended a ban on women driving, but his agents also carried out the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Hubbard’s book, ‘MBS,’ tells the story of the enigmatic leader. Hubbard says MBS could rule the country for the next 50 years.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Octavia Spencer 33 mins – “Spencer stars in the new Netflix limited series ‘Self Made’ as Madam C.J. Walker, America’s first female self-made millionaire. She sold hair and makeup products to black women in the early 1900s. Spencer talks about Walker’s legacy, playing a maid in’The Help,’ and learning to speak up for better pay in Hollywood. Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews the K-pop group BTS’ new album ‘Map of the Soul.’” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paramedic History 32 mins – “Back in the 1960s and 70s, in the city of Pittsburgh, there was a nickname for guys like John Moon – The Unemployables. This nickname meant that you simply could not get hired, no matter where you went for a job. Moon grew up in Pittsburgh’s largely Black and economically depressed Hill District. In better times, the Hill had its own Negro League baseball team and jazz clubs that regularly hosted Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong. But by the time Moon was graduating high school in the late 60s, there was no escaping the neighborhood’s “unemployable” stigma. Moon was glad to land as an orderly at Pittsburgh’s Presbyterian-University Hospital, which provided steady employment, but not much else. One night halfway through a graveyard shift, Moon watched as two young men burst through the doors of the hospital. They were working desperately to save a dying patient. Maybe today he wouldn’t bat an eye at this scene, but in 1970 nothing about it made sense. The two men weren’t doctors, and they weren’t nurses. And their strange uniforms weren’t hospital issued. Moon was witnessing the birth of a new profession—one that would go on to change the face of emergency medicine.  The two men were some of the world’s first paramedics, and, like Moon, they were Black.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

RuPaul 34 mins – “RuPaul describes his drag persona as “one-part Cher, two-parts David Bowie, one-part Diana Ross and two heaping spoonfuls of Dolly Parton.” The reality show he hosts and created, ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race,’ is now in its 12th season on VH1. He talks with Terry Gross about his early punk style of drag, becoming a “glamizon,” and the best advice his mother gave him. ” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stephen Sondheim 31 mins – “Broadway is dark because of the virus, but that doesn’t need to stop us from celebrating the 90th birthday of Broadway’s best living composer and lyricist—and one of the best in the history of Broadway, Stephen Sondheim. His 90th birthday is Sunday. We’re listening back to our interview from 2010, which we recorded on the occasion of his 80th birthday. He wrote the songs for ‘Sweeney Todd,’ ‘Follies,’ ‘Into the Woods,’ ‘Sunday in the Park with George’ and ‘Merrily We Roll Along.’ Revivals of two of his shows had to go dark because of the virus: ‘West Side Story,’ for which he wrote the lyrics, and ‘Company.’” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Valley of the Fallen 26 mins – “About an hour northwest of Madrid, an enormous stone crucifix rises 500 feet out of a rocky mountaintop. It’s so big you can see it from miles away. Beneath the cross, there’s a sprawling Benedictine monastery and a basilica carved out of the mountain. This place is called the Valley of the Fallen. And it’s likely the most controversial monument in Spain. The Valley is synonymous with Francisco Franco, the general who ruled Spain from the end of its bloody civil war in 1939 until his death in 1975. When Franco died, he became the Valley’s most notorious inhabitant. His body was buried under a huge stone slab. As the decades passed after his death, anger about the monument grew. People began to push for the removal of Franco’s body. They argued there was no place in a democracy for a monument exalting a man who had tortured and killed thousands of Spaniards in the name of fascism. And then in October 2019, Franco’s body was disinterred, his coffin packed into a helicopter, and then flown to a graveyard on the outskirts of the city to be reburied. Despite the atrocities he committed, Franco still has supporters in Spain. Some even see him as the emblem of a traditional Spanish Catholic life, and some actually like his fascist ideology and would like to see it make a comeback. When his body was removed, hundreds of his supporters gathered at the new cemetery to wield swastikas and Franco-era flags, and to perform the fascist salute in his honor. But this isn’t just the story of an old mausoleum and the dictator who used to be buried there. Because the monument is also a mass grave. There are tens of thousands of other bodies still trapped in the basilica beneath where Franco used to lie. Many were victims of Franco’s security forces, murdered during the height of the civil war. For years, their families have been trying to get them out.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

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Media Mining Digest 474: Amazon Empire, American Empire, Caffeine Use, Climate Change and Biden, Covid – US Response, Disease Smells, Germ Warfare, Grief Impact, Hate Machine, Loneliness, Medical Literature, Mindy Kaling, Newspapers Disappear, Pandemic Preparation, Recycling Plastics, San Francisco DA, Shaping the Future, Steven King, Tight and Loose Cultures, Vaccine History, Whale Songs

Exercise your ears: the 23 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 444 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Amazon Empire IV 117 mins – “To produce Amazon Empire, filmmakers James Jacoby and Anya Bourg conducted fifty-seven on-the-record interviews. The yearlong investigation revealed how Jeff Bezos transformed a small online bookstore into a trillion dollar global empire, profoundly changed consumer habits and retail commerce, and in the process, became the richest person in the world. In this collection of excerpts from interviews with eleven current and former Amazon executives, part of FRONTLINE’s ongoing Transparency Project, you can explore first-hand insights into Amazon’s rise as a global power, ethical questions surrounding data collection and worker safety, and recent calls to break up Amazon.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copies of the podcast are available in this blog archive.

American Empire 1 20 mins – “When many Americans think of American empire, they think of dispossession of Native Americans; they think of US economic and military power abroad, of CIA coups in Central America. They don’t necessarily think of territory: broad swaths of physical land acquired through warfare and kept as colonies. It was never quite British-style imperialism, with colonies around the world proudly touted as part of a dominating empire. But it was — and in some ways continues to be — a lot closer than most people realize. In the first part of Brooke’s conversation with historian Daniel Immerwahr, on the hidden history of US empire, Immerwahr explains the role of guano — bird poop — in launching America’s overseas empire, and the legal, political and social clashes that ensued. Immerwahr’s book is How To Hide An Empire: A History of the Greater United States.” At the link right-click and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.  

American Empire 2 21 mins – “At the dawn of the last century, the arguments over imperialism didn’t end with poets like Rudyard Kipling and writers like Mark Twain. In a world of shifting borders, how should and would the adolescent United States, big-headed about its democratic values, grapple with the tensions inherent in capturing territory? Historian Daniel Immerwahr explains to Brooke how this vital debate blazed across America’s consciousness like a comet, then vanished just as quickly, out of sight and mind. His new book is How To Hide An Empire: A History of the Greater United States.” At the link right-click and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.  

American Empire 3 21 mins – “After World War II, global anti-colonial sentiment (combined with less dependence on natural resources) led to a shrinking of America’s physical empire. But as historian Daniel Immerwahr explains, American empire didn’t disappear — it merely changed form. We conclude our hour with Immerwahr by looking at the hidden ways empire has changed our history, and more importantly for our purposes, our view of our history. His book is How To Hide An Empire: A History of the Greater United States.” At the link right-click and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Caffeine Use. 33 mins – “’Omnivore’s Dilemma’ author Michael Pollan talks about his audiobook, ‘Caffeine: How Coffee and Tea Created the Modern World.’ He describes caffeine as the world’s most widely-used psychoactive drug. (Originally broadcast Feb. 2020)” At the link you can listen, but not record; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Climate Change and Biden 16 mins – “Can Joe Biden live up to his climate plan? We mark the inauguration of the 46th president of the United States with a panel of three US policy insiders, who forecast how the “most ambitious climate agenda ever” will make ground in the first year.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid – US Response 13 mins – “Inside the Trump administration’s coronavirus response — and missed opportunities to contain COVID-19 before it was too late. Correspondent Martin Smith speaks with global health experts about warnings to the White House that went unheeded, including a health policy expert who said his 2019 study pointing to the threat of a pandemic was met with silence. As he investigates how the crisis unfolded in the U.S., Smith finds: “There’s a lot of unknowns as to who dropped the ball and when. It’s clear that at the top, and I mean by that the president, the wrong messages were being given.”  At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Disease Smells 42 mins – “What if you had a superpower that allowed you to see part of the world that was to come? At the age of 60, a Scottish woman named Joy Milne discovers she has a biological gift that allows her to see things that will happen in the future that no one else can see. Invisibilia looks at how we think about the future, and the important ways the future shapes the present.”  At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Germ Warfare 32 mins – “Apocalyptic novelist Max Brooks is something of an expert on planning for pandemics and other disasters. The author, whose books include World War Z, Germ Warfare and the forthcoming Devolution, has toured the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and has reviewed government response plans related to various emergency situations — all in the course of research. “We have a network in place that we as taxpayers have been funding to get us ready for something just like this,” Brooks says of the U.S. response to the COVID-19 pandemic. But, he adds, “we have been disastrously slow and disorganized from Day 1.” Brooks says the notion that the U.S. government was blindsided by the pandemic is “an onion of layered lies.” “What could have happened when this virus exploded — even when Wuhan was locked down — is we could have put the word out,” he says. “The government could have put the word out to ramp up emergency supplies to get them ready and then have an information strategy in place.” Instead, Brooks says, President Trump was slow to acknowledge the virus as a real threat. And thus far, the president has resisted using the Defense Production Act to force private companies to manufacture masks, gloves and other essential supplies in the fight against the coronavirus. Many government task forces that plan for disasters have yet to be activated in this crisis.-pointing” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Grief Impact 27 mins – “Dorothy Holinger, Ph.D., was an academic psychologist on the faculty of Harvard Medical School for over 23 years. She is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and has her own psychotherapy practice. Her book is, The Anatomy of Grief.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow to get the podcast.

Hate Machine 11 mins – “When a white nationalist massacred 22 people in an El Paso Walmart last week, who besides the shooter was to blame? Most of the media commentary on that question this week focused on Trump, but Bob starts this hour by taking on another culprit — Fox News. But it’s not just Fox that’s spreading dangerous rhetoric. Racism and xenophobia seep into other mainstream outlets under the guise of electoral pragmatism. Bob speaks with Tom Scocca, politics editor at Slate, about how tolerance for intolerable ideology is too often framed as a virtue — even in “ostensibly liberal” outlets.”  At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.  

Loneliness 35 mins – “Vivek Murthy was a newly-minted doctor when he realized that his thorough medical school education had fallen short. His training hadn’t prepared him for one of the most frequent health issues he saw in the examination room: loneliness. Vivek remembers feeling helpless when a patient recounted his sense of social isolation and the physical health problems linked to it. “I felt utterly ill-equipped to address what was clearly the issue that was on his mind,” Vivek says. Years later, when Vivek became the 19th Surgeon General of the United States, he witnessed a “dark thread of loneliness” in his conversations with Americans across the country. Loneliness, he realized, was more pervasive than he’d thought, and was bound up in other health issues in complicated ways. He calls loneliness “the great masquerader”; it often manifests as other emotions, such as anger, or through behaviors, such as drug or alcohol abuse.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Medical Literature 17 mins – “On average, 5,000 new medical articles are published every day. In this segment, Dr. Alan Ehrlich, Executive Editor of DynaMed, and Paul Simmons discuss some practical tips in staying current with the literature and applying it to our everyday practice. Pearls: Have some sort of system for learning that may include multiple different resources. Think critically about the data and focus on the clinical outcomes that matter to your patients. Keeping up with the latest medical literature is hard! A new article is published every 26 seconds = 5,000 articles a day” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Mindy Kaling 33 mins – “When nerds are depicted on screen, they are often bookworms and wallflowers who struggle to stand up for themselves. That’s not the type of nerd Mindy Kaling wanted to focus on in Never Have I Ever, the Netflix series she co-created with Lang Fisher. “There’s also the belligerent, confident nerd, and they want big things for themselves,” Kaling says. “We wanted to show an ambitious nerd … [who] wanted to lose her virginity, wanted to be cool, go to concerts.” Kaling first became known for her role as Kelly Kapoor on The Office. She was also a writer and producer of the series, and she was the showrunner and star of the series The Mindy Project. Never Have I Ever draws on Kaling’s experiences when she was in high school. The main character, Devi, is the 15-year-old daughter of immigrants from India and one the school’s top students. She’s nerdy and unpopular — but she’s also outgoing, opinionated and on the hunt for a boyfriend.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Newspapers Disappear 21 mins – “The value of local newspapers can hardly be overstated right now. We read our local papers to track the spread of COVID-19 in our states, and the availability of ICU beds at nearby hospitals. We read to get a sense of how nearby businesses are faring, and what nursing homes are doing to keep residents safe. More of us are reading more news all the time. But at the same time that readership is soaring, advertising revenue—which keeps newspapers financially afloat—is plummeting. As a result, a number of newspapers across the country are laying off workers, even shuttering. For many newspapers, the economic crisis brought on by the pandemic is merely the final nail in the coffin. For decades, the financial health of many newspapers has been fragile, in good economic times and bad….” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Pandemic Preparation 18 mins – ”Inside the Trump administration’s coronavirus response — and missed opportunities to contain COVID-19 before it was too late. Correspondent Martin Smith speaks with global health experts about warnings to the White House that went unheeded, including a health policy expert who said his 2019 study pointing to the threat of a pandemic was met with silence. As he investigates how the crisis unfolded in the U.S., Smith finds: “There’s a lot of unknowns as to who dropped the ball and when. It’s clear that at the top, and I mean by that the president, the wrong messages were being given.” At the link find “Warnings to the White House,” left-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recycling Plastic 38 mins – “With the plastic industry expanding like never before and the crisis of ocean pollution growing, FRONTLINE and NPR investigate the fight over the future of plastics.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow to get the podcast.

San Francisco DA 33 mins – “This is FRESH AIR. I’m Terry Gross. It’s difficult or impossible to practice social distancing in an overcrowded prison, which is dangerous not only for the people who are incarcerated but also for the guards and other prison staff and for the families and communities they return home to. This is an issue of special concern for my guest, San Francisco’s new DA Chesa Boudin. He’s concerned about the health of prisoners in San Francisco jails and about the health of his 75-year-old father David Gilbert, who’s in prison in New York. In 1981, Gilbert and Chesa’s mother, Kathy Boudin, who were radical leftists, were arrested for driving the getaway car in a botched armed robbery of a Brink’s truck. Two police officers and a guard were shot to death. Chesa Boudin was 14 months old when his parents started serving time. He was raised by his parents’ friends Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn, who were part of the radical group the Weather Underground, lived underground for years and later became educators active in education reform. Kathy Boudin was released on parole the same year that Chesa Boudin was leaving Yale for Oxford as a Rhodes scholar. That was in 2003. Chesa Boudin is now one of a growing number of DA’s advocating reforms in the criminal justice system to reduce mass incarceration and address the racial and economic inequities in the system.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shaping the Future 33 mins – “When we think of “the future,” it sounds like something abstract and faraway — we imagine new inventions, cutting-edge innovations, life on other planets. But the future can also be frightening. This past year has been a stark reminder of how quickly life can change, and how little we control. So which is it — a world that we shape, or one we’re propelled towards? On today’s episode, we explore the future — our worries and anxieties about it, our relationship with our future selves, and our ability to shape the future we want. We hear stories about the predictions of futurists, the efforts of science to save a near-extinct animal, and how we make decisions for our future selves.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Steven King 33 mins – “This is FRESH AIR. I’m Terry Gross. Life during the pandemic has been feeling like living in a Stephen King novel, so let’s see what Stephen King has to say about it. He’s my guest. About 40 years ago, in his novel “The Stand,” he wrote about a virus far worse than COVID-19. It was 99% lethal and wiped out most of the population. That virus was accidentally released by a lab developing biological weapons. Stephen King has a new collection of novellas called “If It Bleeds” that will be published April 21. The main character of the title story is private eye Holly Gibney, who was also a character in several other King books, including “The Outsider,” which was adapted into an HBO series starring Cynthia Erivo as Holly. The series just ended a few weeks ago and is available for streaming and on demand if you have HBO. Like in “The Outsider,” in “If It Bleeds,” Holly is confronted by a force of evil.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tight and Loose Cultures 33 mins – “At the 2014 World Cup in Brazil, Japanese soccer fans did something striking: they started going through the stadium, cleaning up the trash that was left behind. A lot of people were baffled by this behavior, but Michele Gelfand, a psychologist at the University of Maryland, sees their actions in the frame of what she refers to as “tight” and “loose” cultures. Tight cultures, she says, are more rules-oriented. Loose cultures are more permissive. “Countries like Japan, Singapore, Germany, and Austria tend to veer tight,” she says. “And countries like New Zealand, Brazil, the Netherlands, and Greece tended to veer loose. And of course, all countries have tight and loose elements.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Vaccine History 10 mins – “Vaccination is a powerful method of disease prevention that is relevant to people of all ages and in all countries, as the Covid-19 pandemic illustrates. Vaccination can improve people’s chances of survival, protect communities from new and reemerging health threats, and enhance societal productivity. But achieving the promise of vaccination requires much more than the vaccines themselves. It requires appropriate incentives to encourage the timely discovery and development of innovative, effective, safe, and affordable products; effective financing and delivery programs; and credible scientific leaders who can provide evidence-based policy recommendations and reassure the public about the value of the vaccines. Since its inception 50 years ago, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), previously known as the Institute of Medicine (IOM), has been an authoritative resource on medical issues, including vaccination, and a global leader in vaccine-policy development….”  At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Whale Song 46 mins – “Grappling with the realities of the climate crisis can be incredibly discouraging—especially when we feel powerless, paralyzed, or don’t know where to start. In light of the potentially dark future on our horizon, here’s a list of resources we’ve compiled for existing—and resisting—in the face of impending climate disruption.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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Media Mining Digest 473: Abraham Lincoln Lessons, AI Decisions, AI Governance, AI Predictions, Artificial Intelligence, Black Canada, Code Red, Covid and Immigration, Covid and Migrants, Covid-19 and International Effects, Defense Department, Fateful Triangle, Green Card Use, Human Rights in Iran, India and Cash, Inventions Shaped Humanity, Machines that Can Think, Melinda Gates on Gender Equality, Mental Illness History, Poison Squad, School Closures, Silicon Valley Story, Unconventional Diplomat, Venezuelan Migrants, White Nationalism, Work Future, Working in Space

Exercise your ears: the 30 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 499 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Abraham Lincoln Lessons 19 mins – “In 1863, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln wrote a scathing letter to his top Union general, who had squandered a chance to end the Civil War. Then Lincoln folded it up and tucked it away in his desk. He never sent it. Lincoln understood that the first action that comes to mind is often counter-productive. In the third episode of a four-part special series on leadership, HBR Editor in Chief Adi Ignatius and Harvard Business School professor and historian Nancy Koehn explore Lincoln’s career both before and during America’s greatest crisis. They discover lessons on how to learn continuously, communicate values, and exercise emotional self-control.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

AI Governance 38 mins – “As technology becomes more sophisticated, artificial intelligence (AI) is permeating into new parts of society and being used in criminal justice to assess risks for those in pre-trial or on probation. Predictive analytics raise several questions concerning bias, accuracy, and fairness. Observers worry that these tools replicate injustice and lead to unfair outcomes in pre-trial hearings, detention, and incarceration. On February 19, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted an event to address the challenges of federal risk assessment instruments in the criminal justice system. Panelists discussed the implications of AI on criminal justice and ways to improve criminal justice reform initiatives….” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Predictions 17 mins – “AI and robots seem to be everywhere, handling more and more work, freeing humans up — to  do what? In this 3-part serie, contributor Jill Eisen explores the digital revolution happening in our working lives. Artificial intelligence is on the verge of replacing our own intelligence. It took decades to adjust to machines out-performing human and animal labour. What will happen when robots and algorithms surpass what our brains can do? Some say digital sweatshops—repetitive, dull, poorly paid and insecure jobs—are our destiny. Others believe that  technology could lead to more fulfilling lives.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

AI Predictions 16 mins – “Avi Goldfarb, a professor at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, explains the economics of machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence that makes predictions. He says as prediction gets cheaper and better, machines are going to be doing more of it. That means businesses — and individual workers — need to figure out how to take advantage of the technology to stay competitive. Goldfarb is the aIcoauthor of the book “Prediction Machines: The Simple Economics of Artificial Intelligence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Artificial Intelligence 36 mins – “AI and robots seem to be everywhere, handling more and more work, freeing humans up — to  do what? In this 3-part serie, contributor Jill Eisen explores the digital revolution happening in our working lives. Artificial intelligence is on the verge of replacing our own intelligence. It took decades to adjust to machines out-performing human and animal labour. What will happen when robots and algorithms surpass what our brains can do? Some say digital sweatshops—repetitive, dull, poorly paid and insecure jobs—are our destiny. Others believe that  technology could lead to more fulfilling lives. **This episode is Part 1 of series. Part 2 airs Tuesday, July 31; Part 3 airs Tuesday, August 7. **This episode originally aired September 13, 2017. The digital age is transforming the way we work. Some would even say that artificial intelligence, robots, and automation are destroying it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Black Canada 36 mins – “Canada’s history of suppressing Black activism is coming to light like never before, thanks to researchers like PhD student Wendell Adjetey. Wendell’s historical research uncovers evidence of clandestine government surveillance in the 20th century, while also bringing to life overlooked parts of this history. His work highlights the struggles and setbacks of Black activists in the 20th century, helping us understand the ripple effect of those legacies today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Code Red 50 mins – “Broad and principled opposition to Donald Trump’s presidency has drawn millions of previously disengaged citizens to the public square and to the ballot box. But if progressives and moderates are unable—and unwilling—to overcome their differences, they could not only enable Trump to prevail again but also squander an occasion for launching a new era of reform. Will progressives and moderates feud while America burns, or will they take advantage of the greatest opportunity since the New Deal era to strengthen American democracy, foster social justice, and turn back the threats of the Trump era? In his new book, “Code Red: How Progressives and Moderates Can Unite to Save Our Country,” Brookings Senior Fellow E.J. Dionne Jr. calls for an alliance between progressives and moderates to seize the moment and restore hope to America’s future for the 2020 presidential election.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid and Immigration 40 mins – “Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, globally interconnected economies and societies are navigating uncharted waters. The pandemic and its aftermath present policymakers with two crucial challenges: how to manage the spread and hopefully eradication of the disease and how to deal with the economic devastation caused by stay-at-home orders, travel bans, and other measures taken to halt the spread of the virus. Currently migration and mobility have come to a relative standstill. Will migration levels return to pre-pandemic levels? And as most countries’ labor systems and economies are linked to immigration, might this public-health crisis result in a fundamental realignment of economic relationships? Will it stimulate a rethink of migration systems, where policymakers seriously re-examine the role and composition of the foreign-born workforce and approaches to immigrant integration? Or post-pandemic, will countries just revert to their previous approaches to migration, or possibly surge further towards protectionism and restrictionism?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 International Effects 29 mins – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on January 20, 2021, the editors are joined by NEJM colleagues Krista Nottage, a surgeon in the Bahamas, James O’Connell, an infectious disease physician in Ireland, and Gary Wong, a pulmonologist in Hong Kong, to discuss the impact of Covid-19 around the world and the international response to it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Defense Department 48 mins – “Foreign policy is the domain of the executive branch, but Congress plays a key constitutional role by passing budgets and conducting oversight. As the Department of Defense reorients its strategy and outlook to deterring, and if necessary, defeating near-peer great competitors, Congress must ensure that the department is building a force that will address the nation’s security challenges while also stewarding U.S. taxpayer resources. On March 2, Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, joined Senior Fellow Michael O’Hanlon in a conversation on defense policy. Now in his final term, Rep. Thornberry is the ranking member of the House Armed Services Committee and a distinguished former chairman. An advocate of on-time annual defense budgets, Rep. Thornberry was instrumental in realizing the Trump-era increases in defense spending, and in advancing the Obama-era “Third Offset” to enhance U.S. competitiveness before that. Their conversation spanned the defense budget, the role of Congress in overseeing the Defense Department, and the wide range of security challenges confronting the United States.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fateful Triangle 60 mins – “In what is being called the “Asian century,” there has been increasing focus on the fate of the rivalry between China and India. The U.S. relationships with the two Asian giants are now seen to be intertwined, after having followed separate paths during the Cold War. In her new book, “Fateful Triangle: How China Shaped U.S.-India Relations During the Cold War,” Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy and Director of the India Project Tanvi Madan argues that China’s influence on the U.S.-India relationship is neither a recent nor a momentary phenomenon. Drawing on archival documents from India and the United States, Madan traces how American and Indian perceptions of, and policy toward, China significantly shaped U.S.-India relations during the Cold War. She highlights the lessons that this history offers for both the present and future of the triangle and offers insights on the possibilities and limits of U.S.-India cooperation in the face of a rising China….” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Card Use 36 mins – “On this webinar, MPI experts discussed the public-charge rule and released estimates of the populations that could be deemed ineligible for a green card based on existing benefits use. They examined the far larger consequences of the rule, through its “chilling effects” and imposition of a test aimed at assessing whether green-card applicants are likely to ever use a public benefit in the future. And they discussed how the latter holds the potential to reshape legal immigration to the United States. 

Human Rights in Iran 1 36 mins – “The COVID-19 pandemic has scrambled just about every aspect of human mobility. It led governments around the world to close their external borders and, in some cases, impose internal border restrictions. It brought international travel to near shutdown in the early months, with a halting recovery since. And it placed much of migration on ice. The repercussions of this dramatic halt to mobility will be profound, and will almost certainly lead to transformations and innovations that will reshape travel and migration for the foreseeable future—maybe even permanently. Moving Beyond Pandemic explores the questions and challenges confronting policymakers, airport and other transportation hub operators, travelers, and others as mobility slowly resumes. Listen to the podcast and subscribe wherever you usually listen to your podcasts or do so directly on this website.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Human Rights in Iran 2 12 mins – “By the time Shirin Ebadi won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2003 – the first woman from the Islamic world to so – the Iranian lawyer and human rights activist had already paid a steep price for her convictions. Shirin Ebadi had been Iran’s first female judge, but was dismissed following the 1979 revolution and spent subsequent years defending those persecuted by authorities, only to be jailed herself for criticizing the system.The newest wave of unrest that has seized Iran in recent weeks has sparked an exceptionally brutal response that left thousands of victims in its wake. At least 208 people have been killed and 7,000 arrested in protests since mid-November, according to UN human rights monitors and the latest estimates are likely far below the real numbers. The Trump administration believes as many as 1,000 have been killed in the ruthless crackdown. In a year when Iran celebrated the 40th anniversary of the revolution that ushered in the Islamic regime, some activists believe it is on the verge of another revolutionary moment. The evidence, says Nobel Prize-winning human rights activist Shirin Ebadi, is in the scale of the protests and the subsequent crackdown — as well as the identity of the protesters themselves.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

India and Cash 16 mins – “Bhaskar Chakravorti, the dean of global business at The Fletcher School at Tufts University, analyzes the economic impact of India’s unprecedented demonetization move in 2016. With no advance warning, India pulled the two largest banknotes from circulation, notes that accounted for 86% of cash transactions in a country where most payments happen in cash. Chakravorti discusses the impact on consumers, businesses, and digital payment providers, and whether Indian policymakers reached their anti-corruption goals. He’s the author of the article “One Year After India Killed Off Cash, Here’s What Other Countries Should Learn From It.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Inventions Shaped Humanity 15 mins – “Materials scientist and science writer Ainissa Ramirez talks about her latest book The Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Machines that Can Think36 mins. – “Stephen Hawking thought that artificial intelligence could spell the end of humanity. But Roger Melko of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics thinks we could be on the cusp of a wonderfully transformative age. When computers are taught to learn and dream the result can be inspiration, or it can resemble something like dog spaghetti. That’s what happens when machines are programmed to think like humans — at least according to Roger Melko, a professor of physics at the University of Waterloo, and Canada Research Chair. He works on a supercomputer developing algorithms to study quantum matter.  Show a computer photos of dogs and spaghetti and the algorithm may spit out a bizarre image. Feed it information to solve a difficult problem, and it might find a valuable answer.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Melinda Gates on Gender Equality 23 mins – “Melinda Gates, cochair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and founder of Pivotal Ventures, is committing $1 billion over the next ten years to advance gender equality. She says evidence shows it’s the best way to drive economic development in nations and performance in companies. She shares her own stories as a female executive at Microsoft, a working mother, and a nonprofit leader learning from women around the world. Gates is the author of the HBR article “Gender Equality Is Within Our Reach.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Mental Illness History 37 mins – “Anne Harrington puts it plainly: “We don’t understand any major mental disorder biologically.” The Harvard historian of science takes no pleasure in relating this surprising fact. She knows that people with depression, schizophrenia and bipolar conditions want better treatments for their symptoms. She also acknowledges that psychiatrists and researchers ARE “working hard to change that situation.” But her book, Mind Fixers: Psychiatry’s Troubled Search for the Biology of Mental Illness, surveys a flawed medical field that has been unable to come to any clear consensus around the causes of — or cures for — mental illness.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Poison Squad 27 mins – “We talk to science journalist Deborah Blum about her new book The Poison Squad: One Chemist’s Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the Twentieth Century.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

School Closures 40 mins – “Mass school and university closures have been among the most shocking signs of COVID-19’s power to drive a global shutdown. This blog begins the discussion on quantifying the long-term impact of lost earnings on young people and the future global economy of this unprecedented, near universal, policy response. In mid-April, UNESCO reported 192 countries had closed all schools and universities, affecting more than 90 percent of the world’s learners: almost 1.6 billion children and young people. While some governments are starting to order teachers and students back to work, education—one of the most important drivers in human capital investment—continues to be largely closed for business.

Silicon Valley Story 27 mins – “A Totally Fictional but Essentially True Silicon Valley Story: We talk to Jessica Powell, a writer and former VP of Communications for Google, about here new book, “The Big Disruption: A Totally Fictional but…” At the link you can listen, but clicking “A totally Fictional but….”; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Unconventional Diplomat 36 mins – “Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein is perhaps best known as the outspoken UN High Commissioner for Human Rights — considered the world’s moral-arbiter-in-chief — from 2014 to 2018. But he refused to run for a second term because he says it might have meant  “bending a knee in supplication” before the five permanent members of the UN Security Council: United States, France, Russia, China and the United Kingdom.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Venezuelan Migrants 41 mins – “Fleeing crisis, nearly 4 million Venezuelans have moved to other Latin American and Caribbean countries over the past few years. This webinar marked the launch of a Latin American and Caribbean Migration Portal, and a report examining the migration and integration policy responses in the region.” AT the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.  

White Nationalism 41 mins – “The language of racism and white supremacy is all around us; people are getting hurt, and also killed. But racism also pervades our public policies. To address these issues and how to move forward, this episode features a discussion with two Brookings experts: Andre Perry, David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, and Vanessa Williamson, senior fellow in the Governance Studies Program and also in the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Women at Work 31 mins – “In this special episode, HBR IdeaCast host Sarah Green Carmichael introduces Harvard Business Review’s new podcast “Women at Work,” about women’s experiences in the workplace. This episode about being heard tackles three aspects of communication: first, how and why women’s speech patterns differ from men’s; second, how women can be more assertive in meetings; and third, how women can deal with interrupters (since the science shows women get interrupted more often than men do). Guests: Deborah Tannen, Jill Flynn, and Amy Gallo.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Work Future 1 36 mins – “The biggest innovation in the world of work in the last decade has been the rise of online platforms which connect workers and customers. Uber and Airbnb are the most well known, but there are dozens of others. Upwork connects businesses with independent professional, TaskRabbit, handy and jiffy are platforms for various home services, Amazon Mechanical Turk is on-line marketplace for small computer tasks called micro-tasks, and the list goes on. You can find everything from graphic designers to people who will walk your dog or assemble your Ikea furniture. These platforms have been well received by customers, but for workers, they often have a dark side. And they present a major challenge for governments who are grappling with how to regulate them. Contributor Jill Eisen looks at the digital revolution happening in our working lives. ** This episode is part 2 of a 3-part series.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Work Future 2 36 mins – “The future of work has become one huge, nerve-wracking question mark. Technology was once believed to be our deliverance. We’d be working shorter hours, and about the only stress we’d have would be to figure out what to do with all our leisure time. But technology hasn’t quite delivered on that promise. We’re working longer hours, there are fewer jobs and and a lot less job security. In Part 3 of her series on the future of work, Jill Eisen looks at the promise of technology — and how it can lead to a better world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Working in Space 13 mins – “Scott Kelly, a retired U.S. astronaut, spent 520 days in space over four missions. Working in outer space is a lot like working on earth, but with different challenges and in closer quarters. Kelly looks back on his 20 years of working for NASA, including being the commander of the International Space Station during his final, yearlong mission. He talks about the kind of cross-cultural collaboration and decision making he honed on the ISS, offering advice that leaders can use in space and on earth. His memoir is “Endurance: A Year in Space, a Lifetime of Discovery.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

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MMD472 Media Mining Digest: Activist Otto Sharmer, AI and Criminal Justice, AI Principals, Artificial Intelligence, Ayahuasca, Black Business Devaluation, Brown Skinned, Caffeine Use, Chernoble Trends, China and India Areas, China-Australia Relations, Climate Crisis, Coffin Making, Corruption in China, Covid in Jails, Cyberlaw Worldwide, Democracy Fails, DHS Compiles Intelligence on Journalists, Digital Threat Counters, Einstein, Electoral College Abolishment, Ethiopia Conflict, Fauci Article, Fauci Discussion, Film Editors, Foreign Interference, Free Trade, Genetic Experimentation and Innovation, Guantanamo, Hong Kong Protests, Houdini, Human Rights Crisis in Xinjian, Intelligence Innovation, Iranian Assassination, ISIS in America, Longer Life, Managing Older Workers, Mitch McConnell, Molecular Genetics and Genomics, Nazism, Planning Your Post Retirement, Poisoning of Alexei Navalny, President and COVID Infection, Prison Abolition, QAnon Discussion, Rural Broadband Politics, Secondhand Goods, SIGINT Intelligence, Social Media Weaponization, Spymasters, Super Rich, Talented Women, Tranformational Change, Uighurs in China, US in China, Vaccine Misinformation, Vindman Conversation, White Power Violence, Wikinomics

Exercise your ears: the 61 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 802 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Activist Otto Sharmer 38 mins – “It’s no secret that our world today is full of dire crises ranging from ecological to societal. We’ve built a world with the mindset of maximizing “me,” creating catastrophic results that benefit no one. But what to do? As Albert Einstein observed, “We cannot solve problems with the same kind of thinking that created them.” If we want to change the way the world works, we need to update the thinking that created the systems, institutions and economies around us. Otto Scharmer has developed a framework and strategies for guiding this shift in our thinking from an ego-centric awareness to an eco-centric one — from considering what’s best for me to considering what’s best for the whole, including me. Tune in to find out why embracing this shift is at the core of the leadership the world needs.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI and Criminal Justice 38 mins – “As technology becomes more sophisticated, artificial intelligence (AI) is permeating into new parts of society and being used in criminal justice to assess risks for those in pre-trial or on probation. Predictive analytics raise several questions concerning bias, accuracy, and fairness. Observers worry that these tools replicate injustice and lead to unfair outcomes in pre-trial hearings, detention, and incarceration. On February 19, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted an event to address the challenges of federal risk assessment instruments in the criminal justice system. Panelists discussed the implications of AI on criminal justice and ways to improve criminal justice reform initiatives.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however,a copy is included in this blog archive.  

AI Principals 39 mins – “This virtual talk features Jessica Fjeld, assistant director of the Cyberlaw Clinic and lead author on the “Principled AI” report, in conversation with Ryan Budish, an assistant research director at Berkman Klein and a member of OECD’s AI Governance Expert Group, which proposed high-level AI principles. Fjeld and Budish discuss AI principles both generally (the high-level landscape in which they exist) and in practice (the creation and implementation process for principles.) “ At the link you can listen,but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive..

Artificial Intelligence 32 mins – “Darrell West is vice president of the Brookings Institution and director of Governance Studies at Brookings. John Allen is the president of the Brookings Institution and a retired U.S. Marine Corps four-star general. Together, they are the authors of the book, “Turning Point: Policymaking in the Era of Artificial Intelligence,” a broad look at the impact that artificial intelligence systems are likely to have on everything from the military, to health care, to vehicles and transportation, and to international great power competition. They spoke with Benjamin Wittes about the book and the question of how we should govern AI systems. What makes for ethical uses of AI? What makes it scary? What are the anxieties that people have about artificial intelligence, and to what extent are the fears legitimate?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence 52 mins – “Computer Scientist and author Melanie Mitchell of Portland State University and the Santa Fe Institute talks about her book Artificial Intelligence with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mitchell explains where we are today in the world of artificial intelligence (AI) and where we might be going. Despite the hype and excitement surrounding AI, Mitchell argues that much of what is called “learning” and “intelligence” when done by machines is not analogous to human capabilities. The capabilities of machines are highly limited to explicit, narrow tasks with little transfer to similar but different challenges. Along the way, Mitchell explains some of the techniques used in AI and how progress has been made in many areas.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ayahuasca Use 19 mins – “Growing numbers of tourists are travelling to the Peruvian Amazon to drink ayahuasca, a traditional plant medicine said to bring about a higher state of consciousness. Foreigners come looking for spiritual enlightenment or help with mental health problems like trauma, depression, and addiction. But not everyone is happy about Peru’s booming ayahuasca tourism industry. A group of indigenous healers are fighting back against what they see as the exploitation and appropriation of their cultural heritage by foreigners – who run most of the ayahuasca retreats popular with tourists. This coming together of cultures has thrown up another serious problem too: vulnerable women being sexually abused while under the influence of charismatic healers and this powerful psychedelic.” At the link left-click “Download,” select “Lessor quality” then “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Brown Skinned 36 mins – “In a compelling conversation, acclaimed journalist and author Kamal Al-Solaylee discusses all things brown, from the psychology of the colour, to why he says, it’s always ‘a bridesmaid, never the bride,’ in the constructed hierarchy of human skin tone.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Black Business Devaluation..83 mins.- “In 2018, research from the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program (Brookings Metro) and Gallup showed that homes in Black-majority neighborhoods experience devaluation due to racial bias at a rate of 23% on average, when compared to similar homes in otherwise similar white neighborhoods. Now, in a related study, the authors offer evidence for the devaluation of businesses. The report, titled “Five-star reviews, one-star profits: The devaluation of businesses in Black communities”, finds that highly rated businesses in Black neighborhoods (measured by Yelp ratings) experience slower revenue growth than poorly rated businesses in otherwise similar neighborhoods. This unrealized growth results in a total devaluation of more than $1.3 billion in lost revenue annually.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however,a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Caffeine Use 26 mins – “’Omnivore’s Dilemma’ author Michael Pollan talks about his audiobook, ‘Caffeine: How Coffee and Tea Created the Modern World.’ He describes caffeine as the world’s most widely-used psychoactive drug.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Chernoble Trends 13 mins – ”Ninety year old Galina is one of the last witnesses to the wild natural world that preceded the Chernobyl zone in southern Belarus. ‘We lived with wolves’ she says ‘and moose, and elk and wild boars.’ Soviet development destroyed that ecosystem. Forests and marshland were tamed and laid to farmland and industrial use. But when the Chernobyl reactor exploded in 1986, the human population was evacuated; their villages were buried beneath the earth as though they had never existed. A generation on, it seems that the animals Galina knew are returning. But how are they are affected by their radioactive environment? And what can we infer about the state of the land? Monica Whitlock visits the strange new wilderness emerging in the heart of Europe” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive..

China and India Areas 11 mins – “Michael Silverstein, cofounder of The Boston Consulting Group’s global consumer practice and coauthor of “The $10 Trillion Prize.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

China-Australia Relations 47 mins – “In the first part of this episode, Jordan Schneider, the host of ChinaTalk, sat down with Yun Jiang, a former Australian government official and an editor at the Australian National University’s China Story blog, for a deep dive into the Australia-China relationship, providing much needed context on why tension has boiled over in recent months. In the second part, we excerpt a conversation that Jordan had with Wendy Cutler, a long-time USTR official and current vice president and managing director of the Asia Society Policy Institute. They talked about how the Biden administration could address China on trade, and she offers her take on Yun and Jordan’s policy proposals for shoring up Australia.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Crisis 21 mins – “On February 23 at the Hammer Museum in LA, Laura moderated a discussion about the future of environmental justice featuring actor and activist Jane Fonda and community organizer Janet Valenzuela.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coffin Making 19 mins – “Accompanying her neighbour Betty to a funeral, Linda encounters a mislaid eco warrior. Comedy series written by and starring Linda Smith.” At the link you cannot download the episode; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Corruption in China 42 mins – “Why has modern China prospered in spite of vast corruption? On this episode of ChinaTalk, Jordan Schneider talks with Yuen Yuen Ang, associate professor of political science at the University of Michigan, about her new book, “China’s Gilded Age: The Paradox of Economic Boom and Vast Corruption.” She draws comparisons between U.S. history and the China of today, arguing that access money in China functions like campaign finance in the States. They also discuss the implications of corruption for regime stability.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Covid in Jails 33 mins – “Chesa Boudin’s radical leftist parents were imprisoned when he was a toddler. Now he’s working to reduce the inmate population in San Francisco — and worrying about his dad, who remains in prison.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyberwar Worldwide 53 mins – “In today’s interview, I spar with Harriet Moynihan over the application of international law to cyberattacks, a topic on which she has written with clarity and in detail. We disagree politely but profoundly. I make the case that international law is distinct from what works in cyberspace and is inconsistent with either clarity or effectiveness in deterring cyberattacks. Harriet argues that international law has been a central principle of the post-1945 international system and one that has helped to keep a kind of peace among nations. It’s a good exchange….” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Fails 26 mins – “Anne Applebaum is a columnist, writer, historian and most recently, the author of “Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lore of Authoritarianism,” a book that explores why authoritarian ideologies are on the ascendance in countries as diverse as Poland, Hungary, Spain, the United States and Great Britain. Benjamin Wittes spoke with Anne about the themes of the book: Why are all of these authoritarian ideologies on the rise now? What is the role of social media in their rise? What are the major themes that they have in common, and how different are they location by location? How did conservative ideology come to fracture the way it has over so brief a period of time? And how is the modern wave of authoritarianism different from earlier iterations of it?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

DHS Compiles Intelligence on Journalists 36 mins – ““What if J. Edgar Hoover Had Been a Moron?” That’s the question Lawfare’s editor-in-chief Benjamin Wittes asks in a new article about his experience learning that his tweets had been written up in an intelligence report by the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Intelligence and Analysis. After reporting on an internal DHS document and publishing other documents to Twitter, Wittes learned that I&A had distributed intelligence reports about those tweets along with the tweets of New York Times reporter Mike Baker. After Shane Harris reported on I&A’s activities at the Washington Post, DHS announced that it was halting the practice of collecting information on journalists and the head of the office was reassigned. Quinta Jurecic discussed the bizarre story with Wittes and former Assistant Attorney General for National Security David Kris.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Threat Counters 31 mins – “This week on our Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Alina Polyakova and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Shane Huntley, the director of Google’s Threat Analysis Group—a team that leads Google’s efforts to track threats from nation states and hacker groups. If you’ve ever received a notification from Google that a state-sponsored actor is trying to access your email account, you’ve heard from the Threat Analysis Group. The group examines everything from attempts to steal cryptocurrency to what Google calls “coordinated influence campaigns.” Recently, the Threat Analysis Group has begun putting out blog posts with updates on their work against coordinated influence campaigns. Alina and Quinta asked Shane about his “bulletin” for the first quarter of 2020, but since they spoke, Google has published another post for the second quarter—detailing actions against campaigns from Iran, Russia and China.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Electoral College Abolishment 33 mins – “Jesse Wegman, author of ‘Let the People Pick the President,’ says the Electoral College’s winner-take-all rule is not mandated by the Constitution: “There’s nothing keeping us from changing it.” Wegman talks about how winner-take-all came to be, attempts to change it, and how the Electoral College disproportionately affects people of color.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrows and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Einstein 25 mins – In 1905, when Albert Einstein worked as a patent office clerk, he published a series of academic papers that revolutionized physics and our thinking about space and time, mass and energy. His ideas were a great leap forward. Panelists at the Stratford Festival discuss how Einstein revolutionized how we live our lives today.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Ethiopia Conflict 37 mins “It’s not something that has gotten a lot of attention amid a busy U.S. news cycle, but much has been happening in Ethiopia over the past two months. Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, who just last year won the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to bring unity between Ethiopia and neighboring Eritrea, led a military battle against domestic forces in the northern Ethiopian region of Tigray. The fighting has caused the significant displacement of people living in the region and has involved reports of atrocities. In early December, the Prime Minister claimed victory, but concerns remain about how long tensions will endure—or at least continue to simmer. It’s a complicated situation with major implications for stability in the East Africa and Horn of Africa region. To break it all down, Jacob Schulz talked with two different experts. First, to get a sense of what’s going on and how we got to this point, he spoke with Emmanuel Igunza, a reporter in East Africa for BBC News; then, he spoke with Beza Tesfaye, the director of research and learning for migration at Mercy Corps, about the humanitarian problems implicated by the crisis.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Fauci Discussion 27 mins – “President Trump’s daily briefings on the COVID-19 pandemic have introduced millions of Americans to Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. At times, the specialist in infectious diseases has differed with the president during the briefings, correcting him on the seriousness of the virus or on the timeline for developing a vaccine. That’s fueled speculation that Fauci’s tenure might be cut short. But New Yorker writer Michael Specter doesn’t think Fauci needs to worry about job security. “Trump can’t fire him,” Specter says. “He can kick him off the coronavirus task force … but he can’t fire him from his job.” Specter has known Fauci for decades — covering his work and the way he’s handled the role of presidential adviser through six different U.S. presidents and the AIDS epidemic. Specter chronicles those ups and downs in the New Yorker article, How Anthony Fauci Became America’s Doctor.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Film Editors 21 mins – “What are you watching? There’s a good chance it was edited by a woman. This time on the Laura Flanders Show, we talk with avant garde filmmaker and cinema studies professor Su Friedrich about the hidden sheroes of film editing, the names you don’t know but ought to know from Hollywood to Bollywood and beyond. Aside from Blanche Sewell, the editor of The Wizard of Oz, and Thelma Schoonmaker, Martin Scorsese’s editor for over fifty years, there’s Renu Saluja, who edited many classics of 1990s Indian cinema, and Mexico’s Gloria Schoemann, one of the most prolific editors in history with over 227 film credits to her name. Music in the Middle: “My Passion” by Mikki Afflick featuring Miranda Nicole courtesy of Soul Sun Soul Music.” At the link right-click “Download MP3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foreign Interference 28 mins – “It’s been a wild couple of days of disinformation in the electoral context. Intelligence community officials are warning about Russian and Iranian efforts to influence the U.S. presidential election—and claiming that Iran is responsible for sending threatening emails from fake Proud Boys to Democratic voters. What exactly is going on here? To talk through the developments and the questions that linger, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Scott R. Anderson, Susan Hennessey and Quinta Jurecic.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Free Trade 46 mins – “Economist and author Kimberly Clausing of Reed College talks about her book Open with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Clausing, a self-described progressive, argues that the United States should continue to embrace free trade but she argues for other interventions to soften the impact of trade on workers and communities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Experimentation and Innovation 37 mins – “Genetic experimentation and innovation immediately conjures up dystopian visions — just look at our predilection for movies and books about science gone terribly wrong. And then there’s the tendency we humans have to resist change. So often when we hear news of a significant development in genomics, we reflexively ask: “Shouldn’t there be a law against that?” Bartha Knoppers, professor and director of the Centre of Genomics and Policy at McGill University, is all too familiar with this response. She refers to it as the ‘prohibition reflex’. She says it may be natural, but it isn’t necessarily helpful. Instead, she argues, we need to quell our initial fears about genetic innovation so that we can conjure a more fruitful response.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however,a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Guantanamo 32 mins – “Jasmine El-Gamal is a nonresident senior fellow with the Middle East program at the Atlantic Council. Between 2008 and 2015, she served as a Middle East advisor in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and as a special assistant to three undersecretaries of defense for policy. She is the author of a recent article in Newlines magazine entitled, “Lost and Found in Guantanamo Bay: Two encounters with two different men in the most notorious detention facility in the world shaped my faith – and my life – forever.” She joined Benjamin Wittes to talk about the article, how she ended up as a young woman as a translator at Guantanamo and in Iraq, what she’s done since, and how the experience of Guantanamo shaped her later policy career, as well as her view of America, Islam and counterterrorism.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Hong Kong Protests 51 mins – “Jordan Schneider, the host of ChinaTalk, sat down with Antony Dapiran, Hong Kong-based lawyer and author of two books on protests in Hong Kong. They discussed the history and legacy of the 2019 protests on the anniversary of one of the largest protests in human history, when two million Hongkongers marched against the extradition bill. They talked about the lead-up to and aftermath of that day, how protests grew increasingly violent, the new national security law, and how these protests compare and contrast to Black Lives Matter.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Houdini 57 mins – “Journalist and author Joe Posnanski talks about his book, The Life and Afterlife of Harry Houdini, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Posnanski explores the enduring fame of Houdini who remains an iconic cultural figure almost a century after his death. Topics discussed include the nature of celebrity, the nature of ambition, parenting, magic, and the use of public relations to create and sustain reputation and celebrity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Rights Crisis in Xinjiang 27 mins – “There is a human rights crisis going on in the Chinese province of Xinjiang. The Chinese government has been rounding up minority groups, most notably the Uighurs, and putting them into forced labor and reeducation camps. The government has gone to great lengths to keep Xinjiang away from international attention, and it has had some success in doing so. Jordan Schneider, the host of the ChinaTalk podcast, wrote an essay on Lawfare last week outlining how the U.S. can respond and push back on the Chinese government’s abuses in the region. During a live event for ChinaTalk, Jacob Schulz talked through Xinjiang and potential U.S. responses with Schneider and Sheena Greitens, an associate professor at UT Austin’s LBJ School of Public Affairs.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Innovation 30 mins.- “This month, the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence’s Subcommittee on Strategic Technologies and Advanced Research released a report entitled, “Rightly Scaled, Carefully Open, Infinitely Agile: Reconfiguring to Win the Innovation Race in the Intelligence Community.” Susan Hennessey sat down with Subcommittee Chair Congressman Jim Himes of Connecticut to discuss the challenges the United States is facing with near-peer national competitors in science and technology and the impact on the intelligence community. They talked about the role of China, stemming intelligence community brain drain, the need for basic research and how Congress can heal itself to become part of the solution.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Iranian Assassination 33 mins – “The top Iranian nuclear scientist has been killed, apparently in an Israeli strike. Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, who has long been the mastermind of the Iranian nuclear program, was gunned down in an attack with a remote control machine gun. Iranian reprisals are expected, although their timing and nature is not clear. It also puts the incoming Biden administration, which is looking to bring back the Iran nuclear deal, in a bit of a pickle. To chew it all over, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Scott R. Anderson, international law specialist and Lawfare senior editor; Suzanne Maloney, the vice president and director of the Foreign Policy Program at the Brookings Institution and an Iran scholar; and Natan Sachs, director of the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings where he focuses on Israeli policy. They talked about why the Israelis would conduct this operation, how effective its killing of Iranian nuclear scientists has been, whether any of it is legal and what it means for the future of U.S.-Iran relations.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS in America 36 mins – “The Islamic State in America is a topic that once garnered front-page headlines, but it has fallen a bit out of public attention in the past year or so. Jacob Schulz sat down with Seamus Hughes, the author with Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens and Bennett Clifford of “Homegrown: ISIS in America.” They talked about the book, how the Islamic State has attracted American followers, how the organization operates differently in the U.S. versus Europe, the FBI and the role it plays in countering homegrown extremism, and what Seamus is most concerned about going forward.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Longer Life 38 mins – “Today, the average person in the United States lives nearly ten years longer than he or she would have 50 years ago. What does that extra decade at the end of life look like? What are the implications of a longer life span on families, the health care system, retirement planning, government benefits and more? Now that retirement lasts not just a few years but is a whole new life phase extending a decade or two (or three!), how should middle-aged adults prepare for this era of life? Companies, government agencies and individuals are making changes to adjust but there’s more work to do to ensure that seniors live healthier, more enriching lives than in the past. Join Debra Whitman, Executive Vice President of Policy and Strategy at the AARP and host Kate Ebner on June 23 to dig deep into the future of aging in America.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Managing Older Workers 10 mins – “Peter Cappelli, Wharton School professor and coauthor of “Managing the Older Worker: How to Prepare for the New Organizational Order.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Mitch McConnell 33 mins – “’New Yorker’ staff writer Jane Mayer talks about how the Senate majority leader has thrown his support behind the President, and allowed the president to diminish congressional power — in spite of the fact that Trump and McConnell are opposites in several ways. Mayer says McConnell’s refusal to rein in Trump is looking riskier than ever. Also, TV critic David Bianculli bids farewell to ‘Homeland’ and welcomes back ‘Penny Dreadful’ on Showtime.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Molecular Genetics 8 mins – “The breathtaking progress in molecular genetics that has occurred over the past five decades and the transition to genomic medicine would have been difficult to imagine in 1970, when the Institute of Medicine (IOM), now the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), was formed. The term “genomics” hadn’t yet been coined, the tools and technologies that are the foundation of modern biotechnology were in their infancy, and methods for sequencing even a few nucleotides were barely workable.1” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nazism 33 mins – “This year, 2020, sees the 75th anniversary of the end of World War Two. Its legacy remains. Nowhere more so than in Germany, where the rise of Nazism led to the war, and terrible crimes against humanity. Chris Bowlby explores how post-war Germans have faced this inheritance and discovers how a search for justice in relation to Nazi crimes has continued, despite heavy pressure to stop. Alongside that, a powerful culture of remembrance has emerged, as each new generation makes its reckoning with the past. We meet the little-known small team of Nazi crime investigators, working discreetly behind walled premises in Ludwigsburg in Southern Germany. They used to carry guns for self-protection, such was hostility to their work. Through their research they have identified more than 28,000 Nazi crime scenes. But soon those who lived through the Nazi period will all be dead. What difference will it make when there are no more victims alive to tell their stories, no more prosecutions or trials? Will this history still be remembered and understood? And we hear from a new, young and diverse generation of Germans what they think about their country’s Nazi past.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive..

Planning Your Post Retirement 10 mins – “Marc Freedman, founder and CEO of Civic Ventures and author of “The Big Shift: Navigating the New Stage Beyond Midlife.” Retiring to go play golf in Florida isn’t the draw it used to be. In a 2014 Bank of America Merrill Lynch survey, 72% of employees over age 50 reported that they’d like to continue working in retirement. Partly that’s a response to the Great Recession and a need to compensate for diminished savings; a Conference Board study showed that in the past eight years, nearly two-thirds of 45-60 year-olds experienced a 20% or greater decline in their assets.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Poisoning of Alexeia Navalny 22 mins – “Alexei Navalny is Russia’s most prominent dissident, opposition leader and anti-corruption crusader—and the latest such person to be poisoned by the Vladimir Putin regime, which, of course, it denies. When we recorded this episode, Navalny’s condition was improving as he received medical treatment in Germany. To discuss Navalny’s career and why Putin chose now to attack him, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Alina Polyakova, president and CEO of the Center for European Policy Analysis. They talked about how Navalny has become such a thorn in the side of the Putin regime, why Putin keeps poisoning people as opposed to killing them by other means and why the Russians are so ineffective at poisonings when they undertake them.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

President and COVID Infection 32 mins – “President Trump is at Walter Reed with the COVID virus. A large number of executive and legislative branch officials have also tested positive. What happens when the president is seriously ill? What happens when the president is incapacitated? And what happens when a presidential candidate falls seriously ill—after people have already started voting? These are not all questions entirely answered by the law, but they are all questions on which the law has something to say. To talk it all through, Benjamin Wittes spoke with an all Lawfare panel including managing editor Quinta Jurecic, founding editor Jack Goldsmith and chief operating officer David Priess.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Abolition 35 mins – “Prison abolitionists say prison is a failed social policy. Ultimately what it does is address the expected consequences of inequality and marginalization. So, maybe, the time has come to get rid of prisons altogether. If that’s the case, how do we move forward?” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive

QAnon Discussion 35 mins – “This week on our Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Ben Collins and Brandy Zadrozny, reporters at NBC News. Writing at NBCNews.com, they report on disinformation and misinformation in health and politics. Their work covers a lot of ground, but for this episode, they discussed one increasingly prominent issue on that beat: QAnon, a conspiracy theory built around anonymous posts on an internet forum claiming that Donald Trump is waging war against a deep state and a vast network of child sex traffickers. The conspiracy theory has inspired acts of violence and is becoming increasingly mainstream, with several candidates for U.S. Congress being QAnon believers. They talked about how QAnon started, why we need to take it seriously and how the internet—and big technology platformpops—have allowed the theory to spread.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Retaining Talented Women 12 mins – “Hello, and welcome to the HBR IdeaCast from Harvard Business Online. In this week’s program, HBS press editor, Melinda Merino, talks with Sylvia Ann Hewlett, president of the Center for Work Life Policy and author of the new book, Off Ramps and On Ramps: Keeping Talented Women on the Road to Success. And in our HBR In Brief segment, Leadership That Gets Results.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Rural Broadband Politics 35 mins – “Rural broadband is currently having a moment in American political discourse. No less than 5 presidential candidates have released plans to connect the country’s rural places, and the FCC has recently announced a $20billion funding program for fixed broadband and a $9billion program for 5G deployment in rural America. Despite these initiatives and interests, however, rural America remains woefully disconnected from a digital world that the urban and wealthy take for granted. Worse yet, the digital divide is growing, not shrinking despite billions of dollars of yearly investment and dozens of legislative proposals. This talk explains the policies that help and hinder broadband deployment in rural America. Christopher Ali argues that our current policy architecture grossly over-privileges incumbent telephone companies and systematically discourages new entrants from offering broadband, and demonstrates how the largest telecommunication companies have an economic incentive to keep the digital divide alive.” At the link you can listen,but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Secondhand Goods 46 mins – “Journalist and author Adam Minter talks about his book Secondhand with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Minter explores the strange and fascinating world of secondhand stuff–the downsizing that the elderly do when they move to smaller quarters, the unseen side of Goodwill Industries, and the global market for rags.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

SIGINT Intelligence 42 mins – “The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland has been conducting and regulating signals intelligence, SIGINT, since before the United States was born. To talk about how they do it across the pond, David Kris sat down with two experts on UK SIGINT and SIGINT regulation: Michael Drury and Tony Comer, both veterans of Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), the British counterpart to the U.S.’s National Security Agency. Michael was GCHQ’s first full-time legal advisor from 1996 to 2010, when he joined the private sector, and Tony was GCHQ’s historian until his retirement earlier this year. They compared and contrasted the U.S. and UK experience with SIGINT, SIGINT regulation, popular support for SIGINT and intelligence in general, and also some cutting-edge issues, including how SIGINT works today, synergies between SIGINT and cyber, GDPR encryption and online harms.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Weaponization 38 mins – “On this episode of Lawfare’s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek spoke with Maria Ressa, a Filipino-American journalist and co-founder of Rappler, an online news site based in Manila. Maria was included in Time’s Person of the Year in 2018 for her work combating fake news, and is currently fighting a conviction for “cyberlibel” in the Philippines for her role at Rappler. Maria and her fight are the subject of the film, “A Thousand Cuts,” released in virtual cinemas this summer and to be broadcast on PBS Frontline in early next year. As a country where Facebook is the internet, the Philippines was in a lot of ways ground zero for many of the same dynamics and exploitations of social media that are currently playing out around the world. What is the warning we need to take from Maria’s experience and the experience of Philippine democracy? Why is the global south both the beta test and an afterthought for companies like Facebook? And how is it possible that Maria is still, somehow, optimistic?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Spymasters 35 mins – “What is the proper relationship between the CIA director and the president? How should directors handle arguably illegal orders? How important is the director’s role as the nation’s honest broker of information during times of crisis? To get at these questions, David Priess sat down with Chris Whipple, a documentary filmmaker, journalist and the author of two books about the people around the president. “The Gatekeepers,” based upon his documentary of the same name, examines White House chiefs of staff, and his new book, “The Spymasters: How the CIA Directors Shape History and the Future,” is based on the Showtime documentary “The Spymasters: CIA in the Crosshairs,” for which Whipple was the writer and executive producer. They talked about CIA directors through the last several decades and how they’ve impacted U.S. history and national security.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Super Rich 18 mins – “An interview with Chrystia Freeland, editor of Thomson Reuters Digital and author of Plutocrats: The Rise of the New Global Super-Rich and the Fall of Everyone Else.” At the link right-click “Play Episode” to listen; a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Transformational Change 36 mins – “Can people really change? Coaches Chris Wahl and Kate Ebner explore this age-old question on June 16th. Join them for a deep investigation into the nature of personal transformation. They will explain the concept of transformational change, offer suggestions and personal stories, and illuminate how visioning can hold the key to a successful shift in your life. If you are wondering how to create lasting change in your life and your way of being, don’t miss this episode.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uighurs in China 39 mins – “We talk a lot about Chinese policy in Hong Kong, but there’s another human rights crisis going on in China in the province of Xinjiang. It concerns the Turkic minority known as the Uighurs whom the Chinese government has been rounding up and putting in reeducation camps. It is an ugly story—one that the Chinese government has gone to great lengths to keep from international attention, with some degree of success. To walk us through the situation in Xinjiang, Benjamin Wittes spoke with Jessica Batke, a senior editor at ChinaFile; Darren Byler, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Colorado at Boulder whose research focuses on Uighur dispossession; and Maya Wang, a senior China researcher for Human Rights Watch, who has written extensively on the use of biometrics, artificial intelligence and big data in mass surveillance in China.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

US in China 30 mins – “Jordan Schneider, the host of the ChinaTalk podcast, sat down with H. R. McMaster, President Trump’s former national security advisor. They talked about his time in government; the origins of the 2017 national security strategy, which focused the U.S. government on China; how he thinks history is best applied to policymaking; and even why he considers himself to be the funkiest NSA in U.S. history.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccine Misinformation .34 mins – “This week on Lawfare’s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Claire Wardle, the co-founder and leader of the nonprofit organization First Draft and a research fellow at Harvard University’s Shorenstein Center. First Draft recently released a report on the information environment around the development of vaccines for COVID-19, and Claire talked about what she and her team found in terms of online discussion of the vaccine in English, Spanish and French. What kinds of misinformation should we be ready for as vaccines begin to be administered across the world? Why might fact-checking and labeling by platforms not be effective in countering that misinformation? And why is Claire still pessimistic about the progress that platforms and researchers have made in countering dis- and misinformation over the last four years?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Vindman Conversation 1 33 mins – “Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman (Ret.) is now the Pritzker Military Fellow at the Lawfare Institute, the newest member of the Lawfare team. You’ve heard his story, likely in his testimony in the impeachment proceedings for President Trump. But Benjamin Wittes sat down with him for a different reason—his substantive expertise in Eastern Europe policy, Russia matters and great power competition. They talked about the challenges the Biden administration will face as it tries to pick up the pieces the Trump administration has left it, how democracies can hang together and harden themselves against attacks from authoritarian regimes, what a good Russia policy looks like, how China fits in and how we can rebuild traditional American alliances.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Vindman Conversation 2 36 mins – “Following his appearance on Friday on the Lawfare Podcast, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman, the Pritzker Military Fellow at the Lawfare Institute, appeared on Lawfare Live for a live video conversation and audience Q&A. It was a very good conversation—so good that we thought we would bring you an edited version of it as Part Two of our conversation with Alex Vindman. He discussed how one becomes an NSC director while serving in the active duty military, what risks the transition period has in foreign relations, whether he has any regrets about his decision to speak out during the impeachment and much more.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

White Power Violence 37 mins – “Elizabeth Neumann served as the assistant secretary for threat prevention and security policy at the Department of Homeland Security. She has recently been speaking out about President Trump and, among other things, his failure of leadership with respect to the threat of white supremacist violence. In the course of doing so, she made reference to a book by Kathleen Belew, a historian at the University of Chicago: “Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America,” a history of violent white power movements in the modern United States. Elizabeth and Kathleen joined Benjamin Wittes to discuss the interactions of policy and the history that Belew describes. Why have we underestimated this threat for so long? How has it come to be one of the foremost threats that DHS faces? And what can we do about it, given the First Amendment?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Safe File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

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MMD471 Media Mining Digest: 5th Grade Innovator, Africa Growth, Artificial Intelligence Discussion, Bloomberg, Brainstorming, Corporate Law, Covid Control, Cyber Security, DARPA Story, Disease Control, Fake News, FISA Errors, Hearing Aid Technology, High Impact Innovations, innovation Barriers, Innovation Challenges, Innovation Coaches, Innovation Failures, Innovation Myths, Innovation Questions, Innovation Attributes, Innovation Skills, Intelligence Briefing, Land Ownership, Leadership Levels, Placental Biology, Russian Operations Under Putin, Safety Net Hospitals, Soleimani Death Reaction, Transgender, Wine Bottles, Zoom Conferencing Service

Exercise your ears: the 35 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 500 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

5th Grade Innovator 27 mins – “What inspirations feed your ideas for innovation? In this case, seeing a news report on a tragic death of a 6 month old baby let a young entrepreneur to create an innovation that could save kids left in the car.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Africa Growth 29 mins – “The population of Africa is projected to double by 2050, giving the continent one quarter of the world’s people by then. Nigeria alone will have a larger population than the United States. To the extent they aren’t so already, the world’s problems and opportunities will be Africa’s, too, and African problems and opportunities will also be the world’s. David Priess spoke about developments in African politics and international engagement with two experts from the Africa Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies—its director Judd Devermont, and one of its senior associates, Emilia Columbo.” At the link left-click the down-pointing and arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Artificial Intelligence 26 mins – “As humans, we have some unique abilities. We are self-aware, we exhibit critical thinking and we have the ability to be creative and innovate. Will that always be the case? Some think that artificial intelligence (AI) will someday take over creativity and innovation.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence 26 mins – “I’m searching for real innovation in Artificial Intelligence (AI).  A surfeit of AI products leaves me skeptical. Not to rain on anybody’s parade, but the term appears on countless products.  Even so, some companies do the work of real innovation in AI. DeviceBits is one such company.  This start-up charts a unique path.  Their AI customer support suite is distinctly real innovation.  AI customer support is new ground and makes a widespread impact.  It brings value to people’s everyday lives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence Discussion 26 mins – “AI has become the new buzzword that has been applied to anything and everything. You can’t attend trade shows without seeing AI attached to labels such as AI apps, AI-enhanced coffee, and AI influenced healthcare, etc. As of recent, AI has been in transition mode. It has moved from merely a “hype label” to something of reality. Some are even calling it the AI-driven “fourth industrial revolution.” On today’s show, I am going to be discussing AI and how it can be applied and used in innovation.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Bloomberg 34 mins – “On Wednesday, the Democratic primary contenders gathered in Las Vegas for their final debate ahead of the Nevada caucus. The result was a veritable bloodbath, with candidates slamming one another over party allegiance, billionaire donors, policy specifics (or a lack thereof), and more. It was a free-for-all — except for debate newcomer Mike Bloomberg, who has spent over $400 million in the past ten weeks to buy the name recognition needed to get on the stage. And it was him who everyone else on stage most accelerated to demolish. Bloomberg has become the subject of substantial media recognition since his historically expensive campaign began in November, and, if he stays in the race, we can expect the fervent coverage of his campaign to continue. But there is one publication that likely won’t be delving into the details: Bloomberg News, an international news organization founded and owned by Mike Bloomberg. As New York Times media correspondent Michael Grynbaum explains, the Bloomberg staff received a memo in November detailing how reporters were to cover the Democratic primary given their boss’s candidacy. They were told to cover the race, cite polls, and report on policies, but were instructed not to do any in-depth investigations into Bloomberg or any of his Democratic rivals.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brainstorming 26 mins – “So, you are about to pull together a team of eight to twelve people into a brainstorming session; do not make the mistake that 90% of us make…no area of focus.  Most teams will be given the challenge of to “quickly come up with a product idea.” The results can be predicted; poor to none when it comes to creating any form of disruptive ideas.  This week on Killer Innovations, we will talk about four steps to better brainstorm problem statements.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Corporate Law 8 mins – “The Hobby Lobby and Citizens United decisions outraged many Americans who said the Supreme Court was unreasonably expanding corporate rights. But Adam Winkler, professor of law at UCLA, says there’s a rich history of the court expanding corporate rights through creative (and expensive) legal arguments.  Winkler is the author of We The Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights. He walks Bob through a few hundred years of American history to explore how expanded corporate rights have not always hurt society — and what has changed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Control 21 mins – “Many research labs are pivoting from their normal work to offer diagnostic testing for COVID-19. We discuss how to go about retooling a lab, the hurdles researchers are facing and why, in some cases, tests are not being taken up….” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security 29 mins – “Ben Buchanan is a professor at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service and a scholar on cybersecurity and statecraft. He has a new book out this week: “The Hacker and the State: Cyber Attacks and the New Normal of Geopolitics.” Jack Goldsmith sat down with Buchanan to talk about Ben’s new book, about the so-called name-and-shame of Justice Department indictments, and about the various reasons why states engage in offensive cyber operations.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Bonus_Edition_with_Ben_Buchanan.mp3, “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DARPA Story 26 mins – “While many are familiar with the story of how DARPA (actually it was its predecessor ARPA) invented the internet. What few are familiar with is the untold stories of of DARPA and how its innovators solved some of the most pressing problems we faced.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disease Control 33 mins – “Dr. Rebecca Katz is the director of the Center for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University Medical Center. She also teaches courses on global health diplomacy, global health security, and emerging infectious disease in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown. From 2004 to 2019, she was a consultant to the Department of State, working on issues related to the biological weapons convention, pandemic influenza, and disease surveillance. On Sunday, Margaret Taylor spoke with Rebecca about the international legal architecture and institutions for pandemic preparedness response, how some Asian and European countries have approached the problem, and the United States’s response.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 32 mins – “This week on Lawfare’s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Brendan Nyhan, a professor of political science at Dartmouth University. We talk a lot about the crisis of falsehoods circulating online, but Nyhan’s work focuses on empirical research on what the effects of disinformation and misinformation actually are. And he’s found that those effects might play less of a role in political discourse than you’d think—or at least not quite in the way you might think. They talked about the fake news about fake news and the echo chamber about echo chambers.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FISA Errors 30 mins – “Jim Baker served as general counsel for the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He was also the counsel for the Office of Intelligence Policy and Review at the Justice Department, where he supervised FISA applications. He joined Benjamin Wittes in the virtual Jungle Studio to discuss Inspector General Michael Horowitz’s shocking report on inaccuracy in FISA applications, and the problems at the FBI that led to these errors.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hearing Aid Technology 27 mins – “What would you think if your child, grandchild, niece or nephew came to you and said that they were skipping college to start a business? Almost a year ago, I interviewed Nick Titus who was soon to be a High School Senior about his science fair project that was quickly becoming an innovation that could impact the lives of those who had lost mobility. To get an update, I invited Nick back to the show to share an update. To start off, Nick and his friends have decided to take a “gap year” and skip college to start a business. That business is Myonic. Myonic is taking what started as Nick’s science fair project to hack a TENS device so that people who had suffered a spinal cord injury or stokes could regain movement.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

High Impact Innovations 29 mins – “This time of year, I take a moment and look at innovations that were announced in the last year whose impact will be significant in the next 12 to 24 months. This year’s list contains some intriguing innovations that are less about “new tech” and more about human ingenuity to look at problems and opportunities in unique and different ways. These 6 high impact innovations will change the world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Barriers 25 mins – “A common question I get from listeners is how to fight against the roadblocks and barriers to innovation.  In this week’s show, I address five of the biggest barriers to innovation. The list is based on the 2018 Innovation Leader study done in partnership with KPMG.  The study surveyed Chief Innovation Officers in organizations ranging from small to large.  As many of you have let me know, these barriers resonate with you. As we walk through the list, I will share my thoughts on each of these barriers to innovation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Challenges 26 mins – “What can derail the innovation journey?  Recently, I finished a 3.5-day Innovation Bootcamp. In the end, I was asked an interesting question with a different look and perspective of innovation, now and in the future. The participant asked what challenges are facing innovation. After answering the question for the group, I put more thought into what I’ve seen in the past, is happening today and can persist in the future. In today’s show, I will examine in more detail what I see as the 4 challenges facing innovation that innovators need to pay close attention to and address.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Coaches 26 mins – “Lets face it. Innovation is hard work and requires leadership support if an organization is going to be successful at it. Thus every CEO needs an innovation coach who can come alongside and help the CEO achieve innovation success.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Failures 26 mins – “It goes without saying that not all ideas are good ideas that lead to market winning innovations.  Sometimes we need to remind ourselves that while failures will happen, we can learn from those that have gone before us in bringing innovations to market.  This week on the show, we are going to look at the five worst innovation failures and see what could have been done differently.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.  

Innovation Myths 28 mins – “When it comes to innovation, there are a collection of unwritten rules of thumb and myths of innovation that both help and hurt innovators. We all use rules of thumbs and myths in our everyday lives such as estimating how long something will take to complete. At the same time, rules and myths can be misapplied and hold us back from doing something.  For example, using a “rule” to estimate that something will “take to long to complete” and therefore we never start.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Questions 26 mins – “Over the years, I noticed that I seem to get a similar set of questions from the participants at my talks, workshops, and innovation boot camps. What this tells me is that there are a set of common questions about innovation that are on everyone’s mind.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovative Attributes 26 mins -”I’ve been going back and looking at past shows that had guests in an attempt to trigger ideas for new guests we should invite to be on the show. During the process, I started to see patterns of common attributes across this group that I label as the most the innovative people I’ve interviewed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovative Skills 26 mins – “ What are the innovation skills needed to be successful in creating new ideas and products? Many people often find themselves void of creativity in the innovation world. This stems from a deeper issue. On today’s show, we will go through in more detail what innovation skills separate those that have limited success to those that have continual success. The core set of skills to be successful and to win regardless of your organization type, size or geographical location are the same.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Briefing 29 mins – “Every year for a quarter of a century, the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, or both, have hosted the worldwide threat briefing featuring open unclassified testimony from leaders of the intelligence community about the biggest threats facing the United States. That is, at least until this year, when it is still unclear when the worldwide threat testimony will take place, if at all. To shed some light on the history, the norms, and the value of this open intelligence testimony, we gathered an extraordinary group of intelligence leaders who have done it, in some cases many times. David Priess spoke with Jim Clapper, the former director of national intelligence, former director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, and former director of the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency; Michael Hayden, the former director of the Central Intelligence Agency, former principal deputy DNI, and former director of the National Security Agency; and Andrew McCabe, the former Acting Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Land Ownership 28 mins – “Elbert Lester has lived his full 94 years in Quitman County, Mississippi, on land he and his family own. That’s exceptional for black people in this area, and some family members even say the land came to them through “40 acres and a mule.” But that’s pretty unlikely, so our WNYC colleague Kai Wright, host of The United States of Anxiety, went on a search for the truth and uncovered a story about an old and fundamental question in American politics, one at the center of the current election: Who are the rightful owners of this country’s staggering wealth?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leadership Levels 59 mins – “The founder and co-head of the Leadership Practice at CRA and the Admired Leadership Institute, Randall Stutman is an incredible executive coach with an impressive roster of clients. You’ll walk away from this episode with some tools to put into practice to make you a better leader, partner and parent as Randall discusses the behavioral versus psychological view of leadership, what really drives results, and the uncommon routines of the world’s best leaders.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Placenta Biology 40 mins – “Does the fetus have a microbiome? How does the placenta prevent infection? Carolyn Coyne talks about placental structure and biology, and why studying the maternal-fetal interface remains a critical area of research. Julie’s Biggest Takeaways: The placenta forms within 3-5 days post conception as a single layer of cells surrounding the fertilized embryo. These cells differentiate and develop into more complex structures. Very few microbes cause fetal disease. Of those that do, the disease-causing microorganisms are diverse and can lead to serious congenital defects or even death of a developing fetus. These microbes are largely grouped into the TORCH (now TORCH-Z) microorganisms: Toxoplasma gondii Other (a variety of different bacteria and viruses) Rubella Cytomegalovirus Herpesviruses Zika virus…” Ri”ght-click https://www.stitcher.com/show/meet-the-microbiologist/episode/126-placental-biology-infection-and-immunity-with-carolyn-coyne-67332943” to play the podcast. A copy of the podcast is also included in this blog archive.

Russian Operations 34 mins – “The past few years have seen an uptick in Russian covert actions across Europe, including assassinations and attempted killings of people in Ukraine, Bulgaria, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Just this week, Bulgaria charged three Russian agents with the poisoning of a prominent Bulgarian arms manufacturer. Michael Schwirtz has been an investigative reporter with the New York Times for almost 15 years, and he’s been tracking this Russian skulduggery carefully in many of those countries for much of that time. Recentl-click y, he’s reported on how quite a bit of that activity is linked to one particular unit within the Russian GRU. David Priess sat down with Michael to work through this increasingly aggressive Russian action and what it all means going forward.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_500.mp3,” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Operations Under Putin 37 mins – “Russia continues to sporadically poke its head into American media headlines, whether it be for its role in Syria or for anxieties about fresh election interference in 2020. But these news stories seldom provide a window into life in Putin’s Russia. Jacob Schulz sat down with Joshua Yaffa, the Moscow correspondent for the New Yorker, to talk about his new book, “Between Two Fires: Truth, Ambition, and Compromise in Putin’s Russia.” The book gives a series of portraits of prominent figures within Putin’s Russia and details the compromises they make to maintain their status and goodwill with the Kremlin. They talked about this framework as a way to understand Russia, what Putin’s rule looks like on the peripheries of the country, and about a couple of the fascinating characters that animate the book.” At the link left-click the down-load link and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Safety Net Hospitals 5 mins -”Defining what counts as a safety-net hospital has long been a challenging but critical issue in U.S. health policy. The Covid-19 pandemic has brought this subject to the fore, as Congress and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) have struggled to operationalize a strategy for distributing Covid-19 relief funds to the hospitals that need them most. U.S. safety-net hospitals provide essential care to patients regardless of their insurance coverage, financial circumstances, or immigration status. The disproportionate share of uncompensated care that these hospitals provide often leads them to operate with thin financial margins while assuming responsibility for providing services that are critical but often unprofitable, including inpatient psychiatric services, neonatal intensive care, and burn and trauma care. In addition, these facilities often fulfill local community needs, such as offering food pantries and housing-assistance programs, and they represent an important source of employment. They are also the primary sites of care for many non-White communities and structurally marginalized populations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soleimani Death Reaction 32 mins – “Afshon Ostovar is the associate chair for research and an assistant professor of national security affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School. He is also the author of “Vanguard of the Imam: Religion, Politics, and Iran’s Revolutionary Guards.” The IRGC has been in the news of late because of the killing of the head of the Quds Force of the Revolutionary Guard Corps, Qassem Soleimani. Benjamin Wittes spoke with Ostovar about the fallout from the Soleimani killing, how it is all playing in Iran, and why things are so quiet. They talked about whether people made a mountain out of a molehill at the time the killing happened, or whether the blowback just hasn’t happened yet.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender 32 mins – “What does it mean to be a woman who had a boyhood? That’s the question LGBTQ activist Jennifer Finney Boylan set out to explore her new memoir, Good Boy: My Life in Seven Dogs. After Boylan came out as trans in her 40s, she felt estranged from her previous life. She describes her new book as a “memoir of masculinity, kind of told the way an expatriate might speak of the country of their birth.” Boylan acknowledges that some in the trans community might take issue with the notion that she had a “boyhood.” “There are many people who feel that they always were who they are, and to refer to an earlier part of your life differently is really disrespectful,” she says. “But even though I respect that view, for me, … I had this experience and it’s an experience that I now struggle to connect to.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Wine Bottles 26 mins – “When delivery fails, it costs in more ways than one.  In today’s show, I talk with Santiago Navarro, founder and CEO of Garçon Wines.  Santiago shares his unique solution to a constraint that caused major problems for his online wine business.  Based in the UK, Santiago developed a packaging innovation that ensures delivery the first time. But his flat wine bottle does much more than simply guarantee delivery.  This constraint-based innovation gives rise to market opportunities beyond the mailbox.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zoom Conferencing Service 9 mins – “Since many of us have retreated to our homes in the past month, we’ve been connected to each other mostly through our screens. Work meetings, dinners, catch-ups with old friends, classes, religious ceremonies, weddings, funerals. They’re all taking place in one location: our computers. And often, over an app called Zoom. A piece of software that until recently was mostly used for business-to-business conversations, Zoom has taken over lives… and, given the company’s track record of misrepresenting its data and encryption policies, that might be a bit of a problem. For this podcast extra, Bob speaks with Motherboard journalist Joseph Cox, who recently broke the story that Zoom was sharing user data with Facebook.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

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MMD470 Media Mining Digest: Battery Charging, Buy and Hold Investing, Corona Virus Control, Covid Afterwards, Covid and CIA Activities, Covid and Emergency Powers, Covid Inequality, Covid Lab Results, Covid Response by DoD and State, Democracy Playbook, Discovery vs Exploration, Disinformation on Vaccinations, Foreign Agents Information Act, Hurricane Katrina 1 Antediluvian, Hurricane Katrina 2 Come Sunday, Hurricane Katrina 3 Through the Looking Glass, Hurricane Katrina 4 Bridge, Hurricane Katrina 5 Exodus, Hurricane Katrina 6 Reckoning, Hurricane Katrina 7 Destiny, Hurricane Katrina 8 Wake, Learning Styles, Linux Replacing Windows 7

Exercise your ears: the 23 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 441 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Battery Charging 19 mins – “A machine learning algorithm reveals how to quickly charge batteries without damaging them. Research Article: Attia et al. Simultaneously optimizing many design parameters in time-consuming experiments causes bottlenecks in a broad range of scientific and engineering disciplines1,2. One such example is process and control optimization for lithium-ion batteries during materials selection, cell manufacturing and operation. A typical objective is to maximize battery lifetime; however, conducting even a single experiment to evaluate lifetime can take months to years3,4,5. Furthermore, both large parameter spaces and high sampling variability3,6,7 necessitate a large number of experiments. Hence, the key challenge is to reduce both the number and the duration of the experiments required. Here we develop and demonstrate a machine learning methodology  to efficiently optimize a parameter space specifying the current and voltage profiles of six-step, ten-minute fast-charging protocols for maximizing battery cycle life, which can alleviate range anxiety for electric-vehicle users8,9. …Using this methodology, we rapidly identify high-cycle-life charging protocols among 224 candidates in 16 days (compared with over 500 days using exhaustive search without early prediction), and subsequently validate the accuracy and efficiency of our optimization approach….” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Buy and Hold Investing 44 mins – “What’s the toughest challenge for many investors? Staying the course for the long term. In this podcast, Paul discusses what he considers “the most useful information for investors.” While adding new insights to his Ultimate Buy and Hold StrategyFine Tuning Your Asset Allocation and Distributions in Retirement articles and podcasts, Paul explores nine decades of returns for six asset classes that academics have studied for over 50 years. It turns out that the end result of the returns has been exactly what the academics predicted, but the trip was not an easy one for investors. See and download the Tables referenced here. Paul hopes that in understanding this, all investors  — especially young investors — will see that the strategy with the most predictable returns is also the one with the best predictable returns, and maintain the focus and confidence to make it through the normal ups and downs of the market without giving up.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus Control 31 mins – “Josh Sharfstein is the vice dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He also served as the secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. He was the principal deputy commissioner and at some point, the acting commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and he was the Commissioner of Health for the city of Baltimore. He is remarkably well qualified to talk about coronavirus crisis response at the federal, state, and local levels. He’s even written a book about managing public health crises, and he’s hosting a daily podcast of his own on the coronavirus crisis. He joined Benjamin Wittes in the virtual Jungle Studio to talk about the role of coercion in managing these crises, how the U.S. government has performed (and not performed), and what we should be doing differently to get the corona crisis under control.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Covid Afterwards 29 mins – “Like a lot of people, I have really gotten into listening to podcasts over the last year. They’re such an immersive way to learn about the world, and I like how the format lets you dive as deep on a topic as you want. So, I was inspired to start one of my own—but I knew I couldn’t do it on my own. I couldn’t ask for a better partner on this project than Rashida Jones. A mutual friend suggested that the two of us might have a lot to talk about, and it turned out he was right. I already knew she was a talented actor, but I was impressed by her thoughtful perspective on the world. So, we decided to start a podcast that lets us think through some of today’s most pressing problems together. In our first episode, Rashida and I explore a big question that is top of mind for many people: what will the world look like after COVID-19? …Unfortunately, we still have a long way to go before life truly gets back to “normal.” Rashida and I were joined by Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, to discuss what to expect in the months to come. I’ve had the opportunity to work with Dr. Fauci on a number of global health issues over the years, including the quest for an HIV vaccine and cure. He’s such a quiet and unassuming guy normally, so it’s been wild to watch him become a huge celebrity. Dr. Fauci and I are both optimistic that a vaccine will bring an end to the pandemic at some point in the near future. But what the world looks like after that is a lot less clear. I suspect that some of the digitization trends we’ve seen—especially in the areas of online learning, telemedicine, and remote work—will become a regular part of our lives. I hope this episode leaves you hopeful about the future and curious about what comes next.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid and CIA Activities 11 mins – “Like a marriage, a healthy relationship between an intelligence officer and an asset usually features ample attention and extensive energy. And of course, a lot of time spent with one another. But how do intelligence officers have the necessary face-to face-meetings when going outside is all but forbidden? What about conducting surveillance detection or servicing dead drops on empty streets in the coronavirus era? Three former CIA officers—Alex Finley, Jonna Mendez, and David Priess—explored this tricky topic in a recent article on Lawfare, which David reads in full for this edition of the Lawfare Podcast Shorts.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Covid and Emergency Powers 36 mins – “What can the president do in a national emergency? What limits what the president can do? What authorizes the president to do all those things he can do in a national emergency? Is the president abusing, misusing, using appropriately, or under-using emergency powers during the coronavirus crisis? And what are the logical end points for how far this could go? For this bonus edition, Benjamin Wittes got on the phone with Steve Vladeck to work through these questions and talk about all things presidential emergency powers.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Covid Inequality 30 mins – “The COVID-19 pandemic has been difficult for everyone, but it’s been a lot harder for some. Here in the United States, we’ve seen how huge gaps in income, access to healthcare, and quality of education are being exacerbated by these extraordinary times. In the second episode of our podcast, Rashida and I ask a big question that has never felt more urgent: is inequality inevitable?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Covid Lab Results 14 mins – “In this Hippo Education bonus, Dr. Paul Simmons and Dr. Jay-Sheree Allen sit down to discuss what lab studies are recommended on admission of a COVID patient to the hospital, which labs are followed daily, and how they’re best used.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Covid Response by DoD and State 34 mins – “On this bonus edition of the Lawfare Podcast, we have combined two conversations about about how the Department of State and the Department of Defense are responding to the Covid-19 pandemic, including the impact on the workforce of these agencies, their efforts to assist and protect Americans abroad and domestically, and the broader national security and foreign policy consequences for the United States. Margaret Taylor sat down virtually with Robbie Gramer, the diplomacy and national security reporter at Foreign Policy magazine covering the State Department. And Scott Anderson sat down remotely with Katie Bo Williams, the senior national security correspondent for the Defense One news outlet.” At the link right-click “Direct download: DoD_and_State_Bonus_Edition.mp3” then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Playbook 29 mins – “Democracies around the world are under assault, with their norms and institutions undermined by authoritarian actors. From Hungary to India and beyond, illiberal or populist governments are weakening the rule of law, the separation of powers, and the integrity of elections. As part of a two-episode Lawfare podcast series on the state of global democracy, Benjamin Wittes spoke with Alina Polyakova and Torrey Taussig about democracy promotion. Alina Polyakova is the president of the Center for European Policy Analysis, and Torrey Taussig is a non-resident fellow at Brookings’ Foreign Policy program and a research director of the Belfer Center at the Harvard Kennedy School. On Tuesday, we will release a second episode with experts at Freedom House on their annual “Freedom in the World” report. In this episode, Ben, Alina, and Torrey discussed “The Democracy Playbook,” a report by Alina and Torrey—along with Brookings experts Norman Eisen, Andrew Kenealy, and Susan Corke—outlining strategies that supporters of liberal democracy can implement to prevent and reverse democratic backsliding. They talked about Central and Eastern Europe, the drivers of democratic discontent, and how all of this compares to the situation in the United States.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Discovery vs Exploration 42 mins – “Our guest this week is Dr. J. Bryan Henderson, an assistant professor at Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University. Part of Bryan’s research is geared towards  using the science of learning to design physical and digital environments that encourage student interaction in evidence-based argumentation. This research has helped him to develop Braincandy, a suite of free, online formative assessment tools that seeks to help students better listen to and build upon differing ideas. Bryan joins us to discuss evidence-based argumentation, how Braincandy can be used to facilitate this practice, and how we can critically reflect on and evaluate student use of technology on their screens, beneath their screens and beyond their screens.

Disinformation on Vaccinations 28 mins – “For this episode of Lawfare’s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Alina Polyakova and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Renee DiResta, the technical research manager at the Stanford Internet Observatory. Renee has done fascinating work on how technology platforms and algorithms interact with false and misleading narratives, ranging from misleading information on health issues to propaganda pushed by the Islamic State and the Russian government.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the archive file.

Foreign Agents Registration Act 31 mins – “This week on Lawfare’s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Joshua R. Fattal about a fascinating law review article he’s written: “FARA on Facebook: Modernizing the Foreign Agents Registration Act to Address Propagandists on Social Media.” The Foreign Agents Registration Act, known as FARA, is an American law that requires lobbyists for foreign entities to register with the Justice Department. It made the headlines when Special Counsel Robert Mueller claimed that Russians spreading social media disinformation around the 2016 election failed to register under the law. Josh argues that Mueller’s indictments represent an innovative new use of FARA—and he suggests that the law could offer a mechanism for the U.S. government to address disinformation campaigns.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_520.mp3,” then select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Katrina 1 Antediluvian 19 mins – “It all started long before a hurricane named Katrina.” At the link right-click “https://www.theatlantic.com/podcasts/floodlines/” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Katrina 2 Come Sunday 16 mins – “In New Orleans, the disaster wasn’t the hurricane. The disaster was what happened after.” At the link right-click “https://www.theatlantic.com/podcasts/floodlines/” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Katrina 3 Through the Looking Glass..19 mins.- “A universe of rumor and misinformation plays out on television.” At the link right-click “https://www.theatlantic.com/podcasts/floodlines/” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Katrina 4 Bridge 17 mins -”Rumor becomes tragedy.” At the link right-click “https://www.theatlantic.com/podcasts/floodlines/” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Katrina 6 Reckoning 24 mins – “How could the levees have failed?” At the link right-click “https://www.theatlantic.com/podcasts/floodlines/” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Katrina 7 Destiny..20 mins.- “People try to come home. But does home want them anymore?” At the link right-click “https://www.theatlantic.com/podcasts/floodlines/” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Katrina 8 Wake 36 mins – “Water, like history, repeats itself.” At the link right-click “https://www.theatlantic.com/podcasts/floodlines/” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Katrina 5 Exodus 20 mins – “A hero arrives. But not the one everyone expected.” At the link right-click “https://www.theatlantic.com/podcasts/floodlines/” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Learning Styles 21 mins – “That guest is Michelle Weise, who’s currently a senior advisor at Imaginable Futures, a philanthropic investment firm. Weise is someone who has herself changed careers, from her start as a college professor. She’s out with a new book called Long Life Learning: Preparing for Jobs That Don’t Even Exist Yet. She started writing the book before the pandemic—responding to the rapid changes in the job market that were already happening due to technology shifts like artificial intelligence and automation. But now she believes the COVID-19 virus and all the disruptions it has caused may accelerate the trends she was already seeing. In a nutshell, she thinks that we need to shift our thinking away from this idea that people go through a long period of education when they’re young and then shift to being a worker and no longer need to keep learning. She says to keep up with the way employment is going, people will need to find a way to combine working and learning throughout their lives.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Linux Replacing Windows 7 23 mins – “Windows 7 has reached the end of its life. It will no longer receive security updates and Microsoft’s technical support will stop. Running an out-of-date OS can have serious potential risks, and if you’re using Windows 7 connected to the Internet, you will have a problem. Fortunately, there are two simple solutions. Episode 390 Time Stamps 00:00 Going Linux #390 · Replacing Windows 7 00:56 Bill’s been redoing his whole machine with Makulu 06:17 Larry is sheltered in place with a paint brush 07:32 Ubuntu MATE website makeover 08:45 20.04 documentation 10:10 Ubuntu MATE fixes the Windows 7 Blues 12:30 Window 7 has reached the end of its life 12:59 Running an out of date operating system has serious risks 13:48 Why to install Ubuntu MATE to replace Windows 7 14:43 It’s modern and full-featured 15:29 No compromise on Apps 15:57 Web browser 17:10 Office suite 19:10 Audio streamer/player software 19:37 Video player 19:49 Photo organizer 20:35 Video calling with Windows, Mac, Chrome, and Linux users 21:28 Friendly community support 22:31 There is a software catalog of thousands of tested additional apps 23:47 Ubuntu MATE is secure 24:50 How do I get Ubuntu MATE? 25:59 Summary 26:43 Adopting Ubuntu MATE is easy 28:42 Make your computer work for you, not the other way around 33:07 goinglinux.com, goinglinux@gmail.com, +1-904-468-7889, @goinglinux, feedback, listen, subscribe 34:17 End” At the link find the title, “Going Linux #390 · Replacing Windows 7,” right-click “download [mp3]” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

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MMD469 Media Mining Digest: AI Future, Antibiotic Resistance Research, Barbie Dress Designer, Biomedical Research, Convalescent Plasma, Corona Treatments, Corona Virus Affects, Corona Virus Spread, Covid Lab Special, Emerging Markets, Glial Cells, How Inventions Shaped Us, Ira Glass, Learning Process, Marine Microbes, Microbe Research, Mold Control, Neuroscience History, Numbers Instinct, Ocean Water Microbes, Plant Diseases, Prion Proteins, Prosperity Paradox, Prosthetic Vision, Pseudomonas and Candida Interaction, Rape of Chanel Miller, Robert Wong, Robin Williams, Rotavirus and Noravirus, Seaweed Farming, Spontaneous Brain, Surveillance Capitalism, Tosh Hall, Trump Administration Book, Unconscious

Exercise your ears: the 36 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 512 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

AI Future 37 mins – “This episode of Books and Ideas is an interview with Susan Schneider, author of a fascinating new book called Artificial You: AI and the Future of Your Mind. Schneider’s book goes beyond the question of whether AI might become conscious to issues that might affect us on a more personal level.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Resistance Researcher 44 mins – “The TWiM holobionts pay tribute to Stuart Levy, and reveal the remarkably diverse array of cyclic nucleotides synthesized by bacteria that likely mediate interactions with animal and plant hosts.” At the link right-click “TWiM#206,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Barbie Dress Designer 10 mins – “I designed surgeon Barbie Fashion Pack shortly after my biopsy, where I saw women as nurses and men as doctors or surgeons. Why shouldn’t a woman become a doctor?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biomedical Research 55 mins – “At Georgia Tech, members and trainees of the Center for Microbial Dynamics and Infection discuss the identification of pathogen essential genes during coinfections, and how coral management can improve coral defenses against pathogens.” At the link right-click “Right click to download TWiM#208” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biomedical Research 56 mins – “Mark Martin joins Vincent and Michael to present compelling papers suitable for teaching microbiology to undergraduate students.” At the link right-click “Right click to download TWiM #201” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Convalescent Plasma 24 mins – “We’re joined by Drs. Liise-Anne Pirofski of Albert Einstein College of Medicine & Shmuel Shoham of Johns Hopkins University to examine convalescent plasma and its role in the treatment of COVID-19. *This podcast episode was funded by a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (grant number 6 NU50CK000477-04-01). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this podcast do not necessarily represent the policy of CDC or HHS, and should not be considered an endorsement by the Federal Government.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the popup menu.

Corona Treatments 18 mins – “Could blood plasma from coronavirus survivors be an effective short-term treatment for patients?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus Affects 16 mins – “Coronavirus affects far more than just the lungs, and doctors and researchers in the midst of the pandemic are trying to catalog—and understand—the virus’ impact on our bodies. Staff Writer Meredith Wadman joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss what we know about how COVID-19 kills. See all of our News coverage of the pandemic here, and all of our Research and Editorials here. Also this week, Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with Sarah about quantum diamond microscopes. These new devices are able to detect minute traces of magnetism, giving insight into the earliest movements of Earth’s tectonic plates and even ancient paleomagnetic events in space.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus Spread 34 mins – “Over the past two months, packed cities have been repeatedly blamed for the rapid spread of coronavirus. Meanwhile, in jails and prisons, incarcerated people have been contracting the virus at alarming rates, in no small part due to their own overcrowded conditions. On this week’s On the Media, we explore what gets lost in conversations about urban density, prisons and the climate amid coronavirus. Plus, what the history of timekeeping can teach us about our current disorientation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

COVID Lab Special 14 mins – “In this Hippo Education bonus, Dr. Paul Simmons and Dr. Jay-Sheree Allen sit down to discuss what lab studies are recommended on admission of a COVID patient to the hospital, which labs are followed daily, and how they’re best used.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Emerging Markets 38 mins – “Emerging markets are challenging and hostile environments for many mature businesses. Corruption; poorly developed infrastructure; a lack of basic services. In established markets, much has been written about innovation, most notably by Clay Christensen with The Innovator’s Dilemma in 1997: this influential book constituted a roadmap used by many of the world’s most successful companies both to plan their innovation journeys and at the same time avoid being disrupted by agile new competitors. But little has been written about how innovation really works in the developing world. Recently, all this changed with the publication of Clay’s latest book, The Prosperity Paradox, co-authored by Efosa Ojomo and Karen Dillon, one of the most eagerly awaited business books of 2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Glial Cells 40 mins – “BS 169 is an exploration of glial cells with R Douglas Fields, author of The Other Brain: The Scientific and Medical Breakthroughs That Will Heal Our Brains and Revolutionize Our Health. Glial cells outnumber the neurons in our nervous system, but until the last few years they were thought to merely support cells. Dr. Fields takes us through the discovery that they have their own signaling methods and are much more important than we ever imagined. This interview first aired in 2010, but Dr. Fields reviewed the original transcript and made no significant corrections. What was once controversial is now mainstream. I recorded a new introduction and summary and I have included some more recent references below.” At the link “Right Click to download mp3” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

How Inventions Shaped Us 32 mins – “Materials scientist and science writer Ainissa Ramirez talks about her latest book The Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another.” “Ainissa Ramirez, Ph.D., is a scientist and science communicator. A Brown and Stanford graduate, she has worked as a research scientist at Bell Labs and held academic positions at Yale University and MIT. She is the author of The Alchemy of Us (The MIT Press).” At the link find the title, “Inventing Us: How Inventions Shaped Humanity,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ira Glass 34 mins – “From creativity to creative struggles and what makes or breaks a “This American Life” story, Ira Glass reflects on his career on the airwaves.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Learning Process 44 mins – “This is an interview with Stanislas Dehaene about his new book How We Learn: Why Brains Learn Better Than Any Machine . . . for Now. According to neuroscientist Dehaene neuroscience has revealed that human babies are incredible “learning machines” whose abilities exceed those of the best current artificial intelligence. We explore why this is so and how this information could be used to help learners (and teachers) of all ages.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Marine Microbes 37 mins – “The most abundant organism on Earth lives in its seas: the marine bacterium SAR11 [carbon oxidizing bacterium]. Steve Giovannoni describes how the origins of SAR11 provided its name, and the ways that studying SAR11 have taught scientists about ocean ecology. He also discusses how the different depths of the ocean vary in their microbial compositions and what his big questions are in marine microbiology. …These primary producers fix carbon for the entire ecosystem! Because nutrients are readily available, the cell concentration in surface waters can reach nearly 1,000,000 cells/ml. …SAR11 is small in both physical size and genome size (0.37–0.89 µm and 1.3 million base pairs, respectively). It is nevertheless the most abundant organism on the planet, with more than 1028 cells estimated to exist worldwide. These cells convert between 6-37% of the carbon fixed in the oceans daily.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbe Research 36 mins – “Microbial interactions drive microbial evolution, and in a polymicrobial infection, these interactions can determine patient outcome. Deb Hogan talks about her research on interkingdom interactions between the bacterium Pseudomonas and the fungus Candida, 2 organisms that can cause serious illness in cystic fibrosis patients’ lung infections. Her research aims to better characterize these interactions and to develop better diagnostic tools for assessing disease progression and treatment. Links for this Episode: Deb Hogan Lab Website Demers EG et al. Evolution of Drug Resistance in an Antifungal-Naive Chronic Candida lusitaniae Infection. PNAS. 2018. Lewis KA et al. Ethanol Decreases Pseudomonas aeruginosa Flagella Motility through the Regulation of Flagellar Stators. Journal of Bacteriology. 2019. Gifford AH et al. Use of a Multiplex Transcript Method for Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Gene Expression Profiles in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung. Infection and Immunity. 2016. Grahl N et al. Profiling of Bacterial and Fungal Microbial Communities in Cystic Fibrosis Sputum Using RNA. mSphere. 2018. Microbiology Resource of the Month: The Aeminium ludgeri Genome Sequence HOM Tidbit: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0065216408705628 HOM Tidbit: The Frozen Potential of Microbial Collections” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Mold Control 7 mins – “Linda Kinkel describes the important relationships between plants and microbes and her research on Streptomyces that protect against plant pathogens.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then left-click “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Neuroscience History 49 mins – “This episode of Brain Science is an interview with neuroscientist Matthew Cobb author of “The Idea of the Brain: The Past and Future of Neuroscience.” Cobb approaches the history of neuroscience from a different perspective than previous writers. He writes from the perspective of a working scientist with a deep interest in the history of ideas and the interaction between science and culture. This approach makes for a fascinating discussion. Through out history assumptions about the brain have been influenced by both culture and contemporary science. For example, before the discovery of electricity it was impossible to image that the brain uses both chemical and electrical signals to communicate. Similarly, our current understanding is heavily influenced by the computer metaphor, which actually misses much about how real brains function. Another aspect of our discussion involves several ongoing debates with neuroscience such as the importance of localization versus network properties. We also touch on the tendency toward neuromythology, which is the tendency to think that understanding the brain is the only tool for understanding what it means to be human. Dr. Cobb reminds of the importance of being aware of the work in a wide varieties of fields include science and the humanities.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Numbers Instinct 49 mins – “BS 170 is an interview with Andreas Nieder, author of A Brain for Numbers: The Biology of the Number Instinct. We talk about the surprising discovery that a wide variety of animals have a number instinct, which is called the approximate number system. This appears to provide the basis for the more abstract mathematical abilities that are seen in humans. We also explore the relationship between mathematics and language.” At the link “Right Click to download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Water Microbes 37 mins – “The most abundant organism on Earth lives in its seas: the marine bacterium SAR11. Steve Giovannoni describes how the origins of SAR11 provided its name, and the ways that studying SAR11 have taught scientists about ocean ecology. He also discusses how the different depths of the ocean vary in their microbial compositions and what his big questions are in marine microbiology. Different depths of the ocean have different habitats, but the microbes vary continuously, based in part on light availability: Surface light facilitates photosynthesis by algal cells. These primary producers fix carbon for the entire ecosystem!” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this archive.

Plant Diseases 42 mins – “How can the intricate relationship between soil microbiota and plants be managed for improved plant health? Linda Kinkel discusses new insights into the plant rhizosphere and the ways that some Streptomyces isolates can protect agricultural crops against bacterial, fungal, oomycete, and nematode infections.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Prion Proteins 33 mins – “Can a protein be contagious? Jason Bartz discusses his work on prion proteins, which cause spongiform encephalopathy and can be transmitted by ingestion or inhalation among some animals. He further discusses how prions can exist as different strains, and what techniques may help improve diagnosis of subclinical infections.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Prosperity Paradox 27 mins – “Emerging markets are challenging and hostile environments for many mature businesses. Corruption; poorly developed infrastructure; a lack of basic services. In established markets, much has been written about innovation, most notably by Clay Christensen with The Innovator’s Dilemma in 1997: this influential book constituted a roadmap used by many of the world’s most successful companies both to plan their innovation journeys and at the same time avoid being disrupted by agile new competitors. But little has been written about how innovation really works in the developing world. Recently, all this changed with the publication of Clay’s latest book, The Prosperity Paradox, co-authored by Efosa Ojomo and Karen Dillon, one of the most eagerly awaited business books of 2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Prosthetic Vision 46 mins – “This week neuroscientist Stephen Macknik returns on Brain Science 166 to discuss an exciting new approach to prosthetic vision. Unlike traditional approaches electrodes are not required. He explains how this work is based on recent discoveries in vision research along with techniques like optogenetics.” At the link “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download),” then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pseudomonas and Candida Interaction 36 mins – “Microbial interactions drive microbial evolution, and in a polymicrobial infection, these interactions can determine patient outcome. Deb Hogan talks about her research on interkingdom interactions between the bacterium Pseudomonas and the fungus Candida, 2 organisms that can cause serious illness in cystic fibrosis patients’ lung infections. Her research aims to better characterize these interactions and to develop better diagnostic tools for assessing disease progression and treatment.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rape of Chanel Miller 31 minsAuthor Chanel Miller reflects on her journey to healing—and the role of art in her past, present, and future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Robert Wong 36 mins – “Robert Wong ditched accounting and pursued his artistic dreams, criss-crossing the world before co-creating the innovative Google Creative Lab.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Robin Williams 25 mins – “Robin Williams donned many characters in his lifetime. From sweaty standup riffs to sitcom mayhem as an alien named Mork, or from an Academy Award-winning performance in Good Will Hunting to a Disneyfied blue Genie, Robin was constantly pushing his craft. But behind these displays of brilliance was an isolated and truly misunderstood man. In the epic biography Robin, journalist Dave Itzkoff details the fragmentation of one of America’s most beloved comics. In its debut season, Knowing combines interviews with Robin’s family and friends with Itzkoff’s fresh research and poignant insights to paint a true depiction of the man behind the screen.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Rotavirus and Norovirus 36 mins – “Viral gastroenteritis around the world causes 200,000 deaths globally each year. Mary Estes talks about her work on 2 gastroenteritis-causing viruses, rotavirus and norovirus, and tells the story of her discovery of the first viral enterotoxin. She also describes how noroviruses have changed from human volunteer studies to studies using “miniguts,” a system now used with many enteropathogenic microorganisms.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Seaweed Farming 15 mins – “For countries like Malaysia, Tanzania and the Philippines, seaweed agriculture is a major industry. However, these countries still see significant crop losses due to disease and pests. So what role does microbiology have in helping these countries’ growth in the industry?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Spontaneous Brain 47 mins – “BS 174 is an interview with neuroscientist and philosopher Georg Northoff about his fascinating book The Spontaneous Brain: From the Mind–Body to the World–Brain Problem. We explore the significance of the growing evidence that most of the brain’s activity occurs independently of external stimuli with a focus on the implications of this finding for our understanding of how the brain generates consciousness. We recently explored the importance of the brain’s spontaneous activity with György Buzsáki (BS 172), but Northoff suggests a surprising implication. He proposes that if mental features such as consciousness and our sense of self are generated by the brain’s alignment with the world then perhaps we should abandon discussion of the so-called Mind-Body (or Mind-Brain) problem and instead consder the relationship between the world and the brain. This is what he calls the World-Brain problem.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Capitalism 16 mins – “The list of harms perpetuated by Facebook is at this point well-known: quieting dissent, ignoring incitement, and profiting from distortion, to name a few. But, according to Harvard professor emeritus Shoshana Zuboff, author of The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, the bill of indictment can’t merely be a list of harms. To understand the damage being wrought by Big Tech, we must recognize a vast, sinister matrix that not only exploits markets and human frailty, but steals our very selves as fuel for the machine. It’s what Zuboff calls “surveillance capitalism” — and it’s not just Facebook, or even just the tech companies. It’s, increasingly, and broadly, the economic world we live in. Zuboff explains to Bob just how pervasive and pernicious surveillance capitalism is, and why curbing its excesses will involve rethinking how we regulate our data and our markets.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tosh Hall 33 mins – “From breaking down outside of a Kinko’s to being named one of AdAge’s Top 50 creatives, Tosh Hall talks about the highs and lows of a life in branding and design.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Trump Administration Book 35 mins – “Debbie talks with author and investigative journalist David Cay Johnston about his childhood that inspired him to pursue justice and truth in life, his groundbreaking financial reporting, the state of journalism today and, of course, Donald Trump—the subject of his new book, It’s Even Worse Than You Think: What the Trump Administration is Doing to America.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Unconscious 45 mins – “In Are You Sure? The Unconscious Origins of Certainty Dr. Ginger Campbell sharesc the implications of one of the most surprising recent discoveries of neuroscience: most of what our brain does is unconscious. This means it is outside both our awareness and control. In particular she shares the work of retired neurologist Robert Burton who was featured on several early episodes of Brain Science. Burton presented the evidence that mental sensations, like what he called “the feeling of knowing” emerge from “hidden layers” of the brain. One implication of this is that we do not choose what we believe! This is why Dr. Campbell describes Are You Sure? as a plea for compassion and tolerance.” At the link right-click “Part 1 was read by Dr. Campbell in BS 173” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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MMD468 Media Mining Digest: Amgen Tea Brazil, Anthropology and Finances, Bed Bugs, Cement Innovation, Change Disruptive, Cognitive Dissonance, Corporate Insurgent, Disrupt Yourself, Diversity Bonus, Fearless Organization, Innovation, Investment Concepts, Medical Care Access, Medici Effect, Mobile Phone Skype, Nuclear Submarine Commander, Parasitism by Worms, Parasitism in Uganda, Phase Transitions, Proactive Obsolescence, Rotifier Infestation, Sanitizing Hygiene, Smart Companies, Startup History, Team Leadership, Unconscious Bias

Exercise your ears: the 29 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 512 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Aging Mentor, Young Turk 28 mins – “I find stories of leaders who have successfully reinvented themselves mid-career both compelling and informative. This is mainly because I have been on this journey for the past 4 years and am always on the look out for guides. Chip Conley has successfully made this transition, and is now helping many others take the same journey. Rather than being a “sage from the stage”, Chip describes himself as a “guide from the side”. His story of going from founder and CEO of the leading chain of boutique hotels in the US, Joie de Vivre, to being essentially an intern at Airbnb and mentor to founder Brian Chesky, will be of interest to anyone feeling overwhelmed by changes in their industry, or worried about becoming irrelevant in the workplace as a result of technology or other disruptive forces shaping our world of work. As a result of his experiences at Airbnb, and the success of his latest book “Wisdom at Work: The Making of a Modern Elder,” Chip has recently launched The Modern Elder Academy, with the tag line: Where midlife mastery is the launchpad to growing whole, not old. In our conversation he tells his story.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

AI Impact 24 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by digital and marketing entrepreneur, John Straw, who describes himself as a “technonomist” – someone exploring the cutting edge of technology and looking to understand where it fits from both an economic and commercial perspective. John is a Senior Advisor at McKinsey, as well as an author, speaker and investor with over 30 years of experience in IT and digital transformation. What Was Covered: The journey John sees towards “programmatic enterprises” in which the availability of data and artificial intelligence allow for organizational control on a totally different level than possible today; How this journey takes us from decision making via experience and intuition to experience augmented by data to data augmented by experience to simply by data. And how, as per previous major shifts (think of the introduction of the PC) this happens not as a “big bang” but as a more gradual or “stealthy” process; The advice that John uses when personally investing in new technology businesses and his two-part rule which he advises business leaders to use in renovation and innovation implementation Key Takeaways and Learnings: How companies are using “layered” data to improve their renovation and innovation activities; How new technologies, and the pace of their development, provide opportunities for scale for all companies’ renovation processes; Why transformational innovation activities (“breaking” the existing business) need to go “in the garage”, away from the innovation “killers” of process and politics” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Amgen Tea Brazil 25 mins – “In this episode we’re joined by Tyler Gage, co-founder of the organic tea company Runa, and author of the book, Fully Alive: Using the Lessons of the Amazon to Live Your Mission in Business and Life. Tyler shares how his immersion into life in the Amazon guided him in building a socially responsible business able to thrive in the hyper-competitive soft drinks segment. What Was Covered: How Tyler’s interest in peak performance led him to indigenous elders in the Amazon and how life there inspired him to build a business; The parallels to be found from the Amazonian concept of wisdom and modern business and entrepreneurship; Discovering strength in vulnerability and how admitting what we don’t know creates an environment to learn from others Key Takeaways and Learnings: How the sophisticated listening and landscape awareness skills that are required to provide food in the Amazon can deliver success for an executive or entrepreneur; Seeing obstacles as teachers, and how this tribal practice of the South American rainforests is a winning strategy for business problem solving; How businesses can use their “taproot”, their reason for existence, to create cultures that inspire employees” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Anthropology and Finances 29 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by author and journalist, Gillian Tett, to discuss the role anthropology plays in today’s business world. Gillian is the author of the award-winning book, Fool’s Gold, which analyses the origin of the 2008 financial crisis, and more recently, The Silo Effect, and is currently a columnist and US Managing Editor of The Financial Times. What Was Covered: Why more and more companies today are turning to anthropologists for insight into employee and consumer culture. What executives can do to prevent silos from developing within their organizations. How anthropology and cultural awareness can help us to understand and predict the future of the digital and technology economy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Bed Bugs 50 mins – “Dickson, Daniel and Vincent solve the case of the Ugandan Volunteer With Morning Bites and discuss integration of HIV-1 into the Schistosome genome, with a sprinkling of COVID-19 throughout. Case Study for TWiP 18260 yo female comes in with husband, grew up in Lima Peru. Having issue had when child, would get itchiness around anus, mother would have her eat pumpkin seeds. Every 2-3 weeks wakes up with severe itching. Put in q-tip and extracted something, has video of it. ONP stool cultures negative. Referred to Daniel. Negative medical history, no allergies, no surgeries, no medications. Does travel, mainly to Uganda. HIV negative, no toxic habits. Husband reports no symptoms. Has children/grandchildren.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cement Innovation 30 mins – “In this episode we are joined by Annalisa Gigante, former Head of Innovation and R&D at LafargeHolcim. With over 25 years of experience her expertise includes management, HR, strategy, marketing and innovation. She is currently a Board member of ZIS. What was covered: How Annalisa’s experience in different industries throughout her career has given her the opportunity to see parallels in business innovation; Annalisa’s unique approach on handling project failures and how to regain momentum as an individual and as a team; Annalisa’s view that innovation is present in all areas of business and not limited to within innovation teams, and how this multi-disciplinary approach ultimately helps creative growth” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Change Disruption 26 mins – “In this episode, Scott D Anthony, writer, speaker and Senior Partner at consulting firm Innosight, joins us to discuss his book, Dual Transformation – How to Reposition Today’s Business While Creating the Future. Scott is a globally renowned specialist in innovation, publishing several books on the domain as well as being a regular contributor to the Harvard Business Review.What Was Covered: Scott’s concept of ‘dual transformation’ and his assertion today’s every changing global marketplace companies need to reinventing their business of today to make it ‘better, faster, cheaper’ (Transformation A) at the same time as creating their business of tomorrow (Transformation B); Why the most successful leaders in innovation are ‘living at the periphery’ and not at the core of their industry; Why Scott believes that combining the best elements of startups and large companies is a good path to solve today’s biggest global challenges; How Scott’s experience of living in Asia has evolved his thinking on how best to organize markets, and the role that family owned businesses, private companies and government linked enterprises can play” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cognitive Dissonance 18 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by David Novak, former CEO and Founder of Yum! Brands which includes Pizza Hut, Taco Bell, and KFC. David is the author of several books including Taking People With You and his biography The Education of An Accidental CEO. David has co-founded oGoLead, a digital leadership training platform that aims to change the world by building better leaders. What Was Covered: Why David believes there is a toxic leadership problem in today’s business world and the role leadership training has to play in solving this problem; The recognition methods and processes that are central to David’s leadership philosophy; How David uses his experience as a marketer to get inside the minds of the people he leads to learn perceptions, habits, and beliefs and so better understand where to focus efforts to achieve change” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Corporate Insurgent 25 mins – “In this episode, writer, speaker, and intrapreneur, Gib Bulloch, joins us to discuss his book ‘The Intrapreneur: Confessions of a Corporate Insurgent.’ He spent 20 years at Accenture where he started Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), a businsess unit set up to leverage that business’s expertise and experience in service of global development organizations.Gib now works as a consultant specializing in intrapreneurship, social enterprise, and cross-sectoral partnerships. He is also a noted public speaker and has contributed to The Huffington Post, Businessweek, and The Stanford Social Innovation Review.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Disrupt Yourself 28 mins – “Whitney Johnson is the author of Disrupt Yourself and a contributor to the Harvard Business Review. Whitney is best known for her work on driving corporate innovation through personal disruption. She discusses the four things that help you know whether you’re on the right or wrong S curve and shares examples of how to disrupt a constraint in a company environment. Tune in for more insightful advice from Whitney!” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Diversity Bonus 34 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by Scott E. Page, a Professor of Complex Systems, Politcal Sciences, and Economics at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Scott is an external faculty member at the Santa Fe Institute and is an author and speaker who has worked with Google, Bloomberg, Blackrock and NASA. Today, he discusses his book, The Diversity Bonus. What was covered: Why diversity within teams must be based on cognitive differences and not solely differences in identity; How the best problem-solvers and forecasters use several models and equations to assess the best strategy for solving complex economic issues; Why cognitive diversity is a strategic asset given its impact on high-value problem solving, predictions and strategic planning” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Fearless Organization 35 mins – “When Google embarked on an extensive study to understand what makes for a high-performing team, it was Amy Edmondson’s research on “psychological safety” that became the foundation of the company’s findings. Edmondson, a Harvard Business School professor and organizational behavior expert, joins the podcast to talk about her latest book, The Fearless Organization. She says that “psychological safety describes a climate at work where one believes that you can freely speak up with any idea, concern, question, even mistakes.” It’s “a sense of permission for candor.” She explains the benefits of creating psychological safety in the workplace and why it’s essential for learning, innovation, and growth in the knowledge economy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Fearless Organization 31 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by Hal Gregersen, author of The Innovator’s DNA, to discuss his latest book, Questions are the Answer. Hal is a Senior Lecturer in Leadership and Innovation and the Executive Director of the Leadership Center at MIT, and has previously taught at Dartmouth College, The World Economic Forum, and the London Business School. What Was Covered: Why Hal believes most CEOs have trouble asking questions and how to pivot from answer-centric to question-led leadership. How to be a better leader by asking the ‘different, better question’ and using the ‘power of the pause’. How Hal’s question-first process of re-framing of challenges can help us discover the winning solution.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Innovating 27 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by Luis Perez-Breva, a lecturer and research scientist at MIT’s School of Engineering and the Director of MIT’s Innovation Teams Program. Luis has extensive experience in both innovation practice – via his involvement in multiple startups – and innovation research – through his academic work.   We are talking about his first book, Innovating: A Doer’s Manifesto for Starting from a Hunch, Prototyping Problems, Scaling Up, and Learning to Be Productively Wrong. What Was Covered: Why Luis sees following “innovation recipes” is inherently wasteful and essentially high stakes gambling; How the best innovators both prepare for scale at each stage and excel at applying their “parts” to identified problems; How a corporation’s existing products and services give it an innovation advantage over startups Key Takeaways and Learnings: Luis’s tried and tested method, anticipating failure at each ‘scale’, which can help innovators to prepare and solve as many foreseeable faults as possible – what he calls being “productively wrong” as a way to avoid “failing predictably”; How to use linear processes to improve the non-linear process of building innovation; Innovating the skillset; how companies learn and re-purpose what they do today to provide entirely different products in the future” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Investment Concepts 25 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by Robert Hagstrom, who is an author, investment strategist, and portfolio manager. His books include The New York Times bestselling The Warren Buffett Way and The NASCAR Way: The Business That Drives the Sport and Investing: The Last Liberal Art, in which he investigates investment concepts that lie out with traditional economics.” What Was Covered: Robert’s commitment to the “latticework” theory of investing, which is based on building connections between different mental models and disciplines; The reasons that Robert views biology as the better discipline to think about markets rather than the physics based approach most commonly used in modern portfolio theory; The risks of comparative analysis for decision making given our tendency to look for what is similar more than what is different Key Takeaways and Learnings: Steps to being a better investor by using multiple models of comparison and analysis and observing multiple perspectives; Robert’s advice on the questions to ask yourself before investing in companies, and how he personally looks for growth in potential new investments; How to think outside of traditional economic theory and use concepts from biology, philosophy, and psychology to make better business decisions” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Medical Care Access 15 mins – “Sahar Hashemi OBE is best known as the founder of Coffee Republic, as well as a confectionery brand Skinny Candy. She is active in the world of entrepreneurialism and charity, and is an accomplished author, having written “Anyone can do it” about her journey from corporate lawyer to founding a successful chain of coffee shops, and a more recent book titled “Start Up Forever” helping large companies innovate. In this conversation, we cover all topics related to being an entrepreneur, building a business, and what it means from a personal development point of view. We discuss some of the skills and mindsets that one needs, as well as how this impacts people in larger process-driven organizations looking to foster a more entrepreneurial mindset. What Is Covered:  How entrepreneurialism drives resourcefulness and self-discovery; Why people confuse entrepreneurs with inventors and what the difference is; The ‘startup forever’ habits that can help large companies adopt an entrepreneurial mindset Key Learnings and Takeaways: The only way to give momentum to an entrepreneurial idea is to take it out of one’s head, make that first phone call, get a sample of it, try to price it and make the idea tangible in the physical world. Five habits to foster entrepreneurial mindset: get rid of bureaucracy and processes; get out of the office; be clueless, curious, have an open mind; bootstrap and try your idea out on a small scale, and expect people to say no to your idea. The only way to see how a company performs is to maintain the balance between the status quo and having certain systems and processes in place, but also giving people the freedom to break that status quo.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Medici Effect 31 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by author, speaker, and entrepreneur, Frans Johansson. Frans is the author of the bestselling book, The Medici Effect, from which the now popular term was coined, and more recently, The Click Moment. Frans is the Founder and CEO of The Medici Group, a consultancy firm which promotes innovation through diversity. What Was Covered: The Medici Effect, the name given to what happened in a period in Florence history where creative individuals from myriad disciplines, sculptors, architects, painters, philosophers, etc., were able to break down the boundaries between the different disciplines and cultures and ignite what became one of the most creative eras in Europe’s history and the lessons it has for today’s world of business; How the instinct to surround yourself with people like yourself creates barriers to innovation; How organizations typically do not properly capitalize on the valuable resource that new hires bring – a critical period where new concepts and ideas can be introduced; How to introduce diversity at executive level by overcoming the fear of the unpredictability of innovation” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mobile Phone Skype 25 mins – “Combining Startup and Corporate with Jenny Fielding of Techstars In this episode we are joined by Jenny Fielding Managing Director at Techstars, a global venture capital fund for innovative tech startups. Jenny has extensive experience in both the startup and corporate worlds and a strong passion for “marrying startups with corporates” to create innovation and cultural shifts.  In this episode we cover: Jenny’s extraordinary success scaling and exiting her first startup Switch-Mobile in three years; How she moved a legacy organisation like BBC into the new digital era and founded BBC Labs, the UK’s first corporate incubator. Why infusing corporate and startup culture is so powerful and how she continues to do it at Techstars with the likes of GE, Bosch, Verizon, SAP and PWC. What we learned: Why listening to those from all levels of the organisation is so important in effectively innovating.The virtue of listening is also explored by Robert Cialdini and Kevin Kelly. How potent and powerful the idea of bringing people together from different worlds can be and how it can be done effectively. How the startup scene has been hugely idealised and why it’s important to talk openly about the struggles founders face and how it differs from the corporate world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Nuclear Submarine Commander 26 mins – “Captain David Marquet was supposed to command another submarine but was vectored to the USS Santa Fe at the last minute. The Santa Fe was in the hurt locker: morale was low, performance was low, retention was at the bottom of the fleet. The subsequent journey caused him to rethink everything about leadership he’d been taught. …We cover his book, Turn The Ship Around! A True Story of Building Leaders by Breaking Rules, which has been recently re-released with a new companion workbook. Why it is essential to have a longer-term perspective in your people development processes. Because while achievement scorecard runs while you’re at an organization, your leadership scorecard starts counting the day you leave; Why leadership should be centered on ‘leaning back’ and inviting your team to ‘lean forward’; Why David believes it is important to alternate between two sets of behaviors, languages, and mindsets to optimize between production and decision-making scenarios Key Takeaways and Learnings; How pausing – and fighting the urge to take immediate action – is essential to developing the ‘leadership muscle’ of a team…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Parasitism by Worms 69 mins – “The TWiP DVD solve the case of the Child Who Passed Worms, and discuss a non-human primate model for severe malarial anemia.” At the link right-click “Download TWiP #179” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parasitism in Uganda 74 mins – “Eastern border of Uganda with Kenya, in mountains. Drinking water from nearby stream. Two young boys come to clinic, without parents. Sent in by grandmother because 1 yo brother has been passing worms. Long, white, flat. Shown photos in PD7, pinkish worm, 8 inches long, round. He points to those, what he has been seeing in brother’s stool. 1 year old seems small, protuberant abdomen; brother small for stated age, bit of protuberant belly. Diet: high carbohydrate, flour deep fried; yams; cabbage; some rice; soybeans; pumpkin; bananas.” At the link right-click “Download TWiP #178 ” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phase Transitions 40 mins – “Safi Bahcall is a second-generation physicist and entrepreneur, whose first book, Loonshots, has been described as a cross between Freakonomics and the da Vinci Code. At the heart of the book is a philosophy which is foundational for everything we do at OutsideLens: that you can learn a great deal by applying the tools and techniques from one world, in this case the world of physics and to a lesser extent psychology, to the world of innovation in business. What Was Covered: How the structure of a company, rather than its culture, enables or disables innovation; The two basic phases in any organisation – who are “artists” and “soldiers” and how to achieve an equilibrium between them; The three key elements to build a sustainable innovation system – the metaphor of the ice cube, the garden hoe and the heart” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Proactive Obsolescence 24 mins – “Lisa Bodell is a globally recognized innovation leader and futurist. She founded futurethink in 2003 and is the author of the book, Kill the Company. Lisa sits down with Mark to discuss how leaders can become more efficient in the work place and how they can properly simplify the work process for everyone in the company.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Rotifer Infestation 60 mins – “The TWiPsters solve the case of the Rashy Schoolteacher, and reveal a drug from rotifers that live on the snail intermediate host which paralyzes schistosome cercariae and prevents infection of mice. 49 yo man sent to Daniel for ID consultation. Reports in August visited Hawaii with family, then flies to CA. Family event there. Take him to Pakistani restaurant. One day later has gastrointestinal issues, nausea, diarrhea. Goes to urgent care, send stool for O&P. Look at stool, shows chilomastix mesnili. No medicines, will be ok. Over this period of 1 week he loses 15 pounds. Gains 5 back. End of October feels fine, no bloating or diarrhea. No symptoms but goes to gastroenterologist. Stool test returns with D. fragilis; and chilomastix mesnili. Now sees Daniel. Not on any meds. No allergies, no toxic habits, athletic. No illness in family. Normal exam. He ate salads in Hawaii.” At the link right-click “Download TWiP #177” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sanitizing Hygiene 69 mins – “The TWiP DVD solve the case of the Child Who Passed Worms, and discuss a non-human primate model for severe malarial anemia. From Uganda, eastern up in mountains, rainy season. 6 yo girl brought in by mother on Monday, reporting several days of feeling poorly, headache, fever, muscle aches. Negative malaria smear on Monday. Wednesday returns, feeling worse, fever higher, headache worse. Lungs clear, belly (pain on left side) has large spleen. Living in good conditions, well dressed, dirt floor house, concrete walls. Toilet is hole in back. Same dietary habits, high in carbs. No mosquito netting. Water from stream. No siblings. HIV negative.” At the link right-click “Download TWiP #179” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smart Companies 35 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by author and professor, Ed Hess. He has published several notable books on learning and innovation including Learn or Die and his most recent work, Humility is the New Smart: Rethinking Human Excellence in the Smart Machine Age. Ed Hess is currently a professor, Batten Executive-in-Residence and Batten Faculty Fellow at the Darden Graduate Business School at the University of Virginia” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Startup History 35 mins – “This week we are joined by entrepreneur, author and venture capitalist, Brad Feld. Brad is a co-founder of Techstars, a platform for startups to access funding and entrepreneurial networking, and is also the co-founder of venture capital firm, Foundry Group. Brad is the author of several books on startups as well as an entrepreneurial advice blog. He sits on the board of several technology startups and was an early investor in Fitbit, Zynga, and Harmonix. What Was Covered: How startup ecosystems have changed – and become more democratized – in the 30 years in which Brad has been active within them; How digitization of production, distribution, customer relationships, etc., is making strategic “moats” much more penetrable than they were before; How diversity of an ecosystem builds resilience but how our biases (both conscious and unconscious) make this difficult for us” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Team Leadership 26 mins – “I sat down with Dave Kesby, organizational coach and author, to talk about his book, “Extra-Dependent Teams: Realising the Power of Similarity”, where he challenges the conventional wisdom of teams. As he writes in his introduction, “through the lens of convention a lot of the features of Extra-Dependent Teams are misdiagnosed as faults: working apart is seen as working in silos, lack of interdependency is seen as uncollaborative, and working only towards their individual goal is seen as not being a team player.” Dave served in The British Army for seven years before turning to a career in  organizational and leadership development. He combines military, academic, corporate and volunteering experiences to provide a fresh and challenging perspective on what it means to lead, as well as be part of a team.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Unconscious Bias 26 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by author and social scientist, Dolly Chugh, to discuss her book, The Person You Mean to Be: How Good People Fight Bias, which studies how implicit bias and unintentional ethical behavior affects our everyday decision making. Dolly is a Professor of Management and Organizations at New York University, has won several awards for excellence in teaching and ethics, and is a monthly columnist for Forbes.com. What We Covered: Why our brains are biased, and the ways in which we can begin to recognize our own conscious and unconscious biases; Why confirmation bias can hinder the success of a recruiting the best potential talent in the workplace; How we can learn to recognize and use our own privileges to challenge and help change other people’s biases” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

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MMD 467 Media Mining Digest: BARDA, Body Mass Index, Boy Scouts Bankruptcy, Cave Man, Chinese Espionage, Corona Virus Testing, Covid Financial Bailout, Covid Infected Doctor, Culinary Extinction, Deepwater Horizon Spill, Economic Crisis, Exercise, Feeble Mindedness Discussion, Food Production, Ginger Handbook, Gift Card Value, Gluten Removal, Hospital Bed Economics, Jane Goodall, Libyan Female Fighters, Mars Exploration, Moon Exploration, Munition Site Explosions, North Korea Arms Trafficking, Oil Price Control, Oil Prices Drop, Ostomies, Pangolins, Protective Equipment Purchase, Saving Our Planet, Scott and the South Pole, Small Business Support by Government, Telegraphy History in Australia, Temperature and Productivity, Unemployment, Ventilators, Virus Economic Response

Exercise your ears: the 37 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 665 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

BARDA 14 mins – “So as you might’ve heard, we are in the middle of a coronavirus outbreak, and this isn’t the first one. There have been three bad ones in the past 18 years. SARAH GONZALEZ, HOST: There was SARS. Remember that one? That was a coronavirus. It hit in 2003, and it probably came from bats. And then there was MERS, which started in 2012, and that came from camels. ARONCZYK: And now there is COVID-19. That’s the official name of this current coronavirus disease. And that one probably also came from bats. GONZALEZ: And once you know that these coronaviruses aren’t something that came out of nowhere, that they’ve been around for years, the obvious question is, where’s the vaccine? ARONCZYK: That would be great. A vaccine would be great right about now. GONZALEZ: I think people would buy it. ARONCZYK: Yes, we would.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Body Mass Index 12 mins – “Having a high BMI is supposed to be a call to get serious about your health by losing weight. But recent studies say BMI can be inaccurate and misleading. So should you worry if your BMI is too high? To cut through the BS about BMI, Dr. Brian Goldman sits down with Dr. Arya Sharma, a professor of medicine at the University of Alberta, who just happens to be Canada’s obesity guru.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Boy Scouts Bankruptcy 31 mins – “Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy after years of declining enrollment and mounting allegations of widespread sexual abuse. Is this the death knell for the organization?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cave Man 4 mins – “Historically, anthropologists have used brain size to infer intelligence of our ancestors. Lucy, the famous Australopithecine, lived 3.2 million years ago and based on brain size has had her intelligence placed between gorillas and modern humans . But Roger Seymour challenges that approach and says blood flow needs to be considered, as it is related to cognitive ability. By measuring the holes in the brain case through which the carotid artery passes, Roger Seymour is able to determine the rate of blood flow and suggests our ancestor Australopithecine might not have been as intelligent as once thought.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Espionage 32 mins – “Chinese espionage is a real problem for this country. But is the FBI overreacting to Chinese theft of intellectual property, and creating a new red scare?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus Test 15 mins – “The coronavirus feels like it came out of nowhere, but the rules for developing tests have been around for a century. In this episode, we take you inside the pandemic testing system to try and understand the coronavirus tests we’ve all been hearing so much about: how they work, who makes them, and why it’s all taking so long.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Financial Bailout 15 mins – “Now is not the time for finely crafted solutions. The economy is in crisis, and Congress is tackling it by doing what they do best: Spending inconceivable amounts of money. The economic rescue package coming out of the Senate will send an avalanche of cash to small businesses, large corporations, state and local governments — and, mostly importantly, regular Americans. Almost everyone will have more money in their pockets, but where exactly will that money come from? On today’s show, we go deep inside the mechanisms to come up with two trillion dollars before the economy collapses. There’s the regular way and the magical way, and this time we’ll need both. Also, we’ll ask: Can you create too much money, and what happens when you do?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Infected Doctor 18 mins – “Canadians are doing their bit to control the spread of COVID-19 through physical distancing. The idea is to stay far away from a sometimes-deadly virus to which we’re not immune. You can’t do that if you’re a frontline healthcare worker. This week, Dr. Brian Goldman speaks to fellow healthcare workers, who, like him, are dealing with COVID-19 every day, on the job. Maureen Taylor is a physician assistant working on COVID-19 ward at Toronto’s Michael Garron hospital. She shares an intimate look at what it’s like to treat COVID-19 patients, some of whom will not recover. She and Dr. Goldman share thoughts on how they remain calm in the face of the crisis, concerns about a lack of protective equipment and the heightened risk they face for getting infected. That risk became a reality for Dr. Joseph Finkler, a Vancover ER doctor who is now recovering from COVID-19. He tells Dr. Goldman what it felt like to have COVID-19 and how he feels now that he’s recovered, including the fact that he’s facing stigma from neighbours and even other healthcare workers because he tested positive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Culinary Extinction 36 mins – “It all came of a discussion between food researcher Lenore Newman and a friend. They were discussing whether species that we ate would be preserved from extinction because we’d make the effort to save them, if only to keep supplying our dinner tables. This led Newman to investigate the phenomenon of “culinary extinction” in which humans have, by hunting foods to extinction, or just changing our eating habits, allowed edible species and varieties of plant to disappear.  She explores this, and what it means for the future of food in her new book, Lost Feast – Culinary Extinction and the Future of Food. Lenore Newman is the Canada Research Chair in Food Security and Environment at the University of The Fraser Valley.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Deepwater Horizon Spill 37 mins – “On the 5th anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon disaster, Science Editor-in-Chief Marcia McNutt discusses the role of science in responding to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Also, Warren Cornwall examines the state of ecological recovery 5 years later.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Economic Crisis 10 mins – “Neel Kashkari ran the bailout of the banks and car companies in 2008. He explained to Congress why they needed to spend hundreds of billions of dollars. Now, he’s the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, and a member of the committee that sets interest rates. His advice for fighting a crisis like the one we’re facing now: Whatever you think you should do, do more. Whenever you think you should do it, do it sooner.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exercise 36 mins – “We’re constantly told of the importance of exercise…Professor John Hawley from the Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research tells us just how much we need.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feeble Mindedness Discussion 36 mins – “She has her mother’s laugh, or sense of humour, or sensibility, or even intelligence. It raises the age-old question; genetics or environment? In his book, Carl Zimmer dispels longstanding misconceptions about heredity. We are taken on a journey through time and technology, from the inbred Holy Roman Empire to the birthplace of American eugenics to the Japanese lab where scientists are reprogramming skin cells into eggs and sperm – the book covers the entire history of genetics and epigenetics. It was The Guardian’s Science Book of the Year in 2018. This discussion took place at the Adelaide Writer’s Festival.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Production 12 mins – “The empty grocery shelves are unnerving. While we’re probably not going to starve in the long run, the farm system is going to be seriously stressed. Most of our fruits and vegetables are picked by hand. 73% of farmworkers in the U.S. are foreign born; half are undocumented. What happens when those workers get sick? How do we keep the food supply chain going when borders are closed over coronavirus concerns? In this episode, to understand how the coronavirus is affecting and might affect our food, we talk to an economist, a farmer, and, of course, the people who really make farms go — the farmworkers.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Handbook 19 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on gender in small arms control, as part of the Gender Lens for Arms Control Support and Sustainability (GLASS) project, funded by the Government of Canada. The Small Arms Survey will publish a Handbook on gender and arms control later in 2019, the authors and editor of which are discussants in this episode: Vanessa Corlazzoli, independent evaluation consultant; Emile LeBrun, Small Arms Survey consultant; Henri Myrttinen, independent researcher; Allison Pytlak, disarmament programme manager, Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF)” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gift Card Value 20 mins – “Over the past couple weeks, we’ve gotten a ton of questions. Like: How can I help my local small business? Why don’t they just shut down the market? How is the government going to get a check to everybody? In this episode, we reach out to people in the know and try to answer some of the most asked, and most interesting questions. Keep them coming. Some answers: The deal with toilet paper; stock market circuit breakers; coronabucks; corporate paper & how to help. We read every one…” At the link right-click “MP3”the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gluten Removal 5 mins – “Gluten is present in the grains of plants. It is a protein and often a source of nitrogen for the germinating plant. Some plant proteins act as a defence for the plant, leaving insects with a belly ache, similar to when people with gluten intolerance eat gluten. Michelle Colgrave is working to identify gluten in plants, find its genetic source and breed plants without it. It is not an easy task. In wheat for example, there are six chromosomes all with genes coding for proteins including gluten. Her work covers a range of grains including barley and rye. Even when there is success in developing a gluten-free plant, there are additional challenges in growing the gluten-free varieties as contamination occurs easily with crop rotation in fields.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hospital Bed Economics 14 mins – “Bellevue, the oldest public hospital in the nation, has seen everything and survived everything. But even they might not have enough beds. Here’s why.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jane Goodall 36 mins – “How can Jane Goodall have hope for the future, especially for the animals she loves, when the news about extinctions is so bleak? The chimpanzees she’s studied for 60 years are in trouble and climate change bothers her deeply. But she is exuberant above all about Roots and Shoots! These are the young people across the globe who’ve supported her good work and show no signs of slackening their ultra-green efforts.  As The Hope, a 2-hour film about Jane and her life, is launched this week by National Geographic Jane joins Robyn on The Science Show to discuss the film, her work and her hope.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Libyan Female Fighters 17 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on Libyan female fighters and the role of women during the Libyan conflict and post-conflict peacebuilding, as part of the Survey’s Security Assessment in North Africa (SANA) project. The discussants are: Hasnaa El Jamali, Small Arms Survey consultant who has conducted original research with Libyan women who were active during and after the 2011 revolution; David Lochhead, Small Arms Survey consultant with wide experience on security sector reform, border security, and peacekeeping in different parts of Africa with the United Nations; and Manal Taha, Small Arms Survey consultant and northern Africa regional expert with extensive knowledge on violent extremist, stabilization, and conflict resolution.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mars Exploration 12 mins – “One hundred years ago, the first humans reached the South Pole of this planet. More than 40 years ago, man first walked on the moon. When will our species first set foot to explore the planet Mars? Kevin Fong seeks a likely launch date. He asks who will get us there and why we really need to explore the Red Planet.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moon Exploration 12 mins – “One hundred years ago, Scott reached the South Pole. Fifty years later, the first geologist briefly walked on the moon. Kevin Fong asks if why we might want to return to the lunar surface and what will get us. He talks to that first lunar geologist of Apollo 17, Harrison Schmitt and Nasa’s Chief Administrator Charles Bolden, among others.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Munition Site Explosions 16 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on unplanned explosions at munitions sites (UEMS). Our speakers, Jovana Carapic, Remo Gassmann, and Benjamin King, discuss the problem at hand, the causes behind these explosions, as well as their consequences. The episode forms part of our Gender Lens for Arms Control Support and Sustainability (GLASS) project, funded by the Government of Canada.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Arms Trafficking 24 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on illicit arms trafficking from North Korea, including sources of arms, routes and modes of transport, concealment methods, and ways to curb such trafficking. Our discussants are Bruce Bechtol, North Korea expert as well as professor of Political Science, Angelo State University; and Matt Schroeder, senior researcher, Small Arms Survey, and co-author of the Survey’s upcoming Briefing Paper on the mechanics of North Korean arms trafficking. The episode forms part of the Small Arms Survey project Strengthening Implementation and Enforcement of the Arms Embargo on North Korea (SAENK), supported by the Kingdom of the Netherlands ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Price Control 13 mins – “OPEC started in the 1960s when a bunch of oil-exporting countries got together and asked themselves: Why are we all competing with each other? Why don’t we just carve up the market and let the profits roll in? So they formed a cartel. And it had been working pretty well — until this weekend, when something went horribly wrong for the cartel, and the price of oil fell almost 25%. In this episode, we follow the plunge in oil prices from the viral outbreak in China, to a secret meeting in Vienna, to one guy who runs a little mom-and-pop oil business in Kansas — all to find out why this happened, and what exactly this price crash means.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Prices Drop 13 mins – “OPEC started in the 1960s when a bunch of oil-exporting countries got together and asked themselves: Why are we all competing with each other? Why don’t we just carve up the market and let the profits roll in? So they formed a cartel. And it had been working pretty well — until this weekend, when something went horribly wrong for the cartel, and the price of oil fell almost 25%. In this episode, we follow the plunge in oil prices from the viral outbreak in China, to a secret meeting in Vienna, to one guy who runs a little mom-and-pop oil business in Kansas — all to find out why this happened, and what exactly this price crash means.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ostomies 18 mins – “Dr Brian Goldman talks to Jessica Grossman, a twenty-nine year-old marketing executive with Crohn’s disease. In an effort to battle the stigma of having an ostomy, she uses social media to post photos of herself with her ostomy clearly visible. Brian also talks to Karen Bruton, a frontline nurse in Victoria BC who specializes in wound, ostomy and continence care – or NSWOC for short. In her 34-year career, Bruton has taught dozens of patients how to live with an ostomy. She says much of the stigma surrounding ostomies comes directly from health care providers themselves.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Pangolins 36 mins – “Evidence strongly points to a single jump of the SARS COV 2 virus which causes COVID-19 in a wet market in Wuhan China. And now, the pangolin is thought to be a likely transmission vector between bats and humans. Pangolins are found 48 countries across Asia and Africa. They are poached for meat and scales. This excerpt from a discussion about the illegal animal trade is from a discussion at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in February 2016.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protective Equipment Purchase 16 mins – “The pandemic has turned the market for critical items like masks and gloves into a free-for-all. The national stockpile is pretty much depleted. The normal channels are tapped out. The Feds have opted not to manage it, leaving every state to fend for itself. Today on the show, we take you into one high pressure deal where the difference between life and death comes down to a locked room filled with computer servers, bureaucrats willing to bend the rules, and a guy… who knows a guy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saving Our Planet 14 mins – “Dr. Kathy Sullivan talks about her experiences as a space and maritime explorer and how exploration improves the science of sustainability. Hear Esri Chief Scientist Dawn Wright lead this discussion with a voyager who puts her expeditions in the context of civilization. To learn more about location intelligence and solutions for sustainability, visit www.esri.com.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scott and the South Pole 12 mins – “Kevin Fong looks beyond the failure of Robert Falcon Scott’s expedition to be the first to reach the South Pole and focuses instead on the scientific legacy of Scott’s explorations of Antarctica between 1901 and 1912. In recent years, much has been written about Scott the polar loser and bungler. But that personalised focus ignores the pioneering scientific research and discoveries. The revelations transformed Antarctica from an unknown quantity on the map into a profoundly important continent in the Earth’s past and present. Before Scott and Shackleton trekked across the vast ice sheets in the early 1900s, no-one was sure whether there was even a continent there. Some geographers had suggested Antarctica was merely a vast raft of ice anchored to a scattering of islands. The science teams on Scott’s expeditions made fundamental discoveries about Antarctic weather and began to realise the frozen continent’s fundamental role in global climate and ocean circulation. They discovered rocks and fossils which showed Antarctica was once a balmy forested place. They mapped the magnetism around the South Pole for both science and navigators. They found many new species of animals and revealed the extraordinary winter breeding habits of the penguins. The dedication to scientific discovery is most poignantly revealed by fossils that Scott’s party collected after their disappointment of being beaten by Amundsen and a few weeks before they froze to death trudging across the Ross ice shelf. They found a particular plant fossil which had been one of the Holy Grails on the early explorations of Antarctica’s interior. Its discovery proved an hypothesis raised by Darwin among others that all the southern continents were once linked together by a landmass that would lain where Antarctica is today. The fossils were also important evidence to support the new and controversial theory of Continental Drift – a theory which now underpins the entirety of modern Earth science.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Small Business Support by Government 16 mins – “Over this past week, America’s small businesses have been looking for relief and economic security. Their best bet: A brand new government program with $349 billion worth of support. The Paycheck Protection Program, or PPP, was designed for businesses that employ fewer than 500 people. Every business can ask for enough money to cover two and half months worth of payroll. The problem is that this program, meant to save the economy from collapse, is untested. It was thrown together in a week, and the launch has been a mess. The big question: Can the government come up with a system to get massive amounts of money to the right people before millions of businesses close, forever?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Telegraphy History in Australia 36 mins – “It is now thirty years since the internet began to transform the way we communicate. But the age of modern communication was born almost 150 years ago when the telegraph began to spread around the world. For Australia, so isolated by distance, this wonderful new technology had a huge impact on society, business and politics, connecting the far-flung continent with the rest of globe. Paul Davies retraces one of the great engineering achievements of the 19th century. And now, Julian Todd, great great grandson of Sir Charles Todd, who oversaw construction of the telegraph from Adelaide to Darwin is about to set out and retrace Sir Charles’ heroic journey across the continent. This program by Paul Davies and Pauline Newman was first broadcast 26th Nov 2005.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Temperature and Productivity 4 mins – “Women generally want to feel warmer. Younger people are happy in a T-shirt. How do we please everyone in a modern open-plan office? Why should people need personal radiators under their desks and heavy jackets? Tom Chang has investigated who wants what, and how office temperature effects productivity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Unemployment 16 mins – “On Thursday mornings, the Department of Labor releases its weekly unemployment claims — something that never makes the news. On average, maybe a few hundred thousand sign up. But at 8:30am, they announced the worst spike in unemployment the country has ever seen, by far — a staggering 3,283,000 new claims for unemployment. In a week. Today on the show — what it means to lose a job right now when the mandate for most of us is: Stay home. We look at an overwhelmed unemployment system – the system that exists, the one we dream of, and the one that’s being built on the fly.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ventilators 16 mins – “Today on the show: ventilators — the supply and demand problem of the COVID pandemic. The simplest way for the world to get more ventilators is for existing companies to max out production — pay overtime; hire extra workers; run the factory 24/7. They already know how to make ventilators and already have FDA approval. The problem with that strategy is that there’s a ceiling to it. Take the Seattle-area-based Ventec. They’re set up to make around 200 ventilators a month. They could maybe get that up to 1,000. But that’s not going to be nearly enough. So companies that have never made ventilator parts are racing to help. With hundreds of thousands of lives at stake, all across the world, factories are trying to turn on a dime. From the frantic emails, to the supply chain nightmares to the maxed-out assembly lines — we go inside the scramble to make more ventilators, fast.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Economic Response 14 mins – “COVID-19 isn’t the first coronavirus outbreak. It’s actually the third in the past 18 years, following SARS and MERS. And you would think that with all the drug makers in the world, at least one would have come up with a vaccine by now — because it seems like they would have a lot of customers. But the market for emergency vaccines isn’t like a regular market… it’s a lot weirder than that. In this episode, we meet the guy who’s supposed to save us all, we explore how vaccines are made and why they take so long to make, and why you can’t just walk into Walgreens and buy one. Yet.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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MMD466 Media Mining Digest: 1918 Influenza Pandemic, Abortions in Canada, Air Pollution Decreases, Atomic Artifacts, AUMF Discussion, Cataclysm Sentence, Covid Autopsies, Covid Racial Disparities, Data Breaches, Distance Learning, Drug Disposal Program, East Indian Company, Exercise, Homeschool STEM Resources, Ignaz Semmelweis Day, Kindom of Nauvoo, Latif Story, Obesity Control, Pandemic in Rome, Pollution Control, SARS Victim, School Nutrition, Shared Immunity, Social Isolation, Space Discussion, Third Existential Crisis, Thyroid Cancer, Toilet Paper Buying, Transplant Issues, Women in Software and Cybersecurity

Exercise your ears: the 36 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 452 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

1918 Influenza Pandemic 33 mins – “In his recent article for The Atlantic, Dr. Jeremy Brown, author of Influenza: The 100-Year Hunt to Cure the Deadliest Disease in History, wrote: “If the terrible influenza pandemic of 1918 and the current coronavirus outbreak share one feature, it is this: People are terribly afraid.” According to Dr. Brown, while fear links these two outbreaks together, that is where the similarities end between the coronavirus and the influenza pandemic. We’ll talk on Friday at noon about what happened in 1918, how the country handled it and how our responses to these medical emergencies have changed over the past 100 years.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Abortions in Canada 18 mins – “Lack of funding, distance, a patchwork of provincial laws and stigma are some of the barriers facing women seeking abortions in Canada, says Shannon Hardy, who volunteers as an abortion doula.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Air Pollution Decreases 8 mins – “If you live in the Salt Lake area, you may have noticed that the air is a little clearer these days, with so few cars on the road due to the COVID-19 shutdown. Air quality – something the Wasatch Front contends with regularly – is a factor in how people respond to the coronavirus. Bad air can make people more susceptible to the virus, and potentially make our response to it worse if we contract it. L.A. Times environmental reporter Tony Barboza recently asked the question “Does air pollution make you more susceptible to the coronavirus?” in an Times article, and we asked him to talk us through his findings. This is a special, short RadioWest segment as part of our continuing COVID-19 coverage.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Atomic Artifacts 29 mins – “Back in the 1950s, facing the threat of nuclear annihilation, federal officials sat down and pondered what American life would actually look like after an atomic attack. They faced a slew of practical questions like: Who would count the dead and where would they build the refugee camps? But they faced a more spiritual question as well. If Washington DC were hit, every object in the the National Archives would be eviscerated in a moment. Terrified by this reality, they set out to save some of America’s most precious stuff.  Today, we look back at the items our Cold War era planners sought to save and we ask the question: In the year 2020, what objects would we preserve now?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AUMF Discussion 45 mins “This hour we pull apart one sentence, written in the hours after September 11th, 2001, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace. Last weekend President Trump authorized a strike that killed Iranian General Qasem Soleimani in Iraq. The news had us thinking about an episode we produced in 2014. We pulled apart one sentence, written in the hours after September 11th, 2001, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace. In the hours after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, a lawyer sat down in front of a computer and started writing a legal justification for taking action against those responsible. The language that he drafted and that President George W. Bush signed into law – called the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) –  has at its heart one single sentence, 60 words long. Over the last decade, those 60 words have become the legal foundation for the ‘war on terror.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cataclysm Sentence 45 mins – “One day in 1961, the famous physicist Richard Feynman stepped in front of a Caltech lecture hall and posed this question to a group of undergraduate students: “If, in some cataclysm, all of scientific knowledge were to be destroyed, and only one sentence was passed on to the next generation of creatures, what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words?” Now, Feynman had an answer to his own question – a good one. But his question got the entire team at Radiolab wondering, what did his sentence leave out? So we posed Feynman’s cataclysm question to some of our favorite writers, artists, historians, futurists – all kinds of great thinkers. We asked them, “What’s the one sentence you would want to pass on to the next generation that would contain the most information in the fewest words?” What came back was an explosive collage of what it means to be alive right here and now, and what we want to say before we go.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Autopsies 11 mins – “Pathologists are starting to get a closer look at the damage that COVID-19 does to the body by carefully examining the internal organs of people who have died from the novel coronavirus.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Racial Disparities 16 mins – “This year we’ve launched two special audio series to help clinicians practice the best medicine possible: one on the Covid-19 pandemic, and the other on dismantling systemic racism in medicine. In this special conversation, these two audio series come together for an in-depth view of racial disparities in Covid-19 outcomes and how we can do better by our patients. Our usual hosts, Drs. Jay-Sheree Allen and Neda Frayha, interview Infectious Diseases specialist and Diversity and Inclusion expert Dr. Jasmine Marcelin for a rich discussion that sits right in the center of the Covid-19/Race and Medicine Venn diagram.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Data Breaches 18 mins – “Countless Congressional hearings, 48 state data privacy laws and GDPR and mega breaches like the discovery of data on 500 million Facebook users just keep happening. Why? In this episode of the podcast, Paul is joinep d by experts from the firm BitSight and BigID to discuss why we can’t seem to stop the breaches.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Distance Learning 34 mins – “In mid-March, with the coronavirus crisis breaking in Utah, Governor Gary Herbert announced that all of Utah’s K-12 public schools would close and learning would go online. That’s 1,200 schools closed. Almost 667,000 students are now stuck at home, more than 36,000 educators are trying to teach those kids remotely and hundreds of thousands of parents are caught in the middle. Nobody saw this coming, and now everybody is trying to figure out, on the fly, how school happens online. Friday at 11 a.m. MDT, we’re talking about this massive social experiment and exploring how teachers, kids and parents are dealing with what one school administrator calls “a perfect storm of learning.” Tips for parents with school-age children at home (in no particular order): Work with your partner and your kids to build a daily routine that works for everybody;  Get the family outside!  Build regular screen-time breaks into your family’s schedule;  Focus on learning and work quality, not time spent at the desk; Create dedicated spaces in your home where your kids can do school work and you can do your work; Think about how or if you could sacrifice some work productivity for the good of your family and your sanity; Get dressed! Allow yourself breaks to do tasks around the house and with your kids.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Drug Disposal 38 mins – “In June 2012, Alameda County in California became the first local government body to pass a safe drug disposal ordinance that would hold pharmaceutical companies responsible for the safe collection and disposal of unused medications from the public. Now San Francisco and numerous additional local governments are on the cusp of doing the same. Today we’ll talk with former Center for Disease Control physician, Dr. Matt Willis; Heidi Sanborn, executive director of the CA Product Stewardship Council; Guillermo Rodriguez of the San Francisco Department of the Environment; and Conor Johnston, from the office of the President of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

East India Company 34 mins – “It was an international corporation that became an eighteenth century colonial power with its own army – and all entirely run by British stockholders who reported  to a board of directors in London, most of whom had never been to India. When the East India Company won the right to collect taxes in Bengal in 1765, the Company’s abuse of corporate power – such as the world had never seen – ran essentially unchecked for almost 50 years. In his book The Anarchy, historian William Dalrymple explores the wild history of the East India Company, and how, over 200 years later, we continue to see the impact of their influence.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exercise 20 mins – “Health journalist Judy Foreman talks about her new book “Exercise Is Medicine: How Physical Activity Boosts Health and Slows Aging.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Homeschool STEM Resources 44 mins – “With many schools closed and parents looking for resources to help keep children stuck at home engaged and still learning, the hosts of Science for the People stuck on our curation caps and did some digging to create a list of STEM themed online resources for students of all ages and interests. This week we take a break from our usual format so that hosts Bethany Brookshire and Rachelle Saunders can showcase these great resources and hopefully help you find a few that your at-home student is keen to explore. Find a link to every learning resource we talk about in this episode in a blog post in our news section, with a brief sentence explaining it and our best understanding of what age groups these resources are aimed at. We’ve also put together a second blog post with a list of our own previous episodes of Science for the People and the books we talked about in them that we think are suitable for science-savvy teenage students aged 15+.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Ignaz Semmelweis Day..23 mins.- “It began with a tweet: “EVERY DAY IS IGNAZ SEMMELWEIS DAY.” Carl Zimmer — tweet author, acclaimed science writer and friend of the show — tells the story of a mysterious, deadly illness that struck 19th century Vienna, and the ill-fated hero who uncovered its cure … and gave us our best weapon (so far) against the current global pandemic.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kingdom of Nauvoo 34 mins – “As members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints gathered for their semi-annual General Conference April 4-5, historian Benjamin E. Park shared the fascinating history of the city of Nauvoo, an LDS religious utopia situated on the banks of the Mississippi. Founded in 1839 by Joseph Smith Jr., LDS church prophet and founder, Nauvoo, Illinois had its own army – with Smith as general – a constitution, a court system and at its height, more inhabitants than Chicago, over 12,000. Park’s book, Kingdom of Nauvoo, examines this unique city, which eventually fell apart largely because of the rise of the Mormon practice of polygamy, and how it challenged the limits of America’s tolerance for religious freedom. Benjamin E. Park’s book is Kingdom of Nauvoo: The Rise and Fall of a Religious Empire on the American Frontier.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Latif Story 1 30 mins – “Radiolab’s Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda’s top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser’s lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab’s Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn’t do. Along the way, Radiolab’s Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latif Story 2 33 mins – “Latif travels to Abdul Latif’s hometown of Casablanca, Morocco, to try and find out: was he radicalized? And if so, how? Latif begins by visiting the man’s family, but the family’s reaction to him gets complicated as Latif digs for the truth. He finds out surprising information on a political group Abdul Latif joined in his youth, his alleged onramp to extremism. Tensions escalate when Latif realizes he’s being tailed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latif Story 3 27 mins – “Latif turns his focus to Sudan, where his namesake spent time working on a sunflower farm. What could be suspicious about that?  Latif scrutinizes the evidence to try to discover whether – as Abdul Latif’s lawyer insists – it was just an innocent clerical job, or – as the government alleges – it was where he decided to become an extremist fighter.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.   

Latif Story 4 43 mins – “Latif investigates the mystery around Abdul Latif’s classified time in Afghanistan. He traces the government’s story through scrappy training camps, bombed out Buddhas, and McDonald’s apple pies to the very center of the Battle of Tora Bora.  Could Abdul Latif have helped the most sought-after and hated terrorist in modern history, Osama bin Laden, escape? The episode ends with a bombshell jailhouse interview with Abdul Latif, the most reliable evidence yet of what was going on in this man’s mind in the months after 9/11.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latif Story 5 40 mins – “Latif heads to Guantanamo Bay to try to speak to his namesake.  Before he gets there, he attempts to answer a seemingly simple question: why Cuba? Why in the world did the United States pick this sleepy military base in the Caribbean to house “the worst of the worst”?  He tours the “legal equivalent of outer space,” and against all odds, manages to see his doppelgänger… maybe.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latif Story 6 35 mins.- “Despite being cleared for transfer back to his family in Morocco in 2016, Abdul Latif Nasser remains stuck at Guantanamo Bay. Why? Latif talks to some of the civil servants actually responsible for Abdul Latif’s transfer and they tell him a dramatic story of what went on behind the scenes at some of the highest levels of government.  It’s a surprisingly riveting story of paperwork, where what’s at stake is not only the fate of one man, but also the soul of America.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Latif Story Bonus 14 mins – “Since we released the first episode of The Other Latif, we’ve been contacted by many new sources. Which is great! But it also means we need a little extra time to cobble together Episodes 5 and 6. So while we wait, Jad and Latif chat about Abdul Latif’s response to the series, a character who fell out of episode 4, and a tiny moment in Latif’s youth that helped put him on the path he’s on now.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obesity Control 8 mins – “According to the World Health Organization, the global prevalence of obesity has tripled since the mid-1970s. More than 1 billion adults are overweight, and 650 million adults and 124 million children and adolescents have obesity. Globally, obesity is responsible for 41% of uterine cancers; more than 10% of gallbladder, kidney, liver, and colon cancers; 40% of cases of cardiovascular disease1; and most cases of type 2 diabetes. SARS-CoV-2 infection is more likely to cause serious illness or death in people with obesity than in those with a healthier body-mass index (BMI).2 The prevalence of obesity is higher in the United States than in other member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development: nationwide, about 42% of adults, 14% of children 2 to 5 years of age, and 20% of children 6 to 19 years of age have obesity. Obesity disproportionately affects racial and ethnic minority groups and rural and low-income populations in the United States. Obesity rates have increased during the past two decades in all age groups except the youngest children.3 “ At the link right-click “Download Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pandemic in Rome 33 mins – “We know we’re not the first civilization to face a paralyzing pandemic – the history of plagues and pandemics is a long one when you look back over time. According to historian Kyle Harper, the great Roman Empire is one of the most notable that was hit with and ultimately lost to the power of forces like viruses and natural disasters. He’s the author of The Fate of Rome, where he charts how Romans stood against infectious diseases and climate change until the added burdens of outside forces eventually changed their whole society.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Pollution Control 37 mins – “California has a compelling need to reduce pollutant emissions to reach health-based ambient air quality goals. The South Coast Air Quality Management District and the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District are currently in extreme non-attainment of the eight-hour federal ozone standard, and in non-attainment for the 24-hour PM2.5 standard. A recent study found that converting medium and heavy duty transportation vehicles to electricity would not only dramatically reduce air pollution, but would also create more jobs than vehicles that run on other fuels. Tune in as we discuss the study with Eileen Tutt, Executive Director of the California Electric Transportation Coalition and Simon Mui, Senior Scientist, Climate & Clean Energy Program, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC).” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

SARS Victim 19 mins – “In 2003, nurse Susan Sorrenti contracted SARS while working at Toronto’s Mount Sinai Hospital. As a similar virus prompts health warnings in China and around the world, Sorrenti recalls her gruelling experience and reflects on the lessons we can learn as we grapple with this new illness. Plus, an update on the emerging story from infectious disease reporter Helen Branswell of Stat News.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

School Nutrition 34 mins – “Feeding America is the nation’s largest domestic hunger-relief organization—a powerful and efficient network of 200 food banks across the country. As food insecurity rates hold steady at the highest levels ever, the Feeding America network of food banks has risen to meet the need. They feed 40 million people at risk of hunger, including 12 million children and 7 million seniors. But Feeding America also works to alleviate hunger with a focus on sustainability and environmental justice. Today we will discuss their work in America’s Food Deserts, as well as their work to keep edible food from going to waste.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shared Immunity 26 mins – “More than a million people have caught Covid-19, and tens of thousands have died. But thousands more have survived an”Dd recovered. A week or so ago (aka, what feels like ten years in corona time) producer Molly Webster learned that many of those survivors possess a kind of superpower: antibodies trained to fight the virus. Not only that, they might be able to pass this power on to the people who are sick with corona, and still in the fight. Today we have the story of an experimental treatment that’s popping up all over the country: convalescent plasma transfusion, a century-old procedure that some say may become one of our best weapons against this devastating, new disease.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Isolation 33 mins – “Not in recent memory has the question “How are you feeling” been asked by so many with such sincerity. The COVID-19 shutdown, the uncertainty of how long all of this will last and what the impact will be – not to mention the extra stress induced by an earthquake and aftershocks – has Utahns and beyond feeling fragile. We take our 11 a.m. hour on Friday to look closely at what isolation means to our mental health, social creatures that we are, and what relief we can find in this difficult time.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Space Discussion 39 mins – “One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren’t. So today, we’re releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we’re rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60’s, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Third Existential Crisis 34 mins – “As an essayist and novelist, writer Ben Fountain was an unlikely choice to pen a monthly column about the 2016 presidential election for the British newspaper, The Guardian. He’d never worked as a journalist, and although he’s passionate about U.S. politics, he had never written about a presidential election.  But following Donald Trump, both on the campaign trail and in his Guardian column, allowed Fountain to dig deep into that particular moment of our society, leading him to declare that we have entered what he calls the country’s “third existential crisis,“ after the struggle over slavery and the Great Depression. Fountain joined us in February for the David P. Gardner Lecture, thanks to an invitation from the Tanner Humanities Center.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Thyroid Cancer 18 mins – “Producer Lise Hosein tells her story as a patient diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer.Until recently, treatment meant getting surgery to remove the thyroid glands. Now doctors are discovering that surgery can in many cases be safely avoided. Patients can safely choose to live with their cancer. For Lise, that seismic shift in treatment comes too late. This episode is produced with the support of The Doc Project mentorship program.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Toilet Paper Buying 32 mins – “History is full of moments when humans as a group react to difficult events. Now that we are a month into the coronavirus quarantine, we’re taking stock of our own reactions to this time. We’ve been hearing stories from around the country about panic buying — especially people hoarding toilet paper — and when we looked at the numbers, Utah is at the top of current grocery store spending. We’ll talk about the psychology of pandemics, as well as the history and culture of Utah’s own impulse to, well, buy a lot.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Women in Software and Cybersecurity 11 mins – “Roberta “Bobbie” Stempfley discusses her career and journey to becoming the director of the SEI’s CERT Division. “There are a million unfillable jobs in cybersecurity. That means there just are not enough people. We have to grow the number of people who understand how to resolve cybersecurity-related issues, who are focused on it. We need to automate things, so we needmore software folks who are smart in order to do that. We can bring women in, but the other interesting statistic is that more than half of them leave mid-career. So it’s not just how do we bring them in, it is how do we keep them in that space?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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