MMD464 Media Mining Digest: Apprenticeships, Cancer Drugs, Cancer Research, Capitalism, Capitalism Reimagined, Coronavirus Pandemic, Digital Tsunami, Extreme Economies, Health Care Reform, Higher Education, Honest Income, Jack Kornfield, Manufacturing, Narrative Economics, Racism in America, Surgeon General, Universe Origins, Warp Speed Update, Wilding, Willful Book

Exercise your ears: the 21 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 421 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Apprenticeships – “Economist Robert Lerman of the Urban Institute talks about apprenticeships with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Lerman argues that apprenticeships–a combination of work experience and classroom learning–have the potential to expand opportunities for young people who don’t want to attend college.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Drugs – “Oncologist, author, and podcaster Vinay Prasad talks about his book Malignant with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Prasad lays out the conflicts of interest and scientific challenges that make drugs that fight cancer so disappointing at times. The conversation looks at how policy changes might improve the incentives facing doctors, pharmaceutical companies, and patients.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Research – “Author and oncologist Azra Raza talks about her book The First Cell with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Raza argues that we have made little progress in fighting cancer over the last 50 years. The tools available to oncologists haven’t changed much–the bulk of the progress that has been made has been through earlier and earlier detection rather than more effective or compassionate treatment options. Raza wants to see a different approach from the current strategy of marginal improvements on narrowly defined problems at the cellular level. Instead, she suggests an alternative approach that might better take account of the complexity of human beings and the way that cancer morphs and spreads differently across people and even within individuals. The conversation includes the challenges of dealing with dying patients, the importance of listening, and the bittersweet nature of our mortality.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capitalism – “Economist and author Branko Milanovic of the Graduate Center, CUNY, talks about his book, Capitalism, Alone, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. They discuss inequality, the challenge of corruption in the Chinese system, and Milanovic’s claim that in American capitalism, the texture of daily life is increasingly affected by the sharing economy and other opportunities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capitalism Reimagined – “Author and economist Rebecca Henderson of the Harvard Business School talks about her book Reimagining Capitalism in a World on Fire with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Henderson argues that the focus on shareholder value threatens to destroy capitalism from within. Henderson argues that business leaders need to manage their companies differently in order to create a more humane and stable capitalism.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Pandemic – “In this Bonus Episode of EconTalk, economist and Nobel Laureate Paul Romer discusses the coronavirus pandemic with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Romer argues that the status quo of shutdown and fear of infection is unsustainable. Returning to normal requires an inexpensive, quick, and relatively painless test. Such tests are now available. The challenge is in relaxing certain regulations and then creating a supply chain of production and availability. Romer then explains how such a test could ease a return to something like normalcy for many sectors of the economy. The conversation concludes with a discussion of the dynamics of the labor market in the current situation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Tsunami – “Author Martin Gurri, Visiting Fellow at George Mason University’s Mercatus Center, talks about his book The Revolt of the Public with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Gurri argues that a digital tsunami–the increase in information that the web provides–has destabilized authority and many institutions. He talks about the amorphous nature of recent populist protest movements around the world and where we might be headed politically and culturally.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Extreme Economies – “Economist and author Richard Davies talks about his book Extreme Economies with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. The conversation explores economic life in extreme situations. Examples discussed are the Angola State Penitentiary in Louisiana, two Syrian refugee camps in Jordan, the rain forest in the Darien Gap in Panama, and Kinshasa, the largest city in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This is an economic and journalistic tour de force as Davies shares insights from his encounters with people around the world struggling to trade and prosper in extreme environments.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Reform – “Physician and author Vivian Lee talks about her book The Long Fix with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Lee argues that we can transform health care in the United States, though it may take a while. She argues that the current fee-for-service system incentivizes doctors to provide services rather than keep patients healthy and that these are not the same thing. Topics explored include innovations in Medicare and in technology that might change treatment incentives as well as the weird world of health care pricing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Higher Education – “In this 750th (!) episode, Duke University’s Michael Munger talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about whether the pandemic might create an opportunity for colleges and universities to experiment and innovate. Munger is Professor of Political Science, Economics and Public Policy at Duke. He believes “top” schools can emerge from the current period of uncertainty to thrive in the long run. The path for “second-tier” institutions could be more difficult. They will still face the challenges that existed before the pandemic: competition from online classes and a shrinking pool of new applicants ready to pay high tuition bills. This episode also discusses the listeners’ votes for their Top 10 EconTalk podcast episodes for 2019.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honest Income – “Economist and author Daniel Klein of George Mason University talks about the ethics of working and the potential for our working lives to make the world a better place. This is a wide-ranging conversation that includes discussion of Adam Smith, what jobs we should work on, what charities we should donate to, how we can make ourselves more virtuous, the movies Se7en and Sabrina, and ultimately what Adam Smith calls “the becoming use of our own.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Manufacturing – “Economist Ed Leamer of UCLA talks about manufacturing, effort, and inequality with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. The conversation draws on recent empirical work of Leamer’s on how measured inequality is affected by the work effort of Americans at different levels of education. The conversation ends with a discussion of how education can be transformed when it is more personal and allows the student to explore and discover under the guidance of a teacher.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Narrative Economics – “Economist, author, and Nobel Laureate Robert Shiller of Yale University discusses his book Narrative Economics with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Shiller proposes a novel idea–that the narratives that people believe and use to understand the world affect their economic behavior and in turn affect the macroeconomy. Shiller argues that taking these psychological effects into account is a new frontier of economic research and he gives a number of examples of how we might think about these phenomena.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in America – “Economist and author Glenn Loury of Brown University talks about race in America with EconTalk host Russ Roberts.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universe Origins – “Physicist and author Alan Lightman talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the origins of the universe, meaning, transcendence, and the relationship between science and religion.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Warp Speed Update – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on November 9, 2020, the editors are joined by Dr. Janet Woodcock of Operation Warp Speed to discuss the pace of discovery in the U.S. response to Covid-19.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wilding – “Author and conservationist Isabella Tree talks about her book Wilding with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Tree and her husband decided to turn their 3500 acre farm, the Knepp Castle Estate, into something wilder, a place for wild ponies, wild pigs, wild oxen, and an ever-wider variety of birds and bugs. The conversation covers the re-wilding phenomenon, the complexity of natural systems, and the nature of emergent order.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Willful Books – “Economist, author, and investor Richard Robb talks about his book Willful with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Robb is interested in what motivates and explains the choices we make. He explores alternatives to the optimizing model of economics including what he calls “for-itself” behavior–behavior that isn’t purposive. Topics discussed in this wide-ranging conversation include the nature of work, decision-making under uncertainty, the Joseph story in the Book of Genesis, Nietzsche, the Financial Crisis of 2008, altruism, and how green beans are sold.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surgeon General – “Dr. Vivek H. Murthy (@vivek_murthy, vivekmurthy.com) served as the 19th Surgeon General of the United States between 2014 and 2017. As the Vice Admiral of the US Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, he commanded a uniformed service of 6,600 public health officers globally. During his tenure, Dr. Murthy launched the Turn the Tide campaign, catalyzing a movement among health professionals to address the nation’s opioid crisis. He also issued the first Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, calling for expanded access to prevention and treatment and for addiction to be recognized as a chronic illness, not a character flaw. In 2017, Dr. Murthy focused his attention on chronic stress and loneliness as prevalent problems that have profound implications for health, productivity, and happiness. He has co-founded a number of organizations: VISIONS, an HIV/AIDS education program in India; Swasthya, a community health partnership in rural India training women as health providers and educators; software company TrialNetworks; and the grassroots physicians organization Doctors for America. Since leaving government service, Dr. Murthy has continued to focus on loneliness and social connection. His bookTogether: The Healing Power of Human Connection in a Sometimes Lonely World will be published this spring by Harper Collins.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jack Kornfield – “Jack Kornfield (@JackKornfield) trained as a Buddhist monk in the monasteries of Thailand, India, and Burma, shortly thereafter becoming one of the key teachers to introduce Buddhist mindfulness practice to the West. He has taught meditation internationally since 1974… Jack co-founded the Insight Meditation Society in Barre, Massachusetts (with fellow meditation teachers Sharon Salzberg and Joseph Goldstein), and the Spirit Rock Center in Woodacre, California. He holds a PhD in clinical psychology and is a father, husband, and activist. Jack’s books have been translated into 20 languages and have sold more than a million copies, including The Wise Heart; A Lamp in the Darkness; A Path with Heart; After the Ecstasy, the Laundry (one of my favorite book titles of all time); and his most recent, No Time Like the Present: Finding Freedom, Love, and Joy Right Where You Are. He offers a brilliant online training program for those who want to learn to teach meditation at JackKornfield.com.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

MMD463 Media Mining Digest: Addiction During a Pandemic, Apartheid Justification, Black America Speaks, Bread Research Project, Butchers Talk Shop, Chilean Educational Issues, China and the Virus, Corona History, Coronavirus and Africa, Coronavirus and Europe, Coronavirus and Food, Coronavirus and Latin America, Coronavirus Frontline Special, Coronavirus Medic Deaths, Coronavirus Stories, Covid Vaccine Availability, Criminal Justice Reform, Deaf, Disabled Covid Issues, Disabled Stories, Elder Care, Farmer Production, Femicide in Serbia, Fertilizer that Blew Up Beirut, Food Stockpiles, Fried Chicken, Ireland Housing Costs, Jurgen Klopp, Karachi Ambulance Driver, Lebanese Contaminated Fuel, Mafia in Naples, Maggot Masters, Pandemic and Finances, Pot Washers, Race in America, Recycled Orchestra, Recycling Chile and Spain, Robot Fruit Pickers, Swine Fever, Wuhan, Zimbabwe Mental Health Control

Exercise your ears: the 63 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 972 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Addiction During a Pandemic 17 mins – “Nuala McGovern considers alcohol and drug addiction relapse during the pandemic. We hear from two men, in Kenya and the United States, about how they have fought their addictions while under lockdown. Nuala also talks about the importance of family in these times and hears how one man travelled more than 2,000 km across the US to play his trombone for his brother, who was recovering in a rehab centre after a fall. She also talks about how hobbies are helping us and joins a wrestler, a dancer and a musician in conversation about social distancing.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apartheid Justification 18 mins – “As a child of Soweto, apartheid South Africa’s most notorious black township, Milton Nkosi could easily have become an embittered adult; in June 1976 he witnessed the Soweto uprising in which white police brutally suppressed protests by black schoolchildren, leading to many deaths. Yet, as apartheid began to collapse in the early 1990s, Milton found himself drawn into TV journalism; enabling him to question his former tormentors and helping viewers around the world to see the moral case for change. So began a career that took him from translator and fixer to producer and eventually, the head of bureau for the BBC’s news operation in South Africa, where he then sought to diversify coverage of a fast-changing continent. As Milton explains in this conversation with Owen Bennett-Jones, his humble beginnings turned out to be an asset: Among his childhood neighbours in Soweto were anti-apartheid activists including Nelson Mandela’s wife and children, many of whom would become valuable contacts. However, after the transition to democracy in 1994, Milton also had to ask uncomfortable questions of some of them, as claims of corruption emerged within the ANC government. Moral dilemmas such as this defined his working life: Is it even possible to be an impartial reporter when your subject might be a close associate? For Milton, the issues need to be seen in context. As he points out: “Nobody can ever justify apartheid based on the mistakes of the post-apartheid leaders.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black America Speaks 34 mins – “We listen in to four black-owned radio stations in the United States to find out how they are covering the killing of George Floyd and the waves of protest since. From Philadelphia, Houston, Los Angeles and Chicago, we hear discussions on preparing young people for encounters with police, on access to finance and housing and on black identity and activism. We also bring the hosts together, in conversation with Chloe Tilley, to find out what it means to be behind the mic on a black-owned station. How is it different to working elsewhere in the US media?” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bread Research Program 19 mins – “Dan Saladino meets the mastermind behind one of biggest bread research projects ever undertaken. Nathan Myhrvold spent four years researching, baking and collaborating with leading industry professionals to write Modernist Bread – a five-volume, global exploration of this great staple. It follows another hugely ambitious food project -Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking – from 2011. Perhaps it is no surprise then that Nathan Myhrvold has spent his life trying to understand how things work, he researched quantum theory with the late Stephen Hawking and went on to work directly with Bill Gates at Microsoft. So what pearls of wisdom can the man who baked 36,000 loaves share? This is a rebroadcast of an episode of the Food Programme that first aired on BBC Radio 4 in March 2018.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Butchers Talk Shop 19 mins – “Carving up carcasses and slicing up flesh. Day in, day out. Doling out blood for pet leeches, and helpings of animals brains. What drives people to do it? And why do they see themselves as animal lovers, and therapists? Emily Thomas meets three butchers from Limerick, Lagos and Brooklyn to find out what it’s really like to be a butcher. Why is the trade disparaged in some parts of the world? And why in others has it become ‘trendy’ to leave an office job to join the trade? We hear how business might be affected by changing patterns of meat consumption, the popularity of veganism and the dominance of the supermarkets. And are they worried that robots might take their jobs?” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chilean Educational Issues 18 mins – “A much anticipated referendum in Chile on a new constitution has been postponed till the autumn amid safety concerns over the spread of the coronavirus. President Sebastian Piñera had agreed to the vote and a range of reforms following months of civil unrest. Since last autumn, the country has been experiencing a wave of protests with people on the streets angry at the level of inequality in the country. Amongst them thousands of university students, teachers and school children – who have been prepared to face tear gas, water cannon and rubber bullets – in a bid to change the education system in Chile. They say a privileged few have access to all the best jobs and the rest are given a substandard schooling with leaky roofs in winter, boiling hot classrooms in summer and inadequate teaching. For Assignment, Jane Chambers spent time with the protestors calling for a fairer education for all.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

China and the Virus 19 mins – “Has the coronavirus epidemic weakened or strengthened the grip of China’s Communist Party? In the early stages of the outbreak in the city of Wuhan, authorities there downplayed its significance. A doctor who sounded the alarm was forced to contradict himself. He later contracted Covid-19 and died from it. Medical facilities were initially unprepared. This and other similar stories led to an explosion of critical comment on Chinese social media, with deep distrust emerging of the official explanations. President Xi Jinping initially avoided becoming publicly involved in the response to the epidemic, perhaps to avoid a political taint.The government then began do change tack, instituting wide-ranging and it seems effective restrictions, which have slowed the growth of the epidemic. The central government blamed any problems on failings by local authorities. Many Chinese citizens are now taking pride in their country’s response, even arguing that it is an example to the world, despite the continuing economic slowdown. In this documentary, Mark Mardell assesses how President Xi and his government will emerge from the crisis.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Corona History 25 mins – “Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode we speak with Susan Weiss, a microbiology professor at the University of Pennsylvania and the director for the Penn Center for Research on Coronavirus and Emerging Pathogens. She’ll talk about her 40 years of experience researching coronaviruses, how her field reacted to the 2002 SARS and 2012 MERS outbreaks, and the importance of studying diseases that transfer from animals to humans.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Coronavirus and Africa 34 mins – “The terrible choice between hunger and infection, police imposing lockdowns with brutality and the unexpected positives to come out of the pandemic in Africa. Presenter Toyosi Ogunseye in Lagos examines these issues with panellists Dr Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa; Bright Simons, social entrepreneur based in Congo and president of mPedigree, Ghana; Sabina Chege MP, Health Select Committee Chair, Kenya; Ralph Mathekga, political analyst and writer, South Africa.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus and Europe 34 mins – “Experts discuss the challenges posed by and the consequences of the outbreak of Covid-19 in Europe. BBC correspondent Jonny Dymond is joined by a panel of experts from across the continent who answer questions from the public. The panel: Dunja Mijatovic: Commissioner for Human Rights at the Council of Europe; Margaret Harris: World Health Organisation; Richard Horton: Editor in Chief of The Lancet; Nathalie Tocci: Political analyst and Director of the Institute of International Affairs; Danae Kyriakopoulou: Economist from OMFIF, the Official Monetary and Financial Institutions Forum, an independent financial think tank.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Coronavirus and Food 21 mins – “As coronavirus tightens its grip on the world, many of us are facing life in lockdown and are worried about food. Graihagh Jackson takes a journey along the global food supply chain – via her grandparents – to see how it is holding up so far through the crisis. We hear how supermarkets are responding to the strain of widespread stockpiling and panic buying and what implications this could have on the future of food shopping. Food giant Unilever reveals how they are weathering transport bottlenecks and are adapting production to cater to the ‘post-virus’ food penchants of different nations. As global lockdowns affect the flow of local and migrant labour forces we speak to one of Europe’s largest fresh food producers about how they will manage this season’s fruit and vegetable harvests; and the United Nations warns that cooperation by consumers and between countries is key, if we are to avert a global food crisis.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus and Latin American 34 mins – “How has Latin America dealt with the pandemic? The lockdown, the needs of the economy, cash pay-outs to the poor, culture, tradition and safety in a time of crisis are all discussed with an expert panel and questions from the public across the region. Presenter Jonny Dymond is joined by Dr Denise Dresser – political scientist, Mexico. Luiz Philippe de Orleans e Braganca – Chamber of Representatives, Social Liberal Party, Brazil, Laura Alonso – former head of Argentina’s Anti-Corruption office. Margarita Lopez Maya – Venezuelan historian and Dr Marcus Espinal – Pan American Health Organisation.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up me2 – “In March, Aafiyah was told the garment factory where she worked would be closing. And like many other garment workers, she was left destitute in the slums of Dhaka. Bangladesh’s garment industry employs millions of workers, mainly women, who make clothes for high street brands in Europe and the US. Western retailers, who have seen sales plummet due to the pandemic, have cancelled or suspended more than 3 billion dollars’ worth of orders from Bangladeshi garment factories. Over a million jobs in the sector could now be at risk. For Assignment, Caroline Bayley and Morshed Ali Khan hear Aafiyah’s story, and talk to factory owners and the British Retail Consortium about the huge challenges facing Bangladesh’s main export industry.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Bangladesh Garment Workers 19 mins – “In March, Aafiyah was told the garment factory where she worked would be closing. And like many other garment workers, she was left destitute in the slums of Dhaka. Bangladesh’s garment industry employs millions of workers, mainly women, who make clothes for high street brands in Europe and the US. Western retailers, who have seen sales plummet due to the pandemic, have cancelled or suspended more than 3 billion dollars’ worth of orders from Bangladeshi garment factories. Over a million jobs in the sector could now be at risk. For Assignment, Caroline Bayley and Morshed Ali Khan hear Aafiyah’s story, and talk to factory owners and the British Retail Consortium about the huge challenges facing Bangladesh’s main export industry.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Frontline Special 34 mins – “This series comes from the Bradford Royal Infirmary, in the North of England, with recordings made by Dr John Wright, who works there. He is an epidemiologist and as he helps the hospital prepare and cope with a huge influx of patients, he’s also searching for answers about Covid-19.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus in Algeria 18 mins – “A mysterious illness appears out of nowhere. The number of cases rises exponentially, as the authorities attempt to downplay the severity of the disease. There is a shortage of medical staff, equipment and arguments about whether people should wear masks. People are forbidden to leave their homes and many are left stranded in unfamiliar places, separated from loved ones. Albert Camus’ novel The Plague set in the Algerian city of Oran under French colonial rule was published more than 70 years ago. But today it almost reads like a current news bulletin and seems more relevant than ever. This edition of Assignment revisits Oran in the age of the coronavirus and investigates the parallels between now and then. For the time being, it seems the pandemic has achieved something the authorities have tried but failed to do for the past year – clear the streets of protesters. Lucy Ash investigates Algeria’s plague of authoritarianism and finds that the government has been using Covid-19 as an excuse to crack down harder on dissent.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus in South America 19 mins – “We speak to people in China’s capital, Beijing, where a fresh spike of Covid-19 cases has been detected. Fan Fan and Richard tell us what it feels like to go through lockdown all over again. Meanwhile, the most intense outbreaks are now in Latin America. We hear accounts of how communities in countries including Peru and Colombia are dealing with the disease. As restrictions ease elsewhere, businesses are preparing to open again in a very different world. We bring together business owners in Botswana, Turkey and the United States to talk about the challenges they face and their hopes for the future.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Medic Deaths 19 mins – “As medical staff – often originating from economically developing countries – struggle to save the life of patients during the coronavirus epidemic in developed countries, Zeinab Badawi asks if their work amounts to exploitation of poorer nations. More than 17,000 people have died in the UK after testing positive for coronavirus. Among them are frontline medical staff. Dr Adil El Tayar – a British-Sudanese doctor – became the first working medic to die of coronavirus in the UK. His story is illustrative of the many international medics who even now are battling Covid-19. Born in Sudan, he graduated from the University of Khartoum in 1982 and moved to the UK in 1996, where he then studied at university, before becoming a hospital consultant at St. George’s Hospital. He was a cousin of BBC journalist Zeinab Badawi, who paid tribute to him in an impassioned dispatch for From Our Own Correspondent where she wrote. “Adel was a stoic and an optimist and was never one to imagine the worst. So he thought he would soon recover. But then he took a turn for the worse and became breathless. He knew what that meant. His children insisted he go to hospital. He did. He was admitted and put on a ventilator. A few days later his daughter told me his medical team informed the family that his lungs had come under attack from coronavirus and that he could not breathe unaided. Soon after the ventilator was switched off. It had taken just twelve days for Adel to go from being a fit and capable doctor working in a busy hospital to himself lying in a hospital morgue.” For Zeinab, the story – alongside the deaths of other NHS staff – raises wider questions. A vast number of doctors, nurses and others have come to Britain and other Western counties after training in the developing world. Naturally, they want to improve their standards of living and work in more sophisticated medical systems. But is it fair for the rich world to benefit by effectively cherry-picking the brightest and best from poorer countries? Or can the expertise of those medical staff who migrate to wealthier countries benefit their home nations? Some argue that this brain cycle – rather than a brain drain – along with remittances, is actually of benefit to the developing world. Through the stories of individuals, combined with expert analysis, Zeinab unpicks this tricky and intensely personal conundrum.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Coronavirus Medic Deaths 19 mins – “We hear about Sophie Fagan, a nurse in London for over 50 years; Dr. J Ronald Verrier, a critical care surgeon in New York; and Vicenzo Leone, a beloved GP in Northern Italy. Their relatives talk about their enduring pride, but also the shock of losing them to Covid-19. And hospital chaplains talk to us about the religious, spiritual and emotional support they are providing for patients and their loved ones. Also, mothers in Spain tell us how the 40-day lockdown is emotionally impacting their children.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Missing Bodies in Ecuador 19 mins – “In March and April, Guayaquil in Ecuador was the epicentre of the Covid pandemic in Latin America. The city’s health services began to collapse fast – hospitals, cemeteries and morgues were overwhelmed. As the bodies of the dead were not collected, hundreds of desperate families kept the remains of their loved ones at home, or deposited them on the streets. Eventually they were picked up. But in the chaos, some corpses went missing. For Assignment, Mike Lanchin teams up with Guayaquil journalist Blanca Moncada, to follow the story of one woman in her dramatic search for the body of her late husband.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Stories 19 mins – “Listeners from Brazil, Germany, Rwanda, Australia and Norway report on their experiences of lockdown, from reaction to Jair Bolsanaro’s coronavirus policies to the partial easing of lockdown in Germany, to racial abuse experienced by Chinese residents in Australia. By emailing a voice memo recorded on their smartphones listeners from different countries offer their unique perspectives on a global crisis.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Vaccine Development P1 18 mins – “Nearly every person on the planet is vulnerable to the new coronavirus, SarsCoV2. That’s why there are more than 100 projects around the world racing towards the goal of creating a safe and effective vaccine for the disease it causes, Covid19, in the next 12 to 18 months. But this is just the first part of a long and complex process, working at a pace and scale never attempted before. In Vaccines, Money and Politics, Sandra Kanthal looks at the vast ecosystem needed to deliver a vaccination programme to the world in record time. This will require billions of dollars, and likely more than one successful candidate to meet the global demand. The world will need to secure supply chains in order to avoid shortages of vital supplies like medical glass. Companies will have to manufacture the most promising candidates even before they know if the vaccines will work, otherwise the process will be further delayed. Authorities across the world will have to work together to overcome the temptation for countries to keep the vaccines for themselves and allocate a fair global distribution, and then decide which sectors of the population get them first. And they’ll need a communication strategy to convince the public the vaccines are safe and effective – and to combat the antivaxx messages already gaining traction on social media. What plans are in place to make this all happen – and will they work?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Coronavirus Vaccine Development P2 18 mins – “Scientists around the world are working at pandemic speed to discover a safe and effective vaccine against the virus SarsCoV2, and the disease it causes Covid 19. But while all this research is taking place, a host of other critical elements need to be organised if we are to have any chance of successfully building an immunisation programme to reach more than seven billion people with a vaccine that will, at least initially, be in limited supply. In part two of Vaccines, Money and Politics, Sandra Kanthal looks at what strategies are being put in place to transport a vaccine to countries around the world, who will be the first in those countries to get the vaccine, and, once it is available, how to convince people to take it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Covid Vaccine Availability 19 mins – “Scientists around the world are working at pandemic speed to discover a safe and effective vaccine against the virus SarsCoV2, and the disease it causes Covid 19. But while all this research is taking place, a host of other critical elements need to be organised if we are to have any chance of successfully building an immunisation programme to reach more than seven billion people with a vaccine that will, at least initially, be in limited supply. In part two of Vaccines, Money and Politics, Sandra Kanthal looks at what strategies are being put in place to transport a vaccine to countries around the world, who will be the first in those countries to get the vaccine, and, once it is available, how to convince people to take it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Criminal Justice Reform 18 mins – “One year ago, voters in Houston, Texas, elected a slate of liberal Democrats to their local courthouse. These new judges promised to remake justice in America’s fourth-largest city, together with the liberal District Attorney, herself elected just two years earlier. Marshall Project criminal justice reporter Keri Blakinger, who lives and works in Houston, asks how far they have been able to make good on their promises of reform, and whether that has been a good thing. Criminal justice reform has been a rare point of bipartisan agreement across the United States, but away from the cameras how do tricky questions play out in practice? Whether it’s bail reform, defence for suspects with no money to pay for a lawyer, or whether to prosecute low-level drug crime – can reforms stick, and who do they help? Keri has been covering these stories for several years and takes us inside the Harris County courtrooms, where we meet some of the new judges; to the DA’s office; the headquarters of the local police union; and the public defenders’ chambers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Deaf 37 mins – “Joyce welcomes Danielle Filip, vice president of operations, at Sign Language Interpreting Professionals (SLIP) to the show. Founded in 2003, SLIP provides reliable, consistent and professional communication and consultation services thereby connecting the deaf and hearing communities of Pittsburgh. During the show, Danielle will discuss the services provided by SLIP and ways that businesses and hospitals can assure members of the deaf community that clear communication is provided for them during the COVID-19 pandemic.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” to get the podcast.

Disability Education and Health 32 mins – “Joyce welcomes back to the show, Peri Jude Radecic, CEO of Disability Rights Pennsylvania. Disability Rights Pennsylvania is an independent, nonprofit corporation authorized by the U.S. Congress and designated by the Governor of Pennsylvania’s as the Protection and Advocacy System in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Their mission is to advance, protect, and advocate for the human, civil, and legal rights of Pennsylvanians with disabilities. She will discuss issues affecting Pennsylvanians with disabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.” At the link left-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Covid Issues 35 mins – “Joyce welcomes Maria Town, the president and CEO of the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) and Kelly Buckland, executive director of the National Council of Independent Living (NCIL) to the show. Her guests will discuss the issues facing people with disabilities now amid the current outbreak of COVID-19 and will answer questions from callers. The AAPD promotes equal opportunity, economic power, independent living, and political participation for people with disabilities, while NCIL is the longest-running national cross-disability, grassroots organization run by and for people with disabilities. NCIL represents thousands of organizations and individuals including: individuals with disabilities, Centers for Independent Living (CILs), Statewide Independent Living Councils (SILCs), and other organizations that advocate for the human and civil rights of people with disabilities throughout the United States.” At the link left-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Locations 34 mins – ”Joyce welcomes Nedra Dickson, international/national business leader and disability advocate to the show. Ms. Dickson is managing director, Global Supplier Inclusion and Sustainability Programs across 18 countries at Accenture. Accenture is a leading global professional services company, providing a broad range of services in strategy and consulting, interactive, technology and operations, with digital capabilities across all of these services. They combine unmatched experience and specialized capabilities across more than 40 industries – powered by the world’s largest network of Advanced Technology and Intelligent Operations centers. With 509,000 people serving clients in more than 120 countries. Ms. Dickson will offer advice on what businesses can do to prepare for and survive the COVID-19 pandemic.” At the link left-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Stories 37 mins – Joyce welcomes Gerald Homme, recruitment specialist for Bender Consulting Services, Inc. to the show. Gerald will discuss the various talent program recruiting services offered through Bender Consulting and how to apply for a job through the company. He will explain what differentiates Bender from an employment agency. Among other topics discussed, Gerald will share tips to prepare for interviews, what he looks for in a candidate, and the importance of providing references to us and getting references to respond quickly to outreach. mins Gerald will share why it is important for candidates to indicate outside career efforts they are pursuing. This includes sharing about other interviews they have had or are planning, additional job offers, planned vacations, or changes in career desires.” At the link left-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. –

Elder Care 15 mins – “For most of us, people over the age of 65 make up a huge portion of the patients we see and the energy we pour into clinical care. And yet most of us receive woefully inadequate training to provide the best care for these patients and to overcome structural, systemic biases against the elderly. In this special conversation, Neda sits down with Dr. Louise Aronson, geriatrician and Professor of Medicine at UCSF and author of the fantastic book Elderhood to learn more about how we can take better care of our over-65 patients. Pearls: When working with elders, consider the following strategies: start by understanding goals, assess functional status, avoid over controlling chronic illnesses like diabetes and hypertension, keep Beers criteria on your radar, and consider age with tools like ePrognosis when considering “routine” screenings.” At the link you can listen, but not download;however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Farmer Creations 19 mins – “Fancy a career change? If you’re not doing it already, what would it take to make you a farmer? Would smart technology, matchmaking websites or reality TV do it? In our second episode to explore the problem of the world’s ageing agricultural workers Emily Thomas hears about some innovative and surprising attempts to re-brand farming. Is education or technology the answer, does farming need a re-brand, OR is it just too hard for most farmers to make a living – and does the global food system itself need to change? It matters – if the farmers die out, where will you get your food in the future?” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farmer Production 20 mins – “The average age of farmers globally is thought to be around 60, and rising. So where have all the young farmers gone and who is going to farm our food in the future? It’s an issue that could affect every single one us and the food we eat. Emily Thomas meets families in Kenya, the UK and the Netherlands to find out how farmer’s sons and daughters really feel about taking over the family business. How much of a role do economics, regulations, lifestyle and public perceptions play in driving them from agriculture? This is the first of two episodes to explore why so many young people across the globe are turning away from farming, and what can be done to tempt them back.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Femicide in Serbia 18 mins – “Violence against women is a persistent problem in Serbia. The numbers aren’t clear, but in the last decade more than 330 women have been murdered by men, mostly partners or close family members. Already this year, more than twenty women have been murdered and countless others abused. According to some studies, 1 in 3 women has experienced physical violence, and almost half of all women have endured psychological violence. In November 2016 the Serbian Parliament adopted a new law on the Prevention Of Domestic Violence, introducing a series of legal and protection measures. The legal aspects were aimed at meeting the standards set by the Council Of Europe Convention On Domestic Violence, ratified by Serbia in 2013. Despite the new law coming into force in June 2017, reported gender-based violence is on the rise. As Serbia continues its negotiations to join the European Union, Nicola Kelly reports from Belgrade on the progress to address violence against women. She speaks to victims of abuse and relatives of those killed and asks what more can be done to address what critics say are systemic institutional failings.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.”

Fermentation Art 19 mins – “For 20 years Sandor Katz has been fascinated by fermentation – the breaking down of food and drink by microbes. Through his books and workshops he has helped thousands of people begin to experiment with flavours, fruits, vegetables, spices… and microorganisms. Dan Saladino travels to Sandor’s forest home in rural Tennessee to meet Sandor, hear his story, and discover for himself the transformative potential of this culinary process.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fertilizer that Blew Up Beirut 21 mins – “Following the Beirut explosion, we’re exploring the chemical that caused the blast – ammonium nitrate. It’s something many of us will have come across before, it’s in some of our antibiotics and used to feed yeast but it’s most commonly sold as a fertiliser. Graihagh Jackson examines how this substance has changed the world – feeding millions on the one hand, and fuelling warfare, pollution and biodiversity loss on the other.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Stockpiles 20 mins – “We’re on the hunt for the world’s biggest stashes of food. Can the food system handle a big shock, or is it time to stock up on your supplies? In last week’s episode we met people doing just that – stockpiling food in anticipation of anything from a major natural disaster, to the apocalypse. They had little faith that their governments would be able to keep the food supply under control in extreme circumstances. This week we set out to test their assumptions. From forgotten World War Two food sheds to Switzerland’s stockpiling sirens, which companies and governments are storing food in bulk? Where are they keeping it? Who can access it? And, if disaster strikes, will any get to you?” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fried Chicken 19 mins – “Fried chicken is loved the world over – it’s the most popular dish in global fast food, according to industry analysts, eclipsing even the burger. From Senegal to Singapore many countries have their own native twist on it, whether it’s covered in sesame seeds, battered in tempura or finished with a dunk in aioli. But what is it that makes fried chicken so appealing to so many different cultures? Graihagh Jackson speaks to three fried chicken shop owners from South Korea, the UK and South Africa to find out how battered poultry has come to achieve such global dominance. They explain how different cultures like their birds fried, how competitive the industry can be, and go deep into the science behind the perfect bite. We also learn how hard it can be to convince customers that fried chicken should be viewed as a gourmet meal, and priced accordingly, rather than a cheap, unhealthy snack. And how important is it to source the best possible meat, without going bust? Plus, is the smell of a deep fat fryer any good for your love life?” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Georgia Mental Health Program 37 mins – “Joyce welcomes Eric Jacobson, executive director Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities and Marlyn Tillman, co-founder and executive director, Gwinnett Parent Coalition to Dismantle the School-to-Prison Pipeline (Gwinnett SToPP) to the show. In keeping with our commitment to cover how the COVID-19 pandemic is being addressed for those with developmental disabilities, Mr. Jacobson will discuss how this population is being assisted during this critical time. While Ms. Tillman will discuss Gwinnett STOPP and why it is a critical need during this pandemic.” At the link left-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in Silicon Valley 18 mins – “‘Motel 22’ is an unusual shelter for California’s homeless people. The state is one of the wealthiest in America yet it has the largest population of homeless people – more than 151,000 – in the US. In the Silicon Valley the bus route 22 runs an endless loop from Palo Alto to the Valley’s biggest city, San Jose. Along the way it passes some of the world’s biggest tech giants: Google, Apple, Hewlett-Packard and Facebook. It is the Valley’s only all night bus and many of its night-time passengers ride to keep warm and sleep. For Assignment, Sarah Svoboda takes a ride on the bus, known to many as ‘Motel 22’, to hear the stories of its travelers.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ireland Housing Costs 18 mins – “Ireland has booming investment and lots of new jobs. But Chris Bowlby discovers how a huge housing crisis is haunting the country’s young people in particular. Anger about poor housing, and fear of mass emigration by the young are issues with deep roots in Irish memory. And the housing crisis was a crucial factor in the recent Irish election which shocked the main parties and saw big gains for the nationalists of Sinn Fein . Chris travels to the city of Cork in the southwest of the country. He traces the roots of the crisis in a crazy house buying boom a few years ago. And he hears how a lack of good, affordable housing is affecting everyone from students to young families to Ireland’s many younger migrants who hope to stay in Ireland, but have nowhere to call home.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Jurgen Klopp 19 mins – “The manager of Liverpool Football Club, who lead them to victory in the Champions League. But Jurgen Klopp has not always been this successful. When he was a young footballer at Mainz 05 in Germany, his former team mate Guido Shafer says he ‘had no talent’. So what can we learn from his childhood in Germany’s Black Forest? How did he become the manager he is today?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Karachi Ambulance Driver P1 19 mins – “In Karachi, with a population of around 20 million people, ambulance drivers are on the front lines of this megacity’s shifting conflicts. Samira Shackle joins one of these drivers, Muhammad Safdar, on his relentless round of call-outs. As a first-responder for more than fifteen years, Safdar has witnessed Karachi wracked by gang wars, political violence and terrorism. At the height of the unrest, the number of fatalities was often overwhelming. Then a harsh crackdown by the army and the police, beginning in 2014, brought the conflict under control. Following this, Safdar and others like him have seen drastic changes in the nature of their work. Samira joins Safdar as he takes a young man home from hospital after undergoing a leg amputation. They head towards Lyari, on the outskirts of Karachi, which at several points in recent decades has essentially been run by gangsters. Safdar has vivid memories of gang war and street violence, in stark contrast to the situation today. With no state ambulance service in Pakistan, the Edhi Foundation, set up by the late Abdul Sattar Edhi in 1954, stepped in to offer services to the poor. Safdar drives one of its fleet of four hundred ambulances: rudimentary converted vans with basic emergency provision. His missions bring him to many of Karachi’s most deprived and troubled areas, revealing the complex social and economic problems at the heart of the country. As Samira and Safdar traverse this enormous city, their experiences reveal a remarkable story of life and death in contemporary Pakistan.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Karachi Ambulance Driver P2 19 mins – “…Safdar gets an emergency call out: a six-storey building has collapsed in Gollimore. There are many injured. Arriving at the scene, full of noise and chaos, Samira is witness to the scale of the problems Karachi is yet to overcome. As a first-responder for more than fifteen years, Safdar has witnessed Karachi wracked by gang wars, political violence and terrorism. At the height of the unrest, the number of fatalities was often overwhelming. Then a harsh crackdown by the army and the police, beginning in 2014, brought the conflict under control. Following this, Safdar and others like him have seen drastic changes in the nature of their work….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Lebanese Contaminated Fuel 27 mins – “The discovery of a mysterious delivery of defective, sediment-heavy fuel intended to generate electricity in Lebanon has sparked a huge scandal in the country. More than two dozen people, including senior officials, have been charged with various alleged crimes including bribery, fraud, money-laundering and forging documents. Lebanon has already been in uproar since last autumn, with hundreds of thousands of people involved in street protests demanding the overthrow of the entire political elite – and now the country’s suffering its worst economic crisis in decades. The national currency has collapsed and more than a third of the workforce is unemployed. Electricity shortages – long a problem in Lebanon – have become still more acute, with whole towns plunged into darkness for long periods – and the row over the suspect oil delivery has exacerbated the problem. Now the investigation into the tainted fuel has raised questions about the original deal to import heavy fuel oil – and Lebanese hope it will eventually help explain why they’ve suffered black-outs for so long. Did officials try to cover up the presence of sediment in the shipment? How did the original much-criticised 2005 fuel contract come about? And what do the revelations tell us about the shadowy world of oil trading that the world relies on? Reporters Tim Whewell and Mohamad Chreyteh investigate.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mafia in Naples 18 mins – “Across Italy hundreds of mafia leaders, hitmen and drug-traffickers are being jailed thanks to the most powerful weapon now in the hands of Italy’s anti-mafia investigators: the words of one clan against another. Italy’s state collaborator scheme has seen mafia chiefs breaking the code of silence – in return for a lifetime in witness protection, rather than a life behind bars. For Assignment, Dominic Casciani gets exclusive access to an anti-mafia prison to meet one of Naples’ most important “Penitents” – a boss and killer whose evidence has jailed his associates. In the city itself, he witnesses, alongside hardened investigators, the ongoing nightly battle against the Camorra – and also hears voices of hope across the city that the tide has finally turned.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Maggot Masters 19 mins – “This week we’re in South Africa, picking up great big squirming handfuls of maggots. Could these unpalatable little creatures hold the answer to some big questions – what to do about the huge amount of waste going into landfill, and how to meet the world’s growing demand for a sustainable supply of farmed fish, pigs and poultry? A company called Agriprotein thinks its fly farm is the solution. They’ve just won The Food Chain’s first Global Champion Award – which recognises innovative ideas that could have a longstanding impact on the way we produce or consume food. The Food Chain’s Emily Thomas gets up close to their armada of over 9 billion flies in the first of two episodes to explore the potential of using insects as a protein source for animal and fish feed.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marrow Registry 14 mins – “RMF’s Bernie Siegel welcomes Jay Feinberg, founder and CEO of the Gift of Life Marrow Registry, to share his inspiring story, which began in 1991 as a bone marrow transplant recipient. Jay’s experience in finding a match ultimately led to his mission to expand the registry to include all under-represented groups, so that every patient has an equal opportunity and the chance for a cure.” At th link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Mental Health Issues 38 mins – “Joyce welcomes Jennifer Mathis, deputy legal director and director of Policy and Legal Advocacy for the Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law to the show. Ms. Mathis will share advice and suggestions for those dealing with mental health issues, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and employers dealing with increased anxiety due to isolation working from home.” At the link left-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pandemic and Finances 33 mins – “As coronavirus spreads people are worrying about their money as well as their health. What can you do to protect your finances and what are governments doing to help? You’ve been sharing your stories and advice with Manuela Saragosa and Paul Lewis who are joined by: Professor Ricardo Reis, from the London School of Economics Professor Ila Patnaik, a former economic advisor to the Indian government Oluwatosin Olaseinde, founder of Money Africa in Nigeria Bola Sokunbi, the founder of Clever Girl finance in the US Jürgen Stock, the Secretary General of Interpol.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pot Washers 19 mins – “Do you know who’s washing your dishes? Emily Thomas talks to pot washers from around the world, about what they love and loathe about life at the sink. A kitchen can’t survive without the pot washer, yet we rarely give them a second thought, lavishing all our attention instead on the chefs. But maybe we should. Being a pot washer, dishwasher or kitchen porter as it’s variably known, can be the first rung on the restaurant ladder, and many a great chef started out with a scourer in hand. But the job also attracts those who have very limited opportunities in life, and this means they may be more vulnerable to exploitation and abuse.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race and Change 16 mins – “In the days since the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis on 25 May, we have witnessed many things from police officers marching alongside protesters; to the political debate about US police reform; to the toppling of statues that symbolise the history of slavery and racism. Nuala McGovern takes you through conversations with some of the people involved in the global discussion that is taking place.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race in America 16 mins – “As Americans call for change following the killing of George Floyd, three women share the history of slavery in their families and discuss its impact on society today. Sharon Leslie Morgan in Mississippi is the founder of Our Black Ancestry Foundation, which provides resources for African American genealogical research. She’s also co-written a book on the subject called Gather at the Table. Bernice Alexander Bennett is a blogger and radio host in Silverspring, Maryland. Shonda Brooks is a therapist in New Jersey. They’ve been reflecting with Nuala McGovern on what they uncovered when they researched their own family trees.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race in America 16 mins – “The death of George Floyd has provoked a global response and galvanised opinion. We bring together African Americans to discuss race and share experiences of racism in the US. We hear from people who have sought justice from police aggression, from those attempting reconciliation and from police officers themselves. What changes do they want to see to move America in the right direction?” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recycled Orchestra 34 mins – “Every year we produce over 2 billion tonnes of solid waste worldwide. Most of it ends up in dumps or landfills, or is thrown into the oceans, or is burned. Only a small fraction is ever recycled. But are there other, more creative uses for all that rubbish? To try and find some answers, BBC Mundo reporter Lucia Blasco visits Paraguay to meet the inspiring young musicians of the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura, whose instruments are made out of rubbish from the city’s main landfill; and she travels to the city of Linköping in southern Sweden, where almost all the houses are heated by energy produced by incinerating waste.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Recycling Chile and Spain 34 mins – “Leena Vuotovesi, the leader of environmental work in Europe’s greenest town, Ii in Finland, travels to Chile and Spain to compare recycling practices. First she visits La Pintana – Chile’s unlikely climate champion: an impoverished neighbourhood plagued by crime and violence that recycles more than any other town in Chile. Leena then goes to a pristine part of southern Spain – a country where municipal recycling rates lag way behind EU targets. She speaks to children, teachers and waste management experts to find out why Spanish people don’t appear to care about recycling and to see what could be done to reduce environmental and economic damage.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Fruit Pickers 19 mins – “Across the world, as fruits ripen, teams of pickers set out across the fields. Without them, produce would be left to rot and farms profits would plummet. But in many countries, population shifts and changes to immigration laws have left farmers struggling to find enough people to do the work. The effect has been particularly pronounced in the US where President Trump has cracked down on immigration, and the UK with its plans to leave the EU. Enter the robots. Over the past few years, interest and investment in machines that can pick fruit and vegetables that are usually harvested by humans, have been ramping up. Emily Thomas asks whether we should welcome these new developments. Picking fruit is low paid, low-skilled and physically demanding work, and exploitation in the industry is well-documented. But it’s also a source of income that many depend on, and the main source of employment in some parts of the world. Plus, if we do let machines do the job, what are the implications for the environment, and how our food looks and tastes?” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Romanian Revolution 18 mins – “Thirty years after Dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife Elena were executed on Christmas day, Tessa Dunlop looks back at the violent birth of post-Communist Romania and asks if it has shaken off the legacy of decades of ruthless totalitarianism. The violence of the Romanian Revolution marked its difference from the other former Eastern European communist states which were swept away by largely peaceful pro-democracy movements born after the fall of the Berlin wall. In Romania, hundreds died in bloody protests as the regime’s grisly endgame was played out across the world’s media. Now, 30 years later, we revisit the hope and trauma behind the December revolution. What has changed, and how well has Romania come to terms with its past?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Swine Fever 19 mins – “A deadly and highly contagious disease is spreading across Europe’s pig farms. African Swine Fever Virus doesn’t harm humans, but once it infects domestic and wild pigs almost all of them die through internal bleeding within days. More than a million pigs are thought to have died as a result of the latest outbreak, devastating hundreds of farms and damaging exports. It’s the first time the virus has ever hit Europe’s pig farming heartland. With a vaccine still years off, and amid fears the disease could reach as far as China, we ask if the virus can be stopped, and how. Emily Thomas meets people who think the answer lies in building fences between countries, genetically engineering pigs, and even calling in the army to hunt down disease-spreading wild boar.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Teacher in Germany 34 mins – “Five years on from the refugee crisis of 2015, Germany is now home to over a million refugees. In Germany’s Refugee Teachers, Naomi Scherbel-Ball explores a classroom experiment with a difference, a scheme to retrain refugee teachers and place them in German schools to help the country with a shortage of 40,000 teachers. Naomi visits a school in Mönchengladbach in Western Germany, where Mustafa Hammal teaches English. Mustafa, an English teacher with eight years of experience, fled the civil war in Syria with his family in 2015. Arriving in Germany, he discovered a teacher retraining programme designed to harness the skills that refugee teachers bring with them. Miriam Vock, an educational psychologist at Potsdam University transports us back to the summer of 2015. Amidst the chaos of the refugee crisis, she wondered if there might be some teachers amongst the refugees arriving in Germany. A year later the first refugee teacher retraining course was launched, an idea that inspired a number of other pilot courses across Germany. Retraining as a teacher in a system with rigid set qualifications, is particularly challenging however and graduates are finding it difficult to find work. The success of the far-right Alternative for Germany, now the country’s main opposition party, has raised the stakes for refugees trying to integrate. As Germany struggles with an ageing population and a severe labour shortage, Naomi asks if refugees can fill the gap?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Tunes from Trash 34 mins – “Just outside the Paraguayan capital city of Asuncion lies the town of Cateura. It’s an impoverished settlement ranged along the banks of a stinking, polluted river, in the shadow of a giant landfill site. Many of its inhabitants scratch a living by reclaiming objects from the endless ocean of garbage to sell. Recycling of a kind. But for the last ten years the residents of Cateura have been part of a recycling project of a much sweeter sort. La Orquesta de Instrumentos Reciclados de Cateura — the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura — use materials from the landfill site to create musical instruments. An oil drum for a cello, a pipe for a flute, a tin can for a guitar. They’ve toured the world and recorded with the likes of Metallica. As the Orchestra leader Favio Chávez says, “The world sends us garbage. We send back music.” The BBC’s South America Correspondent Wyre Davies visits Cateura, meets Favio Chávez and other members of the Recycled Orchestra and learns how trash, and lives, are being transformed by music.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Wine with Less Alcohol 19 mins – “Wine has been getting more and more alcoholic in recent decades, driven by consumer tastes and climate change. This has big implications not only for public health, but also the quality of the bottle. But making a lower alcohol wine that is still full of flavour is extremely complicated, especially when growing grapes in rising temperatures – some have called it the profession’s Holy Grail. Emily Thomas meets those trying to solve the puzzle: a Chilean vineyard owner; a climate change and grape variety academic; and an Australian scientist whose raspberry-flavoured Chardonnay could hold the key.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wuhan 18 mins – “The BBC’s China correspondent, John Sudworth, travels to Wuhan – the city on the banks of the Yangtze river where Covid-19 first emerged. As the city returns to life, he examines one of the biggest questions on everyone’s mind: did the virus emerge naturally or could it have been leaked, as the US alleges, from a Wuhan lab, where work was being carried out to research bat viruses? As John and his team discover, asking questions and getting answers in Wuhan is no easy task.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zimbabwe Mental Health Control 18 mins – “Zimbabwe has over 14 million people but fewer than 20 psychiatrists. After years of economic turmoil, unemployment and HIV, mental health is a huge challenge and doctors estimate one in four Zimbabweans battles with depression or anxiety. Lucia is one of the 700 grandmothers in the country turning the nation around. She sits on a wooden bench using a gentle form of cognitive behavioural or talking therapy with her community. This is one of 250 Friendship Benches set up by Zimbabwean psychiatrist Dr Dixon Chibanda, who believed that after a few weeks of simple training, grandmothers could become lay health workers for their communities. Lucia has the time, wisdom and respect to help the people who come to her. She understands them and has direct experience of their problems. Presenter Kim Chakanetsa hears the grandmothers are having astounding results. They have helped over 50,000 people and are breaking down the stigma around mental health. Recent clinical trials found they are more effective than conventional medical treatments. As a result, Dixon Chibanda gets enquiries from around the world for the Friendship Bench and he’s setting them up in Malawi, Zanzibar, Kenya, Tanzania and now New York. The World Health Organisation said more than 264 million people were suffering from depression. That was before Covid-19 brought new challenges. As people are more isolated and anxious, Dixon Chibanda explains how he is facing up to the pandemic, moving his idea online and giving the world access to a virtual Friendship Bench.” At the link right-click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

MMD462 Media Mining Digest: 1918 Pandemic, Americans with Disabilities, Army Crime Lab, Blind Chemist, Broadband in Africa, Cancer Treatment, Cattle Domestication, Computers and Mobile Phones, Corona Virus Family, Corona Virus Medicine, Coroners vs Medical Examiners, Covid and African Americans, Covid Clinical Trials, Covid in Iceland, Covid Religion and Travel, Covid Research, Covid Symptoms, Covid Tests, Covid Vaccine, Covid-19 Background, Covid19 Special Topics, Disability History, Weed Research, Emerging Technologies, Futurists, Golden State Killer, Grafting Plants, Improvised Explosive Devices, Innovation Execution, Murdered American Indians, National Digital Inclusion Alliance, Plant Based Oils, Science Costs, Stalking Protection, STEM Cells TED Talk, Telehealth, Universal Influenza Vaccine, W.H.O. Response to Covid-19, Weed Research, Wrongful Convictions

Exercise your ears: the 50 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 772 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,950 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

1918 Pandemic 13 mins – “Mütter Museum historical curator Jane E. Boyd discusses the parallels between the 1918–1919 flu pandemic and the coronavirus. In the fall of 1918 the (misnomered) Spanish flu ravaged much of the world. Philadelphia was hit especially hard: it had the highest death rate of any major American city. Over the course of six weeks 12,000 people in the city died. Hospitals were overcrowded and bodies piled up. When the Mütter Museum embarked on the multiyear exhibition and public art project Spit Spreads Death, the curators and researchers behind it had no idea how relevant it would become—or how quickly.” At the sound bar left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Americans with Disabilities Act 30 mins – “Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division Eric Dreiband speaks with Robbie Kirkendall, Special Legal Counsel in the division’s Disability Rights Section, about the division’s efforts to enforce the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the 30th anniversary of the ADA, and the important role it has played in our society.” At the link right-click “Download audio file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Army Crime Lab 16 mins – “In episode seven of the DNA season, Just Science interviews Molly Hall, an examiner for the United States Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory, about their transition to a Direct-to-DNA approach to processing sexual assault kits. The United States Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory acts as the true crime lab for the entire Department of Defense and serves all branches of the military. With roughly 2,000 sexual assault kits being submitted per year, they needed to find a way to efficiently process these kits without being bogged down by screening or an influx in submissions. Listen along as Molly Hall discusses Sexual Assault Kit processing and why their lab made the switch to a Direct-to-DNA approach in this episode of Just Science.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Biotech Seeds in Africa 25 mins – “Western Africa holds many nations of substantial population and an emerging economies. The nation has recently approved the use of the Bt cowpea to farm without applied insecticide, and with the new technology comes the need to ensure that it is used correctly. Today’s podcast features Francis Onyekachi, Program Officer, West African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF). AATF helps with training farmers around the proper stewardship practices and connecting them with national extension experts. He describes the infrastructure that came with deregulation of the cowpea, and describes how the country’s regulators and oversight agencies will work with them to ensure successful application.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Chemist 27 mins – “Everyone knows that observation is a key part of the scientific method, but what does that mean for scientists who can’t see? Judith Summers-Gates is a successful, visually impaired chemist who uses a telescope to read street signs. If the thought of a blind scientist gives you pause, you’re not alone. But stop and ask yourself why. What assumptions do we make about how knowledge is produced? And who gets to produce it? And who gets to participate in science? In this episode we go deep into the history of how vision came to dominate scientific observation and how blind scientists challenge our assumptions. This is the first of two episodes about science and disability and was produced in collaboration with the Science and Disability oral history project at the Science History Institute.” At the sound bar left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Africa 19 mins – “This week on the Community Broadband Bits podcast, Christopher speaks with Steve Song, a fellow at Mozilla who works to connect unserved communities across the globe. Steve shares his background starting out at a nonprofit Internet service provider in 1990s South Africa, and they discuss the negative but mostly positive effects of widespread Internet access. While acknowledging the limitations of mobile connectivity, Steve describes the essential role wireless technologies have played in connecting people worldwide. To get everyone online, Steve argues that we need a mixture of models, including wireless providers. Christopher and Steve also talk about how the potential impact of 5G is being diluted by focusing on high speeds instead of affordable, rural Internet access. At the same time, Steve explains that the U.S. has been a global leader in terms of opening up wireless spectrum for many uses. For better rural connectivity, Steve points to cooperatives as an exemplary model to follow, and he speaks to the need to treat spectrum differently in rural areas.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Massachusettes 18 mins – “When Paul Revere rode through Concord, Massachusetts, to warn the Colonists about the Red Coats, horseback was the fastest way to move information. More than 240 years later, the community that was so instrumental to founding of the United States as we know it now sends information via their own fast, affordable, reliable Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) municipal network. This week, Concord’s former CIO Mark Howell joins Christopher to talk about the community and their investment. Mark discusses the community’s history and the story of the network, which includes their reasons for investing in the infrastructure. He talks about the local citizens’ enthusiasm for the project and what it was like to go from operating an electric utility to adding Internet access for the public. Mark also discusses the funding mechanism that Concord used to pay for the project and shares a few of the many benefits that the network has brought to Concord and its people. Christopher and Mark review the reasoning behind the different service offerings available to subscribers and the rationale behind choosing these tiers. They also talk about some of the challenges Concord has faced and Mark gets into the possibilities of regional efforts in order to maximize the possibility of reaching more households.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 25 mins – “Early last month, before the spread of the novel coronavirus turned staying home from a quiet night in into a moral imperative, Christopher traveled to North Carolina to attend the Institute for Emerging Issues Forum at North Carolina State University. While there, he interviewed Leslie Boney, Director of the Institute for Emerging Issues. He also spoke with Darren Smith from Wilson’s Gig East Exchange and Ron Townley from the Upper Coastal Plain Council of Governments. We wanted to share their conversation as a special episode of the “Why NC Broadband Matters” podcast series we’ve been working on with NC Broadband Matters. The nonprofit organization works to connect communities across North Carolina, bringing high-quality broadband access to residents and businesses.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Broadband in Oklahoma 28 mins – “Norman, Oklahoma, is known for the University of Oklahoma and, with 30,000 students enrolled, one expects Internet access to be vibrant and readily available throughout the area. It hasn’t always been that way, but thanks to Oklahoma Electric Cooperative and their OEC Fiber, those who live and work in the areas around the fringes of the University and the city now have access to fast, affordable, reliable connectivity. CEO of the co-op Patrick Grace and President of OEC Fiber David Goodspeed visit with Christopher during this week’s episode. They talk about how the electric cooperative got into offering fiber to folks in their region and how they’ve financed the deployment. Patrick and David describe how local competition has influenced their project and how they knew they needed to pursue the prospect of offering Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) service. They talk about their rapid expansion and share information on the popularity of their gig service. They also describe the reactions from subscribers who once had to rely on satellite or mobile hotspots as they’ve transitioned to at-home gigabit connectivity. Enthusiasm for OEC Fiber has been high, partly due to the services they offer, but also because the community and employees of the cooperative have a deep sense of pride in the contribution their project is making to the region.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Treatment 39 mins – “Understanding duplication in certain genes may be the key to creating personalized cancer care for patients with triple-negative breast cancer, scientists from The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) shared during a JAXtaposition virtual event.“It really depends on the type of treatment, but the whole research field is trying to move away from chemotherapy and towards more specific approaches that would be much more effective specifically on cancer cells and have fewer side effects for the normal cells,” said Francesca Menghi, Ph.D., associate research scientist in the Liu lab. Menghi studies critical genomic changes implicated in ovarian and breast cancers, with the goal of a better understanding of the individuality of cancer genomes and the development of novel approaches toward the personalized management of cancer patients. “Precision comes from understanding how to take a surgical strike against the signaling pathway or the growth-promoting feature of the cancer cells, specifically, without targeting everything else that’s present in all the other cells in the body,” added Professor Mark Adams, Ph.D., deputy director of The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, who moderated the discussion. Adams also serves as director of clinical diagnostic research at the Laboratory. “That’s really where the promise is, is understanding that basic science that leads to how is it that the cancer cell stays alive and progresses, and being able to target that correctly,” he said.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cattle Domestication 21 mins – “Cattle are currently used for meat, milk, hide products and as work animals. Where did they come from? Who are the wild relatives? Dr. Hans Lenstra from the Utrecht University describes the domestication of cattle, their radiation throughout the world, and the traits that humans have selected. We discuss the current state of genomics as well as how genomic selection, artificial insemination and gene editing might influence the future of cattle production.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Computers and Mobile Phones 17 mins – “In episode six, Just Science interviews Barbara Guttman from the National Institute of Standards and Technology about the first large-scale black box study to test the accuracy of computer and mobile phone forensics.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Corona Virus and Broadband in Minnesota 23 mins – “Not even a pandemic can stop this week’s guest, US Internet CEO Travis Carter, from finding ways to bring better connectivity to his company’s subscribers and the community. For the 400th episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast, Christopher interviewed Travis (from six feet away) at the US Internet office outside Minneapolis, Minnesota. The pair discuss how the ISP is responding to the crisis, including by limiting home installs and opening up access to its public Wi-Fi network. As people transition to remote work, online education, and digital entertainment, Travis explains how the network is experiencing increased interest from new customers and greater demand from current subscribers. Christopher and Travis also talk about US Internet’s pilot project in low-income housing and how the ISP is trying to determine what barriers prevent households from signing up for the service. Travis describes some of the funding challenges he faces as he expands the network throughout the city and how US Internet differentiates itself in terms of reliability. Before closing the interview, he shares his disappointing experience with mobile connectivity during a big roadtrip he took last summer, arguing that wireless networks can never replace fiber. Travis was previously a guest on Community Broadband Bits episdoes 359 – An Insider’s Perspective on Urban Fiber Deployment, 301 – Wireless and Wired; US Internet Knows Both, and 194 – ISP US Internet Gets More Respect Than Rodney Dangerfield.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Corona Virus Family 50 mins – “Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode we speak with Susan Weiss, a microbiology professor at the University of Pennsylvania and the director for the Penn Center for Research on Coronavirus and Emerging Pathogens. She’ll talk about her 40 years of experience researching coronaviruses, how her field reacted to the 2002 SARS and 2012 MERS outbreaks, and the importance of studying diseases that transfer from animals to humans.” At the sound bar left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus Medicine 16 mins – “When you’ve got a public health crisis like this, you’ve got no choice but to deploy all of your resources toward finding a solution,” says the Alnylam Pharmaceuticals CEO. Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode our senior producer, Mariel Carr, talks with John Maraganore, the CEO of Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, a company developing an antiviral medication for COVID-19. When news broke in January about the new coronavirus, John Maraganore made the decision to pause other drugs in development and pivot to working on an antiviral medication for this new and alarmingly infectious virus. He says it was a difficult decision, but this virus had all the ingredients to become a pandemic. “And when you have a public health crisis like this, that’s what you do.” At the sound bar left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Coroners vs Medical Examiners 25 mins – “This second episode of the medicolegal death investigation special release season of the National Institute of Justice’s (NIJ’s) Just Science podcasts is an interview with John Fudenberg, the Coroner of Clark County (Nevada), regarding differences between coroner and medical-examiner systems.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid and African Americans 49 mins – “Early data from the U.S. shows a higher death rate for African Americans from COVID-19. We discuss what Canada can do to better protect people of colour from inequalities in health care. Then, author and podcast host Brené Brown talks to Matt Galloway about how being vulnerable can help us give us the strength to face the COVID-19 pandemic. Plus, Nova Scotia woman Crystal Blair tells us she’s kept her truckstop restaurant open during the pandemic, so she can serve up free meals to the truck drivers with few options. And as COVID19 cases climb in New York, doctors face tough choices over who gets access to limited resources. Now guidelines have been published in Canada, in case our doctors have to make those same life-or-death decisions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Covid Clinical Trials 19 mins – “Is your local lawmaker flush with pharma cash? How does racism in medicine loom over Covid-19 studies? And who decides when a clinical trial goes on pause? We discuss all that and more this week on “The Readout LOUD,” STAT’s biotech podcast. First, we discuss two high-profile pauses to Covid-19 clinical trials from Eli Lilly and Johnson & Johnson and explain why experts say they offer more good news than bad. Then, STAT Washington correspondent Lev Facher calls in to talk about his first-of-its-kind analysis of the drug industry’s spending to influence policy at the state level. Finally, our STAT colleague Nicholas St. Fleur joins us to tell the story of two Black university leaders who urged their campuses to join a Covid-19 vaccine trial — and the backlash that ensued.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Covid in Iceland 19 mins – “Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, Iceland had become the worst-hit country in Scandinavia. But it reversed its fate, without a full lockdown. And to date, Iceland has seen very few deaths. How? Largely because of the harmonious collaboration of “The Trinity” – Iceland’s chief epidemiologist, Director of Health, and superintendent of police – who implemented the “pandemic plan” – a framework for working together, and saving lives. In episode two of Teamistry’s second season, host Gabriela Cowperthwaite brings us a story of optimism to cut through the gloom. We hear directly from The Trinity: Alma Moller, Iceland’s Director of Health, Þórólfur Guðnason, its Chief Epidemiologist, and Víðir Reynisson, Chief Superintendent of the Office of the National Commissioner of the Police. We also learn how Kári Stefánsson, the CEO of deCODE genetics, and his team of scientists assisted government health officials by examining the virus and increasing Iceland’s testing capacity. And Alexander Elliott, an Icelandic journalist, describes how the country’s pandemic fight unfolded and how its teamwork saved lives. Teamistry is an original podcast from Atlassian.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download MP3” to get the podcast.

Covid Religion and Travel 50 mins – “We’re talking to faith leaders about how they tend to their communities during the pandemic, and why empty houses of worship this weekend don’t mean we can’t come together. Then, we hear from Canadians who were stranded abroad because of COVID-19, but have made it home against all the odds. Also, in these uncertain times, we talk to seniors who have experienced similar challenges in the past, including one 107-year-old Nova Scotian who remembers the 1918 Spanish Influenza pandemic. What can we learn from their experiences? And as some Canadians forgo meat this Good Friday, we’ll check in with a St. John’s fish and chip shop that has been serving the city for almost 70 years.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Covid Research 16 mins – “Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode our producer Rigberto Hernandez talks with Katrine Bosley, who has worked in the biotech industry for more than 30 years. Until recently she was the CEO of Editas Medicine, a company that focuses on a gene-editing technology known as CRISPR. She’s now on the board of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Hospital and is advising the facility on its quest to create a COVID-19 vaccine. She tells us how CRISPR can be used to make faster diagnostic tests and how the hospital in Boston is creating a vaccine using a gene therapy method. “One of the things that’s important for all of us competing against this virus is to have a lot of technologically different strategies to try to make a vaccine.” At the sound bar left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Symptoms 19 mins – “What you need to know – Management of covid-19 after the first three weeks is currently based on limited evidence; Approximately 10% of people experience prolonged illness after covid-19; Many such patients recover spontaneously (if slowly) with holistic support, rest, symptomatic treatment, and gradual increase in activity; Home pulse oximetry can be helpful in monitoring breathlessness; Indications for specialist assessment include clinical concern along with respiratory, cardiac, or neurological symptoms that are new, persistent, or progressive Post-acute covid-19 (“long covid”) seems to be a multisystem disease, sometimes occurring after a relatively mild acute illness.1 Clinical management requires a whole-patient perspective.2 This article, intended for primary care clinicians, relates to the patient who has a delayed recovery from an episode of covid-19 that was managed in the community or in a standard hospital ward. Broadly, such patients can be divided into those who may have serious sequelae (such as thromboembolic complications) and those with a non-specific clinical picture, often dominated by fatigue and breathlessness. The specialist rehabilitation needs of a third group, covid-19 patients whose acute illness required intensive care, have been covered elsewhere.3” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Covid Tests 24 mins – “Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode we talk to Mark Stevenson, the chief operating officer of Thermo Fisher Scientific, an instrumentation company that has designed a diagnostic test for the novel coronavirus. The company is also working on a serology test, which will determine who has already had the virus. He tells us how the company developed those tests and the role they play in managing this pandemic. The Thermo Fisher Scientific executive tells us what it took for his instrumentation company to design a diagnostic test for the novel coronavirus. Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode we talk to Mark Stevenson, the chief operating officer of Thermo Fisher Scientific, an instrumentation company that has designed a diagnostic test for the novel coronavirus. The company is also working on a serology test, which will determine who has already had the virus. He tells us how the company developed those tests and the role they play in managing this pandemic.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Vaccine 24 mins – “Over the past few weeks Distillations has been talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode we talk with Magda Marquet, a biochemical engineer and an entrepreneur. Marquet has spent decades working on DNA vaccines, one of the many techniques being used to create a vaccine for COVID-19. She also sits on the board of Arcturus Therapeutics, which is developing a vaccine for the disease. She tells us about how a company she cofounded, AltheaDx, is taking on the mental health crisis, which has been exacerbated by the pandemic. And she discusses her hopes that the lessons learned during the pandemic might change society for the better.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.  

Covid Vaccine Development 24 mins – “Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode we talk with Robert Langer, a chemical engineer and an entrepreneur, who runs the largest biomedical engineering research laboratory in the world at MIT. He has also started numerous biotech companies, including Moderna Therapeutics, a company that’s been making headlines for the COVID-19 vaccine they’re developing. Langer told us about his work with the Gates Foundation to develop a way for vaccines to self-boost in the body, his work with the sneaker company New Balance to create masks, and his thoughts about how diagnostic testing could be better.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Covid-19 Background 31 mins – “As of 3/11/2020 COVID-19 is emerging as a significant health threat worldwide.  This pandemic is on the rise, and public health suffers from politicized spin, misinformation, and a lack of good information.  This episode is targeted to the Talking Biotech listener that can connect with family and friends, sharing the facts of this outbreak.   Today’s guest is Dr. ChubbyEmu, the YouTube physician that has been at ground zero in discussing the coronavirus outbreak.  We dig a layer deeper into the disease, its physical manifestations, and the current state of the disease as it spreads into the USA.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Covid19 Special Topics 22 mins – “In this special edition of the Talking Bitotech Podcast Dr. Kevin Folta covers recent topics in COVID19.  These topics are pulled from the headlines and distilled to that you can better communicate the current state of this health crisis.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Disability History 41 mins – “There’s a common assumption that to be a scientist you must also be a genius, someone who excelled at school, and learns easily and quickly. But are these really the qualities necessary to produce new scientific knowledge? Collin Diedrich is a research scientist with a doctorate in molecular virology and microbiology. On paper he might seem to be the archetypal smart scientist, but the reality is more complicated. Collin has multiple learning disabilities, and he has struggled to overcome the stigma that comes with them for his entire life. In this episode we explore how our narrow definition of intelligence not only holds back people such as Collin, but also prevents the creation of new scientific knowledge that benefits us all. This is the second of two episodes about science and disability and was produced in collaboration with the Science and Disability oral history project at the Science History Institute.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

EmergingTechnologies 21 mins – “I mentioned last week that I would spend time on education and our critical need to rethink it. To start that journey, fellow Futurist Alexandra Whittington joins our future of business show with host Kevin Benedict. Listen in to their wide ranging conversation about futurism and the rethinking of higher education.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Futurists 37 mins – “Futurists are people who attempt to predict the future – authors, consultants, thinkers, organizational leaders and others who engage in interdisciplinary and systems thinking to advise private and public organizations on diverse global trends, possible scenarios, emerging market opportunities and risk management. Futurists are motivated by change. Not content merely to describe or forecast, they desire an active role in world transformation. Futurology is concerned with ‘three P’s and a W’, i.e., ‘possible, probable, and preferable’ futures, plus ‘wildcards’, which are low-probability, high-impact events. In The Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula K. Le Guin distinguished futurology – the business of prophets, clairvoyants, and futurists – from novelists, whose ‘business is lying.’” en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Futurist We’ll ask futurists Mike Bechtel, Frank Diana, Tom Raftery, and Alexandra Whittington for their take on The Future of Futurists, Futurology and Crystal Ball Tech.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Golden State Killer 18 mins – “In the last episode of Just Science, Dr. Barbara Rae-Venter shared her techniques for creating family trees and discussed the resolution of her first cold case. In episode five of the DNA season, we continue that conversation. In February 2017, Forensic Magazine published an article detailing the Bear Brook Murders, an abandoned girl, and Rae-Venter’s involvement in the resolution of a cold case that tied them all together. One month later, she was contacted by investigator Paul Holes and was on the hunt yet again. Listen along as she discusses building a profile and explains how she used investigative genetic genealogy to identify the Golden State Killer. This season is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Grafting Plants 28 mins – “Grafting is an age-old practice of connecting a set of roots to an aerial portion of a separate plant.  Together they typically exhibit enhanced productivity, disease resistance, or other trait that makes grafting a useful practice.  But why does it work? How does it work? What happens at the cells in the junction where different plants collide?  Dr. Charles Melnyk from the Swedish Agricultural University sheds light on this mysterious process.  We cover the history, applications, and what’s happening at the interface of two very different biologies uniting as one.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Improvised Explosives 20 mins – “In episode six of the Identification season, Just Science interviews Hillary Daluz, an instructor for Tritech Forensics and author on latent print analysis. From soda cans and cigarette packs to animal carcasses and pressure cookers, an improvised explosive device is just that: improvised. One of the most difficult parts of I.E.D. identification after the explosion is figuring out what was part of the bomb itself. Hillary Daluz spent 14 months in Iraq as a latent print examiner working on the remains of improvised explosive devices. Listen along as she discusses contextual bias, the difficulty of identifying finger prints on improvised explosives, and the importance of partnering with other disciplines in this episode of Just Science.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Innovation Execution 25 mins – “I have used the FIRE (Focus, Ideation, Ranking, Execution) framework for more than 20 years, and thousands of organizations use it. Focus is defining where your problem area is. Ideation is the process of creating ideas to address your problem areas. The process consists of individual and team ideation, which, when combined, generates 30% more ideas than when done individually. Ranking is where you prioritize your ideas. This process is through dot/wow voting and criteria ranking. Execution, the last element of the FIRE framework,  is how one turns ideas into innovation. Done through two phases; it involves testing and validation and launching the MVP (Minimum viable product). Execution is not easy. 92% of CEOs say innovation is critical to their organization, but only 35% of them have confidence in executing these ideas.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Innovation Execution 25 mins – “On this week’s show, we will wrap up the series of shows on the innovation framework known as FIRE. We will discuss the part of the innovation framework known as execution. Execution is composed of making your best ideas into something real.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” to get the podcast.

Innovation Lean Canvas 25 mins – “The lean canvas replaces a typically created business plan. We print this out on a huge poster-sized paper and tack it to the wall in our workshops. It allows you to look at your best idea and the critical areas around it, all in one glance. Updated as you acquire more learnings, you’ll be able to see these ideas and critical areas on the paper. I would encourage you to customize your lean canvas to your own organization’s needs. Don’t be afraid to try something different that fits you. Let’s walk through my lean canvas so we can get a feel for it. Starting, we talk about the problem statement, and what makes this idea different. We discuss who the customers are and what the key metrics are. The steps and activities that are needed, as well as the resources needed, are discussed. With this framework, you get a perfect snapshot view of the problem, the solution, and how it all works. It helps you pinpoint areas that need work.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Innovation Ranking 25 mins – “Innovation is about challenging an industry’s assumptions, questioning what we think we know about our customers, and being open to new ideas. When it comes to the framework, it is not the process. Instead, it defines the elements that you need to structure your process around. We use the FIRE framework. The focus area has to be defined or come up with ideas that aren’t impactful. Next is ideation, which is generating ideas. Ideation establishes the framework, and you can use whatever process you want to generate those ideas. The use of ranking is for identifying the best ideas out of the group. Ideas without execution are a hobby, and we are not in the hobby business….So why is ranking so important? Let’s say management asks your team to come up with some new ideas. You write some things down on a flip chart, and someone types them up and emails them out. Typically, this method results in nothing, as there are too many broad ideas. Ranking helps you find the best ideas and zeroes you in on them.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Management System 26 mins – “This week, we will continue the discussion on the FIRE framework and expound upon it. We will discuss a technology that will enable your FIRE framework, known as an Idea Management System (IMS). The Idea Management System supports everything from the focus, ideation, and ranking, to managing your funnel for the execution phase. I deployed my first IMS in 2008 while I was CTO at HP. Not known as IMS yet, we chose a particular platform back then. Every IMS system has its built-in assumptions as part of its basic platform. They have to work on enhancing their platforms due to competition continuously. If you have procured an IMS, are building one, or are integrating one with other systems, there are seven must-have features you need. The first feature is known as the ease of idea capture. This consists of getting all of your ideas captured and putting them into your IMS. The key here is to get every idea you have into this system. It is also important to track who came up with each idea for legal reasons.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Murdered American Indians 25 mins – “Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Justice Programs Katie Sullivan speaks with Wyn Hornbuckle, Deputy Director of the Office of Public Affairs, about Operation Lady Justice, the Presidential Task Force on Missing and Murdered American Indians and Alaska Natives.” At the link right-click “Download audio file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Digital Inclusion Alliance 21 mins – “Our lives have mostly moved online as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, but the millions of Americans who don’t have access to home broadband have been left behind. Whether it’s unavailable or just unaffordable, these families must risk their health to access essential services, like healthcare and education. This week for the Community Broadband Bits podcast, Christopher talks with Angela Siefer, Executive Director of the National Digital Inclusion Alliance (NDIA), about the many ways that the pandemic has highlighted digital divides in our country. Angela shares how NDIA is helping address urgent connectivity needs by supporting digital inclusion practitioners on the ground and by raising public awareness during the crisis. One of NDIA’s efforts is their list of Free and Low-Cost Internet Plans from national broadband providers. Christopher and Angela review some of the providers’ offers and discuss the problems that NDIA has found with the plans. (Spoiler: Comcast is doing, well, pretty good actually. Charter Spectrum on the other hand . . . ) Angela explains why it’s important that these plans serve more than just students if we want to keep people safe at home. The pair also talk about creative efforts to temporarily deploy public Wi-Fi hotspots as well as longer term plans to improve broadband access and availability. However, Angela reminds us that removing the cost barrier is still the quickest way to get people connected today.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plant Based Oils 31 mins – “Plants produce a variety of oils, many that are critical to the human diet. The precise chemical qualities of plant oils dictate its stability, use, nutrient quality, or even its use as fuel. Dr. Surinder Singh is an expert in plant oils at CSIRO, the Australian National Research Laboratory. His laboratory has been working on projects in a variety of crops to improve the oil quality for human nutrition, but also as a potential fuel. Such efforts provide a renewable and more sustainable source of valuable oils, taking pressure off of fisheries and carbon-intensive practices.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Science Costs 33 mins – “In science, we tend to focus on the destination, not the journey. But for every big breakthrough, every historic discovery, there are countless contributions that no one notices: the forgotten grunt workers, research that came to nothing, even lives lost in the pursuit of progress. Today’s episode is about the hidden cost of science — the price of doing business that we rarely think about. We hear stories about the mental health toll of graduate school, the literal cost of research, and the environmental impact of scientific progress.” At the link left-click “Listen” and select “MP3” to download the podcast.

Stalking Protection 17 mins – “Acting Director for the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) Laura Rogers speaks with Bob Davis, the Communications Officer at OVW, about stalking and how the office works to educate and provide resources to prevent it and support victims.” At the link right-click “Download audio file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

STEM Cells TED Talk 10 mins – “Bernie was a courtroom attorney, and a cancer and Hurricane Andrew survivor. For fun, he owned a minor league basketball team and became commissioner of a pro-wrestling federation. A decade ago, he ignited a media firestorm when seeking a guardian for the alleged clone, “Baby Eve.” 18 months later, he found himself at the United Nations addressing the promise of stem cell research as a global leader of the advocacy community.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Telehealth 19 mins – “In February, Christopher was in North Carolina at the Institute for Emerging Issues Forum at North Carolina State University. While he was there, he had the opportunity to conduct several interviews with people engaged in research, working with boots on the ground to expand broadband, or advocating for better policy so more people have access to high-quality Internet access. One of the people he spoke with was Danika Tynes, Ph.D., a Senior Research Associate from the Georgia Tech Research Institute. One of Danika’s areas of expertise is telehealth, which continues to expand in relevance and application with new innovations and the expansion of broadband access. During the conversation, Danika discusses some of the results of her research, including the elements that help telehealth efforts succeed. She also discusses how telehealth applies in different environments and how data can be used to improve its applications for patients and healthcare professionals. Danika also shares a personal experience that illustrates how telehealth is actually more ingrained in our daily lives than we realize.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thai Cave Rescue 24 mins – “In the summer of 2018, twelve Thai teenagers from a soccer team and their 25-year-old coach got stuck deep inside the labyrinthine – and flooding – Tham Luang caves of Thailand’s Chiang Rai province. Missing for over a week, the team was feared dead until they were found by a British cave diver, one of few experts in the world. Weary but alive, the boys’ calm demeanor gave people hope but their discovery also signaled the beginning of a frenzied, complicated, and nearly impossible rescue mission. In this episode of Teamistry, host Gabriela Cowperthwaite takes us inside the caves and alongside the people assembled from across Thailand and the world to work together on this dire operation. This included Thai Navy Seals, British cave divers, members of the U.S. Air Force, doctors, engineers, and countless volunteers, all who worked against the clock to retrieve each individual safely. Hour after hour, as the caves continued to flood and oxygen tanks ran low, we learn about the leadership and teamwork that enabled these disparate groups to remain synchronized, overcome cultural barriers, and make difficult, life-or-death decisions. We hear from Narongsak Osottanakorn, the former Governor of Chiang Rai province, who marshaled the various teams and became a national hero. Lt. Col. Charles Hodges of the U.S. Air Force talks about his role in getting teams to communicate effectively, and Dr. Richard Harris, an anesthesiologist from Australia, describes his climactic moments while inside the caves with the boys. We also hear from Wharton Professor Michael Useem, who offers insight into the leadership techniques that propelled the successful mission. And Richard Lloyd Parry, Asia Editor of The Times of London, revisits his daily on-the-ground reporting to tell us how the rescue unfolded.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download MP3” to get the podcast.

Universal Influenza Vaccine 40 mins – “Seasonal influenza causes thousands of deaths annually. Part of the problem is that the vaccine must be administered annually because the virus presents different immunological faces to avoid detection. Dr. Peter Palese is a pioneer in studying the molecular biology of the influenza viruses Today he and colleagues are on a quest to identify a universal flu vaccine that would provide one-time durable immunity. We discuss the strategies and progress toward this public health milestone.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

W.H.O. Response to Covid 25 mins – “We knew a pandemic was coming at some point – it’s kind of why we have the WHO. We have had various smaller scale tests of the international response to an infectious disease outbreak – Ebola in west africa being the most recent. After that, reports criticised the WHO’s response – citing problems around the swiftness of their action, the lack of coordination between countries, and the platforms for knowledge sharing. Is the agency doing any better in Covid-19? Suerie Moon is co-director of the Global Health Centre at the Graduate Institute of International and Development studies in Geneva, and author of one of those critical reports which was published in The BMJ. She joins us to assess how the WHO is responding.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Weed Research 23 mins – “Weeds are a tremendous problem in agriculture, costing farmers billions a year in crop loss and the cost of control. In Europe one of the critical weeds is black grass, which causes great losses in wheat and other grass crops. However, little is known about this weed, especially the molecular basis of herbicide resistance. Dr. Dana MacGregor came to the daunting task of attacking the molecular biology of a non-model organism. She has applied an ambitious toolbox from basic science to an aggressive agricultural pest You can genuinely sense her passions in how to solve problems that matter using the tools of basic biology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Wrongful Convictions 5 mins – “This transcript and audio of one segment from the Beat podcast series examines victim issues in cases of wrongful convictions. In this podcast, Jennifer Thompson, the crime victim from the Ronald Cotton case in North Carolina, who misidentified the perpetrator of her rape; and Meg Morrow, former OVC attorney advisor, discuss the impacts of wrongful convictions on survivors, victims of crime, and law enforcement.” At the link right-click “mp3 Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

MMD461 Media Mining Digest: America Lost Its Way, American Indians, Canadian Economy and Covid, Climate Change, Climate Crusade for Children, Communications Technology, Covid and Non-medical Workers, Covid and Racial Inequalities, Covid and Refugee Camps, Covid Finances, Covid Health Care Deaths, Covid Heroes, Covid in Long Term Care Facilities, Covid Misinformation, Covid Racial Inequalites, Covid Strandings, Covid Strategies in Different Countries, Covid Tools to End Lockdown, Covid Travel Restrictions, Covid Treatments, Covid-19 Environmental Impact, Design Thinking, Investing, Responsibly, Julia Child, Maya Angelou, Money in Politics, New Robber Barrons, PFAS Pollutant, Plastic Burning, Plastic Waste, Seattle Chef Panel, Vertical Farms

Exercise your ears: the 33 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 441 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,900 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

America Lost Its Way 15 mins – “Three years ago, reporter and former New York Times columnist Bob Herbert took to the road and traveled across the United States to gather research for his new book, Losing Our Way. In it, Herbert tells the stories of the brave, hard-working men and women he met who have been battered by the economic downturn. He found an America in which jobs have disappeared, infrastructure is falling apart and the “virtuous cycle” of well-paid workers spending their wages to power the economy has been broken by greed and the gap between the very rich and everyone else. He tells Bill: “[W]e’ve established a power structure in which the great corporations and the big banks have allied themselves with the national government and, in many cases, local government to pursue corporate interests and financial interests as opposed to those things that would be in the best interests of ordinary working people… Once you do that, you lose the dynamic that America is supposed to be. It’s supposed to be an egalitarian society, a society of rising standards of living, a society of a vast and thriving middle class. And we are getting farther and farther away from that ideal.” As for solutions, Herbert says, “People need to start voting against the excessive power of the great moneyed interests. But more than that, we need a movement, a grass-roots movement that will fight for the interests of ordinary men and women…” Herbert is a senior distinguished fellow at the public policy and analysis think tank, Demos. He is also a board member of the Schumann Media Center, from which he is presently on leave working on a major documentary.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

American Indians 15 mins – “American Indians have long had to contend with the myth of the “savage” as well as with the law, especially the language long employed by the courts to legitimize what legal scholar Robert Williams calls “this uniquely American-style, constitutionally sanctioned white racial dictatorship.” Robert Williams, himself of Lumbee Indian heritage, has set himself the task of trying to root out the law’s bias and to challenge the bigoted ways of talking, thinking, and writing that still shape our attitudes toward the American Indian population. Williams tells Bill Moyers, “When Europeans came to the New World, the first thing they said is, ‘Well, Indians don’t appreciate property. They’re savage. They’re backwards. They’re uncivilized. And so we really don’t have to pay them for it or if we give them a treaty we really don’t have to give them what the land is– is truly worth.’ Nothing could be farther from the truth. Tribes have very clear conceptions of their traditional boundaries, they maintain their rights and their claim to sovereignty over the lands according to their own honored traditions and tribal elders.” Williams continues, “What we’ve had is 500 years of taking away from tribes. And it’s going to be very hard to start giving back and to start recognizing those things were taken from tribes… And that continual work that Indian leaders, indigenous people are doing throughout the world is getting back what was taken away.” Robert Williams teaches law and American Indian studies at the University of Arizona, has represented tribal groups before human rights courts and commissions, adjudicated as a judge for Indian courts of law, and written such influential books as “Like a Loaded Weapon” and “Savage Anxieties: The Invention of Western Civilization,” which show how and why the notion of Indians as war-mongering, unruly savages was used to justify western expansion – and suppression.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

America Lost Its Way 15 mins – “Three years ago, reporter and former New York Times columnist Bob Herbert took to the road and traveled across the United States. What he discovered is chronicled in his new book, “Losing Our Way,” stories of brave, hard-working men and women battered by the economic downturn. He found an America in which jobs have disappeared, infrastructure is falling apart and the “virtuous cycle” of well-paid workers spending their wages to power the economy and spark further growth has been broken by greed and the gap between the very rich and everyone else. “ At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Canadian Economy and Covid 13 mins – ”Finance Minister Bill Morneau says that the federal government financial aid package will help ensure the economy is strong when the COVID-19 pandemic blows over. He speaks to host Matt Galloway about delays in getting money to Canadians and about the federal wage subsidy. Meanwhile, small-business owners say that the measures don’t go far enough. Smaller hospitals outside of Canada’s big cities are facing additional concerns during the pandemic — often fewer doctors and supplies. Three emergency room physicians share what COVID-19 means for their rural facilities. Advocates say prisons are uniquely susceptible to outbreaks of the novel coronavirus, and they’re asking officials to depopulate prisons across the country in the effort to help Canada flatten the curve.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Climate Change 15 mins – “Climate Change: Faith and Fact – Katharine Hayhoe is an atmospheric scientist who’s also an evangelical Christian, but in the face of those who use religion to deny the worldwide crisis of climate change, she believes that her faith is compatible with science. “…The New Testament talks about how faith is the evidence of things not seen,” she tells Bill Moyers. “By definition, science is the evidence of things that are seen, that can be observed, that are quantifiable.  And so that’s why I see faith and science as two sides of the same coin.” The daughter of missionaries, Hayhoe believes she, too, has a mission: “Caring about climate is entirely consistent with who we are as Christians.  But over the last several decades…we have increasingly begun to confound our politics with our faith. To the point where instead of our faith dictating our attitudes on political and social issues, we are instead allowing our political party to dictate our attitude on issues that are clearly consistent with who we are… Climate change is a casualty of much larger societal issues. If we can get past the issue of rhetoric and politics, and actually start talking about what’s in our hearts, I have seen amazing things happen in terms of moving forward to look at solutions that are consistent with the values that we have.” Katharine Hayhoe teaches at Texas Tech University and is director of its Climate Science Center. She is the founder and CEO of ATMOS Research, a scientific research and consulting firm and co-author of A Climate for Change: Global Warming Facts for Faith-Based Decisions. A rising star of climate science, Hayhoe was named one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in 2014 and featured in the Emmy Award-winning Showtime documentary series Years of Living Dangerously.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Climate Crusade for Children 15 mins – With so many in Congress and state legislatures in denial or simply missing in action, and with the very agencies created to protect our environment hijacked by the polluting industries they were meant to regulate, it may turn out that the judicial system, our children and their children will save us from ourselves. The new legal framework for this crusade against global warming is called atmospheric trust litigation. It takes the fate of the Earth into the courts, arguing that the planet’s atmosphere – its air, water, land, plants and animals — are the responsibility of government, held in its trust to insure the survival of all generations to come. It’s the brainchild of Bill Moyers’ guest this week on the final broadcast of the series Moyers & Company (Note that the BillMoyers.com website will continue). Mary Christina Wood is a legal scholar who wrote the book, “Nature’s Trust,” tracing this public trust doctrine all the way back to ancient Rome. It is, she writes, “a robust set of legal footholds by which citizens can hold their government officials accountable.” Wood tells Bill Moyers, “If this nation relies on a stable climate system, and the very habitability of this nation and all of the liberties of young people and their survival interests are at stake, the courts need to force the agencies and the legislatures to simply do their job.” “Climate is not just an environmental issue,” she continues.  “This is a civilization issue.  This is the biggest case that courts will get in terms of the potential harm and in terms of the urgency.”  Mary Christina Wood teaches law at the University of Oregon and is founding director of that school’s Environmental and Natural Resources Law Program. Her theories are being used in several legal suits filed by the advocacy group Our Children’s Trust.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Communications Technology 21 mins – “FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr (R) talked about regulation and the internet in relation to President Trump’s executive order on Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency Act. Section 230 shields websites from liability for content their users post. He also talked about 5G infrastructure and the “digital divide” between school children amid the coronavirus pandemic.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid and Non-medical Workers 48 mins – “Non-medical frontline workers share how they’re being affected by COVID-19, what supports they need — and what physical distancing means for them. What’s it like in Italy one month into lockdown? CBC’s Megan Williams brings us the latest from Rome, and we hear from an ICU doctor on the frontlines of the battle against the coronavirus. Looking for a way to find some calm and reduce stress as life is turned upside down? Research shows it could be as simple as listening to your favourite song. Adriana Barton explains how. First Nations communities are bracing themselves for #COVID19, and trying different strategies to keep the virus out. From lockdowns, to curfews, to quarantines for returning travellers, we hear about what’s being done.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid and Racial Inequalities 49 mins – “Early data from the U.S. shows a higher death rate for African Americans from COVID-19. We discuss what Canada can do to better protect people of colour from inequalities in health care. Then, author and podcast host Brené Brown talks to Matt Galloway about how being vulnerable can help us give us the strength to face the COVID-19 pandemic. Plus, Nova Scotia woman Crystal Blair tells us she’s kept her truckstop restaurant open during the pandemic, so she can serve up free meals to the truck drivers with few options. And as COVID19 cases climb in New York, doctors face tough choices over who gets access to limited resources. Now guidelines have been published in Canada, in case our doctors have to make those same life-or-death decisions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid and Refugee Camps 16 mins – “According to the Official Opposition, the Trudeau government has been too slow to respond to the COVID-19 crisis. Andrew Scheer talks to host Matt Galloway about his party’s role during the pandemic. For many living in refugee camps around the world, access to medical supplies is already limited making COVID-19 a dangerous threat. Canada’s former UN ambassador Rosemary McCarney explains how. Keeping the spark alive during these trying times can be tough. Sex columnist and writer Dan Savage on what sex and love can look like during — and after — the coronavirus. q host Tom Power speaks to Modern Family star Ty Burrell about the hit sitcom’s final episode — and how he’s supporting bar and restaurant staff during the COVID-19 pandemic. You might have her book, Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat, in your kitchen. Chef and food writer Samin Nosrat wants to help you cook during the pandemic with her new podcast.

Covid Finances 48 mins – “Finance Minister Bill Morneau says that the federal government financial aid package will help ensure the economy is strong when the COVID-19 pandemic blows over. He speaks to host Matt Galloway about delays in getting money to Canadians and about the federal wage subsidy. Meanwhile, small-business owners say that the measures don’t go far enough. Smaller hospitals outside of Canada’s big cities are facing additional concerns during the pandemic — often fewer doctors and supplies. Three emergency room physicians share what COVID-19 means for their rural facilities. Advocates say prisons are uniquely susceptible to outbreaks of the novel coronavirus, and they’re asking officials to depopulate prisons across the country in the effort to help Canada flatten the curve.

Covid Health Care Deaths 48 mins – “Police are investigating a Dorval, Que. long-term care home where 31 residents have died since March 13 (five deaths attributed to COVID-19). We talk to Barbara Schneider, whose mother Mary died at the facility. Then, are you a sports fan, and missing your team? Shireeen Ahmed, Morgan Campbell and Devin Heroux discuss the withdrawal many fans are feeling. Plus, Christopher Tito has been passing time in quarantine by remaking classic films on social media — all with the help of his cat Ulysses. And author Val Walker talks about staying connected to beat the loneliness of isolation.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Heroes 54 mins – In a conversation first aired last month, astronaut Chris Hadfield, Giller Prize-winning author Madeleine Thien and Olympian Clara Hughes join us to share why they believe Canadians have what it takes to weather this pandemic. Plus, we talk to some photographers who are capturing memories (from a distance!) with what are being called “porch portraits.” Then, we’re bringing you a Canadian classic. From the Vinyl Cafe archives, we’ll hear the late Stuart McLean with the 1995 story, Sourdough. And finally, host of q Tom Power brings us chats with singer Norah Jones, screenwriter Alan Yang and props designer John Allen.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid in Long Care Facilities 26 mins – “People in long-term care homes are cut off from their relatives during the pandemic, who are left worried their loved ones are in the path of COVID-19. One advocate argues these family members should be viewed as essential workers — and let back in to help with care. Then, hear from staff and management of long-term care facilities to hear their concerns — and distress — about the rising COVID-19 death toll in the facilities.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid in Long Care Facilities 46 mins – “We talk to staff and management of long-term care facilities; hearing their concerns and distress about the rising COVID-19 death toll in the facilities. Then, warnings of deadly consequences followed U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision to cut funding to the World Health Organization — but some argue the organization has serious problems. We hear both sides. Plus, is the pandemic magnifying gender inequality? We discuss how family and work dynamics are playing out during COVID-19.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Misinformation 55 mins – “Some would say that living through the #COVID19 pandemic is sort of like living in the early chapters of one of Daniel Kalla’s novels. The ER doctor and novelist tells us how his fiction books are starting to look a lot more like reality. Have you seen posts claiming that you can make an N95 mask out of a bra, or that gargling salt water will help prevent COVID-19? Don’t believe them — they’re baseless claims, says CBC fact checker Andrea Bellemare. Reports suggest that the Chinese government has underreported the number of confirmed coronavirus cases in that country, but others say to point fingers at China this way is to feed into a conspiracy theory. Science is a process of discovery, according to Deborah Blum. So if the information and advice around COVID- 19 seems to be changing, that doesn’t mean scientists are making mistakes — they’re figuring it out. q host Tom Power speaks to Liza Lou, an artist that’s encouraging people to join her in weaving quilts out of household materials while live-streaming the process.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Strandings 46 mins – “We’re talking to faith leaders about how they tend to their communities during the pandemic, and why empty houses of worship this weekend don’t mean we can’t come together. Then, we hear from Canadians who were stranded abroad because of COVID-19, but have made it home against all the odds. Also, in these uncertain times, we talk to seniors who have experienced similar challenges in the past, including one 107-year-old Nova Scotian who remembers the 1918 Spanish Influenza pandemic. What can we learn from their experiences? And as some Canadians forgo meat this Good Friday, we’ll check in with a St. John’s fish and chip shop that has been serving the city for almost 70 years.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Strategies in Different Countries 45 mins – “We discuss calls for the federal government to release projections of how bad the COVID-19 pandemic could get. How might projections affect public behaviour and compliance with measures to slow the spread? Then, how are different countries dealing with the virus? We’re comparing strategies in India, Sweden and South Korea. And amid the pandemic, some businesses are shifting their production to find ways to contribute, such as distilleries pumping out hand sanitizer, or clothing companies making hospital smocks. We talk to companies involved in business-not-as-usual.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Tools to End Lockdown 49 mins – “How do we safely move past the pandemic lockdown? We discuss two ideas to ease restrictions: tracking the spread of #COVID19 with mobile technology, and testing the population for immunity. How do these tools work, and what are the concerns around privacy, and the gaps in our knowledge about COVID-19 immunity. Then, the CBC’s Adrienne Arsenault takes us inside a Toronto hospital battling the pandemic, and Susan Ormiston discusses the mood in New York, the epicentre of the U.S. outbreak. Plus, having a baby is stressful, having a baby in a pandemic is a whole other matter. We talk to two mothers about their worries (and their joy), and a panel of experts about the steps being taken to ensure quality of care.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Travel Restrictions 50 mins – “If travel restrictions remain in place, that might stop seasonal agricultural workers reaching Canada this summer — and cause problems for farmers, and perhaps the food supply. The pandemic has come with a massive amount of data, but how can you make sense of the numbers, and how do you know what to trust? Statistician and host of the Risky Talk podcast David Spiegelhalter joins us to discuss. The weather’s getting better, but a group of orthopedic surgeons is asking us to think twice before jumping on our bikes or rollerblades for some (physically distant) exercise. They say COVID-19 means a simple broken bone might not be so simple. Exhausted by the pandemic? Philosopher Michael Baur says you might have moral fatigue, a result of everyday choices — like deciding when to go to a grocery store — becoming serious life decisions. And finally, we talk to the organizers of the Quarantine Book Club — a virtual solution for readers stuck at home. Just don’t forget to unmute yourself.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Treatments 46 mins – “We look at the unprecedented collaborative efforts to find a treatment for COVID-19, including a Canadian clinical trial hoping blood plasma from the recovered can help those still sick, and a medical student volunteering to test a vaccine. Plus, are you worried about money amid the pandemic? Personal finance author Lesley-Anne Scorgie and Carleton University assistant professor Jennifer Robson answer your questions about the CERB, retirement savings, interest rates, what students can do, and more. Then, our national affairs panellists Kathleen Petty, Mia Rabson and Jason Markusoff unpack Alberta’s latest COVID-19 projections, the pandemic’s impact on the oil patch, and the latest from Ottawa.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 Environmental Impact 19 mins – “Tom Heap talks through the environmental issues emerging during the coronavirus pandemic and asks what the legacy might be. He’s joined by climate change expert Dr Tamsin Edwards from King’s College, London to examine the effect of the lockdown. With millions of people now working from home, planes being grounded and fewer cars on the roads, what level of environmental improvement has there been, and will that be reversed once our lives return to normal? With the help of experts from the fields of climate change, remote working, ecology and environmental standards, we track the changes in air pollution and global temperature.What will the return to ‘normal’ look like? With the UK aiming to be carbon neutral by 2050, Tom asks whether the pandemic can be seen as a trial run for a zero-carbon world. And, with the international climate meeting COP26 postponed, Tamsin considers how international climate targets might be affected. With contributions from Christiana Figueres – architect of the Paris climate agreement, environmental psychologist Lorraine Whitmarsh, air quality expert David Carslaw, Gina McCarthy of the Natural Resources Defense Council, business communications specialist Jon Sidwick and Julian Newman from the Environmental Investigation Agency.” At the link left-click “Download,” and select “Lower quality,” then “Save Link As” to get the podcast.

Design Thinking 41 mins – “We spend one third of our lives at work, whether it’s at a job we love or one we can’t wait to leave. As the job market shifts with the increase of automation and artificial intelligence, a flexible mindset is more important than ever. Stanford professor Bill Burnett (co-author of the No. 1 New York Times best seller Designing Your Life) believes we can transform our work experience by building and utilizing a designer mindset. He argues that much of our unhappiness and difficulty is caused by “dysfunctional beliefs” that limit our potential. In the forthcoming Designing Your Work Life, Burnett offer strategies on everything work related—from how to quit to how to get the job we want—and everything in between. Join INFORUM as Bill Burnett teaches us how design thinking can transform our experience of work and our outlook on life, without necessarily changing the job we have.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Julia Child 17 mins – ”Radio Cherry Bombe went on tour to find out what’s on the mind of food folk across the country, Once we finished our tour, we realized that three of our talks centered around one very iconic person in the food world: Julia Child. We know Julia’s pioneering spirit, culinary talent, and sheer joy in the kitchen inspires everyone in the Bombesquad and we wanted to share these stories with you. At our San Diego stop, Diane Rocha, a retired school teacher and enthusiastic amateur baker in California shares her very special connection to Julia. In Kansas City, Missouri, Christina Corvino, the co-owner and general manager of Corvino restaurant, tells us how Julia has encouraged her through the ups and downs of her professional journey. In Baltimore, Maryland, Jessica Grosman of With Health & Gratitude tells us about her special moment with Julia Child.” At the link right-click “Share” to get a link where you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Maya Angelou 15 mins – “Over the years and on several occasions, Bill Moyers interviewed Maya Angelou, the legendary author who died in late May. In this first of two programs celebrating her extraordinary life and legacy, Moyers revisits an episode from his 1982 series “Creativity” in which he and Angelou returned to the small town of Stamps, Arkansas, where she spent much of her childhood. Walking with Moyers, she remembers a place where she was “terribly hurt… and vastly loved.” Stamps, Arkansas, was deeply segregated, divided by railroad tracks that split the town into black and white. “This was more or less a no man’s land here… If you were black you never felt really safe when you simply crossed the railroad tracks,” she says. “… And I used to have to walk over here. Oh gosh, I hated it. I had no protection at all over there. I had an idea of protection on this side. I had my grandmother on this side. I had the church, my uncle, and all my people were on this side. So I had an idea of protection, but there I would be all alone and I loathed it, crossing those railroad tracks.” Angelou, who had been traumatized by rape at the age of seven-and-a-half and did not speak for several years, found her voice again with the help of a family friend, Mrs. Flowers, who “told me poetry was music written for the human voice” and encouraged her to read aloud. The great writers she read, the music she heard in church, and the scars of racial discrimination guided her toward the writing career that made her famous. “I am a writer and Stamps must remain for me in that nebulous, unreal reality, because I’m a poet and I have to draw from these shadows, these densities, these phantasmagorias for my poetry,” Angelou tells Moyers. “I don’t want it to become a place on the map, because the truth is you never can leave home. You take it with you everywhere you go.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Money in Politics 15 mins – In this turbulent midterm election year, two academics decided to practice what they preached. They left the classroom, confronted the reality of down-and-dirty politics, and tried to replace moneyed interests with the public interest. Neither was successful – this year, at least – but on this week’s edition of Moyers & Company, they discuss with Bill Moyers their experiences and the hard-fought lessons learned about the state of American democracy.  Lawrence Lessig teaches law at Harvard, is director of that university’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics and founded the University of Chicago’s Center for Internet and Society. A well-known Internet activist and campaign finance reform advocate, this election cycle, he started Mayday.US, a crowd-funded SuperPAC to end all SuperPACs. Its mission, Lessig says, is to reduce the influence of money in politics and make it politically toxic to oppose campaign finance reform. Lessig’s six congressional picks in truly competitive races went down to defeat in the midterms, but he told a reporter, “The fight to root out corruption in our politics is one of the most important in our time, and we will continue to pursue it with fierce urgency.”  Zephyr Teachout is a professor of constitutional and property law at Fordham Law School and this year became a political candidate – going up against incumbent New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo in the Democratic primary. She received more than a third of the vote and carried 30 of the state’s 62 counties, surprising everyone – including Cuomo. Her new book, “Corruption in America,” is a history of the corrosive influence of money in politics. In it she writes, “What America now faces, if we do not change the fundamental structures of the relationship of money to legislative power, is neither mob rule nor democracy, but oligarchy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

New Robber Barons 15 mins – “America’s first Gilded Age, more than a century ago, was a time of vast riches and conspicuous consumption, as well as degrading poverty. “It wasn’t merely that poverty lived alongside great wealth,” historian Steve Fraser tells Bill Moyers on this week’s Moyers & Company, “It’s that poverty was being created by great wealth.” Senators and Representatives were owned by Wall Street and Big Business, and then, as now, those who footed the bill for political campaigns were richly rewarded with favorable laws. We’ve just watched the Senate and the House — aided and abetted by President Obama — pay off financial interests with provisions in the new spending bill that expand the amount of campaign cash wealthy donors can give and let banks off the hook for gambling with customer( and taxpayer) money. The social safety net, Fraser says, has been “shredded to a very significant degree.” But what was different about the first Gilded Age is that people rose in rebellion. Today we do not see “that enormous resistance.” Nonetheless, he concludes, “people are increasingly fed up… their voices are not being heard.  And I think that can only go on for so long without there being more and more outbreaks of what used to be called class struggle, class warfare.” Steve Fraser is a writer, editor and scholar of American history. Among his books are Every Man a Speculator, Wall Street: America’s Dream Palace and Labor Will Rule. His latest, The Age of Acquiescence: The Life and Death of American Resistance to Organized Wealth and Power, will be published early next year.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

PFAS Pollutant 19 mins – When a frustrated farmer dumped a bag of VHS video tapes onto the desk of Cincinnati lawyer Rob Bilott it kick-started a legal process that would ultimately reveal that one of the world’s biggest chemical companies had poisoned thousands of people. The story of DuPont and their manufacture of the non-stick chemical family PFAS matters to the factory workers of Parkersburg, West Virginia but it also reveals the extent to which virtually all of us have been exposed to a chemical that for decades has lined our frying pans and takeaway food containers and guarded our sofas and carpets against stains. Rob’s story of his two decade battle with DuPont has inspired ‘Dark Waters’, a Hollywood film starring Mark Ruffalo and Anne Hathaway. In the first of a new series Tom Heap meets Rob and Mark to discuss the impact on the environment and human health of a family of chemicals that can build up in our bodies and take tens of thousands of years to decay.” At the link left-click “Download,” and select “Lower quality,” then “Save Link As” to get the podcast.

Plastic Burning 19 mins – “Every year billions of products are sold around the world in plastic packaging. But some countries lack a waste system to collect and recycle or dispose of the rubbish. The result can be that waste is dumped, set on fire or used as an accelerant in domestic fires. A new report by Tearfund claims to reveal the scale of the uncontrolled burning in six key countries. Tom Heap finds out what the implications of this are and asks if the product manufacturers which profit have a ‘moral responsiblity’ to help clear up.” At the link left-click “Download,” and select “Lower quality,” then “Save Link As” to get the podcast.

Plastic Waste 19 mins – “Plastic waste is the scourge of developing countries. Many have poor waste collection and virtually no recycling. But there may be ways in which local people can put the waste to good use. In Cameroon a child called Pierre Kamsouloum wanted to play football, but had no ball. He got the idea of melting soft plastic, the kind that food is wrapped in, and moulding it into a crude football. A few years later, without a job and looking for a way to make money, he came back to the idea, and realised that if you mixed the molten plastic with sand, you could turn it into tough paving slabs, competitively priced. Now, with the help of NGOs, thousands of people across Cameroon and Gambia have been trained in the technique. In the Netherlands, design student Dave Hakkens had the idea of creating machines that people could use to recycle their plastic locally. Using quite basic technology, these machines shred, melt and then extrude plastic into moulds to make flat sheets, bowls, and even giant Lego-style house building bricks. The designs are all open-source and online, and a movement of thousands of people has grown up, building, improving and using Dave’s machines. In Guatemala, German environmentalist Susanne Heisse was depressed by the plastic pollution collecting at the side of Lake Atilan. Inspired by the actions of a neighbour, she started stuffing the waste into plastic drinking bottles, and so the idea of the eco-brick was born – a building block that can be strong and durable and at the same time sequesters the plastic and stops it breaking down into dangerous plastics. None of these ideas is without its difficulties and each has its critics. But until we find ways to live without plastic, could they be part of the solution?” At the link left-click “Download,” and select “Lower quality,” then “Save Link As” to get the podcast.

Seattle Chef Panel 27 mins – “On today’s show, we’re celebrating some of our friends in the chef community and airing a panel from our Jubilee Seattle conference with Chef Rachel Yang, Chef Renee Erickson, and Chef Makani Howell. These pillars in the restaurant community talk about leadership and navigating an ever-changing city. Chef Angie Mar of The Beatrice Inn in New York City and author of the new cookbook Butcher + Beast (and who happens to be a Seattle native!), moderated the panel, and Lara Hamilton, owner of the community cookbook store Book Larder, introduces everyone.” At the link right-click “Share” to get a link where you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Vertical Farms 19 mins – “Nine years ago on Sea Change Radio, we spoke to the self-proclaimed founding father of vertical farming, Dickson Despommier, about the concept of moving crops onwards and upwards (literally). In an interesting twist, the global COVID pandemic has resulted in a lot of abandoned office buildings. To proponents of vertical farming, these spaces may represent unprecedented opportunity. We thought this seemed like a good time to revisit our original Sea Change Radio interview with Dr. Despommier, unedited, in its entirety. In fact, Dr. Despommier co-authored a paper just last week for the Proceedings for the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) titled “Wheat Yield Potential in Controlled-environment vertical farms.” In the paper, the authors write that “although it is unlikely that indoor wheat farming will be economically competitive with current market prices in the near future, it could play an essential role in hedging against future climate or other unexpected disruptions to the food system.” Now, let’s go back to our interview from November 2011.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

MMD460 Media Mining Digest: Antivaxxers vs Vaccines, Cancer Survivorship, Climate Deadline, Corona Virus in Wuhan, Corona Virus Questions, Coronavirus Fight, Coronavirus Questions, Covid Alert, Covid and Climate Treatment, Covid and Public Health, Covid Background, Covid in Santa Clara County, Covid Information Sources, Covid Misinformation, Covid Publishing Data Sources, Covid Publishing Links, Covid Symptoms, Covid Tests-Vaccines-Cures, Covid HIV-Aids and Ebola, CRISPR Research Tools, Digital Textbooks, Disinformation, Fauchi Interview, Flying War Stories, Genome Editing, George Marshall’s Biography, In The Dark S1, Janet Napolitano, Mayors Run the World, Nuclear Power Future, Pandemic Campus, Publishing Pirating, Reports from the Field, Super Spreader, Trump Election Health Policy, US President and Covid, Women’s Role in the Workplace, Work Life Redesign, Young Voters

Exercise your ears: the 53 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 514 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,850 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Anti-Asian Violence 39 mins – “As Americans have grappled with coming to terms with the pandemic and its many effects on their lives—working from home, loss of income or job, homeschooling their children, worries about their own or their loved ones’ health—some of them also have to worry about being attacked because of their race. Join us for a timely discussion of the discrimination, verbal abuse and even physical attacks directed at Asian-Americans as the COVID-19 pandemic has spread across the country.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Antivaxxers vs Vaccines 31 mins – “False rumours and conspiracy theories pose a real threat to the rollout of a COVID-19 vaccine. Professors Paul Offit and Heidi Larson tell us how we can fight back.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Cancer Surviorship 12 mins – “With the number of cancer survivors growing and the longer lasting effects of newer treatments, how well equipped are primary care clinicians to care for cancer survivors over the long haul? Dr. Cathy Handy Marshall, an oncologist at Johns Hopkins, joins Neda for a conversation about cancer survivorship in primary care.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Climate Deadline 35 mins – “SPEAKERS Chris Field Faculty Director, Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University Renee Lertzman Climate Engagement Strategist, Author David Fenton Founder, Fenton Communications Greg Dalton Founder and Host, Climate One This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on February 24th, 2020.” At the link find the title, “What the 2030 Climate Deadline Really Means” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Corona Virus in Wuhan 12 mins – “In a very special ad hoc episode, we have the personal experience from the inside of the coronavirus outbreak. From mainland China in Wuhan City, fellow postdocs Elihu Araday and Rute Pinto talked with Siyuan Hu, a PhD student in the Profesor Margaret Hosie’s group, who is currently in Wuhan and living this outbreak from a different perspective.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Corona Virus Questions 14 mins – “In the COVID19 era, data scientists have the expertise and a professional obligation to play vital roles, says Harvard statistics Professor Xiao-Li Meng. The coronavirus pandemic, he says, presents them with opportunities to explore important social and scientific questions. The founding editor-in-chief of the Harvard Data Science Review, Prof. Meng asserts that research based on data sets can yield important insights – from the efficacy of virtual learning and the impact of declining air pollution to best practices for vaccine development. HDSR recently published an online special issue, “COVID-19: Unprecedented Challenges and Chances.” The coronavirus crisis, according to Prof. Meng, amounts to a massive stress test for data science at a critical time in the field’s development. “There’s a lack of global protocol for data collection or even understanding of the differences. Yet you have seen comparisons of countries or systems all the time,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “But the issue here is that different countries and different systems have different definitions, different ways of collecting data. So we’re not even talking about comparing apples and oranges – at least, they are round fruits. We are talking about comparing apples with bananas or maybe even oranges with footballs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coronavirus Fight 43 mins – “Combatting the coronavirus pandemic has quickly become a global health priority. Communities across the United States, including here in the Bay Area, are using a range of strategies to mitigate the spread of coronavirus. In its first program on the coronavirus crisis, The Commonwealth Club will feature two experts who will discuss why significant community interventions are so important and what must be done now. The program will feature the lead author of the well-publicized Journal of the American Medical Association article on how Taiwan has been so effective at reducing the spread of the coronavirus, and what communities in the United States can learn from this experience.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Alert 22 mins – “We knew a pandemic was coming at some point – it’s kind of why we have the WHO. We have had various smaller scale tests of the international response to an infectious disease outbreak – Ebola in west africa being the most recent. After that, reports criticised the WHO’s response – citing problems around the swiftness of their action, the lack of coordination between countries, and the platforms for knowledge sharing. Is the agency doing any better in Covid-19?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid and Climate Treatment 35 mins – “Estimates vary, but somewhere from a fifth to half of the world’s population are confined today to their homes in a global effort to control the spread of the novel coronavirus. Two and a half million people worldwide have already been infected and more than 166,000 have died. In this special report for Copyright Clearance Center’s podcast series, Chris Kenneally travels virtually to India and China to learn how publishers and researchers in the most populous countries on earth are managing. From Delhi, Vikas Gupta, managing director of Wiley India, describes the 2020 pandemic as the latest and most serious challenge to his industry, one which Indians have met with resolve. “One thing about Indians is that they really work well when it comes to adversity, and that has been the case even across the country when it comes to the crisis, and the way the crisis has been managed by the government,” Gupta says. “Publishing as an industry is under threat globally. We know that. It’s not about Wiley, but across the publishing industry we are fighting multiple battles for the last few years, battles around free content, battles around copyrights, battles around re-exports. There are multiple battles they are fighting. So there is a resolve in the people who are in publishing. They work in publishing because that’s their passion. That’s what they want to do.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid and Public Health 35 mins – “What can the spread of the coronavirus teach us about the spread of climate change? Both crises have global reach, invisible perpetrators, and require aggressive, early action for containment. But while an infectious disease is acute and deeply personal, the impacts of a changing climate are systemic and vague. Scientists point out that the coronavirus family—which includes COVID-19 and SARS—originated as an animal disease that can be passed along to humans. With increased human development encroaching into wildlife areas, should communities be preparing for more pandemics? A conversation on climate factors shaping human health with Brian Allan, associate professor of entomology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Aaron Bernstein, interim director of the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at the Harvard School of Public Health, and Barbara Gottlieb, director of environment and health at Physicians for Social Responsibility.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Background 31 mins – “As of 3/11/2020 COVID-19 is emerging as a significant health threat worldwide.  This pandemic is on the rise, and public health suffers from politicized spin, misinformation, and a lack of good information.  This episode is targeted to the Talking Biotech listener that can connect with family and friends, sharing the facts of this outbreak.   Today’s guest is Dr. ChubbyEmu, the YouTube physician that has been at ground zero in discussing the coronavirus outbreak.  We dig a layer deeper into the disease, its physical manifestations, and the current state of the disease as it spreads into the USA.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid in Santa Clara County 42 mins – “As California nears 25,000 cases of COVID-19, there have now been more than 1,800 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Santa Clara County, with a death toll of over 60. With a population of nearly 2 million, the number of COVID-19-related deaths per 100,000 residents is the highest rate of any of the Bay Area’s five most populous counties. How are Santa Clara’s leaders handling this crisis and what steps will they take to handle pandemics in the future? Hear more from Santa Clara County officials.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Information Sources 19 mins – “When reporters cite numbers related to the coronavirus pandemic, they usually are an accounting of grim milestones – so many new cases in one state or another country, so many more deaths within a hot zone of illness. Yet not all numbers on COVID-19 are quite so bleak. The global scientific and medical community have dramatically stepped up the pace of research about COVID-19. According to the research data platform Dimensions, which includes preprints and datasets alongside more traditional research outputs such as journal articles, nearly 15,000 journal publications have appeared related to the pandemic in just the few short months since the disease emerged. “This is a unique moment in scientific research communication history,” says Mike Taylor, Head of Metrics Development for Digital Science, whose portfolio of companies includes Altmetric as well as Dimensions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Misinformation 9 mins – “The spread of the coronavirus across the world is viral, in the common, medical sense of the term. A parallel pandemic has simultaneously erupted, too: A virtual, viral infodemic of misinformation. Anita Makri writes from London on science and global development, and has covered previous health emergencies, including the 2014 Ebola epidemic in west Africa. Lessons learned then can help to dispel rumors and myths about COVID-19, Makri asserts. To battle misinformation successfully, she says, we must try to understand it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Publishing Data Sources 13 mins – “As the American economy shrinks under lockdown limitations imposed to halt the coronavirus pandemic, ongoing enterprises are reduced to a handful – grocery markets, pharmacies, home supplies, and hardware stores. These businesses serve our basic needs of shelter and sustenance. What of those that feed our appetite for information? Are they not essential, too? Factual local reporting is, indeed, “essential” in an age of fear and misinformation, asserts Ken Doctor, a leading news industry analyst and political columnist whose Newsonomics blog appears regularly for NeimanLab. Yet the COVID-19 crisis that is driving readers and listeners and viewers back to substantive news sources, especially local news sources, could also be the proximate cause of death for much of the same industry, Doctor fears. While subscriptions and eyeballs may have soared to new levels, the prognosis for advertising is more frightful than ever.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Publishing Links 14 mins – “In this time of global pandemic, once ordinary medical resources have taken on greater importance – from simple thermometers to sophisticated ventilators. Most highly prized of all may be peer-reviewed research and carefully-curated information. Indeed, immediate access to research findings and reliable news sources can make a critical difference for individuals and entire nations. In an effort to contribute to the common good, leading scientific, news, trade, education and business publishers are offering “open to read” access to a deep pool of content on topics related to the novel coronavirus and the COVID-19 disease pandemic it is creating. Effective immediately, Copyright Clearance Center will regularly update an alphabetical list of links to this important content. CCC will support this roll call of responsible publishing through our own social media channels to give it the greatest possible reach for individuals, academic researchers, commercial scientists and students. Earlier this week, Publishing Perspectives editor-in-chief Porter Anderson reported on how leading publishers across the scholarly publishing ecosystem have enlisted in this volunteer army of knowledge sharing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Symptoms 27 mins – “There are have been local lockdowns in the UK, in places such as Oldham, Birmingham, Manchester – but what is the criteria for making that decision? In the non-Covid world: does honey alleviate symptoms in upper-respiratory tract infections? When does unexpected weight-loss warrant further investigation for cancer in primary care? Plus, in the light of findings from the Cumberlege review of safety in medical devices, the team discuss the issue of doctors’ declaration of interests. There are have been local lockdowns in the UK, in places such as Oldham, Birmingham, Manchester – but what is the criteria for making that decision? In the non-Covid world: does honey alleviate symptoms in upper-respiratory tract infections? When does unexpected weight-loss warrant further investigation for cancer in primary care? Plus, in the light of findings from the Cumberlege review of safety in medical devices, the team discuss the issue of doctors’ declaration of interests.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Tests, Vaccines, Cures 43 mins – “As the coronavirus spreads rapidly through the population, the United States is racing to provide test kits, develop a vaccine and find treatments. Meanwhile, we’re running dangerously low on supplies, ranging from ventilators and test reagents to gowns and N95 masks. When will we have the test kits we need? Can we develop a vaccine and identify treatments in time to contain the pandemic? Will we have enough ventilators to save patients and sufficient equipment to protect our providers? Three leading experts will share where we are today, where we are headed, and what it will take to get us there.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid19, HIV-AIDS and Ebola 19 mins – “As researchers who have long experience with HIV/AIDS prevention, vaccines, and therapies, some of whom also have experience with Ebola, we believe it is critical to build the response to the Covid-19 pandemic on lessons from the HIV pandemic and recent Ebola outbreaks. First and foremost, those epidemics have taught us that interventions must be based on sound science. As in the early days of AIDS, we face many uncertainties about the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and natural history of a new virus. SARS-CoV-2 science is therefore evolving quickly, which adds to the complexity of decision making, communication, and development and sustainability of public trust. Yet Covid-19 presents an important opportunity for smart deployment of our hard-won knowledge.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CRISPR Research Tools 41 mins – “Dr. Ilaria Capua is an internationally recognized virologist, and a world expert in avian influenza and other animal viruses.  Following her effort to make genetic information about viruses more accessible in the interest of finding faster cures, she was unknowingly put under investigation, as she was central in moving viral information and samples to colleagues worldwide.  Wire taps and clandestine evidence gathering filled a file, that eventually would be discovered, leaked and maliciously reinterpreted, alleging that Dr. Capua was the mastermind of an international virus trafficking ring. She was accused in the media, without evidence, of providing viruses for others to spread so that she could profit from vaccines produced. These false allegations left her facing life in prison. Years later the charges were completely dismissed as manufactured claims by the media. However, the events were life changing. Today Dr. Capua has channeled her energies into broadening science education, and continuing her outstanding work as a virologist. In the second half of the podcast she provides her expert interpretation of the 2019 nCov Coronavirus outbreak, its origin, risks and concerns.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Textbooks 28 mins – “As print textbooks eventually do give way to courseware, industry analyst Michael Cairns says, college professors, administrators and students will appreciate an education delivered in 21st century models. While it has long been foretold that the print textbook would disappear, the revolution has actually taken quite a bit longer than people anticipated.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disinformation 37 mins – “Disinformation online is on the minds of voters, candidates, government officials, technology platorms as the US election gets closer. Already experts have seen disinformationc ampaigns around the Covid-19 pandemic, which chould spell trouble in November says Laura Rosenberger, director of the Alliance for Securing Democraty. “When you’re sowing doubt about the information the government is providing about the pandemic, you’re sowing doubt about in citizens’ faith in their democratic institutions. That primes us to have less faith in the integrity of the election.” She speaks with Renee DiResta, technical research manager at the Stanford Internet Observatory, and Celia Kang, technology reporter for the New York Times, about how this perfect storm of disinformation is being tackled.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Fauchi Interview 21 mins – “International experts Helen Clark and Dr Anthony Fauci bring us their global perspective on the challenge and management of Covid 19. Linda Clark asks the questions in this in-depth conversation brought to you by the Aspen Institute New Zealand and the Aspen Institute’s Health, Medicine and Society Program.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Flying and Corona Virus 13 mins – “Wings Over PittsburghFuming passenger delayed by stricken flight gives finger to hero pilots after emergency landingBoeing company uses A321 in website promoNew FAA Ruling Allows For Visibility Commercial Landings…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Flying Scope Clauses 21 mins – “APG/Flying and Life Fly-Ins…APG Home AirportsEclipse 2017 MapUnited ‘clarifies’ that Flight 3411 was not overbookedPentagon awards contract to United Airlines to forcibly remove Assad….Harrison Ford won’t face any penalties over runway incidentRussia Requests…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Flying War Stories 130 mins – “…Crash: Conviasa AT42 near Puerto Ordaz on Sep 13th 2010Crash: Santa Barbara ATR42 near Merida on Feb 21st 2008Accident: Shanghai B738 at Shanghai on Jan 3rd 2020, Tail Strike on Landing, Captain and First Officer Swapped Seats in FlightCorona Virus Disease 19 (COVID-19) Related…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Genome Editing 14 mins – “Over the past 15 years we have made huge advances in our ability to engineer the genome, meaning that we now have the ability to edit DNA in a programmable and precise manner. In the lab, these editing tools allow us to create models of disease and to investigate how changes in the genome lead to changes in cell and organismal biology. And excitingly, these genome editing technologies are now entering clinical trials to treat, and possibly cure, diseases like sickle cell anemia. But there is a component of the human genome which even the much lauded and powerful CRISPR system has not been able to touch: the mitochondrial DNA. The mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell and contain their own, much smaller, genomes which encode several essential proteins and RNAs. Mutations in the mitochondrial genome are the cause of over 150 diseases, but to date, fixing these mutations with gene editing and gene therapy has been off the table due to the inaccessibility of this genome.In this episode of Journal Club, a16z general partner Jorge Conde and bio deal team partner, Andy Tran – experts in genomics and genome engineering – join Lauren Richardson to discuss groundbreaking research creating the first genome editor able to target the mitochondrial DNA: “A bacterial cytidine deaminase toxin enables CRISPR-free mitochondrial base editing” by Beverly Y. Mok Marcos H. de Moraes, Jun Zeng, Dustin E. Bosch, Anna V. Kotrys, Aditya Raguram, FoSheng Hsu, Matthew C. Radey, S. Brook Peterson, Vamsi K. Mootha, Joseph D. Mougous & David R. Liu, published in Nature.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.  

George Marshall’s Biography 45 mns – “As a young officer in World War I, George Marshall’s sterling reputation started forming when he planned and executed a nighttime movement of more than a half million troops from one battlefield to another, leading to the armistice. Between the world wars, he helped modernize combat training, restaffed the U.S. Army’s officer corps with future leaders such as Dwight Eisenhower, Omar Bradley and George Patton, and served as army chief of staff in the run up to Work War II, when his commitment to duty came face-to-face with the realities of Washington politics.  Roll sets his biography of Marshall against the backdrop of five major conflicts—the two world wars, Palestine, Korea and the Cold War—and focuses on the nuances and ambiguities of Marshall’s education in the use of military, diplomatic and political power while watching America emerge as a global superpower. Roll’s conclusion could hardly be clearer: Principled leadership matters.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Harvard University Opening 17 mins – “The Harvard Data Science Review’s Editor-in-Chief, Xiao-Li Meng, and Media Feature Editor, Liberty Vittert, sat down with Lawrence Bacow, the 29th President of Harvard University. Following President Bacow’s COVID-19 recovery, he joined the editors to discuss the data used behind both the decisions to close and to open the university in stages, how economists contemplate the concept of risk and the value of life, and the impact of COVID-19 on higher education and society in general. This interview was conducted online on May 11, 2020.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Humanitarian Action 49 mins – “The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) presents a discussion on the most pressing challenges to humanitarian assistance in the 21st century. Globally, 70.8 million people are considered forcibly displaced by armed conflict, and over 160 million people need emergency humanitarian assistance. Conflict has replaced natural disasters as the driver of humanitarian need—aid organizations are faced with navigating complicated security and political environments while meeting growing demand on the ground. In addition, new actors and increasingly urbanized conflict have strained the global acceptance and adherence to international humanitarian law and the Geneva Conventions. The Humanitarian Agenda is an initiative that leverages the expertise of CSIS programs to explore complex humanitarian challenges. Jacob Kurtzer’s primary focus is the Task Force on Humanitarian Access, which will look at challenges in access to aid in complex man-made emergencies. Prior to joining CSIS, Kurtzer spent seven years with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), most recently as head of communications for the ICRC Delegation in Israel and the occupied territories. Previously, he served as head of public and congressional affairs for the Washington delegation of the ICRC, representing the ICRC to a broad spectrum of audiences in the United States and Canada. In addition, he has conducted field missions in South Sudan and Rakhine State, Myanmar and spent nearly three years as a consultant with the ICRC delegation in Pretoria, South Africa. From 2007–2009, he served as the congressional advocate at Refugees International (RI), a humanitarian advocacy organization based in Washington D.C. Kurtzer began his career as a legislative assistant to Representative Robert Wexler (D–FL), covering domestic and foreign policy issues, including managing the Congressional Indonesia Caucus. Kurtzer earned a master’s in peace and conflict studies from the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, where he studied as a Rotary Foundation World Peace Fellow. He also holds a bachelor’s in philosophy from the University of Maryland, College Park, with a citation in religious studies, and is an alumnus of the College Park Scholars Public Leadership program.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

In the Dark E20 42 mins – “During three years investigating the Curtis Flowers case, we’d talked to nearly everyone involved: lawyers, witnesses, jurors, family members, investigators, politicians, and many, many people around town. But there was one person we hadn’t yet interviewed — Curtis Flowers. That is, until one day in early October, a few weeks after he’d been cleared of all charges. For the final episode of Season 2, we at long last talk to the man at the center of it all.” At the link you can listen, but download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

In The Dark Ep 1 28 mins – “On the morning of July 16, 1996, someone walked into a furniture store in downtown Winona, Mississippi, and murdered four employees. Each was shot in the head. It was perhaps the most shocking crime the small town had ever seen. Investigators charged a man named Curtis Flowers with the murders. What followed was a two-decade legal odyssey in which Flowers was tried six times for the same crime. He remains on death row, though some people believe he’s innocent. For the second season of In the Dark, we spent a year digging into the Flowers case. We found a town divided by race and a murder conviction supported by questionable evidence. And it all began that summer morning in 1996 with a horrifying crime scene that left investigators puzzled.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Janet Napolitano 35 mins – “Join us for a rare conversation with Janet Napolitano about the societal impact of COVID-19 on universities and the U.C. system in particular, as well as the implications for national security now and in the aftermath of the COVID crisis. Napolitano is the 20th president of the University of California and the first woman to serve in this role. She leads a university system of 10 campuses, five medical centers, three affiliated national laboratories, and a statewide agriculture and natural resources program. She also served as the U.S. secretary of homeland security from 2009 to 2013, as governor of Arizona from 2003 to 2009, as attorney general of Arizona from 1998 to 2003, and as U.S. attorney for the district of Arizona from 1993 to 1997. Napolitano earned a B.S. degree (summa cum laude in political science) from Santa Clara University, where she was the university’s first female valedictorian. She received her law degree from the University of Virginia School of Law.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Kaiser Family Foundation 43 mins – “American health care has seen dramatic changes over the past decade. Obamacare reduced the number of uninsured citizens, but rising prices and deductibles have made care unaffordable for many. Medicaid has become the nation’s largest payer and now pays for half of all long-term care. Now the coronavirus pandemic is challenging the health care system in unprecedented ways. All this is happening within the context of a presidential election within a highly polarized country. How will the health care system—and American voters—respond? Kaiser Family Foundation Senior Vice President Dr. Jennifer Kates will be joined by Dr. Josh Michaud, KFF’s associate director of global health policy. A former infectious disease epidemiologist with both the U.S. Department of Defense and the Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Michaud is an expert on the types of models being used to forecast the arc of COVID-19 cases.They will discuss the current and probable future states of the pandemic and the responses by the government, health-care system and public.

Kindness and Mental Health 40 mins – “The Commonwealth Club and Born This Way Foundation Invite you to a conversation focused on the intersection of kindness and mental health during these unprecedented times. In this conversation, moderated by Maya Smith, you’ll hear from mental health experts, advocates and young people on the many ways the COVID-19 pandemic has uprooted our normality, how we can find ways to spread kindness while also focusing on our mental health.

Mayors Run the World 47 mins – “At a time of anxiety about the effectiveness of our national government, Rahm Emanuel believes local government offers a clear vision, for both progressives and centrists, of how to get things done in America today. In his new book, The Nation City, Emanuel, the former two-term mayor of Chicago and President Obama’s first White House chief of staff, offers a firsthand account of how cities, rather than the federal government, stand at the center of innovation and effective governance. Drawing on his own experiences in Chicago, and on his relationships with other mayors around America, Emanuel shows how cities are improving education, infrastructure, job conditions and environmental policy at a local level. Emanuel argues that cities are the most ancient political institutions, dating back thousands of years, and have reemerged as the nation-states of our time. Emanuel argues that mayors are accountable to their voters to a greater degree than any other elected officials and that progressives and centrists alike can best accomplish their goals by focusing their energies on local politics. Join us as Rahm Emanuel maps out a new, energizing and hopeful way forward.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Nuclear Power Future 35 mins – “Nuclear power – revive it or allow a slow death? In middle of the last century, nuclear power promised an exciting new world of efficient and eternal energy. But after a series of major accidents – most notably those at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima — public opposition grew into a vigorous “no nukes” movement. Ken Farabaugh worked as a nuclear engineer at a number of plants. During the the eighties, he was working at the Shoreham plant in Long Island – the hotbed of the anti-nuclear movement. “It just became so emotional that rational thought went out the door,” Farabaugh remembers. “There were protest picket lines and what have you. There were people that worked at the plant that had their houses set on fire.” A handful of the plants that once dotted the landscape have been shuttered because they can’t compete with cheaper sources of power.  By the end of the century, the industry was languishing. But the urgency of climate change causes some to advocate giving nuclear a new lease on life. And a number of companies, such as Oklo and Nuscale power, are coming up with technical innovations, such as smaller, scalable designs and non-water-cooled reactors, that could offer nuclear a new path forward. Per Petersen, professor of nuclear engineering at UC Berkeley, believes that the advantages of using nuclear power instead of burning fossil fuels outweigh the perceived dangers. “Fixing the problem of nuclear waste is something that future generations can grapple with, and it’s technically feasible for them,” Petersen asserts. “The billions and billions of tons of carbon that we’re releasing into the atmosphere now, there’s no practical way for future generations to ever rectify that problem.  And I think that shutting down nuclear plants instead of coal plants is just morally indefensible, when you look at what the consequences are and how hard it’s going to be in the future to deal with what it is that we’re doing today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Pandemic Campus 29 mins – “Fall 2020 will bring the first full college term of the COVID-19 pandemic, and no one knows quite what to expect. Plexiglass has been installed in classrooms. Professors have brushed up on their online teaching skills. New social distancing rules have been issued for students—and already broken. How will it all work out? We’ve enlisted professors and students at six colleges, and we’ve asked them to share audio diaries of college life in this unprecedented time. Follow their stories here.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publishing and Corona Virus 25 mins – “COVID-19 has given rise to a new, terrifying vocabulary from epidemiology and health: Social distancing. Flattening the curve. Super-spreader. We have become suddenly well acquainted with medical equipment: ventilators; PPEs; N-95 respirators. We are learning quite a lot these days about subjects few but the professionals ever gave much thought. For those under quarantine, many with children out of school, the Internet is a lifeline, providing information, instruction and welcome distraction. We are recognizing, in new ways, how much of daily life that authors and publishers make possible and how much they make life under lockdown bearable. In this special report for Beyond the Book, CCC’s Chris Kenneally visits virtually with journalists, publishers and industry analysts in France, Italy, Spain and Mexico. To date, Italy is the European country hit hardest by COVID-19, with the deaths recently climbing over 10,000. Piero Attanasio of the Italian Publishers Association describes an industry in severe contraction with impact across the supply chain.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publishing and Corona Virus 29 mins – “In nature, the coronavirus is smaller than a dust particle but its effect on both individual health and society at large is massive. The abrupt halt to all but essential businesses that has shuttered bookstores and libraries is leading to catastrophe for authors and others creators in book publishing. Around the world, the coronavirus pandemic has marked half the planet’s population for confinement in an effort to block spread of the disease. In this special report for CCC’s Beyond the Book, a trio of trade association leaders share with CCC’s Chris Kenneally how writers, researchers and their publishing partners are coping with the unprecedented public health and economic crisis. From London, bestselling children’s book author Tony Bradman, who serves as chair of the Authors’ Licensing and Collecting Society, tells me that quarantine not only cuts off writers from their audiences but also from a living. “In Britain, a lot of writers make a living from other things – activities around writing, such as school visits, festivals, events.  Poets do readings.  And a lot of that has been cancelled, clearly, because of the lockdown.  I knew a lot of writers who were really struggling almost immediately,” he says. In the United States, Authors Guild executive director Mary Rasenberger has directed her organization to be an online lifeline as a clearinghouse of essential information. “We’re organizing that information and providing a one-stop place where authors can find information related to the crisis that is crucial to them.  We have information about how to obtain relief from the federal assistance programs,” she says/ “We also have information about the various funds that are providing relief for writers right now – additional emergency relief.  We also are offering a number of webinars and how-to videos to help authors market their books.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publishing and Corona Virus 25 mins – “A panel of scholarly publishing executives discussed TechTrends 2024, STM’s annual forecast of technology trends impacting scholarly communications, for the recent STM annual US conference. In 2020, at least as the STM Future Lab Group sees the scholarly publishing universe, the individual user stands at the center of a cloud of media and data. Yet in an age troubled by fake news and fake science, and especially as the world battles the coronavirus crisis, information consumers must take great care lest they become lost in that cloud, says Heather Ruland Staines of the Knowledge Futures Group. “There’s such a higher bar that researchers need to meet in order to ensure reproducibility, replicability, and trust,” she says. “It’s going to be the connection of different researchers together, different lab environments, perhaps workflow tools like their electronic lab notebook and maybe even their AI assistant. “So when all of this comes together and we want to look under the hood, again, we want those trusted partners. We want to be able to see that a publisher asserted that this data is connected to this article and a researcher asserted this lab is responsible for this data. That trust is really the underpinning upon which we’re all trying to move forward now.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publishing Data Sources 19 mins – “As the American economy shrinks under lockdown limitations imposed to halt the coronavirus pandemic, ongoing enterprises are reduced to a handful – grocery markets, pharmacies, home supplies, and hardware stores. These businesses serve our basic needs of shelter and sustenance. What of those that feed our appetite for information? Are they not essential, too? Factual local reporting is, indeed, “essential” in an age of fear and misinformation, asserts Ken Doctor, a leading news industry analyst and political columnist whose Newsonomics blog appears regularly for NeimanLab. Yet the COVID-19 crisis that is driving readers and listeners and viewers back to substantive news sources, especially local news sources, could also be the proximate cause of death for much of the same industry, Doctor fears. While subscriptions and eyeballs may have soared to new levels, the prognosis for advertising is more frightful than ever.

Publishing Pirating P1 48 mins – “Over recent years, publishers have expanded and evolved strategies for combating content piracy in response to increasingly sophisticated counterfeiting techniques. The most promising ways forward involve collaboration across businesses, industries, and continents, pulling together the expertise of legal, content, production, sales and marketing teams globally. For this first of two programs called, The Never-ending Story of Pirates: Global Strategies to Combat Counterfeiting, special content from Copyright Clearance Center examines a variety of international perspectives across different industries. A follow-up program will explore in-depth specific publisher experiences, illuminating how their organizations are responding to the ongoing challenge of piracy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publishing Pirating P2 29 mins – “In this second half of The Never-ending Story of Pirates: Global Strategies to Combat Counterfeiting, special content from Copyright Clearance Center explores in-depth, specific publisher experiences, illuminating how these organizations are responding to the ongoing challenge of piracy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reports from the Field 44 mins – “COVID-19 is challenging the U.S. health-care system in unprecedented ways. Hospitals are staggering under the burden of treating infected patients, doctors struggle to protect themselves while working overtime, and insurers weigh eliminating co-pays for testing and treatment as their expenses skyrocket. Hear top executives from among the country’s largest hospital systems, physician groups and health insurers describe the situations they’re facing and how they’re coping with our nation’s worst pandemic.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Super-Spreader 33 mins – “With President Donald Trump as contagion in chief and the election right around the corner, co-hosts Joe Hagan and Emily Jane Fox break down the administration’s trust deficit, the debate over the next presidential debate, and the personal bellwethers they’ve seen over the last few weeks.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Trump Election Health Policy 12 mins – “The chances of a Republican presidential victory in the November election are unclear, but future changes in U.S. health policy depend even more on another unpredictable event: the U.S. Supreme Court decision on a constitutional challenge to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). If the ACA remains in effect, any changes in a second Trump administration are likely to be modest and to represent a continuation of efforts begun during President Donald Trump’s first term. If the ACA is ruled unconstitutional, then regardless of who wins the election, far-reaching legislative changes will be required, possibly in a divided-government setting. Nevertheless, assuming that no Covid-related twist keeps the health care system from returning to its prepandemic status, the current administration’s policy efforts provide a guide to what might happen after the Court rules — especially given that the Republican National Committee has not written a new platform.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

US President and Covid 25 mins – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on October 7, 2020, the editors discuss treatments the President has reportedly received for Covid-19, the rationale for them, and what is known about risks and benefits.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Vaccinology and Covid-19 22 mins – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on October 14, 2020, the editors discuss the fundamental concepts behind candidate vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 and the status of ongoing clinical trial.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Voter Motivation 41 mins – “As the presidential election approaches, voters are considering factors unique to 2020. While divides on a number of fronts and growing distrust in government may motivate some voters, there’s also deepening concern about America’s response to the Covid-19 crisis and the resulting recession. How will such a chaotic environment continue to shape the public’s interests and discourse, and how much will swing voters matter? Rachel Bitecofer, senior fellow of elections at the Niskanen Center, says turning out new voters is more important than capturing swing votes. She speaks with Tamara Keith, White House correspondent for NPR, and Dan Glickman, executive director of the Aspen Institute’s Congressional program.” At the link right-click the “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women’s Role in the Workplace 42 mins – “Recent feminist movements such as #MeToo and #TimesUp have called out sexism. They have empowered women to become more aware and also raise more questions: How do we find common ground in the new world we are building? How do we keep the momentum going with individual power, structural power and the power of movements? How do we handle a real situation at work, which could affect our livelihoods? Join psychotherapist and professor Joanne Bagshaw, author of The Feminist Handbook, and Professor Kellie McElhaney, founder and executive director of the Center for Equity, Gender and Leadership, in a lively, engaging dialogue meant to educate, prompt inner reflection and inspire. Walk away with a plan to help change society for yourself, your community and future generations.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Work Life Redesign 41 mins – “We spend one third of our lives at work, whether it’s at a job we love or one we can’t wait to leave. As the job market shifts with the increase of automation and artificial intelligence, a flexible mindset is more important than ever. Stanford professor Bill Burnett (co-author of the No. 1 New York Times best seller Designing Your Life) believes we can transform our work experience by building and utilizing a designer mindset. He argues that much of our unhappiness and difficulty is caused by “dysfunctional beliefs” that limit our potential.  In the forthcoming Designing Your Work Life, Burnett offer strategies on everything work related—from how to quit to how to get the job we want—and everything in between. Join INFORUM as Bill Burnett teaches us how design thinking can transform our experience of work and our outlook on life, without necessarily changing the job we have.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Young Voters 23 mins – “It’s election season in the U.S., and get-out-the-vote efforts are in full swing. And one question being asked by pundits and politicos is, how can we motivate young voters to show up at the polls? After all, in the most recent presidential election, less than half of citizens ages 18 to 29 participated, compared to 71 percent of those 65 and older and 67 percent of eligible voters ages 45 to 64. But a book published earlier this year by two political scientists tweaks that question. Young people are already plenty motivated to vote, the authors say, but they don’t always follow through to cast ballots. So this book asks, what is it that prevents young people from actually voting?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

MMD459 Media Mining Digest: Afrofuturism, Agriculture and Drone Usage, Agriculture Hacking, Agriculture in India, Agriculture Indoors, Agriculture Regeneration, Agriculture Small Robot Use, Agriculture Technology, AI and Security, Audio and Video Forensics, Black in Russia, CO2 in Concrete, Computer Penetration Tests, Coronovirus Tech Handbook Online, Covid-19 Stories, Diversity Visa Lottery, Economic Future, Emergency Care Systems, Ethiopia Internet Censorship, Fake News, Food Security, Grief, Hong Kong Life, Identity Theft Resources for Lawyer, Kidney Transplants, Liver Cancer, Muscular Dystrophy Story, Nano Engineering, Nigerian Internet, Pancreas vs Islet Transplantation, Power from Waste Water, Ranching Startups, Troll Tracking, Turkey Lifestyle, Ultrasound in Low Resource Settings, US President Covid-19, Uyghur Story, Vietnam Intelligence Agent, Water Scarcity, Windows Encryption, Working Remotely for Lawyers, Uyghur Story

Exercise your ears: the 52 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 666 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,800 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Agriculture and Drone Usage 29 mins – “We made it to episode 200! Drones have become a sort of symbol for modern ag technology whether over-hyped or legitimate. Michael Ott, CEO of Rantizo, proves that there is little room to be a drone skeptic anymore. Rantizo uses drones with a ten foot boom sprayer to spray, seed and sometimes even pollinate crops. Their main customers are retailers interested in expanding their territory by virtue of ease of application and mobility of equipment. We can get into fields where nobody else can….We’re doing a demo tomorrow, it’s going to be super sloppy and muddy. That’s totally fine. We can get out and apply in those situations.” – Michael Ott The inputs carried by the drone are tailored to keep its weight below 55 pounds. At this weight, Michael says he “can train pretty much anyone to be an operator” through a 2-3 day course. The drone flies itself requiring the operator to only hold the controller rather than actively maneuver the drone. The light weight does result in multiple trips to refill tanks to be able to cover a field. But in this instance that doesn’t serve as a disadvantage. Using this technology enables the farmer to precisely deliver the inputs to specific areas in the field that require them.” At the link right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Food Companies 21 mins – “Michael Bosworth is the President & CEO of Next Generation Foods, a food business that markets and distributes locally produced foods in the Northern California area. Brent Lafollette, Martin Miller, and Robert James Woodry are 5th generation farmers and the founders of Premium Growers, a company that produces and sells a variety of flavored, premium roasted Oregon Hazelnuts. They are some of the many farmers who transitioned from being producers to direct-to-consumer retailers. Michael joins me today to share his company’s humble beginnings. He explains how he puts a price tag on his products and how much of his farm is dedicated to retail. He also describes the benefits of going to food shows. Brent, Martin, and Robert discuss why they decided to start a hazelnut company. They share the effort it took to get their company up and running. They also describe the marketing process involved with their hazelnuts.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Hacking 26 mins – “Michael Stenta is the software developer and owner of farmOS, a web-based app used for planning, record keeping, and general farm management. What sets farmOS apart from other apps is its open-source nature. This means the app can be tweaked or fixed by virtually any contributor. To take advantage of its open-source nature, Michael also created Farmier, a platform that makes it easy for farmers to update or host their farmOS systems. Michael joins me today to discuss what farmOS is, its purpose, and why he decided to develop it. He shares where his passion for programming came from and what inspired him to apply his skills to the ag industry. He explains the unique aspects of creating an app that is open-source by nature and some of the benefits and risks involved with open-source platforms. Michael also describes what the farmOS community is like and the onboarding process involved with using the app.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture in India 26 mins – “Mark Kahn is the Managing Partner of Omnivore, an India-based venture capital firm specifically focusing on funding entrepreneurs who are working to advance agriculture and food systems. Before this role, Mark served as the Executive Vice President of Strategy and Business Development at Godrej Agrovet and Strategy Manager of Syngenta. Mark earned his MBA from Harvard Business School and has extensive experience in rural marketing, corporate strategy, product development, research and development, mergers and acquisitions, and new business incubation. Mark joins me today to discuss his business, Omnivore, and share his insights on the agritech landscape in India. He shares differences between the makeup of the agricultural sectors in India versus the United States, including how the family dynamic plays a role in certain Indian aspects of agriculture such as dairy farming. Mark also explains impact investing, and what Omnivore looks for when it comes to choosing which start-ups to invest in.” At the link right-click “FOA 197: Agritech in India Apr 22, 2020” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Indoors 25 mins – “Jim Pantaleo is a renowned expert and consultant for Indoor Vertical Farming and offers ag companies sound and technical advice on best practices. Some of his services include performing market research and business development work. Other than companies, Jim also works with different universities such as the University of Arizona, UC Davis, and the University of Santa Barbara. He also enjoys writing about indoor vertical farming and regularly speaks at ag-related conventions. Jim joins me today to describe how indoor vertical farming will change the way we look at sustainable food sources. He shares the current technology available for indoor vertical farming and what we can expect in the next few years. He discusses the myths about soil nutrition and crops regarding indoor environments. Jim also explains why the ag industry is experiencing its own version of the Dot Com era.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Agriculture Regeneration 24 mins – “Today’s episode is the deepest dive I’ve done to date into the world of regenerative agriculture. You’ll probably be able to hear it in my voice in the interview, but this one had me on the edge of my seat the entire time. In fact I think the conversation just gets more and more interesting the deeper we get into it.  If you’re new to the concept of regenerative agriculture, some previous episodes in which we discuss the concepts are episodes 44, 64, 109, 135, 182, and 199. My viewpoint on regenerative agriculture since I first was introduced to the concept a few years ago is somewhere in between “cautious optimism” and maybe skepticism. I’m certainly not skeptical about the importance of soil health. I think you’ve heard that from me a lot on this show, and certainly you have if you listen to Soil Sense, one of the other podcasts that I host. But some of the – what I’ll call hype associated with regenerative ag have left me asking a lot of questions. …I couldn’t be more impressed with our guest we have on the show today to talk about these issues. Paige Stanley is a finishing PhD candidate at UC Berkeley, who works at the intersection of rangeland ecology and soil science. ….This master’s program furthered her interest in soil carbon sequestration in grazing lands; how it might reduce greenhouse gas emissions, provide ecosystem services, improving animal welfare, and improving rural livelihoods. That led her to her work today at UC Berkeley. I’m going to let her describe it to you, but first a quick definition: you’ll hear regenerative grazing called AMP grazing in this episode. That stands for adaptive multi-paddock grazing, you may have heard of it as mob grazing. Essentially this is controlled and intensive grazing that is rotated across sections or paddocks of a field. For more on that  go way back to episodes 44 or 64.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Agriculture Small Robot Use 36 mins – “Sam Watson Jones is a fourth-generation farmer and the co-founder of Small Robot Company, an agri-tech startup firm that specializes in advancing agriculture through artificial intelligence and robotics. Specifically, Small Robot Company uses precision agriculture to promote efficiency over speed. Sam is also a director of his family’s farming, house building, and manufacturing business, Howle Manor Group. Sam joins me today to discuss a different way of looking at precision agriculture and how his brand, Small Robot Company, is making waves in the agricultural industry. He shares some insights on agricultural technology entrepreneurship as well as current trends in agriculture. Sam also highlights how his brand’s technology enables per plant precision agriculture as well as his vision for the future of farming.” At the link right-click “FOA 196: Changing Agriculture with Small Robots, Mar 11, 2020,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Startup Strategy 24 mins – “Matthew Pryor joins us today as not only a partner in AgThentic, an Australian based food, and ag sustainability and innovation consulting firm, but also as a co-founder of Tenacious Ventures, a food and ag venture capital firm that just closed their first fund of nearly $30 million. As though that wasn’t enough, Matthew has already successfully exited two different startups. To say he has his finger on the pulse of ag innovation, sustainability and company start-ups is putting it mildly.  In this episode, we discuss Matthew’s rise to success from an entrepreneurial point of view beginning with his first company, Observant. Observant is a company that was born from an issue of water management for cattle in remote areas of Australia. Matthew was solving this water management problem with “bespoke micro-electronics” that they were building themselves.” At the link right-click “FOA 201: AgTech Startup Strategy with Matthew Pryor Apr 15, 2020,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Tech Startups 21 mins – “Micki Seibel is an investor, advisor, and tech builder who was part of the team behind internet products such as Netscape and eBay. She is currently an Operating Partner for Radicle Growth, an acceleration fund that partners with entrepreneurs who have ideas that can innovate the future of food. She has over 20 years of experience in building companies and has made much of it at Silicon Valley. Micki also serves on the advisory board of multiple food system startup companies such as Swarm Technologies. Micki joins me today to share how Radicle Growth is helping startups in the AgTech industry. She discusses the goals of Radicle Growth, their criteria when selecting companies to fund, and the ideas that they want to promote. She describes her career in Silicon Valley and how it led her to be part of the food industry. Micki also explains the effects of climate change on the ag economy and ag innovations.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Technology 21 mins – “CEO Randy Barker joins me to share some high-level thoughts on customer adoption. He told me it all starts with the farmer, and the recognition that all farmers are different…Collaborator Chad Rubbelke is a farmer in Central North Dakota who is a great example of someone who is the right type of collaborative, intelligent, and curious farmer collaborator any company would want to work with. Along with Chad, we talk with John Grandin, who is the National Agronomy Coordinator for Compass Minerals, which is an industry-leading plant nutrient company.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

AI and Security 22 mins – “From manufacturing to healthcare, and from criminal justice to national security, artificial intelligence is changing nearly every sector of the global economy and many aspects of our public and private lives. And as artificial intelligence technology races ahead, its political, legal, and ethical considerations cannot be left undiscussed. Last Tuesday, as part of the A. Alfred Taubman Forum on Public Policy, James Baker, Susan Hennessey, and Scott Tousley joined John Allen at the Brookings Institution to discuss the opportunities AI offers and the challenges it presents to security.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Audio and Video Forensics 35 mins – “This week on Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Hany Farid, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, whose work focuses on analyzing and identifying altered photo and video—what’s known as digital image forensics. Recently, he has done work on deep fakes—realistic synthetic media in which a person’s likeness is altered to show them doing or saying something they never did or said. He’s also helped develop technology used by platforms to identify and remove material related to child sexual abuse. They talked about how dangerous deep fakes really are, how much of that danger is the technology itself and how much of it has to do with how big platforms amplify incendiary content, and whether platforms should moderate disinformation and misinformation in the same aggressive way they take down sexually abusive material.” At the link right-click “Hany Farid on Deep Fakes, Doctored Photos and Disinformation,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black in Russia 43 mins – “People looking everywhere to find a place—any place—where, for once, they don’t have to be the odd man out. Emanuele Berry and Ira Glass watch a Soviet film from 1936. A bizarre cameo of an African American baby in an all-white crowd makes Emanuele wonder about what it’s like to be black in a country with so few black people. (7 minutes) Yelena Khanga grew up in Russia knowing almost no other black people. Emanuele Berry asks Yelena what that was like. As Emanuele learns about it, she realizes something about being black in America, too. (22 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CO2 in Concrete 19 mins – “Concrete is the most used man-made product in the world but it comes with a heavy environmental price. Between 5% and 7% of the world’s annual carbon emissions come from producing the cement that glues concrete together. Most of these climate-changing gases are released when a vital ingredient, limestone, is melted down in the manufacturing process. But one company has devised a new type of cement that only solidifies when you pump carbon dioxide into it. The gas becomes locked in as it turns to concrete. This is similar to the way carbon dioxide has been stored in rocks by nature over millions of years. As Nick Holland reports, it’s one of the solutions the industry could use to mitigate its impact on the environment.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Computer Penetration Tests 16 mins – “The upheaval caused by Covid-19 could very well have put your firm at risk for a data breach. Lawyers can’t simply hope they won’t become a target for hackers. Taking steps to maintain your security is your ethical obligation and vital to your clients’ security. John Simek and Sharon Nelson talk with Mike Maschke about how to assess your cybersecurity and the role of penetration tests in discovering weaknesses in your systems.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Coronovirus Tech Handbook Online 25 mins – “In these unprecedented times of a global pandemic many people are working or studying from home, doctors are facing new challenges, so medical equipment is in short supply – how do deal with this? Perhaps check the coronavirus tech as a shared open source online document where anyone can post their experiences or advice. Open source tech for COVID-1- A 3d printed ventilator that could be used for COVID-19 patients could be ready by the end of the week. An open source project has led to a collaboration of IT professionals and engineers to work on the project. Developing responsible AI – Cultural anthropologist Genevieve Bell joins us on the programme to talk about developing AI safely and responsibly. She’s cofounded an innovation institute – the 3Ai Institute at the Australian National University and is looking for new students from around the world to apply.” At the link left-click “Lesser Quality,” then right-click “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Covid 19 Stories 52 mins – “Michigan has passed its Covid-19 peak, and the state has started opening up. But it’s still been intensely difficult for the staff in the ICU at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. We’ve embedded with them over the past few months, and tracked how this pandemic has changed them and their city. We meet the doctors. Rana Awdish spends hours of each day walking the floors of the ICU checking in on her co-workers, which means that maybe more than any single person in the hospital she knows best what the staff has been going through at each stage of this pandemic. One doctor that has deep ties to Detroit is Geneva Tatem. She’s one of the few Black doctors in the ICU and has a deep awareness of what Covid-19 has done to families in the city. (13 minutes) When it comes to caring for Covid-19 patients, it’s the nurses who are carrying the heaviest burden. Ben Calhoun spent weeks talking to the nurses in the first Covid-19 unit to open in the ICU – Pod 4. (17 minutes) We found out about a patient from a recording made by young doctor named Stan Linder. Producer Emanuele Berry put this together. It begins with a voice memo Stan recorded for us on his phone. (10 minutes) Robert Granger was a patient in Pod 4 for several weeks. During that time, his daughter learns something about him she’d never realized before. (12 minutes) Some of the first Covid-19 patients to arrive at Henry Ford Hospital were police and others who’d attended a community breakfast in early March called Police and Pancakes. Aaron K. Foley has this story of this breakfast and of one man — Marlowe Stoudamire — who ended up at Henry Ford. (20 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Diversity Visa Lottery – “We return to our story about Abdi Nor from 2015, with some big news about his life today. When we first broadcast the story, Abdi was a Somali refugee living in Kenya desperately trying – against long odds – to get to the United States. Then he got the luckiest break of his life: he won a lottery that puts him on a short list for a U.S. visa. But before he could cash in his golden ticket, the police started raiding his neighborhood, targeting refugees. We return to our story about Abdi Nor from 2015, with some big news about his life today. When we first broadcast the story, Abdi was a Somali refugee living in Kenya desperately trying – against long odds – to get to the United States. Then he got the luckiest break of his life: he won a lottery that puts him on a short list for a U.S. visa. But before he could cash in his golden ticket, the police started raiding his neighborhood, targeting refugees. Three weeks ago, Abdi Nor became a U.S. citizen, in a ceremony in Maine. We go to the ceremony, and then head back in time to 2013, when he won a visa under the Diversity Visa Lottery. It turns out winning the lottery is only the first step in trying to come to America. More than half of the people who win each year never make it. Abdi is living in Nairobi, Kenya, when he wins, and as he’s trying to prepare for his interview at the U.S. Embassy, Kenyan police start relentlessly raiding his neighborhood, rounding up Somalis and taking them away. So Abdi goes into hiding in his apartment. Leo Hornak spoke to Abdi almost every night while this was happening, to find out if Abdi would evade the police and make it to America. (17 minutes) Abdi has a memoir called “Call Me American.”  Leo Hornak’s story about Abdi continues. Abdi encounters one obstacle after another on the streets of Nairobi. And finally, the moment of truth comes: his embassy interview. (31 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diversity Visa Lottery 43 mins – “We return to our story about Abdi Nor from 2015, with some big news about his life today. When we first broadcast the story, Abdi was a Somali refugee living in Kenya desperately trying – against long odds – to get to the United States. Then he got the luckiest break of his life: he won a lottery that puts him on a short list for a U.S. visa. But before he could cash in his golden ticket, the police started raiding his neighborhood, targeting refugees. Three weeks ago, Abdi Nor became a U.S. citizen, in a ceremony in Maine. We go to the ceremony, and then head back in time to 2013, when he won a visa under the Diversity Visa Lottery. It turns out winning the lottery is only the first step in trying to come to America. More than half of the people who win each year never make it. Abdi is living in Nairobi, Kenya, when he wins, and as he’s trying to prepare for his interview at the U.S. Embassy, Kenyan police start relentlessly raiding his neighborhood, rounding up Somalis and taking them away. So Abdi goes into hiding in his apartment. Leo Hornak spoke to Abdi almost every night while this was happening, to find out if Abdi would evade the police and make it to America. (17 minutes) Leo Hornak’s story about Abdi continues. Abdi encounters one obstacle after another on the streets of Nairobi. And finally, the moment of truth comes: his embassy interview. (31 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Future 55 mins – “Where does wealth come from, who creates it and what destroys it? In this deep dive into global economics, Mariana Mazzucato explains how we lost sight of what value means and why we need to rethink our current financial systems — so capitalism can be steered toward a bold, innovative and sustainable future that works for all of us.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Emergency Care Systems 36 mins – “Dr. Andi Tenner, Co-Director, UCSF WHO Collaborating Centre for Emergency and Trauma Care, looks at emergency care systems needed to ensure care for the acutely ill and injured. Recorded on 03/30/2020. (#35576)” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ethiopian Internet Censorship 32 mins – “The internet shutdown in Ethiopia has been in place for 2 weeks now. – The Ethiopian Government cut internet connectivity following protests over the killing of singer and activist Hachalu Hundessa. The civil society group NetBlocks monitors connectivity around the world. Their Executive Director Alp Toker explains how by controlling mobile telecoms Ethiopian authorities are able to keep a tight grip on internet access. Researchers at Queen Mary University looked at the network traffic data generated by internet-connected home security cameras. Their work flagged up that hackers can get information about your daily routine without looking at any video content from the cameras. Dr Gareth Tyson, lead author of the study, explains how the rate at which cameras upload internet data can predict whether a house is occupied or not. BBC series Springwatch has been using automated wildlife cameras to record animals in areas of interest, such as Woodpecker nests across the UK. They have been training machine learning systems to only recognise when an activity is happening with a particular animal. Gareth speaks to senior BBC Research engineer, Robert Dawes to find out more.” At the link left-click “Lower quality” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 11 mins – “Fake news does not only disrupt society but also economy and the deep roots of democracy. Sometimes, their impact can even be measured in terms of people killed by the misinformation that it’s spread around. Sinan Aral, a scientist, entrepreneur and investor with a PhD in IT economics, applied econometrics and statistics, has run some of the largest randomised experiments in digital social networks like Facebook and Twitter to measure the impact of persuasive messages and peer influence on our economy, our society and our public health. Having conducted the most extensive longitudinal study of false news spread on Twitter, which was published on the cover of Science this March, Aral has proven that false news diffuses farther, faster, deeper, and more broadly than the truth online. But why? The answer will leave you astonished as the main cause for such an effective spread of false news is not bots, it’s…us. So, how can we be sure that something is real?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Food Security 25 mins – “What does food security mean? We hear about it frequently but this complex category involves much more than just assessing our agricultural capabilities. The main pillars of food security involve food affordability, food availability, food quality, food safety, and natural resource and resilience. One tool for evaluating where companies and governments land is provided in the Food Security Index Report performed by the Economist Intelligence Unit and sponsored by Corteva. Dana Bolden joins us today from Corteva where he acts as the Global Corporate Communications Leader. He shares the motivation behind creating the Food Security Index Report and the impact it could have.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, right-click “Save A” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Grief 10 mins – “In a talk that’s by turns heartbreaking and hilarious, writer and podcaster Nora McInerny shares her hard-earned wisdom about life and death. Her candid approach to something that will, let’s face it, affect us all, is as liberating as it is gut-wrenching. Most powerfully, she encourages us to shift how we approach grief. “A grieving person is going to laugh again and smile again,” she says. “They’re going to move forward. But that doesn’t mean that they’ve moved on.” At the link left-click “Share,” then left-click “Download audio,” then left-click “Save file” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Hong Kong Life 49 mins – “As China’s new national security law tightens its control over Hong Kong, we return to our episode about last fall’s anti-government protests and check in to see how people are responding. Host Ira Glass explains how things have changed in Hong Kong this month, and wonders how things are going for a protester we’re calling Jennifer, who he went to protests with back in the fall. We start with what her life was like in September. (9 minutes) A bunch of 22-year-olds from Hong Kong explain why they are cursed and what that means for their and Hong Kong’s future. (17 minutes) Jennifer, Ira, and producer Emanuele Berry go to a protest and get tear gassed in front of a Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse. (6 minutes) A protestor who thinks the Hong Kong police are terrible has a chat with his dad — a police officer. Alan Yu reports. (12 minutes) Producer Diane Wu goes to a party. A Chinese flag party. (7 minutes) Host Ira Glass calls Jennifer to talk about the new security law. (12 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Humanitarian Community 36 mins – “Dr. Kayla Enriquez explores regions of the world suffering from humanitarian crises. She looks at the history of humanitarian aid and next steps for the humanitarian community, Recorded on 02/25/2020. (#35575)” At the link you can listen, but not record; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Identity Theft Resources for Lawyers 19 mins – “Identity theft doesn’t just apply to stolen credit cards or social security numbers. For attorneys, scammers can steal names and even bar numbers in order to trick consumers. In this episode of The Florida Bar Podcast, hosts Christine Bilbrey and Karla Eckardt talk to Shanell Schuyler about attorney identity theft scams, what they look like, and what both lawyers and clients can do to prevent them. For victims of identity theft, they also share resources within and outside of the Florida Bar that can help attorneys recover from and report identity theft.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Kashmir Internet Shutdown 31 mins – “On August 5, the Indian government announced that it was revoking “special status” for the states of Jammu and Kashmir, enshrined in Article 370 of its constitution. Since then, the government has instituted a lockdown in the Kashmir valley, hundreds of people have been detained, there have been mass protests, and tens of thousands of Indian troops have been deployed to the region. Professor Christine Fair of Georgetown University’s Security Studies Program sat down with Benjamin Wittes to discuss Article 370, its history, and the current state-of-play in the region.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_447.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kidney Transplants 37 mins – “The wait time for a kidney transplant from a deceased donor is many years. Dr. Brian Lee, Medical Director of the Living Kidney Donor Program at UCSF, discusses the risks and benefits of live donor kidney transplant, both for the donor and the recipient. He also talks about the importance of a crossmatch test and the National Kidney Registry and the Advanced Donor Program. Recorded on 10/23/2019. (#35232)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liver Cancer 39 mins – “Liver cancer is the 5th most common cancer worldwide, and the 3rd leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of primary liver cancer. Dr. Neil Mehta explores the risk factors, diagnosis and staging, and treatment decisions including surgery. Recorded on 11/13/2019. (#35235)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liver Transplants 39 mins – “Nationally, there are approximately 18,000 patients on the liver transplant list. Annually, about 6,000 patients receive a liver transplant. Because of the organ shortage, many patients waiting for liver transplants die on the list or become too sick to undergo transplant. Dr. John Roberts offers these solutions: expanded criteria donors, split livers and living donors. Recorded on 10/30/2019. (#35233)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muscular Dystrophy Story 61 mins – “When you’re the only one who can see something, sometimes it feels like you’re in on a special secret. The hard part is getting anyone to believe your secret is real. This week, people trying to show others what they see—including a woman with muscular dystrophy who believes she has the same condition as an Olympic athlete. Journalist David Epstein tells the story of Jill Viles, who has muscular dystrophy and can’t walk. But she believes that she somehow has same condition as one of the best hurdlers in the world, Priscilla Lopes-Schliep. (36 minutes) David Epstein is the author of The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance. Read more from David about Jill and Priscilla and see photos at ProPublica.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Nano Engineering 19 mins – “Cyber attack on Australia, Weird technology from the US Navy, by Ian Woolf, Nano-engineering molecular motors by Dr Shelley Wickham, Sound and facts checked by Charles Willock, Hosted and produced by Ian Woolf” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nigerian Internet 34 mins – “A major problem in laying internet cables in Nigeria is the phenomenal cost of right of way charges – these are local state imposed fees to broadband providers. Ekiti, one of Nigeria’s smallest states, has cut its right of way charges by 96%. It will now cost $374 to lay a kilometre of broadband cable down from $11,600. Tech reporter Yomi Kazeem joins us from Lagos and explains that Ekiti aims to have full broadband access by 2021. Superethics instead of superintelligence – Artificial intelligence research is striving towards creating machines that could surpass the human mind, but shouldn’t we focus on technologies that make us wiser instead of smarter? This is the central question in philosopher Pim Haselager’s most recent paper. He explains how we might use technology as moral crutches for ethical behaviour. Solar Batteries storage – Renewable technology accounted for a quarter of energy production globally in 2018. It’s expected to rise to 45% by 2040. At the end of last year, the Pavagada solar park, in Karnataka, India, became fully operational. Spanning 53 square kilometres, and with a capacity of over 2000 megawatts, this is the largest solar farm in the world. But basic limitations still exist – what can be done to supply electricity when there isn’t sufficient sunlight? Our reporter, Jason Hosken, has been finding out about some energy storage solutions.” At the link left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Pancreas vs Islet Transplantation 52 mins – “Dr. Peter Stock is Professor of Surgery at UCSF and heads up the solid organ pancreas transplant program as well as pancreatic islet cell program. He explores the pros and cons of pancreas transplant and discusses transplant islets, an alternative to whole organ transplants. Recorded on 11/20/2019. (#35236)” At the link left-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power from Waste Water 19 mins – “Stories copy brain states by Ian Woolf, Qilin Wang generates power from waste water, Lachlan Whatmore tells the tale of Louis Pasteur, “A Little Bit” by MJ Hibbert and the Validators. Produced and hosted by Ian Woolf “ At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ranching Startups 27 mins – “Is it possible to become a rancher when you aren’t born into a land inheritance? Aimee Danch and Jeremiah Stent from Square Mile Ranch join us today to talk about their recent purchase of a 370-acre ranch in Wallowa, Oregon. Like people buy a fixer-upper home for their first one. We’re buying a fixer-upper ranch for our first one and we feel really excited about (it). -Jeremiah Stent  Both Jeremiah and Aimee have experience managing ranches across and even outside the country. Originally their goal was to manage livestock and land rather than own their own. They planned on being able to “sell semi truckloads of finished animals and get a paycheck.” But the allure of ownership, autonomy, personally contributing to a local community and being able to manage at their own discretion led them to start looking at land for sale. By pursuing services from the Farm Service Agency Joint Financing Program they were able to gain access to operating loans. Pairing that with an individual investor allowed them to take their first steps into ranch ownership. That’s what people think about farmers and ranchers buying land. They (think) they probably pay for it with what they’re going to grow there. But that’s not very common anymore” – Aimee Danch Despite working very long hours and needing to find supplemental income off the farm Aimee explains that their “quality of life is so high.” They enjoy the food they produce, the “amazing relations” with their neighbors, the “hands-on time with their daughter” and the control over their own schedule.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.  

Segregation in Schools 43 mins – “Years ago, producer Chana Joffe-Walt started reporting on one school in New York. She thought the story was about segregation and inequality in public schools. But the more she looked into it, the more she realized she was witnessing something else. She was seeing the inordinate power of white parents at this school. This is the first episode of Chana’s new mini-series: Nice White Parents.  When the trailer was released for Chana Joffe-Walt’s new show, it prompted a kind of online war. Within a week, people left thousands of ratings and comments: some saying it was divisive and racist; others saying the opposite. But nobody had even heard the show yet. Ira Glass talks about what the discussion illuminates about the show and about this moment. (2 minutes) In just one year, everything in one ordinary public middle school changed. It went from an incoming class of thirty sixth graders—most of them Black, Latino, and Middle Eastern—to a class of 103 sixth graders. The influx was driven by wealthy white students. Producer Chana Joffe-Walt follows how that works out. (29 minutes) As the school year moved forward, the fundraising committee planned a gala at the French Embassy. And the PTA planned a separate, Spring Carnival. Chana explains what happens as quiet resentments lock in place between the two groups of parents. (25 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Troll Tracking 28 mins – “How can we distinguish the online posts written by real people from those coming out of professional bot-farms intent on influencing elections? New research from Princeton University in America uses machine learning to identify malicious online trolls, even before they’ve sent a single tweet. Lead author Meysam Alizadeh explains the power of this work to protect voters in future elections. Gesture-controlled robots – Robots can now be controlled by a simple wave of your arm. Professor Daniela Rus from MIT explains how new research has simplified robot controls by using human movement rather than complicated systems of buttons and gear-sticks. The aim is to allow anyone to pilot a robot without requiring any training. Augmented surgery – Digital Planet’s Florian Bohr reports from Augmented World Expo USA to discover how the new field of spatial computing can be used in medicine. From doctors with x-ray spectacles to virtual reality surgery training, new visual technologies are promising a big impact on healthcare.” At the link left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Uber Strike in Kenya 40 mins – “Benjamen Walker of the podcast Theory of Everything tells guest host Sean Cole about an Uber drivers strike he came across in Kenya. The guys who didn’t join the strike and kept driving for Uber made extra money since there were fewer cars on the road. The strikers felt like it was impossible to beat Uber. But some of them knew a way. (10 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ultrasound in Low Resource Settings 38 mins – “Find out about the history and use of point-of-care ultrasound and how they are used in tropical/low resource environments with Dr. Sally Graglia. Recorded on 02/18/2020. (#35574)” At the link left-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Presidential COVID-19 23 mins – “Daniel Griffin discusses President Trump’s case of COVID-19, including the clinical course, the medications he received and why, and expectations for the next few weeks.”. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog.

Uyghur Story 42 mins – “Desperate to know what happened to his family, a man obsessively decodes the only information about them he can get. That, and other stories of people looking into the void for answers. A Phone Flickers in the Dark Abdurahman Tohti left his home country, China, behind 7 years ago to move to Turkey, safe from the Chinese regime that discriminates and arbitrarily detains Uyghurs, specifically, which Abdurahman is. Reporter Durrie Bouscaren talks to him about what happened to his wife and children and extended family in China, and the endless challenges he faces trying to be sure they are safe. (34 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Vietnam Intelligence Agent 56 mins – “In this DHP episode, CJ is joined by John Murphy and Michael Reiter, who are, respectively, the star and director of the extremely interesting documentary film Agents Unknown: A Vietnam War Intelligence Officer’s Story, which tells the story of John’s experience as a military intelligence officer in the Vietnam War. Join CJ, John, & Mike as they discuss John’s experiences in Vietnam and reflections on them, as well as the making of the film and the takeaways to be gleaned from it.” At the link left-click “Share,” then left-click the down-pointing arrow and select

Water Management 13 mins – “Matthew Pryor joins us today as not only a partner in AgThentic, an Australian based food, and ag sustainability and innovation consulting firm, but also as a co-founder of Tenacious Ventures, a food and ag venture capital firm that just closed their first fund of nearly $30 million. As though that wasn’t enough, Matthew has already successfully exited two different startups. To say he has his finger on the pulse of ag innovation, sustainability and company start-ups is putting it mildly.  In this episode, we discuss Matthew’s rise to success from an entrepreneurial point of view beginning with his first company, Observant. Observant is a company that was born from an issue of water management for cattle in remote areas of Australia. Matthew was solving his water management problem with “bespoke micro-electronics” that they were building themselves.” At the left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Water Scarcity 22 mins – “Chris Peacock is the CEO and Founder of AQUAOSO, a company that aims to build a water-resilient future through software and technologies that identify, analyze, and monitor water risk in the economy. Chris is a three-time water tech entrepreneur with over 20 years of experience in the water industry. He works with agricultural lenders and helps reduce their financial risk by providing analytics and insights on water risk management. Chris joins me today to share AQUAOSO’s main goal and how it can help interpret water data that can benefit both banks and farmers. He discusses the importance of knowing where farm water is sourced and how much water they use. He explains why there is an imperative need to address water needs from both an economic and humanitarian perspective. Chris also describes what happens if AQUAOSO becomes a successful company in the future.” At the link right-click “FOA 198: Data Solutions for Water Scarcity Mar 25, 2020,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Windows Cryptographic Encryption 21 mins – “If you’ve lost the Germans on privacy, you’ve lost Europe, and maybe the world. That’s the lesson that emerges from my conversation with David Kris and Paul Rosenzweig about the latest declaration that the German interior minister wants to force messaging apps to decrypt chats. This comes at the same time that industry and civil society groups are claiming that GCHQ’s “ghost proposal” for breaking end-to-end encryption should be rejected. The paper, signed by all the social media giants, says that GCHQ’s proposal will erode the trust that users place in Silicon Valley. I argue that that argument is well past its sell-by date. Speaking of trust, Paul outlines the latest tit-for-tat in the growing Silicon Curtain between the US and China, as that country announces plans to publish an “unreliable entities” list. I note that the same spirit seems to be animating the announcement that China and Russia are transitioning their militaries from Microsoft Windows to other operating systems. Talk about a bonanza for the NSA: Just the coding errors will sustain its hackers for a generation – even in the unlikely event that the Chinese and Russians resist the temptation to seed the system with backdoors aimed at their erstwhile coding partners.” At the link right-click “Download the 266th Episode (mp3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Windows Encryption 16 mins – “If you’ve lost the Germans on privacy, you’ve lost Europe, and maybe the world. That’s the lesson that emerges from my conversation with David Kris and Paul Rosenzweig about the latest declaration that the German interior minister wants to force messaging apps to decrypt chats. This comes at the same time that industry and civil society groups are claiming that GCHQ’s “ghost proposal” for breaking end-to-end encryption should be rejected. The paper, signed by all the social media giants, says that GCHQ’s proposal will erode the trust that users place in Silicon Valley. I argue that that argument is well past its sell-by date.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Working Remotely for Lawyers 19 mims – “With the coronavirus outbreak driving people to work remotely, John and Sharon have been inundated with questions from lawyers and law firms on how to work from home securely. This edition of Digital Detectives is dedicated to answering the most common questions they’ve received and helping listeners continue to serve their clients in these uncertain times. They discuss methods lawyers should be employing during this crisis and offer recommendations for remote work tools and services.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Wuhan Story 41 mins – “What happens when a Chinese man—just a guy, not a journalist or dissident—decides to go to Wuhan and investigate the country’s response to coronavirus? Reporter Jiayang Fan brings us the story of Chen Qiushi. (23 minutes)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

MMD458 Media Mining Digest: Animal Emotions, Antimicrobial Resistance, Autism, Biofabrication, Branding Daily, Chinese Management, Climate Change Solution in Chad, Climate Migration, Cochlear Implants, Code for Venezuela, Corona Virus Chinese Response, Corona Virus Cure, Corona Virus Knowledge, Covid History, Covid Tracking with Cellphones, Covid19 and Supercomputers, Crisis Text Line, Deep Fakes, Digital Death, Disabled Person, Disinformation, Dismantle Biases, Dr Fauci Interview, Drug Patent Problem, Economic Future, Evolutionary Medicine, Facial Recognition Software, Fake News, GDP Failings, Guest Worker, Hate Panel Discussion, Internet Scammers, Internet Trolls, Just Legal System, Kenya Corruption, Menstruation, Monica Lewinsky, Monkeynomics, Psychedelic-assisted Psychotherapy, QAnon Explained, Racism, Remote Working, Safety-Respect-Truth, Salman Khan, Sleep Value, Teacher Quality, Testing Ed Tech, Tobacco Use, Turning Schools Around, Violence, Womens Rights Activist, Worlds Best Teachers

Exercise your ears: the 68 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 791 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,750 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Animal Emotions 10 mins – “From mourning orcas to distressed elephants, biological anthropologist Barbara J. King has witnessed grief and love across the animal kingdom. In this eye-opening talk, she explains the evidence behind her belief that many animals experience complex emotions, and suggests ways all of us can treat them more ethically — including every time we eat. “Animals don’t grieve exactly like we do, but this doesn’t mean that their grief isn’t real,” she says. “It is real, and it’s searing, and we can see it if we choose.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Antimicrobial Resistance 7 mins – “The UN predicts that antimicrobial resistance will be our biggest killer by 2050. “That should really scare the hell out of all of us,” says bioprocess engineer Leon Marchal. He’s working on an urgently needed solution: transforming the massive, global animal feed industry. Learn why the overuse of antibiotics in animal products, from livestock feed to everyday pet treats, has skyrocketed worldwide — and how we can take common-sense measures to stave off a potential epidemic.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Autism 11 mins – “”Autism is not a disease; it’s just another way of thinking,” says Ethan Lisi. Offering a glimpse into the way he experiences the world, Lisi breaks down misleading stereotypes about autism, shares insights into common behaviors like stimming and masking and promotes a more inclusive understanding of the spectrum.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Download Video” [no audio is available] to get the podcast.

Biofabrication 8 mins – “What if we could “grow” clothes from microbes, furniture from living organisms and buildings with exteriors like tree bark? TED Fellow Suzanne Lee shares exciting developments from the field of biofabrication and shows how it could help us replace major sources of waste, like plastic and cement, with sustainable and eco-friendly alternatives.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Branding Daily 14 mins – “”Branding is the profound manifestation of the human spirit,” says designer and podcaster Debbie Millman. In a historical odyssey that she illustrated herself, Millman traces the evolution of branding, from cave paintings to flags to beer labels and beyond. She explores the power of symbols to unite people, beginning with prehistoric communities who used them to represent beliefs and identify affiliations to modern companies that adopt logos and trademarks to market their products — and explains how branding reflects the state of humanity.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Download Video” [no audio is available] to get the podcast.

Brazil Digital Exclusion 31 mins – “The number of COVID-19 cases continues to increase in Brazil, but access to digital services is getting harder for many of the country’s poorest residents. Emergency aid and state health advice about the virus are only available online, leaving those without internet access with no help at all. Digital Planet’s Angelica Mari explains the situation in Brazil’s favelas and talks about a number of community projects trying to bridge the technology gap. Mixed reality in Covid-19 wards -Over recent months, some hospitals in London have radically reduced the amount of healthcare workers coming into contact with Covid-19. Thanks to mixed reality headsets, only one doctor needs to be at the patient’s bedside while the rest of the medical team sees the same field of view from a different location. Gareth speaks to Dr. James Kinross and Dr. Guy Martin from Imperial College London about how this tech has helped improve working conditions. 3D printing face masks – Shortages of face masks are a common issue around the globe. Could 3D printing be the solution? A firm in Chile has developed an open source design using the natural antimicrobial properties of copper. Meanwhile, a shoe factory in the United States has switched to printing masks for healthcare workers.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Chinese Management 7 mins- “Business management in China is changing, says consultant Fang Ruan. Learn how Chinese entrepreneurs — long guided by Confucianism’s emphasis on authority and regulation — are now looking to Taoist philosophy for a new, dynamic leadership style that believes things spontaneously transform and naturally achieve perfection when they’re supported, not controlled.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Download audio” and then “Save File” to get the podcast.

Climate Change Solution in Chad 9 mins – “To tackle a problem as large as climate change, we need both science and Indigenous wisdom, says environmental activist Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim. In this engaging talk, she shares how her nomadic community in Chad is working closely with scientists to restore endangered ecosystems — and offers lessons on how to create more resilient communities.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download video” [no audio available] and select “Save File” to download the podcast.

Climate Migration 9 mins – “Scientists predict climate change will displace more than 180 million people by 2100 — a crisis of “climate migration” the world isn’t ready for, says disaster recovery lawyer and Louisiana native Colette Pichon Battle. In this passionate, lyrical talk, she urges us to radically restructure the economic and social systems that are driving climate migration — and caused it in the first place — and shares how we can cultivate collective resilience, better prepare before disaster strikes and advance human rights for all.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Download audio” and then “Save File” to get the podcast.

Co-conspirators 8 mins – “In a complex and changing world, how can we make sure unconventional people and their ideas thrive? Business executive Ipsita Dasgupta introduces the concept of “co-conspirators” — people willing to bend or break the rules to challenge the status quo — and shows how they can help create new ways of thinking, acting and being.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download video” [no audio available] and select “Save File” to download the podcast.

Cochlear Implants 9 mins – “”Complete silence is very addictive,” says Rebecca Knill, a writer who has cochlear implants that enable her to hear. In this funny, insightful talk, she explores the evolution of assistive listening technology, the outdated way people still respond to deafness and how we can shift our cultural understanding of ability to build a more inclusive world. “Technology has come so far,” Knill says. “Our mindset just needs to catch up.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Download audio” and then “Save File” to get the podcast.

Code for Venezuela 7 mins – “The world is more connected than ever, but some communities are still cut off from vital resources like electricity and health care. In this solution-oriented talk, activist Johanna Figueira discusses her work with Code for Venezuela — a platform that gathers technologists to address Venezuela’s needs for information and medical supplies — and shares ideas for how it could be used as a model to help other communities in need.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Download audio” and then “Save File” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus Chinese Response 40 mins – “From Hong Kong, South China Morning Post CEO Gary Liu tracks China’s response to the coronavirus pandemic — from the initial outbreak in Wuhan to the shutdown of Hubei province and the containment measures taken across its major cities. Sharing insights into how the culture in places like Hong Kong and South Korea contributed to fast action against the virus, Liu identifies lessons people across the world can use to stop its spread. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. Recorded March 25, 2020)” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Download audio” and then “Save File” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus Cure 11 mins – “Examining the facts and figures of the coronavirus outbreak, epidemiologist Larry Brilliant evaluates the global response in a candid interview with head of TED Chris Anderson. Brilliant lays out a clear plan to end the pandemic — and shows why, to achieve it, we’ll have to work together across political and geographical divides. “This is not the zombie apocalypse; this is not a mass extinction event,” he says. “We need to be the best version of ourselves.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Download audio” and then “Save File” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus Knowledge 7 mins – “What happens if you get infected with the coronavirus? Who’s most at risk? How can you protect yourself? Public health expert David Heymann, who led the global response to the SARS outbreak in 2003, shares the latest findings about COVID-19 and what the future may hold. (Recorded February 27, 2020)” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download video” [no audio available] and select “Save File” to download the podcast.” At the link left-click “Download,” then “Download audio” and then “Save File” to get the podcast.

Covid History 11 mins – “(Update: the CDC and international science community urge everyone to wear face coverings in public.) Where did the new coronavirus originate, how did it spread so fast — and what’s next? Sharing insights from the outbreak, global health expert and TED Fellow Alanna Shaikh traces the spread of COVID-19, discusses why travel restrictions aren’t effective and highlights the medical changes needed worldwide to prepare for the next pandemic. “We need to make sure that every country in the world has the capacity to identify new diseases and treat them,” she says. Recorded March 5, 2020” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download video” [no audio available] and select “Save File” to download the podcast.

Covid Tracking with Cellphones 17 mins – “As COVID-19 continues to spread, the world is facing two existential threats at once: a public health emergency and an economic crisis. Political theorist Danielle Allen describes how we can ethically and democratically address both problems by scaling up “smart testing,” which would track positive cases with peer-to-peer software on people’s cell phones — so we can end the pandemic and get back to work. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and business curator Corey Hajim. Recorded April 6, 2020)

Covid19 and Supercomputers 29 mins – “Supercomputing power for Covid-19 solutions – The world’s most powerful supercomputers are being used for urgent investigations into the Sars-Cov-2 virus. Professor Peter Coveney from the UCL Centre for Computational Science is part of this consortium of hundreds of scientists across the globe, and tells Gareth how this phenomenal amount of computer power is already trying to identify potential treatments and vaccine candidates for Covid-19. Hot and Cold Cognition -Gareth and Bill meet Professor Barbara Sahakian at Cambridge University to discuss her work on hot and cold cognition. Cold cognition is the mechanics of AI. Hot cognition is what humans do so well – being able to empathise. So if we are to take AI to the next stage eg. interactive care robots, it is the hot cognition that needs to be developed – the social and emotional side of AI. Digital Radio Mondiale -DRM is the sister standard to DAB. DAB has taken off in the UK and other developed countries, but it is DRM that is becoming more popular in the developing world – India, Pakistan, China are all using it. Recently Brazil added their support for DRM. The key with DRM is that it digitises everything so we don’t need a new infrastructure for it and it can even act as a backup in disasters when other forms of communication fail.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Crisis Text Line 8 mins – “What if we could help people in crisis anytime, anywhere with a simple text message? That’s the idea behind Crisis Text Line, a free 24-hour service that connects people in need with trained, volunteer crisis counselors — “strangers helping strangers around the world, like a giant global love machine,” as cofounder and former CEO Nancy Lublin puts it. Learn more about their big plans to expand to four new languages, providing a third of the globe with crucial, life-saving support. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Deep Fakes 35 mins – “This week on Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Hany Farid, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, whose work focuses on analyzing and identifying altered photo and video—what’s known as digital image forensics. Recently, he has done work on deep fakes—realistic synthetic media in which a person’s likeness is altered to show them doing or saying something they never did or said. He’s also helped develop technology used by platforms to identify and remove material related to child sexual abuse. They talked about how dangerous deep fakes really are, how much of that danger is the technology itself and how much of it has to do with how big platforms amplify incendiary content, and whether platforms should moderate disinformation and misinformation in the same aggressive way they take down sexually abusive material.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Hany_Farid_on_Deep_Fakes.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep Fakes 36 mins “Jack Goldsmith spoke with Harold Holzer, director of the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College, about his new book, “The Presidents vs. the Press: The Endless Battle Between the White House and the Media from the Founding Fathers to Fake News.” They discussed the long and interesting history of the contentious relationship between presidents and the press, and how President Trump’s relationship with journalists has many precedents and is not the low point in president-press relations. They also discussed the likely arc of the battle between the White House and the media after Trump leaves office.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Harold_Holzer_on_The_Presidents_vs_the_Press.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Death 32 mins – “This week Digital Planet explores digital death and how the COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to update our death rituals and move most of our grieving online. We hear from a listener whose mother passed away with her children by her side via Facetime and how they then moved their traditional American-Irish funeral practices online. In India people of all religions are facing huge disruptions to their traditional burials and are taking tech into their own hands to share their experiences. In some developed countries funeral businesses are using cutting edge tech including sophisticated recording set ups in places of worship to bring together mourners from across the world. People are moving more and more online not only with virtual memorials, RFID tags on gravestones and also ceremonies in gaming environments including Animal Crossing. And we find out more about the Reimagine Festival that’s about to start. The now virtual event explores death during COVID-19 and we see how people are determining their digital legacies after they die.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Digital Government 9 mins – ”What if you never had to fill out paperwork again? In Estonia, this is a reality: citizens conduct nearly all public services online, from starting a business to voting from their laptops, thanks to the nation’s ambitious post-Soviet digital transformation known as “e-Estonia.” One of the program’s experts, Anna Piperal, explains the key design principles that power the country’s “e-government” — and shows why the rest of the world should follow suit to eradicate outdated bureaucracy and regain citizens’ trust.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Disabled Person 6 mins – “In this deeply charming and humorous talk, DJ and self-professed pirate Tom Nash meditates on how facing adversity due to disability invited patience, ambition and pragmatism into his life in enlightening, unexpected ways. “We all have unique weaknesses,” he says. “If we’re honest about what they are, we can learn how to best take advantage of them.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Disinformation 31 mins – “This week on Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth miniseries on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke to Nina Jankowicz, a disinformation fellow at the Wilson Center, about her new book: “How to Lose the Information War: Russia, Fake News, and the Future of Conflict.” The book chronicles Nina’s journey around Europe, tracing down how information operations spearheaded by Russia have played out in countries in the former Soviet bloc, from Georgia to the Czech Republic. What do these case studies reveal about disinformation and how best to counter it—and how many of these lessons can be extrapolated to the United States? How should we understand the role of locals who get swept up in information operations, like the Americans who attended rallies in 2016 that were organized by a Russian troll farm? And what is an information war, anyway?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Dismantle Biases 8 mins – “More barriers exist now than at the end of World War II, says designer Alexandra Auer. And when you erect one wall, you unwittingly create a second — an “us” versus “them” partition in the mind that compromises our collective safety. With intriguing results from her social design project focused on two elementary schools separated by a fence, Auer encourages us to dismantle our biases and regain perspective on all the things we have in common.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio,” then “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Dr Fauci Interview 15 mins – “Beyond the near complete failure of U.S. federal leadership in combating the pandemic, one significant problem, according to Harvard epidemiologist Marc Lipsitch, has been the absence of consistent communication from nonpartisan experts. During the 2009 H1N1 influenza epidemic, he recalled, scientists and public health officials communicated daily with the public, offering nonpartisan advice. “The sidelining of all nonpartisan technical experts…has made it very hard for anyone to know what they should do,” Lipsitch said. That the administration has not just marginalized experts but has actively attempted to undermine their credibility has sown further confusion and distrust, a problem magnified by the many uncertainties surrounding SARS-CoV-2. But though President Donald Trump weaponizes scientific uncertainty and dismisses evidence of the virus’s widespread destruction, he is also exploiting a distrust in scientists that long predated his presidency….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Patent Problem 9 mins – “Between 2006 and 2016, the number of drug patents granted in the United States doubled — but not because there was an explosion in invention or innovation. Drug companies have learned how to game the system, accumulating patents not for new medicines but for small changes to existing ones, which allows them to build monopolies, block competition and drive prices up. Health justice lawyer Priti Krishtel sheds light on how we’ve lost sight of the patent system’s original intent — and offers five reforms for a redesign that would serve the public and save lives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Economic Future 55 mins – “Is the future of our economy scary? Exciting? MIT research scientist Andrew McAfee argues that it’s both. (Audio only)” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evolutionary Medicine 11 mins – “How does your genetic inheritance, culture and history influence your health? Biological anthropologist Lara Durgavich discusses the field of evolutionary medicine as a gateway to understanding the quirks of human biology — including why a genetic mutation can sometimes have beneficial effects — and emphasizes how unraveling your own evolutionary past could glean insights into your current and future health.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Facial Recognition 32 mins – “…what’s the future for the tech with the big names pulling out? Most of the big tech companies have now declared they will not sell facial recognition tech to police, but will this mean that police forces will stop using this tech? There are many smaller companies that have so far not declared their intentions and others are clearly breaking the few regulations in place by using people’s images without consent. It’s widely known that facial recognition technology is racially and sexually biased, and there is little, if any, evidence that this tech does help to reduce crime levels. Dr.Stephanie Hare discusses what might now happen with this tech. Online gambling surge during COVID-19 – Lockdowns are making many players and gamblers move to online gambling platforms, the big issue here is that they do not come under strict regulations like their real world counterparts. Silvia Lazzaris and Katie Kropshofer report on this growing problem. Can you protect a rising number of online gamblers, many of whom suffer from addiction and are bunkered in their homes, from targeted advertising and fraud? And how can regulation catch up with this sudden shift to the online world? Will gaze tech replace touch tech in times of the pandemic? – As computer processing speeds continue to increase, so does the versatility and accuracy of gaze tech – using your eyes instead of a computer mouse or touchpad. Dr. David Souto, from the University of Leicester, explains that as our eye muscles do not tire this technology has untapped benefits. His work is part of the British Academy Virtual Summer Showcase which goes live online this week.” At the link left-click “Lower quality,” then right-click “Save File” to get the podcast.

Facial Recognition Software 32 mins – “Facial recognition – what’s the future for the tech with the big names pulling out? Most of the big tech companies have now declared they will not sell facial recognition tech to police, but will this mean that police forces will stop using this tech? There are many smaller companies that have so far not declared their intentions and others are clearly breaking the few regulations in place by using people’s images without consent. It’s widely known that facial recognition technology is racially and sexually biased, and there is little, if any, evidence that this tech does help to reduce crime levels. Dr.Stephanie Hare discusses what might now happen with this tech.

Fake News 31 mins – “This week on Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth miniseries on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke to Nina Jankowicz, a disinformation fellow at the Wilson Center, about her new book: “How to Lose the Information War: Russia, Fake News, and the Future of Conflict.” The book chronicles Nina’s journey around Europe, tracing down how information operations spearheaded by Russia have played out in countries in the former Soviet bloc, from Georgia to the Czech Republic. What do these case studies reveal about disinformation and how best to counter it—and how many of these lessons can be extrapolated to the United States? How should we understand the role of locals who get swept up in information operations, like the Americans who attended rallies in 2016 that were organized by a Russian troll farm? And what is an information war, anyway?” At the link right-click “Thu, 24 September 2020, Nina Jankowicz on ‘How to Lose the Information War’” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 32 mins – “On this week’s episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek spoke with Craig Silverman, the media editor for Buzzfeed News and one of the leading journalists covering the disinformation beat. Craig is credited with coining the phrase “Fake News.” Evelyn spoke with him about how he feels about that, especially now that the phrase has taken on a life of its own. They also talked about a book Craig edited, the second edition of the “Verification Handbook,” available online now, that equips journalists with the tools they need to verify the things they see online. Journalism and reporting on disinformation has never been so important—but the internet has never been so chaotic and journalists are not only observers of disinformation, but also targets of it.” At the link right-click “Thu, 14 May 2020 Craig Silverman on Real Reporting on Fake News” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 36 mins – “Jack Goldsmith spoke with Harold Holzer, director of the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College, about his new book, “The Presidents vs. the Press: The Endless Battle Between the White House and the Media from the Founding Fathers to Fake News.” They discussed the long and interesting history of the contentious relationship between presidents and the press, and how President Trump’s relationship with journalists has many precedents and is not the low point in president-press relations. They also discussed the likely arc of the battle between the White House and the media after Trump leaves office.” At the link right-click “25 August 2020, Harold Holzer on ‘The Presidents vs. the Press’” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GDP Failings 12 mins – “If you: do laundry, are (or have been) pregnant, tidy up, shop for your household or do similar labor, then by GDP standards, you’re unproductive. In this visionary talk, economist Marilyn Waring seeks to correct the failures of this narrow-minded system, detailing why we deserve a better way to measure growth that values not just our own livelihood but the planet’s as well.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” then “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Guest Worker 7 mins – “The United States can create a more humane immigration system; in fact, it’s been done before, says policy analyst David J. Bier. Pointing to the historical success of the US guest worker program, which allows foreign workers to legally enter and work in the country, Bier shows why expanding the program to Central Americans could alleviate the border crisis and provide new opportunities for immigrants.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” then “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Hate Panel Discussion 40 mins – “Sounds Like Hate is a new podcast from the Southern Poverty Law Center that focuses on the stories of people and communities grappling with hate and searching for solutions. Each two-part chapter, divided into 40-minute parts, takes a deep dive into the realities of hate in modern America: how it functions, how it spreads, who is affected and what people are doing about it. These are human stories. You will meet people who have been personally touched by hate, hear their voices and be immersed in the sounds of their world. You will learn about the power of people to change – or to succumb to their worst instincts. And you will hear about ways that people across the country are becoming change agents in their own communities.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Health Coaches 5 mins – “There’s no shortage of resources to help people change their health behaviors — but far too often, these resources aren’t accessible in underserved communities, says physician Priscilla Pemu. Enter “culturally congruent coaching,” a program Pemu and her team developed to help patients with chronic diseases monitor their health with the assistance of a coach from their community. Learn more about how this approach transcends language and cultural barriers — and could potentially transform health care in America.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” then “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Internet Scammers 26 mins – “Cyber criminals use online forums to sell stolen identity information and other illicit goods. Alex Kigerl, a criminologist at Washington State University explains how a recent leak from two such forums allowed him to identify different types of criminals, with implications for online policing. Migrant money – The pandemic has made it harder for migrants to send money home, forcing some to use criminal networks to avoid expensive bank fees. But new digital platforms are creating safer and cheaper options – as Digital Planet reporters Benjamin Breitegger and Katharina Kropshofer find out. Frictech – Imagine being able to pay with nothing more than a smile – frictionless technology (frictech) aims to make financial transactions as smooth and easy as that. Anders Hartington from Sao Paulo based firm Unike Technologies gives listeners a vision of the future from this fast developing technology.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Internet Structure Safety 34 mins – “The Internet Society has created a way of checking how new regulations could harm the structure of the internet. As the internet doesn’t respect borders, what happens in one country can impact the internet in another. The internet can sustain one or two attacks but many at the same time could even bring it down. Until now there has been no way of predicting how such changes could affect the internet’s architecture. The new toolkit also identifies the critical properties that must be protected to enable the Internet to reach its full potential. EEG that works with Black African American hair – Measuring brain activity can be done using Electroencephalograms, or EEGs. These rely on a number of electrodes being attached to the scalp and the tests are used to diagnose diseases like epilepsy. However if the electrodes are not attached to the scalp properly then getting accurate readings is very hard. This is a problem for people with thick and very curly hair – with some patients having to shave their hair for the test. Now Arnelle Etienne, a student at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, has designed electrodes that suit her hair type – she is African American and hopes her design will significantly improve test results for patients like her. Buddy PKGE – tech to monitor animal vital signs -Harrison Lewis reports on a device capable of measuring animal vital signs that is being adapted to save human lives. The non-invasive tech could help sniffer dogs find people following natural disasters, alerting the handler as soon as dog detects a human heartbeat.” At the link left-click “Lower quality,” then right-click “Save File” to get the podcast.

Internet Trolls 10 mins – “Journalist Andrew Marantz spent three years embedded in the world of internet trolls and social media propagandists, seeking out the people who are propelling fringe talking points into the heart of conversation online and trying to understand how they’re making their ideas spread. Go down the rabbit hole of online propaganda and misinformation — and learn we can start to make the internet less toxic.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Just Legal System 10 mins – “Pardons, commutations and bankruptcy laws are all tools of forgiveness within the US legal system. Are we using them frequently enough, and with fairness? Law professor Martha Minow outlines how these merciful measures can reinforce racial and economic inequality — and makes the case for creating a system of restorative justice that focuses on accountability and reconciliation rather than punishment.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Kenya Corruption 8 mins – “Corruption is a constant threat in Kenya, says social entrepreneur Wanjira Mathai — and to stop it there (or anywhere else), we need to intervene early. Following the legacy of her mother, political activist and Nobel Prize recipient Wangari Maathai, Mathai shares three strategies to uproot a culture of corruption by teaching children and young people about leadership, purpose and integrity.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Legal Identity 6 mins – “More than a billion people worldwide, mostly children, do not have a legal identity. In many countries, this means they can’t get access to vital services like health care and education, says legal identity expert Kristen Wenz. She discusses why this problem is one of the greatest human rights violations of our time — and shares five strategies to ensure everyone can get registered and protected.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Menstruation 12 mins – “’It shouldn’t be an act of feminism to know how your body works,’ says gynecologist and author Jen Gunter. In this revelatory talk, she explains how menstrual shame silences and represses — and leads to the spread of harmful misinformation and the mismanagement of pain. Declaring the era of the menstrual taboos over, she delivers a clear, much-needed lesson on the once-mysterious mechanics of the uterus.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality” and select “Save file” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Monarch Butterfly Preservation 8 mins – “Monarch butterflies are dying at an alarming rate around the world — a looming extinction that could also put human life at risk. But we have just the thing to help save these insects, says author Mary Ellen Hannibal: citizen scientists. Learn how these grassroots volunteers are playing a crucial role in measuring and rescuing the monarch’s dwindling population — and how you could join their ranks to help protect nature. (You’ll be in good company: Charles Darwin was a citizen scientist!)” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Download Video” [no audio is available] to get the podcast.

Monica Lewinsky 15 mins – “Monica Lewinsky reveals the very personal price to public humiliation and explores how we can all do better. (Audio only)” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Monkeyomics 14 mins – “Laurie Santos looks for the roots of human irrationality by watching the way our primate relatives make decisions. A clever series of experiments in “monkeynomics” shows that some of the silly choices we make, monkeys make too.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Productivity 11 mins – “The more we rely on technology to make us efficient, the fewer skills we have to confront the unexpected, says writer and entrepreneur Margaret Heffernan. She shares why we need less tech and more messy human skills — imagination, humility, bravery — to solve problems in business, government and life in an unpredictable age. “We are brave enough to invent things we’ve never seen before,” she says. ‘We can make any future we choose.’” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Psychedelic-assisted Psychotherapy 11 mins – “Could psychedelics help us heal from trauma and mental illnesses? Researcher Rick Doblin has spent the past three decades investigating this question, and the results are promising. In this fascinating dive into the science of psychedelics, he explains how drugs like LSD, psilocybin and MDMA affect your brain — and shows how, when paired with psychotherapy, they could change the way we treat PTSD, depression, substance abuse and more.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

QAnon Explained 35 mins – “This week on Lawfare’s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Ben Collins and Brandy Zadrozny, reporters at NBC News. Writing at NBCNews.com, they report on disinformation and misinformation in health and politics. Their work covers a lot of ground, but for this episode, they discussed one increasingly prominent issue on that beat: QAnon, a conspiracy theory built around anonymous posts on an internet forum claiming that Donald Trump is waging war against a deep state and a vast network of child sex traffickers. The conspiracy theory has inspired acts of violence and is becoming increasingly mainstream, with several candidates for U.S. Congress being QAnon believers. They talked about how QAnon started, why we need to take it seriously and how the internet—and big technology platforms—have allowed the theory to spread.” At the link right-click “Thu, 6 August 2020, Ben Collins and Brandy Zadrozny Explain Qanon” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism 10 mins – “Racism makes our economy worse — and not just in ways that harm people of color, says public policy expert Heather C. McGhee. From her research and travels across the US, McGhee shares startling insights into how racism fuels bad policymaking and drains our economic potential — and offers a crucial rethink on what we can do to create a more prosperous nation for all. ‘Our fates are linked,” she says. “It costs us so much to remain divided.’” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Remote Working 4 mins – “As the popularity of remote working continues to spread, workers today can collaborate across cities, countries and even multiple time zones. How does this change office dynamics? And how can we make sure that all employees, both at headquarters and at home, feel connected? Matt Mullenweg, cofounder of WordPress and CEO of Automattic (which has a 100 percent distributed workforce), shares his secrets.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Rwanda Women 8 mins – “In 1996, Agnes Binagwaho returned home to Rwanda in the aftermath of its genocide. She considered leaving amid the overwhelming devastation, but women in her community motivated her to stay and help rebuild — and she’s glad she did. In an inspiring talk, Binagwaho reflects on her work as Rwanda’s former Minister of Health and discusses her new women’s education initiative for the country, which strives to create one of the greatest levels of gender equality worldwide.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Download Video” [no audio is available] to get the podcast.

Safety, Respect, Truth 12 mins – “Pat Mitchell has nothing left to prove and much less to lose — she’s become a “dangerous woman.” Not dangerous as in feared, she says, but fearless: a force to be reckoned with. In this powerful call to action, Mitchell invites all women, men and allies to join her in embracing the risks necessary to create a world where safety, respect and truth burn brighter than the darkness of our current times.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Salman Kahn 19 mins – “Sal Khan worked as a hedge-fund analyst before he set up the Khan Academy, almost by accident, when his cousin in another city needed help with her maths homework. Since then, his online video lessons have been watched half a billion times, and he’s been described by Bill Gates as ‘the world’s favourite teacher’. In this programme, Sal Khan talks about how and why he set up the not-for-profit organisation. He tells Sarah Montague why he believes lesson time in school could be spent more effectively if the explanation of new ideas is done at home, with students watching video lectures, in a process known as ‘flipped learning’. He argues that pupils should have the freedom to move at their own pace, only moving on when they have mastered a concept. He says this type of learning would be done best in larger classes made up of students from mixed age groups and abilities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Scammers Scamming 26 mins – “(Dis)honour amongst thieves – Cyber criminals use online forums to sell stolen identity information and other illicit goods. Alex Kigerl, a criminologist at Washington State University explains how a recent leak from two such forums allowed him to identify different types of criminals, with implications for online policing. Migrant money – The pandemic has made it harder for migrants to send money home, forcing some to use criminal networks to avoid expensive bank fees. But new digital platforms are creating safer and cheaper options – as Digital Planet reporters Benjamin Breitegger and Katharina Kropshofer find out. Frictech – Imagine being able to pay with nothing more than a smile – frictionless technology (frictech) aims to make financial transactions as smooth and easy as that. Anders Hartington from Sao Paulo based firm Unike Technologies gives listeners a vision of the future from this fast developing technology.” At the link left-click “Lower quality,” then right-click “Save File” to get the podcast.

Sleep Value 13 mins – “A good night’s sleep has perhaps never been more important. Sharing wisdom and debunking myths, sleep scientist Matt Walker discusses the impact of sleep on mind and body — from unleashing your creative powers to boosting your memory and immune health — and details practices you can start (and stop) doing tonight to get some rest. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. Recorded April 1, 2020)” At the link left-click “Download,” select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Social Interest in Africa 8 mins – “What if you could repay loans through volunteering and mentorship instead of money? Activist Angie Murimirwa shares how a game-changing economic tool known as “social interest” is reinvigorating sub-Saharan communities once trapped in cycles of poverty. Join her as she explains how this approach to lending is creating opportunities for thousands of African women and girls — and shows why this model can be replicated anywhere with lasting effects.” At the link left-click “Download,” select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Stubborn Optimism 12 mins – “When it comes to big life problems, we often stand at a crossroads: either believe we’re powerless against great change, or we rise to meet the challenge. In an urgent call to action, political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac makes the case for adopting a mindset of “stubborn optimism” to confront climate change — or whatever crisis may come our way — and sustain the action needed to build a regenerative future. As he puts it: “Stubborn optimism can fill our lives with meaning and purpose.” At the link left-click “Download,” select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Teacher Quality 18 mins – “Studies have shown that the most important thing in a child’s education is the quality of their teacher. A child at a bad school with a good teacher can learn more than someone at a good school getting bad tuition. Doug Lemov has trained thousands of teachers in the UK in how to use their classroom time effectively – keeping children focused with the most subtle of techniques and gestures. His work is based on identifying the most successful teachers in the world, filming them, and studying their methods. He believes that weak teachers can be turned into strong performers, and that the children who benefit most a well-run classroom are those from the most disadvantaged families.” At the link left-click “Download,” select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Testing Education Technology 29 mins – “Across the globe, learning has been transformed over the last few months, often with the help of specialised tech. More and more educational technology, or EdTech for short, is entering the market. But how do governments, schools, and teachers know which tools and platforms to use? And how do countries with limited resources choose the best tech for their needs? Gareth is joined by Joysy John from NESTA and Susan Nicolai, from the Edtech Hub, to find out. Bot or not? – With so many of us socialising and working online it becomes more important than ever to know whether we are talking to a real person or a computer-generated bot. A study from Carnegie Mellon University showed that 45.5% of users tweeting about coronavirus have bot characteristics. A new Mozilla-funded project called “Bot or Not” invites visitors to take part in a modern-day Turing test. One of the creators, Agnes Cameron, tells us about the project, bots online, and how to spot them. Lockdown views – As many people are forced to stay at home we look at how some are using tech to keep looking out on the world. Many are flocking to online webcams to observe serene nature scenes or unusually empty streets in the tourist hot spots of the world. Jacqui Kenny has long used Google Street View to visit foreign places due to her fear of open spaces. She talks about her new photobook and how machine learning may help her find new images to capture.” At the link left-click “Lower quality,” then right-click “Save File” to get the podcast.

Tobacco Use 12 – “The past, present and future of nicotine addiction…” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Turning Schools Around 18 mins – “Schools in England have been warned that if they coast, rather than improve, they risk being closed down. Sarah Montague meets the new head teachers of a Birmingham secondary school involved in the so-called Trojan Horse scandal. Golden Hillock School re-opened in September with new leadership, and became Ark Boulton Academy , where some of the students have seen four different head teachers in four years. Now, principals David Gould and Herminder Channa plan to take the school out of special measures and introduce higher expectations for students, staff and parents. Their promise to students is that they will learn everything they need to go on to university or a career of their choice, but it will require focus, discipline and hard work from students, staff and parents.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Uganda Businesses 7 mins – “What’s your passion? Social entrepreneur Noeline Kirabo reflects on her work helping out-of-school young people in Uganda turn their passions into profitable businesses — and shares the two questions you can ask yourself to begin doing the same.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio,” then “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Violence 16 mins – “You are more likely to die violently if you live in a middle-income democracy with high levels of inequality and political polarization than if you live in a country at war, says democracy advisor Rachel Kleinfeld. This historical shift in the nature of violence presents an opportunity for everyday voters to act as a great force for change in their unbalanced societies. In this eye-opening talk, Kleinfeld unravels the causes of violence and offers a path to security for the world’s deadliest countries.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Download Video” [no audio is available] to get the podcast.

Womens Rights Activist 8 mins – “There’s a simple and powerful way to confront the world’s most pressing crises, says women’s rights activist Yifat Susskind: think like a mother. As she puts it: “When you think like a mother, you prioritize the needs of the many, not

the whims of the few.” Follow along as she shares moving stories of people around the world who embody this mindset — and shows how it can also help you see beyond suffering and act to build a better world.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Download audio” to get the podcast.

Worlds Best Teachers 19 mins – “Studies have shown that the most important thing in a child’s education is the quality of their teacher. A child at a bad school with a good teacher can learn more than someone at a good school getting bad tuition. Doug Lemov has trained thousands of teachers in the UK in how to use their classroom time effectively – keeping children focused with the most subtle of techniques and gestures. His work is based on identifying the most successful teachers in the world, filming them, and studying their methods. He believes that weak teachers can be turned into strong performers, and that the children who benefit most a well-run classroom are those from the most disadvantaged families.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

MMD457 Media Mining Digest: Achoque Preservation, AI and Human Input, Black Lives Matter, Boarder Wall Effectiveness, Capitalism, Child Sex Trafficking, Childhood Trauma, Climate Activist, Climate Countdown, Corona Virus and Bill Gates, Corona Virus Creation, Corruption Reduction, Covid Economic Impact, Covid Vaccine Development, Coworker.Com, Cryptography, Disinformation Online, Elephant Advocate, Farmers Markets, Fire Drill Fridays, Food Waste, Freedom and Democracy, Fungal Mycorrhiza, Global Economics, Hungry Farmers, Immigrant Attorney, Investigative Journalist, Ivermectrin Treatment, Jo Rogan Debate, Kenya Forest Preservation, Kinder Politics, LGBTQ TV Series, Microbe Impact on Health, North Korean Life, Novelty, Nuclear Weapons, Ocean Overfishing, Origins of Life, Plastic Garbage, Pregnancy Deaths, Private Data Ownership, Programming Biology, Rabies Prevention, Ruth Bade Ginsburg, Seaweed Farms, Sex Hormones, Sex Trafficking Bust, Six Hour Workday, Smartphone Chemistry, Soil Scientist, Stockton Mayor, Structure and Order, Student Trauma, Teaching Trends, Technology Trends, The N Word, Tobacco Deaths, Water Quality, Whale Preservation, Zoom Call Fatigue

Exercise your ears: the 74 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 666 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,650 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Achoque Preservation 9 mins – “To save the achoque — an exotic (and adorable) salamander found in a lake in northern Mexico — scientists teamed up with an unexpected research partner: a group of nuns called the Sisters of the Immaculate Health. In this delightful talk, science journalist Victoria Gill shares the story of how this unusual collaboration saved the achoque from extinction — and demonstrates how local and indigenous people could hold the secret to saving our planet’s weird, wonderful and most threatened species.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Video” [only video is available] and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI and Human Input 10 mins -.“Here’s a paradox: as companies try to streamline their businesses by using artificial intelligence to make critical decisions, they may inadvertently make themselves less efficient. Business technologist Sylvain Duranton advocates for a “Human plus AI” approach — using AI systems alongside humans, not instead of them — and shares the specific formula companies can adopt to successfully employ AI while keeping humans in the loop.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Lives Matter 7 mins – “In this lively talk and performance, artist and TED Fellow Amma Y. Ghartey-Tagoe Kootin offers a sneak peek of her forthcoming musical “At Buffalo.” Drawing on archival material from the 1901 Pan-American Exhibition, a world’s fair held in Buffalo, New York, the show examines conflicting representations of black identity exhibited at the fair — highlighting unsettlingly familiar parallels between American society at the turn of the century and today, and asking: Are we all still part of the show?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boarder Crossings..7 mins.-.“In this powerful, personal talk, author and academic Juan Enriquez shares stories from inside the immigration crisis at the US-Mexico border, bringing this often-abstract debate back down to earth — and showing what you can do every day to create a sense of belonging for immigrants. “This isn’t about kids and borders,” he says. “It’s about us. This is about who we are, who we the people are, as a nation and as individuals.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boarder Wall Effectiveness 12 mins – “”Building a 30-foot-high concrete structure from sea to shining sea is the most expensive and least effective way to do border security,” says Congressman Will Hurd, a Republican from Texas whose district encompasses two times zones and shares an 820-mile border with Mexico. Speaking from Washington, DC in a video interview with former state attorney general Anne Milgram, Hurd discusses the US government’s border policy and its controversial detention and child separation practices — and lays out steps toward a better future at the border.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Business Rules 4 mins – “There are three billion working people on this planet, and only 40 percent of them report being happy at work. Michael C. Bush shares his insights into what makes workers unhappy — and how companies can benefit their bottom lines by fostering satisfaction.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capitalism 12 mins – “Rising inequality and growing political instability are the direct result of decades of bad economic theory, says entrepreneur Nick Hanauer. In a visionary talk, he dismantles the mantra that “greed is good” — an idea he describes as not only morally corrosive, but also scientifically wrong — and lays out a new theory of economics powered by reciprocity and cooperation.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Pornography 9 mins – “Social entrepreneur Julie Cordua works on a problem that isn’t easy to talk about: the sexual abuse of children in images and videos on the internet. At Thorn, she’s building technology to connect the dots between the tech industry, law enforcement and government — so we can swiftly end the viral distribution of abuse material and rescue children faster. Learn more about how this scalable solution could help dismantle the communities normalizing child sexual abuse around the world today. (This ambitious plan is part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood Trauma 10 mins – “”To make a difference in the life of a child … I made the commitment to tell my personal story,” says educator Lisa Godwin. In this moving talk, she shares her experience of overcoming childhood trauma with the quiet, unwavering support of a teacher and school counselor — and shows how educators can help students and families navigate hardships by sharing their own stories.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Activist 12 mins – “”I dream of a world where geography classes teach about the climate crisis as this one great challenge that was won by people like you and me,” says climate activist Luisa Neubauer. With Greta Thunberg, Neubauer helped initiate “Fridays For Future,” the momentous international school strike movement that protests the lack of action on the climate crisis. She shares four first steps that anyone, regardless of age, can take to become a climate activist. “This is not a job for a single generation. This is a job for humanity,” she says.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Causes 6 mins – “Journalistic ethics have long tabooed rushing to judgement about the cause of this tornado or that flash flood. But now, with mathematical rigor and clarity, scientists in the field of “extreme weather attribution” can make such connections in some cases. Heidi Cullen, chief scientist at Climate Central, believes the media are failing to contextualize current weather coverage — similar to misleading reporting leading up to the financial crisis. She speaks with Bob about how journalists can embrace this form of science and more precise language to better explain global warming’s role in extreme weather events.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Countdown 42 mins – “Content will focus on five big questions: POWER: How rapidly can we move to 100% clean energy? The plunging cost of renewables is a thrilling game-changer. BUILT ENVIRONMENT: How can we re-engineer the stuff that surrounds us? We need regenerative economics and a materials revolution. TRANSPORT: How do we transform the ways we move? It’s time to rethink our cars, trucks, ships and planes for the 21st century. FOOD: How can we spark a worldwide shift to healthier food systems? A delicious, nutritious future can be good for farmers — and the planet. NATURE: How extensively can we re-green the earth? Our forests, soil and oceans can return us to a stable carbon cycle — and save countless other species.” At the link you cannot download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Corona Virus and Bill Gates 35 mins – “Philanthropist and Microsoft cofounder Bill Gates offers insights into the COVID-19 pandemic, discussing why testing and self-isolation are essential, which medical advancements show promise and what it will take for the world to endure this crisis. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. Recorded March 24, 2020)” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus Creation 42 mins – “When will the coronavirus vaccine be ready? Epidemiologist Seth Berkley (head of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance) takes us inside the effort to create a vaccine for COVID-19. With clarity and urgency, he explains what makes it so challenging to develop, when we can expect it to be rolled out at scale and why we’ll need global collaboration to get it done. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. Recorded March 26, 2020)” At the link left-click “Share” then select “Download video” (no audio option) to get the podcast.

Corruption Reduction 8 mins – “Traditional thinking on corruption goes like this: if you put good laws in place and enforce them well, then economic development increases and corruption falls. In reality, we have the equation backwards, says innovation researcher Efosa Ojomo. In this compelling talk, he offers new thinking on how we could potentially eliminate corruption worldwide by focusing on one thing: scarcity. “Societies don’t develop because they’ve reduced corruption,” he says. “They’re able to reduce corruption because they’ve developed.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Economic Impact 28 mins – “In episode 1 of World vs Virus podcast, economist Nouriel Roubini explains why the economic impact of the COVID-19 coronavirus will be different than anything we have seen before, and a mental health expert gives tips on staying sane. World vs Virus is a weekly podcast breaking down the latest news, research, and analysis of the COVID-19 coronavirus, from the World Economic Forum. Hear the latest episodes as they become available each Thursday: On Spotify ► https://spoti.fi/2Xk5xGR …More information on World Economic Forum’s website ► https://bit.ly/2yLuJfp Episode published 20/03/20 The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Vaccine Development 31 mins – “Antibodies, convalescent plasma, gene-based vaccines — you may have heard these terms on the evening news, but what do they mean? How might they help in the battle against Covid-19? As the race to develop a vaccine continues, questions remain about effectiveness, testing, and whether people will actually get the vaccine once it’s on the market. Two medical experts involved in the fight explain the science behind developing effective protection.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Coworker.org 5 mins – “Got an idea to make your workplace better? Labor organizer and TED Fellow Jess Kutch can show you how to put it into action. In this quick talk, she explains how “productive conflict” — when people organize to challenge and change their work lives for the better — can be beneficial for employees and employers alike.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cryptography 11 mins – “In the war for information, will quantum computers defeat cryptographers?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disinformation Online..36 mins.-.“Disinformation online is on the minds of voters, candidates, government officials, and technology platforms as the US election gets closer. Already experts have seen disinformation campaigns around the Covid-19 pandemic, which could spell trouble in November, says Laura Rosenberger, director of the Alliance for Securing Democracy. “When you’re sowing doubt about the information the government is providing about the pandemic, you’re sowing doubt in citizens’ faith in their democratic institutions. That primes us to have less faith in the integrity of the election.” She speaks with Renée DiResta, technical research manager at Stanford Internet Observatory, and Cecilia Kang, technology reporter for The New York Times, about how this perfect storm of disinformation is being tackled.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Elephant Advocate 9 mins – “Imagine waking in the middle of the night to an elephant ripping the roof from your house in search of food. This is a reality in some communities in Africa where, as wild spaces shrink, people and elephants are competing for space and resources like never before. In this engaging talk, zoologist Lucy King shares her solution to the rising conflict: fences made from beehives that keep elephants at bay while also helping farmers establish new livelihoods.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farmers Markets 4 mins – “The average farmer in America makes less than 15 cents of every dollar on a product that you purchase at a store. They feed our communities, but farmers often cannot afford the very foods they grow. In this actionable talk, social entrepreneur Mohammad Modarres shows how to put your purchasing power into action to save local agriculture from collapse and transform the food industry from the bottom up.

Fire Drill Fridays 10 mins – “At age 81, actor and activist Jane Fonda is putting herself on the line for the planet — literally. In a video interview with TEDWomen curator Pat Mitchell, Fonda speaks about getting arrested multiple times during Fire Drill Fridays, the weekly climate demonstrations she leads in Washington, DC — and discusses why civil disobedience is becoming a new normal in the age of climate change.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Food Waste 8 mins – “In a world that’s wasting more food than ever before, why do one in nine people still go to bed hungry each night? Social entrepreneur Jasmine Crowe calls for a radical transformation to our fight to end global hunger — challenging us to rethink our routine approaches to addressing food insecurity and sharing how we can use technology to gather unused food and deliver it directly to people in need.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Freedom and Democracy 9 mins – “Millions of images and videos are uploaded to the internet each day, yet we rarely see shocking and disturbing content in our social media feeds. Who’s keeping the internet “clean” for us? In this eye-opening talk, documentarians Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck take us inside the shadowy world of online content moderators — the people contracted by major platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Google to rid the internet of toxic material. Learn more about the psychological impact of this kind of work — and how “digital cleaning” influences what all of us see and think.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fungal Mycorrhiza..11 mins.- “Resource inequality is one of our greatest challenges, but it’s not unique to humans. Like us, mycorrhizal fungi that live in plant and tree roots strategically trade, steal and withhold resources, displaying remarkable parallels to humans in their capacity to be opportunistic (and sometimes ruthless) — all in the absence of cognition. In a mind-blowing talk, evolutionary biologist Toby Kiers shares what fungi networks and relationships reveal about human economies, and what they can tell us about inequality.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Economics 13 mins – “Where does wealth come from, who creates it and what destroys it? In this deep dive into global economics, Mariana Mazzucato explains how we lost sight of what value means and why we need to rethink our current financial systems — so capitalism can be steered toward a bold, innovative and sustainable future that works for all of us.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Government Bureaucracy 4 mins -. “What if the government ran more like Silicon Valley? Engineer Matt Cutts shares why he decided to leave Google (where he worked for nearly 17 years) for a career in the US government — and makes the case that if you really want to make an impact, go where your help is needed most.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Video” [only video is available] and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Hungry Farmers 8 mins – “Nearly 800 million people worldwide depend on cassava for survival — but this critical food source is under attack by entirely preventable viruses, says computational biologist and TED Senior Fellow Laura Boykin. She takes us to the farms in East Africa where she’s working with a diverse team of scientists to help farmers keep their crops healthy using a portable DNA lab and mini supercomputer that can identify viruses in hours, instead of months.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Attorney 14 mins – “At the US-Mexico border, policies of prolonged detention and family separation have made seeking asylum in the United States difficult and dangerous. In this raw and heartfelt talk, immigration attorney Erika Pinheiro offers a glimpse into her daily work on both sides of the border and shares some of the stories behind the statistics — including her own story of being detained and separated from her son. It’s a clear-eyed call to remember the humanity that’s impacted by policy — and a warning: “History shows us that the first population to be vilified and stripped of their rights is rarely the last,” she says.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Immigrant Questions 12 mins – “How did the US immigration debate get to be so divisive? In this informative talk, historian and writer Paul A. Kramer shows how an “insider vs. outsider” framing has come to dominate the way people in the US talk about immigration — and suggests a set of new questions that could reshape the conversation around whose life, rights and thriving matters.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous Elements 9 mins – “Indigenous languages across North America are under threat of extinction due to the colonial legacy of cultural erasure, says linguist Lindsay Morcom. Highlighting grassroots strategies developed by the Anishinaabe people of Canada to revive their language and community, Morcom makes a passionate case for enacting policies that could protect Indigenous heritage for generations to come.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investigative Journalist 8 mins – “Film has the power to change the way we think about ourselves and our culture. Documentarian and TED Fellow Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy uses it to fight violence against women, turning her camera on the tradition of honor killings in Pakistan. In a stirring talk, she shares how she took her Oscar-winning film on the road in a mobile cinema, visiting small towns and villages across Pakistan — and shifting the dynamics between women, men and society, one screening at a time.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ivermectin for Covid 10 mins – “For three nights in April, Heather Coutts listened through the door as her husband lay awake in bed, gasping for air. He told her later he’d strained to remember the details of his life insurance policy —  had he signed all the documents? — in case he didn’t make it. Coutts cared for him from a distance, while minding their 11-year-old and 1-year-old. After two weeks of belabored breathing, extreme fatigue and a trip to the emergency room, her husband started to feel better. But Coutts felt like she’d been hit by a truck. She had a sore throat and a fever. Hoping to avoid the hell her husband had just endured, Coutts called her close friend Alexis Lieberman, a Philadelphia pediatrician, to ask if there was anything else she should be doing. Lieberman and Coutts are like family — they met years ago volunteering at a camp for kids with queer parents and have stayed friends ever since. So when Lieberman suggested that Coutts try ivermectin, a cheap, safe drug designed to treat parasites that had almost no known side effects, Coutts trusted her. “We kind of thought, well, there’s no negatives to taking this,” said Coutts. “It’s not going to have any really bad side effects. If it could help, why not?” Within 24 hours, her fever was gone. After two days, Coutts felt completely herself again.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Joe Rogan Debate 12 mins – “Earlier this year we aired a profile of Joe Rogan. The unbelievably popular podcast host was in the headlines because then-presidential candidate Bernie Sanders had gone on his show — resulting in a kerfuffle in the progressive camp, because of Rogans misogyny and racism. He’s back in the headlines again this week after Trump tweeted that he would gladly participate in a debate hosted by Rogan. The fact that Joe Rogan wields so much influence is itself a kind of a head-scratcher for many coastal media observers. “Why Is Joe Rogan So Popular?” is the title of a profile in The Atlantic by Devin Gordon, a writer who immersed himself in Joe Rogan’s podcast and lifestyle to understand his enormous popularity. In this segment, first aired in January, he and Brooke discuss Rogan’s complicated appeal.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Select Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Kinder Politics 9 mins – “In spring 2019, more than 17,000 Europeans from 33 countries signed up to have a political argument with a complete stranger. They were part of “Europe Talks,” a project that organizes one-on-one conversations between people who disagree — sort of like a Tinder for politics. Editor Jochen Wegner shares the unexpected things that happened when people met up to talk — and shows how face-to-face discussions could get a divided world to rethink itself.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language Disappearance 4 mins – “As many as 3,000 languages could disappear within the next 80 years, all but silencing entire cultures. In this quick talk, language activist Daniel Bögre Udell shows how people around the world are finding new ways to revive ancestral languages and rebuild their traditions — and encourages us all to investigate the tongues of our ancestors. “Reclaiming your language and embracing your culture is a powerful way to be yourself,” he says.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

LGBTQ TV Series 5 mins – “Lindsay Amer is the creator of “Queer Kid Stuff,” an educational video series that breaks down complex ideas around gender and sexuality through songs and metaphors. By giving kids and their families a vocabulary to express themselves, Amer is helping to create more empathetic adults — and spreading a message of radical acceptance in a world where it’s sometimes dangerous to just be yourself. “I want kids to grow up and into themselves with pride for who they are and who they can be,” Amer says.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbe Impact on Health 7 mins – “Your lifelong health may have been decided the day you were born, says microbiome researcher Henna-Maria Uusitupa. In this fascinating talk, she shows how the gut microbes you acquire during birth and as an infant impact your health into adulthood — and discusses new microbiome research that could help tackle problems like obesity and diabetes.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

North Korean Life 8 mins -””North Korea is unimaginable,” says human rights activist Yeonmi Park, who escaped the country at the age of 13. Sharing the harrowing story of her childhood, she reflects on the fragility of freedom — and shows how change can be achieved even in the world’s darkest places.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Novelty 10 mins – “Theoretical physicist David Deutsch delivers a mind-bending meditation on the “great monotony” — the idea that nothing novel has appeared in the universe for billions of years — and shows how humanity’s capacity to create explanatory knowledge could be the thing that bucks this trend. “Humans are not playthings of cosmic forces,” he says. “We are users of cosmic forces.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Weapons 9 mins – “There are more than 10,000 nuclear weapons in existence today, each one capable of causing immense destruction. Why don’t we talk about this threat as much as some other major issues? In this practical talk, nuclear security expert Emma Belcher shares three questions you can ask your elected officials to gain a better understanding of nuclear weapons and the measures we need to stay safe.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Ocean Overfishing 9 mins – “We need a radically new approach to ocean conservation, says marine biologist and TED Fellow Alasdair Harris. In a visionary talk, he lays out a surprising solution to the problem of overfishing that could both revive marine life and rebuild local fisheries — all by taking less from the ocean. “When we design it right, marine conservation reaps dividends that go far beyond protecting nature,” he says.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Origins of Life 6 mins – “Exactly when and where did life on Earth begin? Scientists have long thought that it emerged three billion years ago in the ocean — until astrobiologist Tara Djokic and her team made an unexpected discovery in the western Australian desert. Learn how an ancient rock found near a hot volcanic pool is shifting our understanding of the origin-of-life puzzle.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plastic Garbage 10 mins – “Plastic is an incredible substance for the economy — and the worst substance possible for the environment, says entrepreneur Andrew Forrest. In a conversation meant to spark debate, Forrest and head of TED Chris Anderson discuss an ambitious plan to get the world’s biggest companies to fund an environmental revolution — and transition industry towards getting all of its plastic from recycled materials, not from fossil fuels.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pregnancy Deaths 11 mins – “Shocking, but true: the United States has the highest rate of deaths for new mothers of any developed country — and 60 percent of them are preventable. With clarity and urgency, physician Elizabeth Howell explains the causes of maternal mortality and shares ways for hospitals and doctors to make pregnancy safer for women before, during and after childbirth.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Private Data Ownership 10 mins – “The world’s most valuable tech companies profit from the personal data you generate. So why aren’t you getting paid for it? In this eye-opening talk, entrepreneur and technologist Jennifer Zhu Scott makes the case for private data ownership — which would empower you to donate, destroy or sell your data as you see fit — and shows how this growing movement could put power (and cash) back into the hands of people.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Programming Biology 10 mins – “The cells in your body are like computer software: they’re “programmed” to carry out specific functions at specific times. If we can better understand this process, we could unlock the ability to reprogram cells ourselves, says computational biologist Sara-Jane Dunn. In a talk from the cutting-edge of science, she explains how her team is studying embryonic stem cells to gain a new understanding of the biological programs that power life — and develop “living software” that could transform medicine, agriculture and energy.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rabies Prevention 11 mins – “Could we anticipate the next big disease outbreak, stopping a virus like Ebola before it ever strikes? In this talk about frontline scientific research, ecologist Daniel Streicker takes us to the Amazon rainforest in Peru where he tracks the movement of vampire bats in order to forecast and prevent rabies outbreaks. By studying these disease patterns, Streicker shows how we could learn to cut off the next pandemic at its source.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rumination Control 9 mins – “Feeling burned out? You may be spending too much time ruminating about your job, says psychologist Guy Winch. Learn how to stop worrying about tomorrow’s tasks or stewing over office tensions with three simple techniques aimed at helping you truly relax and recharge after work.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg 40 mins – “The late Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second female justice confirmed to the US Supreme Court, told an Aspen Institute crowd in 2017 that her experiences as a woman gave her a unique perspective on the Court. She talked about her relationships with Justices Sandra Day O’Connor and the late Antonin Scalia. She also explained what it was like to work with newly-elected Justice Neil Gorsuch. Her discussion with Elliot Gerson, an executive vice president at the Aspen Institute, also touched on her book My Own Words. This podcast originally dropped in June of 2017.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Seaweed Farms 9 mins – “It’s time for planetary-scale interventions to combat climate change — and environmentalist Tim Flannery thinks seaweed can help. In a bold talk, he shares the epic carbon-capturing potential of seaweed, explaining how oceangoing seaweed farms created on a massive scale could trap all the carbon we emit into the atmosphere. Learn more about this potentially planet-saving solution — and the work that’s still needed to get there.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Hormones 10 mins – “The common thinking on biological sex goes like this: females have two X chromosomes in their cells, while males have one X and one Y. In this myth-busting talk, science writer and podcaster Molly Webster shows why the so-called “sex chromosomes” are more complicated than this simple definition — and reveals why we should think about them differently.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Video” [no audio available] and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Trafficking Bust 10 mins – “Last month, Huffington Post Senior Enterprise Reporter Michael Hobbes noticed a shocking story from Georgia emerge. It traveled from local news outlets, to the Associated Press, to The New York Times and cable news. According the headlines, 39 children had been rescued in a child sex trafficking bust. Except, that wasn’t quite true. Missing children had been located — but almost all of them were found separately in a two-week operation that crossed state lines. In fact, the U.S. Marshals Service that found them doesn’t even investigate child sex trafficking cases. So why the headline? According to Hobbes, it’s a PR strategy used by law enforcement that plays well with the press. But it’s not harmless. The misleading idea that child sex trafficking is rampant stokes fear in the public, lends credibility to conspiracy theories, and can lead to negligence of more widespread and pressing child safety issues.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Relations 7 mins – “As a sex educator, Emily Nagoski is often asked: How do couples sustain a strong sexual connection over the long term? In this funny, insightful talk, she shares her answer — drawing on (somewhat surprising) research to reveal why some couples stop having sex while others keep up a connection for a lifetime.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Victim 10 mins – “’To make a difference in the life of a child … I made the commitment to tell my personal story,’ says educator Lisa Godwin. In this moving talk, she shares her experience of overcoming childhood trauma with the quiet, unwavering support of a teacher and school counselor — and shows how educators can help students and families navigate hardships by sharing their own stories.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Six Hour Workday 26 mins – “This week’s guest offers some excellent knowledge about productivity and having your priorities in place. Steve Glaveski, CEO and Co-Founder of Collective Campus, joins us to discuss prioritizing high-value work. We talk about his view of the 6-hour workday, and how it helps to better innovation. Steve went through the motions of getting his degree and climbing the corporate ladder, chasing what society associates with success. He worked for companies such as KPMG and Ernst and Young and found himself miserably comfortable while in his late twenties. Despite reaching these levels of success, but Steve felt it wasn’t doing what he was called to do. He decided to give it all away and pursue entrepreneurship, which led him to co-found Collective Campus, launch other ventures, and write multiple books. The inspiration behind the work he does is helping organizations and people unlock their potential to create an impact in the world and lead more fulfilling lives. One of his ventures is a company called Lemonade Stand that donates a license to children from socioeconomically disadvantaged areas for every license they sell to the developed world. It works as a software service platform that walks kids aged 10-15 through the entrepreneurial life cycle. When it comes to licenses, they work with schools, governments, and individuals. Steve has a lot on his plate with all the ventures he runs. People often say you can’t do more than one thing if you want to do it well. According to Steve, it is based on how you go about doing things. If you are intentional about getting rid of unnecessary tasks and focus on the high-value work, you will get a lot done and innovate better. Steve reflects monthly and quarterly on how he spends his time, whether it’s his daily tasks or when he’s working on products. A couple of years ago, Steve and his team ran a 6-hour workday experiment to get more done in less time. The shorter timeframe forced them to do away with meetings/outsource and focus on the high-value work. After the experiment, they discovered that productivity was the same if not higher. People had more time to do things outside of the office.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Smartphone Chemistry 10 mins – “Ever wondered how your smartphone works? Take a journey down to the atomic level with scientist Cathy Mulzer, who reveals how almost every component of our high-powered devices exists thanks to chemists — and not the Silicon Valley entrepreneurs that come to most people’s minds. As she puts it: “Chemistry is the hero of electronic communications.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soil Scientist 10 mins – “There’s two times more carbon in the earth’s soil than in all of its vegetation and the atmosphere — combined. Biogeochemist Asmeret Asefaw Berhe dives into the science of soil and shares how we could use its awesome carbon-trapping power to offset climate change. “[Soil] represents the difference between life and lifelessness in the earth system, and it can also help us combat climate change — if we can only stop treating it like dirt,” she says.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stockton Mayor 12 mins – “Michael Tubbs is the youngest mayor in American history to represent a city with more than 100,000 people — and his policies are sparking national conversations. In this rousing talk, he shares how growing up amid poverty and violence in Stockton, California shaped his bold vision for change and his commitment to govern as a neighbor, not a politician. “When we see someone different from us, they should not reflect our fears, our anxieties, our insecurities,” he says. “We should see our common humanity.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Structure and Order 11 mins – “Social media has become our new home. Can we build it better? Taking design cues from urban planners and social scientists, technologist Eli Pariser shows how the problems we’re encountering on digital platforms aren’t all that new — and shares how, by following the model of thriving towns and cities, we can create trustworthy online communities.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Video” [no audio available] and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Trauma 7 mins – “Teachers emotionally support our kids — but who’s supporting our teachers? In this eye-opening talk, educator Sydney Jensen explores how teachers are at risk of “secondary trauma” — the idea that they absorb the emotional weight of their students’ experiences — and shows how schools can get creative in supporting everyone’s mental health and wellness.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Teaching Excellence 7 mins – “Teachers emotionally support our kids — but who’s supporting our teachers? In this eye-opening talk, educator Sydney Jensen explores how teachers are at risk of “secondary trauma” — the idea that they absorb the emotional weight of their students’ experiences — and shows how schools can get creative in supporting everyone’s mental health and wellness.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teaching Trends 15 mins – “Lauren Herckis, an anthropologist at Carnegie Mellon University who has studied the culture of ancient Mayan cities, is turning her focus closer to home these days—exploring why professors try new teaching approaches, or decide not to. She found many professors are reluctant to move away from the way they’ve traditionally taught, even when presented with evidence new approaches might work better. But that isn’t because the professors don’t care about teaching. In some cases the issue involves broader philosophical differences among faculty members over what it means to teach. “I found that every single professor who I spoke to really valued teaching,” she said. “To all of them, teaching was central to their avocation—and their identity.” EdSurge sat down with Herckis to talk about her research and what it might mean for others leading teaching-innovation projects on campuses. The conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Technology Trends 8 mins – “’You don’t predict the future — you imagine the future,’ says sci-fi writer Charlie Jane Anders. In a talk that’s part dream, part research-based extrapolation, she takes us on a wild, speculative tour of the delights and challenges the future may hold — and shows how dreaming up weird, futuristic possibilities empowers us to construct a better tomorrow.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

The N Word 13 mins – “Historian Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor leads a thoughtful and history-backed examination of one of the most divisive words in the English language: the N-word. Drawing from personal experience, she explains how reflecting on our points of encounter with the word can help promote productive discussions and, ultimately, create a framework that reshapes education around the complicated history of racism in the US.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tobacco Deaths 10 mins – “Tobacco causes more than seven million deaths every year — and many of us are far more complicit in the problem than we realize. In a bold talk, oncologist Dr. Bronwyn King tells the story of how she uncovered the deep ties between the tobacco industry and the entire global finance sector, which invests our money in cigarette companies through big banks, insurers and pension funds. Learn how Dr. King has ignited a worldwide movement to create tobacco-free investments and how each of us can play a role in ending this epidemic.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water 9 mins – “We need a global weather service for water, says entrepreneur and TED Fellow Sonaar Luthra. In a talk about environmental accountability, Luthra shows how we could forecast water shortages and risks with a global data collection effort — just like we monitor the movement of storms — and better listen to what the earth is telling us.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water in Flint 8 mins – “Artist LaToya Ruby Frazier spent five months living in Flint, Michigan, documenting the lives of those affected by the city’s water crisis for her photo essay “Flint is Family.” As the crisis dragged on, she realized it was going to take more than a series of photos to bring relief. In this inspiring, surprising talk, she shares the creative lengths she went to in order to bring free, clean water to the people of Flint.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Water Quality 9 mins – “Water is essential to life. Yet in the eyes of the law, it remains largely unprotected — leaving many communities without access to safe drinking water, says legal scholar Kelsey Leonard. In this powerful talk, she shows why granting lakes and rivers legal “personhood” — giving them the same legal rights as humans — is the first step to protecting our bodies of water and fundamentally transforming how we value this vital resource.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Whale Preservation 9 mins – “The ocean is a naturally noisy place full of singing whales, grunting fish, snapping shrimp, cracking ice, wind and rain. But human-made sounds — from ship engines to oil drilling — have become an acute threat to marine life, says science journalist Nicola Jones. Watch (and listen) as she discusses the strange things that happen to underwater creatures in the face of ocean noise pollution — and shares straightforward ways we can dial down the sound to see almost immediate impacts.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download Video” [no audio available] and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zoom Call Fatique 15 mins – “At this point the Zoom call has almost come to define learning and working in the age of COVID-19. But a few months ago, people began realizing that all these video calls were making them tired—exhausted even—more so than a day of in-person class or all-day meetings. The phenomena even has a name: Zoom fatigue. And it’s backed by some pretty interesting brain science. According to scientists, the cause of Zoom fatigue “is that technology can disrupt our normal intricate human communication methods that have been finely tuned over centuries to help humans survive,” writes Brenda Wiederhold in a thought-provoking editorial in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking. As it turns out, live Zoom calls aren’t as live as we think they are. Wiederhold is a licensed clinical psychologist who uses advanced technology, such as virtual reality, to treat patients who experience trauma or stress and also runs the nonprofit Interactive Media Institute. She joins us on the EdSurge podcast this week to discuss how we can combat Zoom fatigue, and she offers a glimpse into her work in virtual reality, weighing in on whether it may one day replace communication as we know it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

MMD456 Media Mining Digest: Algae Blooms, Animal Preservation, Childbirth Quandary, Climate Change and Agriculture, Climate Warming, Concentration Camp Survivor, Documentary Film Maker, Earthbound Problems, Fake Videos, Ghetto Gastro, Hate Online, Headstart versus Upstart, Immigrant Issues, Meat Substitute, Menopause Quandary, Menstruation, Micro Museum, Microbiome Underground, Neighborhood Pollution, Newspaper Shrinkage, North Korea Refugees, Obituary Writer, One Child Policy, Online Marketplaces, Optogenetic Tools, Paleontology, Peptide Medicines, Ping Pong, Police Women, Political Participation, Prisoner Story, Protein Designer, Racism Solution, Refugee Rights, Robot Impact, Scotland’s Well Being, Soul Food, Time Measurement, Transgender, Unhealthy Relationships, Vertical Farming, Work Rules

Exercise your ears: the 43 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 512 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,610 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Algae Blooms 8 mins – “When the ocean changes, the planet changes — and it all starts with microbes, says biological oceanographer Angelicque White. Backed by decades of data, White shares how scientists use these ancient microorganisms as a crucial barometer of ocean health — and how we might rejuvenate them as marine temperatures steadily rise.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download video” [only video is available] and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Animal Preservation 9 mins – “To save the achoque — an exotic (and adorable) salamander found in a lake in northern Mexico — scientists teamed up with an unexpected research partner: a group of nuns called the Sisters of the Immaculate Health. In this delightful talk, science journalist Victoria Gill shares the story of how this unusual collaboration saved the achoque from extinction — and demonstrates how local and indigenous people could hold the secret to saving our planet’s weird, wonderful and most threatened species.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download video” [only video is available] and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Climate Warming 8 mins – “The climate crisis is too vast and complicated to solve with a silver bullet, says author David Wallace-Wells. What we need is a shift in how we live. Follow along as he lays out some of the dramatic actions we could take to build a livable, prosperous world in the age of global warming.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Concentration Camp Survivor 7 mins – “Holocaust survivor Werner Reich recounts his harrowing adolescence as a prisoner transported between concentration camps — and shares how a small, kind act can inspire a lifetime of compassion. “If you ever know somebody who needs help, if you know somebody who is scared, be kind to them,” he says. “If you do it at the right time, it will enter their heart, and it will be with them wherever they go, forever.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Documentary Film Maker 8 mins – “Film has the power to change the way we think about ourselves and our culture. Documentarian and TED Fellow Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy uses it to fight violence against women, turning her camera on the tradition of honor killings in Pakistan. In a stirring talk, she shares how she took her Oscar-winning film on the road in a mobile cinema, visiting small towns and villages across Pakistan — and shifting the dynamics between women, men and society, one screening at a time.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Earthbound Problems 4 mins – “To study a system as complex as the entire universe, astrophysicists need to be experts at extracting simple solutions from large data sets. What else could they do with this expertise? In an interdisciplinary talk, TED Fellow and astrophysicist Federica Bianco explains how she uses astrophysical data analysis to solve urban and social problems — as well as stellar mysteries.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Fake Videos 9 mins – “The use of deepfake technology to manipulate video and audio for malicious purposes — whether it’s to stoke violence or defame politicians and journalists — is becoming a real threat. As these tools become more accessible and their products more realistic, how will they shape what we believe about the world? In a portentous talk, law professor Danielle Citron reveals how deepfakes magnify our distrust — and suggests approaches to safeguarding the truth.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Ghetto Gastro 6 mins – “”The hood is good,” says Jon Gray of the Bronx, New York-based creative collective Ghetto Gastro. Working at the intersection of food, design and art, Gray and his team honor the soul and history of their community while applying their unbridled creativity and expansive imagination to unexpected, otherworldly collaborations. Learn more about how they’re creating and investing in their home borough — bringing the Bronx to the world and vice versa.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Hate Online 7 mins – “Digital creator Dylan Marron has racked up millions of views for projects like “Every Single Word” and “Sitting in Bathrooms With Trans People” — but he’s found that the flip side of success online is internet hate. Over time, he’s developed an unexpected coping mechanism: calling the people who leave him insensitive comments and asking a simple question: “Why did you write that?” In a thoughtful talk about how we interact online, Marron explains how sometimes the most subversive thing you can do is actually speak with people you disagree with, not simply at them.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Headstart versus Upstart 6 mins – “Early education is critical to children’s success — but millions of kids in the United States still don’t have access to programs that prepare them to thrive in kindergarten and beyond. Enter the UPSTART Project, a plan to bring early learning into the homes of children in underserved communities, at no cost to families. Education innovator Claudia Miner shares how UPSTART is setting four-year-olds up for success with 15 minutes of learning a day — and how you can help. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Immigrant Issues 8 mins – “Refugee and immigrants rights attorney Melanie Nezer shares an urgently needed historical perspective on the crisis at the southern US border, showing how citizens can hold their governments accountable for protecting the vulnerable. “A country shows strength through compassion and pragmatism, not through force and through fear,” she says.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Meat Substitutes 4 mins – “Conventional meat production causes harm to our environment and presents risks to global health, but people aren’t going to eat less meat unless we give them alternatives that cost the same (or less) and that taste the same (or better). In an eye-opening talk, food innovator and TED Fellow Bruce Friedrich shows the plant- and cell-based products that could soon transform the global meat industry — and your dinner plate.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Meat Substitutes 4 mins – Conventional meat production causes harm to our environment and presents risks to global health, but people aren’t going to eat less meat unless we give them alternatives that cost the same (or less) and that taste the same (or better). In an eye-opening talk, food innovator and TED Fellow Bruce Friedrich shows the plant- and cell-based products that could soon transform the global meat industry — and your dinner plate.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Menopause Quandary 9 mins – “Many of the symptoms of menopause — hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, memory lapses, depression and anxiety — start in the brain. How exactly does menopause impact cognitive health? Sharing groundbreaking findings from her research, neuroscientist Lisa Mosconi reveals how decreasing hormonal levels affect brain aging — and shares simple lifestyle changes you can make to support lifelong brain health.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Menstruation 7 mins – “Having your period is exhausting — and for many people across the world, menstruation is even more challenging because of stigmas and difficulty getting basic hygiene supplies, says social activist Ananya Grover. In this uplifting, actionable talk, she shares how “Pravahkriti,” her campaign to spread period positivity, creatively engages with everyone to promote menstrual health, raise awareness and break taboos around periods.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Micro Museums 8 mins – “Sometimes, small things make a huge impact. After studying how bees in urban environments can survive by navigating small land patches, ecologist Amanda Schochet was inspired to build MICRO, a network of portable science museums the size of vending machines. Learn how these tiny museums are being deployed in libraries, community centers, transit hubs and elsewhere to increase public access to science.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Microbiome Underground 8 mins – “The ground beneath your feet is home to a massive, mysterious world of microbes — some of which have been in the earth’s crust for hundreds of thousands of years. What’s it like down there? Take a trip to the volcanoes and hot springs of Costa Rica as microbiologist Karen Lloyd shines a light on these subterranean organisms and shows how they could have a profound impact on life up here.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Neighborhood Pollution 4 mins – “To study a system as complex as the entire universe, astrophysicists need to be experts at extracting simple solutions from large data sets. What else could they do with this expertise? In an interdisciplinary talk, TED Fellow and astrophysicist Federica Bianco explains how she uses astrophysical data analysis to solve urban and social problems — as well as stellar mysteries.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Newspaper Shrinkage 8 mins – “Nearly 1,800 newsrooms have shuttered across the US since 2004, leaving many communities unseen, unheard and in the dark. In this passionate talk and rallying cry, journalist Chuck Plunkett explains why he rebelled against his employer to raise awareness for an industry under threat of extinction — and makes the case for local news as an essential part of any healthy democracy.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

North Korea Refugees 8 mins – “”North Korea is unimaginable,” says human rights activist Yeonmi Park, who escaped the country at the age of 13. Sharing the harrowing story of her childhood, she reflects on the fragility of freedom — and shows how change can be achieved even in the world’s darkest places.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Obituary Writers 8 mins – “Since its founding in 1851, the “New York Times” has published thousands of obituaries — for heads of state, famous celebrities, even the inventor of the sock puppet. But only a small percentage of them chronicle the lives of women and people of color. In this insightful talk, “Times” editor Amy Padnani shares the story behind “Overlooked,” the project she’s leading to recognize people from history whose deaths were ignored — and refocus society’s lens on who is considered important.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

One Child Problem 4 mins -”China’s one-child policy ended in 2015, but we’re just beginning to understand what it was like to live under the program, says TED Fellow and documentary filmmaker Nanfu Wang. With footage from her film “One Child Nation,” she shares untold stories that reveal the policy’s complex consequences and expose the creeping power of propaganda. w generation of medicine — made from smaller, more durable proteins known as peptides — is on its way. In a quick, informative talk, molecular engineer and TED Fellow Christopher Bahl explains how he’s using computational design to create powerful peptides that could one day neutralize the flu, protect against botulism poisoning and even stop cancer cells from growing.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download video” [only video is available] and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Online Marketplaces 8 mins – “The growth of online marketplaces like Uber, Airbnb and Amazon can sometimes threaten local businesses such as taxis, hotels and retail shops by taking away jobs or reducing income to the community. But it doesn’t have to be this way, says strategy consultant Amane Dannouni. Pointing to examples like Gojek (Indonesia’s Uber for motorbikes) and Jumia (Africa’s version of Amazon), he explains how some online marketplaces make deliberate trade-offs to include, rather than replace, existing players in local economies — benefiting everyone in the long run.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Optogenetic Tools 9 mins – “Neuroscientist Kay M. Tye investigates how your brain gives rise to complex emotional states like depression, anxiety or loneliness. From the cutting edge of science, she shares her latest findings — including the development of a tool that uses light to activate specific neurons and create dramatic behavioral changes in mice. Learn how these discoveries could change the way you think about your mind — and possibly uncover effective treatments for mental disorders.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Paleontology 6 mns – “In this hilarious, whirlwind tour of the last four billion years of evolution, paleontologist and TED Fellow Lauren Sallan introduces us to some of the wildly diverse animals that roamed the prehistoric planet (from sharks with wings to galloping crocodiles and long-necked rhinos) and shows why paleontology is about way more than dinosaurs.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download video” [only video is available] and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Peptide Medicines 3 mins – “Some common life-saving medicines, such as insulin, are made of proteins so large and fragile that they need to be injected instead of ingested as pills. But a new generation of medicine — made from smaller, more durable proteins known as peptides — is on its way. In a quick, informative talk, molecular engineer and TED Fellow Christopher Bahl explains how he’s using computational design to create powerful peptides that could one day neutralize the flu, protect against botulism poisoning and even stop cancer cells from growing.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download video” [only video is available] and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Ping Pong 9 mins – “Growing up in England, Pico Iyer was taught that the point of a game was to win. Now, some 50 years later, he’s realized that competition can be “more like an act of love.” In this charming, subtly profound talk, he explores what regular games of ping-pong in his neighborhood in Japan have revealed about the riddle of winning — and shows why not knowing who’s won can feel like the ultimate victory.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Police Women 4 mins – “Less than 13 percent of police officers in the United States are women — despite their proven effectiveness in diffusing violent situations and reducing the use of force. Drawing on more than two decades of experience as a police officer and chief, TED Fellow Ivonne Roman shares how a simple change to police academy physical fitness tests could help build a more balanced force that benefits communities and officers alike.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Political Participation 8 mins – “Everyone should participate in decision-making and politics — and it starts at home, says activist Hajer Sharief. She introduces a simple yet transformative idea: that parents can teach their children about political agency by giving them a say in how their households are run, in the form of candid family meetings where everyone can express their opinions, negotiate and compromise. “We need to teach people that political, national and global affairs are as relevant to them as personal and family affairs,” she says. “Can you really afford not to be interested or not participate in politics?” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Prisoner Story 9 mins – “A few weeks before his release from prison, Jarrell Daniels took a class where incarcerated men learned alongside prosecutors. By simply sitting together and talking, they uncovered surprising truths about the criminal justice system and ideas for how real change happens. Now a scholar and activist, Daniels reflects on how collaborative education could transform the justice system and unlock solutions to social problems.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download video” [only video is available] and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Protein Designer 7 mins – “Proteins are remarkable molecular machines: they digest your food, fire your neurons, power your immune system and so much more. What if we could design new ones, with functions never before seen in nature? In this remarkable glimpse of the future, David Baker shares how his team at the Institute for Protein Design is creating entirely new proteins from scratch — and shows how they could help us tackle five massive challenges facing humanity. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio”and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Racism Solution 8 mins – “When we define racism as behaviors instead of feelings, we can measure it — and transform it from an impossible problem into a solvable one, says justice scientist Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff. In an actionable talk, he shares his work at the Center for Policing Equity, an organization that helps police departments diagnose and track racial gaps in policing in order to eliminate them. Learn more about their data-driven approach — and how you can get involved with the work that still needs to be done. (This ambitious plan is part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Refugee Rights 8 mins – Refugee and immigrants rights attorney Melanie Nezer shares an urgently needed historical perspective on the crisis at the southern US border, showing how citizens can hold their governments accountable for protecting the vulnerable. “A country shows strength through compassion and pragmatism, not through force and through fear,” she says.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Robot Impact 4 mins – “How comfortable are you with robots taking over your life? Covering a wide range of potential applications — from the mundane (robot house cleaner) to the mischievous (robot sex partner) to the downright macabre (uploading your brain to live on after death) — technology strategist Lucy Farey-Jones shares data-backed evidence of how our willingness to accept AI may be radically changing.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Scotland’s Well Being 7 mins – “First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon joined TEDSummit in Edinburgh to deliver a visionary talk about making collective well-being the main aim of public policy and the economy. Watch the full talk at go.ted.com/nicolasturgeon. It was a charged week in UK politics; that same morning, Boris Johnson assumed office as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. After the talk, Head of TED Chris Anderson joined First Minister Sturgeon to ask a few questions about the political situation in the UK.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Soul Food 8 mins – “In a lyrical talk full of radical imagination, poet Aja Monet and community organizer phillip agnew share the story of how they fell in love and what they’ve learned about the powerful connection between great social movements and meaningful art. Journey to Smoke Signals Studio in Miami, their home and community art space where they’re creating a refuge for neighbors and creators — and imagining a new answer to distraction, anger and anxiety.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Time Measurement 8 mins – “Ask any deep space navigator like Jill Seubert what makes steering a spacecraft difficult, and they’ll tell you it’s all about the timing; a split-second can decide a mission’s success or failure. So what do you do when a spacecraft is bad at telling time? You get it a clock — an atomic clock, to be precise. Let Seubert whisk you away with the revolutionary potential of a future where you could receive stellar, GPS-like directions — no matter where you are in the universe.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Transgender 8 mins – “In much of the world, gender is viewed as binary: man or woman, each assigned characteristics and traits designated by biological sex. But that’s not the case everywhere, says France Villarta. In a talk that’s part cultural love letter, part history lesson, he details the legacy of gender fluidity and inclusivity in his native Philippines — and emphasizes the universal beauty of all people, regardless of society’s labels.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Unhealthy Relationships 8 mins – “In a talk about understanding and practicing the art of healthy relationships, Katie Hood reveals the five signs you might be in an unhealthy relationship — with a romantic partner, a friend, a family member — and shares the things you can do every day to love with respect, kindness and joy. “While love is an instinct and an emotion, the ability to love better is a skill we can all build and improve on over time,” she says.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio”and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Vertical Farming 7 mns – “By 2050, the global population is projected to reach 9.8 billion. How are we going to feed everyone? Investment-banker-turned-farmer Stuart Oda points to indoor vertical farming: growing food on tiered racks in a controlled, climate-proof environment. In a forward-looking talk, he explains how this method can maintain better safety standards, save money, use less water and help us provide for future generations.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio”and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Work Rules 4 mins – “Most companies operate on a set of policies: mandated vacation days, travel guidelines, standard work hours, annual goals. But what happens when a company looks less to control and more to trust? Patty McCord, the iconic former chief talent officer at Netflix, shares the key insights that led her to toss the handbook out the window.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio”and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

MMD455 Media Mining Digest: AI versus Creativity, Blood Clotting Process, Building Considerations, Cancer Cell Clearance, CAR T Cells, Checkpoint Immunotherapy, Clinton Impeachment, Corona Vaccine Trials, Corona Virus 19 Preparation, Corona Virus Expert, Corona Virus Immunotyping, Corona Virus, Corona Virus T Cells, Corona Virus Update, Corona Virus versus SARS, Digital Currencies, Dumb Mistakes, Enterovirus, Fake News, FDA Intrigue, Gerrymandering Hazard, Giant Virus, Hate, Hepatitis C Story, High Containment Labs, Human Health Collaboration, Immunology Basics, Impeachment, Lymphocyte Tracking, Neutrophil Discussion, Prometheus Project, Science Funding, Soleimani Killing, Telemedicine Do’s and Don’ts, Vaccine Alternative, Virology Diagnostics, Virology History, Virology Researchers, Virus Research, Wild Salmon Virus

Exercise your ears: the 48 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 622 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,500 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

AI versus Creativity 26 mins – “Innovation and creation come from our learnings and experiences. With every new creation comes inspiration from something else. Edison didn’t invent the lightbulb; he perfected it. Einstein was inspired by physicists that went before him. So what is the difference between AI invented and AI-inspired? Input and experience play a key role. For AI, that comes in the form of the “training data” supplied to the system to recognize patterns and identify the best solutions. Training data is critically important and allows AI to do what it does. It is part of an element called machine learning, which has historically applied to games like chess and go. It was initially thought that humans had a unique advantage at these kinds of things.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Blood Clotting Process 59 mins – “The Immune trio explains how activation of the inflammasome by a bacterial protein causes blood clotting through a programmed cell death process called pyroptosis.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Building Considerations P1 11 mins – “Do you know what you should consider when choosing your home site?  After deciding to build instead of buy a new home, many people are so focused on the house design and that they give little thought to the LAND on which they will place their future home.  But what lot you choose is a major factor in determining how much it will cost you to build and maintain your home, and how much you will ultimately enjoy it.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Building Considerations P2 9 mins – “Back on track after unavoidable pre-construction setbacks, my homebuilding journey has had its share of challenges, even before the foundation was placed.  But delays have been used as opportunities for design improvements that will make the house even more resilient than originally planned.  This episode is kind of a construction update.  I’ll tell you about our delays and what we did to make lemonade out of lemons.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Cancer Cell Clearance 46 mins – “The immunophiles explain how metabolic rewiring of macrophages by CpG promotes clearance of cancer cells.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

CAR T Cells 56 mins – “The immu-knowledge-ists deconstruct the holy grail of oncologists, cancer immunotherapy, and the exciting development of CAR T cells and how they work.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Checkpoint Immunotherapy 54 mins – “The Immune team explains the science behind the 2018 Nobel Prizes awarded to Allison and Honjo: checkpoint immunotherapy.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Clinton Impeachment 33 mins – “President Trump is just the fourth president to face impeachment proceedings. In 2016, The Post’s Presidential podcast examined the three presidents in that category before Trump. We finish our series from Presidential with the story of Bill Clinton.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Corona Vaccine Trials 17 mins – “Is AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine in jeopardy? Why can’t politicians and scientists in Washington get along? Did you miss STAT’s first-ever Health Tech Summit? We discuss all that and more this week on “The Readout LOUD,” STAT’s biotech podcast. First, we’ll break down the big news of the week: the global pause on AstraZeneca’s Phase 3 trials of its Covid-19 vaccine due to a suspected serious adverse reaction in a participant in the U.K. Then, STAT’s Lev Facher joins us for an update on the charged politics of the Covid-19 response. Lastly, we’ll highlight three top moments from STAT’s inaugural Health Tech Summit, which took place virtually this week.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus 19 Preparation 44 mins – “Columbia University Chief Neurology Resident Genna Waldman joins TWiN to explains how her department prepared for COVID-19, and the neurological symptoms associated with the disease.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus Expert 71 mins – “Coronavirus expert Ralph Baric joins TWiV to explain the virology and epidemiology of the recent zoonotic outbreak spreading across China and overseas.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus Immunotyping 56 mins – “Immune explains a study of 125 COVID-19 patients by deep immune profiling, which revealed three immunotypes associated with poor clinical prognosis or recovery.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus P1 58 mins – “Brianne Barker joins Immune to discuss the immune response to infection with SARS-CoV-2, including immune respones, pathogenesis, immunopathology and more.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus P2 56 mins – “Brianne Barker returns to continue a discussion of the immune response to infection with SARS-CoV-2, including use of steroid, coagulation in some patients, cytokine storm, and vaccines.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus P3 60 mins – “Immune continues a discussion of the immune response to infection with SARS-CoV-2, including vaccines and immunity, effects of BCG and OPV, immunity passports, and answers to listener questions.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus P4 60 mins – “Immune continues a discussion of the immune response to infection with SARS-CoV-2, including inflammatory responses and disease, antibody and T-cell responses, and vaccines, and answers to listener questions.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus T Cells 58 mins – “Immune explains a study demonstrating T cells that react with SARS-CoV-2 epitopes in individuals who have never been infected with the virus, implying cross-reactivity with common cold coronaviruses.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus Update 56 mins – “Vincent and Rich update the current situation with COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2, including fatality ratios, virus spreading outside of China, immunity to infection, vaccines, antivirals and much more.” At the right-click “Download TWiV 589,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus versus SARS 79 mins – “TWiV provides updates on the new coronavirus causing respiratory disease in China, the current influenza season, and the epidemic of African swine fever, including determination of the three-dimensional structure of the virus particle.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Digital Currencies 21 mins – “Digital currencies from central banks could change money as you know it -Technology has no borders and to understand how it is transforming business, the global economy and peoples’ lives you have to look beyond Silicon Valley. “Beyond the Valley” tells the stories of how technology is shaping the world – no matter where they happen on the globe. Increasingly, some of the biggest technological developments and trends are finding their start outside the traditional tech power centers. “Beyond the Valley” brings the world of tech – and tech around the world – to you.” At the link right click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop up menu.

Dumb Mistakes 27 mins – “We talk to science journalist David Robson about his new book The Intelligence Trap: Why Smart People Make Dumb Mistakes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Enterovirus 81 mins – [Enteroviruses are a group of viruses that cause a number of infectious illnesses which are usually mild. However if they infect the central nervous system, they can cause serious illness. The two most common ones are echovirus and coxsackievirus, but there are several others.] “Amy joins the TWiV team to review evidence that enterovirus D68 is an etiologic agent of childhood paralysis, and her finding that the ability of the virus to infect cells of the nervous system is not a recently acquired property.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 572,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 41 mins – “There is no fact/fiction lobe, no area in the cerebral cortex that holds true facts. We’re not wired for truth—but we are deeply wired for stories. In fact, compelling stories trump true facts as often as not, and our world view is defined by the fake world of 24 or suitcase nukes than they are by cold reality. We’re been looking for this program for a decade, someone who can talk clearly about the nuance of narrative, the power of stories and the resilience of myth. Tried twice before, and didn’t get it. But tonight America’s leading investigative journalist draws on her academic training and over a decade deep in the weeds of natiional security, intelligence and politic to talk about truth. The discussion draws heavily from Marcy’s post On “Fake News”” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

FDA Intrigue 16 mins – “…Eric Topol of Scripps Research calls in to discuss his fiery criticism of FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn and the future of the agency’s reputation. Then, we talk to STAT’s Matthew Herper about how vaccines for Covid-19 might prove their worth before the end of the year. Finally, STAT’s op-ed page, First Opinion, hit a milestone this week, publishing its 2,000th piece, and First Opinion editor Patrick Skerrett joins us for a look behind the scenes and a glimpse at the future.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Gerrymandering 34 mins – “Moon Duchin, a professor of mathematics at Tufts University, uses metric geometry to help defend democracy against the threat posed by gerrymandering. But as she discusses with host Steven Strogatz, the problem of fair voting in a representative democracy can’t simply be reduced to an objective function. This episode was produced by Dana Bialek. Read more at Quantamagazine.org. Production and original music by Story Mechanics.“ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gerrymandering Hazard 3 mins – “It has been happening for more than 200 years. Electoral boundaries are redrawn to favour one party over another. In the United States, a party may receive most votes in a state. But district boundaries mean the less popular party receives more congressional seats. Jared Diamond says it is a perversion of the electoral process and is undermining American democracy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Giant Virus 80 mins – “From the Fourth Symposium on Giant Virus Biology in Germany, Vincent, Rich, and Nels speak with Assaf, Stephen, and Alexandra about their careers and their work on giant viruses that infect ocean hosts: Emiliana huxleyi, Aureococcus anophagefferans, and a choanoflagellate.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 575,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate P1 27 mins – “Getting Out begins with the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August 2017. But this isn’t about that white supremacist rally — it’s about a woman named Samantha, who worked behind the scenes to support this violent alt-right march. This chapter leads us through the story of how Samantha became the women’s coordinator of Identity Evropa, a white nationalist group, and why she decided she had to get out.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Hate P2 27 mins – “Part two takes Samantha’s story from the privacy of chatrooms to the corridors of power. What was the cost of her neo-Nazi separatist views? How did she contribute to the spread of deadly lies? And why did she decide to get out?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Hepatitis CStory 64 mins – “Coronavirus expert Ralph Baric joins TWiV to explain the virology and epidemiology of the recent zoonotic outbreak spreading across China and overseas.” At the link right-click “TWIV 580” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hepatitis C Story 64 mins – “From the University of Texas at Austin, Vincent and Rich speak with Chris Sullivan about his work on miRNAs encoded in the genomes of polyomaviruses and papillomaviruses, and how an RNA triphosphatase restricts hepatitis C virus replication.” At the link right-click “TWIV 580” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

High Containment Labs 56 mins – “Vincent and Rich travel to Galveston National Laboratory to speak with Jim LeDuc, Tom Ksiazek, and Bob Tesch about their long careers as virus hunters.” At the link right-click “TWIV 583” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Health Collaborations 45 mins – “From ASM Microbe 2019 in San Francisco, Vincent speaks with Victoria McGovern, Carl Nathan, and Dan Portnoy about advancing human health through innovative collaborations.” At the linkrRight click to download “TWiM#207” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immunology Basics 48 mins – “The Immune trifecta explores systems immunology, and its use in a study of immune system development in newborn children.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Impeachment P1 109 mins – “It was an impeachment double-header today in the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. In the morning, the committee heard testimony from Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, U.S. Army officer and the top Ukraine expert on the National Security Council, and Jennifer Williams, a foreign service officer detailed to the Vice President’s staff. In the afternoon, the committee heard from Tim Morrison, the former senior director for Europe and Russia at the National Security Council, and Kurt Volker, the former U.S. special envoy to Ukraine. That was a lot to pack into one day, but we here at Lawfare have taken out all the unnecessary speeches, partisan bickering, and repetition to bring you just the portions of the testimony you need to hear. Audio from both hearings can be found below.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment P2 115 mins – “It was an impeachment double-header today… “ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lymphocyte Tracking 58 mins – “Cindy, Steph, and Vincent reveal that lymphocyte trafficking through lymph nodes and lymph is circadian – it is dependent on the time of day.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Neutrophil Discussion 58 mins – “Stephanie takes the Immune team on a tour of neutrophils, the most abundant leukocytes in mammals, including tethers and slings, neutrophil rolling, and neutrophil nets.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Prometheus Project 61 mins – “Vincent speaks with members of Prometheus, a team of academic and industrial scientists assembled to develop antibody-based therapeutics against infections caused by tick-borne Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus and rodent-borne hantaviruses, for which no approved vaccines or specific drugs are available.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 578,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Funding 48 mins – “From Georgia State, Vincent speaks with economics professor Paula Stephan about the ways science is supported in the US, how universities offload risks, the absence of risk-taking, and much more.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 574,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soleimani Killing 42 mins – “The American drone strike last night that killed Qassem Soleimani, the commander of the Iranian Quds Force, is a seismic event in U.S.-Iranian relations—and for the broader Middle East. We put together an emergency podcast, drawing on the resources of both Lawfare and the Brookings Institution and reflecting the depth of the remarkable collaboration between the two. Iran scholar Suzanne Maloney, terrorism and Middle East scholar Daniel Byman, Middle East scholar and former State Department official Tamara Cofman Wittes and former State Department lawyer and Baghdad embassy official Scott Anderson—who is also a Lawfare senior editor—came together the morning after the strike for a diverse discussion of the reasons for the operation, the vast repercussions of it, the legality of the strike and the role Soleimani played in the Iranian regime.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Telemedicine Dos and Don’ts 19 mins – “In this Hippo Education bonus, Dr. Mizuho Morrison from the Urgent Care RAP team sits down with Dr. Ajsa Nikolic, family medicine physician and medical director for Ochsner Health’s Virtual Care Provider Network. They discuss practical do’s and don’ts for those starting out in telemedicine, as an introduction to Hippo Education’s newest video course, Telemedicine: Common Conditions. Check out the course at hippoed.com/telemed!” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Vaccine Alternative 52 mins – “Immune reveals an alternative to a protective vaccine, engineered B cells that produce antiviral antibodies.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Virology Diagnostics 36 mins – “From the 22nd meeting of the European Society for Clinical Virology in Copenhagen, Vincent speaks with Thea, Heli, Kim, Caroline and Irma about big data and its increasing use in virology diagnostics, epidemiology, and public health.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 576,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virology Research 50 mins – “Vincent speaks with Félix Rey about his career and his work on solving structures of a variety of viruses and the insights learned about viral membrane fusion and antibody-mediated neutralization.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 577,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virology Researchers 67 mins – “Vincent speaks with virologists at the University of Nevada at Reno about their careers and their work on herpesviruses, arboviruses, and the development of diagnostics for infectious diseases.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 579,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virus History 76 mins – “William Summers joins the TWiV team to discuss some virology history, including the ever-changing concept of ‘virus’ and the contribution of phage research to the study of animal viruses.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 573,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wild Salmon Virus 74 mins – “The TWiV pro-vaxxers reveal viruses that infect endangered wild salmon, and how iron in host serum modulates dengue virus acquisition by mosquitoes.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 569,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments