Mining Digest 404 – Aug 16, 2019: 5G Communications, Abortion History, Algorithm Faults, Apartheid, Border Wall, Chilean Cybersyn, Civil War Museum, Coal Decals, Cognitive Neuroscience, Container Shipping History, Contraception, Electricity Cost, Elio Schaechter Story, Elizabeth Warren Interview, Gerrymandering, Hearing Loss in Combat, High School Learning, Homeless Containment in Los Angeles, Human and AI Differences, Melting Pot America, Moon Landing Anniversary, Oyster Breakwaters in NYC, Puerto Rico Trends, Reparations, Reverberation Control, Salton Sea, Scott Pelley, Silicon Valley History, Small Cap Value Funds, Stonewall Incident, Tasers, Walt Whitman, Wellness Industry, Women in Congress

Exercise your ears: the 48 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 661 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,869) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

5G Communications 24 mins – “‘5G’ is a new buzzword floating around every corner of the internet. But what exactly is this hyped-up cellular network, often referred to as the next technological evolution in mobile internet communications? Will it really be 100 times faster than what we have now? What will it make possible that has never been possible before? Who will reap the benefits? And, who will get left behind? Mike Thelander at Signals Research Group imagines the wild ways 5G might change our lives in the near future. Rhiannon Williams hits the street to test drive a new 5G network. Amy France lives in a very rural part of Kansas — she dreams of the day that true, fast internet could come to her farm (but isn’t holding her breath). Larry Irving explains why technology has never been provided equally to everyone, and why he fears 5G will leave too many people out. Shireen Santosham, though, is doing what she can to leverage 5G deployment in order to bridge the digital divide in her city of San Jose.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Abortion History 64 mins – “In 1973, the landmark ruling in Roe v. Wade decriminalized abortion. But since then, the court’s findings have been simultaneously celebrated and contested. Now, Roe is in the news again. States including Alabama and Missouri have passed laws that challenge the Roe decision, leading some to ask: Are we close to seeing the Roe v. Wade ruling overturned? On this episode, we dig into the history of Roe and explore the life and legacy of a case whose details are often forgotten or misunderstood.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop- up menu.

Air Conditioning History 32 mins – “In the summer of 1902, the Sackett and Wilhelms Lithography & Printing Company in Brooklyn, New York had a problem. They were trying to print an issue of the popular humor magazine Judge, but the humidity was preventing the inks from setting properly on the pages. The moisture in the air was warping the paper and messing up the alignment. So the company hired a young engineer named Willis Carrier to solve the problem. Carrier developed a system that pumps air over metal coils cooled with ammonia to pull moisture from the air, but it had a side effect — it also made the air cooler. The room with the machine became the popular lunch spot for employees. Carrier had invented air conditioning, and began to think about how it could be used for human comfort. Before air conditioning took off, a hot and crowded theater was the last place anyone wanted to be during the summer. So Carrier approached a bunch of theater owners and pitched them on his technology — it wouldn’t be cheap, he explained, but higher ticket sales could pay for it. Soon, theaters were advertising chilled air and drawing huge crowds, eventually helping to spawn the “summer blockbuster” phenomenon.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “OK” to download the podcast.

Algorithm Faults 24 mins – “…Computer algorithms now shape our world in profound and mostly invisible ways. They predict if we’ll be valuable customers and whether we’re likely to repay a loan. They filter what we see on social media, sort through resumes, and evaluate job performance. They inform prison sentences and monitor our health. Most of these algorithms have been created with good intentions. The goal is to replace subjective judgments with objective measurements. But it doesn’t always work out like that….” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “OK” to download the podcast.

Apartheid 32 mins – ““If you lived in a high rise building with five or six hundred flats in it,” explains Smuts, “they weren’t going to go through each and every flat to come look for any illegal persons.” And over the years, many interracial families like the Smuts disappeared into one high rise apartment building in particular—a tower called Ponte City. “I don’t think there’s anybody in Johannesburg that doesn’t know Ponte,” Smuts says. “They might not have been there. But everybody knows Ponte.” Looking at Johannesburg’s skyline, the 54-story tower is hard to miss—it is the tallest apartment building on the African continent. It is also distinctively shaped, a massive cylinder with an empty central core. The billboard wrapping its top like a crown also helps it stand out. For many, the building symbolizes Johannesburg—because over the past four decades, its fortunes have reflected the changing city around it.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Audry Munson 24 mins – “All over New York City, there is a woman in various states of undress, so baked into architecture that we barely even notice her. In the public library, she leans against a white horse; at the intersection of 59th and 5th, she perches atop a fountain; on 107th and Broadway, she reclines on a bed; and on top of the Manhattan Municipal Building she stands tall, this time cast in gold. She has gone by many names: Star Maiden, Priestess of Culture, Mourning Victory, and, simply: Niche Figure. But the truth is, all these likenesses were based on a single person: a model by the name of Audrey Munson….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Border Wall 32 mins – “When current President Donald Trump took office, he promised to build an “an impenetrable, physical, tall, powerful, beautiful, southern border wall.” The first part of this episode by Radio Diaries tells two stories of what happens when, instead of people crossing the border, the border crosses the people. Then, in part two of the show, Avery Trufelman takes a closer look at eight current designs that have been turned into prototypes near the border in California.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “OK” to download the podcast.

Car Safety 34 mins – “In the past fifty years, the car crash death rate has dropped by nearly 80 percent in the United States. And one of the reasons for that drop has to do with the “accident report forms” that police officers fill out when they respond to a wreck. Officers use these forms to document the weather conditions, to draw a diagram of the accident, and to identify the collision’s “primary cause.” For the more than 30,000 fatal car crashes that happen each year, information gathered on the side of the road goes from the accident report form into a federal database: the Fatality Analysis Reporting System.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chilean Cybersyn 24 mins – “…Cybernetics began to become popular around WWII. As humans developed new kinds of machines, they became interested in developing systems for controlling those machines. Cybernetics looks at how to design intelligent, self-correcting systems. In England, in the 1960s, a business consultant named Stafford Beer was applying concepts of cybernetics to business management. He believed a business could be thought of as an intelligent system. If the goal of a business is to sell more product, or work more efficiently, one could (using the principles of cybernetics) design the system to work toward that goal. Flores thought that Stafford Beer could use Cybernetics to help model and manage Chile’s economy, and Beer was thrilled at the chance to apply his ideas on such a grand scale. Beer arrived in Chile in 1971 to begin on this project, which they called “Cybersyn.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

City Planning Architects P2 36 mins – “The Bijlmermeer (or Bijlmer, for short) was built just outside of Amsterdam in the 1960s. It was designed by modernist architects to be a “city of the future” with its functions separated into distinct zones. To Modernists, it represented a vision of the city as a well-oiled machine. Upon completion, it was a massive expanse of 31 concrete towers. There were 13,000 apartments, many of them unoccupied. Just sitting there, totally empty.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “OK” to download the podcast.

Civil War Museum 56 mins – “On May 4, 2019, the American Civil War Museum opens in Richmond, Virginia. It’s a historic endeavor, building upon a merger of several museums and historical sites in the region, including the former Museum of the Confederacy. The museum’s goal is to tell an inclusive and balanced version of the Civil War. But for an event that’s arguably the most contentious conflict in American history, that’s a tall order. So on this episode, BackStory gets an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at the museum to explore what it means to tell new narratives of the Civil War in public spaces.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop- up menu.

Coal Decals 22 mins – “…As a new miner in a dangerous industry, Ronnie had to go through an intensive orientation process before this first trip underground. He sat through 40 hours of training and safety classes before going down into the mines. He was also issued a yellow hardhat that identified him as a rookie, and given his first reflective coal mining stickers. He put one on his new hardhat and saved one in a box, later putting it into an album. Today, after 34 years as a miner in Alabama, Ronnie has filled several photo albums with thousands of stickers. Some are inside jokes. Others commemorate big events or accomplishments at work. Some come from unions or manufacturers connected to the industry. Lots of other coal miners across the country have collections like Ronnie’s. Miners use these stickers for safety and for communication, and as a kind of currency down in the mines. And for many miners, collecting them was a natural extension of their utility. “It was just what coal miners did,” says Ronnie, like how “kids collect baseball cards…. At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “OK” to download the podcast.

Cognitive Neuroscience 34 mins – This week we are speaking with Jared Cooney Horvath, a cognitive neuroscientist from the University of Melbourne. Jared specializes in human thought, learning, and brain stimulation, and holds the position of Director at both LME Global and The Science of Learning Group. He also has a new book titled, Stop Talking, Start Influencing: 12 Insights from Brain Science to Make Your Message Stick, that was just recently published in March of this year! It’s not only great for a general audience, but for educators as well — providing tons of key insights on the best ways to teach so that the learning will stick. In the discussion, Jared takes Tom through the 12 insights in his book. He speaks about why multitasking is not beneficial, whether it’s better to read or to listen when learning, how accompanying images can help impact memory and learning, whether or not cramming works, the impact spacial layouts have on a learner, and why we should embrace errors. Beyond that, he shares many more of his findings through neuroscience around learning and education.At the link double click the down-poiting arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Container Shipping History 34 mins – “Huge container-moving cranes dot the waterfronts of San Francisco and Oakland while hulking container ships dominate the waterways of the Bay Area. But this was not always the case. In the eight-part audio documentary series Containers, Alexis Madrigal explores how the rise of container shipping and the evolution of global trade have transformed economies and shaped cities around the world.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Contraception 21 mins – “In 1960, a new wonder drug hit the U.S. market. And while lots of new drugs promise dramatic results, this one would actually transform millions of lives and radically shift American culture. It was called Enovid. It was the first oral contraceptive, and it ushered in extraordinary changes and opportunities for women.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “OK” to download the podcast.

Depressed Researchers 71 mins – “From ASM Microbe 2019, the Microbials meet up with Susanna and Alex to talk about mental health in graduate school and NIH peer review.” At the link find the title, “Right click to download TwiM#199,” and right-click it to download the podcast.

Electricity Cost 29 mins – “For most people, electricity only flows one way (into the home), but there are exceptions — people who use solar panels, for instance. In those cases, excess electricity created by the solar cells travels back out into the grid to be distributed elsewhere. And in some states, people can can be paid for this excess electricity. The practice is called “net metering” (referring to the total or “net” amount of energy used) and while it started off as a relatively non-controversial practice, there are now big political battles being fought over it.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elio Schaechter Story 61 mins – “Vincent, Michele, and Michael travel to San Diego to reminisce with Elio about his career, his work in microbiology, and his love for microbes and mushrooms.” At the link find the title, “Right click to download TWiM #200,” and right-click it to download the podcast.

Elizabeth Warren Interview 35 mins – “Rebecca Traister and Elizabeth Warren discuss Warren’s history as a teacher, and how it influences her presidential campaign, on this week’s episode of The Cut on Tuesdays.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gerrymandering 48 mins – “The way we draw our political districts has a huge effect on U.S. politics, but the process is also greatly misunderstood. Gerrymandering has become a scapegoat for what’s wrong with the polarized American political system, blamed for marginalizing groups and rigging elections, but there’s no simple, one-size-fits-all design solution for drawing fair districts….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Hearing Loss in Combat 19 mins – “Most earplugs reduce noise by 30-some decibels, which can be significant. Every three-decibel increase in a loud noise cuts in half the amount of time you can be exposed without risking hearing damage. To put that another way: an unprotected human ear can spend 8 hours a day exposed to 85 decibels (freeway noise, crowded restaurant) without incurring damage. But if you go up to 115 decibels (chainsaw, loud rock concert) your safe exposure time is only half a minute before your hearing could be affected. In a military situation, a reduction of 30 decibels is especially helpful with a steady grinding background din such as the thrum of a Blackhawk helicopter. But there’s a problem with earplugs on the battlefield. Soldiers won’t wear them. If they do wear them, they may miss other important (softer) noises happening around them. The result is lots of service members coming home from battle with tinnitus or hearing loss. In fact, for as long as the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has reported such statistics, tinnitus and hearing loss have remained the number one and two most common injuries of service members. Doctor Eric Fallon, former chief audiologist at Walter Reed Medical Center and now on the staff at 3M, is looking for solutions….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

High School Learning 10 mins – “Dr. Sarah Fine, co-author of  In Search of Deeper Learning, The Quest to Remake the American High School talks about her research into remarkable high school experiences. Scroll down to download the transcript for this episode.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless Containment in Los Angeles 27 mins – “It’s hard to overstate the vastness of the Skid Row neighborhood in Los Angeles. It spans roughly 50 blocks, occupying a significant portion of the downtown Los Angeles area. In some ways, it looks a lot like other neighborhoods with its corner stores and street vendors, old brick townhouses and people gathered in its public spaces. But it’s also very clear when you’ve entered Skid Row….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human and AI Differences 7 mins – “Artificial Intelligence, it seems, is now everywhere. Text translation, speech recognition, book recommendations, even your spam filter is now “artificially intelligent.” But just what do scientists mean with “artificial intelligence,” and what is artificial about it? Artificial intelligence is a term that was coined in the 1980s, and today’s research on the topic has many facets. But most of the applications we now see are calculations done with neural networks. These neural networks are designed to loosely mimic the function of the human brain, but they structurally differ from real brains in ten relevant aspects: form and function, size, connectivity, power consumption, architecture, activation potential, speed, learning technique, structure, and precision. In my video, I briefly explain how neural networks work, and then go through these structural differences.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Infectious Disease Diagnosis 46 mins – “Most diagnostic tests look for a single microorganism, or at most a limited panel of microorganisms. Charles Chiu discusses his research on metagenomic sequencing as a diagnostic tool that can identify all potential pathogens in a given patient sample.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Distributions 44 mins – “For more than 15 years Paul has updated his discussion of fixed and variable distribution strategies. In this podcast he discusses the pros and cons of fixed distributions so investors understand: The importance of the data used to represent returns; The huge differences between 3, 4, 5 and 6 percent distributions; The importance of inflation; Why 3% is the most trustworthy strategy… but be overly conservative; How an extra .5 to 1 percent return can translate into millions of extra dollars to you and/or your heirs; How 10 years of performance may encourage investors to make the wrong decision; How one seemingly harmless decision could lead to going broke; How these tables should be used by members of the FIRE (Financial Independence Retire Early) Movement” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Japanese Internment 27 mins – “When Warren Furutani was growing up in Los Angeles in the 1950s, he sometimes heard his parents refer to a place where they once spent time — a place they called “camp.” To him “camp” meant summer camp or a YMCA camp, but this was something different. During World War II the US government incarcerated Warren Furutani’s parents, along with over 110,000 other Japanese Americans, in ten different detention centers throughout the United States. When they talked about “camp” that’s what they meant.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Land Fill Operations 22 mins – “…San Francisco isn’t the only city that has created new land. Large portions of New York City, Boston, Seattle, Hong Kong and Marseilles were built on top of fill. What is now Mumbai, India, was transformed by the British from a seven-island archipelago to one contiguous strip of land. The most extraordinary example of land reclamation and manufacture may be the Netherlands. As early as the 9th century A.D., the Dutch began building dykes and pumping systems to create new land in places that were actually below sea level….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Melting Pot America 60 mins – “Neighborhoods are constantly changing, but it tends to be the people with money and power who get to decide the shape of things to come. New York City has an especially long history with change driven by landlords and real estate investors. Today, change is taking the form of gentrification, but in the 1960s, the neighborhood of East New York became a nexus of what has since become known as white flight….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Mini Stories 3 40 mins – “At the end of last year, we started a tradition of collecting new short pieces by 99% Invisible producers into “mini-story” episodes. By popular demand, we are back at it again with tales of iceberg ships, famous ruins, sackcloth dresses, innovative instruments and more.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “OK” to download the podcast.

Mini Stories 4 43 mins -.”Last holiday season, we started a tradition of collecting new short pieces by 99% Invisible producers into “mini-story” episodes. Listeners asked for more, so we’re back at it again with tales of a backward index, alarm design, actual alchemy and Seattle’s historic underground. Also: Roman gives his take on the new presidential challenge coin redesign.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “OK” to download the podcast.

Moon Landing Anniversary 65 mins- “In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, BackStory launches into the history of America’s race to the moon. We’ll hear from flight director Gene Kranz about what it was like in Mission Control during the moon landing. And we’ll explore a kind of Apollo nostalgia that has crept into movies and other forms of pop culture. Plus, stay tuned throughout the episode to hear from our listeners about their memories of the moon landing. This episode and related resources are funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this show, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oyster Breakwaters in NYC 31 mins – “Architects and engineers are considering all kinds of different ways that cities can redesign their infrastructure to prepare for climate change. There’s talk of floodgates, and massive seawalls that would stretch across the entire harbor. But Paul Greenberg says that one of the solutions for New York’s future might lie in its past. New York was built at the mouth of the Hudson River, and that fertile estuary environment was filled with all kinds of marine life. But one creature in particular shaped the landscape: the oyster. It is estimated that trillions of oysters once surrounded New York City, filtering bacteria and acting as a natural buffer against storm surges.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Post Offices in the U.S. 21 mins – “…Winifred Gallagher, author of How the Post Office Created America: A History, argues that the post office is not simply an inexpensive way to send a letter. The service was designed to unite a bunch of disparate towns and people under one flag, and in doing so, she believes the post office actually created the United States of America….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Puerto Rico Trends 23 mins – “Puerto Rico is in the midst of a historic societal shift, with massive protests having successfully driven out former Governor Ricardo Rosselló. There have been two more governors in the week since he officially stepped down and more calls from the public to root out corruption. Now, what are the next steps? In the United States, there have been calls for more federal oversight. In San Juan’s political circles, machinations center around who should be the next governor. But elsewhere, the conversation among those who want more from their government is focused around bigger questions about representation and reform. Producer Alana Casanova-Burgess attended two “Asambleas de Pueblo” (people’s assemblies) centered on keeping the momentum for change going. For some, the bigger question is: how much democracy can there be in a colony?…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reparations 77 mins – “Reparations for African-Americans has been a hot topic on the presidential campaign trail, with Democratic candidates including Kamala Harris and Elizabeth Warren coming out in favor of compensation for unpaid African-American labor. But the debate around reparations is nothing new. In fact, it goes back centuries. On this episode, Nathan, Ed and Brian explore the complicated – and often contentious – history of reparations, from the first mass reparations movement led by Callie House, an ex-slave, to a unique moment when African-Americans in Florida received compensation for the destruction of their community. This episode and related resources are funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this show, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop- up menu.

Reverberation Control 22 mins – “There are two primary ways to control the sound of a space: active acoustics and passive acoustics. Passive acoustics are the materials in a space, like the padding in our studio or wooden floors or plaster walls. Materials like carpeting and drapery soak up sound, while materials like glass and porcelain make a room more echoey. Active acoustics are sound systems that use technology like speakers and microphones to boost or minimize certain sounds in a space…and the sonic control they offer can be dynamic and variable and quite dramatic….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Salton Sea 21 mins – “The largest body of water in California was formed by a mistake. In 1905, the California Development Company accidentally flooded a huge depression in the Sonora Desert, creating an enormous salty lake called the Salton Sea. The water is about twice as salty as the Pacific Ocean. The ground beneath the southern end of the sea is volcanic and water bubbles to the surface in muddy pools. The only fish that can live in Salton Sea are tilapia, but even they struggle to survive. This sea—this gurgling, sometimes stinky, accident of a sea—is actually in danger of drying up and disappearing. And you may be thinking: “good riddance!” It doesn’t sound all that nice. But the Salton Sea needs us. And we need it.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Scott Pelley 47 mins – “Scott Pelley is with us to talk about his time at CBS Evening News, his memoir “Truth Worth Telling” and more.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Silicon Valley History 32 mins – “Whether its smartphones, laptops, or the Internet, there’s no doubt the products of Silicon Valley are a part of our daily lives. According to the Pew Research Center, 81% of Americans own a smartphone, and nearly three-quarters of adults have a desktop or laptop computer. But how did a slice of northern California turn into one of the most influential industries in history? Brian talks with historian Margaret O’Mara about the Valley’s rise to global tech capital. O’Mara’s new book is called “The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Small Cap Value Funds 45 mins – “Small cap value continues to be an asset class that Paul recommends for all investors.  Of course, for retired investors it may be a very small part as their position in equities is low. For first-time investors following Paul and Chris’ target date fund recommendations, the super-charged asset class may take up the entire portfolio. Most investors will be surprised to learn that small cap value is low risk compared to the conservative S&P 500. In this discussion Paul references this study by Chris Pedersen, Resilency: How Fast Do Different Asset Classes Recover?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stonewall Incident 47 mins – “It’s been fifty years since patrons of the Stonewall Inn fought back against a police raid and called for gay rights. We’ll consider the meaning of Stonewall and the state of the LGBTQ movement now. How much has changed?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stonewall Uprising 48 mins – “In the early hours of June 28, 1969, a riot broke out at a rundown gay bar in New York City. Today the Stonewall uprising is famous around the world as a clash that helped spark a gay political revolution. Brian and Nathan talk to scholars and participants and discover how Stonewall led to a wave of activism, protest and political agitation. This episode and related resources are funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this show, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tasers 22 mins – “By the early 1900s, lots of police departments across the country had started equipping their officers with guns, but nightsticks remained the alternative weapon of choice. In the 1960s, that began to change, as police departments looked for new weapons to control large crowds. Many of these, like tear gas, came straight from the military. But some departments started using a new electrical weapon: the cattle prod. Often used in the South during the Civil Rights movement, the prods became especially offensive and contentious to many in the public. But there were also proponents of electrical weapons. In 1968, Richard Dougherty, a former Deputy Police Commissioner of New York City, said, “better a few jolts of electricity than a knockout blow on the head….What is a nightstick after all? It’s a club… Why in this age of science…do our police have to use a weapon right out of the stone-age?” As it turns out, a scientist and inventor named Jack Cover was thinking about similar questions. Cover worked as an aerospace scientist and had been involved with NASA’s Apollo program. In the late 1960s, as images of protests and police violence saturated the nightly news, he thought a weapon that temporarily immobilized a person, at a distance, using electricity, might be the solution. Cover’s idea for the weapon came after reading about a hiker who became stuck to an electric fence — unable to move, but otherwise relatively unharmed. After several years of development, he invented a weapon that he named after a science fiction novel from his childhood called “Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle.” To name the weapon, Cover took the initials from the book title (T.S.E.R), then he added an A to make the word easier to say: Taser. The Taser used a small gunpowder charge to fire two metal darts attached to a fine wire, carrying 50,000 volts of current from a rechargeable battery. When both darts hit a person, electricity would flow along the metal wires, causing their muscles to tense up involuntarily….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Walt Whitman 64 mins – “May 31st marks Walt Whitman’s 200th birthday. In honor of the man known as America’s “bard of democracy,” we explore diverse aspects of Whitman’s life and legacy – from sexuality to spirituality, poetics to place.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop- up menu.

Wellness Industry 56 mins – “Recent estimates have put the value of the “Wellness Industry” at $4.2 billion, with celebrities like Jay-Z and Gwyneth Paltrow offering advice on how to get, and stay, well. But being holistically healthy hasn’t always involved a daily dose of meditation. Ed and Brian explore the history of wellness, a story which takes in breakfast cereal, leotards and Sigmund Freud.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop- up menu.  

Women in Congress 55 mins – “Today, 131 women serve in the House and Senate, making Congress the most female and most diverse it’s ever been. But women in politics continue to face an uphill battle. Even after their election, Congresswomen such as Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib have faced criticism for their choice of clothing and language. One radio commentator in Atlanta even suggested Lucy McBath should “go back to the kitchen.” We look at the history of “women in Congress,” how much progress we’ve made and how much work lies ahead.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop- up menu.

WW II Museum Talk 48 mins – “It was codenamed Operation Neptune, part of Operation Overlord. And it was plotted for nearly a year, relying on the insights and arguments of admirals, politicians, engineers and weather forecasters. And on such a plan did World War II and the very trajectory of the 20th century pivot. We know this massive military invasion, of course, as D-Day. Next week marks 75 years since Allied troops stormed into the breach and onto the beaches of Normandy to combat fascism and tyranny, at a terrible price. Yet that history is receding. That’s why we traveled to The National WWII Museum, in a reminder of how that history still breathes — why it matters.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 403 – Aug 9, 2019: 40 Acres and a Mule, 401K Answers, Border Crossing at Nogales, Cambridge Analytica, Children Border Separations, Chinese Surveillance, City Jobs Decline, Climate Warming Impact, Code War Dawning, Cory Doctorow Interview, Courthouse Technology, Deutsche Bank and Trump, Economics Discrimination, Employment Levels, Facial Recognition Concerns, Ferguson Effect, Gerrymandering and Court Packing, GMO Farming and Eagles, Government Operations During Trump, Homeless in New York City, Internet for Lawyers, Intuitive AI, Los Angeles Police CSOC, Measles Outbreak in New York City, Migrants from Mexican Viewpoint, Mueller Report Review, Nerd Wallet, Open Syllabus Project, Police Use of Force, Problem Solving, Protein Research, Recycling Birth, Social Media Regulation in Europe and Fake Meat, Superintelligence, Tiananmen Square Massacre, Trump and Deutsche Bank, Trump Finances, Trumps Racists Comments in Court, Two Funds for Life, Wall Street Whistleblower, White Nationalism

Exercise your ears: the 53 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 704 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,869) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

40 Acres and a Mule 50 mins – “President Trump claims to have struck a deal with Mexico to settle a dispute of his own making. On this week’s On the Media, a look at the lives of the people who stand to suffer most. Plus, how the path to America’s eviction crisis begins, in part, with the Great Migration.1. Bob Moore [@BobMooreNews], freelance reporter based in El Paso, on the human reality at the border amidst the latest Trumpian mendacity. 2. We continue our four-part series on eviction by charting the persistent line between racist housing policies, localized profiteering and the devastating plunder of generations of wealth. Guests include Matt Desmond [@just_shelter], founder of the Eviction Lab; Natalie Moore [@natalieymoore], reporter for WBEZ; and Marty Wegbreit, director of litigation for the Central Virginia Legal Aid Society.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

401k and IRA Answers 38 mins – “Even just one idea from these 22, could greatly increase the money you will have for retirement. This recording is from the PBS Special Paul created in 2011, the information being evergreen. For more on Paul’s recommendations for 401k plans, at more than 100 major U.S. corporations and the U.S. Thrift Savings Plan, go to: https://paulmerriman.com/At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

401k Answers 62 mins – “For more than 90% of working adults, the most important investment decision is how to invest their 401k, 457, 403b or IRA. Each of the 34 points in this podcast addresses a way that is likely to produce better returns. In this podcast Paul mentions several articles: How to Turn $3000 into $50 Million30 Reasons to Fall in Love with Index Funds and The Ultimate Buy and Hold Strategy.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Accounting Breakthrough 18 mins – “On the show today, the story of an innovation that changed the way the world works, and of the man who made this innovation possible. Luca Pacioli was a monk, a mathematician, a magician and, possibly, the boyfriend of Leonardo da Vinci. Jane Gleeson-White, author of Double Entry: How the Merchants of Venice Created Modern Finance, tells us the story of Pacioli and how his book on mathematics changed business across the planet.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Border Crossings at Nogales 12 mins – “If you want to get into Nogales, Arizona, from Mexico, you’ve got options. “As a matter of fact, Nogales is the biggest port in the state of Arizona, and actually the model port of the state of Arizona. We have five port of entries in our city alone.” That’s Arturo Garino. He’s the mayor of Nogales, a small border town 60 miles due south of Tucson. He says the ports of entry include a pedestrian walkway, a truck crossing, and an airport. They also have a border crossing for cattle.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cambridge Analytica 23 mins – “Today on the show, how to meddle in an election, step by step. David Goldstein worked in politics for decades, always for the Democrats, and mostly on digital strategy. But after 2016, David felt like the rules for elections had fundamentally changed. The tactics of one company in particular worried him: Cambridge Analytica. It claimed it had developed new methods for targeting and persuading voters in increasingly personalized, intimate ways. To David, this was a threat to democracy. So, to prove just how much of a threat it was, David decided to mess with democracy himself. And maybe help his own party along the way. And when we say he wanted to prove there’s a threat, we mean it. He ran a science experiment on actual voters, in an actual election, with control groups and treatment groups, statistics, all of it. Now he’s talking about the methods and the results.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Children Border Separations 36 mins – “Jacob Weisberg spoke with Erik Hanshew, assistant federal public defender for the Western District of Texas, about the family separations along the U.S.–Mexico border. After the families’ arrest, the adults are taken into custody for federal criminal prosecution, which is where Hanshew and his office come in to provide counsel. The children are taken into the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement. Hanshew was in his office in El Paso, which overlooks a detention facility where parents are currently being held. Jacob Weisberg: The parents are across the street from you—they’re your clients. Where are their children being sent? Erik Hanshew: There’s the question everybody would like to know the answer to, particularly their parents and my clients. We don’t know. Right now, the process is essentially to start calling the ORR number, asking the whereabouts of our client’s child. Usually we’re told they’re safe somewhere in the United States. ORR for a large part has refused to provide any significant details as to where specifically that location is. It’s not till much later in this process that there’s even any word about, for example, a city and/or a particular home or facility. So right now the answer to most of our clients is, “We don’t know because they won’t tell us.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Surveillance 27 mins – “Alim is a Uighur, a Muslim minority group in China’s Xinjiang province. He was travelling home to see his parents after a long time away from Xinjiang. When his flight landed, he was pulled off the plane by Chinese police and questioned for hours. His blood samples were taken. Officers recorded his voice and took photos of his face from all different directions. When Alim was released, he realized his hometown was vastly different from the one he remembered. There were security checkpoints and cameras everywhere, police officers waiting to stop you on every block. People were afraid to speak about their faith openly. Personal conversation about anything of substance seemed to cease. Today on the show, Alim takes us inside his hometown. We see how the Chinese government has created a surveillance state using DNA, voice, and face recognition technology to track and target Uighurs. And we find out how Americans — some knowingly, some unwittingly — helped advance this system. Note: Alim is not his real name; he requested that we take steps to protect his identity because he’s afraid his family will be targeted if authorities find out he’s been talking to journalists. Many Uighurs are being detained. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

City Jobs Decline 18 mins – “Remember those stories about someone leaving their small town, moving to the big city, starting in the mailroom at a company and working their way up? Well, upward mobility ain’t what it used to be. Big cities used to be the land of opportunity for most people, regardless of their education level. Now, new research challenges decades of economic thinking about jobs, equality, and what makes cities thrive. Now, some economists are wondering: Are cities overrated?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming Impact 45 mins – “On this week’s episode of Slate Money, David Wallace-Wells joins Emily, Felix, and Anna to discuss his new book, The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming, and frankly, freak everyone out about global warming.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Code War Dawning 30 mins – “On The Gist, the White House PR machine. In the interview, John Carlin is a former Asst. Attorney General for the Dept. of Justice and former Chief of Staff to Robert Mueller, and his new book Dawn of the Code War tracks the rise of global cyber threats from Russia and China, and how our country is working to respond. In the Spiel, CPAC lets Trump get away with anything he wants.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cory Doctorow Interview 58 mins – “In this episode of the Good Fight, Yascha Mounk talks to Cory Doctorow, a science fiction author who serves as co-editor of the blog Boing Boing, about measures we can take to preserve the freedom of the net—while preserving our own.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Courthouse Technology 32 mins – “Jim and Sharon discuss courtroom technology and how to be your own Steven Spielberg at trial, storyboarding your case and showcasing technology. They go through the use of various kinds of technology explaining their uses and dangers and recounting stories from real-life trials.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Death Penalty in California 23 mins – “California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s moratorium on executions is largely symbolic.At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deutsche Bank and Trump 27 mins – “When he was a businessman Donald Trump borrowed money often. But after his businesses defaulted on a bunch of those debts, it became harder for him to borrow from many banks. But there was one bank that didn’t run away. It leaned in. That bank is Deutsche Bank. Right now House democrats are trying to get Deutsche to hand over bank records that are connected to Trump. It’s a conflict that’s been playing out in the news, but the details can get pretty confusing. So we have decided to run an excerpt of the podcast Trump Inc. from WNYC and ProPublica that lays out the long relationship between the Trump family and Deutsche Bank.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics Discrimination 24 mins – “When Alice Wu was an undergraduate at UC Berkeley studying economics, she learned about the Economics Job Market Rumors forum, an anonymous forum for economists. She went through a few threads, and was immediately shocked by some of the things that were being said about women on the page. Now for most people, here’s how this story goes. You log onto an anonymous online forum, see a bunch of sexist garbage, and say: Well, it looks like people on this forum are being sexist. Case closed. But Alice Wu set out to use data to test for bias on econjobrumors.com. Because as an economist, she couldn’t be sure it was there until she wrote a rigorous, replicable, statistically-sound, quantitative economics thesis about it. Today on the show: A young economist holds a mirror up to her field.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

El Chapo Trial 12 mins – “Joaquín Guzmán operated in Mexico’s shadows for decades. His trial is shining a spotlight on who the man is and the chaos he had sown in a country. How are Mexicans dealing with the explosive allegations made against former presidents? And what are we all missing by sensationalizing the drug lord’s trial?At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Employment Levels 22 mins – “On today’s show, we ask: What does full employment really look like? NPR sent reporters across the country, including to Ames, Iowa, the city with the lowest unemployment rate, to find out. The unemployment rate is just 3.6% in the U.S., a 50-year low. People think we are at, or near, full employment. That’s the lowest the unemployment rate can go without triggering inflation. And when the labor market is that tight, power shifts from employers to workers. When unemployment is low, workers can threaten to quit and their bosses have to take that threat seriously. That’s what leads to raises.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facial Recognition Concerns 33 mins – “In this episode, Aaron Mak talks about federal law enforcement’s use of facial-recognition technology with Jake Laperruque. Laperruque is senior counsel at the Constitution Project, which is part of the Project on Government Oversight. According to the Washington Post, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and FBI officials have been partnering with state DMVs to scan through millions of driver’s license photos. Laperruque explains the civil liberties implications of the practice and suggests regulations that might provide some level of oversight.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ferguson Effect 12 mins – “There’s a new prosecutor in St. Louis County, Missouri, taking on decades of racial injustice. How will Wesley Bell, buoyed by the political movement after the death of Michael Brown, deliver on his progressive promises?At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gerrymandering and Court Packing 67 mins – “Dahlia Lithwick and Mark Joseph Stern unpack the arguments in the North Carolina and Maryland gerrymander cases… Court packing is becoming a rather unexpected litmus test in the Democratic primary. This is an idea that would not have dared speak its own name in any earlier election that I can think of, and is now resoundingly on the table. And that’s in no small part because, by any construction of constitutional norms or rules, Neil Gorsuch now sits in a seat at the Supreme Court that was actually stolen from Merrick Garland. For years, Democrats that I know tended mostly to just stew about that, but more and more they’re talking about taking some kind of action. Aaron Belkin is a scholar and advocate who designed and implemented much of the public education campaign responsible for helping end the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy in 2011. Then he launched an advocacy group called Pack the Courts this past October. Now Aaron, I want to be clear that you come to this as you came to “don’t ask, don’t tell” and the trans ban—as a political scientist and advocate, not as a constitutional lawyer, right?At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Farming and Eagles 17 mins – “Will Harris took over his family’s industrial farm after he graduated from college. Harris was making a profit, just as his dad had. He was also farming just as his dad had: with pesticides in the field, hormone injections for the cattle, and whatever else squeezed more money out of his land. Over time, though, Harris’s worldview changed. He started to see the downside to the industrial farming: his animals weren’t as healthy as they could be. His soil wasn’t as rich as the soil just over the fence in the forest nearby. He wanted a different kind of farm, one that didn’t depend on chemical fertilizers or man-made interventions. He went organic. He started making changes. To replace the chemical fertilizer, he brought in chickens and let them roam free. Free-range chickens would fertilize the grass; the grass would nurture the cattle, and shoppers at Whole Foods would love Harris’s organic beef. It was a great plan. But then, the eagles started to descend on Harris’s farm. Eagles eat chicken. Eagles love chicken. Today on the show, a farmer tries to live more in harmony with nature — and pays the price.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Operations During Trump 57 mins – “Virginia Heffernan welcomes back Dahlia Lithwick, host of the Slate podcast Amicus, for a deep journey into the health of the judicial branch in Trump times, the leanings of Supreme Court Justices John Roberts and Neil Gorsuch, the 25th Amendment, Corey Robin’s New York magazine thesis that Trump is “weak,” and whether we should still rely on our institutions.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in New York City 22 mins – “New York City is legally obligated to find a bed for every person who needs one, every night of the year. So, when homeless shelters fill up, the city turns to the next best thing: Hotels. The city spends millions renting out entire blocks of hotel rooms. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Research suggests that the most cost-effective way to address homelessness may not be investing in temporary shelters or hotels, but providing rental assistance. Today on the show, we trace three efforts to address homelessness in America. Including one of the most obvious yet thorniest challenges to getting people off the street: Counting the homeless.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet for Lawyers 56 mins – “The Internet is a powerful tool for research that few people know how to use well. Carole Levitt and Mark Rosch are two of those people. They move through the Internet like ninjas through a moonless night. Before we talk to Carole and Mark, we argue about whether Nikki Black is right that 50% of lawyers will have an Apple Watch in 2 years.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Intuitive AI 15 mins – “What do you get when you give a design tool a digital nervous system? Computers that improve our ability to think and imagine, and robotic systems that come up with (and build) radical new designs for bridges, cars, drones and much more — all by themselves. Take a tour of the Augmented Age with futurist Maurice Conti and preview a time when robots and humans will work side-by-side to accomplish things neither could do alone.” At the link left-click “Share” and click the down-pointing arrow and select “Download Audio” from the pop-up menu.

Lawyer Software Utilities 19 mins – “Holy downloadable data directors! In this edition of “The Digital Edge: Lawyers and Technology” Jim Calloway and Sharon Nelson discuss their favorite software utilities.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Lawyer Websites 34 mins – “How do you help clients find their way to your doorstep? Use the Internet’s whizbang! This podcast contains many tips and strategies, including website development and search engine optimization, the purchase of keywords on search engines, directory listings (free and paid), electronic newsletters, blogs, podcasts, and much more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Los Angeles Police CSOC 18 mins – “On this bonus episode, I go into some of the history between the LAPD police commission and the Stop LAPD Spying Coalition, and feature some of the tape from the Central station CSOC protest that didn’t make it into the episode, including some creepy stuff that happened toward the end of the protest. I then talk to Sarah Brayne about the possibility of using surveillance technology to monitor the police themselves.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Measles in New York City 23 mins – “…New York is in the middle of one of the largest outbreaks of measles in decades—there are at least 214 confirmed cases since last October. Back in 2013, there were about 60 cases. The epicenter of the ongoing outbreak is in Williamsburg—31 cases were confirmed there in just the past week. Many of those infected are part of this sheltered Orthodox community, and the Akeres Habayis hotline has become a place for families to gather…. Back in 2013, the community was also at the center of the outbreak. “There are a couple of reasons for this,” Hogan says. “This is a very tight-knit community. And so even with a small percentage of unvaccinated children, there’s just a lot more insularity, so it’s spreading. And to be clear, it appears that the outbreak began from travelers who in some cases were from Europe, several from those who went to Israel and caught the measles and brought it back. So it’s not just like one person brought it. And now we’re seeing this whole evolving situation.” In her reporting, Hogan is trying to understand why this community has continually had trouble with measles. Which brought her to the Vaccine Safety Handbook. “[It’s] a project of PEACH, which stands for Parents Educating and Advocating for Children’s Health,” she says. “This pamphlet has been out for several years, but when the outbreak began last October, it was sent to some Orthodox homes and neighborhoods.” The pamphlet just appeared in people’s mailboxes. In New York and New Jersey, it was passed between friends and family members and circulated through the community. I’ve seen this pamphlet—it looks professional. It resembles something you might find in a doctor’s office. But it is different. “It’s full of all these big questions, like Why are autism rates going up?” Hogan says. “It posits all these questions, and then it says all this information about vaccines—it sort of puts vaccines in parallel to all these, every possible ailment. So it asks these questions and gives you this information about vaccines, sowing these kind of seeds of fear. Well, maybe it’s vaccines, you know—the reader jumps to that conclusion.” “The Rockland County executive declared a state of emergency for a period of 30 days, which he could potentially extend, [and now] unvaccinated children are banned from public places,” Hogan says.At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrants from Mexican Viewpoint 37 mins – “León Krauze talks to Stephanie Leutert, director of the Mexico Security Initiative at the University of Texas at Austin, about how the migration crisis at the border is being handled, understanding the Northern Triangle, the role Mexico is playing in the crisis, and where in particular we should shift our current focus in the region.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Money Design 21 mins – “Even though paper currency itself, just idea of money, is a massive, world changing technology, the look and feel of US paper money is very stagnant. Richard Smith is the founder of the Dollar ReDe$ign Project and in an article in the New York Times, he pointed out five major areas where the design of US currency could improve: color, size, functionality, composition, and symbolism. It just so happens that Australian currency addresses each and every one of the points made by Richard Smith. Tristan Cooke and Tom Nelson of the blog Humans in Design are big fans of all the design innovations in Australian money. Aussie polymer notes are varied in color, get larger with each denomination, are more durable and are generally considered better and easier to use than US currency.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mueller Report Executive Summaries 58 mins – “Don’t have time to read the whole Mueller report? Now there’s a podcast for that. Listen to Slate’s Gabriel Roth and June Thomas read the special counsel’s executive summaries in our free mini-audiobook. You can hear this reading below, or get Trumpcast via Apple Podcasts, OvercastSpotifyStitcher, or Google Play.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mueller Report Review 25 mins – “On a special Thursday episode of Amicus, Slate’s podcast about the Supreme Court, Dahlia Lithwick was joined by Jed Shugerman, a professor of law at Fordham University who writes about law and politics at Shugerblog and is a regular contributor to Slate. A transcript of the interview, which has been lightly edited and condensed for clarity, follows.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nerd Wallet 33 mins – “In this episode, Seth Stevenson talks to Tim Chen, co-founder and CEO of NerdWallet. During the conversation, Chen talks about what inspired him to found the company, how millennials think about money choices, and what he thinks the U.S. government should be doing when it comes to consumer finance protection.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Syllabus Project 15 mins – “What 6 Million Syllabi Reveal About Higher Education: What if you could map every book and article assigned in college courses around the world and see which authors are making the most impact? A project run out of Columbia University is working to do just that. It’s called the Open Syllabus Project, and this week its leaders released a new version of their tool that analyzes assignment lists from more than six million syllabi. But there could be unintended consequences.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Use of Force 18 mins – “Stephon Clark was shot and killed by police officers in his grandmother’s backyard on March 18, 2018. He was unarmed. He was black. Last month, the Sacramento DA decided not to press charges against the two officers who fatally shot Clark citing an honest and “reasonable” threat to the police officers’ safety. In California, and across much of America, the word reasonable is enough to get officers off the hook when deadly force is used. Will the California state Legislature change that?” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Problem Solving 11 mins – “Carol Dweck researches “growth mindset” — the idea that we can grow our brain’s capacity to learn and to solve problems. In this talk, she describes two ways to think about a problem that’s slightly too hard for you to solve. Are you not smart enough to solve it … or have you just not solved it yet? A great introduction to this influential field.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protein Research 10 mins – “Proteins are remarkable molecular machines: they digest your food, fire your neurons, power your immune system and so much more. What if we could design new ones, with functions never before seen in nature? In this remarkable glimpse of the future, David Baker shares how his team at the Institute for Protein Design is creating entirely new proteins from scratch — and shows how they could help us tackle five massive challenges facing humanity. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recycling Birth 25 mins – “In the 1980s, the mafia controlled garbage in New York. So when an Alabama businessman named Lowell Harrelson wanted to turn trash into energy, he found a mob boss. Bought 3,186 tons of garbage, put it on a big ship, and set sail to find a landfill to work with. After a 6,000 mile journey, The Garbage Barge, as it came to be known, resulted in an epic mess. But it was also the birth of residential recycling in the U.S. as we know it. This is the first in a two-part series.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recycling Question 23 mins – “China used to be America’s market for recyclables. At one point it was taking about half the world’s junk plastic. Turning peanut butter jars into socks. But China’s economy is different now. It doesn’t want our garbage anymore. What now? America’s towns are slowly breaking up with recycling. And not just for economic reasons—economists are increasingly wondering if we are actually recycling…too much. Today on the show, in the second part of a two-part series on recycling, we dig into why.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Regulation in Europe and Fake Meat 39 mins – “In this episode, April Glaser is joined by Gizmodo investigative reporter Kashmir Hill to talk about an ambitious British proposal to regulate content on social media sites. Then they discuss Airbnb’s efforts to kick white nationalists off its platform ahead of a national summit in Tennessee. After that, they talk to Pat Brown, CEO and founder of Impossible Foods, about his company’s eerily realistic fake meat products and his vision for a more environmentally sustainable food system.At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Superintelligence 16 mins – “He talks about training the AI to learn our values. But who define which are the right values when you impact the whole world? Probably the US government will try to enforce the american lifestyle to the rest of the world, and the AI will have a bias against russian, chinese, etc.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tiananmen Square Massacre 47 mins – “Tianamen Square 30 years after the crackdown. We remember the day that changed modern China.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and Deutsche Bank 44 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to David Enrich, finance editor for the New York Times, about Deutsche Bank’s relationship with Donald Trump, how they began working together, and the bank’s funding of Nazi activities during World War II.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump at 2 Years In 47 mins – “Jan. 20, 2019 marks the second anniversary of President Trump’s inauguration. By almost any measure, his has been a norm-breaking presidency. We’ll look at defining moments thus far, and how they have changed the country. The Atlantic’s series “Unthinkable” chronicles “50 moments that define an improbable presidency.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Finances 35 mins – “Virginia Heffernan dissects this week’s New York Times revelation about Trump’s financial losses with Richard Rubin, who writes about tax policy for the Wall Street Journal. Also discussed: Trump’s approach to taxes, his sources of income, and the cognitive dissonance between wealth and debt.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump’s Racist Comments in Court 24 mins – “President Trump’s language may be part of his political strategy, but this moment raises questions about what consequences the president can face for using inflammatory language. Fred Barbash explains how Trump’s words can legally work against him.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Two Funds for Life 68 mins – “In October 2018, Paul and Chris Pedersen recorded a video that offers a new and significant advantage to standard Target Date Funds. Following the release of the YouTube video, “2 Funds for Life — A simple strategy to maximize your retirement investments,” Paul responded to many questions and decided to use this podcast to expand his answers to several of the most common comments and questions. Join Paul as he discusses:  Why adding a second mutual fund, or ETF, to a basic target date fund will likely result in extra returns;  How to use 2 Funds for Life in the U.S. government’s Thrift Savings Plan (TSP);  How a small difference in returns could have a huge impact in retirement;  The impact of using mid-cap instead of small-cap value  How to use the strategy at Schwab instead of Vanguard;  How often to rebalance the 2-Fund strategy” At the link find the title, “Understanding the 2 Funds for Life strategy,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wall Novel 21 mins – “In the interview, the New York Times’ Rukmini Callimachi has a new podcast. Caliphate lays out how she knows what she knows about ISIS. Through her reporting in Iraq, she’s learned how the group endeared itself to locals with services as simple as garbage collection. And though the would-be Islamic State has fallen, the extremists behind it persist as an insurgency.” At the link left-click “Share” and select the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wall Street Whistleblower 24 mins – “Jordan Thomas is one of the top whistleblower lawyers in the country. When people on Wall Street see some kind of financial wrongdoing and want to report it, they can work with him to bring evidence to the SEC anonymously. Tips his clients have brought to the SEC have led to huge cases against some of the biggest banks in the world. On today’s show, Jordan Thomas talks about the world of Wall Street whistleblowers—and about the extraordinary life that led him to the work he does now.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White Nationalism 14 mins – “When events like the shooting in El Paso happen, the elements may indeed be obvious: Guns. Sociopathy. Alienation. But the obvious is also reductive, and risks obscuring larger forces at play. The same goes with the vocabulary of race violence: White nationalist. White identity. Alt-right. White supremacy. White power. They’re used interchangeably, which further clouds the picture. Following the events in Christchurch, New Zealand earlier this year, we spoke to University of Chicago professor Kathleen Belew. She told us that the shooting was not just born of resentment and paranoia, or even radical racism, but of a clearly defined revolutionary movement: the white power movement. Belew is author of Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America, which describes the history of the white power movement that consolidated after the Vietnam War. She argues that if society is to wage an effective response to the white power threat, we need to work to understand it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Population Day 10 mins – “To mark World Population Day, UNFPA executive director Dr. Natalia Kanem discusses progress made since the landmark 1994 Cairo conference on population and development, and her hopes for the future.” At the link find the title, “25 Years Since Cairo,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 402 – Aug 2, 2019: AI in China, Alzheimers Research, Atrial Fibrillation Screening, Awakened Family, Battery Research, Bug Hunting Careers, Cancer Genomics, Chagas Disease, Climate Crisis, Cruise Ship Pollution, Cyanide Antidote, Disaster Research, DNA Research, Drug Price Increases, E Scooters, Earth Cooling Ideas, El Paso Water Supply, El Paso Zoo, Electronics Research, Emancipation Proclamation, Emu Wars, Gay Priests, Gene Therapy Trends, Google Ethics Panel and Dementia Music, Happiness, Hydrology, Kidney Function Research, Krill Impact, Military Housing Problems, Mueller vs Watergate, Psychedelic Drug Research, Rare Earth Mining and Radioactive Waste, Robin Roberts, San Francisco Prosperity Impact, Sharon Stone, Slavery in Canada, Smart Road Research, Substance Abuse Research, Surveillance Capitalism, Tech Worker Resistance, Vaccine Discussion

Exercise your ears: the 58 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 612 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,869) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

AI in China 59 mins – “Helen Toner, the director of strategy at Georgetown’s Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET), shares her observations from the last few years of talking with AI scientists and policymakers in the US and China. Helen and Julia discuss, among other things: How do the views of Chinese and American AI scientists differ? How is media coverage of China misleading? Why the notion of an “AI arms race” is flawed; Why measures of China’s AI capabilities are overstated; Reasons for optimism and pessimism about international cooperation over AI” At the link right-click “Download Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimers Research 29 mins – “Dr. Keith Pannell sits down with Dr. Moss, a nationally and internationally recognized expert on acetylcholinesterse inhibitors and their use in the facilitation of memory, especially in aging and Alzheimer’s disease.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronomer Royal 27 mins – “Dr. Keith Pannell speaks with cosmologist, astrophysicist, Astronomer Royal, Master of Trinity College and President of the Royal Society Martin Rees about among other things our existence in the universe.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Atrial Fibrillation Screening 21 mins – “Current evidence is sufficient to justify a national screening programme, argues Mark Lown, but Patrick Moran thinks there are too many unanswered questions and evidence from randomised trials is needed to avoid overdiagnosis…” At the link find the title, “Should we be screening for AF? Feb 2019,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Awakened Family 30 mins – “In her second SuperSoul Conversation, New York Times best-selling author Dr. Shefali Tsabary discusses the revolution of conscious parenting, creating an awakened family and raising confident children. Dr. Shefali shares teachings from her book “The Awakened Family.” She provides daily tools for parents on how to manage expectations, avoid the pressure to succeed and embrace the child they have rather than dream of the child they want. Dr. Shefali challenges myths of traditional parenting and provides skills that allow children to grow into their own authentic selves.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battery Research 27 mins – “Dr. Pannell sits down with Professor Kimberly See of Caltech. She went from playing in the streams of Colorado and snapping pictures of leaves to cutting-edge battery research that goes beyond tradional lithium-ion.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.    

Bedbug Control 13 mins – “We eradicated bedbugs so thoroughly in the 50s that generations who came later suspected they weren’t anymore real than jackalopes and snipes. But since we banned DDT, the pesticide that kills bedbugs best, they’re back again. And they’re terrible.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Bestsellers on Wattpad 12 mins – “When a publishing imprint announces its launch, any excitement is usually linked to the founder’s literary reputation. The rule holds true in the recent of case of Wattpad Books, the first direct publishing division for a company that calls itself “a global multiplatform entertainment company for original stories.” The web-based publisher, largely of genre fiction, has nurtured the careers of hundreds of authors and shepherded nearly 1,000 titles into print and on screen. Novels born on Wattpad have grown into hits online and later found homes at traditional publishers, such as Random House, Simon & Schuster, and Macmillan.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bug Hunting Careers 145 mins – “The increasing feasibility of making a sustainable career out of hunting for software bugs…” At the link left-click “Download options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Genomics 27 mins – “Dr. Pannell discusses cancer and the genome with expert Dr. Scott Ness of UNM. An in-depth interview about cancer genomics and the science behind personalized medicine.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chagas Disease 27 mins – “On this edition of Science Studio we meet two UTEP professors, Igor Almeida, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences, and Katja Michael, Ph.D., associate professor of chemistry.  They have received $6 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to improve treatment and develop new diagnostic tools to assess post-therapeutic outcomes for patients with Chagas disease..” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Circadian Rhythms 29 mins – ”Have you ever noticed you tend to feel energized and drowsy around the same times every day? Your 24-hour internal clock, that’s running in the background of your brain, cycles between sleepiness and alertness at regular intervals and it’s known as your circadian rhythm. Dr. Seung-Hee Yoo is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of McGoven Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Russ Chianelli speaks with her as they discuss her field of study in circadian rhythms.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Crisis 50 mins – “On this episode of StarTalk Radio, we investigate ways to combat the climate crisis. We’ve assembled a team of experts to help us understand what really needs to happen to save our planet. Neil deGrasse Tyson sits down with former Vice President, Nobel Prize winner, and environmental activist Al Gore, journalist Andrew Revkin, climate scientist Kate Marvel, and comic co-host Chuck Nice.  Find out why Al Gore deemed it was time to make a sequel to his Oscar-winning documentary, An Inconvenient Truth. You’ll hear more about the sequel, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power which was released in 2017. We discuss why the solutions to solving climate change are still complicated. You’ll learn how to deal with climate deniers. We explore the shared tactics of the fossil fuel industry and the tobacco industry when it comes to releasing information to the public. Andrew explains the importance of telling the truth when science reporting….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Cruise Ship Pollution 29 mins – “Growing up watching “The Love Boat,” some of us thought of a cruise as a romantic and exciting way to see the world. New research out of Johns Hopkins University and Stand.earth, however, indicates that cruises don’t just “set a course for adventure,” they deliver high quantities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons into the air and delicate ocean habitats. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Kendra Ulrich, a Senior Shipping Campaigner at Stand. She tells us about the hazards presented by these moving “cities on the sea” that float into some of the planet’s most fragile ecosystems, the diesel fumes that harm the lungs of the ship’s crew and passengers, and the greenwashing that the cruise-lines have used in response to allegations of environmental irresponsibility. It could be enough to make Julie McCoy, Gopher and Isaac stage a mutiny.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyanide Antidote 29 mins – “Dr. Steve Patterson is a professor of the Center for Drug Design at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Patterson’s research is particularly interested in creating an antidote for cyanide. Current treatments for cyanide poisoning are slow acting and can have serious life-threatening side effects. His research team is developing a series of antidotes that use an enzyme that converts cyanide to a non-toxic substance. His results have shown that these antidotes are more effective than current treatments available. Dr. Patterson continues to work on expanding this series of antidotes, to improve their efficacy in reversing cyanide.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Research 28 mins – “Kent Gates, Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Missouri, visits us in-studio to enlighten us on his latest research on DNA. It’s a very fundamental piece of research about how we can control the degradation of our own DNA.” At the link right-click the “Listen” mark and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Disaster Research 28 mins – “While host Keith Pannell was on the road, he visited with Dr. Duane Gill, Professor and Head of Sociology at Oklahoma State University. His areas of specialization include disasters and contaminated communities. Dr. Gill has conducted research understand social and psychological impacts of the 1989 Exxon Valdez Oil Spill in Alaska and the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in coastal Alabama. Dr. Gill was part of a research team employed by the Gitga’at First Nation in British Columbia to assess potential impacts of an oil spill associated with the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline project. He discusses his recent studies on natural disasters and the impacts communities can face in terms of social impact.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Price Increases 66 mins – “Robin Feldman of the University of California Hastings College of Law and author of Drug Wars talks about her book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Feldman explores the various ways that pharmaceutical companies try to reduce competition from generic drugs. The conversation includes a discussion of the Hatch-Waxman Act and the sometimes crazy world of patent protection.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

E Scooters 29 mins – “The first time you saw a fleet of rent-able electric scooters huddled together on a city sidewalk, what was your reaction? Annoyance at yet another silly transportation trend, hope for a greener way to get around, or perhaps a burning desire to jump aboard? This week on Sea Change Radio, we hear from Carter Rubin of the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). We discuss why some municipalities like San Francisco have banned these E-Scooters, the safety concerns surrounding them, and their estimated carbon footprint. Can electric-assist scooters be an integral part of our clean transportation future, or are they just faddish fun?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Earth Cooling Ideas 7 mins – “In this perspective-shifting talk, Danny Hillis prompts us to approach global issues like climate change with creative scientific solutions. Taking a stand for solar geoengineering, he looks at controversial solutions with open-minded curiosity.

Earthquakes in San Francisco 20 mins – “The earthquake risk in California is real, and tall buildings present a particular hazard because they concentrate people and activities, they support critical economic activities, and their scale can pose threats to nearby people and structures. In December of 2018, San Francisco’s Department of Emergency Management released a study of tall buildings focused on damage minimization and quick restoration of functionality. In this podcast we learn about the recommendations in this study from Brian Strong, San Francisco’s Chief Resilience Officer and Director of its Office of Resilience and Capital Planning, the office that oversaw this study.” At the link find the title, “Earthquake Resilience for San Francisco’s Tall Buildings, Mar, 2019,” right-click Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Einstein 50 mins – ““I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious,” said Albert Einstein. We beg to differ. On this episode of StarTalk Radio, Neil deGrasse Tyson, comic co-host Harrison Greenbaum, and astrophysicist Janna Levin celebrate the life and legacy of Einstein himself, accompanied by Neil’s interview with director Ron Howard, who directed the National Geographic Genius series that explored Einstein’s life. Ron shares why he agreed to sign on to this Einstein project after rejecting multiple scripts for Einstein movies. Find out what Ron found most interesting about Einstein besides his discoveries. Harrison tells us about his close family connection to Einstein. You’ll also find out why Ron thinks making shows and movies based on true events, like Apollo 13 and A Beautiful Mind, is liberating.  Explore Einstein’s theory of general relativity and how it re-shaped the universe around us. Investigate Einstein’s use of Gedankenexperiments – “thought experiments.” We reflect on Einstein’s annus mirabilis, or “miracle year” of 1905, in which he came up with the theory of special relativity, the E = mc2 equation, and his Nobel-prize winning work on the photoelectric effect. Learn about Einstein’s complicated relationship with the atomic bomb. You’ll also hear  about what Einstein called “the happiest thought of his life.” We look at the different types of genius, ponder if genius like Einstein’s could happen in today’s world, and reflect on the importance of collaboration. Janna explains the peculiar rhythm of conversation that occurs when physicists are working together. Lastly, you’ll find out how relativity played a factor in Neil meeting his wife. All that, plus, we investigate the relationship between genius and mental stability.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

El Paso Water Supply 28 mins – “Dr. Keith Pannell sits down with former EPWU Director and now Director of Water Initiatives at UTEP Ed Archuleta to dicuss El Paso’s water supply.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

El Paso Zoo 27 mins – “Dr. Pannell discusses the importantance of local zoo’s in our environment with El Paso Zoo veterinarian and director Steve Marshall and Victoria Milne. They talk about the survival of certain rare species and what you can do to help.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronics Research 29 mins – “Lane Martin is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Martin’s work focuses on developing materials that will change the way we live. In particular, he works on the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of advanced functional electronic materials. Ultimately his research is aimed at enabling dream applications in areas ranging from new modes of computation, memory and data storage, energy conversion, sensing and transduction, actuation, and much more.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Emancipation Proclamation 13 mins – “The Black Loyalists were a group of Colonial slaves who fought for their freedom alongside the British. Learn all about this nearly forgotten group in today’s Short Stuff.

Emu Wars 13 mins – “Did Australians really wage war on a group of emus? YES. Learn all about it in today’s short stuff.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Forest Composition Around Mayan Ruins 27 mins – “Dr. Pannell sits down with Professor David Cambell of Grinnell College. His research is in the ecology and species composition of tropical and subtropical forests in both the Paleotropics and Neotropics. Ph.D. 1984, The Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health; Department of Immunology & Infectious Disease.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gay Priests 56 mins – “Gay priests are often rolled into the blame game in the Catholic Church’s sex abuse crisis. There’s a Vatican prohibition on gay men entering seminaries, even as the stories swirl about how many high-level clerics are sexually active. Meanwhile, the flock needs tending, and some of its most steadfast shepherds are gay, in a Church that can’t countenance them. Producer Sean Foley explores the psychological, historical, and pastoral paradoxes of clerical sexual identity at a pivotal time for the Church and the world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Gene Therapy Trends 16 mins – ‘Those who have followed the gene-therapy field over the decades may be weary of forward-looking positive statements. However, over the past 3 years, six gene-therapy products have been approved for clinical use. This article describes challenges, risks, and advances in gene-therapy clinical research.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Google Ethics Panel and Dementia Music Box 40 mins – “Shut down of Google’s Ethics Panel – Google announces an advisory artificial intelligence ethics board and then closes it down within a fortnight, following a row over the choice of its members. BBC Technology reporter Jane Wakefield explains why the now ex-Advanced Technology External Advisory Council has been disbanded. – Do robots have morals? – Who is responsible for incidents involving autonomous machines? A paper considering the moral responsibilities of robots has been published, prompting these big questions. Yochanan Bigman, a postdoc at the University of North Carolina, discusses what they found. – The Music Memory Box for dementia patients A small box combining objects that are precious to a person with dementia and music from their past has reached its crowdfunding target. The ‘Music Memory Box’ includes a miniature Raspberry Pi computer and RFID sensors and is based on the idea that a sense of music often endures in a dementia patient long after many of their other faculties have diminished. Reporter Madeleine Finlay finds out more….” At the link right-click the box with three dots, then left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Happiness 34 mins – “In a live appearance at UCLA’s Royce Hall, New York Times best-selling author, happiness expert and Harvard-trained researcher Shawn Achor says that pleasure isn’t the only thing that brings people happiness. How do you explain the joy felt during spiritually and emotionally challenging moments, such as when your legs are burning halfway through a marathon or when you cradle your 1-year-old in the middle of the night until she falls back to sleep? He offers a definition of happiness that encompasses all things that bring us deep, lasting joy. Shawn also explains how by making a single positive behavioral change, you can spark a powerful chain of happiness in your own life.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hydrology 27 mins – “Dr. Keith Pannell sits down with Hydrologist Professor Jennifer Druhan to discuss the Critical Zone. Her recent work has involved integrating stable isotope systems in numerical models of reactive flow and transport for a variety of field and laboratory experiments.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Kidney Function Research 24 mins – “On this edition of Science Studio, Keith Pannell and Russ Chianelli speak with Dr. Rudy Ortiz from the University of California Merced.  Professor Ortiz’s research focuses on the regulation of kidney function and metabolism in a variety of animal models, including seals and dolphins, with the intent that the data will have translative value to clinical medicine.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Krill Impact 56 mins – “Krill may be one of the most abundant forms of life on our planet… but it turns out we don’t know that much about them. For a create that underpins a massive ocean ecosystem and lives in our oceans in massive numbers, they’re surprisingly difficult to study. We sit down and shine some light on these underappreciated crustaceans with Stephen Nicol, Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania, Scientific Advisor to the Association of Responsible Krill Harvesting Companies, and author of the book “The Curious Life of Krill: A Conservation Story from the Bottom of the World”. At the link find the title, “#521 The Curious Life of Krill,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lake Peigneur Catastrophy 14 mins – “In 1980 something catastrophic happened to the quiet town of New Iberia, Louisiana. Their wide, shallow lake grew much deeper after it underwent an apocalyptic transformation.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Military Housing Problems 53 mins – “Shelley Kimball of the Military Family Advisory Network discusses the group’s recent report on the state of military housing.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mueller vs Watergate 15 mins – “While researching the Watergate Road Map, Benjamin Wittes discovered a letter written by the then-Chairman of the House Committee on the Judiciary Peter Rodino to the chief judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. In the letter, Rodino requested that any material relevant to the House’s impeachment inquiry be transferred to his committee. This morning, Wittes analyzed in a Lawfare article how the letter could instruct current Chairman of the Judiciary Committee Jerry Nadler on what steps he can take to ensure his committee properly executes its constitutional obligation. In the latest edition of the Lawfare Podcast Shorts, you can listen to that article in-full, read by the author.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Shorts 1_31_19 mixdown_3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuroscience 49 mins – “ On this episode of StarTalk Radio, we try and solve some of the mysteries of the ever-evolving, ever-eluding human brain. Neil deGrasse Tyson is joined by first-time comic co-host Jackie Hoffman, and neuroscientist and StarTalk All-Stars host Heather Berlin, PhD, to help answer fan-submitted questions on an array of neuroscientific topics.  You’ll learn how male and female brains differ. We explore the colorful world of psychedelic drugs. Find out why taking psychedelics is like putting your brain into a dream state. We discuss how psychedelic drugs allow unfiltered information from the world to enter your brain. Heather shocks Jackie by revealing that everyone is hallucinating most of the time as we try and break down the nature of our reality. We also discuss the idea that some people claim to see insight into the universe and beyond when experimenting with psychedelics.  Next, investigate our reality and if it’s possible that everything we experience is a figment of our imagination. As part of the discussion we take a look back at movies like The Matrix and Total Recall. You’ll explore turning certain sensory information into different sensory information, like when a blind person turns visual information into audio information for the brain to process. You’ll also discover more about synesthesia.  Finally, we explore the current state of mental health awareness. Dive into dreams as we break down the importance, or non-importance, of what your dreams are about. Neil and Heather point out the merit and flaws of Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams. You’ll find out what it means to “focus” on something. We ponder whether or not brain transplants will ever become a reality. We also wonder if you’ll be able to implant memories. All that, plus, we ask, “Do you need a brain to feel pain?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Driller 29 mins – “Dr. Todd Halihan is a professor of geology at the Boone Pickens School of Geology at Oklahoma State University. Dr. Halihan’s particular interest is beneath our Earth’s surface. He has a background in both geology and physics, he’s also a professional driller and is a divemaster! Dr. Halihan has many areas of expertise which made for an insightful and entertaining program on Science Studio this week.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Parasite Research 28 mins – “Dr. Vernon Carruthers is a professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Michigan. Dr. Carruthers’ expertise on parasites seeks to understand survival strategies employed by microbial pathogens during infection. We discuss his recent studies and discoveries on parasites on this edition of Science Studio.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Periodic Table History 30 mins – “This week, we began a new season by welcoming Dr. Eric Scerri, author, chemist and a leading philosopher of science specializing in the history and philosophy of the periodic table. Dr. Scerri’s research includes chemical education and historical-philosophical questions such as the reduction of chemistry to quantum mechanics. He continues to work on the foundations of the periodic table, including whether it makes sense to speak of an ‘optimal’ table and the form such a table might take.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Pigments 27 mins – “pigment is a material that changes the color of reflected or transmitted light as the result of wavelength-selective absorption. Dr. Keith Pannell welcomes Professor Tim Hanusa of Vanderbilt University to discuss the history of color and pigments.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plant Architecture 29 mins – “Dr. Andrew Doust is a professor of Plant Biology, Ecology, and Evolution at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, OK. While host Keith Pannell was on travels, he had the opportunity to speak to Dr. Doust about his field of interest as well as his most recent research findings. Dr. Doust primarily studies the evolution of plant morphology. His lab projects include the evolution of plant architecture in grasses, developmental genetics of domestication evens in foxtail millet and other grasses, and evolution of fruit shape and of seed oils.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychedelic Drug Research 54 mins – “In his book “How to Change Your Mind”, Michael Pollan explores how psychedelic drugs have been used to enhance spiritual experiences and treat many conditions from depression to anxiety. He speaks to IDEAS producer, Mary O’Connell.” At the link find the title, “Michael Pollan on the therapeutic use of psychedelic drugs (Encore Sept. 25, 2018),” right-click “Download Michael Pollan on the therapeutic use of psychedelic drugs” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rare Earth Mining and Radioactive Wastes 24 mins – “A single factory in Malaysia supplies about 10% of the world’s rare earth oxides, used in everything from cellphones to lasers to missiles. Controversy over the final resting place for the slightly radioactive byproducts has pushed the plant to the brink of closure. Host Meagan Cantwell talks with freelance writer Yao Hua Law about calls to ship the waste back to where it was originally mined in Australia, and how stopping production in Malaysia would mean almost all rare earth production would take place in China. In another global trade story, host Sarah Crespi talks with freelance writer Sam Kean about close links between the slave trade and early naturalists’ efforts to catalog the world’s flora and fauna. Today, historians and museums are just starting to come to grips with the often-ignored relationships between slavers and scientists.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robin Roberts 34 mins – “’Good Morning America’ anchor Robin Roberts opens up about her brave battle with breast cancer and how she uses her diagnosis to help others. She shares her most valuable life lessons, including how to be true to yourself and listen to your inner voice. Robin also reveals the two most influential people she’s ever met” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

San Francisco Prosperity Impact 56 mins – “It’s fashionable to blame San Francisco’s homelessness crunch on the prevalence of “NIMBYs” — people who hear about the need for more housing and say, “Not in My Backyard.” On the latest episode of Recode Decode, UC Berkeley professor emeritus Richard Walker dismissed the notion that the answer is as simple as “just build more housing.”…Calling San Francisco’s treatment of its homeless citizens a “moral pustule on American society,” Walker said there are no simple solutions. However, he argued, the debate about NIMBYs and their supposed rivals YIMBYs (“Yes, in My Backyard”-ers) distracts people from the ways in which public housing, education, and health care have been decimated by tax cuts for the Bay Area’s tech millionaires and billionaires. “They developed this ideology, and when they’re the outsiders and when they’re the little guys and they say, ‘Yeah, of course, we’re doing this great stuff. We need to be rewarded,’” Walker said. “Okay, that’s fine when you’re a bunch of little guys. When you become the biggest corporate monopolists on Earth, the most valuable corporations on Earth, you can no longer say that. When you’re multi-billionaires, you can’t say that.” “The rich are not going to go away, just if you start to tax them fairly,” he added. “It’s all about marginal tax rates. It’s not like we’re gonna take all your money tomorrow, but if you don’t tax at high marginal rates, you get endless accumulation of capital in the hands of the well-to-do.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharon Stone 36 mins – “Academy Award-nominated and Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning actress Sharon Stone opens up about her illustrious career, fighting to survive a brain aneurysm and the valuable lessons she’s learned along the way. Sharon is known for her iconic beauty and indelible roles in “Basic Instinct” and Martin Scorsese’s “Casino.” Sharon shares her thoughts on aging in Hollywood: “I don’t believe that being 19 or 20 or 25 or 30 or 35, that any of these moments are ‘the moment’ of ultimate beauty,” she says. In 2001, Sharon was knocked over with a pain so severe, she felt as if she had been shot in the head. After surviving the brain aneurysm, Sharon had to relearn how to walk, talk, hear and write. She says she lost her career, marriage and custody of her child in the process. Though it was the darkest period in her life, Sharon believes that starting over actually made her life richer and showed her how to stay in a place of gratitude.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery in Canada 54 mins – “Why is it common knowledge that we saved runaway slaves from the United States, but few know that Africans and Indigenous peoples were bought, sold and exploited, right here? In part one of a two-part series, contributor Kyle G. Brown asks how slavery was allowed to continue for some 200 years, and be one of the least talked about aspects of our history….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Smart Roads Research 28 mins – “Dr. Pannell sits down with Professor Tomas Torres of Autonoma University of Madrid, Spain to discuss among other things the development of smart roads.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.    

Substance Abuse Research 29 min – “If you were an incoming freshman and saw a sign that said “Spit for Science,” what would you think? This week we visit with Dr. Danielle Dick, Virginia Commonwealth University, as she shares details about her research. She focuses on how genetic and environmental influences contribute to the development of patterns of substance use and related behaviors, such as childhood conduct problems and depression, and how we can use that information to inform prevention and intervention.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Capitalism 48 mins – “Beginning with Google’s development of targeted online ads, the most successful companies in the world have been powered by “surveillance capitalism” — a term popularized by the guest on the latest episode of Recode Decode, Shoshana Zuboff. “All of the economic imperatives now that define surveillance capitalism are aimed at, how do we get better and better prediction products?” Zuboff told Recode’s Kara Swisher. “How do we win the most lucrative prediction products, so that not only are we predicting the future, but really increasingly, our prediction products are equal to observation.” There are just a couple problems: One, when customers are fully informed about how their data is being used, they don’t like it. So, companies like Google and Facebook have decided to “take without asking,” Zuboff said. And whoever has all that data has a tremendous amount of power — so much so that the same people who unwittingly provided more data than they realized to tech companies can then be manipulated toward commercial and political outcomes. “Right now, surveillance capitalists sit on a huge asymmetry of knowledge,” she said. “They have an asymmetry of knowledge, a concentration of knowledge unlike anything ever seen in human history … We have an institutional disfiguring of these huge asymmetries of knowledge and power which are antithetical to democracy.,” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Synthesis Reaction Research 29 mins – “Javier Read de Alaniz is an Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Associate Director of the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) at the University of California Santa Barbara. Dr. Alaniz is interested in a wide range of fundamental and applied chemistry that extends from the development of new synthetic transformations to the creation of a novel class of organic photochromic material. His particular interest, however, is in harnessing the synthetic utility of highly reactive intermediates for development of new bond-forming reactions used in synthesis and material science.” At the link right-click the “Listen” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tech Worker Resistance 22 mins – “There’s a movement building within tech. Workers are demanding higher standards from their companies — and because of their unique skills and talent, they have the leverage to get attention. Walkouts and sit-ins. Picket protests and petitions. Shareholder resolutions, and open letters. These are the new tools of tech workers, increasingly emboldened to speak out. And, as they do that, they expose the underbellies of their companies’ ethics and values, or perceived lack of them. In this episode of IRL, host Manoush Zomorodi meets with Rebecca Stack-Martinez, an Uber driver fed up with being treated like an extension of the app; Jack Poulson, who left Google over ethical concerns with a secret search engine being built for China; and Rebecca Sheppard, who works at Amazon and pushes for innovation on climate change from within. EFF Executive Director Cindy Cohn explains why this movement is happening now, and why it matters for all of us.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Time Discussion 56 mins- “We live our lives by the calendar and the clock, but time is also an abstraction, even an illusion. In this hour, TED speakers explore how our sense of time changes depending on who and where we are.” At th elink you can listen, but have to download individual segments; however, a copy of the entire podcast is included in this blog archive.

Vaccine Discussion 50 mins – “On this episode of StarTalk Radio, Neil deGrasse Tyson sits down with first-time comic co-host Felicia Madison and returning friend of the show and Pulitzer Prize-winning science writer Laurie Garrett, to debunk disinformation and get straight to the facts about vaccines. As we watch the rise of anti-science movements, it’s important to set the record straight and what better way to do it than answer fan-submitted questions on the topic. Laurie explains why the rise of anti-science movements stem from a rise in distrust of government. You’ll find out if there are public health policy avenues that can help combat the growing anti-vaccine movement. Explore why seeing a disease in action might be the most effective way to show people why vaccines are vital to public safety. You’ll learn about “herd immunity” and why not getting vaccinated impacts far more than just the individual. Learn the dangers of a Measles outbreak. You’ll hear about a Measles outbreak that started at Disneyland and caused California to quickly re-think its laws on vaccines. We try and nail down the main reasons why parents are worried about getting their children vaccinated, and Felicia shares what her own worries were before she got her own children vaccinated.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

YouTube Diet Impact 14 mins – “This is On The Media, I’m Brooke Gladstone. We just heard Jay Fonseca urged the media to get out of their bubble. That’s what some concerned citizens are doing on YouTube, making content that the algorithm delivers to the opposite bubbles by design. Free of old school gatekeeping, YouTube hosts a wide political spectrum from the furthest right to the fringi-est left–reaching some of the youngest eyes and ears On The Media. Producer Micah Loewinger tells the story of three young viewers whose perspectives were changed and their identities shaped by their YouTube diets.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 401 – Jul 26, 2019: Abolition and Pro Slavery, Abortion History in U.S., Alpha Males, American Segregation, Barbara Bush, Bioanalytics, Brexit Problems, Campaign Technology, Cancer Cure Question, Childhood Poverty, Climate Change Crisis, College Tuition Cost Reduction, Congressional Activities, Crony Capitalism, Female Engagement Team, Fox News, Green New Deal, HR 1, ISIS Fighter Repatriation, James Fallows Observations, Martin Luther King Day, Moon Race Project, Mueller Report and Barr, Mueller Report Translation, Neil Gaiman, Nitric Oxide, Platinum Antitumor Chemistry, Prochlorococcus, Procrastination Value, Putin’s World, Ray Kurzweil, Safi Bahcall, Sandra Day O’Connor, Senate Youth Program, States of the Union Addresses, Supreme Court Appointments, Swiss Lifestyle Changes, Trump Finances, Ulysses S. Grant Memoirs, US and Soviet Relations Under Reagan, Victimhood, Vietnam War Lessons, Vulcanologist, White Nationalism

Exercise your ears: the 43 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 522 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,815) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Abolition and Pro Slavery 52 mins – “University of Alabama professor Joshua Rothman teaches a class on abolition and pro-slavery movements in the early 1800s” At the link find the title, “Early 1800s Abolition & Pro-Slavery Movements – Mar, 2019, “ right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. )

Abortion History in U.S. 73 mins – “Tulane University professor Karissa Haugeberg teaches a class about the legal history of abortion in the United States from the 1840s through 2016.” At the link find the title, “Legal History of Abortion in the U.S., right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Alpha Males 16 mins – “In this fascinating look at the “alpha male,” primatologist Frans de Waal explores the privileges and costs of power while drawing surprising parallels between how humans and primates choose their leaders. His research reveals some of the unexpected capacities of alpha males — generosity, empathy, even peacekeeping — and sheds light on the power struggles of human politicians. “Someone who is big and strong and intimidates and insults everyone is not necessarily an alpha male,” de Waal says.” At the link right-click “Share” and right-click the “download” to get the podcast.

American Segregation 50 mins – “After World War II, Germany and the Allied powers took pains to make sure that its citizens would never forget the country’s dark history. But in America, much of our past remains hidden or rewritten. This week, Brooke visits Montgomery, Alabama, home to The Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a new museum and memorial created by the Equal Justice Initiative that aim to bring America’s history of segregation and racial terror to the forefront.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Barbara Bush 49 mins – “The country knew Barbara Bush as the wife of one president, the mother of another. During her time as first lady, she became an unwavering advocate for literacy, and, for many years, was seen as the grand dame of the Republican Party. With her pearls and shock of white hair, she was dubbed “everyone’s grandmother,” and often kept silent on political issues, deferring publicly to her husband, George H.W. Bush. In a new book, Susan Page of USA Today peels back this public persona to reveal a complicated woman — and argues Barbara Bush’s influence on the country was far greater than anyone acknowledged. Diane talked to Susan about her book, “The Matriarch,” at a live event at Politics and Prose bookstore in Washington D.C.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Bioanalytics 28 mins – “Susan M. Lunte, of the University of Kansas Department of Chemistry, visits with us and discusses her area of expertise and recent studies. Lunte’s research group focuses on microanalytical methods and microchip-based diagnostics for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Problems 39 mins – “On April 12th, Britain is scheduled to leave the European Union. But right now, there is no plan in place for the departure. Parliament has rejected Prime Minister Theresa May’s proposal – three times. And attempts to address Brexit with other options have also been shot down by lawmakers. How did Britain get to this place and why can’t the country can’t get out?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Campaign Technology 47 mins – “Political campaigns are using your phone and TV to gather data and send you targeted messages. We look at the rise of campaign tech.” At the link you can listen, but not download this item; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Cancer Cure Question 9 mins – “Despite steadily declining rates of cancer deaths over the past two decades, cancer remains responsible for 1 in every 6 deaths worldwide. It’s a scourge. So when, this week, an Israeli company called Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies captured the news cycle with promises of a complete cure for cancer within the year, the story caught fire. The company’s technology is called “MuTaTo” — that’s multi-target toxin. …A couple days into the fanfare, the skeptics started coming out: for one thing, as oncologist David Gorski points out in his blog “Respectful Insolence,” the claims are based on experiments with mice: no human trials have yet started. For another, they haven’t been sufficiently peer reviewed. In fact, the company won’t share its research, claiming it can’t afford the expense. The too-good-to-be-true story appears to be just that, built on PR puffery. But who can resist a good cancer cure? With Mutato in mind, for this week’s podcast extra, we revisit our Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook: Health News edition, with Gary Schwitzer, publisher & founder of HealthNewsReview.org.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chief Justice John Roberts Biography 59 mins – “Supreme Court reporter Joan Biskupic discusses her biography of Chief Justice John Roberts.” At the link find the title, “Joan Buskupic – Mar, 2019, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Childhood Poverty 15 mins – “What does it take to build a national movement? In a captivating conversation with TEDWomen curator Pat Mitchell, Marian Wright Edelman reflects on her path to founding the Children’s Defense Fund in 1973 — from the early influence of growing up in the segregated American South to her activism with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. — and shares how growing older has only made her more radical.” At the link left-click the up-pointing arrow by “Share”, then right-click “download” to get the podcast.  

Climate Change Crisis 42 mins – “This is the debut episode of a new Rev Left Radio sub-series called Red Hot Takes, where Breht breaks down and analyzes current events, new works, or breaking news in a monologue format. In this episode, Breht analyzes the popular new book on Climate Change by journalist David Wallace-Wells entitled “The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming” from a Marxist perspective.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Tuition Cost Reduction 47 mins – “Some private college are slashing tuition. We’ll look behind the numbers and add up the risks and rewards.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Congressional Activities 30 mins – “It’s been three months since Democrats took control of the House. In that time, there has been an historic government shutdown, explosive congressional testimony, multiplying investigations, and even some new legislation. Now, as talk of impeachment buzzes through the Capitol, both Democrats and Republicans seem to be struggling to maintain unity. To help understand what all this means for priorities in Congress and the balance of power in Washington, Diane talks to Sheryl Gay Stolberg, congressional correspondent for the New York Times.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Crony Capitalism 69 mins – “Michael Munger of Duke University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about whether real capitalism is unstable and leads inevitably to crony capitalism. They also discuss ways to prevent the descent into cronyism and speculate on their own blind spots.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Engagement Team 59 mins – “U.S. Army veteran Eileen Rivers talks about her book “Beyond the Call: Three Women on the Front Lines in Afghanistan.” At the link find the title, “Eileen Rivers – March 3, 2019, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fox News 30 mins – “The most watched cable channel is having its own bad news week. First came a report in the New Yorker outlining in new detail the cozy relationship between Fox and President Trump. Then two Fox hosts, Tucker Carlson and Jeanine Pirro, came under fire for anti-Muslim and misogynistic comments. It’s putting the channel on the defensive and forcing advertisers to decide whether to pull out. Fox News is certainly no stranger to controversy, but is this time any different?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Green New Deal 49 mins – “At Tuesday’s State of the Union, President Trump continued to call for a wall at the southern border. Meanwhile, some Democrats point to the real crisis: climate change. A look at the messaging of urgency and hope around the Green New Deal. And, a former mentor to Mark Zuckerberg lays out his deep criticisms of Facebook. Then, a Facebook employee makes the case for one potential solution. Plus, a new documentary about Pete Hamill and Jimmy Breslin, two New York City reporters, who helped turn column writing into an art form.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HR 1 47 mins – “The House votes on a sweeping anti-corruption proposal this week. It could have major implications for campaign finance, voting rights and ethics.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Fighter Repatriation 47 mins – “An American woman joined the Islamic State, went to Syria, married three ISIS fighters and called for attacks on Americans. But now, she says she was brainwashed, is rejecting extremism and wants to come back — with her child. She says she’s willing to face justice here in the U.S., but should she be allowed to come home?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

James Fallows Observations 39 mins – “James Fallows is no doubt a Washington insider. He worked for Jimmy Carter’s administration and has long covered politics as a journalist. He’s also found it increasingly important to get out of D.C. His travels around the country with his wife, Deborah Fallows, have revealed an America less divided — and more functional — than the picture we often see in the headlines. This week, as Democrats demand release of the full Mueller report – and President Trump lashes out at critics – Fallows offers some perspective from inside – and outside – the Beltway.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Martin Luther King Day 19 mins – “When he was still in his twenties, Martin Luther King Jr. was, among other things, an advice columnist for Ebony magazine. Writer Mychal Denzel Smith studied those columns for an article this week in The Atlanticand he found that readers asked the civil rights leader about everything from race relations to marriage problems. In some instances Dr. King was surprisingly unorthodox — the preacher’s thoughts on birth control are particularly eloquent — and in others, his advice was less than sage. When one reader complained about her philandering husband, he told her to self-reflect: “Are you careful with your grooming? Do you nag? Do you make him feel important?” When another described her husband as a “complete tyrant,” self-reflection on the part of the woman was, again, the answer….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moon Race Project 58 mins – “Historian Douglas Brinkley talks about his book, “American Moonshot: John F. Kennedy and the Great Space Race.” At the link find the title, “Doug Brinkley – April 7, 2019, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mueller Report and Barr 30 mins – “It’s been two days since Attorney General William Barr submitted a four-page summary of Robert Mueller’s findings to Congress. Now, Washington seems to be left with as many questions as answers. Democrats are demanding the release of the full report by April 2. Meanwhile, President Trump and Republican lawmakers have gone on the offensive, calling for an investigation into why the special counsel was created in the first place. Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne joins Diane to discuss his takeaways.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Mueller Report Translation 12 mins – “Attorney General Bill Barr announced on Wednesday, April 10, that the Mueller report will be released next week. While we wait for the release, Quinta Jurecic and Benjamin Wittes have written a “Memo to the Press: How Not to Screw Up on the Mueller Report.” Jurecic and Wittes argue that the press got lost in the confusion of Barr’s letter to Congress announcing the special counsel’s top-line conclusions, and they offer nine principles for how to “[do] better the second time.” You can listen to Quinta Jurecic read that article in the latest edition of the Lawfare Podcast Shorts.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Memo to the Press podcast mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Neil Gaiman 109 minsNeil Gaiman (@neilhimself) is the bestselling author and creator of books, graphic novels, short stories, film and television for all ages, including Neverwhere, Coraline, The Graveyard Book, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, The View from the Cheap Seats and the Sandman series of graphic novels. His fiction has received Newbery and Carnegie Medals, and Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy, Bram Stoker, and Will Eisner Awards, among many other awards and honors. His novelistic retelling of Norse myths, Norse Mythology, has been a phenomenon, and an international bestseller, and won Gaiman his ninth Audie Award (for Best Narration by the Author). Recently Gaiman wrote all six episodes of, and has been the full-time showrunner, for the forthcoming BBC/Amazon Prime mini-series adaptation of Good Omens, based on the beloved 1990 book he co-wrote with Terry Pratchett. Many of Gaiman’s books and comics have been adapted for film and television including Stardust (starring Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer), Coraline (an Academy Award nominee and the BAFTA winner for Best Animated Film), and How to Talk to Girls at Parties, a movie based on Gaiman’s short story. The television series Lucifer is based on characters created by Gaiman in Sandman. His 2001 novel, American Gods, is a critically acclaimed, Emmy-nominated TV series, now entering its second season.” At the link and soundbar right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nitric Oxide 28 mins – “Roberto Cao, professor of science at the University of Havana, was this week’s guest and discussed how he got his start in science as well, as well as what led him to his particular interest in nitric oxide.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Platinum Antitumor Chemistry 29 mins – “Dr. Pannell Speaks with Professor Nick Farrell of VCU about new treatments in cancer research. In platinum antitumor chemistry our objective is to design and develop complexes acting by new discrete mechanisms of action. Platinum-based drugs are an important part of the anticancer drug armamentarium.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prochlorococcus 17 mins – “Oceanographer Penny Chisholm introduces us to an amazing little being: Prochlorococcus, the most abundant photosynthetic species on the planet. A marine microbe that has existed for millions of years, Prochlorococcus wasn’t discovered until the mid-1980s — but its ancient genetic code may hold clues to how we can reduce our dependence on fossil fuels.” At the link right-click “Share” and right-click the “download” to get the podcast.

Procrastination 15 mins – “…we designed some experiments. We asked people to generate new business ideas, and then we get independent readers to evaluate how creative and useful they are. And some of them are asked to do the task right away. Others we randomly assign to procrastinate by dangling Minesweeper in front of them for either five or 10 minutes. And sure enough, the moderate procrastinators are 16 percent more creative than the other two groups. Now, Minesweeper is awesome, but it’s not the driver of the effect, because if you play the game first before you learn about the task, there’s no creativity boost. It’s only when you’re told that you’re going to be working on this problem, and then you start procrastinating, but the task is still active in the back of your mind, that you start to incubate. Procrastination gives you time to consider divergent ideas, to think in nonlinear ways, to make unexpected leaps.” At the link right-click “Share” and right-click the “download” to get the podcast.

Putin’s World 47 mins – “Are we all in a paranoid and polarized world of Vladimir Putin’s making? A longtime Russia analyst chronicles how Moscow has become the world’s most disruptive superpower.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ray Kurzweil Interview 38 mins – “Join head of TED Chris Anderson for a very special conversation with legendary inventor and computer scientist Ray Kurzweil, recorded live onstage at TED2018. Listen in to hear what the man who makes a living from predicting the future arc of technology thinks is coming our way next — including a specific prediction of when he thinks technology will finally gain human levels of language understanding.” At the link left-click the up-pointing arrow, then right-click “download” to get the podcast.

Safi Bahcall146 mins – “… (@SafiBahcall) is the author of Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas that Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries. Loonshots describes what an idea from physics tells us about the behavior of groups and how teams, companies, and nations can use that to innovate faster and better. It has been selected for The Washington Post‘s 10 Leadership Books to Watch for in 2019, Inc.‘s 10 Business Books You Need to Read in 2019, and Business Insider‘s 14 Books Everyone Will Be Reading in 2019. Safi received his PhD in physics from Stanford and his undergrad degree from Harvard. After working as a consultant for McKinsey, Safi co-founded a biotechnology company specializing in developing new drugs for cancer. He led its IPO and served as its CEO for 13 years. In 2008, Safi was named Ernst and Young’s New England Biotechnology Entrepreneur of the Year. In 2011, he worked with President Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology on the future of national research.” At the link and soundbar right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sandra Day O’Connor 33 mins – “Last year retired Supreme Court justice Sandra Day O’Connor announced she had Alzheimer’s disease. For many, this became a moment to pause and remember a woman who broke glass ceiling after glass ceiling. A woman who, for decades, was considered the most powerful justice on the nation’s highest court. Now, author Evan Thomas has written a intimate portrait of O’Connor’s life titled “First.” It chronicles the trails she blazed and the way she shaped American rule of law.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Senate Youth Program 58 mins – “High school students from the U.S. Senate Youth Program talk about their week in Washington and what they’ve learned from the experience.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Senate Youth Program – Apr, 2019,right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

State of the Union Addresses 69 mins – “Stonehill College professor Peter Ubertaccio taught a class on the history of State of the Union addresses. He described George Washington’s first address — delivered in person — but explained that many presidents who followed simply elected to send Congress a written statement until Woodrow Wilson in 1913. He explored how, since then, State of the Union speeches have evolved along with new technology and, in modern times, have been used to bolster political platforms.” At the link you can listen but must pay for a download; however, a copy of the audio podcast is included in this blog archive.

Supreme Court Appointments 76 mins – “Brooklyn College Professor KC Johnson taught a class on Presidents Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon’s Supreme Court nominations. He described Johnson’s plan to fill the bench with liberal justices and the difficulties he ran into getting them confirmed. He outlined the resistance from conservative senators in the confirmation hearings and concluded with background on some of Nixon’s nominations to the court.” At the link you can listen but must pay for a download; however, a copy of the audio podcast is included in this blog archive.

Swiss Lifestyle Changes 63 mins – “When Nancy Holten was 8 years old her mom put her in a moving van. She fell asleep, woke up in Switzerland, and she’s been there ever since. Nancy is big into animal rights, crystals, and various forms of natural and holistic healing. She’s also a viral sensation: the Dutch woman apparently so annoying, her Swiss town denied her citizenship. In this episode we go to the little village of Gipf-Oberfrick to meet Nancy, talk with the town, and ask the question: what does it mean and what does it take to belong to a place?At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Trump Finances 30 mins – “With Democrats in control of the House, predictions of further scrutiny into President Trump’s finances are becoming a reality. Several different House committees have opened up probes into various aspects of the President’s business dealings, from questions about how the Trump charity operates to the long simmering debate over releasing his tax returns. And then there’s state and federal level investigations. It’s a lot and it’s confusing, but the Washington Post’s David Fahrenthold has it covered.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

U.S. and Soviet Relations Under Reagan 77 mins – “George Washington University Professor Chris Tudda taught a class about foreign relations between the United States and the Soviet Union during President Ronald Reagan’s administration. He began with the Iran-Contra affair but then examined the impact of changes in Soviet leadership during the 1980s on Cold War policies in both countries.” At the link you can listen but must pay for a download; however, a copy of the audio podcast is included in this blog archive.

Ulysses S. Grant Memoirs 59 mins – “West Point English professor Elizabeth Samet discusses her annotated edition of Ulysses S. Grant’s memoirs.” At the link find the title, “Elizabeth Samet – Feb 24, 2019, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Victimhood 49 mins – “On Thursday in the Wall Street Journal, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh acknowledged his sharp tone in recent hearings. This week, we examine the anger and resentment driving the #MeToo backlash. Plus, a deep dive into into our flawed narratives about Native American history, and a close look at the role problematic fantasies about indigenous people play in German culture.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam War Lessons 61 mins – “Triton College professor Edward White teaches a class on lessons learned from the Vietnam War.” At the link find the title, “Vietnam War Lessons Learned – Mar, 2019, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vulcanologist 29 mins – “Dr. Teresa Ubide at the University of Queensland. Dr. Ubide is a volcanologist with a passion for understanding why, how and when volcanic eruptions start. She studies a wide range of active and past volcanic systems in different tectonic settings around the world, and her current research focuses on minerals hosted in volcanic rocks, as they provide a detailed record of the processes leading to eruptions.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White Nationalism Leader 26 mins – “Most Americans are not familiar with the name Madison Grant. But in the early 20th century he was one of the most well-known members of an elite group of intellectuals and policy makers who promoted ideas of racial purity and white nationalism. He influenced restrictive immigration policy making in this country, and from his 1916 book “The Passing of the Great Race,” Grant’s views spread around the globe. In fact, Hitler considered the text as his “bible.” So who is Madison Grant and why don’t we know about him today? And what can this history teach us about the resurgence in white nationalism? Adam Serwer’s recent profile of Madison Grant looks into these questions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 400 – Jul 19, 2019: Alcohol Addiction, Angry Women, Broadband in North Carolina, Chinese Internet, Clemency Concept, Concussion Discussion, Democratic Socialism, Depression Causes, Fibernet Failure, Genetic Advances, Immigration Controversy, Impeachment Discussion, Investment Advice, Iran Women’s Revolution of ’79, Kellogg Brothers, Marijuana Effects, Medical Doctor Part-time, Molecular Engineer, Mountaintop Removal, Obesity Paradox, Online Censorship, Opioid Narratives, Palliative Care for Homeless, Paris Sewers, Parkland One Year Later, Policing the Police, Population Decline, Programmers Culture, Shoemaker-Levy 9, Smart City Problems, Tech’s Moral Void, Telemedicine via Internet, Tribal Rights, Urban Growth, Wildfire Impact

Exercise your ears: the 53 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 778 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,485) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Alcohol Addiction 52 mins – “The writer Leslie Jamison said she had bought into the story that booze and a dark temperament were ingredients of beautiful art. So when she sobered up she had to ask herself whether you can write compelling stories about happiness. The writer Leslie Jamison had a lot going for her: she had studied at the Iowa Workshop and earned a Ph.D. from Yale. She was also an alcoholic. Jamison said she had bought into the story that somehow booze and a dark temperament were the ingredients of beautiful art. So when she decided to sober up she had to ask herself whether you can write compelling stories about happiness. Jamison’s book tells her story, along with the stories of some of our greatest authors, to explore how we imagine addiction.At the link right-click “Listen” and select “save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Angry Women 12 mins – “Anger is a powerful emotion — it warns us of threat, insult, indignity and harm. But across the world, girls and women are taught that their anger is better left unvoiced, says author Soraya Chemaly. Why is that, and what might we lose in this silence? In a provocative, thoughtful talk, Chemaly explores the dangerous lie that anger isn’t feminine, showing how women’s rage is justified, healthy and a potential catalyst for change.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atlantis Discussion 35 mins – “While the search for Atlantis has been pushed to the fringes since the 19th century, archaeologists have quietly pursued cities that may have inspired Plato to fabricate the mythical city. It looks like a team in Greece has found it..” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Broadband in Michigan 22 mins – “This week, Marshall FiberNet’s Customer Service and Marketing Manager Jessica Slusarski talks to Christopher about the town’s investment in their community broadband network. Quiet and quaint Marshall, Michigan, didn’t expect to become one of the state’s communities with the best Internet access, but here we are. Like many other small towns where big incumbent providers didn’t want to make infrastructure investments, most of Marshall was stuck with DSL and some premises were still using dial-up connections. Their solution was clear — build a Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) network. Jessica and Chris discuss how the idea became a reality and what were some of the services that the city decided they wanted to include for subscribers, based on the needs of residents and businesses. They also discuss how, even though Michigan requires local communities to reach out to the private sector first, a lack of responses allowed the town to move forward. Jessica describes the favorable response from users and how subscribers are taking advantage of better Internet access than they’ve ever experienced. We also learn about nuts and bolts, including what it took to get the network deployed, how the city administrates the utility, and what’s next. You can learn more details by reading our coverage of Marshall’s FiberNet.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Missouri 26 mins – “Missouri is one of the states where electric cooperatives are taking the lead in bringing high-quality Internet access to rural areas. This week, we talk with Jack Davis, Vice President of IT and Special Projects at Pemiscot-Dunklin Electric Cooperative. The co-op is in the midst of deploying Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) to members in their service area, located in Missouri’s “Bootheel” region. The mostly agricultural area consists of three counties that extend down from the southeast corner of Missouri and is surrounded by Arkansas, Tennessee, and Kentucky. The co-op brought electric service to homes in the region in the 1930s and Jack and his colleagues are performing a similar service today by bringing broadband to a region where large corporate ISPs haven’t invested much in infrastructure. In this interview, he describes what Internet access is like for people in the region before the cooperative decided on the project, and how strong support from residents and businesses has helped the cooperative determine the services to offer. Jack and Christopher also discuss how the geography and environment influenced engineering and design plans, how locals are responding to the new service, and potential plans for growth in the region. In this conversation, you’ll also hear about some of the partnerships that Pemiscot-Dunklin has forged with other cooperatives in order to offer better services to cooperative members.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 22 mins – “While in North Carolina at the recent Let’s Connect! speaking tour, Christopher sat down with Greg Coltrain, Vice President of Business Development of RiverStreet Networks. Greg participated in panel discussions in all three communities where the community meetings occurred: Albemarle, Fuquay-Varina, and Jacksonville. RiverStreet Networks is the product of evolution of what began as Wilkes Communications. They’ve acquired several local providers in different areas across the state and are set on bringing high-quality Internet access to rural North Carolinians. In this interview, Greg shares some of the cooperative’s history, including information on how they’ve funded their deployments. Greg also discusses his experience on the practical side of cooperative life, such as comparative operating costs between fiber and copper, working with electric cooperatives, and the ins and outs of leasing assets from public entities. Christopher and Greg also talk about future plans that RiverStreet has to partner with North Carolina’s electric cooperatives across the state to bring connectivity to more people in rural areas. Learn more about Wilkes Communications and RiverStreet Networks from our conversation with Eric Cramer from 2016 for episode 188 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Internet 13 mins – “The Chinese internet has grown at a staggering pace — it now has more users than the combined populations of the US, UK, Russia, Germany, France and Canada. Even with its imperfections, the lives of once-forgotten populations have been irrevocably elevated because of it, says South China Morning Post CEO Gary Liu. In a fascinating talk, Liu details how the tech industry in China has developed — from the innovative, like AI-optimized train travel, to the dystopian, like a social credit rating that both rewards and restricts citizens.” At the link left-click “Sharethen right-click the down-pointing arrow select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clemency Concept 50 mins – “Justice for whom? President Trump’s controversial pardoning spree has benefited political allies and nonviolent drug offenders alike. This week, we look at whether the President’s unorthodox use of clemency might not be such a bad thing. Plus, why the Justice Department curbed prosecution of white collar crime, and Seymour Hersh revisits highlights from his storied investigative reporting career.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concussion Discussion P2 24 mins – “Doc Lax continues our discussion of diagnosing and managing concussion (mTBI) for operators and PJs, corpsman, and medics.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democratic Socialism 29 mins – “Twenty Democrats seeking their party’s presidential nomination took to the debate stage this week. Over two nights, we heard from the crowded field on health care and immigration, as well as gun control and how to make the economy “work for all Americans.” Diane discusses who stood out, the state of the race, and what the debates revealed about the future of the Democratic party.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Depression Causes 52 mins – “The journalist Johann Hari traveled around the world to find out why people are so depressed these days. He found evidence for nine causes of depression and anxiety, and he says he has some ideas for fixing them. At a young age, the journalist Johann Hari was diagnosed with depression. Doctors said there was a chemical imbalance in his brain that drugs could fix. As an adult, he began to wonder if it wasn’t his brain that was off kilter. What if it had more to do with the way we live? So he traveled around the world, investigating these questions, and he found evidence for nine causes of depression and anxiety. Two of them are biological, but the others are cultural, and Hari has some ideas for fixing them. Johann Hari’s writing has appeared in the New York Times, the Guardian, and Politico, among many others. His TED Talk “Everything You Know About Addiction Is Wrong” has been viewed more than 10 million times. His new book is Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes ofand the Unexpected SolutionsAt the link right-click “Listen” and select “save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Fibernet Failure 31 mins – “The United States prides itself on being a country of innovation. But in the land that built the internet, our ability to get access to high speed quality service is not on par with other countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard law professor Susan Crawford says as the country slips further behind, we jeopardize our place as a leader in the tech revolution. Susan Crawford’s new book is called “Fiber: The Coming Tech Revolution―And Why America Might Miss It.” AT the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Genetic Advances 18 mins – “Gene-editing tools like CRISPR enable us to program life at its most fundamental level. But this raises some pressing questions: If we can generate new species from scratch, what should we build? Should we redesign humanity as we know it? Juan Enriquez forecasts the possible futures of genetic editing, exploring the immense uncertainty and opportunity of this next frontier.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Controversy 51 mins – “Immigration systems regulate the flow of foreign immigrants into any given country. But why is immigration such a controversial topic, especially in the United States? In this episode, Josh and Chuck delve into the details and debate behind immigration.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Impeachment Discussion 35 mins – “The first calls to remove President Trump were heard even before he took office. After Trump fired former FBI Director James Comey, talk of impeachment became louder. But with a Republican-controlled Congress, that was all it was – talk. Now that Democrats have a majority in the House of Representatives, that could change. But should the House move to impeach? The Atlantic’s Yoni Appelbaum says “yes.” He looks to history to make his argument that the impeachment process may be just what this country needs right now.” At the link you can listen, but not down-load; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Impeachment Discussion 52 mins – “The journalist Yoni Appelbaum says that to understand what impeaching Donald Trump would mean, it helps to look at the case of the 17th president, Andrew Johnson. His impeachment, Appelbaum says, brought order out of chaos. Thursday, we’re talking about the power of impeachment. The journalist Yoni Appelbaum says that to understand what impeaching Donald Trump would mean, it helps to look at the case of the 17th president, Andrew Johnson. He was a brash and profane businessman-turned-politician who stoked racial tensions. Appelbaum says that impeaching Johnson moved the debate about his fitness for office out of the court of public opinion and into Congress, where it belonged. It also brought order out of chaos. Yoni Appelbaum is a historian and a senio editor at the Atlantic, where he oversees the Ideas section. His article “The Case for Impeachment” appeared in magazine’s the March 2019 issue.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation and Scientific Progress 76 mins – “Patrick Collison, co-founder and CEO of Stripe, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the pace of innovation. Collison argues that despite enormous increases in the numbers of scientists and researchers, the pace of progress in scientific and technological understanding does not seem to be increasing accordingly. The conversation looks at the challenge of measuring innovation and whether the pace of innovation should be a matter of concern and if so, what might be done about it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Advice 99 mins – “In this special podcast, Paul discusses his list of “A Dozen Million-Dollar Decisions.” This advice for college students was recorded this week for students at Western Washington University, Paul’s alma mater and where The Merriman Financial Education Foundation funds the development and presentation of Personal Investing 216, an accredited course since 2014.  The 12 Decisions include: saving vs. spending, stocks vs. bonds, degrees of diversification, taxes, expenses, target date funds, and more. For young investors to better understand equities (stocks) and fixed income (bonds), see this Table   Here also are some sites that appeal to young investors trying to deal with the realities of student debt and transitioning to the “real world” while maintaining a budget that leaves room for some saving: http://www.mrmoneymustache.com https://thinksaveretire.com https://www.choosefi.com” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran Womens’ Revolution of ‘79 54 mins – “”We didn’t have a revolution to go backwards.” That was the rallying cry which brought tens of thousands of Iranian women together onto the streets of Tehran on March 8, 1979. After finally ousting the Shah, and just mere weeks after Ayatollah Khomeini took power, Iranian women marched to show their fury at the revolution, which now seemed to be turning against them. On the 40th anniversary of their protests, CBC Radio producer Donya Ziaee spoke to three women who were on the streets of Tehran, fighting to to turn the tide of history.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Kellogg Brothers 74 mins – “There’s no way you haven’t had one of their breakfast cereals, but we bet you don’t know the story behind the two brothers who brought the world corn flakes. Buckle in for a lot of talk about poop, religion and masturbation, live from Sydney, Australia.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Lewis and Clark Details 59 mins – “They may be the most famous explorers in U.S. history, but there are plenty of interesting details to the Lewis and Clark expedition that history has allowed to fade. Learn about the origin and the aftermath of America’s first early push Westward in this episode..” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Marijuana Effects 64 mins – “For millennia people used marijuana for fun and medicine. Not until the 20th century that was it vilified, unfairly say many. Weed has done lots of good things, from alleviating cancer symptoms to unlocking secrets of the brain. Learn all about pot here. .” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Medical Doctor Part-time 26 mins – “Few doctors plan for a future that involves part-time work while they’re in the throes of a gruelling medical school education, but even then, Michelle Cohen knew it would be a part of her plan at some point down the line. “I never really wanted to be — especially with a young family — to have that kind of 60-plus-hour-a-week work,” Dr. Cohen told Dr. Brian Goldman, host of White Coat, Black Art. The 30-something family physician in Brighton, Ont., shares a practice with a semi-retired doctor who wanted to reduce his hours. The arrangement lets her spend time caring for her three children. “I don’t want to push myself to that extent and not be a part of my family life and not enjoy my life now that I’m finally out of school,” said Cohen, who worked full-time work previously when her husband took parental leave. Dr. Michelle Cohen, shown with her three children, says working part-time allows her to spend more time caring for her family, but it’s a constant juggling act. (Submitted by Michelle Cohen) Part-time work is becoming a fact of life in Canada. A recent look at job stats shows that the greatest number of positions being created are part-time. It’s something we accept when it comes to our supermarket cashiers, nurses and even our children’s teachers. But it’s also becoming more common among doctors. An estimated 15 per cent of physicians work part-time, some as a means of reducing burnout. Others, like Dr. Michelle Cohen, planned for it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Molecular Engineer 12 mins – “The transistors that power the phone in your pocket are unimaginably small: you can fit more than 3,000 of them across the width of a human hair. But to keep up with innovations in fields like facial recognition and augmented reality, we need to pack even more computing power into our computer chips — and we’re running out of space. In this forward-thinking talk, technology developer Karl Skjonnemand introduces a radically new way to create chips. “This could be the dawn of a new era of molecular manufacturing,” Skjonnemand says.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mountain Top Removal 14 mins – “Research investigator Michael Hendryx studies mountaintop removal, an explosive type of surface coal mining used in Appalachia that comes with unexpected health hazards. In this data-packed talk, Hendryx presents his research and tells the story of the pushback he’s received from the coal industry, advocating for the ethical obligation scientists have to speak the truth.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nairobi Slumlords 53 mins – “In Nairobi’s slums, more than 90% of residents rent a shack from a slum landlord. These so-called slumlords have a less than shining reputation in the popular media, for exploiting the lives of the some of the poorest people in Kenya. BBC reporter Anne Soy takes one Kibera street as her starting point and investigates the ownership chain back to its source in an attempt to discover that there are bigger players and corruption on a much wider scale. It turns out that there is no business like slum business. Who are the faceless figures who own hundreds of shacks and make massive tax-free profits? Who is bulldozing whole areas of Kibera and leaving hundreds homeless? We meet the activists who are bringing slumlords and tenants together to fight these mass evictions and the real enemy behind them. We also exmaine the structural reasons that might explain the so-called ‘Kibera Conundrum’ – why this slum defies all efforts to develop it. The answer, we discover, lies with land titles and those who benefit from maintaining the status quo, of keeping Kibera as one of Africa’s largest poverty traps.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Obesity Paradox 27 mins – “It is well known that being overweight or obese puts a person at a higher risk of stroke, heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and many other conditions. But new research suggests that if a person does have a stroke, they are more likely to survive it if they are overweight. This adds evidence to what is known as the obesity paradox; namely that obesity puts you at risk, but might protect you in certain circumstances. Claudia speaks to the study author Dr Zuolu Liu, Vascular Neurology Fellow at the University of California Los Angeles Medical Center. Algae, cacti and the horseradish tree – they may sound like parts of nature you would observe on a hike but, according to a new report, these are among the 50 so-called foods of the future we should all be eating. The report, compiled by the food manufacturers Knorr, WWF-UK and the Center of Public Health Nutrition at the University of Washington, is hoping to help find solutions to how we can reduce the impact our food has on the environment. And give us some health benefits as well. The BBC’s Katie Silver went along to taste some of the ingredients in Paris and New York.” At the link you can listen, but not down-load; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Online Censorship 64 mins – “Professor Jonathan Zittrain discusses the social media giant’s ‘long year’ with Facebook’s head of global policy management Monika Bickert. Citing his sense of the “pessimism and near-despair that permeate our feelings about social media,” Zittrain opened the conversation by recalling a September 2017 discussion in which he and Bickert looked at the rise of white nationalism and the first indications of how social media manipulation had been at play in the 2016 elections….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the soundbar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Addictions P3 55 mins – “In the final chapter of this series we travel to the heart of our modern opioid crisis. In what is now a notorious Philadelphia neighborhood called Kensington, we meet two victims of the epidemic and follow them on two distinct paths toward recovery. Our current devastating opioid crisis is unprecedented in its reach and deadliness, but it’s not the first such epidemic the United States has experienced or tried to treat. In fact, it’s the thirdTreating America’s Opioid Addiction is a three-part series that investigates how we’ve understood and treated opioid addiction over more than a century. Through the years we’ve categorized opioid addiction as some combination of a moral failure, a mental illness, a biological disease, or a crime. And though we’ve desperately wanted the problem to be something science alone can solve, the more we look, the more complicated we learn it is.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop- menu.  

Opioid Narratives 24 mins – “Purdue Pharma has settled a lawsuit with the state of Oklahoma for $270 million, a larger figure than two other cases the company has settled with other states. In doing so, the company also avoided a televised trial in May at a time when there’s been growing public pressure on Purdue and its owners, the Sackler family, amid allegations that they misled the public about the dangers of OxyContin. Back in 2017, Bob spoke with Barry Meier about how public discourse about chronic pain and treatment have been shaped by companies like Purdue with help from physicians, consultants, and the media. Meier is a former reporter for The New York Times and author of Pain Killer: A “Wonder” Drug’s Trail of Addiction and Death. Bob also interviewed journalist Anna Clark about her reporting for the Columbia Journalism Review on opioid-related death notices. Sites like Legacy.com, she explained, have often chronicled the crisis’ individual human toll.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Pablo Picasso 51 mins – “When Pablo Picasso moved to Paris in 1904 he was still struggling to find his artistic identity. Three years later, he broke through with one of the most famous and controversial paintings ever: Les Demoiselles d’Avignon. When Pablo Picasso moved to Paris in 1904 he was still struggling to find his artistic identity. The French capital was the center of the art world, and it was there, in the seedy glamour of Montmartre, that Picasso found friends, rivals, patrons and inspiration. Then, in 1907, he broke through with one of the most famous and controversial paintings ever: Les Demoiselles d’Avignon. Biographer Miles Unger has written a book about Picasso’s breakthrough period, and he joins us to talk about it. Miles Unger writes about art and books the The Economist. He’s written biographies of Machiavelli, Lorenzo de’Medici, and Michelangelo. His latest book is Picasso and the Painting that Shocked the World At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Palliate Care for Homeless 26 mins – “It was an unremarkable venue for an extraordinary gathering: A drab, windowless staff room in the basement of a Toronto homeless shelter in mid-February. Doctors, nurses and shelter workers sat on well-worn chairs around a coffee table displaying a framed photo of the woman — who is being called Ruth to protect her privacy — beside a flickering candle. Hoping to find better care in a larger centre, Ruth arrived in Toronto from Saskatchewan with a dire cancer prognosis, no family and no place to live. The team at Palliative Education and Care for the Homeless (PEACH), which had cared for the 56-year-old woman through her metastatic breast cancer for two years, were mourning in a “healing circle” to help process her death….” At the link find the title, “Palliative care team helps the homeless die ‘with dignity.’ A healing circle helps them grieve,” right-click “Download Palliative care team helps the homeless die ‘with dignity.’ A healing circle helps them grieve” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paris Sewers P1 54 mins – “Public sewers might be a fairly modern innovation, but that’s not to say that people in the past were entirely ignorant about disease and how it was transmitted. Did people actually throw the contents of their chamber pots out the window and into the street hundreds of years ago? The Romans had a sewer system that drained into the rivers, and they knew enough about to keep clean drinking water separate from more general purpose water. A couple of thousand years earlier, the palace at Knossos in Crete also had sewers and even a kind of flushable toilet. Yet plague and disease swept across the world on a regular basis. So why did it take so long to figure out the causes and the probably solutions to the great pandemics? Part of the reason is that for a very long time, there was no real idea of the public good, that in order for all of us to be healthy, we all pretty much have to have the same access to clean water, and similar standards of hygiene. The herd immunity idea. But there was one other big consequence to our lack of understanding about disease: the big pandemics slowed down the growth of cities. The Paris Sewer Museum is, in fact, a working sewer. In the 19th. century you could eat dinner while taking a boat tour through the sewers. (Philip Coulter/CBC) At a certain point, all that concentration of humanity – and its waste – bred disease, and growing civilizations would have to step back for a while. The modern metropolis is really only possible because now we have a better understanding of how disease is transmitted, and of the public good. The French Revolution, and the Declaration of the Rights of Man, proposed a big idea of the common good, a more equitable society, a social contract between the state and the citizen. One of the offshoots of that was the notion of public health: it took about fifty years to get established with the rebuilding of Paris that started in the 1850’s. We may suffer a little nostalgia for the beauty of the old medieval city that is lost now. But there’s no question that the new city is beautiful too – and partly for what’s below ground: the sewers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Paris Sewers P2 54 mins –Sewers are a relatively modern phenomenon. For centuries, people in cities lived intimately with their waste. The price paid for that lack of awareness about hygiene was of course disease and plague — as well as unbearable stench. Understanding how germs and diseases are spread led to sanitation and sewers — and to the modern city. The rebuilding of Paris in the mid-19th century was a great civic achievement and a new idea of society only made possible because it was built on sewers. This is the second of a 2-part series by Philip Coulter. The idea of the common good has deep roots. Ancient Greek philosophers thought about what “the good” might be, and how it might find expression in both individual action and individual lives, as well as in the good society. Social cohesion was important, but that didn’t mean that everyone was somehow equal, merely that knowing your role in the overall pecking order brought happiness and social harmony. It was more of a philosophical idea than a practical one, and a long way from our modern focus on equality of access and opportunity. The French Revolution of the 18th century brought in a new idea – the Social Contract, borrowed from the philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau, which promised not just a mutual set of obligations and responsibilities between the individual and the state, but also a new idea of the common good: that a state is successful when it responds to and reflects the interests and needs of its citizens. We can draw a fairly straight line from these lofty ideas and ideals to the massive expansion of the Paris sewers in the mid-19th century. When the Emperor Napoleon III, his city planner Baron Haussmann and the engineer Eugene Belgrand set out to tear down most of the city and build something absolutely new, a large part of the impetus was to create a city that would be for the benefit of all, and not just the few. The city in and of itself would be the expression of a civic ideal of equality: everyone would have clean water, clean air, parks, as well as wide, pleasant and beautiful streets. And proper sewers. But all this depended on people agreeing on what their common needs are. It’s one thing for an emperor, or a philosopher-king, to decide what the people really want and then give it to them. It’s quite another thing, as Patrick Zylberman laments, when the people have the power to decide for themselves what they want, and decide through both collective action and inaction that the common good is less important than the personal good. That part the ancient Greeks got right.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Parkland One Year Later 47 mins – “In one year since Parkland, more than 1,000 young people have died in gun violence. We talk to the reporters who counted the numbers and tell the stories.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Pathology Services 9 mins – “Kenneth Fleming and John Nkengasong discuss the importance of pathology services, as part of The Lancet’s Series on pathology and laboratory medicine in low-income and middle-income countries.” At the link find the title, “Pathology and laboratory medicine,” right-click “Download audio” and “save” to get the podcast.

PBS Survival 53 mins- “Paula Kerger, the president and CEO of PBS, talks with Recode’s Kara Swisher about the state of public media as President Trump is trying to cut its federal funding. In this episode: How Kerger got to PBS 13 years ago; why running it is more like running a co-op than a normal company; the decline of local media; how public media is funded; bringing PBS into the digital age; why it’s backed off of Netflix in favor of competitors like Amazon; YouTube isn’t just a stepping-stone to TV; the commercial cable channels that gave up on PBS-style content; how important is broadcast for PBS’ future?; how it builds for mobile streaming; investigative journalism in VR; has content changed in the digital era?; kids’ shows like Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood; Trump’s proposal to close the Corporation for Public Broadcasting; why that would hurt rural communities the most; why PBS is not “liberal”; and where will PBS be in 20 years?” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photographing the West 51 mins – “How much can a photograph tell us about our past? Historian Martha Sandweiss says images like the one of the railroads meeting at Promontory Summit “can describe, but they rarely explain.” How much can a photograph tell us about our past? You’ve probably seen the 1869 image of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railroads meeting at Promontory Summit. What you can’t see though are the Chinese laborers who laid more than 10 miles of track in one day. The historian Martha Sandweiss says photographs “can describe, but they rarely explain.” She’s coming to Utah, and joins us to talk about 19th century photography and what you can learn by what those photos show and don’t show.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pixar Story 40 mins – “Harness the power of frustrated people to shake up the status quo — just like Pixar did. This episode is made possible with the support of Bonobos, Accenture, Hilton and JPMorgan Chase & Co. (Audio only)” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Planet Fire 54 mins – “People like neo-nazi Andrew Anglin and conspiracy theorist Alex Jones have long tested the limits of permissible speech. On this week’s On the Media, hear from a lawyer who defends the First Amendment rights of society’s worst actors. Plus, a lawyer suing in defense of government transparency, a fire historian weighs in on the coverage of the California wildfires, and a Texas journalist who has reported on hundreds of executions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plant Reproduction 33 mins – “For about 375 million years, plants have been using pollen (aka plant sperm) to propagate their species. And the technique has stuck around because it works. Join Chuck and Josh for a cozy look at the ins and outs of plant reproduction..” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Policing the Police 16 mins – “California recently passed a law that eliminates some of the barriers to accessing records on egregious police misconduct and deadly use of force. With the floodgates open, journalists, like KPCC investigative reporter Annie Gilbertson, are elated and terrified. Just one police violation can come with hundreds of associated documents for journalists to comb through.So, instead of fighting tooth and nail for the scoop, over 30 media organizations across the state are teaming up to share resources, bodies and insight as they begin the arduous task of combing through the newly-available records. The coalition is called the California Reporting Project. Bob Garfield talked with Gilbertson about what the project is uncovering.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Population Decline 47 mins – “Ten billion people on earth by 2050. But what if that prediction is … all wrong? A pair of researchers argues the population is headed for a steep decline, and bring with it a whole new set of challenges.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Programmers Culture 47 mins – “Algorithms influence everything we do now. Who’s creating them? Understanding coders and why how they think is changing how we live.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Romanians 27 mins – “Romanians are the second largest foreign nationality in the UK. Why did they come and will they stay? One politician famously once said he “would not like to live next door to Romanians.” But now they work in the health service, they teach in British universities, pick fruit on farms and wash cars. Yet sensational headlines have described them as “criminal gangs” and “begging Roma.” Tessa Dunlop, a Romania-phile historian, uncovers a misunderstood, multi-layered immigrant community and asks why so many now call Britain home. The UK has a surprising historic link with Romania. 100 years ago, the British-born monarch, Queen Marie of Romania emerged as a big winner from the post WWI settlement, with her country doubling in size. As Romania celebrates this centenary back home, 30% of its workforce now live overseas, with nearly half a million in the UK. Arguably, their arrival in the UK was an important factor in the Brexit result. Tessa meets medical staff who treated her in hospital, fruit pickers, academics and those working below the minimum wage, to understand more about this community, what keeps them here and what stops them from going home.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Shoemaker–Levy 9 24 mins – “Yep. Podcats. Not a typo. This week we take a journey back to 1994, just after an astronomer named Heidi Hammel — as well as the entire scientific community at large — learned that a fragmented comet named Shoemaker-Levy 9 was going to crash into Jupiter at a speed of more than 130,000 miles per hour. “We have witnessed other impacts,” Heidi tells us. “What was really special about the Jupiter one was we had warning that it was going to happen.” This moment was huge for Heidi, who was just a young astronomer from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology at the time. She was asked to lead the team that would analyze photos of the impacts taken by the still-relatively-new Hubble Space Telescope. Oh yeah, in this podcast episode Heidi also compares planets to cats and herself to a veterinarian so PODCATS!” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smart City Problems 67 mins – “Robin Chase — cofounder of Zipcar and Veniam (building a dynamic communications network for the Internet of moving things) — lays out a near term future where communications and software platforms will deliver us smart cities, smart homes, and ubiquitous clean low-cost shared transport. On the one hand we have an environmental imperative to get co2 emissions under control, use assets efficiently, deliver thriving sustainable cities. On the other hand, at what cost to privacy?” At the link left-click the square with three dots, then left-click “download file,” and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Tech’s Moral Void 54 mins – “Lawyers and doctors have a code of ethics. Teachers have them. Even journalists have them. So why not the tech sector, the people who create and design our very modes of communication? Coders and designers make products that allow to us communicate with each other, across cities and nations and borders. How we speak and how many we reach determines what we buy and sell, affects our health and economy, and — as we’ve come to realize — influences our democracy. Contributor Tina Pittaway explores whether the time has come for tech to reckon with its moral void.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Telemedicine via Internet 36 mins – “This week, we have another interview that Christopher recorded while he was at the 2019 Broadband Communities Summit in Austin, Texas. Dr. Robert Wack from Westminster, Maryland, where the town is partnering with Ting Internet, sat down for a conversation on telemedicine. As the United States’ healthcare system continues to degrade, hospitals, doctors, and other caregivers are looking for new and efficient ways to provide better care for their patients. Broadband is a tool that healthcare professionals are already using for preventative care, consultation, and treatment from a distance. Dr. Wack and Christopher discuss some of the innovations within the healthcare industry that use connectivity, data, and human engagement. These approaches reduce costs and help patients by reducing the stress that accompanies unnecessary trips to the emergency room or can identify when a patient requires medical intervention from the security of their home. Christopher and Dr. Wack also discuss some of the new challenges that accompany these innovations and strategies for bringing these programs to large groups of people, rather than focusing on small populations. Dr. Wack updates us on the progress of the network deployment in Westminster and discusses the community’s Mid-Atlantic Gigabit Innovation Collaboratory (MAGIC), the nonprofit established to optimize use of the fiber network they began developing in 2014.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tribal Rights 11 mins – “Still invisible and often an afterthought, indigenous peoples are uniting to protect the world’s water, lands and history — while trying to heal from genocide and ongoing inequality. Tribal attorney and Couchiching First Nation citizen Tara Houska chronicles the history of attempts by government and industry to eradicate the legitimacy of indigenous peoples’ land and culture, including the months-long standoff at Standing Rock which rallied thousands around the world. “It’s incredible what you can do when you stand together,” Houska says. “Stand with us — empathize, learn, grow, change the conversation.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump’s Boarder Wall Issue 47 mins – “President Trump declares a national emergency to fund that border wall. We’ll unpack the politics and legal hurdles. Plus, we’ll touch on former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe’s comments about President Trump and his interactions with the FBI.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban Growth 86 mins – “Paul Romer of New York University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about reforming cities to allow growth and human flourishing. Topics discussed include charter cities, the role of population density in city life, driverless cars, and various ways to help the poorest people in the world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Impact 35 mins – “Wildfires consume an annual average of 5 million acres in the US. But what causes wildfires? How do they become so powerful? More importantly, how do we fight them? Join Josh and Chuck as they take you to the frontlines of the fight against wildfires.,” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 399 – Jul 12, 2019: Broadband in Oregon, Censorship in China, Cyber Attack-Australia, Death Process, Detroit House Rehab, Dialogue Writing, Disability Rights, Doctors Stories, Ebola Insights, Genetic Testing, HIV Vaccines, HPV Vaccinations, Impossible Foods, Intel Chiefs Summaries, Leading Ladies, Mapping Political Prejudice, Measles in New York City, Microgrids, Money Processing, Moth Book, Nepal Fights Paedophiles, Neverland Discussion, New Zealand Mosque Attacks, News Media Alliance, Nixon Beyond Watergate, Oprah Philosophy, Parasites, Pete Buttigieg, Pirates of the Air, Planned Parenthood CEO, Populism, Resistome of Soils, Spillover Events, Tropical Diseases, Valerie Jarrett Interview, White Nationalist Conversion, Work Mobility

Exercise your ears: the 42 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 780 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,485) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Broadband in Oregon 30 mins – “Before the Oregon communities of Monmouth and Independence banded together to form MINET, many people in the community were accessing the Internet via old dial-up connections. This week, MINET’s General Manager Don Patten comes on the show to discuss the past, present, and future of the network that has revolutionized connectivity in the far western cities near Salem and Portland. During their conversation recorded in Washington D.C., Christopher and Don review some of the difficulties that MINET has had and the changes that have helped the organization overcome those challenges. By adopting an approach that embraces the competitive spirit, MINET has achieved a take rate of more than 80 percent. Now, MINET is venturing into another community as they expand to nearby Dallas, Oregon. Working with atypical investors and private sector entities, MINET will be bringing service to a community that has been actively seeking connection to MINET. Don shares some details of the plan.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Censorship in China 27 mins – “This week we’re discussing government censorship in China, #metoo and cryptocurrency.Endless Thread is hosted by Ben Brock Johnson and Amory Sivertson, and is made by WBUR. You can listen to the show at wbur.org/endlessthreadAt the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Attack – Australia [first item] 28 mins – “Cyber attack on Australia,Weird technology from the US Navy, by Ian Woolf, Nano-engineering molecular motors by Dr Shelley Wickham,…” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death Process 38 mins – “We are talking about death on this episode and it is a party! We are going to explore life, love, and family through the lens of death with our incredible guest Alua Arthur. Alua is a Ghanifornian Mash-Up (Ghana + California, obvs) and a death doula, which means that she works with individuals and families to help them through the process of death. We chat with Alua about everything from what to do with your loved one’s magazine subscription after they are gone to what an advanced care directive is and why we need one. She tells us about the cultural differences surrounding death and about her personal journey from being a child missionary to working as a lawyer to now working within the death industry with her company, Going With Grace. Plus we find out what kind of funeral Alua wants to have and it is far from a stuffy ceremony in a church.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Detroit House Rehab 14 mins – “In 2009, journalist and screenwriter Drew Philp bought a ruined house in Detroit for $500. In the years that followed, as he gutted the interior and removed the heaps of garbage crowding the rooms, he didn’t just learn how to repair a house — he learned how to build a community. In a tribute to the city he loves, Philp tells us about “radical neighborliness” and makes the case that we have “the power to create the world anew together and to do it ourselves when our governments refuse.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dialogue Writing 39 mins – “This week we welcome Nina Stibbe to the Books podcast, with her latest Lizzie Vogel novel, Reasons to Be Cheerful. She talks to Sian Cain about the art of writing dialogue, finding humour in the most unlikely situations and what it means to be labelled a “funny woman”. We also take a look at a petition calling on Waterstones to pay staff the UK living wage. Is it time to recognise the contribution booksellers have made to turning the company around? And does a strategy based on trusting the expertise of individual booksellers make any sense without rewarding the people on whom it depends?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disability Rights 17 mins – “Four decades ago, Judith Heumann helped to lead a groundbreaking protest called the Section 504 sit-in — in which disabled-rights activists occupied a federal building for almost a month, demanding greater accessibility for all. In this personal, inspiring talk, Heumann tells the stories behind the protest — and reminds us that, 40 years on, there’s still work left to do.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doctors Stories 27 mins – “Hospital chefs and medical students make a hands-on connection to put food at the heart of preventative care.” At the link find the title, Why bringing room service to hospitals helps patients convalesce,” right-click “Download Why bringing room service to hospitals helps patients convalesce” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Insights 46 mins – “Erica Ollmann Saphire discusses her research on Ebola virus glycoprotein and the changing nature of structural biology. The Ebola virus glycoprotein sequence can vary up to 50% between Ebola virus species, presenting a challenge to develop pan-Ebola therapeutics or vaccines. Erica Ollmann Saphire discusses her work on antibodies that neutralize all Ebola virus species and the changing nature of the structural biology toolkit used to study them.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Testing 7 mins– “Brent Fogel talks to The Lancet Neurology about his work on large-scale genomic analysis.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Pollination Conservation 16 mins – “Professor of Biological Sciences at UTEP, speak with Nigel Raine.   Raine is a Professor in the School of Environmental Sciences at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada whose research focuses on pollinator conservation and behaviour and monitoring of wild pollinator populations in Ontario.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV Vaccines 38 mins – “Why have scientists struggled to generate a protective HIV vaccine? Dan Barouch lays out the unique challenges and discusses the ongoing clinical trial with an adenovirus-based vaccine developed in his lab. …HIV poses unique and unprecedented challenges for vaccine development including: Viral diversity: extremely wide range of viral diversity. No natural precedent: No human has cleared HIV based on their immune responses. Unknown correlates of protection: scientists are unsure what immune responses are important to induce….HIV latent infection causes complications in vaccine development because HIV latency is seeded early, possibly in the first few days of infection. Once latency is established, the individual is infected for life. Any low level of HIV infection in vaccinated people could potentially seed this latent infection. Quickly-seeded latency means immune responses must react extremely quickly….The challenges in the development of a prophylactic HIV vaccine are among the toughest challenges in biomedical and scientific research.” …I always encourage young scientists to pursue their dreams and to tackle hard problems. There’s a lot of easy problems to solve but some of the hardest problems are the most impactful in the end.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HPV Vaccinations 75 mins – “In the early 1950s, the U.S. was a high-incidence country for cervical cancer. Through application of screens using the Pap smear, doctors have been able to catch and excise suspicious tissue, leading to a significant drop in incidence. Cervical cancer remains high-incidence in low- and middle-income countries; in high-incidence countries, cervical cancer is the most common form of HPV-associated cancer. In the U.S., cervical cancer represents around 50% of the HPV-associated cancers, with others like penile, anal, and oropharyngeal cancers also represented. Henrietta Lacks, the woman from whom HeLa cells were derived, had a cervical adenocarcenoma caused by HPV-16. The viral DNA had integrated near the myc oncogene to generate high expression of this oncogene. The cell lines have been growing for decades but the epigenetic changes from HPV infection have led to a dependence of the cells on E6 and E7; if they are blocked or removed, the HeLa cells undergo apoptosis. Lowy’s work on bovine papilloma virus (BPV) played a key role in development of the HPV vaccine. Other researchers attempting to generate a neutralizing response to the HPV capsid failed, but Lowy and his colleague Reinhard Kirnbauer had successfully achieved neutralization using BPV. By comparing HPV and BPV sequences, Lowy realized there was a single amino acid change in the HPV-16 strain that was being used as a lab standard strain; fixing this restored capsid self-assembly, led to immunogenicity and provided the basis for the HPV vaccine. HPV L1 capsid protein has a repeating structure that induces a very high level of immune protection. Protection is so high that it is sterilizing, meaning that exposed individuals prevent any infection, not just disease. This may serve as the basis for a new strategy, using repeating structures such as ferretin in vaccine development. The incubation between infection and development of cancer can take decades, and the vaccine has not been on the market long enough to assess a difference in cancer incidence. It has resulted in a decrease in cervical dysplasia, the endpoints used in cervical cancer screening via pap smear, but no cancer reduction has been observed yet.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impossible Foods 110 mins – “Pat Brown founded Impossible Foods with a mission to replace animals as a food production technology. Here, he discusses the ways microbial engineering helps produce the plant hemoglobin that provides the Impossible Burger’s meaty qualities.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intel Chiefs Summaries 12 mins – “…the Senate Intelligence Committee heard testimony on global threats to U.S. national security from six heads of intelligence agencies: Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, CIA Director Gina Haspel, FBI Director Christopher Wray, NSA Director Paul Nakasone, NGIA Director Robert Cardillo, and DIA Director Robert Ashley. In a three-hour open session, they gave testimony about North Korea, they gave testimony about Iran, and they gave some testimony that clashed with statements made by the president of the United States. But we cut out all of the bull, and left you with just the 15 minutes of the hearing that you need.” At the link right-click “Direct download: no_bull_intel_chiefs_mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leading Ladies 30 mins – “Aline Brosh McKenna is a Hollywood triple threat; she’s a showrunner, director, and writer and she does them all really really well. She has worked in this business for more than two decades but her mission has remained the same: to center women’s stories around something other than a man. We talk about Cher, body hair, bacterial vaginosis, and so much more. Get ready! She’s the writer of your favorite rom coms, from 27 Dresses to The Devil Wears Prada to I Don’t Know How She Does It. Most recently she has been busy showrunning and writing Crazy Ex-Girlfriend which is now in its fourth and final season. Aline tells us what it was like growing up in the 70’s in very white suburban New Jersey with Jewish immigrant parents, and why she relates more to people with immigrant parents than other Jewish people. She tells us about the differences between being a boss in her 20’s and being a boss in her 40’s, and why she wants to write more roles for women over 50.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Mapping Political Prejudice 52 mins – “According to analysis by The Atlantic, Salt Lake and Summit Counties are pretty prejudiced. The least prejudiced place is a little town in New York. Journalist Amanda Ripley went to find out why.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Measles in NY City 28 mins -”In this bonus podcast Dr. Goldman speaks to Donald G. McNeil Jr. a New York Times science reporter who unpacks how New York City ended up declaring a public health emergency over the measles, as well as revealing the factors at play in a worldwide resurgence of the disease.” At the link right-click “ Download Measles: How did we get here? Bonus Podcast,” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microgrids 27 mins – “Hundreds of large power plants and a nationwide, interconnected distribution network produce and deliver electricity to homes and businesses in the United States. While our electric system is quite reliable (though nowhere near the best compared across nations), cascading failures do shut down parts of the network, and natural disasters, such as hurricanes, snow storms, and earthquakes, can cause widespread power blackouts. Microgrids, partly- or fully-independent sources of localized electrical power, can add resilience and sustainability to the power system. To learn about the characteristics, applications, and motivations for microgrids, we talk with Dr. Chris Marnay, retired staff scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, who is an expert on microgrids and sustainable energy systems.” At the link find the title, “Microgrids for Resilient Power, Feb 26, 2019,” right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Money Processing 30 mins – “This episode is all about money. How we make it, spend it, save it, and invest it. Wendy De La Rosa is our guest and she has a lot to say about all of this. Not how we are supposed to save money, but how we actually do it. Wendy is a Dominican-born and Bronx-raised Mash-Up who studies consumer behavior and is a founder of the Common Cents Lab, which aims to teach fintech companies how real people use money. Wendy talks to us about her life before becoming an academic, living as a brown person in Silicon Valley, and her relationship to her Afro-Latinx identity in the US versus the Dominican Republic. She also gives us some really good advice on how to save more money.* *Hint: it includes deleting that food ordering app from your phone*” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Moth Book 18 mins – “On this week’s episode, we’re celebrating the release of the Moth’s third book, Occasional Magic. Listen to Ana Del Castillo tell her story of finding her light again after a harrowing family trauma. Find Occasional Magic anywhere you buy your books March 19.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save link As from the pop-up menu.

Mumbai Mirror Newspaper 53 mins – “As the 2019 Indian election campaign kicks off, BBC World Service follows journalists from the daily Mumbai Mirror newspaper to get under the skin of the stories that matter to Mumbaikers. From daily editorial meetings to exclusive investigations this ‘fly-on-the-wall’ radio documentary offers insight into how a newspaper covers the life and news of India’s largest city.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Nepal Fights Paedophiles 27 mins – “Hunting western paedophiles is a priority for a new police unit tasked with safeguarding children in Nepal. Mired in poverty and still recovering from a devastating earthquake in 2015, Nepal is increasingly being targeted by foreign paedophiles who recommend it as a destination when they share child abuse tips on the dark web. In recent years a series of western men have been charged with raping or sexually assaulting Nepali boys. Jill McGivering follows the under-resourced police unit, hears the stories of victims and perpetrators and examines what makes Nepal so vulnerable to abuse by western men. This programme contains descriptions of child sexual abuse which some listeners may find distressing.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Napoleon 51 mins – “…we’re looking at the life of Napoleon. Sure, he was crowned emperor of France, but the historian Adam Zamoyski says he was also a rather ordinary man, who happened to live a very big life.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Neverland Discussion 59 mins – “A conversation hosted by Oprah Winfrey, featuring Wade Robson and James Safechuck, subjects of the two-part HBO documentary “Leaving Neverland,” alongside director Dan Reed.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

New Zealand Mosque Attacks 47 mins – “The deadly attacks on two New Zealand mosques. We look at anti-Muslim sentiment, white supremacism and the growing global threat.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

News Media Alliance 47 mins – “On the latest episode of Recode Decode, News Media Alliance CEO David Chavern joined Recode’s Kara Swisher in studio to talk about the challenges facing the thousands of print and online media businesses that the NMA represents — and possible solutions. One of Chavern’s jobs is talking to big platforms like Google and Facebook, but he acknowledged that, historically, “We have not had a good interaction with them….” At the sound bar left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nigerian View of Britain 27 mins – “Neil MacGregor visits different countries to talk to leading political, business and cultural figures to find out how they, as individuals and as members of their broader communities, see Britain. Neil visits Nigeria to meet Nobel Laureate for Literature, Wole Soyinka; Yeni Kuti, dancer, singer and eldest child of Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti; and Muhammadu Sanusi II, the Emir of Kano.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Nixon Beyond Watergate 64 mins – “Today the presidency of Richard Nixon is mostly remembered for how it ended – with the Watergate scandal, impeachment and resignation. But what about early Nixon, the man sworn into office in January 1969? As Nathan, Ed and Brian discover, Nixon ran a more imaginative and ideologically flexible administration than its ignominious ending might suggest.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oprah Philosophy 31 mins – “In a live appearance at UCLA’s Royce Hall, Oprah explains why it’s important for all of us to find our own truth. “What is the truth of me? Why am I here? And what do I have to offer?” Oprah asks. “The answer,” she says, “is yourself.” Oprah shares why you are enough, just as you are, and offers up the one question you need to ask whenever life throws you a curveball. She also shares what she wants everyone to stop doing right now.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Parasites 36 mins – “Parasites are incredibly varied in many characteristics, including their size! Some are microscopic, while others are macroscopic and can be seen with the naked eye. Not just small macroscopic, although some worms at 35 cm can be considered quite large. Some tapeworms can reach 50 feet! Bobbi Pritt’s blog started as an exercise to share the cases she observed while a student at the London School of Tropical Medicine. She wanted to share these cases with students back at the Mayo Clinic, but found the audience grew to include clinical parasitologists, microbiologists, and parasite-interested people worldwide. Part of its success relies on its succinctness: a short, digestible case study with the minimum information needed to make a diagnosis…A new bacterium that causes Lyme disease, Borellia mayonii, was found because the molecular tests that detect Borellia burgdorferi are flexible enough to detect multiple species and can differentiate between the different types of organisms. It was an astute technologist working at the bench who recognized the readout was slightly different than….One of the outstanding questions in parasitology is the relationship of Blastocystis (formerly known as Blastocystis hominis but may actually be several species) to human health. Blastocystis lives in the intestinal tract and may cause irritable bowel-like syndrome. Definitive evidence on whether Blastocystis causes intestinal disease has yet to be presented, and there is a lot of opportunity for research in this area.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pete Buttigieg 47 mins – “Pete Buttigieg, the 37-year-old Democratic mayor of South Bend, Indiana, on why he’s building a presidential run on what he calls “intergenerational justice.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pirates of the Air 51 mins – “As the workday winds down across New York, you can tune in to a clandestine world of unlicensed radio stations; a cacophonous sonic wonder of the city. As listeners begin to arrive home, dozens of secret transmitters switch on from rooftops in immigrant enclaves. These stations are often called ‘pirates’ for their practice of commandeering an already licensed frequency. These rogue stations evade detection and take to the air, blanketing their neighbourhoods with the sounds of ancestral lands blending into a new home. They broadcast music and messages to diverse communities – whether from Latin America or the Caribbean, to born-again Christians and Orthodox Jews. Reporter David Goren has long followed these stations from his Brooklyn home. He paints an audio portrait of their world, drawn from the culture of the street. Vivid soundscapes emerge from tangled clouds of invisible signals, nurturing immigrant communities struggling for a foothold in the big city. With thanks to KCRW and the Lost Notes Podcast episode Outlaws of the Airwaves: The Rise of Pirate Radio Station WBAD.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Planned Parenthood CEO 36 mins – “New Season! We’re kicking off Mash Ups to Know with the newly appointed president and CEO of Planned Parenthood, Dr. Leana Wen! A long time leader and advocate in public health,  Dr. Wen’s mission to depoliticize healthcare at the forefront of everything she does. We talk with her about what it was like to immigrate here from Shanghai at such a young age, how becoming a mother changed the way that she approaches healthcare, and why her mother’s bout with cancer led to her passion for patient advocacy.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Populism P1 54 mins – “Elif Shafak says Turkey holds valuable lessons for other countries who wish to elect populists. Elif Shafak is a public intellectual, novelist, feminist and a staunch opponent of populism. Turkish by birth and now a British citizen, she believes Turkey holds valuable lessons for other countries who wish to elect populists.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Populism P2 54 mins – “Polarization in Poland. The success of Sweden’s far right. In Turkey, “the supremacy of the people” reigns. And Brexit threatens Britain’s economic and social order. Everywhere, populism is winning big. The question is why? This episode is the second of a 2-part series.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Resistome of Soils 69 mins – “While searching for lignin-degrading soil microbes, Gautam Dantas discovered growth in an antimicrobial compound-containing control! He has since studied the resistance determinants (resistome) of soil and clinical samples to determine their similarities. …Gautam’s resistome research is built on the research of many, but especially inspired by: Gerry Wright, who proposed the presence of a resistome. The resistome is a collection of genetic determinants in a microbial group that allows phenotypic resistance against antimicrobial compounds. Julian Davies, who proposed the producer hypothesis. The producer hypothesis suggests that the same microorganisms that produce antimicrobials must also be the source of resistance, because they need to be able to protect themselves against the action of their own compounds. Gautam’s discovery of antibiotic-eating microbes was completely serendipitous! As a postdoc, he was looking for lignin-degrading soil microbes and set up a culture with antibiotics as a negative control. To his surprise, there were some soil microbes that were able to grow – using the drugs as food! Samples from 3 different states were all able to support microbial life. The resistome of soil is very similar to the resistome of clinical samples, but the study design doesn’t allow Gautam to conclude directionality: do the genes move from the clinic to the environment or from the environment to the clinic? This requires studying the resistomes over time, rather than the snapshot analyses this study generated. However, Gautam’s group has received funding to do longitudinal studies, which will help scientists understand how resistance originates and then moves to new microbial communities. Context is very important for determining disease. A microbe may make one person but not another sick. Context can also be the genes carried by the microbe, and E. coli is a great example of this. Some E. coli are very good at causing UTIs but cause no disease when carried in the gut.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spillover Events 46 mins – “When will the next disease outbreak occur? Why are some pests better at spreading disease than others? Disease Ecologist Barbara Han talks about her research that addresses these questions with computer modeling, as well as how modeling predictions can inform field and bench research.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tropical Diseases – “Burkholderia pseudomallei is an endemic soil-dwelling bacterium in southeast Asia, where it causes melioidosis. Direk Limmathurotsakul discusses his work to improve the official reporting numbers and how…Melioidosis can present in a number of ways, such as sepsis, pneumonia, or abscesses. Because the symptoms are not specific, diagnosis requires isolation of the Burkholderia pseudomallei bacterium. Risk factors for disease include diabetes and exposure to the soil and water in which the bacterium lives.. In 2012, only 4 people were officially reported to have died of melioidosis in Thailand, but microbiological records suggest the real number was closer to 696. Scientists like Direk worked with the government to improve reporting requirements and the numbers now reflect a more accurate assessment of the disease burden. More accurate official reporting can lead to more public health campaigns, resources, and support for both scientists and patients…..” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Valerie Jarrett Interview 46 mins – “Her road from Chicago to the White House — our conversation with Obama senior adviser Valerie Jarrett.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

White Nationalist Conversion 20 mins – “At 14, Christian Picciolini went from naïve teenager to white supremacist — and soon, the leader of the first neo-Nazi skinhead gang in the United States. How was he radicalized, and how did he ultimately get out of the movement? In this courageous talk, Picciolini shares the surprising and counterintuitive solution to hate in all forms .” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Work Mobility 54 mins – “Some people now find it desirable – or even necessary – to work from home. Others are expected to spend more time travelling to and from the workplace than they actually spend doing their job. How the changes in the way we work affect every other aspect of 21st century life? Seven years ago, a large group of interdisciplinary scholars from all parts of Canada (and beyond) began researching ‘work-related mobility’ with a project called the On the Move Partnership. Paul Kennedy was there from the beginning creating documentaries based on the research. As the project nears completion, Paul speaks to the participants about their conclusions in this final episode of On The Move.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 398 – Jul 5, 2019: Amazon and Antitrust Issues, Assange Indictment Discussion, Bassem Youseff, Blockchain and Podcasting, Climate Change Impact, Congo Documentary, Crowdfunding a Book, David Sedaris, Death Penalty Discussion, Democracy and the Internet, Empathy, Equal Rights Amendment, Exoplanets, Facts and Truth, Food Abundance, Gun Control, Humans and AI, Koch Brothers and Public Transit, Life Defined, Loneliness Problem, Machines Learning to Find Injustice, Man vs. the Machine, Muller Report and Barr Letter, Music and Culture, Oregon Life, Pain Management Problem, Political Tribes, Refugee Documentary, Religious Freedom, Saturday Night Live Creator, Secret Organizations, Stuff You Should Know, Virtual Reality, Water Purification, Women in STEM

Exercise your ears: the 54 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 619 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,485) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

AI Uses 36 mins- “‘AI is like fire’ — and it’s spreading – Yep, those sci-fi movies and shows like “Blade Runner” and “Westworld” about robots imbued with enough A.I. to make them seem human are developing at a rapid pace. Kim talks to Ryan Steelberg, president of Veritone, a leading provider of artificial intelligence technology and solutions, about how robots are becoming less fantastical. Ryan describes how one man in Great Britain has his “companion” robot sit with this family at mealtimes. You don’t want to miss this conversation.” At the link right-click ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon and Antitrust Issues 15 mins – “At the end of the 19th century, many local railroads in the United States became consolidated into giant iron networks.  The anticompetitive practices that resulted soon made these trusts, also called monopolies, a hot political issue.  More than a century later, a new rebellion is gathering strength against domineering players on the digital network – the digital network that is our new railroad for e-commerce and much more. In 1890, the Sherman Antitrust Act made it illegal under federal law to restrain trade or to form a monopoly.  Many celebrated legal cases since then have threatened, and sometimes succeeded, to break up such legendary American companies as Standard Oil, US Steel Corporation, International Harvester, and Microsoft. In 2019, the so-called “hipster antitrust” cohort now have Amazon in their sights.  A leader in that effort is Lina Khan, an academic fellow at Columbia Law School and senior fellow at the Open Markets Institute, who recently was named to the Politico 50, a list of thinkers whose ideas are driving politics.  Her piece, Amazon’s Antitrust Paradox, published in January 2017 in the Yale Law Journal, was awarded the 2018 Antitrust Writing Award for best academic unilateral conduct article from Concurrences Review and the George Washington University Law School Competition Law Center. She delivered a keynote address at this weekend’s Pubwest 2019 Conference.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Status 66 mins – “Historian and author Jill Lepore talks about nationalism, populism, and the state of America with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Lepore argues that we need a new Americanism, a common story we share and tell ourselves. Along the way, topics in the conversation include populism, the rise of globalization, and the challenge of knowing what is true and what is false in the internet era.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Assange Indictment Discussion 48 mins – “The indictment of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange for conspiracy to hack into a classified government computer has reignited the debate over the question: what is the line between First Amendment-protected journalism and cyber-crime? On this episode, two leading experts on the intersection of the First Amendment and national security–Josh Geltzer of Georgetown University Law Center and Ben Wizner of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project—join host Jeffrey Rosen to consider whether Assange’s indictment poses a threat to press freedom.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bassem Youseff 45 mins – “My grandmother used to tell a story about coming to America from Poland. How she sang God Bless America to cheer up all the grownups on the ship. She was 5 or 6 years old, traveling alone with her mom. For her, it must have been a big adventure. I can hardly imagine what it was like for her mom— my great grandmother — how bad things must have been for Jews in their home town of Bialystok for her to pick up and leave like that, without her husband, heading toward some distant cousin in the undiscovered country of Vineland, New Jersey. My guest today left Egypt as an adult for the US, also under politically grim circumstances. During the Arab Spring, as his country convulsed toward revolution, he became a leading voice of dissent. A trained surgeon, he made an unlikely transition to famous tv satirist for millions of viewers on his nightly political comedy show. Bassem risked jail, helped facilitate the toppling of a dictator who’d been in power for 30 years, and after all that change decided it was time to start a new life in America.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain and Podcasting 49 mins “Why would two intelligent women running a hugely successful podcast at one of the most respected studios in the audio world, quit to start a small journalism company built on blockchain, a technology very few people have ever heard of? To quote someone on Twitter yesterday paraphrasing Bill Clinton sounding pretty harsh, actually: “It’s the business model, stupid.” As we keep learning the hard way, as long as we get our journalism from Facebook and 24 hour cable news, we’re suckers for infotainment, propaganda, and actual fake news—not the real news Trump is always calling fake, but the real fake news trolls cook up to polarize American culture. And in these raging digital waters, non-profits and public media struggle just to stay afloat. There’s got to be a better way, right? Manoush Zomorodi and Jen Poyant thought so. Partners on the podcast Note to Self, they left to start Stable Genius Productions. It’s part of Civil, a new blockchain journalism platform. For reasons we’ll try to explain, blockchain has the potential to bring us better, more independent media. Better, more independent everything, maybe. That’s what Jen and Manoush were betting on, anyway. They document the twists and turns since that fateful decision with refreshing vulnerability on their podcast ZigZag.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Poet Li Bai 48 mins – “In his beautiful new biography THE BANISHED IMMORTAL: a Life of Li Bai, the poet and author Ha Jin paints a vivid picture of this extra-vivid man—who suffered the double misfortune of living in interesting times and being interesting himself. Ha Jin is interesting too—a young soldier in China’s Cultural Revolution, he came to America as a grad student. Watching the Tiananmen Square Massacre on TV, he decided to stay in America for good.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Impact 29 mins – “How do you usually react to the stream of dire warnings about climate change and wildlife extinction? Does it motivate you to do more to make a difference, or does it submerge you into depressed inertia? This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with environmental journalist Jeremy Hance about his ongoing series for Mongabay which shines an encouraging light on the future of our planet’s flora and fauna. Hance outlines the Bottleneck-to-Breakthrough theory and looks at the driving factors that may save our species and others from extinction. Who knew that earth science prognostications could actually serve as an antidote to climate change malaise?” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Congo Documentary 56 mins – “THIS IS CONGO, a new documentary film, attempts to wrap its mind around the incomprehensible realities of the Democratic Republic of Congo, almost 60 years after it was founded. At one point, commenting on one of the more incomprehensible recent events, a high-ranking military officer remarks: “They will say, “This is Congo” But when will they ask “Why? why is Congo like this?At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crowdfunding a Book 16 mins – “What if your book concerns the absorbing life story and voluminous work of a seminal figure in graphic design and bookmaking?  The printed object must seek to match its subject matter in presentation and production.  How to pay for such a treasure, and where to find the audience?  Well, now there’s Kickstarter for that. Bruce Kennett, graphic designer, photographer, and teacher, has lectured and written for much of his professional life about William Addison Dwiggins, an American type designer, calligrapher, and book designer who is credited with coining the term graphic designer.  After a Kickstarter campaign that raised $200,000, Kennett wrote and designed W. A. Dwiggins: A Life in Design. His new role as publisher proved a rewarding one – even if it added to his workload. “What’s so great about this crowdfunding model is that titles that might not appeal to a mainline publisher are eminently suitable for this,” Kennett tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally from his New Hampshire studio. “You do have to gather together the people who want to read the book.  But in the end, you’re delivering directly into the hands of the reader a publication whose every quality you can control.  And that was what was so great for me – being able to supervise the printing, use really high-quality paper, and produce most of the book right here in New England.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

David Sedaris 60 mins – “…Life is full of horrible things. I dare you to deny it. Things like death, sickness, and alcoholism. And did I mention death, which lies in wait for us all? But if you talk about these things at dinner parties, or at work, or to someone you have just met in line at the grocery store, you risk being branded a negative person. In some circles, such as the state of California, negativity is like leprosy. It can really mess up your social life. This does not seem to trouble my guest today, who has spent much of his life turning horrible, true stories into festive comedy. like many people, I first heard David Sedaris‘ unmistakable voice on public radio in the late 90s. My sister and I took a couple of his audio books on a road trip across America in her red Saturn with a bumper sticker on the back that read “Humanity is Trying”. Having Sedaris along as company somehow made the endless miles of Stuckeys’ and strip malls, and the weeping people at Elvis’s grave side in Graceland a little less alien and terrifying. In his latest book, Calypso, David is doing his thing better than ever. It’s about what’s on his mind these days, from decluttering the English countryside, to feeding a surgically removed lump of fat to a snapping turtle, to a sister’s suicide.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death Penalty Discussion 50 mins – “Is it constitutional to execute an inmate who doesn’t remember the crime he committed? Or a person who might suffer excruciating pain during execution? These questions were raised by cases that came before the Supreme Court this term; joining host Jeffrey Rosen to debate them are John Bessler of the University of Baltimore School of Law and Richard Broughton of the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law. These two scholars consider the death penalty’s past and present, find points of agreement between death penalty abolitionists and supporters, and predict what the new makeup of the Court will mean for the future of capital punishment.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy and the Internet 26 mins – “Part of celebrating democracy is questioning what influences it. In this episode of IRL, we look at how the internet influences us, our votes, and our systems of government. Is democracy in trouble? Are democratic elections and the internet incompatible? Politico’s Mark Scott takes us into Facebook’s European Union election war room. Karina Gould, Canada’s Minister for Democratic Institutions, explains why they passed a law governing online political ads. The ACLU’s Ben Wizner says our online electoral integrity problem goes well beyond a few bad ads. The team at Stop Fake describes a massive problem that Ukraine faces in telling political news fact from fiction, as well as how they’re tackling it. And NYU professor Eric Klinenberg explains how a little bit of offline conversation goes a long way to inoculate an electorate against election interference.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Future 49 mins – “A nation born in revolution will forever struggle against chaos. Jill Lepore, author of THESE TRUTHS, on the political divide, public shaming, and the future of democracy.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Empathy 46 mins – “Empathy is the basic stuff of human connection. It’s how we hear and are heard by one another. It’s how we deal with one another as people rather than objects. But with massive, relentless trouble in the world, the 24 hour news cycle, the pressure to choose political and social sides, and the struggles of our everyday lives, empathy is sometimes in short supply. My guest today is the psychiatrist and research scientist Helen Riess. She’s an associate clinical professor at Harvard and runs the relational science program at Massachusetts General Hospital as well as the company Empathetics, Inc. Her new book, THE EMPATHY EFFECT: 7 Neuroscience-based keys for transforming the way we live, love, work, and connect across differences, is all about empathy: where it comes from, what its effects are, and how we can develop more of it.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equal Rights Amendment 73 mins – “The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) technically expired on June 30, 1982, the ratification deadline set by Congress, but a renewed push to resurrect and ratify this constitutional amendment gained momentum in 2017, with ratification by Illinois and Nevada. Now, ERA proponents are looking to secure ratification in a  38th state, which would round out the necessary three-fourths majority of the states required to pass an amendment. Two leading voices on either side of the debate over the ERA – Linda Coberly, chair of the national ERA Coalition Legal Task Force, and Inez Stepman, senior policy analyst at the Independent Women’s Forum – join host Jeffrey Rosen to detail the potential constitutional, legal, political, and cultural effects of adding the ERA as the 28th Amendment to the Constitution.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exoplanets 46 mins – “For our 200th episode, we welcome Phil Plait (The Bad Astronomer) back to the show.  Phil joins us to discuss the current status of exoplanet discovery and gives us a glimpse of what we might find in the future.  Listen to the show to hear Phil discuss new techniques and technologies in planet hunting, looking for life on other worlds and the role of science in science fiction.” At the link right-click “download” above the sound bar select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facts and Truth 54 mins – “While the idea that we’re living in a post-truth era is still highly contested, there is greater agreement that facts themselves have also become contestable. Belief and feeling have sideswiped facts, especially when it comes to news stories about politics. IDEAS producer Naheed Mustafa examines the increasingly elastic and unsettle relationship between facts and truth.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Flying Saucers 60 mins – “…what happens when someone claims that something’s objectively true, but reason, evidence, and/or science are insufficient to test it? Claims of hauntings, cryptozoological wonders, or alien technology under US military lock and key? This is the stuff of endless subreddits and secret societies. Of conspiracies and shadow-wars between skeptics and believers. Where evidence is lacking or disputed, things can get hella heated. My guest today wants to “weaponize your curiosity” in the realms of these extraordinary beliefs. He’s Jeremy Kenyon Lockyer Corbell, a mixed-martial artist, a visual artist, and an investigative filmmaker. His new documentary is Bob Lazar: Area 51 and Flying Saucers. It raises some ghosts, some hell, and some unsettling questions.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Folk Music in Greece 61 mins – “Christopher C. King is a writer, Grammy—winning music producer, and something of an ethnomusicologist. His obsessive collecting of rare ’78s led him to discover the music of Epirus, a region of northwestern Greece. To his ears, the playing of Kitsos Harisiadis, Alexis Zoumbas, and other Epirote masters virtually unknown outside of Epirus had an elemental power transcending even that of Delta Blues legends like Robert Johnson and Skip James. In Epirus, King found something he thought had been lost in the world: a musical culture with unbroken roots stretching back into prehistory. And some clues, perhaps, as to why we make music in the first place.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Abundance 28 mins – “You’re walking the aisles of your local grocery store, picking out fresh ingredients for dinner — you get to the counter, pay for it, bag it, and you’re off. Pretty simple, right? Well, that little mindless exchange was the product of thousands of years of human development. There was a time, not that long ago, when acquiring what you needed to survive entailed far more individual effort. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to Kevin Walker about his new book, The Grand Food Bargain, to learn about the ups and downs of all this food abundance. We take a look back at how we got here, some of the unforeseen outcomes from this grand bargain, and what we ought to do moving forward. You may just take a step back in wonder the next time you go to the store for a loaf of bread, a container of milk, and a stick of butter.” At the link right-click “Download’ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greek Former Finance Minister 56 mins – “My guest today experienced this in the most intense way imaginable, wrangling with the European Union over the economy of his country, Greece, in the aftermath of the 2008 financial meltdown. He saw firsthand what a house of cards global capitalism can be, and what can happen to the ones on the bottom. Yanis Varoufakis is Greece’s former finance minister and the author of two recent books: Adults in the Room and Talking to My Daughter About the Economy.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Control 48 mins – “When you think of the industrial revolution what comes to mind? Steam engines probably. Lone genius inventors. Factories and coal mines, perhaps. And depending on your professional interests and political leanings, either suffering laborers in sweat shops or the Great Onward March of Civilization. Did anybody think of guns? According to my guest today Stanford historian Priya Satia, guns are inextricably bound up with industrialization and it is our long and ever-changing relationship with these tools, toys, trade goods, status symbols, and instruments of war that makes them such a persistent fact of life to this day. Priya Satia’s latest book is EMPIRE OF GUNS: the Violent Making of the Industrial Revolution.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hoover Dam Construction P1 48 mins – “It’s one of America’s biggest accomplishments in the 20th century, a slab of concrete holding back one of the country’s most finicky rivers, providing water and electricity to a swath of majors cities that otherwise couldn’t exist.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Hoover Dam Construction P2 44 mins – “And now for something completely different. Just kidding – tune in to hear the thrilling conclusion of America’s most amazing public works project in the 20th century.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Humans and AI 64 mins – “Historian Jessica Riskin of Stanford University talks about her book The Restless Clock with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. What is the difference between human beings and machines? How has science thought about this distinction? When do we have agency and when are we constrained? Riskin discusses these issues and the implications for how we think about ourselves and the growth of artificial intelligence.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Koch Brothers and Public Transit 39 mins – “ On this week’s episode, Felix Salmon, Emily Peck, and Anna Szymanski discuss: The Koch brothers and public transit Pregnancy RwandaAt the link right-click the download arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Land O’Lakes CEO 58 mins – “Land O’Lakes CEO Beth Ford talks with Recode’s Kara Swisher about running a modern dairy and food company, which is co-owned by thousands of farmers.  In this episode: What Land O’Lakes does other than butter; Ford’s thoughts on being an openly gay female leader; the changing role of a modern CEO; why farmers are the “ultimate entrepreneurs”; agriculture technology, aka agritech; automation and big data in farming; the future of food; why Land O’Lakes withdrew its support for Congressman Steve King; and the political demands on modern CEOs.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Life Defined 31 mins – “This week we welcome science writer Carl Zimmer to the show.  As Zimmer often writes about life, he has been wondering about the concept of life and if there is a way to properly define it.  To shed some light on the matter, he recently hosted a series of live conversations with some leading thinkers on life—including chemists, physicists, and a philosopher .  Supported by a grant from Science Sandbox, these conversations are now available as a podcast of seven episodes called “What is Life?”  Zimmer joins us to discuss the concept of life, shares with us some insights from his guests and even reveals how his thinking about life changed based on these conversations.” At the link right-click “download” above the sound bar select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Loneliness 26 mins – “White Coat Black Art looks at ways of dealing with loneliness in seniors. We visit roommates Cara Duncan, 23 and Lesly Adamson, 92. Dr. Mayur Lakhani, a family doctor and president of Britain’s Royal College of General Practitioners, talks about the social prescribing expert in his office who guides his patients to local community activities. Dr. Helen Kingston, another U.K. doctor, tells Brian about the Compassionate Frome Project, a plan to treat lonely patients in her hometown of Frome.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Loneliness Problem 56 mins – “Urban loneliness is a virtual pandemic. Even though there have never been as many cities across the world as there are right now with such high populations, urban loneliness carries with it huge social, medical and financial consequences. Why are cities the new capitals of isolation?Ideas contributor Tom Jokinen believes the design of urban centres may actually be the cause of urban isolation. Yet they may also contain the ingredients for a more integrated social landscape. It’s hard to believe that anyone could be lonely in the city, surrounded by millions of people. But urban loneliness is real, and it’s at the centre of a health epidemic. According to Dr. Vivek Murthy, former United States Surgeon General under President Obama, loneliness can lead to increased risks for heart disease, anxiety, depression and dementia: in stark terms it is the same as smoking fifteen cigarettes a day. At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Machine Learning to Find Injustice 47 mins – “Predictive algorithms can often outperform humans in making legal decisions. But when used to automate or guide decisions, predictions can embed biases, conflict with a “right to explanation,” and be manipulated by litigants. HLS Climenko Fellow and Lecturer on Law Ryan Copus suggests we should instead use predictive algorithms to identify unjust decisions and subject them to secondary review. This event is supported by the Ethics and Governance of Artificial Intelligence Initiative at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society. In conjunction with the MIT Media Lab, the Initiative is developing activities, research, and tools to ensure that fast-advancing AI serves the public good.“ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malawi Death Penalty 27 mins – “Byson expected to be dead long ago. Now in his sixties, he was given a death sentence quarter of a century ago. But instead of being executed, he’s found himself back at home, looking after his elderly mother, holding down a job, and volunteering to help other prisoners leaving jail. His release was part of a re-sentencing project in Malawi. Anyone who was given the death penalty automatically for killing someone can have their case re-examined. What is known as a mandatory death sentence was ruled to be unconstitutional, so now judges are giving custodial sentences instead, or in some cases inmates are even being freed. Charlotte McDonald travels to the small town of Balaka to visit the Halfway House where Byson mentors former inmates. She visits someone who came out of jail a few years ago and now runs her own business in the village where she was born. And she speaks to one of the last remaining people on death row about their upcoming re-sentencing hearing.Many of those former death row inmates are now back in their communities living and working – but that doesn’t necessarily mean that ordinary Malawians are ready for the death penalty to be abolished.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Man vs the Machine 41 mins– “What drives people to reject technology? Though American society has been driven by technological leaps forward, not everyone has come along for the ride. We explore the strain of technophobia in American society from Neo-Luddism to Sabbatarianism and the anti-technology terrorism of the Unabomber. This episode and related resources are funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this show, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Michael Palin 56 mins – “…My guest today is writer, actor, comedian, and explorer Michael Palin. He studied history at Oxford, then transformed comedy forever as a writer and performer in Monty Python’s Flying Circus. Since then he’s been traveling the world, writing books and hosting travel documentaries. His latest book, EREBUS, resurrects one of the greatest nautical mysteries of all time, and takes us deep into the icy heart of polar exploration in the mid-19th century.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mueller Report and Barr Letter 56 mins – “Special Counsel Robert Mueller sent his report to Bill Barr on Friday, and the attorney general sent a letter to Congress on Sunday detailing the principal conclusions of the Mueller report. Benjamin Wittes talks about it all with Lawfare Executive Editor Susan Hennessey, former senior Justice Department official Carrie Cordero and former assistant attorney general for national security David Kris.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Lawfare_Special_Edition_mixdown.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music and Culture 61 mins – “Christopher C. King: While you live, shine – Think Again like you’ve never heard it before. A trip deep into the oldest living folk music in the Western world — that of Epirus, Greece — and what it reveals about why we make music at all…Christopher C. King is a writer, Grammy—winning music producer, and something of an ethnomusicologist. His obsessive collecting of rare ’78s led him to discover the music of Epirus, a region of northwestern Greece. To his ears, the playing of Kitsos Harisiadis, Alexis Zoumbas, and other Epirote masters virtually unknown outside of Epirus had an elemental power transcending even that of Delta Blues legends like Robert Johnson and Skip James. In Epirus, King found something he thought had been lost in the world: a musical culture with unbroken roots stretching back into prehistory. And some clues, perhaps, as to why we make music in the first place.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Myers-Briggs Test 42 mins – “How a mother-daughter obsession became a massive and dangerous industry. The weird history of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oregon Life 56 mins – “…In the 1980’s, Northeast Portland was a black neighborhood hustling to survive. Today, it’s full of pilates studios and handlebar moustaches. As a writer, professor, and former inmate, Mitchell S. Jackson has lived in and learned from both worlds. In SURVIVAL MATH, he puts the pieces together….Can you lie in both places at once.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Management Problems 12 mins – “Inappropriate use of opioids after surgery has contributed substantially to the global opioid epidemic. Lead author Paul Myles (Alfred Hospital and Monash University, Melbourne, Australia) discusses a new Lancet Series that proposes alternative approaches for pain management after surgery.” [Opioids can increase pain!] At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Opposition 51 mins – “Following a string of landmark Supreme Court rulings and a surprise retirement, this week On the Media examines the conservative culture on the bench and wonders what we can expect from the court going forward. Plus, is civility really dead or only sleeping? And what is the view from small-town America?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Tribalism Problems 52 mins – “Legal scholar Amy Chua says tribalism is tearing the U.S. apart, and in order to build unity, we need to understand how identity politics have hijacked the left and the right. Legal scholar Amy Chua says Americans have a hard time understanding tribalism around the globe. We get “Capitalism vs. Communism” or “Democracy vs. Authoritarianism,” but in places like Vietnam and Iraq, we’ve underestimated the role ethnic rivalries have played. Worse yet, we’re missing that same insight at home. In her latest book, Chua argues tribalism is tearing the U.S. apart, and in order to build unity, we need to understand how identity politics have hijacked the left and the right. Amy Chua is a Professor of Law at Yale University. her books include Days of EmpireWorld on Fire, and Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother. Her latest is called Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations.At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Political Tribes 46 mins – “My guest today is Yale Law professor Amy Chua, who shook the Internet up a few years back with her book BATTLE HYMN OF THE TIGER MOTHER. What upset some progressive American parents most, it seems, was the suggestion that they were members of a parenting tribe. A cultural bubble with its own fallible set of assumptions.  In her powerful new book POLITICAL TRIBES: GROUP INSTINCT AND THE FATE OF NATIONS, Amy points out that long past high school, group instinct is much stronger than Americans generally like to admit. And that this cognitive blind spot has led to our repeatedly shooting ourselves in the foot, at home and abroad.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Lessons 19 mins – “Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin talks about what we can learn from American presidents, including Abraham Lincoln and Lyndon Johnson. Then she shares a moving memory of her own father, and of their shared love of baseball.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Documentary 56 mins – “…Since 2011, an estimated 11 million Syrians have fled their homes. They and refugees from other troubled nations like Eritrea and Somalia have been trying to migrate Westward and northward, to Turkey, then to Europe. Many have died along the way. Many thousands of others have been detained in refugee camps while nations decide what to do with them.  I’m here today with filmmakers Lorena Luciano and Filippo Piscopo. Their new documentary, IT WILL BE CHAOS airs on HBO this month. It follows Eritrean, Somali, and Syrian refugees on their harrowing journeys to new lives in Europe.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Religious Freedom 60 mins – “A dispute over the firing of a high school football coach who refused to stop praying on the field after games reached the Supreme Court this term; last week, the justices said they would not hear the case until its facts were better established by lower courts. Justice Alito concurred but, joined by three other conservative justices, indicated that he might be sympathetic to Kennedy’s claim that his actions were protected by the First Amendment, should his case eventually return to the Court. Justice Alito also suggested that he and some of his colleagues may be willing to overturn Employment Division v. Smith in order to bolster free exercise and religious exemption claims under the First Amendment. Religion law experts Professor Stephanie Barclay of BYU Law School and Richard Katskee of Americans United for Separation of Church and State discuss Coach Kennedy’s case, whether Smith should be overturned, and how such changes might affect people like public school teachers and coaches. Jeffrey Rosen hosts.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saturday Night Live Creator 24 mins – “Creator and producer of “Saturday Night Live,” Lorne Michaels discusses the landmark series that changed television and comedy forever. Lorne shares what he’s learned from being at the helm for more than 25 years, and his thoughts on the power of laughter and taking risks. He reflects on the importance of changing with the times and the value of comedy as a political tool. Lorne also discusses the tragic loss of “SNL” cast members John Belushi and Chris Farley.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Secret Organizations 45 mins – “It’s interesting that several centuries after the Illuminati first appeared, as basically a idealistic secret boys’ club, followed by the Freemasons, these kinds of shadowy organizations still exert so much power on our imaginations. That’s because power doesn’t always come in the shape of Queens, Presidents, CEOs or Members of Parliament. Often it exists in the more or less invisible relationships between people. My guest today is renowned historian Niall Ferguson. His new book The Square and the Tower: Networks and Hierarchies, from the Freemasons to Facebook looks at the two ancient power structures that continue to move the world today.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Squid Biologist 30 mins– “Our guest this week is Sarah McAnulty, squid biologist and founder of Skype a Scientist.  Using readily available video chat tools, SKYPE a Scientist connects real scientists with classes  around the world.  Through these video sessions, classes can  learn more about the scientist’s field of study, what it means to be a scientist and how they do their job. Sarah joins us to talk about the program, how it promotes scientific literacy, communication and outreach.  Listen to the show to find out how you can be matched with a scientist or join a live Q&A session held weekly.” At the link right-click “download” above the sound bar select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stuff You Should Know 60 mins -”I like to think. If I didn’t, this would be the wrong job for me. But I realize that as open-minded as I like to consider myself, I’ve taken a thick, black sharpie to certain areas of the philosophical map, scrawling “here there be monsters” and leaving them be. We’re all like this to some extent—it’s the flip side of interest—even if you’re super-curious, the things that interest you most become safe spaces. Comfort zones. And there’s nothing wrong with that. But if you want to keep learning, it’s necessary to spend time in regions of reality that scare the crap out of you. The things you don’t want to look at. And if, like me, your unsafe spaces include the many catastrophes that could befall the human race—you couldn’t ask for a more affable, well-informed, tour guide than Josh Clark. Trained in history and anthropology, Josh is a writer and podcaster—host of Stuff You Should Know and now, The End of the World—a 10 part series that looks at the many ways humanity might go extinct. And what we can do about them. And why it’s all worth taking very, very seriously.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terry Gilliam 51 mins – “The film becomes the story of the making of the film. From his Monty Python days to now, Don Quixote is a metaphor for Terry Gilliam’s whole career, and for his 30 year project of making a film about a film about the knight of the woeful countenance. We talk about Muppets, time, and basically everything else two humans can talk about.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virtual Reality 48 mins– “Jeremy Bailenson, my guest today, has been experimenting with cutting edge virtual reality for over a decade now. His Virtual Human Interaction Lab studies the ways VR’s unique sense of presence—of putting you into a different place (and maybe time) from the one you’re in can be used for education, healing, and—yes—generally making the world a better place. His new book is called: EXPERIENCE ON DEMAND: What Virtual Reality Is, How It Works, and What It Can Do.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Purification 36 mins – “In the late 1950s a Texas town on the Gulf of Mexico was suffering from a devastating, decade-long drought. But while the wells ran dry, the ocean lapped at the town’s shore, taunting the thirsty residents with its endless supply of undrinkable water. Undrinkable, that is, until President John F. Kennedy stepped in to save the day with the promise of science. The evolving technology of desalination wouldn’t just end droughts: it would give us as much water as we wanted. It would allow us to inhabit otherwise uninhabitable places. It would let us make the deserts bloom. But at what cost?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Women in STEM 22 mins – “This week we welcome Laurie Wallmark to the show.  As a computer science teacher and award-winning children’s author, Laurie has been writing picture book biographies that recognize women in STEM.  Her breakout book Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine (Creston Books) debuted in 2017 and was readily recognized with numerous awards.  Laurie’s most recent book, Hedy Lamarr’s Double Life, was just released in February from Sterling Children’s Books.  Listen to the show to hear Laurie discuss Hedy Lamarr in her new book, how she selects women in STEM to write about, and why her work is so important,” At the link right-click “download” above the sound bar select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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