Media Mining Digest 254 – Sep 23, 2016: Afghanistan Lessons, Air Conditioning Trends, Airships in Canada, American West Revisited, Animal Intelligence, Appalachia Culture, Asylum Villages, Believer In Chief, Birth Of a Nation, Black Lawyers in Canada, Bone Problems of Aging, Brain Plasticity, Carbon Farming, Cashless Society, Cities Without Cars, Civilization Trends, Climate Change Politics, Climate Melts Glaciers, Consciousness Discussion, Crowd Supply, Dakota Access Pipeline, Dental Decay and Fluoridation, Direct Care Workers, Dress Codes, Drones for Refugees, Drop Shipping Problem, Education in America, Education Inequality, Elections in America, Electronic Freedom Foundation, Emotions and Stress, Empathy and Stress, Energy Conservation System, Food Laws and Policies, Forsyth Racism Story, Franklin Expedition, Game Psychology, Genetic Engineering History, Global Climate Emergency, Gluten and Celiac Disease, GMOs in Canada, Green Business Incubator, Health Care Costs, Hospital Architecture, Hydrogel, Ice Age Art, India Car Crashes, Intelligence Post 9-11, Internet Pioneer, Investment Advisors, Iraqis in Syria, ISIS Defeat, Jakarta Sea Rise, Landfill Projects, Libertarian Party, Life Saver Sparks, Machine Learning, Medical Statistics, Mob Violence, Money and Finances, Nicotine Uses, Night Vale in Stereo, North Korea Nukes, Nuclear Power, Open Source Science, Pensions in Australia, Perspectives, Physician Attitude, Political Metaphors, Polyamorous Families, Profit College Scam, Psychedelic Education, Refugee Island, Rituals and Thrills, Schools Size Decline in NH, Seaweed Farming, Sex Trafficking, Short Coat Podcast, Sleep Chronotypes, Social Weapons of Destruction, Stalinist Resistance, Students and CIA, Textbook Costs, Trees Talk, Underworld Operation, Vaping, Wells Fargo Fraud, William Styron, Work Evolution

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 89 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 211 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files  here  as one download for the next four months.  A collection of over 11,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

Afghanistan Lessons 52 mins – “A decade and a half after the United States and NATO allies invaded Afghanistan and U.S. President George W. Bush declared a “War on Terror,” the future of Afghanistan is still being written. Attal, a Fulbright scholar and a bright young activist-educator, will discuss the turbulent situation in Afghanistan, lessons from the War on Terror, and his hopes for the future. After receiving his Masters at San Francisco’s Golden Gate University, Attal returned to Afghanistan committed to helping his struggling homeland achieve labor reform, more gender equality and evasive stability. He is a recipient of the United Nations Youth Courage Award.” At the link right-click “Play” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Air Conditioning Trends 30 mins – “On this episode of Direct Current, we’re taking you to the future of cooling, where new technologies like magnet-based air conditioning and personalized robots will transform how we fight climate change, save on energy costs and stay comfortable.” At the link right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Airships in Canada 14 mins – “The high cost of groceries in First Nations communities in the North, and Arctic, has a Winnipeg man calling on Canada to use airships to transport food and supplies to the North – a move he says would significantly reduce the cost of living.” At the link find the title, “How airships could make life more affordable in northern Canada, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160915_63775.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American West Revisited 58 mins – “BBC World Service drives across the United States to find out why Americans seem more divided than ever.” At the link find the title, “America Revisited: The West, Sept, 2016,”right-click “Media files p047c0gf.mp3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Intelligence 30 mins – “How do we define intelligence? How do we decide which animals possess it? And why are some people so uncomfortable with the idea of intelligence and consciousness existing outside the world of Homo sapiens?In his latest book, Are we smart enough to know how smart animals are?, legendary ethologist Professor Frans de Waal questions the boundaries that have historically existed between the minds of humans and other animals. Here Waal joins Hannah Devlin in the studio – alongside psychologist Professor Wendy Johnson – and they discuss the nature of intelligence and intelligence in nature, throwing light on an age-old debate that challenges just how special we humans are.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Appalachia Culture 16 mins – “Hillbilly Elegy author J.D. Vance grew up between the Rust Belt and Appalachia surrounded by poverty, anger and love. Part of a culture that he says is in crisis in America today and that feeds into the politics playing out in this U.S. election year.” At the link find the title, “Yale University hillbilly J.D. Vance on learned helplessness in America, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160914_66939.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asylum Villages 57 mins – “Jean Vanier, who founded the L’Arche movement in 1963 for people with profound disabilities, quickly learned that “normal” people have much to learn about being human by watching those we perceive as weak. Jean Vanier in conversation with Philip Coulter.” At the link find the title, “The Rabbit and the Giraffe: Jean Vanier, Part 2, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160919_87016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Believer in Chief 57 mins – “American presidential candidates are expected to proclaim their religious faith and the 2016 election is no exception. In this episode of BackStory, Peter, Ed, and Brian explore the complicated relationship between American presidents and their spiritual beliefs. We’ll look at how many early leaders, like Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln, didn’t belong to a particular church, and how Democratic presidential candidate Al Smith’s Roman Catholicism was a flashpoint in the 1928 election. We’ll also hear how evangelical preacher Billy Graham became the spiritual advisor to a dozen Presidents.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Birth Of a Nation 17 mins – “Nate Parker’s The Birth of a Nation is one of the most talked about movies at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival. For many, Parker’s history involving a sexual assault charge raises complex questions about whether to even see the film.” At the link find the title, “Nate Parker’s Birth Of A Nation: can you separate art from the artist? Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160912_20762.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Lawyers in Canada 18 mins – “Toronto lawyer Selwyn Pieters has filed a lawsuit alleging humiliating treatment based on his race by the Law Society of Upper Canada. Now other lawyers who say they have faced similar situations are speaking up about racial bias in the court system.” At the link find the title, “Non-white lawyers in Canada call out racial profiling in justice system, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160913_76234.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bone Problems of Aging 88 mins – “Age-related bone and joint injuries are increasing as the population ages. Dr. Eric Meinberg looks at managing osteoporosis and its complications and Dr. Paul Toogood looks at broken hips and discuses joint replacement. Recorded on 05/31/2016. (#30990)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Plasticity 64 mins – “Steven R. Campbell, M.S., Information Systems Campbell presents an eye-opening look at the latest research on how our brains conform to the messages we give it: When we optimize those messages, our brains will literally rewire themselves again to create new, positive self-images of who we want to be. This is formally called “neuroplasticity.” Understanding this could open doors to creating more success in our health, personal relationships and in our businesses. It’s not magic…it’s science! The speaker will share practical knowledge of cutting-edge brain research on creating success, better health, loving relationships and overcoming your fears as well as an understanding of the surprising power of thinking differently when you mess up.” At the link right-click “Play” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Carbon Farming 29 mins – “Can simply changing how and what we grow really make a difference to a changing climate? This week’s guest on Sea Change Radio, author and agricultural expert, Eric Toensmeier, is quite certain it can. We discuss smarter agricultural methods like using trees and grazing animals. And we talk about what might turn an enormous, slow-moving industry like agriculture onto a more sustainable path.” At the link right-click “Download’ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cashless Society 47 mins – “Economist Kenneth Rogoff says it’s time to be done with paper money and what he calls “The Curse of Cash.”Cash may feel a little old-fashioned these days, but there sure is a lot of it out there. Trillions of dollars in paper money. Economist Kenneth Rogoff says it’s time to get rid of it. Almost all of it. Everything bigger than a ten dollar bill. Cash is for criminals these days, he says. Drug dealers and terrorists and tax dodgers. Plus, he wants negative interest rates as a tool in the next recession. And he doesn’t want you to be able to hide out in cash. This hour On Point, the call for an end to cash.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cities Without Cars 30 mins – “The battle in big cities continues: how do you keep cars out to cut congestion and reduce pollution? Chris Ledgard visits Paris and Barcelona to explore two different approaches. In Paris, the mayor’s office wants to ban the most polluting cars, and coloured stickers are being introduced to help the authorities determine which vehicles can enter the city centre. Meanwhile, more and more Paris residents are turning to the electric car-sharing scheme, Autolib. We hear how it works. In Barcelona, urban ecologists are adapting the famous grid system designed by Ildefons Cerda to create ‘superblocks’ – large traffic-free spaces across the city where the sound of traffic is only distantly heard. Chris talks to the scheme’s inventor, Salvador Rueda, and hears about his vision for Spain’s second biggest city.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Civilization Trends 60 mins – “’…Noah Harari Yuval Noah Harari is the star historian who shot to fame with his international bestseller ‘Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind’. In that book Harari explained how human values have been continually shifting since our earliest beginnings: once we placed gods at the centre of the universe; then came the Enlightenment, and from then on human feelings have been the authority from which we derive meaning and values. Now, using his trademark blend of science, history, philosophy and every discipline in between, Harari argues in his forthcoming book ‘Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow’, our values may be about to shift again – away from humans, as we transfer our faith to the almighty power of data and the algorithm. …After a few countries master the enhancement of bodies and brains, will they conquer the planet while the rest of humankind is driven to extinction?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Politics 46 mins – “President Obama calls climate change trends “terrifying.” But what about Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump? We’ll look at their plans for the environment.There are so many big forks in the road as Americans prepare now to choose the country’s next president. If you want to see a giant one, look at environmental policy, Trump versus Clinton. Hillary Clinton would carry on battling climate change and put solar panels all over. Donald Trump says manmade climate change is a hoax, and would pour on the coal and fossil fuels. President Obama says he already terrified by what’s coming. This hour On Point, the huge canyon over climate in the 2016 race.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Melts Glaciers 60 mins – “This week, we look back at a previous episode about how climate change is altering the face of the planet, and affecting the lives of the people who live here. Desiree Schell speaks to science writer and naturalist Christoper White, about his book “The Melting World: A Journey Across America’s Vanishing Glaciers.” And she’s joined by sociology researcher Stephen Castles, to discuss the factors driving human migration, and how it could be affected by the shifting climate. Download “Foresight: Migration and Global Environmental Change” (2011) Final Project Report from the UK Government Office for Science, London. Download Stephen Castles’ “concluding remarks on the climate change-migration nexus,” from “Migration and Climate Change” 2011.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness Discussion 77 mins – “Advances in physical sciences, biology, and neuroscience have dramatically enhanced our knowledge of the human species. But can physical sciences solve the biggest mystery—the emergence of human consciousness?” At the link find the title, “The Rise of Human Consciousness, Sep, 2016,” right-click “Media files 160915_poe4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crowd Supply 78 mins – “Josh Lifton of Crowd Supply talks about what it takes to make sure every project is delivered to backers. Also: distributed sensors at light shows and how to become an open source stenographer.” At the link find the title, “#314 – An Interview with Josh Lifton, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dakota Access Pipeline 5 mins – “For weeks, members of the Standing Rock Sioux have gathered in Cannonball, North Dakota standing against what’s known as the Dakota Access pipeline. The 1,172-mile pipeline is a $3.7 billion dollar project that would carry about 470,000 barrels of crude oil a day from North Dakota to Illinois. Its route would take the pipeline under the Missouri River, just upstream from the Standing Rock reservation, and Sioux tribal members say this would threaten their drinking water and sacred sites. Hundreds of other tribes in the US and Canada have pledged support for the Sioux nation, and thousands of activists have traveled to North Dakota to stand with them. It’s considered one of the largest Native American movements in recent history, and president of the Native American Journalists Association Jason Begay finds it “quite remarkable.” …The project has been overseen by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Last Friday, a federal judge ruled against the Sioux nation’s attempt to stop the work — but immediately after that ruling, the US government ordered construction on the pipeline to halt temporarily. “The Army will not authorize constructing the Dakota Access pipeline on Corps land bordering or under Lake Oahe until it can determine whether it will need to reconsider any of its previous decisions regarding the Lake Oahe site under the National Environmental Policy Act or other federal laws,” the order said. “Therefore, construction of the pipeline on Army Corps land bordering or under Lake Oahe will not go forward at this time.”…“For the first month or so of the movement people relied entirely on Facebook updates to see what’s been going on,” Begay said, and only recently has the case gotten mainstream media attention. Supporters who can’t make it to North Dakota have been using the hashtag #NoDAPL to show their opposition to the project…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dental Decay and Fluoridation 13 mins – “Professionals in dental health believe there’s a link between tooth decay and Calgary’s choice five years ago to pull fluoride out of the water. But the city’s elected officials aren’t interested in the details.” At the link find the title, “Study suggests more tooth decay in Calgary kids after end of water fluoridation, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160914_19199.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Direct Care Workers 5 mins – “Audio interview by GAO staff with Kathleen King, Director, Health Care” At the link find the title,”Long Term Care Workforce, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files 679354.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dress Codes 50 mins – “…France’s highest court struck down a prohibition against Burkinis in one of the 30 seaside towns which forbade the full-body covering favored by some Muslim women. Proponents argue the ban increases security and defend secularism in light of the attack in nearby nice. Opponents claim it’s straight-up islamophobia…. We move from a pioneer in magazines for kids to the story of a woman who would fit quite well within those pages. Nate DiMeo, creator and host of The Memory Palace podcast brings us her story….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drones for Refugees 4 mins – “More than a decade ago he fled the Taliban in Afghanistan. He made his way to Turkey, and later rode a flimsy boat to Greece. Now Salehi is working to help other refugees survive the perilous sea crossings to Europe that have claimed thousands of lives. To do that, he’s become a drone expert. Salehi developed a “real-time data gathering and sharing platform,” he told the BBC. “You use this drone system to identify where refugees are … and what their needs are,” he explained. His program, “Drones for Refugees,” allows for broadcasting the exact locations of boats in distress…. The sea crossings, perilous for humans, aren’t always easy for drones either — especially amid sensitive relations over airspace, like those between Turkey and Greece. Salehi’s confident about his program’s mission, though. Eventually Drones for Refugees hopes to add emergency air drops and two-way messaging systems to its fleet. But before that, “the main purpose is to identify the GPS location of refugee boats, and send help right away.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drop Shipping Problem 21 mins – “The internet was supposed to get rid of middlemen–but instead they are taking over the global economy.” At the link find the title, “#724: Cat Scam, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160914_pmoney_podcast091416.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education in America 27 mins – “The Education of Omarina continues a story FRONTLINE has been following since 2012 — showing how an innovative program to stem the high school dropout crisis has affected one girl’s journey, from a public middle school in the Bronx to an elite New England private school, and now on to college.” At the link find the title, “The Education of Omarina, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files 282891916-frontlinepbs-the-education-of-omarina.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Inequality 47 mins – “A Connecticut judge calls unequal education unconstitutional, and raises national questions about the American way of schooling.Americans know that funding local schools with local property taxes means inequality. We know that whole communities of children are coming up with substandard, even lousy education. And we don’t fix it. Last week, one judge said “enough.” A Connecticut judge said his state is failing – that it “has left rich districts to flourish and poor districts to flounder” – and gave legislators 180 days to design a better way. The whole country’s watching. This hour On Point, facing up to education inequality.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elections in America 62 mins – “Experts discuss the history and development of the U.S. presidential nominating process, including primaries, caucuses, and conventions, and whether the process should be changed in light of the unpredictability and tumult surrounding this election season.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronic Freedom Foundation 33 mins – “In the wake of the Panama Papers breach, securing law firm and client data has been a huge concern for many practitioners in the legal space. Similarly, other information leaks like the Edward Snowden revelations have made the general public more aware of government surveillance than ever before. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek sit down with executive director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation Cindy Cohn to discuss domestic surveillance concerns, encryption technology, and how lawyers and law firms can protect themselves and their clients from cyber attacks. Cindy Cohn is the executive director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation. From 2000-2015 she served as EFF’s Legal Director as well as its General Counsel. Ms. Cohn first became involved with EFF in 1993, when EFF asked her to serve as the outside lead attorney in Bernstein v. Dept. of Justice, the successful First Amendment challenge to the U.S. export restrictions on cryptography.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emotions and Stress 26 mins – “In the third episode of Brain waves, Dr Kevin Fong and Nathalie Nahai discover how our love of sport evolved out of ancient emotional experiences and ask how modern stadiums are designed to maximise sensation. Plus, we meet the world’s first “thrill engineer” In this third episode, Dr Kevin Fong and Nathalie Nahai turn their attention to the world of sport and learn how the feelings we share in huge crowds echo rituals of repetition that humans have always used to bind families, communities and nations. We hear from Brendan Walker – the world’s only “thrill engineer” – who spends his life designing rollercoasters to maximise our need for sensation seeking – and learn how modern sporting events are engineered to hack into ancient emotional experiences from Larry Hall at the Indianapolis Colts stadium. They’ve won “best NFL experience” for the last five years, thanks to the way they pump up NFL fans on game day with a precise combination of sensory overload, community and pride. Plus we hear from De Monfort University historian Professor Tony Collins, who specialises in the history of sport, and the University of Sussex’s Professor David Hendy and Professor Ellen Dissanayake from the University of Washington unravel why crowds come together to chant at mass spectator events. These are the thrills that make us feel alive – and for a first-hand report, producer Max Sanderson (who hates heights) volunteers to chuck himself down the giant ArcelorMittal Orbit slide.…” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Empathy and Stress 86 mins – “Eve Ekman looks at the areas of meaning, empathy and burnout and how to manage stress in a work environment. Recorded on 06/09/2016. (#31010)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Conservation System 58 mins – “According to the U.S. Department of Energy, commercial buildings have high energy needs and can put great strain on the nation’s power grids during peak periods. Developing more efficient buildings helps ensure a steady supply of affordable power and significantly lowers operating costs for businesses, schools, hospitals, and more.” At the link find the title, “InTech Energy and the Building Internet of Things -Biot, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files buck090916.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Role Models 43 mins – “When a seasoned magazine editor took her daughter to the bookstore, they found scientists and explorers in magazines for boys. For girls: princesses, cover girls in make-up and tips for shinier hair. On today’s show a new magazine for girls has plenty of creative, inspiring ideas, and no lipstick! Also today, aspiring doctors get all they can from med school, for the rest, they turn to actors. We’ll find out how playing sick is helping to make better doctors. And the 5-second rule gets the science treatment..” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save lLink As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Laws and Policies 58 mins – “Bad food laws are handcuffing America’s most sustainable farmers, producers, sellers, and consumers, while rewarding those whose practices are contributing to the food industry’s biggest problems, according to food lawyer and scholar Baylen J. Linnekin, author of Biting the Hands that Feed Us: How Fewer, Smarter Laws Would Make Our Food System More Sustainable.” At the link find the title, “Biting the Hands that Feed Us, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files buck091616.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forsyth Racism Story 47 mins – “In 1912, white mobs set fire to black churches and black-owned businesses. Eventually the entire black population of Forsyth County was driven out, says ‘Blood at the Root’ author Patrick Phillips. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews an album from Jim Black’s trio.” At the link find the title, “September 15, 2016, The ‘Racial Cleansing’ Of Forsyth County, GA,”click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Franklin Expedition 10 mins – “This month, HMS Terror — one of the ships from the Franklin expedition — was found in an Arctic Bay. While many history buffs are excited by the news, it raises questions of sovereignty for Inuit people who want input over the division of the artifacts.” At the link find the title, “Inuit demand input over division of Franklin expedition artifacts, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160915_14749.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Game Psychology 57 mins – “Why do people cheat? Why are our online worlds often so toxic? What motivates us to “catch ’em all” in Pokemon, grinding away for hours to hatch eggs? In this episode, psychologist Jamie Madigan, author of Getting Gamers, explains how by exploring the way people interact with video games we can better understand how brains interact with everything else.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 084 Getting Gamers-Jamie Madigan.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Engineering History 49 mins – “One of the most important steps in genetic engineering a plant is the process of regenerating an entire new plant from a single cell that contains the new genetic instructions. The process is as much art as science. Dr. Indra Vasil was a pioneer in this area, especially in monocots, the plants we think of as our major grasses and grains. In this interview Dr. Vasil discusses the early days of plant tissue culture, and his contributions to the process that makes genetic engineering of crops possible. Dr. Vasil shares his experiences and talks fondly of the many scientists that supported his work, as well as the need to get students to think outside the box.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Climate Emergency 60 mins – “It’s been summer in the Northern Hemisphere, when viewers and journalists drift into platitudes and cat videos. Meanwhile the planet is going through extreme changes, not seen during the time of humans. We’re going to spend this program going through the science that should have been foot-high headlines around the world. Plus some small signals of big things to come. Our guest is climate scientist and returning Radio Ecoshock guest, Paul Beckwith. Paul teaches climate and Earth science at Canada’s University of Ottawa. He’s got two Masters degrees and is working on his PhD in climate science. Beckwith’s You tube videos have been seen by millions, where he lays out the case we are already in a global climate emergency.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” beside “Download…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gluten and Celiac Disease 58 mins – “…In this auto-immune condition, exposure to gluten found in barley, rye and wheat causes the body to attack the lining of the digestive tract. The damage that is done interferes with the ability of the intestines to absorb nutrients properly and that can lead to serious consequences indeed. In fact, people with undiagnosed or untreated celiac disease are twice as likely to die prematurely as other individuals. …Certain drugs, such as antibiotics or PPI acid-suppressing medicines, may predispose susceptible people to developing celiac disease. It may take several years before people with celiac disease get a proper diagnosis; once they do, they need a gluten-free diet. … For most people, it is important to see a doctor and be tested before starting a gluten-free diet. …Do you really need a gluten-free diet? If so, how do you ensure that it provides all the necessary nutrients? Our guests discuss this dilemma. A recent article in JAMA Internal Medicine (online Sept. 6, 2016) is extremely relevant to this show: “Time Trends in the Prevalence of Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet in the US Population.” This Week’s Guests: Peter H.R. Green, MD, is the director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University. …His recent research paper was on “Intestinal cell damage and systemic immune activation in individuals reporting sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease.” It was published in Gut (online, July 25, 2016). Rory Jones, MS, is a medical writer and Adjunct Professor of Narrative Medicine at Barnard College of Columbia University. Ms. Jones and Dr. Green have co-authored two books: Celiac Disease: A Hidden Epidemic and Gluten Exposed: The Science Behind the Hype and How to Navigate to a Healthy, Symptom-Free Life….” At the link find the title, “Show 1049: Do You Need a Gluten-Free Diet?Thursday, September 08, 2016 7:22 PM, right-click “Media files PP-1049Gluten-Free.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMOs in Canada 13 mins – “This week Monsanto agreed to be taken over by the pharmaceutical company, Bayer at a price of $66 billion. There’s a chance genetically altered seeds may still be sold but without the brand name, could this move change the conversation on all things GMO?” t the link find the title, “Can the Monsanto-Bayer deal change the image of GMOs? Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160916_80837.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Green Business Incubator 8 mins – “A few years ago, when Sorin Grama had just finished graduate work at MIT and was looking for a place to build his new solar electricity startup, he came across an old abandoned warehouse. “My partner and I were looking at it and said, ‘Well, it’s a lot of space here, maybe others can join, it’s kind of lonely,’” Grama says. “We put out a call to the MIT community.” Within weeks, a handful of startups were sharing that cavernous space. …Today, their home is a massive old mid-19th century pipe factory in Somerville, just outside of Boston. It’s called Greentown Labs, and it’s one of the most successful in a new wave of what are called green business incubators, clusters of startups looking to build a business by helping cut carbon emissions and fight climate change. Executive vice president Mark Vasu says Greentown is now the nation’s largest clean tech incubator, home to more than 50 clean energy and clean technology-focused companies…. Of course outgrowing the incubator is part of the point, showing there’s money to be made tackling the world’s climate and energy challenges. …Steven Pike, interim CEO of the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, says it’s an efficient way to spend. …“We want to be the Silicon Valley of clean energy, renewable energy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Costs 65 mins – “John Dearborn, M.D. The United States is in the midst of a crisis in health care. With the many advances in biomedical technology and pharmacology, fueled by research in academia and industry, we have never been better cared-for and are enjoying longer productive lives. But the growing cost of delivering that care, especially for an aging population, has us in the middle of a battle between the health-care delivery system and third-party payers, including Medicare. Premiums have soared, and coverage has waned to keep the insurers in the black, but Medicare has been badly underfunded for decades. Can physicians and hospitals strike a balance between high-quality care and cost that will ease the strain on our wallets yet still keep us healthy and active? This has been the focus in the joint-replacement realm at Washington Hospital in Fremont for nearly 20 years, and the results have been astounding..” At the link right-click “Play” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Hospital Architect 16 mins – “Architecture is more than a clever arrangement of bricks. In this eloquent talk, Michael Murphy shows how he and his team look far beyond the blueprint when they’re designing. Considering factors from airflow to light, theirs is a holistic approach that produces community as well as (beautiful) buildings. He takes us on a tour of projects in countries such as Rwanda and Haiti, and reveals a moving, ambitious plan for The Memorial to Peace and Justice, which he hopes will heal hearts in the American South.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hydrogel 4 mins – “Injectable gels could help prevent heart failure.” At the link find the title,”Episode 685 – September 15 2016,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_Sept15_2016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ice Age Art 56 mins – “Paul Kennedy takes a trip back in time to the Ice Age with renowned Canadian archaeologist Genevieve von Petzinger.” At the link find the title “First Signs: Unlocking the Mysteries of the World’s Oldest Symbols, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160915_77565.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Car Crashes 27 mins – “India has some of the world’s most dangerous roads. The government says almost 150,000 people died on them last year. Nowhere saw more crashes than the booming city of Mumbai. The carnage is relentless, affecting people at every level of society. Neal Razzell meets the Mumbaikers who are saying, enough: a vegetable seller who fills potholes in his spare time after his son died in one; a neurosurgeon whose experience treating victims has led him to try to build trauma centres along one of the worst roads; and an unlikely combination of engineers, activists and police officers with an ambitious plan to bring the number of deaths on a notorious expressway down to zero. It’s hoped there will be lessons in Mumbai for all of India. The country is in the midst of an historic road-building push. By 2020, Prime Minister Modi wants to pave a distance greater than the circumference of the earth. Produced by Michael Gallagher” At the link find the title, “Fixing India’s Car Crash Capital, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Fixing India’s Car Crash Capital, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files p047qpw5.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Post 9-11 56 mins – “Experts discuss developments in counterterrorism and intelligence gathering in the past fifteen years, including lessons learned since the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Pioneer 71 mins – “Mark McCahill is an American programmer who has been involved in developing and popularizing a number of Internet technologies since the late 1980s. Mark is best known for helping create the first popular Internet e-mail clients, POPmail, for the Macintosh (and later the PC). He also developed the gopher protocol, as well as coined the phrase “surfing the web”.” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “Download” and select “Audio” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Advisors 41 mins – “In this first of a 10-part CD series produced for the PBS Show, “Financial Fitness After 50” (2012), Paul discusses how to identify an advisor who will provide all the services you need to ensure you maximize the advantage of working with a professional. He’ll also show you how to tell if the advisor is working in your best interest or in his /her own.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iraqis in Syria 16 mins – “Journalist Deborah Campbell tells remarkable stories in her book, A Disappearance in Damascus. It’s the story of her fixer, the trusted emissary relied on by foreign correspondents to get the story. But in the case of Ahlam, she became the story herself.” At the link find the title, “’Real heroes’: Journalist highlights invaluable role of fixers in foreign reporting, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160916_34268.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Defeat 37 mins – “General Jack Keane briefly describes the history and rise of ISIS and its aim in the Middle East. Keane then discusses the concrete steps America should take to defeat ISIS, including partnerships with Sunni tribes and a more comprehensive air war.” At the link find the title, “A Plan to Defeat ISIS, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160325-Keane.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jakarta Sea Rise 5 mins – “…The city faces some of the worst flooding problems of any major urban area in the world, in part because those 13 rivers, often swollen by monsoon rains, drain into a dense urban area that’s rapidly sinking below sea level…. Going online for flood information is faster than waiting for official announcements, and residents say they trust the information more because it’s coming from a real person.…That’s where PetaJakarta comes in. It’s an open-source, real-time, online map of the city that automatically filters Tweets about flooding to improve accuracy and fill in the gaps between official city reports. When someone tweets “banjir” — the Indonesian word for flood — and tags @PetaJkt, PetaJakarta automatically replies, asking them to verify the tweet with geotagged photos. The app then combines all those reports with official data from the city into an up-to-the-minute, online flood map that can be more reliable than other social posts…. By one estimate, Jakarta is also the world’s capital of Twitter activity, which Turpin says makes it a goldmine of data, full of what he calls “human sensors” for tracking disasters and vetting real-time reports.…. Given its speed and accuracy, even some government officials have turned to PetaJakarta. Soon after it went online, Jakarta’s governor urged his followers on Twitter to use PetaJakarta to tweet about flooding.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 Landfill Projects 21 mins – “On May 3rd, 1978, construction workers in San Francisco were digging a foundation for a new building on Sansome Street, right next to the Transamerica Pyramid in the heart of the financial district. About 20 feet below street-level their shovels hit something totally unexpected. It was the hull of an old boat. Within a few days archaeologists had uncovered the full skeleton of a 120-foot gold rush era ship called the Niantic… The Niantic is not the only ship buried under the streets of San Francisco. Some estimates put the number as high as seventy…Large portions of New York City, Boston, Seattle, Hong Kong and Marseilles were built on top of fill. What is now Mumbai, India, was transformed by the British from a seven-island archipelago to one contiguous strip of land. The most extraordinary example of land reclamation and manufacture may be the Netherlands. As early as the 9th century A.D., the Dutch began building dykes and pumping systems to create new land in places that were actually below sea level… A new luxury community called Eko Atlantic near the coastal city of Lagos, Nigeria will be 3-4 meters higher than the rest of Lagos in order to make Eko Atlantic more resistant to sea level rise…Human activity has effectively created a new layer on the surface of the planet, made up of old bricks, cement and rusting metal. Geologists and archaeologists have started calling this layer the archaeosphere….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Libertarian Party 50 mins – “Gary Johnson, the Libertarian Party’s presidential candidate, likes to say that most Americans are libertarians but don’t know it yet. So why can’t Libertarians (and other third parties) gain more political traction?” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Life Saver Sparks 23 mins – “As a young science reporter at NPR, Science Friday’s Ira Flatow accepts a challenge to record what it sounds like to go over Niagara Falls. [and what causes sparks when Life Savers are crunched.] Award winning science correspondent and TV journalist Ira Flatow is the host of Science Friday, heard weekly on PRI, Public Radio International, and online. He anchors the show each Friday, bringing radio and Internet listeners worldwide a lively, informative discussion on science, technology, health, space, and the environment. Ira is also founder and president of the Science Friday Initiative, a 501 (c)(3) non-profit company dedicated to creating radio, TV, and Internet projects that make science “user-friendly.” At the link find the title, “Ira Flatow: The Sound of the Falls, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files 283205534-the-story-collider-ira-flatow-the-sound-of-the-falls.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Machine Learning 62 mins – “Can machinAe learning improve the use of data and evidence for understanding economics and public policy? Susan Athey of Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how machine learning can be used in conjunction with traditional econometric techniques to measure the impact of say, the minimum wage or the effectiveness of a new drug. The last part of the conversation looks at the experimental techniques being used by firms like Google and Amazon.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Statistics P1 39 mins – “In episode 324, Mike and James start a discussion about why numbers and our ability to communicate risks, benefits and harms to patients is crucial in today’s health care environment. Unfortunately, we find that many of us struggle with these concepts.” At the link find the title, “Episode 324: 1+1 =3 Numeracy and shared-decision making, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files Episode 324_11_3_Numeracy and shared decision making.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mob Violence 60 mins – “Which side were you on? The Jets or the Sharks? The Capulets or the Montagues? The Greeks or the Trojans? Antony or Caesar? William or Harold? And so the list goes on … Indeed, maybe the whole of human history is the story of group-making and group-breaking. The passions of loyalty and love for the in-group are matched by the de-humanising indignation and hatred for the out-group. But what’s actually going on in the chemical soup of the brain when Agamemnon gathers his heros-to-be and sets sail after Helen? Will peering into that soup – as neuroscientist David Eagleman is now doing – actually give peace a chance? Maybe utopia can come out of the lab. Will a scientific understanding of love and hate deliver social programmes that undermine the nastiness without sacrificing the good?” At the link click “Download” and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Money and Finance 55 mins – “We think we know what money is. We use it every day and our lives are unimaginable without it. But look more closely and you find that coins and dollar bills aren’t “real”. They’re promises, symbols, ideas.” At the link find the title, “The Illusion of Money, Part 1 (Encore Feb 24, 2016), Sept, 2016” right-click “Media files ideas_20160914_14925.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Nicotine Uses 41 mins – “[start at 10 mins]What comes to mind when you think of nicotine? For many people, it’s dirty smokers and lung cancer. But as Dr. Neil Grunberg, Professor of Medical and Clinical Psychology at the Uniformed Services University, explained to us way back in Episode 22, if you uncouple nicotine from tobacco, it’s actually a pretty darn powerful cognitive enhancer.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Night Vale in Stereo 24 mins – “Everything is all right.” At the link find the title, “94 – All Right,” right-click “Direct download: 94-All_Right.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Nukes 14 mins – “Analysts are warning North Korea’s continued nuke testing goes beyond basic posturing and is extremely dangerous for the region, and the world. The Current explores North Korea’s nuclear weapons potential.” At the link find the title, “North Korea’s nuclear test cause for alarm, experts warn, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160912_92719.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Power 14 mins – “’We’re not in a clean energy revolution; we’re in a clean energy crisis,’ says climate policy expert Michael Shellenberger. His surprising solution: nuclear. In this passionate talk, he explains why it’s time to overcome longstanding fears of the technology, and why he and other environmentalists believe it’s past time to embrace nuclear as a viable and desirable source of clean power.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Source Science 27 mins – “Matt Todd explains Open Source Malaria research, and the acceleration of science, part 2.” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pensions in Australia 60 mins – “Speakers Everald Compton, Jo Toohey and David Hetherington discuss the topic Adequacy of the Age Pension.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Adequacy of the Age Pension, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_AgePension_1409_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Perspectives 58 mins – “This week, stories about people trying their best to turn themselves into something else—like a badger. Or a professional comedian, in a language they didn’t grow up speaking.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physician Attitude 46 mins – “Dr Robin Youngson is a practicing anesthesiologist and international advocate for promoting compassion in healthcare. Dr Youngson has worked for many years on developing the concepts of rehumanizing healthcare at a clinical and leadership level. In addition to being the CoFounder of ‘Hearts in Healthcare’, a global social movement for physicians, he is also the author of several books, his most recent being the highly acclaimed ‘Time To Care: How to love your patients and your job’. This is a fantastic conversation on how we desperately need to bring humanity back to medicine and how we might go about doing so.” At the link right-click “Download’ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Metaphors 23 mins – “In the midst of a rancorous election, we present a new theory to explain why the two sides of the aisle seem irreconcilable sometimes.” At the link find the title, “Episode 44: Our Politics, Our Parenting, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160912_hiddenbrain_44.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Polyamorous Families 17 mins – “As unconventional, multi-person partnerships become more mainstream in Canadian society, The Current gets a first-hand look into legal challenges polyamorous families face such as getting benefits, doing taxes and filling out government forms.” At the link find the title, “Polyamorous families want Canadian law to catch up with their relationships, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160916_18762.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Profit College Scam 33 mins – “FRONTLINE investigates allegations of fraud and predatory behavior in the troubled for-profit college industry.” At the link find the title, “A Subprime Education, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files 282891123-frontlinepbs-a-subprime-education.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychedelic Education 59 mins – “[start at 10 mins]Let’s go on a trip with psychedelics expert (and brother of Terence McKenna) Dr. Dennis McKenna. Dr. McKenna has dedicated his research career to the study of hallucinogens and psychedelics and is a founding board member of the Heffter Research Institute, a non-profit organization dedicated to investigating therapeutic uses of psychedelics medicines. We talk varieties of magic mushroom, why Dr. McKenna is a cheerleader for ayahuasca, and the connection between religion and psychedelics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Island 18 mins – “The tiny Italian island of Lampedusa has been thrust into the centre of Europe’s migration crisis. Now a new bold documentary shows us a year in the life of the island – for its residents, migrants passing through and those trying to make a difference.” At the link find the title, “Documentary offers unflinching look into migrant crisis in Mediterranean, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160912_89422.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rituals and Thrills 26 mins – “In the third episode of Brain waves, Dr Kevin Fong and Nathalie Nahai discover how our love of sport evolved out of ancient emotional experiences and ask how modern stadiums are designed to maximise sensation. Plus, we meet the world’s first “thrill engineer” In this third episode, Dr Kevin Fong and Nathalie Nahai turn their attention to the world of sport and learn how the feelings we share in huge crowds echo rituals of repetition that humans have always used to bind families, communities and nations. We hear from Brendan Walker – the world’s only “thrill engineer” – who spends his life designing rollercoasters to maximise our need for sensation seeking – and learn how modern sporting events are engineered to hack into ancient emotional experiences from Larry Hall at the Indianapolis Colts stadium. They’ve won “best NFL experience” for the last five years, thanks to the way they pump up NFL fans on game day with a precise combination of sensory overload, community and pride. Plus we hear from De Monfort University historian Professor Tony Collins, who specialises in the history of sport, and the University of Sussex’s Professor David Hendy and Professor Ellen Dissanayake from the University of Washington unravel why crowds come together to chant at mass spectator events….” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School Size Decline in NH 58 mins – “Breaking up is hard to do. But in New Hampshire, multi-town school districts and administrative units (SAUs) are doing just that. Some say the process should be made easier, particularly for cooperative districts that were designed to discourage dissolution. But others warn of unintended consequences for students. School enrollment throughout New England has been declining, a demographic change that has prompted Maine and Vermont to encourage districts and towns to combine schools and resources to save money and provide educational opportunities for students.” At the link you can only read the transcript. A copy of the audio file is in the blog archive.

Seaweed Farming 30 mins – “Seaweed farming is booming: the global harvest has doubled in the past decade, according to a new report from the United Nations University, and it’s now worth more than all the world’s lemons and limes. Most of that seaweed ends up in our food, though there is a growing market in seaweed-based cosmetics and drugs. So what does a seaweed farm look like? How does it help restore the ocean? And what can you do with kelp in the kitchen, other than wrap sushi? Join us for a conversation with Bren Smith, fisherman-turned-seaweed farmer, for the answers to these questions and more….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Trafficking 56 mins – “Powered by the internet, the sex trade is reaching into all corners of the country. Reveal takes us into hidden places – real and virtual – where people are exploited for sex. Produced in collaboration with APM Reports, we’ll hear stories from the pot fields of Northern California to the streets of Chicago and suburban Seattle.” At the link find the title, “Against their will, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files Against-their-will_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Lin As” from the pop-up menu.

Short Coat Podcast 49 mins – “The Short Coat Podcast is from the students at Iowa’s Carver College of Medicine. After talking to them, I think every med school should have a podcast!” At the link find the title, “199 : The Short Coat Podcast Visits the Premed Years, Sept, 2016,” Media files PMY199.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep Chronotypes 57 mins – “Dr. Michael Breus talks about chronotypes and how to use them to our advantage for better sleep, productivity, and happiness.” At the link find the title, “The Science Behind Getting Better Sleep (Ep. 124),” right-click “Media files 47169.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Weapons of Destruction 51 mins – “On this episode of Slate Money, hosts Felix Salmon of Fusion, Cathy O’Neil, author of, Weapons of Math Destruction, and Slate Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann dive into Cathy’s new book, “Weapons of Math Destruction.” We discuss the worst math how algorithms can fail us, breakdown examples from criminal justice and insurance, and talk about “the way forward” when it comes to regulation, transparency, and ethics.” At the link find the title, “The Weapons of Math Destruction Edition, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM1368186687.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Stalinist Resistance 56 mins – “In the 1960s, young Soviet iconoclasts waged a musical battle against the banality of state-sanctioned culture. Simon Nakonechny looks at the phenomenon of Magnitizdat, and ponders its parallels to forms of cultural dissidence in Russia today.” At the link find the title, “Analog Resistance, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160913_15290.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Students and CIA 52 mins – Karen Paget, Author, Patriotic Betrayal: The Inside Story of the CIA’s Secret Campaign to Enroll American Students in the Crusade Against Communism Monday Night Philosophy considers the social ramifications of a democratic society allowing internal spying. In 1967, Ramparts magazine exposed a CIA secret: a decades-old project to enroll American students in the crusade against communism by suborning the National Student Association. Patriotic Betrayal tells a story filled with self-serving rationalizations, layers of duplicity, and bureaucratic double-talk. Author Karen Paget, herself a former member of the NSA, mined hundreds of archival sources and declassified documents, and interviewed more than 150 people, to uncover precisely how the CIA turned the NSA into an intelligence asset during the Cold War. Her answer throws a sharp light on the persistent argument about whether America’s national security interests can be secured by skullduggery and deception.” At the link right-click “Play” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Textbook Prices 15 mins – “Prices of new textbooks have been going up like crazy — faster than food, cars, even healthcare. On today’s show: Why textbooks have gotten so expensive.” At the link find the title, “#573: Why Textbook Prices Keep Climbing, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160916_pmoney_podcast091616.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trees Talk 46 mins – “The secret life of trees. They talk to each other, says forester Peter Wohlleben. They have families. We’ll sit down with the tree whisperer.We know from our language that the body is deeply engaged in our understanding of the world. A joke is side-splitting. We get butterflies in our stomach. Our eyes pop with surprise. Our blood runs cold. But my guest today says humans have radically retreated from the wisdom of the body’s signals to a hegemony of the brain, the intellect. In many ways, sitting at keyboards and screens, we’ve abandoned, forgotten the embodied cognition in the work of hands and backs. Time to get it back, he says. This hour On Point: When the brain is not enough. Intelligence in the flesh.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Underworld Operation 69 mins – “Did you know that the US government, in the form of the Office of Naval Intelligence in World War II & the Central Intelligence Agency in the Cold War, frequently made common cause with La Cosa Nostra & other organized crime syndicates? Join CJ as he discusses: How the alliance between the US Office of Naval Intelligence & American mafia groups began in 1942….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaping 81 mins – “Danielle Ramo, PhD examines the usage marijuana and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) such as e-cigarettes, vape pens and discusses their long and short term health effects. Recorded on 06/01/2016. (#31003)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wells Fargo Fraud 46 mins – “A $185 million fine for Wells Fargo. Sham accounts. Five thousand-plus employees fired and a huge payout going to the executive in charge. We’ll dig in to the banking scandal.Shocking news in the banking world. Wells Fargo fined $185 million. More than 5,000 employees fired. Millions of fake accounts. But no one at the top is getting the ax. CEO John Stumpf said he won’t resign. He’s there to lead. And the executive in charge of those so-called rogue employees is retiring at the end of the year with a $125 million pay package. This hour On Point, Wells Fargo, and what’s going on with American banks.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

William Styron 27 mins – “When journalist Philip Caputo set out to profile William Styron in 1985, it was something of a dream assignment: Styron, then at work on the novel The Way of the Warrior, was one of the towering figures in American letters. The two men’s shared experience as Marines—Styron himself praised Caputo’s 1977 Vietnam memoir, A Rumor of War—formed a connection far stronger than their common bond as writers. But when Styron fell into a clinical depression during the reporting of the story, the nature of Caputo’s profile changed radically. Styron never completed the novel, although his 1990 meditation on depression, Darkness Visible, remains one of the most lucid and illuminating accounts of the illness. Caputo joins host David Brancaccio to discuss Styron’s greatness as a writer and how his struggle against depression—and his ability to articulate it in print—stands, in some regards, as his ultimate literary achievement.” At the link find the title, “Styron’s Choices, by Philip Caputo, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files 01-Styrons-Choices-by-Philip-Caputo.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Work Evolution 65 mins – “As the economy has improved across the Bay Area, not everyone has benefitted equally from economic gains and job growth. In fact, many haven’t benefitted at all. While there is seemingly no shortage of high-paying jobs for workers with advanced degrees and a surplus of low wage jobs with little hope for advancement, there simply are not enough jobs that pay a wage that provides safety, security and hope for a better future. In this session, we will bring together leaders from the advocacy community and the business world to talk about what it will take to create good jobs that allow people to make a meaningful contribution to their community and the local economy, and to build a better life for their kids.” At the link right-click “Play” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 253 – Sep 16, 2016: Alpha-GPC, American Dream Changes, American Work Ethic, Americans in Revolt, Arctic Ice, Attica, Black Women in Space, Boarder Barriers, Buckleys, Canadian Economy Slows, Chronic Fatigue and Malaria, Climate Disruption, Cluster Bombs in Laos, CO2 Extraction, Coal Trends, Colorado River Basin, Communist Recruit, Concussion Research, Conservation Front Lines, Corruption in Washington, Dancing Professionally, Digital Divide Fix, Disruptive Era, Dog Training, Education in Rural Areas, Farming in Poor Countries, Flint Michigan Water, Fox News, Gender Anxiety, Girls and Sex, Great Place to Work, Health Care in America, Health Care in Canada, Hearst Kidnapping, Hieronymus Bosch, Homework, Human Transplant, Infrastructure History, investment Lessons, Invisible People, IRA Belfast Project, ISIS Recruiting Disruption, Journalism, Juan Gabriel, Loons, Lost Property Scams, Macular Degeneration, Mindset Mastery, Mushroom Radio, Nigerian Film Industry, Nuclear Waste, Oil Industry, Physician Mental Health, Polish Village Massacre, Power Paradox, Private Prisons, Reviving the Dead, Science of Warfare, Seed Vaults, Sex Harassment in Canada, Sex Slavery in Mumbai, Single Women, Skill Hoarder, Sleep, Smartphone Future, Smell, Social Impact Organizations, Stasi Police Techniques, Statins, Terrorism Years, Theranos Story, Twin Towers Falling Man, Vietnam War, Virginia from Canada, Virginia Tech Massacre, Watermelons

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 84 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 229 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 11,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

Alpha-GPC 33 mins – “While there are many foods naturally high in choline, there are also tons of choline supplements out there: citicoline (also known as CDP choline), phosphatidylcholine, and alpha-GPC (L-Alpha glycerylphosphorylcholine). In episode 144, Jesse and Scott Hagerman, President of Chemi Nutra focus on alpha-GPC. Acetylcholine is the End Game for Alpha-GPC Choline is an essential precursor to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine.  Acetylcholine is a multi-tasker in the brain and body, playing important roles in activating muscles, attention, responsiveness to sensory stimuli, motivation, learning, memory, and REM sleep. It’s a natural compound and is biosynthesized by the body from foods like eggs and liver are particularly high in choline.  Choline is then turned into acetylcholine. In the body, acetylcholine engages muscle fiber and controls muscle movement and power output. In the brain, acetylcholine keeps you motivated, helps you focus, boosts memory, and aids with learning….” At the link right-click “Download” and slect “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Dream Changes 16 mins – “For the first time in history, the majority of American parents don’t think their kids will be better off than they were. This shouldn’t be a cause for alarm, says journalist Courtney Martin. Rather, it’s an opportunity to define a new approach to work and family that emphasizes community and creativity. “The biggest danger is not failing to achieve the American Dream,” she says in a talk that will resonate far beyond the US. “The biggest danger is achieving a dream that you don’t actually believe in.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Work Ethic 58 mins – “The Labor Day holiday offers some of us a much-needed break from work, but most Americans don’t get much vacation time. In this episode, the Guys look at American attitudes towards the value, meaning, and importance of work. We examine the meaning of the Puritan work ethic, and how race and class are often more important than hard work in determining achievement. We also ask why a strong work ethic has long been a key part of what it means to be American.

Americans in Revolt 54 mins – “A first book launch from our very own Sarah Jaffe! For over two years she has painstakingly chronicled and analyzed social movements since the 2008 financial crisis, and Belabored couldn’t be prouder to present the final product with an exclusive interview with the author. From the other side of the mic, Sarah discusses the political developments depicted in Necessary Trouble, drawing connections among the activists and campaigns she’s followed in her reporting over the years, and illuminates new horizons in American radicalism. In other news, we look at another digital newsroom organizing battle, India’s child labor loophole, a right-to-work showdown in West Virginia, and Olympic sexism. With recommended reading on a union battle at a Trump casino and labor’s decline in the shadow of Trump.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arctic Ice 32 mins – “The extent of the Arctic sea ice continues to drop, but how accurate are the predictions that measure it? And what could happen if it finally disappears?In his latest book A Farewell to Ice, Peter Wadhams, professor of ocean physics at Cambridge University, explores the current crisis faced by Arctic sea ice, and in doing so makes some alarming predictions. But how accurate are these? And do they even matter, when the potential ramifications of the total disappearance of Arctic sea ice are considered? Joining Ian Sample in the studio this week alongside Professor Wadhams, are Dr David Schroeder, at the Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling at Reading University, Jonathan Bamber, professor of physical geography at the University of Bristol, and the Guardian’s own environment site editor, Adam Vaughan.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Attica Revolt 50 mins – “We’re revisiting the Attica prison revolt in 1971. It began as a civil rights protest and ended in a massacre when Governor Nelson Rockefeller ordered his state troopers to teargas the prisoners and open fire. In the story only now coming clear, Attica marks the twilight of the civil rights movement and the dawn of mass incarceration….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Attica Story 25 mins – “Tom Robbins talks about his recent New York Times story, reporting on prisons, and getting the public to care about abuse of inmates.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Women in Space 47 mins – “The untold story of the black women — mathematicians — who helped NASA win the space race. We’ll talk to the author of “Hidden Figures.”Think of NASA and the early days of the space race, and you’re likely to envision a bunch of white guys in crew cuts and chunky glasses at Mission Control. Behind the scenes, there was another, most unlikely reality: a crew of black women doing the math that would guide those American rockets into space and home again. Their story is about to be a big movie with Taraji P. Henson and more. We’ve got the woman who wrote it. This hour On Point: the black women who steered the space race.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Boarder Barriers 9 mins – “Donald Trump and his supporters have a plan for a wall on the U.S. Mexican border. But a wall authorized by George W. Bush is already there, and it’s affecting everything from wildlife migration to flooding.” At the link find the title, “Trump’s U.S.-Mexico border wall will endanger wildlife, says scientist, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160908_56914.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Buckleys 25 mins – “James Buckley discusses his life and upbringing as well as the genesis of Firing Line and the success of his brother Bill. James describes Bill as a fresh spirit who wanted to meet all types of people and listen to different viewpoints. Bill loved a good debate. James notes that his parents were literate and that education and speaking well were important. They trained their children to work hard, be genteel, and listen to the other side. James notes that we make progress in society, such as during the Reagan years, if someone can demonstrate the causes and effects of socialist-type policies so that people are more apt to understand, embrace, and thrive in the free market. James ends by saying that although we may become pessimistic about the American experiment, hope is always around the corner because virtue and good sense reside in the people.” At the link find the title, “James Buckley discusses his life and values on Uncommon Knowledge, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160713-buckley.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Economy Slows 21 mins – “Canada’s GDP numbers reveal a faltering economy and critics argue more needs to be done to fix our economic situation. With key members of the Liberal’s economic team at the G20, it’s time to ask what fiscal forensics mean to Canada’s financial future.” At the link find the title, “GDP numbers worst since 2009, critics argue government needs to fix faltering economy, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160905_10442.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Fatigue and Malaria 27 mins – “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is like hibernation? by Ian Woolf, and Associate Professor Mat Todd talks about Open Source malaria research – part 1” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Disruption 60 mins – “What are top world scientists telling government about climate extremes? How dangerous is our current situation? From Carnegie at Stanford, Dr. Chris Field and Dr. Katharine Mach on latest. Plus Dr. Mylene Mariette: what birds tell eggs about a hotter world….” At thelinkright-click “Lo-Fi” beside “Download…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cluster Bombs in Laos 5 mins – “Laos became the world’s most-bombed country per capita from 1964 to 1973 as Washington launched a secret CIA-led war to cut supplies flowing to communist fighters during the Vietnam War. Much of the country is still littered with ordnance, including millions of cluster munition “bomblets” that still maim and kill to this day. The issue has long dogged relations between the United States and Laos, a cloistered and impoverished communist nation. But both sides have moved closer in recent years and Obama’s visit — the first by a US president to Laos — is being hailed as a landmark opportunity to reset ties. In a statement, the White House said it was earmarking $90 million for Laos over the next three years “to address the impact caused by unexploded ordnance”. The figure dwarfs Washington’s previous commitments to Laos — in the last 20 years it had given a total of $100 million….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CO2 Extraction 36 mins – “Hacking is a word that is often tied to something bad. However, there are times when hacking can be for something good. Think of it as a tool that can be put to use for good or bad. We also think of hacking as something only done with computers, but can we hack other things? Dr. Biology sits down with scientist Klaus Lackner to talk about how he is hacking the environment in order to pull carbon dioxide (CO2) out of the air. If he succeeds, it could help reduce CO2 in atmosphere and redirect it towards better uses.” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Trends P1 54 mins – “When we burn coal we change the biosphere. As James Hansen says, ‘if we burned all of the coal in the ground, the planet is cooked. It would result in temperature rise of several degrees and sea level rise of tens of metres.’ So do we continue down that road, or change?  There are encouraging signs, with the price of renewable energy falling. But there is vast investment in coal. Mining companies are looking to increase production. Tom Morton visits Germany, India and northern NSW where plans are underway for new and bigger coal mines. Local people are fighting back, to save their traditional lands, their ancient villages, animal corridors and rich agricultural lands, all of which are threatened by the ongoing march of coal.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Trends P2 53 mins – “Today, Tom Morton continues documenting the struggle against coal on three continents. In Germany, the proposed expansion of a coal mine would see villages destroyed, along with farmland and forest. In Australia, a food bowl in northern NSW will be at risk if aquifers are damaged by mining. Farmers and environmentalists have joined forces in an unlikely alliance. And in India, subsistence farmers would be removed from traditional lands, with animal corridors disrupted if a proposed mine expansion goes ahead.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Trends P3 54 mins – “Change in the world’s energy system is happening fast in some countries, not at all in others. We’ve heard the battles of local people fighting for their homes, their farms and forests against the expansion plans of coal mining companies. And despite coal’s low market price in 2016, solar PV is on its way to becoming the cheapest source for electricity. Global investment in renewable energy is now higher than in fossil fuels. Some countries understand the urgency to reduce the amount of coal burnt for electricity. China has a policy to shift away from coal and has begun an energy transition. The nation has plans to reduce coal in its energy mix to 60% by 2020 and then reduce further. China’s wind capacity alone is already 100GW. Australia’s total generating capacity is 60GW. Change is under way. Electricity will be cheaper and cleaner. The challenge is for the world to rebuild its energy system quickly to minimize damage from a warming planet.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Colorado River Basin 29 mins – “As the temperature and population continue to rise in the southwestern United States, water becomes scarcer than ever. How did we get here? Will the water dry up completely? This week on Sea Change Radio, we discuss all things Colorado River Basin with author John Fleck, who’s just released a book on the subject. We look back at the struggle over water rights in Arizona, discuss how Mexico and the U.S. are cooperating over the Colorado River Delta, and talk about the complexities of growing alfalfa in the desert.” At the link right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communist Recruit 47 mins – “Noel Field is not a name you’re likely to recognize. But you’ll never forget his story once you hear it. His is the tale of a 20th century American who fell in love with an idea called communism and decided to betray his country for it, even as the system betrayed him and nearly destroyed him. In a new book, “True Believer,” journalist Kati Marton tells Field’s story. She joins guest host John Donvan to explore Field’s fascination with the Soviet cause and why young people today can still fall in love with dangerous ideologies.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Concussion Research 16 mins – “What is a concussion? Probably not what you think it is. In this talk from the cutting edge of research, bioengineer (and former football player) David Camarillo shows what really happens during a concussion — and why standard sports helmets don’t prevent it. Here’s what the future of concussion prevention looks like.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conservation Front Lines 47 mins – “The new conservationists of the Mississippi River watershed: author Miriam Horn joins us with stories of ranchers, farmers and fishermen trying to do the right thing- ecologically- in the country’s heartland.We’ve got challenges coming to our fields and streams and seas. We’ve got challenges already here, with climate change and more. Ask any farmer or rancher or fisherman. Some of those frontline harvesters of the land and sea are also on the frontline of finding new ways to cultivate and care for soil and water, fisheries and farmland. It’s not hypothetical for them. It’s their livelihood. Their family futures. This hour On Point: the rancher, farmer, fisherman view of conserving our environmental future.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in Washington 22 mins – “Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton discusses his book, [Clean House: Exposing Our Government’s Secrets and Lies], about government controversies that occurred during the Obama administration, including those involving Hillary Clinton.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Tom Fitton, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.452958.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dancing Professionally 50 mins – “Blessed with astonishing power and grace, Ukrainian dancer Sergei Polunin rocketed to the top of the ballet world. At 19 years old he became the youngest ever principal dancer in London’s Royal Ballet. Two years later, he quit. There was nothing left for him to accomplish, and his pursuit of stardom had torn his family apart and left him feeling hollow. Filmmaker Steven Cantor’s new film documents Polunin’s rise, fall, and redemption. It’s called Dancer, and he joins us Thursday to talk about it.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Divide Fix 30 mins – “After his daughter asked how her classmates could do their school homework if they did not have a computer or Internet access at home, Pat Millen’s family formed E2D – a nonprofit organization called Eliminate the Digital Divide. This week, Pat and I talk about their strategy, which was created in the footprint of North Carolina’s municipal MI-Connection but is now expanding through Charlotte and working with incumbent operators. E2D has arranged an innovative and replicable program to distribute devices, provide training, and arrange for an affordable connection. Along the way, they developed a sustainable funding model rather than merely asking people with deep pockets for a one-time donation. An important lesson from E2D is the richness of opportunity when people take action locally. That is often among the hardest steps when success is far from assured – but these local actions are the ones that can be the most successful because they are tuned to local needs, assets, and culture.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from here.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disruptive Era P1 26 mins – “Undeniably, we’re living in an age of disruption. From breakneck advances in technology; to staggering wealth inequality, and global terrorism. Author Chris Kutarna says it’s the best time in history to be alive in what he calls a new renaissance.” At the link find the title, “What the renaissance can teach us about Trump and our disruptive age, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160906_57904.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disruptive Era P2 24 mins – “Age of Discovery author Chris Kutarna is back. Yesterday, he argued we are.living through a second Renaissance. Today, he finds similarities in the populist politics of the 1400’s and the words of a certain presidential candidate just over our border.” At the link find the title, “Pt 2: What the Renaissance can teach us about our disruptive age, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160907_49435.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dog Training 27 mins – “We all like to think our dogs are happy with us, but how can we be sure? New research suggests most of us can’t tell – so are our dogs really happy, and can we use science to make them happier? We discover new science-based ways of communicating with dogs, how to better read what they’re saying to us, how our own personalities impact their happiness, and how new technology can help our pets be happier in life – all part of a new science dubbed dogmanship.” At the link right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education in Rural Areas 58 mins – “Technology can bring great benefit far outside the ecosystem of a city. Rural schools are often understaffed and underfunded, so digital courses can bring extra faculty in from afar, and inexpensive digital materials can provide much needed resources to students. That said, bringing technology infrastructure to a school far from a city is no easy task. However, one individual in particular knows a lot about how to run a rural school. Daisy Dyer Duerr is a former principal from Arkansas who’s now working with rural schools across the country on technology initiatives and training for teachers and administrators. She transformed her floundering Title I school without any technology into a top-performing school with cutting edge devices for its students. Check out the podcast to hear her story.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in Poor Countries 21 mins – “There is a mystery in many poor countries. Why don’t farmers specialize and grow more food? Two economists with very different theories go head to head to find out.” At the link find the title, “September 7, 2016, #723: The Risk Farmers,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flint Michigan Water 27 mins – “For decades Flint Michigan derived safe drinking water from Detroit. When the supply was switched to save money a series of events unfolded and their supply became undrinkable. How could this happen? With John Chidgey.” At the link find the title, “Causality 11: Flint Michigan, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files Causality-E011.m4a” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fox News 47 mins – “Fox News has been making its own news this week: a $20 million dollar payout and an unusual public apology to former Fox News host Gretchen Carlson who filed sexual harassment charges earlier this year against now former CEO Roger Ailes. Then the announcement that long time Fox evening anchor Greta Van Susteren was stepping down effective immediately. Many question whether recent events point to a few bumps for the top rated cable news organization or the start of a wholesale shift in organizations culture and direction: Join us to discuss what’s going at Fox News and why it matters.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Gender Anxiety 48 mins – “Last week, a federal judge blocked an order from the Obama administration mandating that public schools nationwide allow transgender students to use bathrooms that correspond with their gender identity. Earlier in the summer, the U.S. legally recognized the first non-binary person, someone who identifies as neither male nor female. Both of these stories highlight the latest chapter in how our understanding of gender is changing—and the corresponding unease many have with it. What it means to be a man and a woman, and evolving perspectives on gender and sex.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Girls and Sex 47 mins – “It’s always been hard for parents to talk to their kids about sex. But author Peggy Orenstein says, particularly with daughters, it’s more important than ever. For her new book, “Girls & Sex: Navigating the Complicated New Landscape,” Orenstein interviewed over 70 girls and young women—on everything from the pressures of social media to the impact of online pornography—and what she found disturbed her. Orenstein says that while girls have more opportunities today than ever, when it comes to sex, they’re getting mixed messages. Diane and her guests discuss the complicated and contradictory messages young girls are getting about sex.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Great Place to Work 23 minsInterview with China Gorman, former CEO of the Great Place to Work Institute. At the link find the title, “The Bill Kutik Radio Show #183: China Gorman, Former CEO, Great Place to Work Institute,Sept, 2015,” right-click “Media files BKRS_183_CHINA_GORMAN_V2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care in America 12 mins – “Rebecca Cooney discusses a platform for improving health in the US.” “US Election 2016: The Lancet: September 8, 2016,” right-click “Media files 08sept-uselection.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care in Canada 20 mins – “Eight years ago, Dr. Brian Day began his court challenge to have private health insurance for surgery in private clinics. It is a case with the potential to reshape our health-care system. But health advocates foresee negative consequences for Canada.” At the link find the title, “Should Canadians have access to private surgery clinics? Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160907_28912.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hearst Kidnapping 52 mins – “Thursday, our guest is author Jeffrey Toobin, who’s written a book about the 1974 kidnapping of Patty Hearst. Hearst was 19 and heir to her family’s fortune when the “Symbionese Liberation Army” took her, and it soon seemed that she had adopted their incoherent, revolutionary cause. We’ll explore the controversy over Hearst’s involvement in their crimes, the atmosphere that gave birth to the SLA, and why Toobin says the story sheds light on a time when America was on the brink of a nervous breakdown. Jeffrey Toobin is a staff writer at The New Yorker and senior legal analyst at CNN. His new book is called American Heiress: The Wild Saga of the Kidnapping, Crimes and Trial of Patty Hearst.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” nd select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hieronymus Bosch 52 mins – “If you’ve ever seen paintings by the Dutch artist Hieronymus Bosch, such as The Garden of Earthly Delights, you’ve probably wondered what they mean and what kind of person could have imagined such fanciful scenes. Problem is, we know very little about Bosch’s personal story. That leaves the paintings, which present their own puzzles. This year marks the 500th anniversary of Bosch’s death, and Monday, art historian Gary Schwartz joins us to discuss the fearless artist’s life and his inventive art. Gary Schwartz is an art historian of Dutch painters of the 17th century and the author of two books about Hieronymus Bosch, one for young readers, First Impressions: Hieronymus Bosch , and Jheronimus Bosch: The Road to Heaven and Hell.At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homework 25 mins – “As students return to school, some families are pushing for no homework for their kids saying there’s no evidence that homework helps academic achievement. Critics say homework can actually hurt both learning and overall well-being.” At the link find the title, “School homework hurts learning and well-being, says parent, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160906_14856.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homework Ban 57 mins – “Nicola Luksic marks the history of homework and what it would mean if it was banned all together.” At the link find the title, “Homework Ban, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160907_37089.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Transplants 47 mins – “Human transplants. Hand, face, uterus, even head transplants in the news now. We’ll look at the widening frontier of transplant surgeries.The world can look tough, but some people are getting new starts out there – with transplants. Hearts and kidneys we know about. Great gifts from donors who literally give life. But the world of transplants has been expanding, too. You may have heard. Hands. Arms. Faces. More. Transplants that go to quality of life. How far should and will that go? This hour On Point: We talk to a face transplant recipient, and the doctors on the transplant frontier.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Infrastructure History 16 mins – “Infrastructure makes modern civilization possible. Roads, power grids, sewage systems and water networks all underpin society as we know it, forming the basis of our built environment … at least when they work. As Henry Petroski documents in The Road Taken: The History and Future of America’s Infrastructure, physical infrastructure in the United States is in an ongoing state of crisis. The American Society of Civil Engineers recently give American roads and bridges dismal letter grades of D and C+ respectively. Their report describes roughly sixty-five thousand bridges in the United States as being “structurally deficient.” Petroski, a professor of civil engineering and history at Duke University, notes that while the concept of infrastructure is universal our current use of word itself is actually relatively new. In America, the old phrase “public works” became associated with pork barrel spending and fell out of favor in the latter half of the 20th century. Politicians had developed a reputation for swapping favors and funds for support on public works legislation, trading votes and cash to get things done. Infrastructure graft and corruption peaked publicly on October 10, 1973 when Spiro Agnew became the second Vice President to resign the office. His resignation came in the wake of a bribery scandal. These bribes were not tied to his federal position but rather to his time has governor of Maryland and infrastructure projects he was illegally paid to promote in office. In fact, Agnew was in a much greater position to participate in such schemes as a state official rather than a federal one: states and municipalities are largely responsible for roads in the United States.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Lessons 20 mins – “Over the last 3 years the S&P 500 has been the best performer of all the asset classes, as shown in the table of returns at http://paulmerriman.com/decade-returns/. That might easily lead investors to conclude that it’s a waste of extra risk to add the other asset classes to a portfolio (small cap, value and international). This table makes it easy to compare these asset classes over 8 decades starting in 1930. Paul recommends printing out the table or referencing it on your screen while listening to this podcast. The decade of the 80s was the only decade that the S&P 500 was the star performer. To read more about this, see Paul’s MarketWatch article, “8 lessons from 80 years of market history. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Invisible People 35 mins – “Alecia Faith Pennington was born at home, homeschooled, and never visited a dentist or a hospital. By both chance and design she is completely invisible in the eyes of the state. We follow Faith as she struggles to free herself from one restrictive world only to find that she is trapped in another. In her journey to prove her American citizenship she attempts to answer the age-old question: who am I?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IRA Belfast Project 42 mins – “On the next all-NEW Snap…”Blood Oath.” Some commitments go way beyond words. Amazing stories of friendship and betrayal. It’s not always easy to deal with the past, especially if it’s a troubled one. Do you hold on to it or do you let it go? For Anthony McIntyre the answer was easy. Anthony McIntyre is a journalist and you can check out his writings on his website: The Pensive Quill. Thank you to Ed Moloney for sharing the archival tape of the Brendan Hughes interviews from the Belfast Project that were featured in his book, Voices from the Grave. And to learn more about the Belfast Project subpoenas check out this link: https://bostoncollegesubpoena.wordpress.comAt the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download audio” and seelect “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Recruiting Disruption 72 mins – “As ISIS loses territory and suffers military defeats, the terrorist organization continues to expand its presence online, using the internet to recruit new members and disseminate its messages. Although governments have previously done the most to counter ISIS propaganda, private sector actors are increasingly aiding in this effort based on their industry expertise. A new and promising approach seeks to disrupt online recruiting efforts through targeted advertising. On September 7, new tools and strategies private industry has developed for curating and disseminating anti-extremist content online were discussed. Yasmin Green, head of research and development at Jigsaw, presented the results of a pilot program they developed with Moonshot CVE, Quantum Communications, and the Gen Next Foundation. Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Affairs Richard Stengel joined the panel to offer the U.S. government’s perspective on the role of the private sector in countering extremist propaganda. William McCants, senior fellow and director of the Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World at Brookings, provided introductory remarks and moderated the discussion.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Removal 37 mins – “General Jack Keane briefly describes the history and rise of ISIS and its aim in the Middle East. Keane then discusses the concrete steps America should take to defeat ISIS, including partnerships with Sunni tribes and a more comprehensive air war.” At the link find the title, “A Plan to Defeat ISIS, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160325-Keane.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism Today 24 mins – “The documentary, All Governments Lie argues mainstream, corporate, U.S. media rolls over, not only for government but for commerce. Filmmaker Fred Peabody and journalist Amy Goodman discuss what the media misses, allowing deceptions to go uncovered.” At the link find the title, “‘All Governments Lie’ documentary takes aim at mainstream media, investigative reporting, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160908_87675.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Juan Gabriel 48 mins – “We look back on the huge impact of Mexican pop icon, Juan Gabriel.So many popular Mexican singers are macho. Juan Gabriel was not. And he was the bestselling Mexican musical artist of all time. A Latin American music icon. A cross somehow between Elvis, Tom Jones and Liberace. Last week he performed for a sold-out crowd in Los Angeles, went home, and died. At 66. He grew up in an orphanage. He sang of simple things. And millions sang his songs. This hour On Point, the story of Mexican superstar, Juan Gabriel.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Loons 16 mins – “The iconic call of the loon is one you’ll hear on ponds and lakes throughout the state. We’re checked in with John Cooley, Senior Biologist with the Loon Preservation Committee to learn a bit about the bird and the state of its welfare….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lost Property Scams 39 mins – “Liz lost her camera in a cab, so she went to the New York City Taxi website to submit it to their lost and found database. At least, that’s what she thought she did. Alex investigates and finds a big business behind the success of a suspicious little website. If you lose something in a cab in New York City, Call 311, or go to this website. The Department of Consumer Affairs encourages anyone who feels they have been misled by yellowcabnyc.com to file a complaint with DCA‎ online at nyc.gov/consumers or by calling 311.” At the link find the title, “#76 Lost in a Cab,” right-click “Media files GLT9011306807.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Macular Degeneration 19 mins – “This week’s Pickens Podcast is an interview with Dr. Neil Bressler, MD, a Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Retinal Division at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Bressler is one of the world’s experts in treating the eye disease known as macular degeneration. I, along with about 8 million other Americans, have this disease, which used to be the leading cause of blindness in older Americans. Due to the research Dr. Bressler and his colleagues have been conducting at Johns Hopkins and elsewhere, 75-80 percent of people with macular degeneration can have their vision preserved using modern drugs and medical techniques. If you’re over the age of 60 or have a parent or relative who is, I think you (and they) will find this discussion interesting, informative, and inspiring.” At the link find the title, “Episode 36: Dr. Neil Bressler,” right-click “Media files 4896240-episode-36-dr-neil-bressler.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mindset Mastery 11 mins – Salman Khan discusses mastering subjects and impact of mindset in the process during this 2015 TED talk, The talk is missing online, but a copy is included in the blog archive.

Mushroom Radio 29 mins – “1635 Mushroom FM Radio (Aug. 24, 2016) Show Notes Mushroom FM Radio is a globally available internet station completely run by blind individuals. Hosts Nancy and Peter Torpey speak with Jonathan Mosen, founder, director and weekly DJ, about Mushroom FM (“the home of the fun guys”), how this streaming service got started….” At the link find the title, “1635 Mushroom FM Radio (Aug. 24, 2016),” right-click “Media files eos_1635_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nigerian Film Industry 24 mins – “Nadia Denton, the author of The Nigerian filmmaker’s guide to success: beyond Nollywood about the Nigerian film industry, talks to Cambridge Judge Business School’s Dr Allègre Hadida. Nadia Denton is a member of BAFTA with considerable film industry experience. She has curated programmes at the British Film Institute and the Institute of Contemporary Arts and acted as a consultant for both film festivals and film schools. She has been featured on CNN, BBC and Radio 4 and her other publications include The British black filmmaker’s guide to success: finance, market and distribute your film. Nadia has a BA in Modern History from St Hilda’s College, Oxford.” Right-click down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up

Nuclear Waste 26 mins – “Keith talks with May Nyman, Associate Professor of Chemistry at Oregon State University. She talks about her time at Sandia National Laboratories researching nuclear waste management and using titanium dioxide to quickly and more efficiently absorb radioactive strontium, neptunium, and plutonium. She also talks about the benefits of virtual collaboration with other universities on conducting research.” At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Industry 30 mins – “The big oil companies are the pantomime villains of the global warming debate. They’ve been accused of everything from climate change denial to commercial incompetence in a rapidly changing world. Campaigners attack their boardroom practices and push pension funds and universities to withdraw their investments. Tom Heap examines the reactions of the likes of Exxon, Shell, BP and Total to the mounting evidence of man-made climate change. How much did they know? How much did they lobby against meaningful action? He meets Lord Browne, the former head of BP who famously rebranded his company as ‘Beyond Petroleum’ to find out why the rest of the industry failed to join his campaign to cut emissions and invest in renewable energy. Tom and Lord Browne also discuss the changing rhetoric since the signing of the 2015 Paris climate change agreement. With fresh commitments to alternative fuels could the oil companies finally turn themselves from the villain to the principal boy, using their engineering expertise to halt the planet’s changing climate?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physician Mental Health 21 mins – “When Giselle applied to medical school she decided to be completely open about her experience with mental health: depression, anxiety and a suicide attempt when she was 16 years old. She’s not alone—roughly 300 physicians in America commit suicide every year, and a higher percentage of doctors are depressed than the average person. But the intensity and prestige of the medical field doesn’t always lend itself to an open conversation about these issues.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Tom Fitton, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.452958.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Polish Village Massacre 53 mins – “This week we feature a reading and conversation presented by the Boston University Center for the Study of Europe, and the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies. Speaking on their new bookThe Crime and the Silence: Confronting the Massacre of Jews in Wartime Jedwabne” are author, Anna Bikont, and translator, Alissa Valles. Princeton University Research Scholar and Lecturer in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Irena Grudzinska Gross moderates.” At the link right-click the down=pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power Paradox 21 mins – “We’ve all heard the old adage that “power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely,” but psychologist Dacher Keltner at UC Berkeley has found evidence to prove it. His book is The Power Paradox: How We Gain and Lose Influence.” At the link find the title, “Episode 43: The Perils of Power, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160902_hiddenbrain_podcast43.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Private Prisons 47 mins – “This week, Reveal revisits an hour with Mother Jones reporter Shane Bauer inside a private prison on lockdown. We take an unfiltered look at America’s private corrections industry and follow up on some big news.” At the link find the title, “[Update] The man inside: Four months as a prison guard, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files Update-The-man-inside_-Four-months-as-a-prison-guard_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reviving the Dead 58 mins – “For millennia, when people stopped breathing, they stopped living. The classic test for determining whether people were asleep or dead was whether they could fog a mirror. Resuscitating the Drowned: In the eighteenth century, the citizens of Amsterdam became alarmed at the number of residents perishing by drowning in the canals. They started a Society for the Favor of Drowned Persons that experimented with some interesting techniques to try to revive the drowned. David Casarett, MD, reviews the history of resuscitation medicine with us. He then brings us up to date on current advances in rescuing people who have suffered heart attacks or other potentially lethal catastrophes as well as drowning. What questions should we ask as science makes it increasingly possible to revive the recently dead? Is that always desirable? This Week’s Guest: David Casarett, MD, MA, is a palliative care physician and health services researcher whose work focuses on improving systems of care for people with serious, life-threatening illnesses. He recently relocated from the University of Pennsylvania where he was a tenured professor of medicine. Dr. Casarett is now Chief of Palliative Care at the Duke University School of Medicine. He received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. This is the highest honor the US government gives to researchers in the early stages of their careers. Dr. Casarett has also written three non-fiction books, including Shocked: Adventures in Bringing Back the Recently Dead (2014). His first novel in the Ethical Chiang Mai Detective Agency series, Murder at the House of Rooster Happiness, will be published in September 2016.” At the link find the title “Show 1048: How to Revive the Recently Dead,” right-click “Media files PP-1048ReviveDead.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science of Warfare 52 mins – “When you think about military science, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Bombs and guns, right? Well, that’s not what interests the writer Mary Roach, who has a habit of seeking out eccentric scientific corners. She’s not so much curious about the killing as she is about the keeping alive. That curiosity led her to research into the battlefield’s more obscure threats: exhaustion, shock, bacteria, panic, even turkey vultures. Roach joins us Tuesday to explore the curious science of humans at war. Mary Roach is the author of the books Stiff, Spook, Bonk, Packing for Mars, and Gulp. Her new book is called Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seed Vaults 46 mins – “North of the Arctic Circle, deep inside a mountain in Norway, there’s a tunnel carved into the rock. It leads to a big room with subzero temperatures, filled with shelf upon shelf of boxes that hold hundreds of seeds from all over the planet. It’s called the Global Seed Vault, founded by conservationist Cary Fowler in 2008 to collect and protect seed samples from all over the world. Today, the vault holds more than 800,000 samples. For this month’s Environmental Outlook: Guest host John Donvan talks with the “father” of The Global Seed Vault about its role in protecting the world’s food supply from political upheaval and climate change.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Sex Harassment in Canada 9 mins – “Employment lawyer, Janice Rubin says Ontario’s Bill 132 is game-changing. It’s the first time in Canada where employers are obligated to investigate both, complaints and incidents of harassment, and also must train employees on this issue.” At the link find the title, “Ontario law strengthens workplace harassment investigations, says lawyer, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160908_56310.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Slaves in Mumbai 34 mins – “Novelist Anosh Irani takes us into Mumbai’s red light district in his latest novel, The Parcel. The light he sheds on the dark corner of reality reveals harsh truths about child sex workers in Mumbai. But it’s ultimately redeeming.” At the link find the title, “Anosh Irani sheds light on Mumbai’s child sex workers in The Parcel, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160909_53311.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Single Women 46 mins – “An unprecedented number of women in the U.S. are staying single longer. How those “single ladies” are shaping our nation.For the first time in history in recent years, single women outnumbered married women in America. Among young adults, their numbers have exploded. Forty six percent of women under 34, now never married. The stigma of “spinster” sounds positively antique. The reality of single ladies has huge new range, from power to poverty. For many, a sense of liberation. And a swelling impact on workplaces, economics, politics. This hour On Point, Rebecca Traister on the rise of the American single woman.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Skill Hoarder 58 mins – “Bob Clagett from I Like to Make Stuff talks about building new skills, managing multiple projects at once, and DIY.” At the link find the title, “Skill Building, Project Planning, and DIY (Ep. 123),” right-click “Media files 46319.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep 39 mins – “It is incredible how we have disregarded and marginalized sleep in our order of priorities” Prof Russell Foster is a circadian neuroscientist and heads the Circadian Neuroscience Institute at the University of Oxford, UK. He has spent his career exploring the issues of sleep, from why we sleep to what its relationship is with mood disorders and abnormal cognitive behavior. This is a conversation I have wanted to have for quite some time and a topic I wanted to include on the show as sleep, or more accurately, its absence is an ever present concern for most physicians.” At the linkr ight-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smartphone Future 47 mins – “What next for smartphones? Apple’s got a new one out. Samsung’s got a recall. We’ll look at the smartphone future. A new smartphone out from Apple yesterday: iPhone 7. No headphone jack. Fancy cameras. New colors. No revolution. But relentlessly in the near-decade now since the iPhone’s debut, smartphones – Apple, Samsung and more – have flooded, changed, our lives. For many, they’re almost attached to the hand. Constant, engrossing, increasingly powerful companions. This hour On Point: What’s the next great evolution of the smartphone? And how are smartphones changing us? The way we live?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Smell 30 mins – “In the second instalment of Brain waves, Dr Kevin Fong and Nathalie Nahai explore what it’s like to live without smell. Plus, can a multisensory chef help anosmiac Lucy Mangan appreciate the joy of food? This week, Dr Kevin Fong and Nathalie Nahai explore what it’s like to live without one of the five senses: smell. Molecular gastronomist Jozef Youssef is challenged to prepare a taste test for Guardian journalist Lucy Mangan; she was born without the sense of smell and says she regards food more as “fuel” – can he make dining fun for her? As we unpick the connections between the brain and senses, we hear from the University of London’s Professor Barry Smith, Nobel prize winner Professor Edvard Moser from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Duncan Boak, founder of the smell and taste disorder charity Fifth Sense, and psychologist Dr Ilona Croy from the University of Gothenberg. Along the way, we’ll also discover how rats in a maze have added some scientific backing to Marcel Proust’s famous thoughts on memory, find out the impact of losing your sense of smell later in life, and learn how important the olfactory senses are to human attraction. Thanks to Food at 52.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Impact Organizations 15 mins – “Current Cambridge MBAs Priya Shah and Kia Kavoosi share what they learned on a day-long visit to five organisations who approach social impact from very different angles. An interview with Conrad Chua, Head of Marketing and Admissions for the Cambridge MBA.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stasi Police Techniques 17 mins – “During life in communist East Germany, the Stasi secret police were everywhere. It meant neighbours spied on each other and no one really knew who was who. For filmmaker Petra Epperlein, that included her father. Her documentary explores Karl Marx City.” At the link find the title, “Documentary explores legacy of East Germany’s Stasi secret police, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160909_34589.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Statins 18 mins – “Rory Collins discusses his Review of the evidence from randomised studies concerning the efficacy and safety of statins.” At the link find the title, “Statins reviewed: The Lancet: September 8, 2016,” right-click “Media files 08sept-statins.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Years 47 mins – “Fifteen years after the attacks of 9/11, we’ll sit down with Lawrence Wright, author of “The Terror Threat” to take stock of where we’ve come, where we are in the age of terrorism.This Sunday marks the 15th anniversary of the terror attacks of September 11, 2001. Fifteen years. A rising generation of young people has never known a world without that terror threat. The dull, sometimes keen, sense that terrible things could happen nearby in a hurry. What has it made of us? Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright has been watching, reporting. This hour On Point: Lawrence Wright on where we’ve come in what he calls “The Terror Years.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Theranos Story 19 mins – “Wall Street Journal reporter John Carreyrou tells ProPublica’s Charles Ornstein about the fallout from his report that a blood-testing company’s hype outpaced its actual science.” At the link click “Download,” select “Save File,” and click “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Twin Towers Falling Man 36 mins – “Do you remember this photograph? In the United States, people have taken pains to banish it from the record of September 11, 2001. The story behind it, though, and the search for the man pictured in it, are our most intimate connection to the horror of that day….” At the link find the title, “The Falling Man, by Tom Junod, Do you remember this photograph? Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files 01-Falling-Man-by-Tom-Junod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam War  63 mins – “Doug Bradley and Craig Werner talk about their new book “We Gotta Get Out of This Place,” which explores how and why U.S. troops turned to music as a way of coping with the complexities of the war. Through personal stories from Vietnam veterans, the book demonstrates how music was important for veterans of all races, gender and military rank.” At the link find the title, “The Soundtrack of the Vietnam War, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files IM_20160827.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virginia from Canada 20 mins – “Follow The Current’s Anna Maria on the road to Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains as she meets voters and asks them which U.S. president candidate should occupy the White House.” At the link find the title, “Travel Virginia’s Crooked Road to hear what average Americans think of the U.S. election, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160906_46878.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virginia Tech Massacre P1 7 mins – “On the morning of April 16, 2007, a gunman worked his way through the Virginia Tech campus, claiming the lives of 32 people and wounding 17 others before turning a gun on himself. It remains the deadliest shooting rampage in U.S. history. In preparation for our upcoming two-part season finale, the Campus crew visits the university town of Blacksburg, Virginia. We’ll bring you the haunting first-person stories of two students who were shot in the Virginia Tech massacre. This is a preview of what’s to come.” At the link find the title, “The Virginia Tech Massacre, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files 254311749-cbc-campus-the-virginia-tech-massacre.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virginia Tech Massacre P2 30 mins – “In part one of our two-part season finale, two survivors of the 2007 Virginia Tech massacre bravely recount the emotional and disturbing events of the fateful day that transformed their lives. That morning, Kevin Sterne was in German class, and Kristina Anderson was in a nearby French class when a gunman chained the doors of Norris Hall, walked up to the second floor, and suddenly opened fire in their classrooms. Following a terrifying shooting rampage in several other classrooms, the gunman finally shot himself, ending the deadliest mass shooting in American history. Kristina lay helplessly on her classroom floor, anxiously waiting for help to arrive after being shot three times, including twice in her back. Kevin never thought he would make it out of his classroom alive after a bullet tore through his femoral artery. Both of them courageously held on in the final moments waiting to be rescued.” At the link find the title, “Season Finale: Part 1 – Darkness falls on Virginia Tech,Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files 256379866-cbc-campus-season-finale-part-1-darkness-falls-on-virginia-tech.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virginia Tech Massacre P3 36 mins – “Part 2 of our season finale deals with the physical and psychological aftermath of the Virginia Tech massacre. Two survivors, Kevin Sterne and Kristina Anderson, do their best to pick up the pieces and move forward with their lives, but the ghosts from that day continue to haunt them. Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder began seeping into their psyches. Both would become consumed by a wide-range of emotions. Over time, Kristina would become so gripped with fear, a simple shower became impossible. Meanwhile, Kevin suffered with unexplainable fits of rage. His temperament would ebb and flow in waves that were never a part of his personality.” At the link find the title, Season Finale: Part 2 – Walking with the ghosts of Blacksburg, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files 257758298-cbc-campus-season-finale-part-2-walking-with-the-ghosts-of-blacksburg.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Watermelons 61 mins – “The dog-days of summer are a perfect match for watermelon. This podcast discusses domestication, breeding and interesting stories of where this magical fruit came from, and where it is going. Dr. Cecilia McGregor shares her knowledge of the origins of this important dessert crop, along with interesting facets of how it is used by other people around the world. She also ventures into “endless amusement” with watermelons.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 252 – Sep 9, 2016: Ageism in Global Development, Airsoft Gun Culture, Aluminum Solder, Antibiotic Discovery, Archeology from Space, Australian Detention Camps, Autism, Broadband Connectivity Background, Business Aids, Car 54, Chris Anderson Tools, Climate Challenge from Exxon, Climate Change Battle in California, Clinton Foundation, Cluster Bomb Legacy, Cold Water Hazards, Consciousness, Criminal Records Checks, CRISPR, Drug Deaths in Suburbs, Eggplant Crops, Emotions, Energy Poor People, Female Superheroes, First Nation Artist, Forest Harvest, Gary Trudeau vs Trump, Gene Wilder, Global Problems, Gloria Steinem, Google Search Power Question, Growing Forest in Ten Years, G-Spot Scam, Homeless in San Francisco, Investing $3000, Joe Hill Activist, Joint Care Tools, Kareem Abdbul Jabbar, Kevlar, Larry Wilmore, Myth Buster Adam Savage, National Parks, Nuclear Fuel Production, On Campus Political Correctness, Open Source Ecology, Palliative Medicine, Product Design, Refugees in France, Right Wing Old and New, Rubber Stamps, Savant by Injury, Science Research Controversy, Siberian Tiger Photographer, Sociolinguistics, South China Sea, Syrian Aid, Ten Year Old Boys, Tom Hanks, Traffic Deaths Increase, Unknown Disease, Zika Virus

The 63 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 215 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 11,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded.

Ageism in Global Development 12 mins – “The United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals, and the subsequent Sustainable Development Goals, define premature mortality as being a death under the age of 70. As demographic change means more people are living longer than this, Peter Lloyd-Sherlock, professor of social policy and international development at the University of East Anglia, argues that this will lead to discrimination against older people.” “It suggests that older people have a lower value in society” At the link find the title, “Ageism in global development, Sep, 2016,” right-click “Media files 281081138-bmjgroup-ageism-in-global-development.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Airsoft Gun Culture 87 mins- “Today we delve into the misunderstood world of airsoft. I think airsoft has an unfair and undeserved stigma among many of the “tactically minded” due to the majority of enthusiasts being gamers. While I have no interest in the game aspects of airsoft I feel even this community is misunderstood and many unfair assumptions are made about them. Today though I will focus on what I call “Airsoft for Practical Training”. By that I mean real world training that benefits the average civilian that either carries a gun for defense or keeps a gun in their home for the same purpose or both.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aluminum Solder 25 mins – “Windell Oskay is the co-founder of Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories, a Silicon Valley company that has designed and produced specialized electronics and robotics kits since 2007. Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories also runs a popular DIY project blog, and many of its projects have been featured at science and art museums and in Make, Wired, and Popular Science magazines. He’s the oo-author of the recently published book, “The Annotated Build-It-Yourself Science Laboratory.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Discovery 37 mins – “Carolyn Shore of Pew Charitable Trusts in Washington, D.C., and Ruben Tommasi of Entasis Therapeutics in Waltham, Massachusetts, talk with Jeff Fox about what’s needed to identify and develop new antimicrobial agents to treat infections caused by bacterial pathogens, with an emphasis on gram-negative bacterial pathogens. According to that recent report from Pew Charitable Trust, which is based in Philadelphia, the challenges facing developers of such antibiotics fall into four main categories: developing a better understanding of the workings of gram-negative bacterial pathogens, a shortage of candidate drugs whose chemical design focuses on bacterial pathogens, an assessment of non-traditional efforts to control microbial infections, and an overview of what’s needed in terms of expertise and of sharing information among investigators in this field to meet these challenges.” At the link find the title, “MMP #15: A Scientific Roadmap for Antibiotic Discovery, Aug 23, 2016,” right-click “Media files MMP015.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Archeology from Space 5 mins – In this short talk, TED Fellow Sarah Parcak introduces the field of “space archaeology” — using satellite images to search for clues to the lost sites of past civilizations.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Detention Camps 12 mins – “”I say to all Australian doctors – young, old, the political and the apolitical – that on this depends not just our ethical credibility as a profession, but our shared humanity.Following the leaked emails published in The Guardian newspaper, alleging abuse of asylum seekers detained by the Australian government on the Pacific island of Nauru, David Berger joins us again to say it is time that doctors take a stand and march to protest against this treatment.” At the link right-click “Not just our ethical credibility as a profession, but our shared humanity, Aug, 2016,” right-click “ Media files 280563327-bmjgroup-berger-detention-camps.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism 82 mins – “Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), a developmental disorder that often interferes with a person’s ability to communicate with and relate to others, affects about 1 in 68 school-age children. Dr. Bennett Leventhal, a psychiatry professor at UCSF, discusses the history and diagnosis of Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD) such as autism and Asperger’s. He also looks at the prevalence, assessment and risk factors. Recorded on 05/25/2016. (#31002)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Connectivity Background 20 mins – “Dane Jasper co-founded Sonic, an Internet and telecommunications company, in 1994, at a time when many people hadn’t yet heard the terms Internet, email address, or World Wide Web. Today, Sonic is the largest independent Internet service provider in Northern California.” At the link click “download options,” right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Business Aids 36 mins – “Our guest this week is Brian Brushwood. Brian is is the creator and host of over 400 episodes of Discovery’s “Scam School,” with over one million subscribers on YouTube. In 2015, his first full season of “Hacking the System” debuted on the National Geographic Channel (now available on Netflix). Brian has performed thousands of live stage shows (appearing in every state in the continental US), headlined 3 years at Universal Orlando, and recorded two Billboard #1 comedy albums with his “Night Attack” co-host, Justin Robert Young.” (The key tool mentioned is found at various places via Google with the search term, “ST66676”.) At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car 54 74 mins – “In addition to playing Officer Ed Nicholson on the beloved sitcom, “Car 54, Where Are You?”, actor and comedian Hank Garrett has worked with Robert Redford, Sophia Loren, Al Pacino, James Earl Jones and Kirk Douglas (to name a few). Hank tells Gilbert and Frank about his unlikely journey from street tough to award-winning actor and reveals how Sammy Davis Jr. changed his life. Also: Hank remembers Al Lewis, emulates Sid Caesar, wrestles with Luca Brasi and shares a bill with Tony Bennett. PLUS: Gorgeous George! The Great Ballantine! The legend of Joe E. Ross! Gilbert meets Nipsey Russell! And the singular genius of Nat Hiken!” At the link find the title, “#118: Hank Garrett, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/4278039/4a5e08dc-d46f-427c-994a-94c8c6fd5a89.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Chris Anderson Tools 19 mins – “Chris Anderson is the CEO of 3D Robotics and founder of DIY Drones. From 2001 through 2012 he was Editor in Chief of Wired Magazine. Before Wired he was with The Economist for seven years in London, Hong Kong and New York. He’s the author of the New York Times bestselling books The Long Tail, and Free, as well as Makers: The New Industrial Revolution. His background is in science. He starting with studying physics and doing research at Los Alamos, culminating in six years at the two leading scientific journals, Nature and Science. Chris is also the founder of the site Geekdad. He lives in Berkeley, California with his wife and five children.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Challenge from Exxon 10 mins – “We return to Bob’s Grill this week with a 2015 interview with ExxonMobil’s Richard Keil, the company’s senior adviser for global public affairs. Last year, the website InsideClimate News published an investigative series examining ExxonMobil’s rich history of scientific study on fossil fuels and global warming. The series, called “Exxon: The Road Not Taken“, found that the company was at the forefront of climate change research in the 1970s and 80s – before pivoting to funding climate change denial groups in 1989. At the time, Bob spoke with Richard Keil of Exxon about why the company disputed the reporting, and about the company’s history of funding climate change denial front groups.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Battle in California 62 mins – “California and the University of California are leaders in confronting one of the world’s most complex and daunting issues: climate change. Three distinguished UC professors from across the university system will discuss how the UC and the state of California lead and plan to continue leading the world on a path to a sustainable environmental future.” South China Sea – “The South China Sea is where China’s rising ambitions are colliding with the United States’ global role. This strategic competition is interacting in dangerous and unpredictable ways with tensions about the fate of the atolls and islands that dot the sea: the Spratly islands, the Paracels and Scarborough Shoal. Bill Hayton will explain the — sometimes bizarre — origins of the various claims and suggest how they might be resolved. Hayton’s The South China Sea was named as one of The Economist’s books of the year in 2014. He has worked for BBC News since 1998 and was the BBC’s reporter in Vietnam in 2006-07. He spent 2013 embedded with Myanmar’s state broadcaster working on media reform. He is also an associate fellow with the Asia Program of Chatham House, the Royal Institute of International Affairs in London. He has given presentations about South China Sea and Southeast Asian issues for think-tanks and government institutions in the UK, United States, the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore and Vietnam. His written work has been published in The Economist, the South China Morning Post, The Diplomat and The National Interest.” At the link right-click Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clinton Foundation 47 mins – “Saving lives or selling access? We’ll break down the ethics, politics, and good work surrounding the Clinton Foundation controversy.More than her economic agenda, more than her plan to stop ISIS, Hillary Clinton’s relationship with the charitable foundation set up by her ex-president husband has become a campaign flashpoint. What does the Clinton Foundation do? Who gives money to it, and why? Did they distort US policy when she was Secretary of State? Would they if she’s president? This hour On Point, sorting fact from fiction on the Clinton Foundation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cluster Bomb Legacy 14 mins – “The destruction of war doesn’t stop when the fighting is over. Photographer and TED Fellow Laura Boushnak shares a powerful photo essay about the survivors of cluster bombs, people who encountered these deadly submunitions years after the end of conflict. With her haunting photos, Boushnak asks those who still produce and condone the use of these weapons to abandon them.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cold Water Hazards 16 mins – “Neuroscientist Paula Croxson is determined to finish her first open-water swimming race — despite the dangers. Paula Croxson is a neuroscientist at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, where she researches the brain mechanisms and chemicals that are responsible for memory. She’s particularly interested in complex, autobiographical life memories. Paula is from the UK and before coming to New York she received an M.A. in Natural Sciences from the University of Cambridge and a M.Sc. and a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of Oxford. When she’s not doing science, she plays the flute, and she blogs for Psychology Today.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness 74 mins – “Evolutionary Biologist, Jon Mallatt has always been interested in science, and early on became interested in vertebrates, and on a more granular level, the development of jaws in vertebrates. By understanding how insects, plants, and vertebrates are inter-related, we can better understand consciousness. The type of consciousness we are talking about today is Primary Consciousness (Basic Sensory Consciousness). The feeling of something that it’s like to be! Being aware of stimuli and objects in the environment but without any processing or judging of the stimuli. The hard problem comes into play with subjectivity. In his book “The Ancient Origins of Consciousness: How the Brain Creates Experience”, Jon and Todd Feinberg explore sensory consciousness and how the brain uses subjectivity to create experience. We discuss the 4 subdivisions of subjectivity and their impact on solving the hard problem. Qualia, Unity (central stage of consciousness), Mental Causation (how subjectivity can effect larger events), and Referral (sensory input that is referred to the outside world; it places sensations everywhere except in the brain) are components of primary consciousness that have to be explored to solve the hard problem. Join us for this interesting conversation about the latest trends and discoveries in consciousness!” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Criminal Records Checks 44 mins – “In this episode, Ryan talks with his lawyer uncle, Larry, (who is also the first in-studio guest and first lawyer on the show) where he has a track record of helping doctors over the last ten years. They talk about how to best answer certain challenging questions in your medical school applications and later on for residency applications, board certifications, and licensing, and all of those future applications as a physician, specifically questions related to violations and arrests. Listen in to learn about this and more information related to some legal implications to certain medical practices.” At the link find the title, “197: Can You Become a Doctor If You’ve Been Arrested? Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files PMY197.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CRISPR 30 mins – “CRISPR is a powerful gene-editing technique that is transforming the field of genetics. Faster, easier and cheaper than previous gene modification methods, the dream of treating cancer or curing hereditary gene diseases is one step closure. However, with the power to change DNA come ethical implications. CRISPR gives us the ability to alter the evolution of an entire species. Scientists are excited but are aware that they need to be careful how they use this revolutionary gene editing tool.What if we could use one tool to bring species back from extinction? Wipe out malaria? Cure genetic disease? Make food allergen-free? These are all ideas scientists believe they can realise using a new gene-editing technique called CRISPR-Cas9.” At the link right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Deaths in Suburbs 27 mins – “The United States is in the throes of a heroin and opiate epidemic. For Crossing Continents, India Rakusen travels to Lorain County, in the state of Ohio, where addiction has become part of everyday life. West of the city of Cleveland, Avon Lake is a wealthy suburb – its large, expensive properties back onto the shores of Lake Eerie, and wild deer frolic on neat lawns. But behind this façade, there is a crisis. Many families have felt the damaging impact of addiction. And across Lorain County, opiates – pharmaceutical and street heroin – have killed twice as many people in the first six months of 2016 alone, as died in the whole of 2015. Producer Linda Pressly.” At the link find the title, Addicted in Suburbia, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p046f1xm.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eggplant Crops 64 mins – “One of the amazing success stories of genetic engineering is the eggplant, known as the “brinjal” in Asia and the “aubergine” in Europe. In the west it is occasional table fare, yet in many parts of Asia it is a daily staple. Farmers in Bangladesh and India rely on doses of old-school insecticides to protect their crop, up to eighty a season, and not always with appropriate protection equipment. The problem is insects that bore into the plant and into the fruit, destroying a crop. One solution has been the use of the bacterial protein known as “Bt”, only that the plant produces itself to protect it from insects. t is the same protein used in corn and cotton in other countries, including the USA. The new eggplant lines have been wonderfully accepted, and poor farmers in Bangladesh are making excellent profits from this technology, while making safer produce. The story is told by Dr. Tony Shelton, Professor of Entomology with Cornell University in Geneva, NY. The story has captured the interest of many, including science journalist and filmmaker Dr. Hidde Boersma. Dr. Boersma has a Ph.D. in microbiology, and appreciates the potential contributions of genetic engineering. He has captured the story of the eggplant in a beautiful documentary called Well Fed. The documentary tells the story of the farmers that grow the plant, and the well-fed Europeans that change their attitude toward the technology when they see the beautiful ways it can benefit people.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emotions 35 mins – “What is love – and what does it have to do with meeting a bear in the woods? In the first of a five-part series, Dr Kevin Fong and Nathalie Nahai unpick the causes of emotions. But where’s the best place to start – history, culture, society or our bodies? Dr Kevin Fong and Nathalie Nahai talk to historian Richard Firth-Godbehere, neuroscientist Adam Anderson at the University of Cornell and sociologist Doug Massey from Princeton University to explore how different disciplines have approached the science of emotions. There’s the evolutionary theory, the internal theory looking at the physiological and cognitive side, and also cultural and social factors that have an impact on how we understand feelings. But first they’ll have to pin down a useful definition of what an emotion actually is …” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Poor People 21 mins – “’Ontario’s energy minister may not be calling energy prices a crisis, but many in the province would beg to disagree. With skyrocketing hydro bills forcing many into ‘energy poverty,’ Ontarians are calling on the government to lower rates.” At the link find the title, “People have to choose between heating and eating’: Ontario hydro bills cause ‘energy poverty, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160901_16283.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Superheroes 16 mins – “Why is it so hard to find female superhero merchandise? In this passionate, sparkling talk, media studies scholar (and father of a Star Wars-obsessed daughter) Christopher Bell addresses the alarming lack of female superheroes in the toys and products marketed to kids — and what it means for how we teach them about the world.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Nation Artist 18 mins – “The B.C. artist, carver, designer and storyteller, Roy Henry Vickers, explains how art helped him beat a life-threatening addiction, and says he’s now eager to create and share Aboriginal stories.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Artist Roy Henry Vickers on making art, beating addiction and turning 70, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160902_56248.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forest Harvests 11 mins – “We don’t often think of trees when we speak of “harvest.” Corn is harvested; apples, tomatoes, squash are the fruits of the annual autumnal rite which is the province of our farmers. Maybe it’s because those plants are harvested at the end of their lifespan that we don’t lament the moment they are cut down. We’re much more precious with our trees. Maybe because we associate de-forestation with developments of housing sub-divisions, or banal strip malls with all the character and scenic beauty of sound baffles on the sides of our highways. But, as a society we consume forest products as much as we do farm products. And sometimes when a tree comes down it’s not to make room for another human edifice, but another tree. Dave takes us to a site in Stoddard, NH where that is the precise plan: taking down trees to plant the next forest.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

G-Spot Scam 39 mins – “Join us on a hunt for the elusive G-spot. Our guides: Prof. Beverly Whipple, who introduced America to the G-spot in the 1980s, and Prof. Helen O’Connell, a urologist and expert on female sexual anatomy.” At the link find the title, “The G-spot, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT3815154846.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gary Trudeau vs Trump 47 mins – “It was 1987 when the “Doonesbury” comic strip first imagined a Donald Trump presidential run. Since then, Trump has been a recurring character in cartoonist Garry Trudeau’s Pulitzer Prize-winning strip. Over the years “Doonesbury” has taken on Trump’s rhetoric, his beliefs about women, Trump University… well before any of this was making front-page campaign news. And the candidate has been less than pleased with Trudeau’s satirical depictions, calling Trudeau a “sleazeball” and a “third-rate talent.” Now the author has compiled all his Trump clips into a new book. Cartoonist Garry Trudeau on satire, politics and thirty years of drawing Donald Trump.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Gene Wilder 46 mins – When Gene Wilder was 8 years old, his mother had a heart attack — and he took it upon himself to try to cheer her up. “It was the first time I ever tried consciously to make someone else laugh,” Wilder said. “And when I was successful, after peeing in her pants, she’d say, ‘Oh, Jerry, now look what you’ve made me do.’ ” Wilder — who was born Jerome Silberman — went on to become a comic actor whose film credits included Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory and The Producers and Blazing Saddles. He died Monday of complications related to Alzheimer’s. In a 2005 interview with Fresh Air, Wilder said that those moments with his mother sustained him throughout his career. “When your mother gives you confidence about anything that you do, you carry that confidence with you,” he told Terry Gross. “She made me believe that I could make someone laugh.” Though Wilder was known for his comedic roles, he also had a serious side. He described his marriage to comedian Gilda Radner as an “odyssey” that was “wonderful, funny, tortuous, painful and sad.” Radner, his third wife, died from ovarian cancer in 1989. He remarried in 1991. Wilder faced his own cancer diagnosis in 2000 — but he wasn’t afraid, and was in remission when he spoke with Gross in 2005. “I’ve had a very good life and a very good career,” he said. “I have no regrets.” Today, we’ll listen back to Wilder’s 2005 Fresh Air interview.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Problems 18 mins”Global problems such as terrorism, inequality and political dysfunction aren’t easy to solve, but that doesn’t mean we should stop trying. In fact, suggests journalist Jonathan Tepperman, we might even want to think riskier. He traveled the world to ask global leaders how they’re tackling hard problems — and unearthed surprisingly hopeful stories that he’s distilled into three tools for problem-solving.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gloria Steinem 37 mins – “ As she approached 60, the co-founder of Ms. magazine says, she entered a new phase in life, one in which “you can do what you want.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Google Search Power Question – “Google dominates internet searching across most parts of the globe. The algorithm which produces its search results is highly secret and always changing. But however good the algorithm, however carefully crafted to give us what Google thinks we actually want, is it really healthy for one search engine, and one company, to have so much impact?” At the link find the title, “The Force of Google, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p046dgbr.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Growing Forest in Ten Years 9 mins – “Forests don’t have to be far-flung nature reserves, isolated from human life. Instead, we can grow them right where we are — even in cities. Eco-entrepreneur and TED Fellow Shubhendu Sharma grows ultra-dense, biodiverse mini-forests of native species in urban areas by engineering soil, microbes and biomass to kickstart natural growth processes. Follow along as he describes how to grow a 100-year-old forest in just 10 years, and learn how you can get in on this tiny jungle party.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

G-Spot Scam 39 mins – “Join us on a hunt for the elusive G-spot. Our guides: Prof. Beverly Whipple, who introduced America to the G-spot in the 1980s, and Prof. Helen O’Connell, a urologist and expert on female sexual anatomy. “ At the link find the title, “The G-spot Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT3815154846.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in San Francisco 65 mins – “We see the sad lives of the homeless in our beautiful city, and our hearts sink. But is there an answer? In different ways, our three panelists have given a great deal of attention to the problem. They will share their observations and possible remedies.” At the link right-click Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing $3000 29 mins – “Mastering Your Money™ is a 30-minute educational radio program designed to give individuals and business owners directions to turbo charge their ride on the Financial Freedom Highway. In this show Ed digs deep into Paul’s How to turn $3000 into $50 million article and strategy.” At the link right-click “Download” nd select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Joe Hill Activist 44 mins – “In 1915, Joe Hill, a Swedish-American labor activist, was unjustly convicted and executed by the State of Utah, but not before leaving behind a body of work that would inform the next generation of American folk music. In this episode, we talk with William Adler author of the Joe Hill Biography titled, “The Man Who Never Died,” and Clayton Simms, a criminal defense attorney working to get Joe Hill exonerated more than a century later.” At the link find the title, “13: The Execution of Joe Hill, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files 57c7b6463113c9a11ac7c81f.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Joint Care Tools 28 mins – “Jane Metcalfe started Wired Magazine with her life partner Louis Rossetto, and Kevin and I had the honor of working with her during those glory days. More recently Jane was the President of TCHO Chocolate. She’s currently at work on a new startup about how advances in science and technology are conspiring to improve our health.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kareem Abdul Jabbar 66 mins – “Since retiring from professional basketball as the NBA’s all-time leading scorer, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar has become a lauded observer of culture and society, a New York Times bestselling author, and a regular contributor to The Washington Post, Time magazine and Time.com. At a pivotal time in our history and in the midst of a presidential race that threatens to divide us, Mr. Abdul-Jabbar will give his take on the origins of bias and inequality that remain a stubborn part of America, 240 years after its founding document declared that all Americans are created equal. He contends that many Americans, out of fear and sometimes ignorance, make too many false assumptions about fellow citizens who aren’t like them. Join Mr. Abdul-Jabbar for an unabashed and important conversation on how America can be a more unified country.” At the link right-click Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kevlar 4 mins – “Stephanie Kwolek was born in New Kensington, Pennsylvania in 1923. Her father kindled her interest in science at an early age. Together, father and daughter studied plants and animals around their home. From her mother, a homemaker, the young girl developed an interest in clothing design. Both skills would prove useful in later life. In college, Kwolek majored in chemistry with the goal of attending medical school. But when medical school proved too expensive, she interviewed for a chemical research position at DuPont. The work was so interesting she never left. In 1965, at age forty-two, Kwolek was working in the laboratory looking for a strong, lightweight fiber to strengthen automobile tires. And she was successful beyond anything she could have imagined. What she discovered was a material that, pound for pound, was five times stronger than steel. The material? Kevlar….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Larry Wilmore 46 mins – “The self-deprecating former host of Comedy Central’s The Nightly Show talks about getting his start and finding humor in politics “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marvin Kaplan 71 mins – “Gilbert and Frank catch up with one of their favorite comedic actors and one of the last surviving cast members of “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World,” Marvin Kaplan, who’s worked with pretty much everyone in his 70-year career, including Charlie Chaplin, Katharine Hepburn, Clark Gable, Jack Lemmon, Paul Newman and Lon Chaney Jr. (to name a few). Also, Marvin praises Sam Jaffe, props up Broderick Crawford, remembers Zero Mostel and risks his life for Blake Edwards. PLUS: Fritz Feld! Strother Martin! Arnold Stang takes a fall! Stanley Kramer sacks Jackie Mason! And the return (once again) of Maria Ouspenskaya!” At the link find the title, “#109: Marvin Kaplan Jun, 2016, right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/3725812/e3554c9c-9c92-4945-8e69-5996923db09f.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Myth Buster Adam Savage 35 mins – “Our guest this week is Adam Savage. Adam was the co-host of Mythbusters and editor-in-chief of Tested.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Parks 51 mins – “Wednesday, writer and naturalist Terry Tempest Williams joins Doug to discuss her latest book, The Hour of Land. It’s a paean to America’s natural parks. The parks are, Williams says, fundamental to our national identity, despite our complicated relationship with them. To mark the centennial of the National Parks Service, Williams visited 12 national parks. She wanted to better understand their relevance in the 21st century. She also wondered if they might serve to help unite our fractured country. Terry Tempest Williams is the author of 15 books, including Refuge and When Women Were Birds. Her newest book is called The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Fuel Production 27 mins – “*Rebroadcast from Feb 10, 2013* Keith talks with Gregory O.D. Smith, Chairman of URENCO United Kingdon, and Chief Cultural Officer at URENCO Group. At the time of this interview in 2012, Smith was president and CEO of EURENCO, a uranium enrichment company located in Eunice, New Mexico. Smith talks about the large, fast centrifuges that separate uranium-238 from uranium-235 and result in an enriched uranium product for nuclear power plants.” At the link find the title, “SCIENCE STUDIO – EURENCO, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files sci_show_8-21-16__cold_.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

On Campus Political Correctness 47 mins – “The University of Chicago is the latest school to push back against trigger warnings and safe spaces. We’ll look at the debate over political correctness on campus.The University of Chicago decided to send a message about political correctness – to students and everyone else. “Our commitment to academic freedom means we do not support so-called ‘trigger warnings, or intellectual ‘safe spaces,’” the dean wrote incoming freshmen. Was that a provocation, or common sense for campuses gone mad? This hour On Point, anew chapter in the debate over PC culture. “ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Source Ecoology 67 mins – “Marcin Jakubowski is a Polish-American who came to the U.S. from Poland as a child. He graduated with honors from Princeton and earned his Ph.D. in fusion physics from the University of Wisconsin. Frustrated with the lack of relevance to pressing world issues in his education, he founded Open Source Ecology in 2003 in order to make closed-loop manufacturing a reality. He began development of the Global Village Construction Set (GVCS)—an open source tool set of 50 industrial machines necessary to create a small civilization with modern comforts. His work has recently been recognized as a 2012 TED Senior Fellow, in Time Magazine’s Best Inventions of 2012, as a 2013 Shuttleworth Foundation Fellow, and a White House Champion of Change in 2013. Marcin joins us to discuss Open Source Ecology (OSE) and Open Building Institute (OBI) and how they are launching a joint project to make affordable, ecological housing accessible to everyone—using a library of engineered modules and a series of rapid-build procedures. Beginning in 2016, the project plans to offer aspiring home owners all the designs and tools necessary to build a 700 square foot Expandable Starter Home at 1/10th the cost of an average new home. This incremental home is loaded with ecological features and can be built in 5 days—from raw materials—and then expanded as needed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Palliative Medicine 14 mins – “The healthcare industry in America is so focused on pathology, surgery and pharmacology — on what doctors “do” to patients — that it often overlooks the values of the human beings it’s supposed to care for. Palliative care physician Timothy Ihrig explains the benefits of a different approach, one that fosters a patient’s overall quality of life and navigates serious illness from diagnosis to death with dignity and compassion.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Product Design 74 mins – “After recognizing the need for better-designed personal care products for people of color, Tristan Walker, a former entrepreneur-in-residence at Andreessen Horowitz and director of business development at Foursquare, struck out on his own and launched Walker & Company Brands, Inc. Now, Walker & Company is an emerging leader in the field of product design, and his company’s wares are being met with both critical acclaim from health and beauty industry heavyweights and financial backing from celebrities like John Legend and Magic Johnson. Join INFORUM, Tristan Walker and design industry guru John Maeda for an insightful discussion about how companies like Walker & Company Brands are finding success and redefining product design by making products that are both visually appealing and highly effective available to the masses.” At the link right-click Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in France 27 mins – “Catherine Carr travels to the refugee camps in northern France known as The Jungle. The journeys people have undertaken to get there are epic, and their onward passage is uncertain. Where are they going? Their answers to that simple question reveal the rhythms of life in limbo and describe past lives and future hopes.” At the link find the title,”Where Are You Going?

Right Wing Old and New 70 mins – “Believe it or not, prior to about the mid-1950s, to be on the “Right” in American political discourse actually meant you opposed American wars & interventions abroad most of the time, and it meant you took seriously ideas of individual liberty, even if you weren’t always 100% consistent on them. Then there was a ‘revolution within the form,’ so to speak, and with remarkable speed & completeness, a handful of individuals changed what “Right” meant in American politics, into something defined above all else by hawkish militarism, and with (at best) mere lip service paid to ‘limited government,’ etc. Who the Old Right were, and how the New Right hijacked their brand, is the subject of this episode.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rubber Stamps 29 mins – “Jesse Genet is the CEO and Founder of Lumi, a company that makes it easy to order custom manufactured goods online, like rubber stamps, silkscreen kits and decals. Jesse’s picks this week follow the same spirit of prioritizing high quality, simple solutions and resources to enrich and support a creative lifestyle.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Savant by Injury 26 mins – “Derek Amato wasn’t born a musical savant. He became one—almost instantly—after hitting his head on the bottom of a swimming pool.” At the link find the link “Encore of Episode 21: Stroke of Genius, Aug, 2016, right-click “Media files 20160826 hiddenbrain_genius.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Research Controversy 47 mins – “Science is in trouble. More and more research findings turning out to be mistakes or useless. Can science be saved from itself?“Science, our one source of objective knowledge, is in deep trouble,” says a professor at Arizona State’s School for the Future of Innovation and Society. In a generation that’s seen revolutions in digital technology and bio-medicine, can that be true? If so why? Is the World War II research boom running out of steam? We’ll talk to that professor, Daniel Sarewitz. This hour On Point, does science need saving?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Siberia Tiger Photographer 24 mins – “In remote Siberia, ecologist Chris Morgan joined renowned tiger researcher Sooyong Park to document his methods, a man observing three generations of tigers in the harsh Siberian landscape. Chris Morgan comes out of the cold to share his experience.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Researcher tracks Siberian tigers for months crouched in freezing hole, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160830_50720.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sociolinguistics 60 mins – “This week we’re learning about the field of sociolinguistics: what it is, why it’s important, and what it can tell us about our culture and our society. University of Toronto Professor Sali Tagliamonte helps us better understand the field, how her research is done, and how language changes over time in cultural and regional groups. And Dr. LeAnn Brown talks about how language cues reveal — or more often fail to reveal — gender and sexual preference.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South China Sea 63 mins – “The South China Sea is where China’s rising ambitions are colliding with the United States’ global role. This strategic competition is interacting in dangerous and unpredictable ways with tensions about the fate of the atolls and islands that dot the sea: the Spratly islands, the Paracels and Scarborough Shoal. Bill Hayton will explain the — sometimes bizarre — origins of the various claims and suggest how they might be resolved. Hayton’s The South China Sea was named as one of The Economist’s books of the year in 2014. He has worked for BBC News since 1998 and was the BBC’s reporter in Vietnam in 2006-07. He spent 2013 embedded with Myanmar’s state broadcaster working on media reform. He is also an associate fellow with the Asia Program of Chatham House, the Royal Institute of International Affairs in London. He has given presentations about South China Sea and Southeast Asian issues for think-tanks and government institutions in the UK, United States, the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore and Vietnam. His written work has been published in The Economist, the South China Morning Post, The Diplomat and The National Interest.” At the link right-click Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Aid 21 mins – “An investigation by the Guardian newspaper has revealed the United Nations has paid tens of millions of dollars in aid money to the Assad regime and businesses close to it. Critics are calling the UN “morally bankrupt” but the UN says it’s complicated.” At the link find the title, “Millions in UN aid for Syria paid to Assad-linked companies, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160831_11427.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ten Year Old Boys 27 mins – “What it feels like to be a boy in America.” At the link find the title, “The American Male at Age Ten, by Susan Orlean, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 01-The-American-Male-at-Age-Ten-by-Susan-Orlean-repeat.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tom Hanks 37 mins – “No matter what we’ve done, there comes a point where you think, … ‘When are they going to discover that I am, in fact, a fraud?’ ” Hanks says. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Traffic Deaths Increase 56 mins – “After decades of improved safety on our roadways, the trend seems to be reversing, with major increases in fatalities around the country and in New Hampshire.  We look at the reasons for the dramatic uptick in traffic deaths, including distracted drivers and cheap gas.

Unknown Disease 37 mins – “Barry develops a small but very inconvenient health problem, which becomes so persistent and pernicious that it feels as if someone put a curse on him. Sruthi Pinnamaneni goes deep on a decades-long medical mystery. Lisa Sanders’ book, Every Patient Tells a Story. Lisa Sanders’ column, Diagnosis.” At the link find the title, “#75 Boy Wonder, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT7250961898.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus Fight 48 mins – “Forty one cases confirmed in Singapore. Calls to test all blood donations in the U.S. The latest global efforts to stop Zika.The more we learn, the more we know the Zika crisis is not receding. Dozens of cases now confirmed in Singapore. Evidence that the virus damages adult brains, not just fetal or infant ones. Transmission by people who don’t display symptoms. More than 2,500 cases in the continental U.S. We’ll talk to the US Surgeon General – and other experts – about what’s next. This hour On Point, how can we protect ourselves from Zika?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus Books 52 mins – “New York Times reporter Donald McNeil’s new book begins with a mysterious illness that broke out in Brazil in March 2015. The rash and flu-like symptoms were temporary and few were hospitalized. When the Zika virus was pinned as the culprit, Brazil’s health minister brushed it aside as “a benign disease.” Then, nine months later, the babies arrived. Babies with tiny heads. McNeil’s new book tells the story of Zika and he joins us Thursday to assess the very real threat posed by the emerging epidemic. Donald McNeil is a science reporter covering plagues and pestilence for the New York Times, where he began as a copy boy in 1976. His new book is called Zika: The Emerging EpidemicAt the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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Media Mining Digest 251 – Sep 2, 2016: AcroYoga, Aging Solutions, Alzheimer’s Prevention, Animal Mating, Antibiotic Resistance, Antiquities Theft, Autism Research, Average Concept, Bearings in Machines, Blended Families, Blockchain, Bob Fosse, Bobcat Trapping, Brain Glitches, Brexit Britain, Camping Out, Canning Food, Climate and Religion, Cod Fish Rebounds, College Budgeting, Congestion and Allergies, Cosmetics Safety, Crowd Psychology, Cruise Ships, Cyber Psychology, Cystic Fibrosis Drugs, Dating History, Decision Making, Diablo Canyon Nuclear Plant, Disability and Tech, Docs Outside the Box, Editorial Cartoons, Electric Grid, Exhaustion, Fathers as Bachelors, Flood Protection Houston, Fugitive America, Global Economy, Great Depression Food, Green Costa Rica, Health Care Industry, Hillbilly Elegy, Hiring Computer Tech, Immigration Education, Internet History, Internet Security, Iraqi Displaced People, Journalism Today, Louisiana Flooding, Mall Closings, Marijuana vs Opiates, Meditation, Methane Issues, Music Therapy, Nature, Loss, Northwest Passage, Oil Business, Organic Food, Pill Taking Problems, Political Sex Scandals, Population Stability, Premed Minority Story, Private Prisons, Proteins, Retirement for Athletes, Retirement Investing, Roger Ailes, Roman Times, Rubber Business, Russian Protests, Salary Negotiations, Salt Wars, Scholarly Communications Networks, Scientific Imagination, Shepherds Life, Slavery and Racism, Smallpox Eradicator, Societal Collapse, Solutions to Big Problems, Sperm Whales, Student Load Debt, Sushi Trends, Tiny Houses, Triage Stories, Trumps Life, Wilderness Act, Wildfires and Foods, Zika Virus Status,

The 94 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 268 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 11,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded.

AcroYoga 120 mins – “My guest on this episode of the podcast is Jason Nemer, co-founder of AcroYoga. Jason is an incredible character, who travels the world with next to nothing. He introduced me to my latest obsession – AcroYoga. Along with Gymnastic Strength Training, I’ve been doing AcroYoga — and I think about doing it all the time. AcroYoga is closer to partner acrobatics: Cirque du Soleil routine meets sensual-but-not-sexual contact. Even if you have no interest in doing AcroYoga yourself, there are many takeaways and recommendations in this episode that can benefit your life. And for those of you that are interested, we even do a couple of video demos, which can be found here. But don’t feel like you need to step away from the purely audio experience of this podcast to follow along. Incidentally, the video was recorded at Creative Live, my favorite place to learn online. I’ve taken hundreds of courses there, but the one I’ll recommend is Six Months to Six Figures by Peter Voogd.” At the link find the title, “#182: Jason Nemer – Inside the Magic of AcroYoga, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files The_Tim_Ferriss_Show_-_Jason_Nemer.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Solutions 49 mins – “Richard G. Caro, Ph.D., Co-founder, Tech-enhanced Life, PBC While much of the Western world worries about the economic and human costs of an aging population, Dr. Caro argues that there is room for optimism—and that by harnessing the power of technology and the untapped wisdom of the older adult population, we can improve the quality of life as we age, expand the capabilities of caregivers, and perhaps even make the process of aging less costly.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Workforce 47 mins – “For years, economists have been warning about the effects of an aging U.S. population on the federal budget. But a new study finds a much more powerful effect: Researchers concluded that an aging workforce causes a decline in productivity and economic growth. The joint Harvard-Rand study predicts that over the next 10 years, annual GDP growth will slow by 1.2 percentage points due to population aging. Critics of the study say aging workers are just one factor in a slowing economy. But many industries are already creating incentives for older employees to work longer. Guest host Derek McGinty and guests discuss an aging U.S. population and its effect on the U.S. economy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Alzheimer’s Prevention 27 mins – “Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia accounting for up to 70 per cent of cases. After the age of 65, the chance of getting the disease doubles every five years. Given there’s no cure, it’s scary stuff. But mounting research suggests that Alzheimer’s can be delayed – and even prevented. In this episode we explore how lifestyle choices today may affect our chances of cognitive decline in the future. From what we eat to how much we move, even how we sleep … scientists are suggesting that the power to push back the disease is largely in our hands.” At the link right-click “download video: mp4 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Mating 34 mins – “We talk to biologist Carin Bondar about her new book Wild Sex: The Science Behind Mating in the Animal Kingdom.” At the link find the title, “145 Carin Bondar – Wild Sex, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files b219067f-697c-415a-ba3a-6ee29d3597c7.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Psychiatry 47 mins – “Compulsive disorders, depression, anxiety… They’re all too common in humans. But the animals in our lives can suffer from them, too. Veterinarian and research scientist Nicholas Dodman has treated animals with a range of psychological issues for years. These experiences led him to what he calls “One Medicine,” the idea that people and animals share the same neurochemistry, and that our minds and emotions are very much alike. From Elsa, the dog with PTSD, to Maxwell, the cat with depression-related anorexia, Dr. Dodman shares illuminating stories of treating animals suffering from a range of problems — and explains how they can teach us about human medicine.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Antibiotic Resistance 18 mins – “Six out of ten of the world’s best-selling drugs are based on molecules called monoclonal antibodies. But their high impact comes with a low profile. This is a story of how basic science quietly became blockbuster medicine.” At the link find the title, “REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast – August 1975, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antiquity Theft 42 mins – “Last year, the world watched in horror as ISIS destroyed key historical sites in Palmyra, Syria. But experts warn it’s not only these high profile acts of destruction that pose the biggest threat to the world’s cultural heritage. Instead, it’s a practice that dates back millennia – tomb raiding. The trade in looted antiquities is big business – and some fear it’s growing due to instability in the Middle East and North Africa. While the U.S. has passed laws restricting imports from Syria and Iraq, many argue little will change until the market for these stolen antiquities is eliminated. New efforts to curb the plunder of the world’s cultural heritage.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Autism Research 85 mins – “The CDC estimates the rate of Autism to be 1/5%. This developmental neurological impairment has a dramatic impact on the life of the family. Stephen Sanders shares his insights into autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and the use of genomics and bioinformatics to understand the etiology of ASD. Recorded on 05/18/2016. (#31001)” (Video version may be better.) At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Average Concept 21 mins – “In many ways, the built world was not designed for you. It was designed for the average person. Standardized tests, building codes, insurance rates, clothing sizes, The Dow Jones – all these measurements are based around the concept of an “average.” The modern use of averages was pioneered by a Belgian mathematician and astronomer named Adolphe Quetelet. In the 1830s, astronomers were some of the only people that regularly calculated averages, since early telescopes were extremely imprecise. To obtain more accurate data for say, tracking the orbits of planets, astronomers would take multiple measurements (all of which were slightly different) add them together, then divide by the number of observations to get a better approximation of the true value. Quetelet was the first to take this tool of astronomers and apply it to people. Chest dimensions of Scottish soldiers (1846) …By the 1840s and 50s, Quetelet had become a celebrity, and his radical new science had begun to influence a whole range of people, including Karl Marx and Abraham Lincoln.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bearings in Machines 76 mins – “Carmen and Jeff discuss mechanical bearings in this episode of The Engineering Commons podcast. … A distinction is made between rotational and linear-motion bearings. Non-contact fluid bearings may be of the hydrostatic or hydrodynamic variety. Magnetic bearings allow for higher relative motion velocities, albeit at a higher cost than other non-contact bearings. … A flexure bearing allows relative motion to take place through bending of the bearing element. The lid of a Tic Tac box provides an example of a flexure bearing. The two most commons types of bearings are journal bearings and rolling-element bearings. Oilite is a porous bronze alloy impregnated with an oil lubricant. Engineers must consider the trade offs between using oil or grease when lubricating a bearing. A starting point for choosing a plain bearing is calculating a PV value (pdf). A pillow block may be used to attach a bearing to a component lacking room for a bearing bore. A ball bearing consists of an inner race, an outer race, balls, and a cage. Assembling a ball bearing is fairly straightforward once you’ve seen how it’s done. Ball bearings may be ordered with either shields or seals to limit the amount of contamination able to reach the rolling elements. Bearing quality can vary significantly between manufacturers. A variety of roller bearings can be used to support greater radial and axial loads than can be handled by a ball bearing. It’s important to apply the correct amount of preload to angular contact bearings….” At the link find the title,”Episode 115 — Bearings, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files TheEngineeringCommons-0115-Bearings.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blended Families 47 mins – “When 40 percent of new marriages are re-marriages. We’ll unpack what it really takes to blend two families. It’s not the Brady Bunch.In the old “Brady Bunch” TV show, two families were thrown together by remarriage and blended. It was an icon early in America’s introduction to widespread divorce and reshuffling. Today, a full 40 percent of marriages are remarriages. And nobody thinks blending families is a snap. Some say it can take a decade. Some don’t even like the phrase “blended family.” There are many configurations. Some never blend. This hour On Point, what it really takes to blend two families, or to make a step-family.”(3 guests) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain 19 mins – What is the blockchain? If you don’t know, you should; if you do, chances are you still need some clarification on how it actually works. Don Tapscott is here to help, demystifying this world-changing, trust-building technology which, he says, represents nothing less than the second generation of the internet and holds the potential to transform money, business, government and society.” At the link click “download,” right-click “Download video” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain 25 mins – “Primavera De Filippi, researcher at CNRS and faculty associate at the Berkman Center, Harvard Law School, is investigating emergent decentralized technologies to design new governance models. In this final talk of the session Blockchain Technology Beyond Bitcoin at Lift16, Primavera De Filippi explored the possibilities that live at the intersection between the blockchain and art, society and work, imagining what the future might look like when creative people use the full power of this technology. Hold on to your hats and embark on a journey into the future!” At the link right-click under “Download this video” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bob Fosse 48 mins – “A big biography of Broadway dance king Bob Fosse – of “Chicago,” the film “Cabaret,” “All That Jazz” – opens up a turbulent life.Gustav Flaubert said “be bourgeois in your life and radical in your work.” Broadway and Hollywood dance king Bob Fosse, says a big new biography, was radical in both. On stage and screen, Fosse remade the American musical with his unmistakable tilted hat, splayed-fingered, high charge. His razzle dazzle in “Cabaret” and “Chicago,” “All That Jazz” and more was laced with sex and death and darkness. Sensual grit. So was his life. Dazzling on stage. Dark and turbulent off. A terror of failure as he commanded dazzling success. This hour On Point, a new life of Bob Fosse.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bobcat Trapping 48mins – “Find out what’s happened since we first took a look at two cats whose fates diverged. One, an invasive predator, is encouraged to thrive and hunt; the other, a native wildcat, is being hunted and trapped. We revisit these cat stories on the next Reveal. Find out what’s happened since we first took a look at two cats whose fates diverged. One, an invasive predator, is encouraged to thrive and hunt; the other, a native wildcat, is being hunted and trapped. We revisit these cat stories on the next Reveal.At the link find the title, “[Update] Cat Fight, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files Update-Cat-Fight_podcast.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Glitches 48 mins – “In this episode we interview Dean Burnett, author of “Idiot Brain: What Your Brain is Really Up To.” Burnett’s book is a guide to the neuroscience behind the things that our amazing brains do poorly. In the interview we discuss motion sickness, the pain of breakups, why criticisms are more powerful than compliments, the imposter syndrome, anti-intellectualism, irrational fears, and more. Burnett also explains how the brain is kinda sorta like a computer, but a really bad one that messes with your files, rewrites your documents, and edits your photos when you aren’t around. Dean Burnett is a neuroscientist who lectures at Cardiff University and writes about brain stuff over at his blog, Brain Flapping hosted by The Guardian.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 083-Idiot_Brain-Dean_Burnett.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Britain 48 mins – “This panel session was part of Brexit Britain, an afternoon of debate and discussion produced by BBC Newsnight in partnership with Intelligence Squared at the Royal Geographical Society in London. In this, the first session of the day, folk singer/songwriter and left-wing activist Billy Bragg, Director of Resolution think tank Torsten Bell, UKIP parliamentary spokesperson Suzanne Evans and Vice-Chair of Migration Watch UK Alp Mehmet, discussed what the referendum – and the campaigning that preceded it – have taught us about Britain. The discussion was chaired by Newsnight’s lead presenter Evan Davis.” At the link find the title, “Brexit Britain – Our Divided Nation, Jul, 2016, right-click “Media files 276170817-intelligence2-brexit-britain.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Camping Out 56 mins – “Today, we pull the tent flaps back on camping. Every summer, thousands of Americans load up the car and head into the wilderness on outdoor excursions. Now, a new book traces the origins and evolution of this tradition, examines a few unorthodox camping methods, and ponders the joys of subjecting ourselves to the buggy, lumpy, and unpredictable great outdoors.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canning Food 73 mins – “(Starts at 5min mark.) So today we look at using electric canners specifically my preferred electric pressure canner the “Chard 9.5 Quart Smart Pressure Canner“,[$212] and the only other one I recommend, the Power Pressure Cooker XL. For what it is worth the Power Pressure Cooker XL is a DISTANT second, you will hear why in today’s show. I own both of the above models and a traditional All American Canner, that thing is a beast and will likely outlast my grandchildren, but honestly I don’t use it much since discovering electric pressure canners. The key with these items is they work and do so without a lot of supervision, when they are finished they just shut themselves down.  They also do far more than just can, they pressure cook, you can water bath can, they steam and more.  Today though we will focus on the canning aspect of things.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate and Religion – “Representatives of the three Abrahamic faiths will discuss each of their faith’s views about protecting the Earth, caring for the environment and being proactive in combatting climate change, which many believe is Earth’s biggest problem. Rev. Bingham will also describe the work of the Regeneration Project, which promotes renewable energy and conservation as part of Interfaith Power and Light, an interfaith climate change initiative.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Codfish Rebounds 62 mins – “Since 1992, fish ’n chips fans may have noticed that there was no cod in their classic fried dish. That’s the year that the Canadian government issued a moratorium on fishing the popular, tasty species. It devastated the Newfoundland region’s economy, but it had to be done. The cod population had dwindled to nearly nothing at that time due to over-fishing and changing water temperatures. Our guest today on Sea Change Radio is Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Abel, who recently wrote a piece for the Boston Globe about how the cod has actually rebounded in recent times. We talk about the region’s historical relationship with cod, how science-informed policy can help reverse human-generated ecological damage, and Abel’s upcoming film on the subject, Sacred Cod.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Budgeting 27 mins -”How do you effectively budget your money as a student? This guide goes over how I did it, how I automate as much of it as I can, and how you can apply what I learned.” At the link find the title, “BONUS: The Ultimate Guide to Budgeting in College, Jan, 2015,” right-click “Media files 6816.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Costs 56 mins- “As the annual trek back to campus begins, we examine the options available to cover those hefty tuition bills, including new types of loans, grants and new tools for repayment.  We discuss how families navigate the landscape of funding options and government forms.  And we take a look at whether families are having that kitchen-table conversation about the high cost of higher education earlier in the college search process.” (4 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Congestion and Allergies 41 mins – “In this episode, we discuss the self-care of nasal congestion and allergies, including systemic/topical decongestants, nasal corticosteroids, antihistamines, cromolyn, and alternative medicine therapies.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 048-OTC_Nasal_Congestion_and_Allergies.mp3” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Cosmetics Safety 47 mins – “We pat and smear and paint and pencil cosmetics and personal care products all over ourselves. Shampoo, lotions, creams, dyes, deodorants. But do you know what’s in that stuff? What you’re putting on your face? Your scalp? Your underarms? Your eyes? There is almost no regulation of ingredients here in America. Now there’s a big push to change that. Big personal care product companies are signing on. Little ones may be driven out. This hour On Point, cleaning up cosmetics.” At the link right-click the tiny arrow under th eplay button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crowd Psychology 48 mins – “This episode’s guest, Michael Bond, is the author of The Power of Others, and reading his book I was surprised to learn that despite several decades of research into crowd psychology, the answers to most questions concerning crowds can still be traced back to a book printed in 1895. Gustave’s Le Bon’s book, “The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind,” explains that humans in large groups are dangerous, that people spontaneously de-evolve into subhuman beasts who are easily swayed and prone to violence. That viewpoint has informed the policies and tactics of governments and police forces for more than a century, and like many prescientific musings, much of it is wrong. Listen in this episode as Bond explains that the more research the social sciences conduct, the less the idea of a mindless, animalistic mob seems to be true. He also explains what police forces and governments should be doing instead of launching tear gas canisters from behind riot shields which actually creates the situation they are trying to prevent. Also, we touch on the psychology of suicide bombers, which is just as surprising as what he learned researching crowds.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 082-Crowds_rebroadcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cruise Ships 27 mins – “Philip Dodd looks at the impact that mass tourism on cruise liners can have. He talks to the people who benefit from the arrival of the huge new ships, and those who are unhappy about the environmental impact.” At the link find the title, “Cruising: Bad for the World? Aug, 2016, right-click “Media files p045kgtv.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Psychology 46 mins – “If you’ve watched the TV show “CSI: Cyber” then you know a little bit about Mary Aiken. She’s a forensic cyber psychologist, and the fictional television program was inspired by her real life work advising law enforcement on virtual crime. Aiken says people take risks online they never would in the “real world”, a phenomenon that puts vulnerable populations at risk, particularly the young. In a new book, “The Cyber Effect”, Aiken explains how the act of going online changes our behavior in fundamental ways. From what happens in the “dark web”, to issues raised by digital selfies, to the growing problem of “cyberchondria” Aiken introduces us to some of the many ways our behavior changes online.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Cystic Fibrosis Drugs 29 mins – “Until 2012, if you had a rare genetic disorder, there didn’t seem to be much hope for a cure. The science just wasn’t there, and creating drugs for small populations made little financial sense for big pharma. The story of one cystic fibrosis drug is proof: not only is treating the root cause of a rare genetic disorder possible; it can be profitable. But the way this new drug was made is causing a stir among some of the very scientists and doctors who helped to create it. This week: what happens when a charity dips its toe into the risky world of venture capitalism to speed the search for a cure — and the result is a drug with a list price of about $300,000 a year? Scientist Paul Quinton, 72, who discovered the root problem in cystic fibrosis patients, called the price tag “unconscionable.” He is one of 28 doctors and scientists who wrote a letter to the pharmaceutical company pushing back on the price tag. He said he’s in a difficult position. “I’ve had friends tell me that they would shake hands with the devil if it meant that we would get a cure for this disease,” Quinton said. But in the case of this particular drug, everybody wants to know: who gets to decide how much it costs to save a life?” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dating History 52 mins – “From Match.com to Tinder, there are all kinds of ways single people meet each other in today’s tech-driven world. It was a whole lot simpler and, some would say, better just a generation ago – what happened to meeting someone and asking them to dinner? According to scholar Moira Weigel, this is nothing new. As dating has changed throughout American history, people have questioned matchmaking practices. Weigel joins us Friday to explore the transformation of dating. Her book is called Labor of Love. Moira Weigel is a Comparative Literature PhD candidate at Yale University examining film, media theory, and gender. She has written for The New York Times, The New Republic, and The Wall Street Journal among other publications. Her new book is called Labor of Love: The Invention of DatingAt the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Decision Making 24 mins – “This week, Harvard researcher Dan Gilbert tells us why we’re bad at predicting our future happiness, how that affects our decision making, and why we are actually happier after making a decision that feels irrevocable.” At the link find the title, “Episode 42: Decide Already! Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160822_hiddenbrain_decide.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diablo Canyon Nuclear Plant 58 mins – “David Baker, Energy Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle John Geesman, Attorney, Dickson Geesman LLP Dian Grueneich , Former Commissioner, California Public Utilities Commission Michael Shellenberger, President, Environmental Progress Will closing the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant raise or lower California’s carbon pollution? Is it a deal with the devil or bold leadership?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disability and Tech 21` mins – “The Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired has been stocked with all kinds of gadgets: singing calculators, talking typewriters, even video games that you navigate using only sound. Most are specialized and expensive — the school can afford them, but a lot of families can’t. There is one piece of tech, however, that almost every student has, and, according to 14-year-old student Demetria Ober, absolutely every student wants. It’s a status symbol, it’s a social media machine, it’s… yes, you know exactly what it is: the iPhone. On this week’s New Tech City, reporter Ryan Kailath introduces us to Demetria, and poses the question gaining importance in both her life and broader society: Are iPads and iPhones rendering Braille obsolete? And if so, should advocates for the visually impaired be worried? Demetria, who started losing her vision at an older age, has had a tough time with Braille class — it’s tied with algebra for her least favorite. Fluent Braille readers usually start around the age of 3 or 4, and catching up is an involved, often somewhat tedious process. So she prefers to read by enlarging the print or turning up the contrast on a screen. She can still see a little out of the corner of her eye. For the totally blind kids, smartphones will read text out loud. No raised dots involved. They’re reading through their ears — a skill unto itself.” At the link click the button with the three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Docs Outside the Box 64 mins – “I’m Dr. Nii Darko and welcome to the first ever episode of Docs Outside the Box podcast! I have finally launched and I’m not looking back! Are you a doctor who feels trapped by the notion that having a traditional clinical practice is the only end point to your career? Not sure you can have the bomb lifestyle and medical career of your dreams? Think again! Docs Outside the Box will feature guests and topics covering career advice, entrepreneurship, personal finance, technology, and more! My first guest is Dr. Carmen Brown, an obstetrician-gynecologist who practices all the way down under in New Zealand. She is a southwest Atlanta native who started her medical career in Athens, Georgia. After being fed up with all the typical frustrations doctors have, she and her husband literally closed up shop, packed their bags, and took a world tour. If you’ve ever been to New Zealand, you’ll know why they decided to call it their new home.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Editorial Cartoons 48 mins – “Political cartoonists at Moses Znaimer’s ideacity Conference ponder the role and limits of satirical cartooning. Where do they, and society, draw the line?” At the link find the title, “Line Drawing (Encore December 9, 2015), Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160826_45856.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Grid 36 mins – “In her new book, The Grid, Gretchen Bakke argues that the under-funded power grid is incapable of taking the U.S. into a new energy future. She explains the challenges to Fresh Air‘s Dave Davies.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exhaustion 47 mins – “It’s August. Summertime. If you’re lucky, vacation time. We’re supposed to be refreshing, refreshed. But look across the year and think how often people say they’re exhausted. Too much work. Too hectic a schedule. Too many texts rolling in, emails to answer. Away from vacation – and maybe even on it! – are we more exhausted today than our ancestors? And what exactly is that feeling of exhaustion anyway, when it’s something more than too little sleep? This hour On Point, sizing up exhaustion.” At the link right-click the tiny down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fathers as Bachelors 29 mins – “Martha Sherrill’s father, Peter, rakish and handsome, was an irrepressible charmer and natural raconteur; when he died, she was flooded with calls from his ex-girlfriends who wanted to pay their respects and share their stories about this man who adored women. This week Sherrill joins host David Brancaccio to discuss her intimate 1999 Esquire essay, “My Father the Bachelor,” one of the most unusual and endearing tributes to fatherhood ever published.” At the link find the title, “My Father, the Bachelor, by Martha Sherrill, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13153/4209231/01-My-Father-the-Bachelor-by-Martha-Sherrill.mp3and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flood Protection 17 mins – “The threat of damaging storm surges grows as sea levels rise and the frequency of severe storms increases. Some U.S. cities on the east and Gulf coasts are particularly vulnerable to storm surges. Houston is the fourth-largest city in the country, home to the nation’s largest refining and petrochemical complex, and it may be right behind Galveston in the path of the next big Gulf hurricane. This area has been hit hard by past hurricanes, which underscores the importance of protecting it. In this podcast, Prof. Wesley Highfield of the department of Marine Sciences at Texas A&M University at Galveston discusses storm surge risks, protective options, decisions to act, and lessons for other coastal cities.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fugitive America 46 mins – “The underground economy where drug war and police lockdown meet urban America. We’ll look at life on the run.America’s underground economy sprawls far and wide now. Maybe $2 trillion in off-the-books work and trade. A big part of it grows from tough neighborhoods where the formal economy is so thin and the hand of the law is so heavy that it’s hard to stay on the straight and narrow. Sociologist Alice Goffman has gone there. To an urban economy and culture so shadowed by police and incarceration that it lives “on the run.” To a system that finds millions living as fugitives in their own neighborhoods. This hour On Point: the underground life of America’s most heavily-policed communities.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Economy 48 mins – “The global economy is flat. The US is doing a little better than others, but growth is slow. And inequality, here and abroad, is growing. This all bites, and its bite will be worse over time if we don’t fix it. How to do that? We’re talking today with two big economists. Nobel prize-winner Joseph Stiglitz. He says neo-liberal economics just aren’t working out. And the more conservative Douglas Holtz-Eakin. He’s been tough on Trump. This hour On Point, what to do with the global economy.” At the link right-click the tiny down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Great Depression Food 49 mins – “During the Depression, cheap, nutritious and filling food was prioritized — often at the expense of taste. Jane Ziegelman and Andy Coe, authors of ‘A Square Meal,’ discuss food trends of the time. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews ‘Trials of the Earth.’ At the link find the title, “Aug 15, 2016, A Culinary History Of The Great Depression” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Costa Rica 16 mins – “How do we build a society without fossil fuels? Using her native Costa Rica as an example of positive action on environmental protection and renewables, climate advocate Monica Araya outlines a bold vision for a world committed to clean energy in all sectors. In 2015 Monica Araya’s native Costa Rica produced almost all of its electricity from renewable sources. She advocates for the next step: a fossil-fuel-free world.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Industry 47 mins -”Lifetime M.D. Dr. Nortin Hadler joins us to look at what’s happened to the doctor-patient relationship, and how to save it.Nortin Hadler, MD, has been doctoring for a long time. He’s old school. Loves a rich doctor-patient relationship, where the whole person – patient – is seen and comprehended. Treated in full. But these days, he says, doctors who care are burning out, retiring early, pulling their hair out. “Today,” he writes, “health is a commodity, disease is a product line and physicians are a sales force in the employ of a predatory enterprise.” Ok! This hour On Point, Dr. Nortin Hadler on how to heal American health care.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hillbilly Elegy 48 mins – “ Vance grew up in a Rust Belt town in Ohio, in a family from the hills of eastern Kentucky. His new memoir details the social isolation, poverty, and addiction that afflict poor white communities. Rock critic Ken Tucker reviews the album ‘Rattle and Roar’ from The Earls of Leicester.” At the link find the title, “Aug 17, 2016, ‘Hillbilly Elegy’ Author J.D. Vance,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hiring Computer Techs 92 mins – “Topic: What do you look for when hiring a Tech? Where do you find them?” At the link right-click “Direct MP3 Download: Podnutz – The Computer Repair Podcast #196 – Where do you Hire Techs?and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Education 64 mins – “There has been considerable policy activity and innovation over the last 50 years to improve educational equity across student populations, starting with civil-rights lawsuits in the 1960s over access to high-quality education and continuing through the 2001 and 2015 reauthorizations of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Disproportionately lower achievement outcomes for several student subgroups have remained a top concern during this time, including those for economically disadvantaged students, English Learners (ELs), and certain racial and ethnic minority groups. Marking the release of a new report, this webinar will explore the key funding mechanisms in place to support EL students, including federal Title III and state supplementary funding sources. In light of broad trends toward more decentralized decision making and the increased opportunities that follow for stakeholder input to shape key educational policies, presenters discuss the diverse sources of information that should be brought to bear on public conversations about funding. These include demographic trends in the student population, district and school-based services that meet diverse student needs, and what efforts are being made to improve educational quality and student outcomes. Drawing examples from recent national and state-level actions, the speakers demonstrate how efforts to improve educational quality for ELs are tightly bound to efforts to improve the equitable distribution of educational resources.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet History P2 43 mins – “The Internet is one of those things that is right there in front of our face but can be hard to define exactly. Community Broadband Bits Episode 216 answers that question and picks up right where episode 213 left off with Fred Goldstein, Principal of Interisle Consulting Group. Having already discussed the regulatory decisions that allowed the Internet to flourish, we now focus on what exactly the Internet is (hint, not wires or even physical things) and spend a long time talking about Fred’s persuasive argument on how the FCC should have resolved the network neutrality battle. We also talk about why the Internet should properly be capitalized and why the Internet is neither fast nor slow itself. These are core concepts that anyone who cares about getting Internet policy correct should know — but far too few do. Not because it is too technical, but because it does require some work to understand. That is why this is such a long conversation – probably our longest to date in over 200 shows. “ At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from here.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Security 63 mins – “General Keith Alexander (Ret.), Founder and CEO, IronNet Cybersecurity; Former Head, U.S. Cyber Command and the National Security Agency Alfred R. Berkeley, Director, World Economic Forum USA; Co-Author, The New Paradigm for Cyber Security David Mount, Partner, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers The “Internet of things” promises tech-savvy people the ability to tap a smart phone to unlock your home door to let in your dog walker or house guest. Other possibilities include refrigerators that can order groceries and thermostats that can be controlled remotely. Smart homes outfitted with appliances that send and receive data are related to a smart electric grid, which would similarly send electricity to homes and receive energy generated on solar rooftops or other renewable sources. California law requires the state to source half of its energy from renewable sources by 2030. That will present big challenges for a grid that was built to be only one-way. Companies financing and supplying renewable energy are scrambling to figure out how to make the grid both green and safe from cyber attacks. How California manages the transition may be a model for the country for what to do—or not do. Join us for a conversation about the transition to smart homes and a smart grid and whether smart hackers can exploit the situation to wreak havoc on our connected lives. We also will discuss broader issues of cybersecurity and privacy in a hyper-connected age.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iraqi Displaced People 21mins – “The Iraqi city, Mosul, has been controlled by ISIS for the past two years. Now, they are poised for a battle as Iraqi forces seek to liberate it. But the most likely immediate result of the battle for Mosul will be chaos and a vast new wave of refugees.” At the link find the title, “UN prepares for mass displacements as anti-ISIS troops approach Mosul, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160825_70108.mp3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism Trends 56 mins – “A recent Pew Research report finds some bad news for traditional print media with newspapers seeing perhaps their worst year since the Great Recession. But there’s good news for all things digital: many more people are seeking information on social media sites and in the mobile realm. We examine the trends on all platforms, and look at ramifications for the actual work of journalism.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Louisiana Flooding 48 mins – “President Obama visits Baton Rouge today. Flooding there killed 13 people and hit tens of thousands of homes. Clean-up is underway, but the challenge is profound: dozens of state highways remain closed, vast acres of crops are a 100 percent loss and thousands of people still can’t return to their homes. Those who can confront mountains of mud and debris, but some say news of the devastation was slow to reach the rest of the country and there are concerns that the national response may fall far short of the true need. Join us to talk about the crisis in Baton Rouge, the disasters we pay attention to, those we don’t and why.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Mall Closings 46 mins – “It’s a confusing, challenging time for the retail sector. Macy’s is closing 100 stores. Wal-Mart is struggling to grow its online sales. Many traditional malls are dying. Yet TJ Maxx and Marshalls are thriving. So are Home Depot and Lowe’s. And Amazon continues to dominate the online shopping world. What’s a store to do in an era when lots of people shun malls and prefer to shop with an iPad while lounging on the couch? This hour On Point, the changing ways Americans shop, the continuing battle between brick-and-mortar versus online, and how the retail sector is trying to innovate to keep up.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana vs Opiates 56 mins – “The state’s therapeutic cannabis program is up and running, with the opening of its fourth and final dispensary, but debate continues over who should access the drug . For example, some argue it’s a good alternative to opioids for chronic pain sufferers, but others warn of unintended consequences and inadequate research.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation P3 86 mins – “How does mindfulness and meditation improve health? Helen Weng, UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, explains that training our internal mental lives can have positive effects on our minds, health, and relationships. Recorded on 05/26/2016. (#31008)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Methane Issues 27 mins –Methane Madness (start time: 2:20) More than a decade ago, scientists noted that the area where Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah meet, known as Four Corners, appeared to be emitting a curiously large amount of methane. In a new study, a team of scientists have traced the source: more than 250 gas wells, storage tanks, pipelines and processing plants associated with oil and gas development in the San Juan Basin. The basin is one of many places where new drilling technologies, including horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, have propelled a boom in natural gas extraction. The boom has transformed the U.S. energy mix. Our two guests discuss with hosts Daniel Glick and Susan Moran the science and public health aspects of this study as well as the human side of living near natural gas wells in Colorado. Dr. Colm Sweeney co-authored the recent Four Corners study. He is the lead scientist for NOAA’s Earth System Research Lab Aircraft Program, and he is a research scientist with the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, or CIRES, at the University of Colorado Boulder. Our other guest, Dr. Christopher Clack, is a physicist and mathematician with CIRES whose research focuses on renewable electricity. He shares his personal experience with and documentation of natural gas extraction.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Therapy 48 mins – “Music therapists have been working to help patients for decades. In recent years, research on music and the brain has indicated listening to songs can help patients with a wide range of medical problems, including sleep disorders and strokes. Classical guitarist Andrew Schulman says music helped him recover from a coma. While he’s not a music therapist, he now works with doctors in intensive care units at Mount Sinai Beth Israel hospital in New York and Berkshire Medical Center in Massachusetts. He plays his guitar to help stabilize patients blood pressure and heart rates after surgery. A look at how music is being used to aid patients recover from medical conditions.” (5 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Nature Loss 48 mins – “Three experts in urban and environmental conservation discuss an ecological approach to the restoration and preservation of both wilderness and cityscapes.” At the link find the title, “Reimagining Ecology, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160825_63906.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Northwest Passage 4 mins – “The sea route over the top of Canada has historically been impassable, but ice melting in the Arctic has in recent years cleared a path for shipping vessels. Now, a 1,600-person, 13-deck cruise ship is plying those waters, too. The Crystal Serenity left Seward, Alaska last week on a 32-day cruise that will take it around Alaska, through the Canadian Arctic, past Greenland and finally to New York….Safety isn’t the only aspect of the cruise that locals are worried about. The ship has already stopped in Nome, Alaska, population roughly 4,000….The ship’s captain Birger Vorland visited some of these small Arctic communities, and said they are “apprehensively excited” about the onslaught of visitors….Rachel Waldholz said Crystal Cruises is exceeding environmental regulations for wastewater discharge and is using grade of fuel oil that would be easier to clean up in the event of a spill. “But the concern is sort of what happens next,” Waldholz said. “All of these measures are voluntary… will other companies follow suit and follow sort of the same high standards?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Business P4 27 mins – “Fourth of five episodes. Oil is in our sneakers, our clothes, and the computer or phone you’re using right now. On today’s show: The story of the man who made it happen.” At the link find the title, “Oil #4: How Oil Got Into Everything, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160826_pmoney_pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Business P5 28 mins – “Last of five episodes. We follow the Planet Money oil to a gas station. And we ask: What would our world look like if there were no fossil fuels?” At the link find the title, “Oil #5: Imagine A World Without Oil, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160824_pmoney_podcast082416.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Organic Food 35 mins – “People are going bonkers for organic, but what are you really getting when you buy them? Better taste? Fewer toxic chemicals? A cleaner environment? Farmers Mark, Andy, and Brian Reeves, nutritional epidemiologist Dr. Kathryn Bradbury, Ass. Prof. Cynthia Curl, and Prof. Navin Ramankutty help us sort it all out.” At the link find the title, “Organic food, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT9168305065.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pill Taking Problems 20 mins – “The BMJ publishes a variety of education articles, to help doctors improve their practice. Often authors join us in our podcast to give tips on putting their recommendations into practice. In this new monthly audio round-up The BMJ’s clinical editors discuss what they have learned, and how they may alter their practice. In our first audio edition, GPs Sophie Cook and Helen Macdonald, psychiatry trainee Kate Adlington, and HIV and sexual health trainee Deborah Kirkham talk about communication skills – ICE – obtaining a patient’s ideas, concerns and expectations about their health.” At the link find the title, “Education round up – ICE, examinations, and adherence, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 279858282-bmjgroup-education-round-up-aug-2016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Sex Scandals 7 mins – “So it turns out that Warren G. Harding really did father a love child with one of his mistresses, Nan Britton. Last month, descendants of Harding and Britton confirmed that DNA evidence linked their families to each other. But Harding never discussed the matter in public, which separates his time from ours. Today’s sexually wayward leaders are required to grovel, confessing their sins to the world. Think Bill Clinton and John Edwards, Mark Sanford and Anthony Weiner. That makes us feel superior to our politicians, but—in the end—it diminishes our politics. It’s easy to mock our Victorian forbears, with their formal manners and blind spots on race and gender. But they kept silent about their personal transgressions, even in the face of salacious reporting about them. And we could all stand to learn from that….” Jonathan Zimmerman teaches history and education at New York University. He is the author of Too Hot to Handle: A Global History of Sex Education, which was published in March by Princeton University Press.At the link find the title, “Political sex scandals and the culture of confession, Sept, 2015,” right-click “Media files love-child-web.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Population Stability 48 mins – “Offering insights and guidance from prominent academics and journalists, The Good Crisis: How Population Stabilization Can Foster a Healthy U.S. Economy -Population Connection: 2016- takes on one of today’s most pressing challenges: keeping our aging population healthy, productive, and prepared for today’s technologically-focused jobs. At the same time, today’s youth must be prepared for productive futures through education, skills training, and delayed parenthood. Dispelling anxieties about the impact of slowing population growth on Social Security, commerce, and society, this collection of essays presents innovative and practical solutions to issues from labor shortages to fossil fuel dependence. Backed by extensive research and real-world examples, The Good Crisis presents a path to a more productive, sustainable world. Tune in as we talk with John Seager, one of the book’s authors and President and CEO of Population Connection.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Premed Minority Story 44 mins – “Dr. Nii Darko took the long road to medicine. Growing up a first gen student left him learning about medicine from The Cosby Show. Learn how it influenced him.” At the link right-click “Direct download: PMY196.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Private Prison Closures 47 mins – “The Justice Department will phase out its use of for-profit prisons to house federal inmates. This follows a government report indicating private prisons are not as secure or safe as those federally run, and don’t offer significant cost savings. Prison rights advocates hailed the move. Supporters of the private system criticized it, saying it was partly based on faulty data. The majority of incarcerated Americans are in state prisons, not federal. Some rights groups hope the Justice Department move will set the stage for state prisons to follow suit. We weigh the pros and cons of government and private prisons.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Private Prison Problems 49 mins – “Seth Freed Wessler reported on the substandard medical care in privately-run prisons in the federal corrections system for ‘The Nation.’ His work may have led the Justice Department to phase out private prisons. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews two reissues from saxophonist Teddy Edwards.” At the link find the title, “Inside Private Prisons: Crowding, Under-Staffing, And Inmate Deaths, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_491391936.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Proteins 27 mins – “Keith & Russ talk with Kevin Burgess, Professor of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station TX. Burgess talks about the importance of learning how proteins interact, and which molecules interact best with others. Resulting research has led to advances in fighting HIV, diabetes, and cancer. Burgess also talks about his work with florescent molecules and how they can be used to mark DNA strands or view interactions between proteins inside a cell.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Retirement for Athletes 27 mins – “As the Rio Olympics comes to an end, Claudia Hammond looks at what happens when elite sportspeople retire from competition. Life becomes very different when they stop striving for those medals, and they no longer have an identity as an athlete. After a decade or more of being told how to become a champion – when to train, what to eat and when to sleep – they have to return to making decisions for themselves. For some it can put people at risk of depression, alcohol abuse or even suicide. Claudia Hammond talks to former athletes, swimmer Sharron Davies and footballer Clarke Carlisle, about how they have redefined their lives. Paul Wylleman, Professor of Sports Psychology at the Free University of Brussels, and performance manager to the Dutch Olympics team, tells her how some countries’ Olympic organisations prepare their stars for the future outside sport.” At the link find the title, “Olympic Minds: Retirement, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p045rk2n.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Retirement Investing P1 45 mins – “Paul considers this podcast, the best of his career. In this 2 part podcast you will hear Paul interviewed by Michael Port, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Port. Michael Port is an author, speaker, small business marketing consultant, and public speaking teacher. Michael is not a financial expert but, as you will learn from the interview, he has taken the time to understand how the investing process works. In these two podcasts Michael and Paul discuss dozens of important topics including: the essentials of successful investing, how salespeople hurt investors, what is a fiduciary and how do you know you have a good one, why investors make less than they should, the possibility of making 12%, what asset classes produce the best returns, how much investors need to save before they retire, rebalancing, Paul’s $3000 to $50 million strategy and lots more. For those who enjoy Michael’s interview style, check out http://stealtheshow.com/podcast/archive/At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roger Ailes 47 mins – “Fox News debuted 20 years ago as a conservative alternative to mainstream media. It quickly grew into a national phenom that became the voice of conservative America. But now its powerful co-founder, Roger Ailes, is out over sexual harassment claims and corporate restructuring is underway. That internal drama comes just as Trump’s campaign is splitting the GOP. This hour On Point, the troubles at Fox, the Trump effect on political journalism, and the future of conservative media.” At the link right-click the tiny arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roman Times 48 mins – “From Julius Caesar’s last words to what Gladiator duels were actually like, classicist Mary Beard sets the record straight. Her book ‘SPQR’ is now out in paperback. Also, film critic David Edelstein reviews ‘Hell or High Water.’Historian Mary Beard Tackles Myths About Ancient Rome,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rubber Business 4 mins – “Scientists estimate that a forest the size of Indiana will be cut down to plant rubber trees over the next eight years. That’s creating biological deserts, driving some of our favorite exotic animals toward extinction….Burning forests in Southeast Asia for commodities — like rubber, palm and paper — releases carbon stored in trees. Last year, fires in Indonesia raged out of control. “And for 26 days in a row, the fires in Indonesia released greenhouse gasses that outstripped those of the US economy. It was just an incredibly serious climate change catastrophe,” says Higonnet. There are also human rights abuses: Indigenous people have been forced from their lands in Laos, Burma and Cambodia to build new rubber plantations. And there have been problems with child labor. Now, to be clear, tire companies like Michelin, Pirelli and Goodyear aren’t engaging in these practices or burning forests directly, but they buy rubber from contractors who do.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Protests 27 mins – “After the last elections in Russia, mass protests against vote-rigging led to clashes in the centre of Moscow. The events on Bolotnaya Square were the biggest challenge President Putin has ever faced to his rule. Four years on, several demonstrators are still serving long prison sentences, the laws on protesting have been tightened and the arrests continue. As Russia gears up for parliamentary elections in September, Sarah Rainsford talks to some of those caught up in the Bolotnaya protests, and asks what their stories tell us about Putin’s Russia today.” At the link find the title, “Protesting in Putin’s Russia, Augu, 2016,” right-click “Media files p045qgrf.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salary Negotiations 60 mins – “Learn how to stand out in salary negotiation with Jim Hopkinson of SalaryTutor.com” At the link find the title, “In-Depth Salary Negotiation Tactics (Ep. 52) Feb, 2015,” right-click “Media files 7943.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salt Wars 45 mins – “Salt is a magical substance. It reduces bitterness, enhances sweetness, boosts flavor, and preserves perishable foods. Without it, we would die: the human body can’t make sodium, but our nerves and muscles don’t work without it. It was considered rare until quite recently, so it’s hardly surprising that, throughout history, salt has been the engine behind empires and revolutions. Today, there’s a new battle in the salt wars, between those who think that we eat too much of it and it’s killing us—and those who think most of us are just fine. Join us for a serving of salt, seasoned with science, history, and a little politics.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scholarly Collaboration Networks 9 mins – “On these websites, millions of registered users around the world share published materials, argue and collaborate, or just form communities of common interests. The domain names, though, are ones you may not be familiar with. Don’t think Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram. Think ResearchGate, Mendeley, and Academia.edu. Scholarly collaboration networks, known as SCNs, have received much credit from academics and scientists for bringing research into the digital age.  Publishers and institutional librarians, though, also recognize that everyday activity across SCNs raises questions about the proper sharing of materials. Now there’s a website for getting answers to those questions – www.howcanishareit.com. “What we really need to do is to work with publishers to make sure that their licensing and copyright information is as clear and simple as possible, and likewise does address sharing specifically as one means of distribution,” Matt McKay, director of communication and events for the STM Association, the leading global trade association for academic and professional publishers. STM over the last two years has undertaken a thorough look at the current landscape of article sharing through scholarly collaboration networks and sites, and has sought to clarify how, where, and what content should be shared using these networks and sites. “So it’s quite a big body of work, not only to start looking at building those tools to help people, but also working with publishers to make that process as simple and as streamlined as possible,” McKay tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scientific Imagination P1 48 mins – “Central to the quest of understanding the universe is the creation of images through simile and metaphor. Four prominent physicists join host Paul Kennedy in conversation about the vitality and centrality of the scientific imagination.” At the link find the title, “Similes and Science Part 1 (Encore September 10, 2015), Aug, 2016,”right-click “Media files ideas_20160823_62735.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shepherd’s Life 47 mins – “The shepherd’s life. James Rebanks on the ancient and new life of the shepherd.Life is change, we hear a lot these days. For James Rebanks, that is only partly true. Rebanks is a shepherd in the far north of England, on land his family has farmed since ancient days. He went to Oxford, and then came home. To farm. To his sheep. He’s written the story of that life, the shepherd’s life, in a new book that’s getting raves all over. Maybe it’s a sign of others’ longing for that sense of continuity and rootedness, the land. Maybe it’s your longing. But would you want the work? This hour On Point, news from the hills. ‘The Shepherd’s Life.’“ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery and Racism 74 mins – “Michael Munger of Duke University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how attitudes in the American South toward slavery evolved over time and what we can learn from that evolution about the role culture plays in our lives.” At the link right-click “download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smallpox Eradicator 61 mins – “Donald “D.A.” Henderson, a physician, educator, and epidemiologist who led the World Health Organization’s campaign to eradicate smallpox, died at 87 years of age on Aug. 19, 2016. Vincent was fortunate to have the opportunity to speak with DA Henderson in 2014 about his career, the smallpox eradication effort, and what it means for the eradication of polio.” At the link right-click “Download TWIV Special” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Societal Collapse 94 mins – “CJ Killmer has been teaching college history since 2006, but he has been a smartass, iconoclast, and cynical questioner and critic of authority since he was a kid. Naturally, these attitudes have influenced his take on history. In 2014, he started the Dangerous History Podcast, a show that covers a wide variety of history topics from an individualist-anarchist perspective, combining education and entertainment with the ultimate goal of empowerment. Today we discuss the historical reality of societal collapses in history, both long ago and very recently. We also take a look at the causes of societal collapse beyond the surface examples usually given. Further we look at what our future holds and what lessons we can learn from past collapses.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solutions to Big Problems 46 mins – “Marty Nemko, Ph.D., Contributor, Time; Host, “Work with Marty Nemko,” KALW 91.7 FM What’s the Big Idea? Possible Solutions to Our Biggest Problems. Imagine you are emperor of the United States of America. With a wave of your hand, you can enact any policy you want. A policy that would: remove people’s employment fears remove our health-care fears eliminate terrorism make the U.S.’s $20 trillion dollar debt vanish even solve the Palestinian/Israeli crisis. Marty Nemko, Time contributor, KALW-FM (San Francisco public radio station) host, U.C. Berkeley Ph.D. specializing in the evaluation of innovation, and author of What’s the Big Idea? 39 Reinventions for a Better Society, will share his provocative ideas and leave plenty of time for Q&A so you can react to those ideas and share your own! *THIS PROGRAM CONTAINS EXPLICIT LANGUAGE*” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sperm Whales 24 mins – “In an unprecedented study, Canadian marine biologist Shane Gero has been decoding a group of sperm whale families for more than a decade. Find out what sperm whales are talking about and what Gero has learned about their society.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Canadian researcher reveals how sperm whales communicate, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160824_64974.mp3 and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Loan Debt 48 mins – “Student loan debt: We’ve seen the numbers heading sharply north for a decade. The amount Americans owe in student loans now stands at well above a trillion dollars. Recent surveys show a majority of Americans approve of free college tuition, but they don’t want to pay more taxes to make it possible. We’ve long been told that college offers a path to a better life for individuals-and greater prosperity for the nation. But when accompanied by crushing debt, many say the value of a college education needs to be recalculated. Join Diane and guests as they discuss student loan debt, college affordability and what the presidential candidates are proposing.”(4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Sushi Trends 48 mins – “What’s the future of sushi? We look at tradition, sustainability and changing sushi tastes in America.Once, sushi was exotic and simple. Raw fish, vinagered rice, a gift from Japan. Now, sushi is very familiar to many all over the world – certainly in the U.S. – but it has grown exotic in new ways. Wild directions. Sushi burritos. Cajun sushi. Sushi doughnuts! And it’s grown endangered, along with global fish stocks of blue fin tuna and more. A lot of culture and questions converging around sushi. This hour On Point, we are rolling out the sushi, with top chefs and your questions.” (2 guests) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tiny Houses 62 mins – “Chris Haynes is an electrical and software engineer. He moved from a full size grid connected house to an off grid tiny house located on a rural lot. He has built a very small (66sf) tiny house and a code compliant 252sf tiny house where he currently lives. He has been living off grid for over 4 years using a very simple and inexpensive solar system. He shares his experiences in tiny house living at conferences held in the northeast US. He just released a new book called “Tiny House Engineers Notebook: Volume 1, Off Grid Power”. Its written in a style that is suitable for folks with no electrical knowledge. Chris originally joined us at TSP on Episode 1365 that is almost two years ago, he now has a lot more experience actually living the Tiny House way. He has been though Snowpocalypse and a hell of a Heat Wave for a summer as well. So we will discuss somethings he has done to make his home more livable.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Triage Stories 63 mins – “When people are dying and you can only save some, how do you choose? Maybe you save the youngest. Or the sickest. Maybe you even just put all the names in a hat and pick at random. Would your answer change if a sick person was standing right in front of you? In this episode, we follow New York Times reporter Sheri Fink as she searches for the answer. In a warzone, a hurricane, a church basement, and an earthquake, the question remains the same. What happens, what should happen, when humans are forced to play god? In the book that inspired this episode you can find more about what transpired at Memorial Hospital during Hurricane Katrina, Sheri Fink’s exhaustively reported Five Days at Memorial You can find more about the work going on in Maryland at: www.nytimes.com/triage Very special thanks to Lilly Sullivan. Special thanks also to: Pat Walters and Jim McCutcheon and Todd Menesses from WWL in New Orleans, the researchers for the allocation of scarce resources project in Maryland – Dr. Lee Daugherty Biddison from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Howie Gwon from the Johns Hopkins Medicine Office of Emergency Management, Alan Regenberg of the Berman Institute of Bioethics and Dr. Eric Toner of the UPMC Center for Health Security.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump’s Life 37 mins – “Donald Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, is known for his outspoken personality and oversize public image, which he believes help build his brand name. “Whether it’s good press or bad press, it’s getting your name out there,” Washington Post investigative reporter Michael Kranish tells Fresh Air‘s Dave Davies. “Getting your name on the gossip pages and the front pages and even the sports pages, [is] all in the effort of building the name.” Kranish and his Post colleague Marc Fisher are the authors of Trump Revealed, a biography about Trump’s life and career that is based on the work of more than 20 of the Post’s reporters, editors and fact-checkers. Fisher says 20 hours of interviews with Trump helped him come to a better understanding of the candidate. “The man we’ve come to know and understand is someone who has led a strikingly solitary life given how public he is and how glad-handing his image is,” Fisher said. ‘When I asked him about friendships, he said he really doesn’t have friendships of the kind that most people would describe.’ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wilderness Act 52 mins – “BackStory is quitting the city and heading into the wild. In this episode, Brian, Ed, and Peter return to America’s fascination with wild places and learn how we impact even the most remote corners of our country. The Guys explore how early European arrivals created wilderness out of a landscape long shaped by human intervention, find out how the city of San Francisco controlled the remote Hetch Hetchy valley, hundreds of miles away, and ask how our ideas about wild places have changed over time.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfires and Floods 47 mins – “Fire and flood punishing California and Louisiana this week. The images are incredible. The reality is worse. Louisiana’s unnamed deluge and flooding is being called the biggest US natural disaster since Superstorm Sandy. We’ve got storms that should happen once every five hundred or a thousand years happening all the time now. In California, long drought has made the Blue Cut fire explode like a bomb. 80,000 evacuees. This hour On Point, epic fire and rain, and what we’re up against now.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus Status 47 mins – “The Centers for Disease Control’s travel warning for the Zika virus expanded four days ago — to another neighborhood of Miami. And experts say the virus likely isn’t done spreading. Most at risk: Gulf coast areas like Louisiana, still overrun by standing water after historic flooding, and Texas, vulnerable to infected mosquitoes because of its hot climate. Zika’s threat has ignited conversations for families who are pregnant and those who hope to become pregnant, including a new debate around reproductive healthcare and abortion. Meanwhile, new vaccines are moving through early-stage trials at a rapid pace, but how quickly they come to market could hinge on funding woes in congress. Where Zika is headed — and how we’re treating it.” (5 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 250 – Aug 26, 2016: Africa Arising, Air Conditioning Costs, Alternate Realities, Art Forgery, Atrial Fibrillation, Aviation Jobs, Bauhouse Photos, Beaver Trapping, Bike Sharing, Bobby Kennedy, Brain Tumors, Broadband in Maine, Brown Skin Discrimination, Camp Century, Canadian Nationalist, Car Use Decline, Civil War Professor, Coffee Production, Collection Museums, Connect to the Land, Co-parenting, Cyclone Winston, Drug Approval Process, Drug Controls, Drug Costs, Electrifying America, Exoplanets, First Nations Discrimination, Forest Systems, Geoengineering, Grand Canyon Rapids Ride, Green Party Candidate, Gun Security, Haptic for Blind, Heart Complications, Human Development, Incubator History, Injustice, Investing Common Sense, ISIS Recruiting, Manhattan Project, Manufacturing Decline, Meatless Future, Meditation, Mediterranean Diet, Mental Health, Mormon Voters, Muslim Misunderstandings, Nanotoxicology, Nora Ephron, Oil Production, Olympic Games, Osteoporosis, Planetary Science, Political Party Policy, Political Trends, Politics, Racism in America, Racist Book, Railroad Across Panama, Right to Die, Sand Usage, Satire, Sex Abuse Case, Sex Assaults in Colleges, Sexual Harassment at Fox, Sonic Pi, Sports Science, Standing in Line, Startups in Israel, Stroke Research, Syrian Archaeology, Syria-Russia-US, Terrorist Security, Tom Hayden, Tourism in America, Turkish Spring, Unconscious Mind, Violent Crime in America, Vitamania, Vocational Education, Voice of America, Water Treatment, White House Slaves, Wildlife Photographer, Wind Turbines Offshore, WW II Tobruk and Stalin, Zia Virus Research

The 93 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 280 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 11,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded.

Africa Arising 15 mins – “African growth is a trend, not a fluke, says economist and former Finance Minister of Nigeria Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala. In this refreshingly candid and straightforward talk, Okonjo-Iweala describes the positive progress on the continent and outlines eight challenges African nations still need to address in order to create a better future.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Air Conditioning Costs 29 mins – “Who doesn’t enjoy that refreshing feeling when you walk in from 90 degree heat to the cool blast of an air-conditioned room? Last month extreme heat blistered most of the US, from the Northeast, to the Southwest and practically every place in between. Weather experts are telling us that extreme is going to be the new normal when it comes to summer temperatures. Thank heavens for A/C. Approximately 86% of American households are equipped with air conditioners, and the rest of the world is rapidly catching up. But, while it undoubtedly helps human beings survive extreme heat, A/C is a huge and growing greenhouse gas offender. Our guest this week on Sea Change Radio is reporter, Katie Herzog, who recently wrote a piece for Grist on the social and environmental costs of air-conditioning. We discuss the past and future of these machines, the possibility of solar-powered A/C units, and the irony of this thing that is making us hotter by keeping us cool.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alternate Realities 62 mins – “Chuck Klosterman, author of But What If We’re Wrong, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the possibility that things we hold to be undeniably true may turn out to be totally false in the future. This wide-ranging conversation covers music and literary reputations, fundamentals of science, and issues of self-deception and illusion.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Art Forgery 28 mins – “This week on Hidden Brain, we explore real and fake, from fine art to fine wine. Shankar speaks with Noah Charney, author of The Art of Forgery, about why art forgers are compelled to spend their lives copying the great masters, and why so many of them want to get caught. Also this week: why we love studies that prove wine connoisseurs wrong.” At the link find the title, “Encore of Episode 11: Forgery, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160815 hiddenbrain_forgery.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atrial Fibrillation 15 mins – “Ben Freedman from the University of Sydney discusses atrial fibrillation and stroke risk with Richard Lane.” At the link find the title,”Atrial fibrillation: The Lancet: August 18, 2016,” right-click “Media files 08august.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aviation Jobs 53 mins – “Welcome to episode 113! There are many jobs in aviation and some will surprise you. Today I am joined by Paul Grieco and special guest Jennifer Adams. Jenn is an Aviation blogger writing at Tales from the Terminal on all types of Aviation jobs and adventures….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bauhouse Photos 21 mins – “Founded by architect Walter Gropius in 1919, the Bauhaus school in Germany would go on to shape modern architecture, art, and design for decades to come. The school sought to combine design and industrialization, creating functional things that could be mass-produced for the betterment of society. It was a nexus of creativity in the early 20th century. Most now-famous designers and artists who were in Europe during the 1920s and ’30s spent time at the Bauhaus.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beaver Trapping 5 mins – “Beavers have been busy this summer, building dams and creating wetlands—in places they’re not always welcome. Commercial trappers are getting more calls to remove beavers from neighborhoods this season, and that’s due to a drop in international fur prices. When prices for fur drop overseas, the number of beavers in New Hampshire goes up. …” At the link right-click the play button next to “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bike Sharing 25mins – “…world-wide growth of bike sharing with Janet Larsen of Earth-Policy.” At the link download the MP3 as the segment linked to Janet Larsen.

Bobby Kennedy 62 mins – “Nobody was better, half a century ago, at thinking about the biggest solutions for the problems of his age than Bobby, whether that be race riots roiling in cities across America, and especially in California; the war raging in Vietnam; or the general issue of inequality that was dividing people along lines of class, race, gender and generation. Those issues, of course, are a mirror of those facing the country today, when RFK’s message is more resonant than ever. He predicted we’d have a black president almost to the day, when no white politician dreamed of it. He talked about how our problems made us ripe for demagogues, though he’d never met Donald P. Trump but did know George Wallace better than anyone. And he offered ways out of all of that, in compelling enough terms to win the California primary and seem poised for the presidency.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Tumors 21 mins – “Demetri Kofinas had a benign brain tumour that was too tricky to remove, so he left it. But then it grew and threw him into dementia in his 20s. This is the story of one man’s journey toward profound loss and the turnaround that brought everything back.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: How a man with a brain tumour rebooted his memory, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160815_92263.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Maine 27 mins – “Cape Cod’s Open Cape is the latest of the stimulus-funded middle mile broadband projects to focus on expanding to connect businesses and residents. We talk to Open Cape Executive Director Steve Johnston about the new focus and challenge of expansion in episode 215 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. Steve has spent much of his first year as executive director in meetings with people all across the Cape. We talk about how important those meetings are and why Steve made them a priority in the effort to expand Open Cape. We also talk about the how Open Cape is using Crowd Fiber to allow residents to show their interest in an Open Cape connection. They hope that expanding the network will encourage people to spend more time on the Cape, whether living or vacationing. The Cape is not just a vacation spot, it has a large number of full time residents that are looking for more economic opportunities and the higher quality of life that comes with full access to modern technology.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from her” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brown Skin Discrimination 21 mins – “When Kamal Al-Solaylee travelled to 10 countries to capture the experience of being brown, he concluded that a brown racial identity has been shaped by the cheap labour movement. His book Brown explores what being brown in today’s world means to everyone.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Author Kamal Al-Solaylee on how cheap labour shapes brown racial identity, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160817_78954.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Camp Century 4 mins – “By 2090, layer after layer of the Greenland Ice Sheet will vanish, exposing a once-top secret US military base established during the Cold War. Camp Century was part of a secret plan to test the possibility of deploying nuclear missles aimed at the Soviet Union under the ice in Greenland. That’s according to a new study that projects 75 years from now, Camp Century “will begin to experience more melt than snowfall, which means that each year, rather than having an additional layer of snow and ice accumulate on top of the camp, instead a layer of snow and ice will be removed from across the top of the camp.” Not only would the base’s once classified infrastructure be revealed, so too would the potentially hazardous waste left behind. This includes sewage, diesel fuel, toxic chemical compounds like PCBs — a multi-purpose industrial chemical—and some low-level radioactive waste from the camp’s nuclear generator. All that could re-enter the environment and potentially disrupt nearby ecosystems, says William Colgan, one of the lead authors of the study….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-u menu.

Canadian National P2 48 mins – “For almost fifty years, Mel Hurtig was a prominent voice in any discussion about the country that he loved. Kathleen Flaherty traced Mel Hurtig’s lifelong quest to shape a Canada that he passionately believed in.” At the link find the title, “Citizen Mel, Part 2 (Encore June 23, 2011), Aug, 2016,”right-click “Media files ideas_20160812_24581.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Use Decline 49 mins – “Think about a city around the world – big or small – and one common feature nearly all share are cars. Whether these urban centers were designed primarily for walking, metro or the automobile, drivers are everywhere. But Peter Newman, an expert of sustainability who has been researching car use since the early 1970s, sees a change underway. Newman says we’ve reached “peak car use” – a point in which driving will play a significantly less central role in how we get around, and that will change the nature of our cities. Guest host Susan Page and her panel discuss how cities are steering away from car-based planning and what it means for how we live and work.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Civil War Professor 60 mins – “Virginia Tech professor emeritus James Robertson discusses his book, [After the Civil War: The Heroes, Villains, Soldiers, and Civilians Who Changed America].” At the link find the title, “Q&A with James Robertson, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.449502.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Co-parenting 47 mins – “The simple fact is a lot of children’s parents don’t live together. They split up. They divorce. And suddenly, children have two homes. But they only have one childhood. How do you make it good? The childhood they need and deserve? Psychologist and divorce mediator Robert Emery says frankly that it’s hard – emotionally, practically, financially. But you can do it. He’s seen a lot of ways. He’s got advice. This hour On Point: New parenting plans. Making good childhoods in divided families.” At the link right-click the tiny arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coffee Production 56 mins – “Talking Biotech #45 discusses the viral threats to coffee. We’re joined by Dr. Michael Goodin, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology from the University of Kentucky. Coffee viruses are important threats to sustainable production. They are spread by insects, so insect control is a critical aspect of their spread. Dr. Goodin talks about the unusual molecular aspects of the virus, plus the reasons he enjoys researching coffee, as it is a high-value crop that helps farmers in the developing world, and is a product enjoyed by people worldwide. Nat Graham is a Graduate Student in the University of Missouri Biology Department.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Collection Museums 66 mins – “We talk about the significance of collection museums with Emily Grasile, Chief Curiosity Correspondent at the Field Museum; Shannon Bennett, Chief of Science at the California Academy of Sciences; and Jack Dumbacher, chairman and curator of the California Academy of Science’s Department of Ornithology and Mammalogy.” At the link find the title, “143 The Stories That Collection Museums Hold, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files d3ff72b8-cccf-498d-b855-9e08418f0b51.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Connect to the Land 58 mins – “Can we return to the primitive? Miles Olson on personal rewilding. Asoka Bandarage on the “middle way” out of collapse. Organic grow and cook with Barbara Damrosch of Four Season Farm.” At the link find the title, “Radio Ecoshock: Civilization: Change It or Leave It (Replay),” Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files ES_130612_Show_LoFi.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyclone Winston 13 mins – “Cyclone Winston is the worst storm ever recorded in the southern hemisphere. It had sustained winds of 185 miles an hour and killed 42 people. It also destroyed thousands of homes in Fiji, left many people without water and electricity and forced tens of thousands of Fijians to live in evacuation centers. Irshad Hussain, a radio station manager in Fiji, talks to Broadcast Committee member Irv Chapman about his experience surviving the category 5 storm. He was at the station when the cyclone hit on February 20, damaging the station’s antenna and knocking it off the air in parts of the Pacific Islands. Hussain explains in detail what it was like when the cyclone hit, how the media have covered the story and how Fiji is recovering.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Approval Process 17 mins – “The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has embraced a new model of drug testing and marketing called “adaptive pathways”, allowing new drugs for “unmet medical needs” to be launched on the market faster, on the basis of fewer data. While industry claims this is necessary, an analysis on thebmj.com looks at the assumptions underlying the new pathway, and raises concerns about the negative impact on patient safety and the cost of healthcare.” At the link find the title, “A maladaptive pathway to drug approval, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 278961505-bmjgroup-a-maladaptive-pathway-to-drug-approval.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Controls 58 mins – “100 years since the first UK drug law, we explore the controversial and confusing science behind the drugs debate. From the brain basis of addiction to how ecstasy could treat anxiety, what are the implications of the world’s war on drugs?” At the link right-click “Download as mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Costs 58 mins – “…Get tips on how you can save money on your medicines from Lisa Gill of Best Buy Drugs at Consumer Reports. The websites she mentioned are GoodRx.com and BlinkHealth.com. Vinay Prasad, MD, describes how critical treatments such as those for cancer or hepatitis C came to cost so much. He has objected to the superlatives used to promote these medications to physicians as well as to the public (JAMA Oncology, Jan., 2016). This Week’s Guests: Lisa Gill is deputy content editor of Best Buy Drugs for Consumer Reports. The website is http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/health/prescription-drugs/best-buy-drugs/index.htm The article, Is There a Cure for High Drug Prices? was published in the August 2016 issue of Consumer Reports. Vinay Prasad, MD, MPH, is assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Hematology Oncology in the Knight Cancer Institute. He is also a senior scholar in the Center for Health Care Ethics in the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Oregon Health and Sciences University. His website is http://www.vinayakkprasad.com/ Dr. Prasad is co-author, with Adam Cifu, MD, of the book, Ending Medical Reversal: Improving Outcomes, Saving Lives.” At the link find the title, “Show 1046: How to Save Money on Prescription Drugs, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files PP-1046SavingMoneyOnMeds.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electrifying America 57 mins – “The modern day Edisons have done their job. We need not wait any longer. We are poised to wake up to a world running completely on renewable energy. Waiting any longer is like saying we shouldn’t have used the personal computer in 1985 until the smartphone was invented. In their new book, “All-Electric America,” authors S. DAVID FREEMAN, former utility CEO, and LEAH Y PARKS, a journalist in the electricity industry, explain how making the transition to an all-electric, all renewable society by the year 2050 is necessary, practical, and achievable. An energy infrastructure powered by the sun and wind and running on electricity, for all our energy needs, will be reliable, cleaner, safer, and CHEAPER. It will be superior to the system we have today and will lead to a better future.” At the link right-click Download MP3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exoplanets 28 mins – “Has another Earth been discovered? by Ian Woolf
Chris Tinney talks about exo-planets – what they are, and how we find them.
Why is Earth called Earth? by Fred Watson
“ At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Nations Discrimination 22 mins – “The killing of Colten Boushie, a 22-year-old Indigenous man shot dead on a farmyard near Biggar, Sask. has set off a firestorm of hate-filled response online. Many are not surprised saying the death exposes long-simmering racial tensions in Saskatchewan.” At the link find the title, “Racial tensions flare in Sask. following killing of 22-year-old First Nations man, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160816_54984.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forest Systems 15 mins – “’A forest is much more than what you see,’ says ecologist Suzanne Simard. Her 30 years of research in Canadian forests have led to an astounding discovery — trees talk, often and over vast distances. Learn more about the harmonious yet complicated social lives of trees and prepare to see the natural world with new eyes.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geoengineering 25 mins – “Australian author Clive Hamilton on geoengineering & his new book “Earthmasters”. Plots by big oil, Bill Gates & nuke scientists. Shocking new science shows Arctic could melt at current carbon levels.” At the link MP3 download the MP3 as the segment linked to Clive Hamilton and “Earthmasters”. Right-click and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geoengineering 60 mins – “Can geo-engineering help us stave off even more dramatic climate disruption? Dr. Field and Dr. Neudermans will be interviewed by Gerald Harris, chair of The Commonwealth Club’s Science & Technology member-led forum. He will inquire about the latest approaches to geo-engineering to address climate change, the need for such work, the risks involved and the potential benefits. Mr. Harris has been consulting to the electric power industry on long-term planning for more 25 years and has been an executive at both Bechtel Engineers and Pacific Gas & Electric Company.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grand Canyon Rapids Ride 33 mins – “Each summer, the National Center for Science Education organizes a boat trip down the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon to bring visitors face to wall-face with striking examples of geologic and evolutionary processes.” At the link find the title, “Grand Canyon Rapids Ride for Evolution Education, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Party Candidate 47 mins – “As Bernie Sanders was at the Democratic convention in Philadelphia beseeching his backers to throw their support to Hillary Clinton or risk a Donald Trump presidency, Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein was outside with another message: Don’t compromise. Vote for me. Vote for a Green New Deal. Stein wants college debt forgiveness, free tuition, Medicare for all and an emergency transition to green energy, food, transportation. This hour On Point, the Green Party’s Jill Stein.” At the link right-click the tiny arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Security 60 mins – “Margot Hirsch, President, Smart Tech Challenges Foundation Matt Drange, Technology and Business Writer, Forbes With federal standards for smart guns coming this fall, along with grants for law enforcement to purchase smart firearms, there is renewed interest in technology to prevent the harm done when guns fall into the wrong hands. Each year there are 20,000 injuries and deaths caused by accidental shootings and teen suicides, nearly all of which advocates say could be prevented with personalized firearms. A recent Johns Hopkins study found that 6 in 10 Americans support the development of smart gun technologies, including modifications to the existing 300 million guns in America today—a rare middle ground politically.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Haptic for Blind 21 mins – “The new generation of watch. Ian Macrae demonstrates a watch which uses Haptic technology and enables you to tell the time by a series of vibrations. Tom Walker goes to Salford to meet Paralympic swimmer Hannah Russell as she makes her final preparations for Rio. She’ll be competing in the Fifty and One Hundred metres Freestyle, and the One Hundred metres backstroke. She made her Paralympic debut aged sixteen at London 2012, walking away with three medals. What can she achieve this time round?“ At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Complications 16 mins – “Skylar Bayer’s dreams of a career in scientific scuba diving are put in jeopardy when her heart begins acting strangely. Skylar Bayer is a PhD candidate studying the secret sex lives of scallops in the great state of Maine. Due to a mishap involving a fisherman, buckets of gonads, and an unlocked Chevy, she once lost all her research samples, but gained a segment on The Colbert Report. She has also appeared as a guest on MPBN’s Maine Calling and manages the blog and podcast, Strictlyfishwrap. Skylar has produced and hosted shows for The Story Collider throughout Maine.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Development 61 mins – “Myths. We tend to think they’re a thing of the past, fabrications that early humans needed to believe in because their understanding of the world was so meagre. But what if modern civilisation were itself based on a set of myths? This is the big question posed by Professor Yuval Noah Harari, author of ‘Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind’, which has become one of the most talked about bestsellers of recent years. In this exclusive appearance for Intelligence Squared, Harari argued that all political orders are based on useful fictions which have allowed groups of humans, from ancient Mesopotamia through to the Roman empire and modern capitalist societies, to cooperate in numbers far beyond the scope of any other species.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Incubator History 28 mins – “The story of the premature babies in incubators on display in amusement park on Coney Island, and how the man who put them there, Martin Couney, changed attitudes to premature babies and saved countless lives. At Coney Island amusement park between 1903 and 1943 there was an extraordinary exhibit: tiny, premature babies. ‘Dr Martin Couney’s infant incubator’ facility was staffed by nurses in starched white uniforms and if you paid a quarter, you could see the babies in their incubators. Journalist Claire Prentice has been following the story and tracked down some of those babies, now in their 70s, 80s and 90s, who were put in the show. She discovers how Dr Couney brought the incubator to prominence in the USA through World’s Fairs and amusement parks, and explores how a man who was shunned by the medical establishment changed attitudes to premature babies and saved countless lives.” At the link find the title, “Life Under Glass, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p044whml.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Injustice 24 mins – “In an engaging and personal talk — with cameo appearances from his grandmother and Rosa Parks — human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson shares some hard truths about America’s justice system, starting with a massive imbalance along racial lines: a third of the country’s black male population has been incarcerated at some point in their lives. These issues, which are wrapped up in America’s unexamined history, are rarely talked about with this level of candor, insight and persuasiveness.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Common Sense 47 mins – “In this radio interview with Ken Roberts, of Ken’s Bulls and Bears, Paul and Ken discuss an array of essential investor questions and concerns, including the following: Given that investors are at risk of responding emotionally to what’s going on in market, what should they do to keep their emotions in check? What are the simple investment decisions that can have the biggest impact on future returns? What is the best mix of stocks and bonds? Is there a point that we can have too much diversification? Why not make an attempt to protect our money against huge losses? What are the risks of taking too little risk? What investments aren’t worth the risk? How important is it to understand your investment expenses and their long term impact on returns? Why shouldn’t investors try to beat the market.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link kAs” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Recruiting 47 mins – “‘New York Times’ reporter Rukmini Callimachi says ISIS’ recruiting efforts focus on both the “mentally unwell” and those who have been “radicalized since birth.” At the link find the title, “August 11, 2016, Inside ISIS’ Movement To Spread Terror ‘All Over The World’” click the cricle with three dots and select “Download” from the pop-up menu.

Manhattan Project 60 mins – “This week, we’re looking back at a previous episode and learning about the power and peril of the atom, with two books about women who were instrumental in helping us unlock its secrets. We’re joined by Huffington Post editor Shelley Emling, to discuss her book “Marie Curie and Her Daughters: The Private Lives of Science’s First Family.” And we’ll speak to author Denise Kiernan about her book, “The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Manufacturing Decline 56 mins – “Both major candidates have promised to revive manufacturing jobs. We look at the root causes of its decline, including imports and automation. We explore what it would take to renew this sector, both in the U.S. and in New Hampshire, and identify the challenges in creating manufacturing jobs here in the state. Dean Spiliotes is guest host.” (4 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meatless Future 42 mins – “Today we go to a future where animal products are banned. What are the arguments for and against? How does banning meat impact different cultures? Does it help or hurt the environment? Can you really grow meat in a lab? And is that meat vegan? would really go down.” At the link find the title, “Where’s The Beef? Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation P1 87 mins – “Does the science live up to the hype? Dr. Rck Hecht, the director of research at the UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine looks at the effects of meditation on health and behavior. Recorded on 05/12/2016. (#31006)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation P2 88 mins – “Mindfulness is the practice of maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of one’s thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and environment. Dr. Kevin Barrows, the Director of Mindfulness Programs at the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine and a Clinical Professor at UCSF. explores mind-body medicine, with a special focus on the application of mindfulness practice in health care settings Recorded on 05/19/2016. (#31007)”” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mediterranean Diet 58 mins – “The Zone diet popularized by Dr. Barry Sears was one of the earliest to emphasize the importance of balancing protein, fat and carbohydrate consumption at every meal. Dr. Sears pioneered the idea that the food we eat is more powerful than any drug in controlling the activity of multiple hormones in our bodies. Many studies have pointed to the value of a Mediterranean diet for reducing heart disease, stroke, dementia and other chronic diseases. How does a Mediterranean diet affect inflammation? And what is a real Mediterranean diet? There are lots of countries around the Mediterranean sea, and typical meals and favorite foods vary from one to another. One thing the entire region has in common is a preference for vegetables and fruits rich in phytonutrients that give them strong flavors and bright colors. How do our bodies react to the colors on our plates and the flavors on our tongues? According to Dr. Sears, minimizing white foods (flour, sugar, shortening) as much as we can helps to control blood sugar and reduce inflammation, so long as we pay attention to the Zone way of eating. Find out about the power of polyphenols from plant foods and the importance of omega 3 fats to maintain good health for life. According to Dr. Sears, all we need is to use a hand, an eye and a watch to set ourselves up for success on the Mediterranean Zone. The ratios he mentions on the show are the ratio of triglycerides to HDL cholesterol (<1 is best) and the ratio of arachidonic acid (AA) to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Ideally, says Dr. Sears, AA/EPA is between 1.5 and 2.” At the link find the title, “Show 989: The Mediterranean Zone Diet (Archive), Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files PP-989MedZoneArchive.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Health 87 mins – “Dr. Descartes Li looks at how we understand mental disorders, cultural factors and the criteria used in the DSM-5. Dr. Li is the director of the UCSF Bipolar Program and co-director of the UCSF Electroconvulsive Therapy Service. Recorded on 05/11/2016. (#31000)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mormen Voters 52 mins – “…we’re putting Utah’s voters under the microscope, and we’re particularly curious about what motivates the state’s Mormon electorate. Utah has long been a sure bet for the Republican Party. This year, the party’s presidential candidate is putting Utah’s partisan loyalty to the test. But where does that loyalty come from? What matters most to the state’s electorate? And are voters here really all that different from the average American? A panel of guests will join us, and we hope you will, too.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muslim Misunderstandings 66 mins – “Get inside of Carla Power’s eye-opening story of how she and her longtime friend Sheikh Mohammad Akram Nadwi found a way to confront ugly stereotypes and persistent misperceptions that were cleaving their communities. Their friendship—between a secular American and a madrasa-trained sheikh—had always seemed unlikely, but now they were frustrated and bewildered by the battles being fought in their names. Both knew that a close look at the Quran would reveal a faith that preached peace and not mass murder; respect for women and not oppression. And so they embarked on a year-long journey through the controversial text.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nanotoxicology 26 mins – “Keith & Russ talk with Jason White, from the Department of Analytical Chemistry at the Connecticut Agricultural Experimental Station. White talks about testing the toxicity of nanomaterials against plants. He has found that smaller particles of nanomaterials such as silver tend to be more toxic than larger particles, especially when they begin to accumulate.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nora Ephron 42 mins – ““A Few Words About Breasts,” from May 1972, is Nora Ephron’s comic lament about how her late onset of puberty and earliest sexual experiences gave her a lifelong obsession with her breasts. Jessi Klein, head writer for “Inside Amy Schumer,” joins David Brancaccio to discuss Ephron’s famous Esquire story and its lasting influence on the way women perceive and voice themselves in writing and comedy.” At the link find the title, “A Few Words About Breasts, by Nora Ephron, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13153/4150951/A-Few-Words-About-Breasts-by-Nora-Ephron-repeat.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Production P2 23 mins – “Second of five episodes. Oil is priced down to the penny, and the price changes every day. Who sets that price?” At the link find the title, “Oil #2: The Price Of Oil, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160812 pmoney_podcast081216.mp3” and select “Save LinkAs from the pop-up menu.

Oil Production P3 27 mins – “Third of five episodes. The Planet Money oil faces a test, we sell it, and we meet the man who set off the fracking boom in America.” At the link find the title, “Oil #3: How Fracking Changed the World, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160817 pmoney_podcast081716.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Olympic Game Sites 22 mins – “Despite some headaches, The Rio 2016 Olympic Games appear to be a success so far. But what will happen when the world moves on? Will Rio be dotted with abandoned venues like in Athens? Maybe it’s time for a permanent Olympic Games site?” At the link find the title, “Should the Olympic Games have a permanent venue? Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160817_63453.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Olympic Minds 28 mins – “In Rio athletes from around the world have spent years training and they know that to get gold it’s essential to keep it together mentally in those crucial minutes or even seconds that will make all the difference. In the second of her series on the Olympic Mind, Claudia Hammond is looking at the psychology of losing that edge. Why is it that for athletes at the peak of their performance, sometimes it can all go wrong – very wrong. Just think of the England football team which has on many occasions missed penalties at a crucial time. To find out what happens in the mind at these all-important moments Claudia has been to talk to Professor Geir Jourdet at the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences. He explains how he helps footballers deal with performance stress. Former country cricketer and psychologist Steve Sylvester also talks to Claudia about how he has helped individual sportspeople overcome their fear of failing at key moments. Claudia meets the coaching team at the Norwegian Premier League football club, Lillestrom, as they consider how to use psychology to help them get back to winning matches….” At the link find the title, “Olympic Minds: Football, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p045013p.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Osteoporosis 89 mins – “Age-related bone and joint injuries are increasing as the population ages. Dr. Eric Meinberg looks at managing osteoporosis and its complications and Dr. Paul Toogoodlooks at broken hips and discuses joint replacement. Recorded on 05/31/2016. (#30990)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Planetary Science 14 mins – “’Venus is too hot, Mars is too cold, and Earth is just right,’ says planetary scientist Dave Brain. But why? In this pleasantly humorous talk, Brain explores the fascinating science behind what it takes for a planet to host life — and why humanity may just be in the right place at the right time when it comes to the timeline of life-sustaining planets.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Party Policy 45 mins – “On the eve of the Republican national convention in Cleveland, Aaron Blake of The Washington Post provides an insider’s look at the 2016 elections, with previews of both the GOP and Democratic conventions.” At the link find the title, “Election 2016 Update With The Washington Post’s Aaron Blake, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files IM_20160716.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Trends 48 mins – “[Wall Street Journal] political columnist Kimberley Strassel argues that the left is trying to usurp the political process.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Kimberley Strassel, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.445854.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politics by Fukuyama 65 mins – “Professor Fukuyama presents the keynote lecture of our special August series, Big Solutions for Big Problems. He asks whether our current “vetocracy” has made it easier to stop our government from doing anything than to accomplish something for the common good. Meanwhile, the presidential race has caused a lot of apprehension. The Republican Party has succumbed to Donald Trump’s hostile takeover, and the ultra-insider Hillary Clinton had to face surprisingly strong competition from Vermont socialist Bernie Sanders. Whatever the issue—from immigration to financial reform to trade to stagnating incomes—large numbers of voters from both ends of the spectrum have rejected what they see as a corrupt, self-dealing establishment, and turned instead to radical outsiders in the hopes of a purifying cleanse. But is that what we will be getting?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in America 52 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Department of Sociology, and titled “Foundational Violence: U.S. Settler Colonial Articulation of Racialized and Gendered Citizenship.” Our speaker is Evelyn Nakano Glenn, Graduate School Professor and founding Director of the Center for Race and Gender at the University of California, Berkeley.” At the link right-click the tiny arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racist Book 47 mins – “Historian Charles Dew was born in 1937 and grew up in St. Petersburg, Florida. His parents, along with every white person he knew, believed without question in the inherent inferiority of black Americans and in the need for segregation. In a new memoir, “The Making of a Racist,” he describes what he learned as a child and how he gradually overthrew those beliefs. Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Isabel Wilkerson details the crushing realities of the Jim Crow South from the other side of the color line. In her 2010 book, “The Warmth of Other Suns,” she documents the migration of black families in the 1930s, 40s and 50s in search of better lives in the North and in the West. Charles Dew and Isabel Wilkerson join us to talk about racism in American, then and now.” (2 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Railroad Across Panama 4 mins – “…Typically, a combination steam and sailing ship would leave New York and make the 2000-mile journey to Panama. The overland trip through terrible mosquito infested jungles from Atlantic to Pacific was only 47 miles, but it took the better part of a week. Then another ship made the 3500-mile trip to San Francisco. That 47-mile leg was a huge impediment, and these businessmen set out to replace it with a rail link….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save link As” from the pop-

Right to Die 57 mins – “Andrew Denton addresses the National Press Club in Canberra on the topic of assisted dying.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Andrew Denton, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_Denton_1008_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sand Usage 47 mins – “Sand is essential for modern construction. Almost every new office tower, road and shopping mall being built in Asia’s booming cities is made with concrete mixed with sand. And to get more sand, companies and people are pulling sand out of rivers and oceans at an unprecedented rate, say scientists. And in the deep ocean waters off the U.S., sand is being excavated to restore coastlines from Louisiana to New Jersey. Some estimate that extracting sand is a $70-billion industry. Diane and a panel of guests take a look at the increasing demand for sand, and concerns about the impact of dredging on river and ocean life worldwide.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Satire 36 mins – “In the political turmoil of mid-1990s Britain, a brilliant young comic named Harry Enfield set out to satirize the ideology and politics of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. His parodies became famous. He wrote and performed a vicious sendup of the typical Thatcherite nouveau riche buffoon. People loved it. And what happened? Exactly the opposite of what Enfield hoped would happen. In an age dominated by political comedy, “The Satire Paradox” asks whether laughter and social protest are friends or foes.” At the link right-click “Download” for Episode 10 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Abuse Case 52 mins – “Reporter Tennessee Watson was sexually abused by her gymnastics coach when she was a kid. Over 25 years later, when she learned he still was coaching children, she called the police. Her inside account of the arduous process of seeking justice in her own case exposes discrepancies in prosecutors’ responses to reports of child sexual abuse and spotlights a lack of accountability.” At the link find the title, “Dropped and dismissed: Child sex abuse lost in the system, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files Dropped-and-dismissed_Child-sex-abuse-lost-in-the-system_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Assaults in College 63 mins – “Are the current policies and laws in place regarding sexual assault on college campuses and in the broader community working as intended? The public is in deep public debate over the issue of sexual assault and whether existing standards are fair and meet their intended goals of educating and protecting students and the public-at-large, supporting survivors and holding college and communities accountable. Join INFORUM for a powerful panel discussion about the issue of sexual assault with leaders across the legal, academic, government and advocacy fields who are all playing a pivotal role in shaping how sexual assault is addressed on college campuses and beyond.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment at Fox 49 mins – “In 2005, Gretchen Carlson began working for Fox News. She rose through the ranks to become host of her own show, “The Real Story.” But in June, Fox News declined to renew her contract. A few weeks later, Carlson sued Roger Ailes, alleging the Fox News chief fired her because she refused his sexual advances. Ailes denies the allegations but has since left the network. Since then, more than 20 women have come forward with stories about Ailes sexually harassing them on the job. And investigators are now looking at what other Fox News executives knew about Ailes’s behavior. Diane and guests discuss the case against Roger Ailes and the challenges of confronting sexual harassment in the workplace.” (5 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Sonic Pi 80 mins – “Sam Aaron, the creator of Sonic Pi, explains how he live codes music on the Raspberry Pi, and teaches Leo some simple musical code.” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sports Science 34 mins – “David Epstein talks about his 2013 bestseller The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance and his recent Scientific American article “Magic Blood and Carbon-Fiber Legs at the Brave New Olympics.” At the link find the title, “Big Bang of Body Types: Sports Science at the Olympics and beyond, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Standing in Line 34 mins – “Standing in line represents a particularly sloppy – and frustrating – way for supply and demand to meet. Why haven’t we found a better way to get what we want? Is it possible that we secretly enjoy waiting in line? And might it even be (gulp) good for us?” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startups in Israel 62 mins – “A distinguished panel discusses the impressive contributions the tiny state of Israel (known as the Start Up Nation) has made in finding and sharing solutions to big problems threatening the environment, health and economies throughout the world. In particular, DCG Baer speaks to how the government supports Israeli technology, research and development, as well as assisting other societies, such as California with our drought.” (3 guests) At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stroke Research 28 minsWe’ve sent astronauts into outer space, but travelling to the inner space of the human body still remains the stuff of science fiction – or does it? A unique collaboration between art and science is now taking scientists and stroke patients on an immersive 3D journey inside the human body for an interactive experience designed to help foster research and education.” At the link right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syria-Russia-US 48 mins – “The U.S. under Barack Obama did not want to get too involved in Syria’s civil war. Russia did. Moscow moved in heavy last fall on the side of Syrian leader Bashar al Assad — who Washington said had to go. Now, Syria’s civil war is a kind of U.S.-Russia proxy war. With Cold War echoes, big new wrinkles, and a lot on the line. It’s raging right now in Aleppo. This hour On Point, the stakes. U.S. and Russian proxies, raging in Syria.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the tiny arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Archaeology 48 mins – “’Archaeology is supposed to be fun and interesting and apolitical and those are the reasons I love it, but none of this is now.’ Archaeologists like Jesse Casana have lived and worked on sites throughout Syria for years. He describes his feelings about the fate of friends and colleagues left behind. The excavation at Tell Qarqur that he oversaw before the war has now been bulldozed, but he says, “It seems like a fairly small concern compared to the human tragedy unfolding before our eyes.” Tell Qarqur is not the only monument of archaeological interest that has been destroyed. The statue of an 11th Century Arabic poet, atheist and vegetarian, al-Ma’arri, was decapitated Islamic militants in 2013. And Aleppo, thought to be the oldest city in the world, is now in ruins. Its sights are remembered fondly by the people who lived there including the elegant, 1000 year old mineret of the Great Mosque destroyed in April 2013.” At the link find the title, “The Museum of Lost Objects: Bombed and Bulldozed in Syria, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0456sbr.mp3” and select “Save Link Ass” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorist Security 48 mins – “After the 9/11 attacks, the government re-organized dozens of federal agencies and spent almost a trillion dollars to protect the country from terrorism. In the last 15 years, the overall FBI budget nearly tripled to fund counter-terrorism efforts. Intelligence sharing among federal agencies improved. And airport security was strengthened. But are we safer? With emerging threats of lone-wolf killers inspired by the Islamic State, national security and intelligence experts warn we will never be completely safe. A look at the strengths and weaknesses of homeland security and counter-terrorism today.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Tom Hayden 60 mins – “There are undercurrents of new movements in many countries. When and how does social change arise? On July 3rd, 2008 I recorded this speech by legendary American activist Tom Hayden. The speech was broadcast in Vancouver, but this is it’s first appearance on Radio Ecoshock. I call it “Birth of Movements”. With Trump and Sanders, or new parties in Europe, this 2008 speech by California activist Tom Hayden is important. Hayden was a founder of Students for a Democratic Society in the 60’s, was one of the Chicago Seven, and with his wife Jane Fonda was an early environmental activist. I recorded this speech at the University of British Columbia, following student protests there.” At the link find the title, “Radio Ecoshock: Tom Hayden – Birth of Movements, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files ES_160817_LoFi.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tourism in America 57 mins – “In this episode of BackStory, Peter, Ed and Brian explore the history of American tourism. We’ll hear how asylums and prisons were popular tourist destinations in the 19th century, and how the tiny community of Gettysburg, PA became a tourist town just days after the bloody battle. We’ll also look back on a western mountain resort that catered exclusively to black Americans during the era of segregated travel, and we’ll explore the links between tourism and the development of a national identity.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkish Spring 46 mins – “The failed military coup in Turkey has led to a government crackdown that’s purged more than 60,000 people from their jobs – judges, police, academics, reporters, military members. The Turkish president says he’s simply protecting his country, but US officials say that’s no way for a democracy to react. Meanwhile, Turkey claims a Turk living in exile in Pennsylvania orchestrated the coup and wants him extradited. It all makes for messy international politics.” (4 guests) At the link right-click the tiny arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Unconscious Mind 52 mins – “NPR’s Shankar Vedantam says that in some ways, human behavior is the ultimate frontier of science. After all, there’s a lot we don’t know about why behave the way we do. But if we can get a glimpse at the unconscious patterns that influence us, Vedantam argues we have the potential to make big changes in our lives and our world. Shankar Vedantam is host of the popular podcast Hidden Brain, and Tuesday, he joins us to explain how science and storytelling can improve the human experience. Shankar Vedantam is NPR’s social science correspondent and host of the Hidden Brain podcast. He’s also the author of The Hidden Brain: How Our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars, and Save Our Lives.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Violent Crime in America 60 mins – “Barry Latzer talked about his book The Rise and Fall of Violent Crime in America, in which tracks violent crime in America from the 1960’s through the 21st century and examines the factors behind the surge and downturns in violent crime. He was interviewed by Samuel Bieler of the Urban Institute’s Justice Policy Center. “ At the link you can listen or purchase the file. A copy is also included in the blog archive.

Vitamania 52 mins – “To many people, the term “vitamin” is shorthand for “health,” and so the more vitamins we consume, the healthier we’ll be. But what exactly do the 13 dietary chemicals we call vitamins actually do for our bodies? And how much of each vitamin do we need? The journalist Catherine Price went looking for answers to these basic questions. What she learned undermines much of what we thought we knew about nutrition. She joins us Thursday to talk about our quest for better health through nutrition perfection. Catherine Price has written for numerous publications, including the New York Times, Mother Jones, and Outside. Her book is called Vitamania: Our Obsessive Quest for Nutritional PerfectionAt the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vocational Education 46 mins – “The term “vocational education” has a reputation problem, triggering memories of shop classes and cosmetology courses that led to menial, low-paying jobs. But voc-ed has been re-branded. It’s now “career and technical education,” and supporters say it’s the ideal alternative to crippling college debt and worthless bachelor’s degrees. This is skills-based training for high-quality jobs, from audio engineering to welding to commercial diving. This hour On Point: the case for vocational training, sometimes instead of a college degree.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the tiny arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voice of America 47 mins – “Communicators visits Voice of America and several international broadcasting agencies sponsored by the Broadcasting Board of Governors to learn about their operations and how they create a U.S. message about news to send to other countries.” At the link find the title, “Communicators at Voice of America, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.439248.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Treatment 12 mins – “Our poop and pee have superpowers, but for the most part we don’t harness them. Molly Winter faces down our squeamishness and asks us to see what goes down the toilet as a resource, one that can help fight climate change, spur innovation and even save us money.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Treatment Problems 27 mins – Tackling Lead Contamination: Flint and Beyond (start time: 6:27) When you pour yourself a glass of water from the tap, do wonder whether it’s truly clean and safe? How would you know for sure? Flint, Mich., is a haunting example of how a breakdown in water-supply infrastructure, and political integrity, can result in lead contamination of a city’s tap water. Last year, thanks to the dogged investigation of an environmental engineer from Virginia, all of us nationwide were rattled by the disclosure that Flint residents were drinking poisoned tap water and that their city and federal officials were doing little to disclose the problem, much less tackle it. Since then, lead-poisoning outbreaks have emerged in Portland, Ore., Cleveland, Ohio, and elsewhere. Dr. Marc Edwards is the Virginia Tech professor who led the investigation in Flint, and previous water-contamination probes, most notably in Washington, D.C. He talks with How On Earth host Susan Moran about the public health, political and racial-justice facets of the Flint water crisis, and how many more similar crises around the country can be prevented in the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White House Slaves 59 mins – “Q&A with Jesse Holland Jesse Holland talked about his book, The Invisibles: The Untold Story of African American Slaves in the White House. At the link you can listen or purchase the file. A copy is also included in the blog archive.

Wildlife Photographer 21 mins – “Wildlife filmmaker John Aitchison has made his living watching predators stalk their prey. He joins The Current to talk about the beauty, brutality and inevitability of nature and shares what he’s learned watching for the perfect shot.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: ‘We have an obligation to care for nature,’ says wildlife filmmaker, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160819_32609.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wind Turbines Offshore 5 mins – “Construction on the five-turbine, $250 million project will finish this summer. When the wind farm starts generating power late this year, it will be the first to operate off the coast of the US. As offshore wind gets its start here, project developers have leaned heavily on expertise from Europe, where offshore wind has a 25-year head start….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WW II Tobruk and Stalin 50 mins – “Gen. Auchinleck’s Operation Crusader is finally launched, but Rommel does not react as predicted as his focus is still on taking Tobruk. AND Tsar Nicholas II guides Russia through the Great War. At its end, Stalin is freed.” At the link find the title, “Episode 167-Operation Crusader Part 3 & Episode 168-Stalin and The Great War, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files Ep_168-81416_2.58_PM.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus Research 67 mins – “Dr. Michael Diamond, 2016 Elizabeth O. King Lecturer, has worked for the past two decades investigating how viruses work, with a goal of defining basic principles of pathogenesis and host immune restriction. His talk in this podcast focuses on how his laboratory has studied three emerging mosquito-transmitted viruses (West Nile, Chikungunya, and Zika viruses) of global importance from a basic perspective, and how this information facilitates the development of diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines.” At the link right-click “MP3 Audio Only (65 megs” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 249 – Aug 19, 2016: Abu Ghraib Interrogator, Adopted Child, Afghanistani Refugee, Aging Population, AI for Therapy, Ancient Latin, Animal Welfare Program, Artificial Sweeteners, Athletic Stress, Attorney Fees, Ballot Box Laws, Blindness Onset, Brain Stimulating Drugs, Brain Surgery in Tanzania, Brain Swelling for Research, Brazilian Wealth, Brexit Britain, Canadian Nationalist, Cancer Pioneer, Class in America, Cloud Storage Failure, Darian Gap, David Attenborough, Death Fraud, Decision Making, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, Diamond Auction Failure, Disabled Doctor, Down Syndrome Test, Drought in California, Drought in New Hampshire, Economic Problems for Families, Editorial Cartoonist, Electronics Repairman, Epilepsy, Evilness, Food Hazards, Fracking, Fungal Network, Ghrelin, Green Party, Guns, Harambe Meme, Hurricane Threats, Intelligence Operations, Jello, Judy Blume on Puberty, Justice System Improvement, Kombucha Culture, Koramatsu WWII Case, Losing Aftermath, Machine Learning, Malawi’s Big Charity, Melatonin, Mennonites, Moral Monday, Mug Shot Scam, Obamacare and Same Sex Marriage, Obamacare in Court, Oil Business, Olympic Champions, Olympic Issues, Paleo Doctor, Patty Hearst, Performance Coach, Police Incidents Discussion, Policing the Police, Political Polarization, Productivity, PTSD, Quora Founder, Refugee Life, Religious Minority Freedom, Residential Canadian Schools, Rosenwald Schools, Russian Influence, Salton Sea, Seed Science, Slavery, Statin Pros and Cons, Suicide Story, Surgeon Shortage, Third Political Party, Tornado Aftermath, Tornado Aircraft, Trans Kids, Trans Pacific Partnership, Undercover Work Ethics, Visual Communication, Voting Access Laws, War Medicine, Washboard Bill, Witchcraft Book, Women and Power, Women in Politics, Women’s Entrepreneurship, Yoga History, Zika, Zora Neale Hurston

The 102 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 266 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 1o,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded.

Abu Ghraib Interrogator 60 mins – “Eric Fair talks about his experiences serving as an interrogator at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. He is interviewed by Raha Wala, director of National Security Advocacy for Human Rights First.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Eric Fair, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.438889.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Adopted Child 21 mins – “Phyllis Whitsell’s birth mother was incapable of giving her answers so Whitsell embarked on a journey where only one of them knew the other’s identity.” At the link find the title,”ENCORE: Nurse tracks down birth mother, cares for her without revealing identity. Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160802_78881.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Afghanistan Refugee 20 mins – “Gulwali Passarlay’s mother paid traffickers to get him out of Afghanistan in what became a journey of suffering, abuse and occasional kindness.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: A 12-year-old refugee’s harrowing escape from Afghanistan, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160809_71063.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Population 46 mins – “In an aging nation, what makes an age-friendly community? We look at what U.S. cities can do to help seniors live better.” At the link find the title, “Designing Communities For An Aging America, Aug, 2016”right-click “Media files npr_488393616.mp3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI for Therapy 28 mins – “Now that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs recognizes post-traumatic stress disorder as a significant issue among veterans, they’ve uncovered another problem—there aren’t enough therapists to go around. Virtual reality experts at the University of Southern California have a solution: robots. Reporter Anna Stitt explains how advocates see these “therapy bots” as enhancing the field of therapy; they don’t tire out, they don’t need a salary, and patients are often more honest with them than human therapists. The only problem? Some people are worried that these therapy bots will one day replace humans. Fears of artificial intelligence aren’t new, but they do seem increasingly common. Elon Musk declared that creating artificial intelligence is akin to “summoning the demon.” And Hollywood has done a solid job of convincing us that we’re approaching an age of artificial superintelligence—when machines’ capabilities will greatly exceed those of humans. We turned to philosopher and University of California, Berkeley professor John Searle to get his take on how realistic these concerns are. He says he takes the threat just as seriously as if someone said “shoes have been walked on for centuries. Any day now, they might come out of the closet and walk all over us.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Ancient Latin 24 mins – “A classics scholar is the the first to investigate centuries-old manuals on how to learn Latin, what she reveals about life in the ancient world may surprise you.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Translations of ancient Latin give unique insights into Roman culture, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160803_96492.mp3” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Animal Welfare Program 54 mins- “For those who eat animal products, there is a growing demand for assurances that the animals are treated humanely. Packaging for products like eggs, milk, cheese and meat are replete with phrases like, ‘free range,’ ‘cage free,’ and ‘pasture fed.’ But consumers who do their homework soon learn that those phrases may not mean what we envision, and may not ensure that the animals producing our food are well cared for. Today we’ll be joined by Andrew Gunther of the Animal Welfare Approved -AWA- certification program, whose food labeling standards have been named by Consumer Reports as the only ‘highly meaningful’ food label for farm animal welfare, outdoor access and sustainability. AWA is an independent, nonprofit farm certification program–and one of the nation’s Top 5 fastest growing food label claims. We will also be joined by Sarah Hoffman, founder of Green Dirt Farm, MO who will give us the farmer’s perspective on what it means to enact and maintain the standards of AWA.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Sweeteners 29 mins – “Proponents say they are safe and prevent diseases like diabetes, while critics say they may cause a variety of health problems. With so much conflicting information online, GP and guest reporter, Dr Zeeshan Arain unpacks the science on artificial sweeteners and how they impact or benefit our health….” At the link right-click “download video mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Athletic Stress 25 mins – “Between 1977 and 1987, Edwin Moses won 122 consecutive races in the men’s 400-meter hurdles—including his second Olympic gold—in a streak as fantastic and improbable as Joe DiMaggio’s fifty-six-game hitting streak. In his 1987 interview with Moses, Mark Kram, known for writing penetrating and lyrical boxing profiles, probes the champ’s cool, implacable exterior to discover what kind of person can sustain such excellence—and to measure the toll it took. With the Summer Olympics now under way in Rio, Sports Illustrated veteran Tim Layden joins host David Brancaccio to shed further insight on Moses, an enigmatic star who helped usher in the professionalization of what was previously an amateur sport, and who left a record that remains peerless.” At the link find the title, “Edwin Moses, by Mark Kram, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13153/4122992/Edwin-Moses-by-Mark-Kram.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Attorney Fees 54 mins – “Big Solutions to Big Problems, the 2016 August Forum series at the Club, investigates whether excessive legal fees in class action lawsuits can be reined in without eliminating the incentives needed to prosecute such actions. Schonbrun’s talk will discuss the recent California Supreme Court case, Laffitte v. Robert Half Int’l., Inc., which establishes the rules that courts must follow in awarding reasonable attorneys’ fees from class action settlements.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ballot Box Laws 22 mins – “On Ep. 4 of Amicus, a pre-election special. Dahlia sits down with UC Irvine law professor Rick Hasen, founder of Election Law Blog, to survey the landscape of state voter ID laws. They consider the effect of recent headlines on voters’ confidence in elections, as well as the enduring curiosity of judicial elections in America.” At the link find the title, “Amicus: Ballot-Box Special, Nov 2014,” right-click “Media files SM8544863048.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blindness Onset 50 mins – “Joyce welcomes Janice L. Lehrer-Stein, Member of the National Council on Disability -NCD- to the show. NCD is an independent federal agency that advices the President, Congress and other federal agencies regarding policies, programs, practices and procedures that affect people with disabilities. Ms. Lehrer-Stein will discuss her role as a member of NCD and share how her personal journey with disability led her to become an advocate for all Americans with disabilities.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Stimulating Drugs 44 mins – “If you could take a pill that would enhance your concentration, increase your productivity, and reduce your stress levels, would you do it? Or is that cheating? On today’s show, the science and ethics behind a growing class of so-called “smart-drugs” [first half of program]. Plus, a portrait of bias: in the aftermath of the great depression, the WPA commissioned hundreds of interviews with former slaves and descendants of slaves and recorded their stories as part of the Federal Writer’s Project. However, the circumstances under which the interviews were collected have given researchers pause.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Surgery in Tanzania 43 mins – “From Dr. Dilan Ellegala’s mission to bring life-saving surgery within reach of rural Africans, to a panel about the realities of living trans today… This is The Current with Connie Walker.” At the link find the title, “Full Episode for August 11, 2016 – The Current, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160811_80509.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Swelling for Research 13 mins – “Neuroengineer Ed Boyden wants to know how the tiny biomolecules in our brains generate emotions, thoughts and feelings — and he wants to find the molecular changes that lead to disorders like epilepsy and Alzheimer’s. Rather than magnify these invisible structures with a microscope, he wondered: What if we physically enlarge them and make them easier to see? Learn how the same polymers used to make baby diapers swell could be a key to better understanding our brains.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazilian Wealth 21 mins – “With the games underway, journalist Alex Cuadros explains why Brazil’s ultrarich, or “Brazillionaires,” will be the real winners of this Olympiad.” At the link find the title, “How Brazil’s wealthy benefit from the Rio Olympics, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160808_88274.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Britain 45 mins – “This panel session was part of Brexit Britain, an afternoon of debate and discussion produced by BBC Newsnight in partnership with Intelligence Squared at the Royal Geographical Society in London. In this, the second session of the day, Guardian columnist Owen Jones, Kwasi Kwarteng MP, former Northern Ireland secretary Theresa Villiers, and former advisor to the Chancellor Catherine Macleod, discussed the political fallout of the Brexit vote. The discussion was chaired by Newsnight’s political editor Nick Watt.” At the link find the title, “Brexit Britain – Political Fallout, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 276169445-intelligence2-brexit-britain-political-fallout.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Nationalist 57 mins – “For almost fifty years, Mel Hurtig was a prominent voice in any discussion about the country that he loved. Kathleen Flaherty traced Mel Hurtig’s lifelong quest to shape a Canada that he passionately believed in.” At the link find the title, “Citizen Mel, Part 1 (Encore June 22, 2011), Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160805_80257.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Pioneer 139 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Guest: Harold Varmus – The TWiV team is together in New York City for a conversation with Nobel Laureate Harold Varmus about his remarkable career in science.” At the link right-click “Download TWIV400” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Class in America 20 mins- “Author Nancy Isenberg on her book “White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America” and the roles of race and class in this year’s presidential election.” At the link find the title, “Modern American politics and the Untold History of Class in America, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160802_57626.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cloud Storage Failure 51 mins – “Rachel was a faithful user of a photo storage website called Picturelife, until one day all of her photos disappeared. As she investigated, she realized that every Picturelife user was having the same problem. Alex tries to find out if there’s any hope of getting her photos back.” At the link find the title, “#71 The Picture Taker, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT5679995980.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Darien Gap 47 mins – “The Darién Gap, the lawless jungle between Colombia and Panama. Migrants from around the world risk crossing it to get to the U.S.” At the link find the title, “Stories From The Dangerous Darién Gap, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_488547903.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

David Attenborough 22 mins – “David Attenborough has become a household name. His BBC nature documentaries have taken viewers to every part of the globe, sharing the intimate workings of the natural world. It began in 1979 with Life on Earth, and continued with The Living Planet, The Private Life of Plants, The Life of Birds, The Life of Animals and more. Many will remember his close encounter with mountain gorillas who, had they chosen, could have pulled David apart. Luckily for him and us, they didn’t. Gretchen Miller met David Attenborough in his home in London, as he celebrated his 90th birthday. She was joined by her twelve-year-old son Keir who shares his birthday with David. They reflect on David’s life on Earth, the changes he has observed, and the challenges that confront a world full of people.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death Fraud 43 mins – “Today on the show, a writer explores the greatest escape plan: pseudocide… We’ll hear about the global disappearance industry that plots, facilitates and forges documents for fake deaths – and the investigators who track them down. And from Team Refugee to Superfan Mavis, a rundown of Olympic tweets, memes, and illegal gifs… Including a very photogenic Tongan flagbearer.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Decision Making 53 mins – “Today, I am joined by my friend, Mike Lauria, to interview Gary Klein, PhD. Dr. Klein is a masterful cognitive psychologist. He is known for many groundbreaking works, including: the Recognition-Primed Decision (RPD) model to describe how people actually make decisions in natural settings; a Data/Frame model of sensemaking; a Management by Discovery model of planning to handle wicked problems; and a Triple-Path model of insight. He has also developed several research and application methods: The Critical Decision method and Knowledge Audit for doing cognitive task analysis; the PreMortem method of risk assessment; the ShadowBox method for training cognitive skills. He was instrumental in founding the field of Naturalistic Decision Making.” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals 60 mins – “August marks the fourth anniversary of implementation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Since its launch in 2012, DACA has provided a reprieve from deportation and temporary eligibility to work legally in the United States to more than 700,000 young unauthorized immigrants. And in light of the Supreme Court’s recent decision not to allow a more expansive deferred-action initiative for parents to go forward, DACA remains the only large-scale initiative that offers relief from deportation to unauthorized immigrants. This webinar marked the release of a new Migration Policy Institute issue brief that includes the most current estimates of potential DACA beneficiaries, which were generated using data from the 2014 American Community Survey (ACS) and MPI’s unique assignments of unauthorized status to noncitizens in the data….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diamond Auction Failure 21 mins – “The Lesedi La Rona diamond is the size of a tennis ball that some believed would fetch a record breaking multi-million dollar price at auction, but it didn’t — the story behind its failure to sell.” At the link find the title, “Intrigue and greed: the failed auction of a 1,109 carat diamond, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160805_22202.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Doctor 34 mins – “Jeff Gazzara wasn’t going to let his vision stop him from becoming a physician. Learn how he overcame obstacles and some possible biases on his journey.” At the link right-click “Direct download: PMY194.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Down Syndrome Test 29 mins – “At 81, Lee, a professor of genetics, is still running the lab she and her husband founded more than 50 years ago. Len died in 2013. The lab is a quirky place, even by Stanford standards. … the science that’s done here has changed the course of medicine. …Now, at just 10 weeks into a pregnancy, a whole range of things can be revealed with this test. Not just Down syndrome, but a host of other chromosomal abnormalities as well as the sex of the child to be. Until this test, doctors had to rely on amniocentesis, an invasive procedure that involves– inserting a needle in the womb to sample amniotic fluid, or biopsying the placenta — to tell them with any reliability whether a fetus had a chromosomal abnormality. These tests aren’t just uncomfortable, they come with a risk of miscarriage. By some estimates, in the last five years the number of these procedures performed in this country have plummeted by more than 50 percent….” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought in California 59 mins –California storms and droughts are getting more extreme, according to new research from Stanford examining recent rainfall patterns. The result is a new normal, with fewer average years and more dry times and also more wet times. Other forecasters warn that California might be entering an extended period of drought known as a megadrought. Uncertainty about changing rainfall is a challenge for the state’s water system built on the predictable arrival of snow and rain. What is California doing to prepare for bigger storms and droughts? How can an average person use water more efficiently and think about the water embedded in their food? Join us for a conversation about California’s water future in strangely wet and dry times driven in part by the high-pressure system hanging off the coast called the “ridiculously resilient ridge.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought in New Hampshire 56 mins – “The Granite State is experiencing its worst drought in years, with southeastern New Hampshire most affected.  And despite a little rain lately, dry conditions are expected to continue, affecting farms, fish, private wells, plus increasing fire danger. We’ll get the latest, including response from the state’s drought task force.” (5 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Problems for Families 60 mins – “In an increasingly insecure economy, it’s easy to get bogged down with statistics and lose sight of the human costs of the recession. Stanford sociologist and lead researcher for the book Lean In, Marianne Cooper wants to change that. In her new book, Cut Adrift, Cooper weaves together deep data analysis of our frightening economic condition with real-world stories of families struggling to adjust. Hearing from everyone from suburban soccer moms to those struggling to feed their children, we’re given an intimate look at the challenges facing modern families, and how financial anxiety penetrates the daily lives of those at every socioeconomic level. Whether it’s the wealthy seeking even stronger security or the poor trying to avoid further instability, Cut Adrift gives us a glimpse of changing gender dynamics and how families are coping in a go-it-alone economy. Hear Cooper in conversation with LeanIn.org Founder Sheryl Sandberg, as they unpack the worries all American families face and brainstorm what can be done about it.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Editorial Cartoonist 59 mins – “Editorial cartoonist and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Michael Ramirez talks about his career and his book, [Give Me Liberty or Give Me Obamacare].” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Michael Ramirez, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.424573.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronics Repairman 96 mins – “Louis Rossmann talks to Dave about repair, legislation about repair, the best tools for the repair job and philosophy around business and life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Epilepsy 56 mins – “Joyce welcomes Sam Estes, Co-chair of the Athletes vs. Epilepsy Initiative, a nationwide program for athletes, coaches, volunteers, and fans to raise awareness and funds for the Epilepsy Foundation’s mission to lead the fight to overcome the challenges of living with epilepsy and to accelerate therapies to stop seizures, find cures, and save lives. The program will also include Jerry Kill, Associate Athletic Director Kansas State University, Jeff Klauk, Professional Golfer, and Chanda Gunn, Ice Hockey Olympian.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evilness 69 mins – “The dichotomy between good and evil was popular long before Zoroaster was born, and it will probably continue to be long after Manichaeism’s last influences subside. But is evil a useful concept? Or an obfuscating one? The big solution to this big problem in understanding reality comes from comparing the concepts of good and evil to the less emotionally fraught concepts of hot and cold. They appear to be opposites at first, but are actually relative labels we apply to our experiences that depend both on an objective reality and on the relative perspective of the perceiver. Understanding evil this way vastly reduces the fears that have scared us silly for centuries, and provides a tremendous boost to the effectiveness of our pursuit of happiness—a big solution indeed.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Hazards 55 mins – “This week, Reveal revisits an hour of stories dedicated to food. We take a look at the complicated networks of labor, trade and regulation that carry meat, produce and other products to our tables.” At the link find the title, “[Update] Farm to fork: Uncovering hazards in our food systems, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files Update-Farm-to-fork_Uncovering-hazards-in-our-food-systems_podcast-rev2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking 43 – “We often hear stories about fracking that go like this: a gas company comes to a small town, starts drilling wells, and then terrible things start to happen. People get sick. Water burns from taps. Earthquakes ruin houses. And the climate will soon be destroyed. But, is fracking really a disaster unfolding? To find out, Science Vs speaks to Prof. Robert Jackson, Asst. Prof. Peter Rabinowitz and Prof. Bob Howarth. We’re also joined by Pennsylvanian resident James Hughes and Seneca Resources’ Rob Boulware and Doug Kepler.” At the link find the title, “Fracking, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT2425248954.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fungal Network 34 mins – “A forest can feel like a place of great stillness and quiet. But if you dig a little deeper, there’s a hidden world beneath your feet as busy and complicated as a city at rush hour. In this story, a dog introduces us to a strange creature that burrows beneath forests, building an underground network where deals are made and lives are saved (and lost) in a complex web of friendships, rivalries, and business relations. It’s a network that scientists are only just beginning to untangle and map, and it’s not only turning our understanding of forests upside down, it’s leading some researchers to rethink what it means to be intelligent.…Correction: An earlier version of this story misidentified naturalist David Attenborough as his late brother, actor Richard Attenborough. In addition, it dated the earliest scientific studies of fungi to the late 19th century, whereas naturalists have studied fungi since the 17th century. Lastly, we mistakenly stated that the oxygen that a plant respires comes from CO2, when in reality it comes from water. The audio has been adjusted to correct these facts. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ghrelin 6 mins – “…the chemistry that controls that most basic human desire – hunger, isn’t well understood. One peptide hormone that seems to be involved is Ghrelin, and Martha Henriques investigates….” At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Ghrelin.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Party 12 mins – When Green Party candidate Jill Stein ran for president in 2012, she walked away with .36 percent of the vote. In this election season, she’s found renewed support from voters dissatisfied with both major political parties and Washington as a whole – especially from disillusioned Bernie Sanders supporters. Since June, she’s risen from 2.5 to 3.5 percent in the presidential polls, according to RealClear Politics. The doctor-turned-activist and politician talks with guest host Susan Page about the 2016 presidential race and running as a third-party candidate.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Guns P1 Guns 40 mins – “We find out how many times a year guns are used in self-defense, how many times they’re used to murder someone, and what impact guns have on the crime rate. In this episode we speak with Prof. David Hemenway, Prof. Helen Christensen, Prof. Gary Kleck and New Jersey gun-range owner Anthony Colandro.” At the link find the title, “Gun Control (Pt 2), Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT3321712890.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guns P2 41 mins – “In last week’s episode, we learned that around 30,000 Americans die each year from guns. This week, we examine possible solutions. Do better background checks, buybacks, and gun registration lead to fewer shooting deaths? What happened in Australia after they got rid of all the guns? To find out, we talk to gun shop owner Bob Kostaras, former ATF special agent Mark Jones, Prof. Philip Alpers, and Prof. Peter Squires.” At the link find the title, “Gun Control (Pt 2), Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT7885207373.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Harambe Meme 33 mins – “This week, a Yes Yes No about gorillas, conspiracy theories, and glitter.” At the link find the title, “#72 Dead is Paul, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT8540693922.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Threats 52 mins – “As the country enters the peak of storm season this summer, we want to return to an issue we first talked about earlier this year. What would happen if a major hurricane hit Texas? The state is home to the Houston Ship Channel, one of the world’s busiest maritime waterways. And along the Ship Channel are refineries and chemical plants that make up the nation’s largest refining and petrochemical complex. It’s a pretty major economic hub. In this hour of Reveal, we revisit a story with The Texas Tribune and ProPublica that takes a look at what would happen if a worst-case storm hit the region in the not-so-distant future – a storm that scientists have dubbed “Mighty Ike.” At the link find the title, “[Update] Mighty Ike, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files UpdateMighty-Ike-1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Operations 24 mins – “The former chief spymaster — a leader in America’s intelligence through 9/11, the Iraq war and criticism over torture methods — on “Playing to the Edge.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Inside America’s intelligence with former CIA and NSA director Michael Hayden, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160804_85043.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jello 4 mins – “If you’ve ever boiled meat bones to make stock, you know that what you find in the refrigerator the next morning looks like a giant bowl of jello. That’s because it is. Bones, tendons, cartilage, and other connective tissues are largely made up of a protein called collagen which, when boiled, produces gelatin.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Judy Blume on Puberty 49 mins – “Today on Word of Mouth, a conversation with Judy Blume, recorded live at The Music Hall in Portsmouth for Writers on a New England Stage, a partnership between NHPR, and The Music Hall. Judy Blume was one of the first authors to write frankly about the confusing, and often humiliating transition from childhood to adolescence. Her best known books were published in the 1970s. Are You There God? It’s Me Margaret, Deenie, Blubber, and Forever offered young readers plain language and shame-free stories about periods, bullying, sexual urges and, even “doing it” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Justice System Improvement 66 mins – “Paulette Brown is the first woman of color to become president of the ABA and has been recognized by the National Law Journal as one of the “50 most influential minority lawyers in America.” She has been a municipal court judge, in addition to focusing on all facets of labor and employment litigation. Brown has devoted her presidency to “rebuilding the nation’s confidence in our justice system” by “working to eliminate bias and enhance diversity and inclusion” and offer “tangible, sustainable solutions that will have a positive impact on the perception of our justice system.” Join an important discussion of what’s being done to ensure that the legal system can better represent the under-represented across the United States. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kombucha Culture 44 mins – “If you haven’t tasted kombucha yet, you probably will soon. The sour-sweet, fizzy, fermented tea is becoming ubiquitous in trendy cafes, workplaces, and health food stores across America. Where did it come from, and how did it get so popular? And what in the world is the slimy, beige blob that produces it? From German POWs to Lindsey Lohan to a kombucha zoo at Tufts University, this episode explores the history and science of summer’s hottest drink.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Koramatsu WW II Case 66 mins – “The vulnerability of minority communities has always been a big problem, but it is particularly so when fear exacerbates ignorance. Not long ago, it was Japanese Americans; now it is Muslims. Professor Bannai illuminates this theme through the story of Fred Korematsu, a 22-year-old Oakland welder who refused to comply with orders that led to the incarceration of more than 110,000 people of Japanese ancestry during World War II. In Korematsu v. United States­, the wartime Supreme Court rejected his challenge to the government in one of its most infamous cases. More than 40 years later, Professor Bannai was part of the legal team that successfully challenged Korematsu’s conviction based on proof that the government had falsified the record. For Korematsu’s courage and for his work warning of the dangers of prejudice, President Clinton awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1998.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Losing Aftermath 22 mins – “While everyone is focused on the Olympic winners in Rio, we’re zooming in on loss. We have the story of how a world-champion judo player reacted to a devastating defeat, plus a Stopwatch Science on how losing affects us all.” At the link find the title, “Episode 41: Defeated, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160808 hiddenbrain_losing.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Machine Learning 5 mins – “Machine learning isn’t just for simple tasks like assessing credit risk and sorting mail anymore — today, it’s capable of far more complex applications, like grading essays and diagnosing diseases. With these advances comes an uneasy question: Will a robot do your job in the future?” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malawi’s Big Charity 27 mins – “Inside the secretive world of one of Malawi’s biggest charities – DAPP (Development Aid from People to People). For decades, governments including the US, UK and other European nations have donated many millions of dollars to DAPP for projects ranging from sanitation to teaching. But DAPP has a big secret – it is under the control of a Danish cult-like organisation called the Teachers Group. Simon Cox investigates. *Since uploading this programme the UK’s Department for International Development has suspended payments to DAPP and launched its own investigation*” At the link find the title, “Malawi’s Big Charity Secret, Aug, 2016” right-click “Media files p043bjh4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Melatonin 40 mins – “…Among other indignities that occur as you age, your pineal gland is calcifying, meaning it’s producing less melatonin at night. This is why older adults have a hard time staying asleep — they produce enough melatonin to fall asleep, but not enough to stay asleep throughout the night….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mennonites 36 mins – “A 98-year-old minister takes on his church over the subject of gay marriage—and teaches the rest of us what it means to stand up in protest.” At the link find the title, “Generous Orthodoxy, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files PP6772350337.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moral Monday 27 mins – “The Fourteenth Amendment to the US Constitution declares that anyone born on US soil “and subject to the jurisdiction thereof” is an American citizen. It was intended to give freed slaves guaranteed citizenship in the wake of the 1861-65 Civil War. But today, it also means the children of illegal immigrants to the US automatically become American citizens. This places it right at the heart of the huge controversy over immigration. Adam Smith, historian of 19th Century America, travels to Washington DC and North Carolina to find out.” At the link find the title, “The Battle for the US Constitution, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p043d1r9.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mug Shot Scam 45 mins – “Mugshots are considered to be public record by the American justice system. They’re also a multi-million dollar source of revenue for internet scammers. Today on the show, an investigation of extortionist websites that hold people’s images, and reputations for ransom. Plus, the chancellor of a very unusual school talks about the growing business of cannabis, and a troupe of Muslim women form a B-Girl dance group and show the western world that just because you wear a hijab, doesn’t mean you can’t bust a move.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obamacare and Same Sex Marriage 30 mins – “With the ink barely dry on two momentous Supreme Court decisions affecting marriage equality and health care, Dahlia discusses the history, high points, and likely impact of those decisions with Walter Dellinger, professor of law at Duke University, a Slate contributor, and the former head of the Office of Legal Counsel from 1993 to 1996. First, Dahlia and Walter reflect on Friday’s 5-4 decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, which ruled that same-sex marriage bans are unconstitutional. Next, they talk about Thursday’s 6-3 decision in King v. Burwell, which supported the Affordable Care Act’s subsidies for poor and middle class people….” At the link find the title, “Amicus: The Storm Arrives, Jun, 2015,” right-click “Media files SM9532358639.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obamacare in Court 42 mins – “As the Supreme Court prepares to hear arguments in the latest challenge to the Affordable Care Act — King v. Burwell — Dahlia Lithwick hears from experts on both sides of what could be the most important case in the Court’s entire term. First, she speaks with Jonathan Adler, a law professor at Case Western Reserve University and a one of the lawsuit’s chief architects. Then she hears from Abbe Gluck, a professor at Yale Law School and a co-author of an amicus brief submitted in the case.” At the link find the title, “The Letter of the Law, Feb, 2015,” right-click “Media files SM3721518129.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Business P1 18 mins – “First of five episodes. We’re getting into the oil business. We go to Kansas, and negotiate with a preacher to buy 100 barrels of crude.” At the link find the title, “Oil #1: We Buy Oil, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160810_pmoney_podcast081016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Olympic Champions P1 27 mins – “As the Rio 2016 Olympic Games play out, Claudia Hammond begins a series of three programmes examining the sporting mind. What does it take to become a world champion? Why does it sometimes all go wrong at the peak of an athlete’s career? And what happens to elite sportspeople when it’s all over and retirement looms? The physical abilities of gold medalists are visible for all to see, but we want to know what goes on inside the head of an Olympian. We start at the beginning, with young sportswomen and men, asking how lifetime psychological foundations can best be laid. Today we focus on tennis, a sport requiring considerable mental strength. Claudia travels to the Academia Sánchez-Casal in Spain, where three-time Grand Slam winner, Olympic and Davis Cup champion Andy Murray trained. Here, they offer psychological training to their young players to help them develop the mental strength not only to win, but to lose, or deal with the myriad other challenges involved in taking on a sporting career. Olympic men’s doubles silver medalist and academy founder Sergio Casal takes us on a tour of life as an elite young tennis player, along with sports psychologist Andrea Crosas and players hoping to become champions of the future. Dr Mustafa Sarkar, Senior Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Psychology at Nottingham Trent University, UK, has studied Olympic champions to find out what they attribute their success to. Is developing psychological resilience – along with a good dose of perspective – the key to success?” At the link find the title, “Olympic Minds: Tennis, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0444v0h.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Olympic Issues 29 mins – “If you’ve been tuning into the Olympics in Rio this week, you’ve probably watched your fair share of inspirational profiles of athletes. You may also have been following some of the stories emerging out of Brazil about the corruption, poor environmental stewardship, and social justice transgressions surrounding the Olympics. It’s enough to make the most ardent sports fan a little ambivalent. In Rio, athletes will be swimming or sailing in water that is literally crappy — some athletes may be taking home gold, silver, bronze, or just hepatitis. It may turn out that the more emotional story is not an athlete profile, but one of environmental malfeasance and social injustice — it tugs at the heartstrings, alright, but not in the way that NBC had hoped. This week on Sea Change Radio, we take a deep dive into some of the issues surrounding the thirty-first Olympiad as we are joined by Kate Zerrenner of the Environmental Defense Fund.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paleo Doctor 43 mins – “On this episode of the podcast we have guest Dr. Marc Bubbs ND, CISSN, CSCS. Dr. Bubbs is a board-certified Naturopathic Doctor, Strength Coach, Speaker, Blogger, and Sports Nutrition Lead for the Canadian Men’s Olympic Basketball Team. Join us as we talk nutrition for elite and professional athletes, health, carb tolerance and blood sugar, and more.” At the link right-click “Download Episode Here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patty Hearst 47 mins – “Hearst was abducted in 1974 and then declared allegiance to her captors. Legal expert Jeffrey Toobin does not believe Hearst was brainwashed, but rather, “responded rationally to the circumstances.” At the link find the title, “Aug, 2016 The Wild Saga Of The Kidnapping, Crimes And Trial Of Patty Hearst,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Performance Coach 98 mins – “I’m very pleased to welcome Tony Robbins (@tonyrobbins) back to the show. (You can check out our previous in-depth conversations here: Part 1 and Part 2). For those of you that aren’t familiar, Tony Robbins is the world’s most famous performance coach. He’s advised everyone from Bill Clinton to Mikhail Gorbachev to Serena Williams, and Leonardo DiCaprio to Oprah (who calls him “superhuman”). This time around, we discussed a number of topics we didn’t get to cover in our previous interviews. I also hit him with some new rapid-fire questions. Some of the highlights of our conversation include: Tony’s best investment ever; Quotes he lives by (and how he puts them into action); The worst advice he regularly hears; Why he changed his diet for the first time since age 17” At the link right-click “Media files Tim Ferriss Show, Tony Robbins.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Incidents Discussion 56 mins – “We pick up our recent conversation on race, policing and guns. Deadly encounters this summer between police and African Americans and the targeting of law enforcement by lone attackers have set many communities on edge. We get a Granite State perspective on this turmoil, as well as on efforts to repair a rift that many say has been long in the making.” (4 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Policing the Police 99 mins – “From Minnesota to Baton Rouge, Ferguson, New York and even here in San Francisco, the nation is struggling with an increasing number of incidents where images are captured depicting controversial uses of force by police on predominantly black and brown members of the community. The culture within law enforcement departments from coast to coast is under fire, with seemingly no end in sight. In San Francisco, the Blue Ribbon Panel on Transparency, Accountability, and Fairness in Law Enforcement was established by San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón as an advisory body in May 2015 following revelations that 14 San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) officers had exchanged numerous racist and homophobic text messages. Since then, the fatal officer-involved shootings of Mario Woods, Almicar Lopez, Luis Gongora and Jessica Williams have prompted outrage from the community. The Blue Ribbon Panel is comprised of three distinguished jurists, eight top-tier law firms and five law schools that investigated the SFPD’s use of force, stops, searches and arrests, personnel practices, culture, internal discipline, crime clearance and data, and external oversight. They recently released an extensive report detailing their findings and corresponding recommendations. The Commonwealth Club and GLIDE Center for Social Justice invite you to this important and timely discussion about the recommendations made by the Blue Ribbon Panel, as well as what it will take to achieve true justice and reform in police department culture both here and across the country.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Polarization 21 mins – “The recent Republican and Democratic conventions highlighted the deep divide in America today, but is this political polarization fact or perception?” At the link find the title, “America grapples with deep polarization ahead of election, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160801_97688.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productivity 56 mins – “Want to know how my productivity system works? This is the episode for you. I get questions from you guys every week about what task manager I use, how I keep track of multiple projects, how I organize my schedule, etc. So I thought it’d be fun to do an episode that dives into all of that. Today you’ll learn all the ins and outs of how we use our task manager of choice – Asana – here at College Info Geek. I’ll also explain all of the other systems that work alongside it. As usual, Martin joins me in this conversation, so you’ll also get to hear about how he handles his own personal productivity – there are definitely some key differences, which underlines one of my central beliefs about productivity: Productivity is highly personal. What works for me might not work for Martin, and it might not work for you. However, listening to this exposé on all my systems might give you some new ideas and inspiration to make changes to your own.” At the link right-click “download” at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PTSD 26 mins – “Junger argues it is the experience of returning home, and not the trauma of war, behind PTSD.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: War reporter Sebastian Junger on why peace can be more traumatic for vets than war, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160801_64694.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quora Founder 66 mins – “Adam D’Angelo, CEO of the question and answer website, Quora, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the history, evolution, and challenges of Quora. Along the way they discuss the aggregation of knowledge and the power of experiments for improving the day-to-day performance of the site.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Life 80 min – “We return to Greece with stories of people trying to move on with their lives in whatever way they can. We meet a couple who fell in love even though they weren’t expecting anything like that to happen, and even though her family didn’t approve. We also meet a shopkeeper in a camp who’s running what amounts to a cigarette charity” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Religious Minority Freedom 64 mins – “We are delighted to have Father Thomas Reese to talk about international religious freedom and the persecution of religious minorities around the world. Elizabeth Cassidy, the co-director of policy and research at the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, will be joining us as a discussant during the question-and-answer portion of the conversation. Father Reese is a senior analyst for the National Catholic Reporter, and recently became the chair of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom. Previously he was editor-in-chief of America magazine, and a senior fellow at the Woodstock Theological Center. He is also the author of a trilogy on the organization and politics of the Catholic Church….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Residential Canadian Schools 54 mins – “Lorena Fontaine is completing her PhD at the University of Manitoba and is battling to revive aboriginal languages. She argues that Canadian indigenous communities have a legal right to the survival of language.” At the link find the title, “Ideas from the Trenches – Undoing Linguicide, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160719_31973.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rosenwald Schools 59 mins – “Filmmaker Aviva Kempner discusses her documentary [Rosenwald], about the life of American businessman and philanthropist Julius Rosenwald.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Aviva Kempner, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.424002.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Influence 47 mins – “The U.S.-Russia relationship, this time with evidence that Russia meddled in our election, and with assurances from Trump that Russia would not go into Ukraine.” At the link find the title, “A Russian Intrusion In 2016 Politics, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_488393598.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salton Sea 20 mins – “The largest body of water in California was formed by a mistake. In 1905, the California Development Company accidentally flooded a huge depression in the Sonora Desert, creating an enormous salty lake called the Salton Sea. The water is about twice as salty as the Pacific Ocean. The ground beneath the southern end of the sea is volcanic and water bubbles to the surface in muddy pools. The only fish that can live in Salton Sea are tilapia, but even they struggle to survive.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seed Science 60 mins – “…we’re exploring the world of seeds: how they’ve become so successful, how they work, how humans depend on them, and what we still don’t understand about them. We spend the hour with Thor Hanson, conservation biologist and award-winning author, about his book “The Triumph of Seeds: How Grains, Nuts, Kernels, Pulses, and Pips Conquered the Plant Kingdom and Shaped Human History”. At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery 64 mins – “Ending slavery was a 19th century obsession that appeared quite successful, as did the attempt to end intemperance. But was slavery, like drunkenness, just pushed underground when it was criminalized? The intense psychological desire for hierarchical status, and the economic desires that reinforce that, explain why slavery is as hard to eliminate as other social ills, as is evidenced by the continuing mass incarceration of African-Americans and the endurance of various forms of female slavery. The big solution to this big problem is an easily understood and almost as easily adopted perspective that effectively undermines the psychological need for hierarchy. There are also legal incentives, and technical half-solutions, which could help minimize the demand for enslaving each other in the meantime.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Statin Pros and Cons 59 mins – “…Two Views on Statins: We speak with two experts on statins and heart disease to get to the heart of the matter. They have different perspectives on the value of statins, but their views on what else we should be doing to protect our hearts are not as divergent as you might imagine. Pros and Cons of Statins: Find out about the pros and cons of statins so you can determine if one of these drugs is appropriate for you. In addition to learning about statins and heart disease, you’ll also learn about other approaches you can take to keep your heart as healthy as possible. You’ll also find out how to judge your risk of heart disease through the Reynolds Risk Score that Dr. Nissen recommends or the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Cardiovascular Risk Calculator. He also suggests shared decision-making between doctor and patient to determine when a statin is appropriate. This Week’s Guests: Steven Nissen, MD, is chairman of the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. …David M. Diamond, PhD, is a professor in the Departments of Psychology and Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of South Florida. …The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free for four weeks after the date of broadcast. After that time has passed, digital downloads are available for $2.99….” At the link find the title,”Show 1044: The Truth about Statins and Heart Disease, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files PP-1044StatinsPro-Con.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide Story 47 mins – “Love, death and art. A friend remembers a powerful artist whose life was more than he could bear.” At the link find the title, “Grief And Gratitude After A Friend’s Death, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_488707675.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surgeon Shortage 20 mins – “Neurosurgeon Dr. Dilan Ellegala set about creating a new model to solve the chronic shortage of doctors and surgeons in rural Africa by putting the surgeon’s skills in their hands.” At the link find the title, “How brain surgery with a tree saw led to a rethink of medical aid, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160811_33820.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Third Political Party 56 mins – “Green Party candidate Jill Stein and Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson are gaining attention –boosted by the current penchant for outsiders, as well as dismal popularity ratings for the two major Presidential candidates. But whether this will translate into votes in November remains a question.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tornado Aftermath 35 mins – “This week on the show hosts Sam Bradley and Jamie Davis, the Podmedic are joined by regular guest Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group. We are joined by Penny James, trained in forensic photography for disaster events. In this particular segment, we address her experiences with the Oklahoma City Level F5 Tornado in 1999. Check it out.” At the link find the title,”Forensic Photography in OKC Tornado Event with Penny James, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files DisasterPodcast_20160811.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tornado Aircraft 110 mins – “During his career in the Royal Air Force, Dave Gledhill has been flying as a navigator in the Tornado ADV. After his career he wrote a book about this airplane, and its (not always problem-free) introduction into service with the RAF. In this episode we talk about the airplane, about his flying, about some of the challenges during its development and introduction into service, and how they were overcome to make the F.3 a capable interceptor after all.” At the link right-click Download MP3 File Directly” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Trans Kids 27 mins – “Earlier this year, North Carolina passed HB2, the so-called “bathroom bill.” The law bans anyone from using a public restroom that doesn’t match up with his/her biological sex. HB2 put the state in the middle of a national fight about gender. But North Carolina is also home to one of the few gender clinics for kids in the South, at Duke University’s Children’s Hospital. This week, we spend a day in that gender clinic, the only one in North Carolina. We wanted to know how a clinic like this one operates in this political climate. And we wanted to find out how these patients are coping. Dr. Deanna Adkins, a pediatric endocrinologist, started the clinic a year ago. Over the course of our day, we met three of her very different patients. Drew Adams is a 15-year-old trans man who came with his mom, Erica, all the way from Jacksonville, Florida. On the drive up, Drew wore a T-shirt with “This is What Trans Looks Like” printed on it. He told us he decided to change out of it before he stopped for a bathroom break in North Carolina; he used the men’s room. When Dr. Adkins told Drew that not only would he get a prescription for testosterone, but that he could give himself his first shot that very day, Drew stood up and cheered….” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Pacific Partnership 47 mins – “President Obama makes another strong push for the Trans Pacific Partnership, putting him at odds with Clinton, Trump, maybe you.” At the link find the title, “Global Trade And The Politics Of The TPP Backlash, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_488701784.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undercover Work Ethics 21 mins – “A B.C. Supreme Court judge ruled that John Nuttall and Amanda Korody could not have carried out a bomb plot without help from the RCMP, but how will their overturned conviction impact future terrorism investigations?” At the link find the title, “Police undercover tactics questioned after Canada Day bomb plot conviction overturned, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160803_59293.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Visual Communication 67 mins – “…It’s the 35th anniversary of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellows Program, the so-called “genius grants” that recognize exceptionally creative people who inspire us all. Past MacArthur Grantees include “Hamilton” creator Lin-Manuel Miranda, Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates, choreographer Twyla Tharp and world wide web inventor Tim Berners-Lee. Join us for a fascinating conversation with MacArthur Fellows from the Bay Area about creative problem solving. Cecilia Conrad, managing director of the MacArthur Foundation, will talk with computer vision technologist Maneesh Agrawala and digital artist Camille Utterback. Mr. Agrawala is a computer scientist designing visual interfaces that enhance our ability to understand large quantities of complex information. Ms.Utterback is an artist who uses digital technologies to create visually arresting works that redefine how viewers experience and interact with art. Ms. Conrad will also discuss 100&Change, MacArthur’s new competition for a single $100 million grant to solve a critical problem of our time.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Access Laws  46 mins – “One after another after another, voting laws nationwide that many people claimed were racially discriminatory are being struck down. Federal courts have ruled the laws were designed to make it harder for minorities to vote through tactics like requiring photo IDs or limiting early voting. But critics say some of these were common-sense reforms. This hour On Point, the legacy of race at the polls, and how much oversight is still needed to make sure everyone gets the right to vote.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Access Laws  46 mins – “Voter restriction laws struck down in North Carolina, Wisconsin and Texas. We’ll look at the battle over voting rights around the country.” At the link find the title, “Widespread Judicial Action On National Voting Laws, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_488547867.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Medicine  27 mins – “ …From dealing with blood loss to extraordinary advances in facial reconstructive surgery, conflicts like World War I have driven technological innovation. …On 1st July 1916 alone, there were 58,000 British casualties. The need for speedy and effective evacuation and treatment for the injured on the frontline was urgent. But the narrow trenches on the edges of the battlefields made it very difficult to carry the wounded to field hospitals. …a special stretcher – which could be adjusted to turn round tight corners – was used in the muddy trenches. …Many of the fields of battle were covered in animal manure and infection was a risk to injured soldiers. Anti-tetanus serum was given and antiseptic used to help keep wounds clean. Gadgets such as the Carrel Dakin apparatus were used to deliver antiseptic solution directly and continuously into a wound – via tiny rubber tubes. …When the Germans first started to use poison gas as a weapon, British physiologist John Scott Haldane – famous for bold self-experimentation – went to the frontline to try and identify the gases used. …A number of gases were used as weapons – chlorine gas on its own or mixed with phosgene, and later mustard gas caused severe blistering to the body. Doctors used paraffin to treat the blisters. …today some victims of gunshot wounds are far from the battlefield. In countries like Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of India and Latin America, so-called “celebratory” gunfire involves firing weapons up into the air in order to mark a positive event. They’re often considered to be a harmless show of strength or bravado, but Hugo Goodridge reports from the Lebanese capital Beirut, where a number of people have been killed or injured by guns fired in the city. It is illegal to discharge a gun in a public place in Lebanon and the police have used social media to try and change attitudes towards celebratory gunfire…. ” At the link find the title, “How War and Conflict Have Helped to Improve Medical Treatments, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03zx0vy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Washboard Bill 58 mins – “…Washboard Bill was born in Dupont, Florida on July 4, 1905. He was known as a percussionist, rooted in the minstrel tradition, as well as a captivating storyteller. During much of Cooke’s childhood, his mother operated a juke joint in Dupont. The young Cooke would secretly stay up past his bedtime listening to the music emanating from his mother’s establishment. These experiences shaped Cooke’s interest in music, and in his later life, would greatly influence his rhythmic style. At age six, Cooke began working for a local sawmill, making .25 cents per day, after his mother fell on hard financial times. In 1916, Mrs. Cooke closed her juke joint, and sent her children to live on their grandfather’s farm in Sanford, Florida. As times grew tougher and the Great Depression set in, Cooke grew weary of his life on the farm, and decided to leave home. For 10 years, he led the life of a hobo, traveling by train all over the East Coast. Although Cooke spent the majority of his younger years traveling outside of Florida, he still maintained a connection with the state, generally spending his winters in West Palm Beach. Between 1947 and 1963, he performed with a group called the West Palm Beach Washboard Band. They played in venues everywhere from the streets, to the estates of the Rockefellers and Kennedys. In 1956, he recorded Washboard Country Band with Sonny Terry, and folk legend, Pete Seeger. Cooke moved to West Palm Beach permanently in 1973. He performed in Florida, and throughout the country, until his death in 2003. For his musical and historical contributions, Cooke received the Florida Folk Heritage Award in 1992. In 1988, Cooke recited a personal narrative, A Hobo’s Birthday, for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education Project, conducted by the Florida Folklife Program. Cooke’s story offers a fascinating account of life as a hobo during the Great Depression. His travels and experiences give the listener a vivid portrayal of transient life on the railroad tracks, and of the character Washboard Bill.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Witchcraft Book 57 mins – “Our ideas about witches and witch hunts may come from a manuscript found in the University of Alberta Library. It’s one of only four known copies. Written in the 1400s and now being re-translated from medieval French.” At the link find the title, “Tinctor’s Foul Manual (Encore May 13, 2013), Aug, 2016, right-click “Media files ideas_20160802_58939.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women and Power 47 mins – “The new film “Equity” looks at the lives of women on Wall Street, who navigate a world of men in pursuit of power and money. We talk with director Meera Menon.” At the link find the title, “’Equity’ And Women On Wall Street, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_488864814.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Politics 60 mins – “Hillary Clinton moved a giant step closer to becoming the first woman elected President of the United States when she accepted the Democratic nomination at the party’s convention in Philadelphia. Clinton stands on the shoulders of generations of women who fought for the right to vote. On this episode of BackStory, we look at the different ways women have influenced American politics, including: The bread riots by Confederate soldiers’ wives. The 1913 Women’s Suffrage Parade in Washington, D.C. Shirley Chisholm’s historic 1972 presidential campaign.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women’s Entrepreneurship 58 mins – “Jane Nelson and Sarah Thorn will discuss strategies to grow women’s entrepreneurship worldwide, with a particular emphasis on the role of the private sector. They will address the importance of public-private partnerships to train female entrepreneurs and facilitate the integration of women-owned businesses into global supply chains. This meeting is part of a high-level series on women and development, generously sponsored by the ExxonMobil Foundation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yoga History 41 mins – “This week, we found many surprising twists, turns, and holds in the story of modern yoga.” At the link find the title, “#18 Yoga, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT5545485653.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Cases 19 mins – “The CBC’s Dr. Brian Goldman travels to the front lines to meet the families affected by the Zika virus, the doctors trying to help and those trying to stop it.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Zika’s Ground Zero: Brazil hits 4,000 suspected Zika-related cases of birth defects, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160805_85952.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika in US 47 mins – “Over the last two years, the Zika virus has infected more than one million people, most of them in Latin America. Carried by mosquitos, the virus can be transmitted by a pregnant woman to her fetus, leading to possible birth defects. Zika is now found in 30 U.S. states. On Monday, the CDC warned pregnant women and their partners not to travel to a Miami neighborhood where 14 cases have been diagnosed. The new Zika infections are considered “locally grown” and came even after aggressive mosquito control efforts. Diane and guests discuss the spread of Zika in a South Florida neighborhood, how officials are responding and what it means for the rest of the country.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Zika in US 52 mins – “The Zika virus already has spread swiftly across the island territory of Puerto Rico. And now, Miami is reporting its first cases in people infected by local mosquitoes. This week, Reveal takes us to the front lines of the battle against the disease.” AT the link find the title, “From A to Zika, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files From-A-to-Zika_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zora Neale Hurston 39 mins – “Zora Neale Hurston was an African-American novelist and accomplished anthropologist whose rich literary work has inspired generations of readers. By 1938, she had already published Jonah’s Gourd Vine, Mules and Menand Their Eyes Were Watching God. Despite her reputation as a writer, there exists another side to Hurston’s career. In 1938 and 1939, during the Great Depression, Hurston worked as a folklorist and contributor to the Florida division of the Federal Writers’ Project (FWP), part of the Works Progress Administration (WPA). Through her work with the FWP, Hurston captured stories, songs, traditions and histories from African-Americans in small communities across Florida, whose stories often failed to make it into the histories of that time period. The Works Progress Administration — after 1939, the Works Projects Administration — was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Franklin Roosevelt administration. It had employed over 8.5 million people by its demise in 1943. One of its programs was the (FWP), which included a folklore section. The staff conducted fieldwork and recorded songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. In 1939, Hurston went to a turpentine camp near Cross City in Dixie County, Florida, to find candidates for recording interviews, songs and life histories of interesting everyday people. Hurston’s essay, “Turpentine,” traced her travels through the pine forests with an African-American “woods rider” named John McFarlin. Her work on Florida’s turpentine camps is still considered authoritative. Back in Jacksonville, Hurston’s final major contribution to the Florida FWP was to arrange a recording session at the Clara White Mission. The African-American participants told stories and sang or chanted traditional music. Hurston also sang 18 songs herself, mostly work songs and folk songs.” At the link right-click Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 248 – Aug 12, 2016: Adoptions, Amputations, Anger Discussion, Attachment Parenting, Blind Author, Blindness Treatment, Bluberry Value, Bone and Joint Injuries, Brazil During the Olympics, Carbon Foam Bread, Chemical Engineer Interview, Chocolate History, Class in America, Clean Economy Agreement, College Life, Comic Book business, Consciousness, Cooperating People, Creativity, Democracy Debate, Dental Anesthesia, Diabetes Control, Diarrhea in Combat, Digital Addiction, Disaster Equipment, Drones for Inspection Work, Drug Access, Eating Habits, Ebola Voices, Education Curricula, Eleanor Amplified, Election Reform, Electric Car Discussion, Emotional Incest, Extinction Reversal, Farm to Table, Female President, First Nations Doctor, fMRIs of Brains, Food Politics, Genes Explained, Genetic Operations, Genetic Wizardry, Government Transformation, Graffiti, Graph Theory, Great Bear Rainforest, Handicapped Journey, Helping Children Succeed, High Voltage Engineer, Hip Hop for Clean Energy, Hiring for Top Firms, Homeland Security History, Homeless in New Hampshire, India Classics, Indian Farmer Suicides, Internet History and Security, Investing in Value Stocks, ISIS Impact, Junipero Serra, Knowledge Structure, Machiavelli Advice, Mariachi Women, Marijuana, Martial Arts, MCAT Course, Memphis Sound, Michael K Williams, Minimalist life, Nootropic Drugs, People Stories, Physics Professor, Pig Farming, Play Doh Invention, Pokemon Go, Protectionism in the US, Refugee Camps in Greece, Richard Dawkins, Roger Ailes, Rogue Justice, Science Value, Segregational Custody, Sewing Robot, Sound Engineer, Sports Business, Stings and Stingers, Stress Concepts, Supreme Court Role, Syrian Library, Taurine, Toyota Accelerator Scandal, Universe Intro, Ursula Franklin Tribute, Voting Rights Act, Walking in Cities, Welfare Reform, Wildfire Control Lessons, WW II Science, Yoga for Bones

The 161 podcasts where you can hear the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 332 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 1o,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded.

Adoptions 56 mins – “It was decades ago that adoption became a more open arrangement. Rather than no contact whatsoever and a secretive approach, birth and adoptive parents began communicating both before and after the adoption. Now there are all sorts of variations — from exchanging occasional letters and pictures to more frequent contact. Still, it can be a difficult decision that raises boundary issues, among others. In New Hampshire, the tendency has been toward more minimal involvement. We’ll look at this and other recent trends in adoption, including the rise of single parenting.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amputations 83 mins – “There are over 185,000 limb amputations per year and over 1.9 million people living with limb loss. Dr. Lisa Pascual looks at preventing limb loss and at pre and post surgery care in the case of amputation. Then, Certified Prosthetist Orthotists Aarti Deshpande and Hanna Dollard look at modern prosthetics and new advancements. Recorded on 06/07/2016. (#30991)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anger Discussion P1 50 mins – “On Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, Justice (2016). What role should we allow anger to play in our public life? Should systems of punishment be strictly impartial, or should they be retributive, i.e., expressive of public anger? Nussbaum thinks that anger necessarily involves the desire for payback, and that this is nearly always unhelpful. We should instead use anger (or rather, change it into “transition anger”) to look toward the future and prevent future harm. Whether in personal relationships, dealings with acquaintances, or in setting policy, anger as desire for payback tends only to further exacerbate bad situations. And “transactional forgiveness,” i.e., debasing someone and making them jump through hoops before you accept an apology, is a historical relic that also just expresses hostility. But what about social justice—can anger help us focus on achieving that? Doesn’t punishment need to express our collective anger against undesirable behaviors and those who perform them? Nussbaum is an engaging and provocative speaker, and Mark, Wes, and Dylan were happy to get to talk with her. Here’s the Huffington Post article she wrote on sexual assault that she mentions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Attachment Parenting 27 mins – “[Starts at 10 mins] Alex Blumberg interviews Wendy Zukerman, host of Gimlet Media’s newest show, Science Vs. Hear how Wendy found her way to Gimlet and enjoy the first half of the latest episode: Science Vs Attachment Parenting.” At the link find the title, “BONUS – Introducing Science Vs, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT6849433183.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Author 52 mins – “Laurie Rubin has been blind since birth, and she says people imagine her world to be a dark place. But the accomplished mezzo-soprano and lyricist experiences color all around her. She says yellow is an afternoon when birds are singing; green is her backyard; blue is an early morning or the key of G. Rubin is performing in Park City this weekend, and Thursday, she joins Doug to talk about growing up blind, learning to navigate the world, and dreaming in color. Laurie Rubin is a mezzo-soprano and has sung on stages around the world from Carnegie Hall and The Kennedy Center to Rome’s Parcol Auditorium della Musica and London’s Wigmore Hall. She’s Co-Artistic Director and Co-Founder of the performing arts program Ohana Arts in Hawaii. Her memoir is called Do You Dream in Color?” At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blindness Treatment 2 mins – “Gene therapy could help prevent blindness.” At the link find the title, “Episode 673 – August 04 2016,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_Aug4_2016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blueberry Value 42 mins – “ Are you what you eat? When it comes to your brain, the answer is a resounding yes. One brain-friendly food to add to your shopping list: blueberries. In episode 139, Dr. Robert Krikorian, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Director of the Division of Psychology at the University of Cincinnati, talks to Jesse about why you should eat blueberries to improve memory. The Benefits of Blueberries – There’s been plenty of talk in the media about how blueberries are the new superfood. We’re always hesitant to buy into this kind of hype (remember how margarine used to be “healthy” and eggs were horrible for you?). But in the case of blueberries, the science backs up the hype. Blueberries improve long-term memory (retention of information over time), access to words and concepts (crucial for dementia or Alzheimer’s sufferers), and short-term memory (aka working memory). They reverse loss of balance and coordination in older rats. The benefits aren’t confined to older people, though. One study found that blueberry juice improved memory and concentration in children. And if you’re worried about consuming too much sugar from fruit, blueberries even lower blood glucose levels. For more, check out Dr. Krikorian’s latest research on blueberries.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bone and Joint Injuries 59 mins – “Trauma injuries affect millions in the the global community every year. Hear from orthopoaedic surgeons who lead surgical missions and use the power of surgical education to save limbs and save lives in the developing world. Recorded on 06/14/2016. (#30992)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazil During the Olympics 58 mins – “Laurie Garrett, CFR Senior Fellow for Global Health, Shannon K. O’Neil, CFR Nelson and David Rockefeller Senior Fellow for Latin America Studies and Director of the Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program, and Neil Shearing, Chief Emerging Markets Economist, Capital Economic Ltd, discuss the issues facing Brazil as the country prepares to host the 2016 Summer Olympics. The experts examine the implications of Dilma Rousseff’s impeachment trial and Brazil’s deepening economic recession for the country’s future.  They also discuss the health concerns, including the Zika virus and widespread water pollution, that confront Brazil as the Olympic Games begin.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Foam Bread 2 mins – “Super-toasted bread used to create eco-friendly carbon foam.” At the link find the title, “Episode 671 – August 01 2016,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_Aug1_2016.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chemical Engineer Interview 64 mins – “Chris Welch joins Adam, Brian, Carmen, and Jeff to talk about the field of chemical engineering.Jeff believes in unicorns, even though he’s never seen one! From his childhood, Jeff recalls watching a DuPont film about “Better Living Through Chemistry.” Our guest for this episode is Chris Welch, a chemical engineer from New Brunswick, Canada, who works in the water treatment industry. Branches of chemistry include (but are not limited to): physical chemistry, organic chemistry, and analytic chemistry.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chocolate History 4 mins – “For many people, there’s nothing quite as satisfying as biting into good quality chocolate. The sweetness. The subtle smoothness as it melts on the tongue. But that’s not the way we find it in nature. A lot of processing takes place first. And one of the most important breakthroughs in making chocolate occurred in 1879 in Bern, Switzerland….” At the link right-click Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Class in America’s 52 mins – “We like to think of America as a class-free society where anyone who works hard can achieve economic success. Historian Nancy Isenberg says it’s a promise as old as our nation, and that it’s always been a myth. She argues that landowners and the elite have only valued the poor for their labor – while describing them as vagrants, crackers, squatters, and rednecks. Isenberg joins us Tuesday to trace what she calls the 400-year untold history of class in America. Her book is called White Trash. Nancy Isenberg is the T. Harry Williams Professor in American History at Louisiana State University. Among her books are Fallen Founder: The Life of Aaron Burr and her latest White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clean Economy Agreement 30 mins – “What would it take for North America to really reduce pollution? At a minimum, Canada, the U.S., and Mexico would have to jointly commit to increasing renewable energy sources and eliminating fossil fuel subsidies. Fortunately, these three nations just signed onto the North American Clean Economy Agreement, which includes these commitments and many others aimed at improving the environment. Author and sustainability consultant Andrew Winston joins us today on Sea Change Radio to explain the ins and outs of the agreement. Winston and host Alex Wise discuss its importance, dissect the specific pledges made by the three countries, and look at what steps must be taken to achieve the goals listed in this unprecedented agreement.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Life Q and A 68 mins – “It’s high… time we answered some of your questions again! (And, technically, it’s also high noon somewhere.) In today’s 5 Questions episode, we’ll be analyzing several different perplexing conundrums, including challenging ourselves to use more than five 3-syllable words in a row. Just kidding – though, if you’re keeping score, I just got seven.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comic Book Business 13 mins – “Comic books – and graphic novels, their book trade cousins – are no laughing matter. The characters between these covers are usually troubled souls, and the situations they confront range from disturbing to dire. The scenario for the comic book business is anything but dire, however. According to a recently published report on the North American market, sales in 2015 topped $1 billion for the first time. What makes comics sales pop? It’s a convergence of factors that have reshaped the marketplace in recent years, says Calvin Reid, Publishers Weekly senior news editor and PW Comics World co-editor. “We’ve seen the mainstreaming of comics publishing and comics reading,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. At the same time, “the market has expanded beyond the superhero genre. It’s also owing to the power of librarians. And at the end of the day, we’re seeing the evolution and the development of comics industry as part of the book trade.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness 40 mins – “Ever since Descartes famously split the world into “mind” and “‘matter”, the debate amongst philosophers and thinkers about conscious experience has raged. And with recent advances in brain imaging technologies, scientists now offer a new and exciting viewpoint on this quintessential human phenomenon. But are we any closer to revealing the mechanisms behind it? And can science offer anything other than objective measures? Under the watchful gaze of the cognitive neuroscientist Professor Anil Seth, Ian and Nicola delve into the murky world of consciousness in an attempt to unravel its mysteries. Along the way we meet UCL’s Dr Steve Fleming and Professor Christof Koch from the Allen Institute for Brain Science, to hear how experimental practice and theory are tackling this problem head on.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cooperating People 46 mins – “Humans – homo sapiens – rule the world.  For better or worse, some might say. My guest today looks at how that happened – why – and where we’re headed next.  It’s us and not others, he says, because of our affinity for myth-making and stories. We buy into big ideas that bind us together and have given us power. Religion. Money. Nation states. Now that power may threaten the planet. But evolution isn’t over. Homo sapiens may be in their last few hundred years, he says. Ready to merge with machines. This hour On Point, historian Yuval Noah Harari on the rise and maybe end of us, homo sapiens.“ At the link right-click the small cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity 15 mins – “What comes to mind when you hear the word “creativity”? A painter toiling away at a canvas into the wee hours of the morning? A composer spending hours on a new piece until it’s perfect? Or maybe an actor bringing an audience to tears with the right word said at just the right time? What about that final project you have due for your Intro to Anthropology class? I don’t know about you, but if you’d asked me a couple years ago if creativity had anything to do with course work, I probably would have said something like, “Well, sure, but only if you have a creative major like art, creative writing, music, drama, or dance.” What I’ve realized lately, however, is that my assumptions were all wrong. Creativity absolutely has a place in your studies, no matter what your major is. To excel at college-level work, you have to think creatively. That’s why in today’s post I’m going to break down what exactly creativity is, how you can practice it, and how you can apply it to your studies.” At the link find the title,”Cultivate Creativity to Study Better and Dominate Assignments (Narration), Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 43624.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Debate 46 mins – “Democracy is the worst form of government except all the others that have been tried. So said Winston Churchill and who would disagree? One man, one vote, the rule of law, equality and a free press. These are the principles which tens of thousands have been imprisoned or lost their lives for in despotic regimes from South America to Burma. But is the assumption that democracy always leads to a freer and more tolerant society correct? Many would argue that it can lead to quite illiberal outcomes especially where there is profound ethnic division. What if democracy were installed in Syria? It’s not hard to imagine what would happen to the minority groups who have enjoyed the protection of Assad’s regime. There have been successful transitions to democracy in post- war Germany and Japan, but free elections in countries such as Iraq and Egypt have not brought peace and prosperity. In this debate, from March 2014, Rosemary Hollis, Professor of Middle East Studies at City University, and Martin Jacques, academic and acclaimed author of ‘When China Rules the World’, proposed the motion. Opposing them were American political scientist Ian Bremmer and eminent Ukrainian MP Andriy Shevchenko.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dental Anesthesia 60 mins – “One of the best ways to build your practice is to become known by your patients and by people in your community as the ‘Painless, On Time Dentist’. In this Thriving Dentist Show interview Gary interviews Dr. Dan Davidian on specific tips that will help you deliver painless injections that will also improve your office efficiency. In this Show, Gary and Dan discuss; what motivated Dan to develop the Anutra Local Anesthetic Delivery System, The family connection and how his Dad inspired the development of this system, the history of local anesthetic from whiskey to cocaine to lidocaine, the science of buffering, what buffering is doing and the benefits provided by buffering, how he gained FDA approval for the one handed feedback aspiration syringe and how buffered anesthetic has changed Dan’s practice. You will enjoy learning the science of buffered anesthetic and Dan’s passion for helping patients enjoy a comfortable injection. “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diabetes Control 57 mins – “On this important episode we have guest Dr. Mark Cucuzzella. Dr. Cucuzzella is a Professor of medicine at West Virginia University medical school, Fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), family physician for over 20 years, Lt Col in the US Air Force Reserves, and an avid runner and running coach. Listen in as we discuss Dr. Cucuzzella’s experience in treating diabetes. Link to The Skinny on Obesity video mentioned in the podcast http://www.uctv.tv/skinny-on-obesity/. At the link right-click “Download Episode Here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diarrhea in Combat 37 mins – “Best-selling science writer Mary Roach talks about her latest book Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.” At the link find the title, “The Science of Soldiering: Mary Roach’s Grunt, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files podcast.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Addiction 48 mins – “The obsessive use of digital technology is a real problem for many teens and children, say parents and therapists. A recent study by Common Sense Media, a parent advocacy group, found that 59 percent of parents think their teens are “addicted” to mobile devices. A growing number of psychologists specialize in treating young people who use digital technology obsessively— some even to the point of not eating or sleeping. Yet the term “internet addiction” is controversial and not officially recognized as a mental disorder. Guest host Derek McGinty and a panel of guests discuss therapies designed to treat compulsive web use among young people—and what parents and teens should know.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Disaster Equipment 46 mins -”This is part two of a special double episode on wilderness EMS is full of great tips and discussion on what austere wilderness medicine has to teach every responder. Make sure you catch part one of this episode in last week’s show at DisasterPodcast.com. Host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and his co-host Sam Bradley are joined by a group of wilderness EMS experts to talk about this topic. This week on part two of the special wilderness EMS epsidoe, we have a group of excellent panelists on the subject of wilderness EMS as it relates to what the Urban medic can take from it. We have Kevin Reiter from WildSafety.com, Dr. Seth Hawkins from Hawk Ventures which supports a wide range of Wilderness EMS programs, including the flagship Carolina Wilderness EMS Externship program. also joining us is Dr. Ben Abo, DO, MPH an ER Doc and Wilderness EMS specialist, and paramedic David Fifer, NRP who is a wilderness search and rescue specialist with RedSTAR Wilderness Response Team, which lives online at redstarmedical.org.. We also have the regular Disaster podcast guest USAR doc, Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drones for Inspection Work 12 mins – “Unmanned aerial cameras – drones – are becoming a standard part of the infrastructure management toolkit. They are particularly useful for inspecting widely dispersed facilities in areas than can be difficult to navigate on the ground. Although there are important flight restrictions that preclude operations over populated areas, there is a growing set of applications in surveillance and inspection for large-scale infrastructure systems. In this discussion, Kevin Lewis of the Denver Department of Public Works describes the merits of using an off-the-shelf quadcopter drone to inspect critical flood control structures.” At the link right-clickListen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Access 50 mins – “The Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine and the Academy bring together patients, regulators, manufacturers, journalists, and experts to debate the difficult ethical issues surrounding “compassionate use” of pre-approved medicines.” At the link find the title, “Bioethics Meets R&D: The Ethics of Pre-approval Access, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 160602_bioethics.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eating Habits P1 27 mins – “Back by popular demand, this two-part Catalyst special investigates whether food could actually be our medicine? Unbeknownst to most of us, we each carry about 1.5 kg of bacteria – that’s trillions of tiny microbes that contribute 100 times as many genes as our genomes do. Scientists are now beginning to discover just how crucial these microscopic creatures are to our overall health … and what they’re learning is shaking the very foundations of medicine and nutrition.“ At the ink right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eating Habits P2 27 mins – “Could our food be making us sick – very sick? In the second episode of this two-part special, Dr Graham Phillips reveals new research about the interplay between food and the bacteria deep within our guts. This program was originally broadcast in 2014 but is back by popular demand.” At the ink right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Voices 49 mins – “Radio producer Penny Boreham and Sierra Leonean storyteller, Usifu Jalloh, travel from the UK to Kailahun district, the remote eastern area of Sierra Leone bordering Guinea and Liberia, to meet the children they have been working with remotely in a radio project.” At the link find the title, “Ebola Voices, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0428qkm.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Curricula 44 mins – “Increasing numbers of internationally branded schools serving local [rather than predominantly expatriate] populations and Ministries of Education engaged in educational reform, are adopting what they perceive as international best practice. This raises a number of questions and issues explored in this lecture. Is there such a thing as international best practice? Does globalization imply the need for a common curriculum and pedagogy in order to prepare students for the modern world? Should curriculum be about cultural transmission or transformation? A few principles and practices that might be helpful in building a curriculum that respects local and global realities are considered. Change, which is both desirable and inevitable, needs to be evolutionary and grounded in an understanding of local context and culture if it is to lead to beneficial outcomes. One curriculum prescription does not suit all.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eleanor Amplified 6 12 mins – “Our nation’s capital: come for the museums, stay for the intrigue… “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Election Reform 44 mins – “We Americans may love our democracy — at least in theory — but at the moment our feelings toward the federal government lie somewhere between disdain and hatred. Which electoral and political ideas should be killed off to make way for a saner system?” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Car Discussion 77 mins – “…One of the currently available electric hybrids is the Cheverolt Volt. Adam notes the Volt’s drive arrangement is similar to that of a diesel electric locomotive. Electric vehicles were first invented back in the mid-19th century. Although gas vehicles were less popular than either steam or electric vehicles in 1900, the gas engine was clearly established as the market leader by the 1930s. At one point, Ford suggested it might build a nuclear-powered passenger vehicle, the Ford Nucleon. General Motor’s entry in the electric vehicle field, the EV1, was made famous by the 2006 documentary Who Killed the Electric Car? Although not a “pure” electric vehicle, the Toyota Prius has been a popular electric hybrid. The first highway-capable electric vehicle mass produced for sale in the United States was the Tesla Roadster. Smaller gas pump nozzle diameters were introduced as automobiles transitioned from leaded to unleaded gas. Differing interfaces exist for charging electric vehicles. A common connector for charging electrical vehicles in North America is defined by the SAE 1772 standard. Tesla is building its Gigafactory 1 to produce lithium-ion batteries in high volume. A recent death in an auto-piloted Tesla will challenge the emerging self-driving vehicle industry. Some states are levying “green car” taxes to make up for lost gas tax revenues. Tesla has recently purchased solar power provider SolarCity. The U.S. Department of Energy provides a webpage that estimates emissions, on a state-by-state basis, for the electrical power used to operate electric and hybrid vehicles….” At the link find the title, “Episode 114 — Driven Electrons, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files TheEngineeringCommons-0114-DrivenElectrons.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emotional Incest 24 mins – “Neil Strauss was a music journalist when he turned an assignment on pickup artists into a book. The Game was wildly popular, even considered a bible for how to pick-up-women-for-sex. But after living the game, he eventually realized it was game over.” At the link find the title, “Emotional Incest ENCORE: Neil Strauss rethinks his pickup artist past, confesses ‘The Truth’ about relationships, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160727_71416.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Extinction Reversal 54 mins “From passenger pigeons to woolly mammoths, Britt Wray delves into the science, the ethics, and the implications of de-extinction for all animals, including us humans.” At the link find the title, “Undoing Forever, Jul, 2016” right-click “Media files ideas 20160727_75117.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm to Table 56 mins – “This week, Reveal revisits an hour of stories dedicated to food. We take a look at the complicated networks of labor, trade and regulation that carry meat, produce and other products to our tables.” At the link find the title, “[Update] Farm to fork: Uncovering hazards in our food systems, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files Update-Farm-to-fork_Uncovering-hazards-in-our-food-systems_podcast-rev2.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female President 47 mins – “It was a real contest in the Democratic Party this season. Two tough political fighters, battling all the way through the primaries. Last night, one clinched the formal nomination. And that one was a woman. Hillary Clinton. And with that, history was made. It’s never happened before. In November, she could be elected president. Bigger history. We’re weighing the moment, and how gender may play. This hour On Point, we talk with women about Hillary Clinton, gender, the issues, and the White House.” (4 guests) At the link right-click the small cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Nations Doctor 22 mins – “As the first female Indigenous woman to graduate from UBC’s medical school, Dr. Nadine Caron says there’s so much to be done to ensure Canada’s Aboriginal people get the health care they need. And she knows how hard it can be from her own experience.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Meet Dr. Nadine Caron, Canada’s first female First Nations surgeon, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160726_58330.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

fMRIs of Brains 39 mins – “fMRIs sound pretty scientific, right? But what if it turns out that some scientific results, backed by fMRI data, may be unreliable? That’s what Dr. Thomas Nichols, Professor and Head of Neuroimaging Statistics at the University of Warwick, has discovered in his recently published research: about 10% of the scientific literature that relies on fMRI data is contaminated with false positives. But how significant is that number, really? Keep reading (or listening) to find out.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Politics 30 mins – “Today we have the pleasure to begin with the broadcast of a series of shows that will be ongoing over the course of the summer. A group of dedicated citizens has gotten together to create a set of three seminars about food, and we were asked to participate by turning the series into a podcast. So here is the first installment in a three-part series, featuring Phil Pohl of Sandia National Labs and Greg Gould, self-described foodologist. To learn more about the speakers, have a look at their websites. Phil Pohl runs Sandia’s Food, Water and Energy program, and Greg has recently been host of the Foodology Show. Also, special thanks to Kathy Isaacson of Strategic Engagement LLC for organizing these seminars.”[Ep 21, Carbon Footprint of Food, is the last part of this series] AT the link righrt-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genes Explained 51 mins – “Monday, the writer and oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee is our guest. He’s written a new book that tells the epic tale of our quest to unravel the human genome. It’s the story of a long lineage of scientists—from Mendel, to Darwin, Watson, Crick, and countless others—and their efforts to understand the workings of the very threads of our existence. But how, Mukherjee wonders, can we best apply that knowledge? And what does it mean to be human when we can read and write our own genetic information? Siddhartha Mukherjee is the author of The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, which won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in general nonfiction. He is an assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University and a cancer physician and researcher. He has published articles in Nature, The New England Journal of Medicine,The New York Times, and Cell. His new book is called The Gene: An Intimate History At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Operations 30 mins – “In Ernest Hemingway’s house in Florida there is a family six-toed cats. Their appearance is caused by a mutation in the molecular switch that controls the Sonic hedgehog gene. These cats provided Kat Arney with the impetus to write a book that explaines how genes work and dispels some of the misconceptions created by the media’s misrepresentation of the subject.” At the link right-click “Download: Chemistry World Book Club – Herding Hemingways cats.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Wizardry 60 mins – “Today we mashup the science of genetics with the world of Harry Potter to get a better handle on how genetics works, and to find out what the odds are when it comes to getting a Hogwarts invite. (We can dream, right?) Dr. Tina Saey, who covers the molecular biology beat at Science News, helps us understand how to make a wizard with a little genetics 101. And Dr. Julian Knight, Professor of genomic medicine at the Wellcome Trust Center for Human Genetics at the University of Oxford, talks about his paper that looks to genetics for the origins of…” At the link find the title, “#380 Yer A Wizard Harry,” right-click “Media files Science for the People 380, Yer A Wizard Harry.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Transformation 64 mins – “How can government transform its capabilities by capitalizing on today’s new digital tools? Best-selling author William D. Eggers coined the term “government 2.0” more than a decade ago and now envisions an even more revolutionary era in government, enabled by cloud computing, mobile devices and analytics. Eggers chronicles the new generation of digital innovators who are “hacking bureaucracy” to reform and modernize long-standing bureaucratic processes and reimagine virtually every facet of what government does using digital tools—inspiring us to “think digital” when it comes to citizens, products and process.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graffiti in Brazil 27 mins – “Thousands of angry young Brazilians could not care less about the 2016 Olympics; they would rather paint Rio and São Paulo’s walls with their views about political turmoil, poverty and inequality. Steve Uruqhart meets graffiti writers and street artists in Brazil. Why do they choose to risk their lives, their limbs, their freedom, to highlight their social concerns?” At the link find the title, “Graffiti: Paint and Protest in Brazil, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0438cxx.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graffiti in Europe 27 mins – “Graffiti’s modern role is evolving rapidly. From Europe to Brazil, street artists are displaying their anger about inequality, invisibility, corruption and control. Artists including Blek Le Rat (the “father of stencil graffiti”), Roc Blackblock, Suriani and Vegan Bunnies defend their actions, and discuss whether such “freedom of expressiaon” on walls should have any limits.” At the link find the title, “Graffiti: Paint and Protest in Europe, Jul, 2016,”Media files p042khk9.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graph Theory 4 mins – “I first encountered the problem in elementary school. I was on a field trip to the Seattle Science Center. One of the instructors there showed us a picture. On it were four islands. Some were connected by bridges — seven in all. And she gave us a challenge. “Pick any island,” she said, “and see if you can find a walk that goes over every bridge exactly once and brings you back to the island where you started.” I tried one walk, then another. No luck. I always had to retrace at least one bridge. I drew the picture on a piece of paper and took it home to show my parents. The instructor had succeeded. She’d made me think. I ran into the problem many years later in a college course on graph theory. To mathematicians, a graph is a collection of islands connected by bridges or, more precisely, points connected by lines. Get a sheet of paper. Draw some points. Connect some of them with lines. You’ve got what mathematicians call a graph. Pretty simple. But graphs turn out to be remarkably interesting….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Great Bear Rainforest P1 8 mins – “In the summer of 1993, everyone I knew was chaining themselves to something. And where I grew up, on the west coast of Canada, the fight was over trees. Environmentalists and aboriginal communities united to stop a company from logging in a remote place called Clayoquot Sound, on the far western edge of Canada. More than 12,000 people blockaded a logging road into Clayoquot. Some chained themselves to bulldozers, others to trees. Almost 1,000 people were arrested in the largest act of civil disobedience in Canadian history….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Great Bear Rainforest P2 7 mins – “It’s a cloudless morning and just beyond the bow there’s rustling of trees and the sound of branches snapping. I’m holding my microphone as far out as I can — so that I can record the sound of a male grizzly, on the shore about 15 yards away. My guide here is Tom Rivest. “That is the sound that is called either chuffing or huffing. It sounds a little bit like bellows expelling air,” says Rivest. “The bears do that when they’re stressed — or excited, or a little both — which they probably are.” The reason this bear is excited is that it’s mating season and he’s following a female and her two cubs….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Handicapped Journey 24 mins – “When Robert Hoge was born in Brisbane, Australia, in 1973, his mother immediately knew there was something wrong. Instead of asking the doctors, “Is it a boy or a girl?” she asked, “Is my baby okay?” He wasn’t. He had a tumor the size of his newborn fist smack in the middle of his face. His legs were very short; his feet were missing toes and twisted out of shape.

Helping Children Succeed 51 mins – “A few years ago, Paul Tough wrote a book about new research showing that character traits like grit, self-control, and optimism are critical to a child’s success. Tough’s latest book builds on that research by explaining how to put it into practice. He argues that a child’s home and school environments are the principle barriers to his or her success. Improve the environment, Tough says, and you can improve the child. He joins us Wednesday to explain his theory of helping children succeed. Paul Tough is the author of the books How Children Succeed and Whatever It Takes: Geoffrey Canada’s Quest to Change Harlem and America. He is a contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine and a regular contributor to This American Life. His latest book is called Helping Children Succeed: What Works and Why At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

High Voltage Engineer 96 mins – “Stefan stops by to talk with Chris about High Voltage power supplies, conductive paint sensors, field testing solar chargers and working on HUGE art installations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hip Hop for Clean Energy 54 mins – “Today we’ll be joined by Hip Hop Caucus President and CEO Rev. Lennox Yearwood Jr. to discuss his work for climate justice and a new partnership with the 100 percent Campaign to support access to clean, affordable energy for all. Rev. Yearwood is known as one of the most influential people in Hip Hop political life. He works tirelessly to encourage the Hip Hop generation to utilize its political and social voice. A national leader and pacemaker within the green movement, Rev. Yearwood has been successfully bridging the gap between communities of color and environmental issue advocacy for the past four years. With a diverse set of celebrity allies, Rev Yearwood raises awareness and action in communities that are often overlooked by traditional environmental campaigns.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hiring for Top Firms 47 mins – “Lauren Rivera wants to understand how and why American elites keep reproducing themselves. Social and economic mobility in the US anow trail much of Europe’s. Concentration of wealth at the top is up. We have no titled aristocracy. No formal entitlement. We love our up-by-the-bootstraps, Horatio Alger stories. But American elites keep reproducing themselves from the same pool. Rivera has gone deep on hiring at top firms. Looking at how and why elites hire elites with such consistency. She’s with us. This hour On Point: “Pedigree.” Who gets the top jobs in America, and why. “ (3 Guests) At the link right-click the small cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeland Security History 49 mins – “In the years following 9/11, conversations about the threat of terrorism, and debates over the role of government in keeping us safe have been constant. Political scientist Matthew Dallek says there’s many parallels to the late 1930s and ’40s when fears of a Nazi attack in the U.S. were high. In a new book, “Defenseless Under the Night,” Dallek explores the history of the Office of Civil Defense, a precursor to the Department of Homeland Security. It was led by First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and New York City Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, whose competing visions set the stage for the debates we are still having today about security and democracy. Guest host Derek McGinty is joined by author Matthew Dallek to discuss the origins of homeland security.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Homeless in New Hampshire P1 56 mins – “It’s a question Granite State communities are grappling with, as progress appears to have stalled on finding housing for homeless people. Advocates agree a dearth of affordable housing exacerbates the problem. But there’s debate over whether providing temporary shelter can forestall lasting solutions on such challenges as unemployment and substance abuse….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in New Hampshire P2 8 mins – “Communities in New Hampshire are grappling with this question: where are homeless people supposed to go? Cities tend to answer that question by spelling out where homeless people can’t be, imposing bans on panhandling and camping. That’s often called criminalizing homelessness. We hear now about one city that recently came together to strike down one of those bans—Lebanon, N.H. Tim McNamara is on the city council there and was at the public hearing where over 100 people turned out. He joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk about these issues….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in New Hampshire P3 6 mins – “Ten years ago policy makers in New Hampshire made an ambitious promise: to end homelessness by 2016. We haven’t gotten there yet. As part of our special series on homelessness called ‘No Place To Go,’ NHPR’s Jack Rodolico and Natasha Haverty reported the story of one homeless man, Gene Parker, who lived on the streets of Concord for five years before being struck and killed by a car this winter. Cathy Kuhn directs New Hampshire’s Coalition to End Homelessness and joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss where the issue stands today.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Classics 46 mins – “Talk of the classics, classical literature, and minds quickly go to ancient Greece and Rome. To Greek and Latin. Homer and Virgil. But there are other, giant classical traditions, of course. One of the greatest, out of India. Essentially unknown in the West until 200 years ago Its surface still barely scratched in English translation. A huge new project aims to change that, with 500 new volumes. The first five are out. It’s a different setting: elephants, blood rice, moonbirds. And a different way of seeing human life. This hour On Point: we’re dipping into the new Murty Classical Library of India.” (2 guests) At the link right-click the small cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Farmer Suicides 2 64 mins – “ Talking Biotech Podcast #44 continues Kavin Senapathy’s interview with Dr. Ronald Herring. Dr. Herring is a Professor of Government and International Professor of Agriculture and Rural Development at Cornell University. Dr. Herring is a social scientist that has carefully studied the situation in India. This is the second part of the interview discussing the myths and facts surrounding Indian farmer suicides, a popular narrative in anti-genetic-engineering circles. Professor Herring provides first-hand illumination of the topic, from his experience in India, and scholarly examination of the facts around the topic.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet History 35 mins – “We originally planned this episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast to answer the question of “What is the Internet?” But as we started talking to our guest, Principal of Interisle Consulting Group Fred Goldstein, we quickly realized we first had to dig into a little bit of history. This is not the story of how the Department of Defense and university researchers created the ArpaNet. We are focused on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and telephone companies and how the FCC’s Computer Inquiries allowed the Internet to thrive. Fred lived it and offers a passionate retelling of key events, motivations, and more. This conversation is setting the stage for a future show – later this month – focused on answering the original question: “Just what, exactly, is the Internet?” And we’ll also talk about network neutrality and other hot topics in answering it. But for now, we hope you enjoy this show. We went a bit long and it is a bit technical in places, but we think the history is important and a reminder of how good government policy can lead to great outcomes….” At the link right-click “download this mp3 file directly from here”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Privacy 15 mins – “The computer or phone that you use knows a lot about you. It knows your secrets — and it might be giving them away.” At the link right-click “#548: Project Eavesdrop, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160729_pmoney_xxxx_eavesdrop_rerun_12.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Security 94 mins – “Nathan Freitas, Executive Director of the Guardian Project and Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, talks to Leo about Tor, privacy, securing mobile devices, and the Internet of Things.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing in Value Stocks 29 mins – “Paul explains the importance of adding value to your portfolio. The higher long-term returns of value stocks is not in question, but it is confusing to many investors as to why troubled and out-of-favor companies are expected to make more than great companies. To clarify this, Paul reads sections from both “Financial Fitness Forever” and “Live It Up Without Outliving Your Money.” And for those who aren’t interested in all these details, it’s important to know that almost every famous professional investor became famous using value stocks (e.g., Warren Buffet, Peter Lynch, John Templeton, and Michael Price).” At the link right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Q and A 54 mins – “For 10 years, Paul had a weekly “Outrage of the Week” on his Seattle radio show. He says it was never a problem finding something that made him hopping mad. In this podcast, Paul explains his recent outrage about one of America’s most trusted insurance companies giving their employees the shaft. He also answers questions from his listeners and readers at paulmerriman.com (Note to listeners: there are 12 Q&A’s mentioned on the podcast, but one was removed in order to better address it in a future Q&A).” At the link right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Impact 21 mins – “A young Yazidi woman’s life in Iraq took a horrific turn when her town was taken over by ISIS. She was captured, enslaved, and endured weeks of rape and torture. Now, she is calling on Canada to take in more refugees like her.” At the link find the title, “‘I wished I was killed’: Yazidi ISIS slave shares her harrowing story, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160725_92511.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Junipero Serra 47 mins – “Every California school child knows the story of Father Junípero Serra, the Franciscan priest who brought the mission system, New Spain and the Church north from Mexico and up the western shore of the New World. If you know San Diego, Santa Barbara and Santa Clara, San Francisco, you know his design. Build the missions, gather the natives, teach the Gospel, change the world. He is venerated for what he built, and – like Christopher Columbus these days – criticized for what he crushed. This hour On Point, a new history of California’s founding father and imperialist priest, Junípero Serra.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the small cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Knowledge Structure 51 mins – “The way that knowledge is structured has implications for the way we teach. Where the information that is presented in lectures fails to represent the knowledge structure of the discipline, then students have to resort to rote learning of materials. Where the curriculum structure aligns with the structure of the discipline, then students will be learning in more authentic ways and will have access to powerful knowledge. To get to this point, teachers first need to consider the structure of their own discipline and the values that underpin their teaching so they may reflect on the appropriateness of their professional practice. “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Machiavelli Advice 52 mins – “Niccolò Machiavelli lived hundreds of years ago, and though he was a gifted political strategist, he knew nothing about democratic republics. So the scholar Maurizio Viroli recognizes that it’s a bit extravagant to consult a 15th-century Florentine for electoral advice in 21st-century America. But Machiavelli, Viroli says, remains the most competent, honest and disinterested political counselor we could ask for. Viroli joins us Friday to examine what Machiavelli can teach us about choosing leaders. Maurizio Viroli is professor emeritus of politics at Princeton University, professor of government at the University of Texas, Austin, and professor of political communication at the University of Italian Switzerland in Lugano. His many books include Niccolò’s Smile: A Biography of Machiavelli and Redeeming “The Prince”: The Meaning of Machiavelli’s Masterpiece. His new book is called How to Choose a Leader: Machiavelli’s Advice to Citizens At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mariachi Women 48 mins – “When you hear the mariachi music, the visuals are right there too in our mind’s eye. The guys in their elaborate, silver-spangled outfits. The boots. The big sombreros. The machismo, Mexican-style. But when Flor de Toloache is playing, it’s a different picture. Mariachi, yes. But all women. Those great outfits, yes. But flowers in their hair. And Mexican is just the beginning. They’re from all over Latin America, beyond – and New York City. This hour On Point, the women of Flor de Toloache.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the small cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Conference 29 mins – “California, the nation’s most populous state, votes again this Fall on the legalization of marijuana. It’s yet another sign that the century-long prohibition may finally be lifting, one state at a time. This week on Sea Change Radio, we bring you four interviews from the National Cannabis Industry Association conference held recently in Oakland, CA. Host Alex Wise talks with “ganjapreneurs” Matthew Huron, Nancy Whiteman, Kevin Dolan and Shelly Peterson, about the horticulture, distribution, extraction, and marketing of the nation’s fastest growing crop, and learns what legalization would mean for their respective businesses.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Legalization 59 mins – “Scott Greaten, Executive Director, Friends of the Eel River Michael Sutton, Former President, California Fish and Game Commission Growing pot indoors consumes large amounts of water and energy. Growing illegal weed outdoors often involves trespassing on national or state parks. Runoff from cannabis farms pollutes streams and ecosystems. Could legalizing marijuana in California result in more efficient harvesting that uses less water and results in less environmental destruction? California voters will have a chance to weigh in on legalizing marijuana on the November ballot. Join us for a conversation about the climate, energy and water impacts of changing the way one of the state’s biggest crops is produced.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martial Arts 68 mins – “Join us on this episode as I talk with my good friend Roy Dean (Black Belt in Bjj, Aikido, and Judo) about Jiu Jitsu, Martial Arts, running a business, and much more.” At the link right-click “Download Episode Here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martial Arts Path 69 mins – “Richard Ryan is one of the world’s foremost authorities on martial arts, combative weaponry and self-defense. Recognized as a pioneer of the art and science of Reality Martial Arts, Ryan has taught his systems to countless civilians, law enforcement and military special ops in over 30 countries. Holding Black Belt level or above in more than 12 different martial arts, Ryan was also a U.S. Protective Service Agent and Master Firearms and Edged Weapons Instructor for the U.S. Marksmanship Academy and the world famous Gunsite Training Center where he created groundbreaking integrated force programs. …He is the founder of the Dynamic Combat martial art system regarded as one of the most sophisticated and effective fighting arts in the world today. …Richard’s programs and presentations are brutally honest, direct and highly enlightening and the success of his systems can be attributed to his no- nonsense approach to the martial arts and personal protection.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MCAT Course 22 mins – “Today’s session gives way to the inaugural episode of The MCAT Podcast, the newest member of the MedEd Media. The MCAT Podcast has been in the works for about eight months now. Being one of the biggest hurdles in getting into medical school, Ryan is motivated to giving students sufficient information they need to know to successfully crush the MCAT. The Medical School Headquarters has collaborated with Next Step Test Prep to create a whole new podcast called The MCAT Podcast, which is going to be its own separate weekly podcast that you can subscribe to on iTunes, Google Play, etc. Go to www.themcatpodcast.com and sign up to be notified when it’s going to be on iTunes….” At the link right-click “Direct download: PMY193.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memphis Sound 47 mins – “So much American history is the story of power, race and money. And that story runs extra deep and vivid in the old Tennessee river city of Memphis. On the Chickasaw Bluffs, above the Mississippi, Memphis moved after the Civil War, says my guest today, from slaves and cotton to sex and song. There was a furious battle for power. For a time, blacks won a notable share. It built Beale Street. The blues. The roots of the Memphis sound. This hour On Point: we’re walking in Memphis, and an amazing chapter in American history.” (2 guests) At the link right-click the small cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Michael K. Williams 37 mins – “Actor Michael K. Williams is known for playing morally ambiguous, sometimes violent characters. As Omar Little on The Wire, Williams was a fearless stick-up man who stole money from drug dealers. In Boardwalk Empire, he played Chalky White, a bootlegger in Prohibition-era Atlantic City. Now, in the new HBO series The Night Of, he’s a powerful inmate in New York’s notorious Rikers Island Prison. Williams tells Fresh Air‘s Terry Gross that playing such intense characters sometimes takes a psychic toll. “When I wear these characters to the extent that I wear them to, that [energy’s] gotta go somewhere,” he says. The dark energy of Omar Little, for example,was a little too close to home.” Williams struggled with addiction while he worked on The Wire and eventually sought help at a church in New Jersey. Now the actor practices prayer and meditation, which help him separate from his work. “One of the main things that’s changed from when I was first on The Wire and to now — in, particularly, The Night Of — is I know how to differentiate myself from the character. … I still go in just as deep, but now I have the tools … to pull myself out of that.” Williams is also the host of the new Viceland series Black Market, which explores underground economies in America and around the world.” At the link “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minimalist Life 47 mins – “A battle is being waged across the nation this summer – in closets, garages, attics, even drawers. It’s a struggle against…stuff. For some, the goal is to declutter, for others it’s much more – a desire to pare down on material objects and prioritize experiences instead. In a messy and complex world, many of us are seeking simplicity, but try as we may, getting it isn’t simple. Marie Kondo’s “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up” has sold nearly 6 million copies, while the duo known as “The Minimalists” attract 4 million visitors annually to their website and have just released a new film that tries to get us to focus on “the important things.” The appeal of minimalism…and why it’s so difficult to achieve.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Nootropic Drugs etc 44 mins – “If you could take a pill that would enhance your concentration, increase your productivity, and reduce your stress levels, would you do it? Or is that cheating? On today’s show, the science and ethics behind a growing class of so-called “smart-drugs”.

People Stories 51 mins – “When Jeannette Quinn first traveled to Uganda in the summer of 2006 she knew it would be an enriching experience. But then she met a little boy named Opiyo Ivan and her life took the most unexpected turn. Jeannette Quinn has started the Opiyo Ivan Memorial Fund, and proceeds will go to support her organization, AFENDS, which provides services for individuals (and their families) in northern Uganda who suffer from epilepsy or nodding disease/syndrome.” Three different and unusual stories follow this one. At the link click the circle with three dots, then right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physics Professor 29 mins – “Keith talks with Allen Hermann, a physicist who has worked and taught at universities such as the University of Colorado and Tulane University, and at scientific hubs such as the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Solar Energy Research Institute. Hermann talks about his past groundbreaking research, how he missed a chance at making millions with one of his discoveries, and about his rewarding life as a jazz trombonist.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pig Farming 24 mins – “Not long ago, the biggest moral dilemma would-be meat eaters faced, was whether or not to put meat on their forks. Today, with the proliferation of options like “humanely raised,” “grass fed,” “free range,” and on and on, there’s a lot more to chew on.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Is ‘ethical meat’ helping pigs or salving consciences? Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160728_69259.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Play Doh Invention 9 mins – “When no one wants your product, don’t change the product, change the name.” At the link find the title, “Episode 28: An Incredible Reinvention, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files Episode_28__An_Incredible_Reinvention.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pokemon Go 22 mins – “This summer’s craze features cartoon characters, smartphones and crowds of people roaming the streets. Pokemon Go is a game and a popular one. But critics say it isn’t just fun and games – it’s discriminatory. The Current looks at race, class and Pokemon.” At the link find the title, “Pokemon Go discriminates based on bias embedded in algorithm, says prof, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160728_68319.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protectionism in the US 26 mins – “Edward Stourton examines America’s long history of resistance to free trade, and asks why it has again become such a potent political force. Donald Trump’s most consistent policy has been opposition to free trade agreements, which he sees as unfair, particularly with China. On the Democratic side, Bernie Sanders has been equally opposed, if for different reasons, while Hillary Clinton has had to tack away from her previous support for free trade pacts.” At the link find the title, “Protectionism in the USA, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p042nqbj.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Camps in Greece 64 mins – “A bunch of us from our show went to refugee camps all over Greece. We found people falling in love, kids mad at their parents for dragging them to Europe, women doing their laundry in a baseball stadium locker room, and hundreds of people living at a gas station—sitting next to the pumps, smoking. Also: wild pigs. 57,000 refugees are stuck in Greece, making homes in some surprising locations. We hear what that’s really like.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Richard Dawkins 60 mins – “ In the 1960s and 70s, a revolution took place in the way we understand human nature. Out went Marx and Freud, and in came a rational, scientific approach to the way we see ourselves. At the vanguard of that revolution was Richard Dawkins, the evolutionary biologist whose book ‘The Selfish Gene’ changed the thinking not just of other scientists but of all of us, and propelled its author to intellectual stardom as the modern heir to Darwin. …It was Dawkins, too, who invented the word ‘meme’ to describe the cultural equivalent of a gene – an idea, belief or practice that replicates itself from person to person and is subject to the same selective pressures as genes – whether it’s an age-old religious practice or a modern fad such as the ice bucket challenge. And on the subject of religion, the publication of ‘The God Delusion’ a decade ago marked the moment when Dawkins became the patron saint of atheism. The book turned him into the world’s leading controversialist – hero-worshipped by atheists, demonised by believers. But throughout the hubbub of being the celebrity scientist and the non-believers’ poster boy, Dawkins continued his scientific studies at New College, Oxford, and in obscure corners across the world – where he honed the art of observing and writing beautifully about nature, conveying his sense of wonder at how organisms developed their complexity over the ages.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roger Ailes 31 mins – “Ailes resigned last week amid allegations of sexual harassment. Biographer Gabriel Sherman joins Fresh Air to discuss the accusations, as well as Ailes’ influence on political discourse in America.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Rogue Justice 59 mins – “Karen Greenberg, director of Fordham University’s Center on National Security, talks about legal questions arising from policies and laws enacted to fight the U.S. war on terrorism. She’s interviewed by Ali Soufan, author of [The Black Banners].” At the link find the title, “After Words with Karen Greenberg, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.443526.MP3-STD.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Value 54 mins – “British geneticist Sir Paul Maxime Nurse recently discovered some fascinating secrets about his own hereditary background, long after he made the discoveries that won him a Nobel Prize in 2001. On the occasion of being honoured with the 2015 Henry Frie…” At the link find the title, “The Eminent Dr. Nurse, Jul, 2016,” right-click “The Eminent Dr. Nurse (Encore Feb 17, 2016),” right-click “Media files ideas_20160722_70095.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Segregational Custody 22 mins – “After news of more suicides by prisoners serving time in solitary confinement in Canada, there’s renewed debate about ending or changing the practice. But one guard says given the challenges facing those who work inside prison walls, it just won’t work.” At the link find the title, “Deaths of two prisoners in segregated custody renew solitary confinement debate, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160729_91600.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sewing Robot 15 mins – “Building a robot that can sew even simple clothes is surprisingly hard. A retired professor in Atlanta thinks he’s solved the problem. It could bring textile manufacturing back to America.” At the link find the title, “#715: The Sewing Robot,” right-click “Media files 20160803 pmoney podcast080316.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sound Engineer 28 mins – “Inside a Victorian sewer, with fat deposits sliding off the ceiling and disappearing down the back of his shirt, Trevor Cox had an epiphany. Listening to the strange sound of his voice reverberating inside the sewer, he wondered where else in the world he could experience unusual and surprising noises. As an acoustic engineer, Trevor started his career tackling unwanted noises, from clamour in the classroom to poor acoustics in concert halls. But his jaunt inside a sewer sparked a new quest to find and celebrate the ‘sonic wonders of the world’. In this episode he shares these sounds with Jim Al-Khalili and discusses the science behind them.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sports Business 64 mins – “Fifty years ago, many of the best players in the National Football League took jobs in the off-season to augment the salaries they earned playing football. Matthew Futterman of the Wall Street Journal and author of Players talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how much football and so many aspects of sports–from tennis to golf to apparel to broadcasting to Olympics–has become incredibly more lucrative. Futterman shares the insights from his book and how all that money has changed sports, the athletes who compete, and the fans who watch. “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stings and Stingers 52 mins – “Entomologist Justin O. Schmidt is on a mission. Some say it’s a brave exploration, others shake their heads in disbelief. His goal: to catalogue the painful effects of stinging insects on humans, mainly using himself as the gauge. Most people regard stinging insects as horrible pests, but by investigating their lifestyles and adaptations, Schmidt hopes to spread his passion for the inherently interesting story every animal on earth has to tell. Schmidt joins us to explore the world of stinging insects. Justin O. Schmidt is a biologist at Southwestern Biological Institute and is associated with the Department of Entomology at the University of Arizona. His new book is called Sting of the Wild” At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stress Concepts 89 mins – “Did you know that broccoli is actually toxic? It’s true; every time you eat one of those delicious little trees, you’re subjecting your body to a small amount of toxicity. Oddly enough, though, that’s a good thing. It’s one of the reasons that broccoli is a “healthy” food. You see, our bodies and minds have adapted to the harsh conditions of this world in such as a way that they actually improve when subjected to stress. That’s right – stress can be a good thing. In the case of our toxic broccoli, the cells in your body experience stress in response to the chemicals it contains. This stress response ends up bolstering the cells – as long as the stress load isn’t too high and there’s time for recovery. Mark Mattson, the chief of the neurosciences lab at the National Institute of Aging, explains this phenomenon in Dr. John Ratey’s book Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain: “Many of the beneficial chemicals in plans – vegetables and fruits – have evolved as toxins to dissuade insects and other animals from eating them. What they’re doing is inducing a mild, adaptive stress response in the cells. For example, in broccoli, there’s a chemical called sulforaphane, and it clearly activates stress response pathways in cells that upregulate antioxidant enzymes. Broccoli has antioxidants, but at the level you could get from your diet, they’re not going to function as antioxidants.” Unfortunately, stress usually gets a bad rap in the press – undeservedly so. Stress itself isn’t bad – it’s chronic stress that should be avoided. Stress that persists for a long period of time is what can cause a lot of problems. So in this episode, Martin and I will do our best to break down stress. Specifically, we’ll tackle: The biology of stress; The negative effects of chronic stress; 10 things you can do to mitigate bad stress; How you can use stress to your advantage.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stress Neurobiologist 29 mins – “Keith & Russ talk to Lawrence Reagan, a stress neurologist with the University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Neuroscience. Reagan talks about how stress affects the brain, with an emphasis on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and the connections between obesity & depression….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Role 49 mins – “Jeffrey Rosen explores how the US Supreme Court, once derided as the third branch of government, has become the busiest and most powerful institution in American politics, and how that makes the court’s current vacancy a particularly valuable prize in this presidential year.” At the link find the title, “Court in the Centre, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p042zc95.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Library 27 mins – “Away from the sound of bombs and bullets, in the basement of a crumbling house in the besieged Syrian town of Darayya, is a secret library. It’s home to thousands of books rescued from bombed-out buildings by local volunteers, who daily brave snipers and shells to fill it’s shelves. In a town gripped by hunger and death after three years without food aid, Mike Thomson reveals how this literary sanctuary is proving a lifeline to a community shattered by war. Produced by Michael Gallagher and translated by Mariam El Khalaf. *Omar, the FSA soldier who was the last voice heard in this programme has been killed in fighting* (Photo: Omar Abu Anas, a Free Syrian Army soldier reads on the front line)” At the link find the title, “Syria’s Secret Library, Jul, 2016,” right-click ‘Media files p042rlqb.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taurine 6 mins – “..Scientific studies suggest that small amounts of taurine are needed for muscles to work properly, and it also seems to be important for keeping the liver healthy, and plays a role in the brain – including a possible role in helping to control body weight. Tests in rats show that it also boosts the heart rate, can cut cholesterol, and may even help to treat people with congestive heart failure – where the heart doesn’t beat strongly enough – by increasing the force of the heart’s muscle contractions, and potentially could help treat other heart conditions too. But what about the levels found in drinks? Luckily for fans of these energy-boosting beverages, there’s no evidence that the high doses of taurine found in these drinks is harmful. However, what is risky is the caffeine they contain – in some cases, up to 300 milligrams, more than three times the amount in a strong cup of coffee. And high doses of caffeine are definitely associated with jitteriness, heart rhythm problems, seizures and even – in extreme circumstances – death, so that’s a better reason to limit your consumption of the stuff….” At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Taurine.mp3“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Toyota Acceleration Scandal 41 mins – “In the summer and fall of 2009, hundreds of Toyota owners came forward with an alarming allegation: Their cars were suddenly and uncontrollably accelerating. Toyota was forced to recall 10 million vehicles, pay a fine of more than $1 billion, and settle countless lawsuits. The consensus was that there was something badly wrong with the world’s most popular cars. Except that there wasn’t. What happens when hysteria overtakes common sense? If you’re looking to go deeper into the subjects on Revisionist History, visit Malcolm’s collection on iBooks at http://www.apple.co/MalcolmGladwell — iBooks will update the page every week with new recommendations.” At the link find the title, “Blame Game, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files PP3573562692.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universe Intro 60 mins – “Does time exist? Was our universe born from a Big Bang, or from a Big Bounce triggered by a former universe imploding? Is this the only universe, or are there infinite ones, all expanding in parallel and out of sight of each other? These are just some of the questions that were tackled by world-renowned physicists Carlo Rovelli and Christophe Galfard when they came to the Intelligence Squared stage, in this event chaired by BBC science star Helen Czerski……Rovelli and Galfard have found a way of explaining the mysteries of physics that has made them the most popular science communicators in their countries. In Italy, Rovelli has consistently outsold Fifty Shades of Grey with his book ‘Seven Brief Lessons on Physics’, which last year became a Sunday Times bestseller. Galfard — who gained his PhD as Stephen Hawking’s graduate student — won France’s Science Book of the Year for his book on the cosmos ‘The Universe in Your Hand’. There could hardly be a better moment for Rovelli and Galfard to shed light on the revelations that physics is making about the universe. Technology is allowing us to observe for the first time in reality phenomena that have until now only been suggested in theory. Earlier this year, the LIGO observatory in the US made the first ever detection of gravitational waves — 100 years after Einstein predicted the existence of these ripples in spacetime. Galfard describes the discovery as the beginning of ‘a totally new era for mankind’. He states: ‘We haven’t lived through such a thing since the advent of Galileo’s telescope, which changed the whole face of the universe. This is history in the making. Mankind will probably remember this in 1,000 years.’ Being able to see these waves, Galfard and Rovelli will explain, will let us peer into the very origins of matter and time.” At the link find the title, “Carlo Rovelli and Christophe Galfard on the Architecture of the Universe, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 275959051-intelligence2-carlo-rovelli-and-christophe-galfard-on-the-architecture-of-the-universe.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ursula Franklin Tribute 54 mins – “To commemorate the recent death, and to celebrate the remarkable life of Ursula Franklin, we turn to the IDEAS archives, and sample over forty years of appearances by the public intellectual who delivered the 1989 CBC Massey Lectures — “The Real World of” At the link find the title, “Peace and Justice – A Celebration of Ursula Franklin, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160725_55125.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Rights Restrictions 37 mins – “The Voting Rights Act of 1965 outlawed racial discrimination in voting. But author Ari Berman says a 2013 Supreme Court ruling blocks the enforcement.” At the link “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Walking in Cities 39 mins – “On this week’s podcast, we take a stroll through history with Lauren Elkin, as we talk about her book Flâneuse. The book combines first person and historical accounts to build a history of the women who have explored the world at street level. Elkin talks about iconic wanderers – Martha Gellhorn, Jean Rhys, George Sand – and shares her tips for anyone who wants to wander a city with a true mindset of a flâneuse. Then we are paid a visit by the Bookshop Band: Beth Porter and Ben Please, who write songs inspired by literature. After years of performing, Beth and Ben spent a year recording 10 albums, all to be released between 2016 and 2017. They talk about turning books into songs and perform two songs – Curious and Curiouser, based on The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland, and Once Upon a Time, inspired by the first lines of classic books.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Welfare Reform 34 mins – “In 1996, President Bill Clinton and the Congress undertook a reform effort to redesign the welfare system from one that many believed trapped people in a cycle of dependence, to one, that in the President’s words, would give people “a paycheck, not a welfare check …. Today, we are ending welfare as we know it.” Many of the key components implemented by Clinton can be traced back to a bureaucrat named Larry Townsend and a pilot program he operated in California called GAIN (Greater Avenues for Independence). Head of the welfare office in Riverside County, Townsend didn’t have much patience for the education-and-training route of existing welfare programs—the ones which helped welfare recipients gain more skills so they would fare better in the job market. Townsend’s approach was much more straightforward: get people into jobs as fast as possible….” At the link right-click the down-pointing a link and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Welfare Reform 44 mins -”What’s the best path out of poverty–work or education? Twenty years ago, welfare reformers came to this fork in the road and had to ask the question: Is it better to encourage welfare recipients to get a job, any job? Or is it better to support them while they get training and education that will eventually help them get better-paying jobs?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow near the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Control Lessons 21 mins – “They call fire chief Darby Allen a hero. But when wildfire started tearing through Fort McMurray, he didn’t feel like one. He shares what was going through his mind and his fear that many would die in the fire as we look back at the battle of the beast.” At the link find the title, “Fort McMurray Fire: Three men in charge recall the firefight they will never forget, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160727_32001.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WW II Science 16 mins – “Scientists were put to good use during the Second World War. John Westcott’s secret project was to design radars. His work not only helped the war effort – it also led to new branches of science. Originally aired 19/07/2013.” At the link find the title, “REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast – July 1942, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yoga for Bones 58 mins – “Do you think of yoga as exercise? Many people don’t. Yoga doesn’t seem like exercise that can combat osteoporosis. Yet physiatrist Loren Fishman, MD, has shown that certain yoga poses can improve bone mineral density and reduce fractures. … Find out whether Dr. Fishman’s yoga exercises could help strengthen your bones, counteract osteopenia or combat osteoporosis. His DVD demonstrating the poses is sold at his website, sciatica.org. Dr. Fishman also describes how he treats scoliosis, sciatica and rotator cuff injuries with specific yoga poses. This Week’s Guest: Loren Fishman, MD, is medical director of Manhattan Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in New York City. He is the author of ten books, including Healing Yoga and Yoga for Osteoporosis. He is associate editor of Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation and on staff at Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons. His website is sciatica.org. He published his report, “Twelve-Minute Daily Yoga Regimen Reverses Osteoporotic Bone Loss,” in Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation in April, 2016. …The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free for four weeks after the date of broadcast. After that time has passed, digital downloads are available for $2.99. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99. Buy the CD Download the mp3” At the link find the title, “Show 1043: How to Strengthen Bones and Fix Your Body with Yoga, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files PP-1043YogaBones.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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