Media Mining Digest 250 – Aug 26, 2016: Africa Arising, Air Conditioning Costs, Alternate Realities, Art Forgery, Atrial Fibrillation, Aviation Jobs, Bauhouse Photos, Beaver Trapping, Bike Sharing, Bobby Kennedy, Brain Tumors, Broadband in Maine, Brown Skin Discrimination, Camp Century, Canadian Nationalist, Car Use Decline, Civil War Professor, Coffee Production, Collection Museums, Connect to the Land, Co-parenting, Cyclone Winston, Drug Approval Process, Drug Controls, Drug Costs, Electrifying America, Exoplanets, First Nations Discrimination, Forest Systems, Geoengineering, Grand Canyon Rapids Ride, Green Party Candidate, Gun Security, Haptic for Blind, Heart Complications, Human Development, Incubator History, Injustice, Investing Common Sense, ISIS Recruiting, Manhattan Project, Manufacturing Decline, Meatless Future, Meditation, Mediterranean Diet, Mental Health, Mormon Voters, Muslim Misunderstandings, Nanotoxicology, Nora Ephron, Oil Production, Olympic Games, Osteoporosis, Planetary Science, Political Party Policy, Political Trends, Politics, Racism in America, Racist Book, Railroad Across Panama, Right to Die, Sand Usage, Satire, Sex Abuse Case, Sex Assaults in Colleges, Sexual Harassment at Fox, Sonic Pi, Sports Science, Standing in Line, Startups in Israel, Stroke Research, Syrian Archaeology, Syria-Russia-US, Terrorist Security, Tom Hayden, Tourism in America, Turkish Spring, Unconscious Mind, Violent Crime in America, Vitamania, Vocational Education, Voice of America, Water Treatment, White House Slaves, Wildlife Photographer, Wind Turbines Offshore, WW II Tobruk and Stalin, Zia Virus Research

The 93 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 280 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 11,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded.

Africa Arising 15 mins – “African growth is a trend, not a fluke, says economist and former Finance Minister of Nigeria Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala. In this refreshingly candid and straightforward talk, Okonjo-Iweala describes the positive progress on the continent and outlines eight challenges African nations still need to address in order to create a better future.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Air Conditioning Costs 29 mins – “Who doesn’t enjoy that refreshing feeling when you walk in from 90 degree heat to the cool blast of an air-conditioned room? Last month extreme heat blistered most of the US, from the Northeast, to the Southwest and practically every place in between. Weather experts are telling us that extreme is going to be the new normal when it comes to summer temperatures. Thank heavens for A/C. Approximately 86% of American households are equipped with air conditioners, and the rest of the world is rapidly catching up. But, while it undoubtedly helps human beings survive extreme heat, A/C is a huge and growing greenhouse gas offender. Our guest this week on Sea Change Radio is reporter, Katie Herzog, who recently wrote a piece for Grist on the social and environmental costs of air-conditioning. We discuss the past and future of these machines, the possibility of solar-powered A/C units, and the irony of this thing that is making us hotter by keeping us cool.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alternate Realities 62 mins – “Chuck Klosterman, author of But What If We’re Wrong, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the possibility that things we hold to be undeniably true may turn out to be totally false in the future. This wide-ranging conversation covers music and literary reputations, fundamentals of science, and issues of self-deception and illusion.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Art Forgery 28 mins – “This week on Hidden Brain, we explore real and fake, from fine art to fine wine. Shankar speaks with Noah Charney, author of The Art of Forgery, about why art forgers are compelled to spend their lives copying the great masters, and why so many of them want to get caught. Also this week: why we love studies that prove wine connoisseurs wrong.” At the link find the title, “Encore of Episode 11: Forgery, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160815 hiddenbrain_forgery.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atrial Fibrillation 15 mins – “Ben Freedman from the University of Sydney discusses atrial fibrillation and stroke risk with Richard Lane.” At the link find the title,”Atrial fibrillation: The Lancet: August 18, 2016,” right-click “Media files 08august.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aviation Jobs 53 mins – “Welcome to episode 113! There are many jobs in aviation and some will surprise you. Today I am joined by Paul Grieco and special guest Jennifer Adams. Jenn is an Aviation blogger writing at Tales from the Terminal on all types of Aviation jobs and adventures….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bauhouse Photos 21 mins – “Founded by architect Walter Gropius in 1919, the Bauhaus school in Germany would go on to shape modern architecture, art, and design for decades to come. The school sought to combine design and industrialization, creating functional things that could be mass-produced for the betterment of society. It was a nexus of creativity in the early 20th century. Most now-famous designers and artists who were in Europe during the 1920s and ’30s spent time at the Bauhaus.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beaver Trapping 5 mins – “Beavers have been busy this summer, building dams and creating wetlands—in places they’re not always welcome. Commercial trappers are getting more calls to remove beavers from neighborhoods this season, and that’s due to a drop in international fur prices. When prices for fur drop overseas, the number of beavers in New Hampshire goes up. …” At the link right-click the play button next to “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bike Sharing 25mins – “…world-wide growth of bike sharing with Janet Larsen of Earth-Policy.” At the link download the MP3 as the segment linked to Janet Larsen.

Bobby Kennedy 62 mins – “Nobody was better, half a century ago, at thinking about the biggest solutions for the problems of his age than Bobby, whether that be race riots roiling in cities across America, and especially in California; the war raging in Vietnam; or the general issue of inequality that was dividing people along lines of class, race, gender and generation. Those issues, of course, are a mirror of those facing the country today, when RFK’s message is more resonant than ever. He predicted we’d have a black president almost to the day, when no white politician dreamed of it. He talked about how our problems made us ripe for demagogues, though he’d never met Donald P. Trump but did know George Wallace better than anyone. And he offered ways out of all of that, in compelling enough terms to win the California primary and seem poised for the presidency.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Tumors 21 mins – “Demetri Kofinas had a benign brain tumour that was too tricky to remove, so he left it. But then it grew and threw him into dementia in his 20s. This is the story of one man’s journey toward profound loss and the turnaround that brought everything back.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: How a man with a brain tumour rebooted his memory, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160815_92263.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Maine 27 mins – “Cape Cod’s Open Cape is the latest of the stimulus-funded middle mile broadband projects to focus on expanding to connect businesses and residents. We talk to Open Cape Executive Director Steve Johnston about the new focus and challenge of expansion in episode 215 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. Steve has spent much of his first year as executive director in meetings with people all across the Cape. We talk about how important those meetings are and why Steve made them a priority in the effort to expand Open Cape. We also talk about the how Open Cape is using Crowd Fiber to allow residents to show their interest in an Open Cape connection. They hope that expanding the network will encourage people to spend more time on the Cape, whether living or vacationing. The Cape is not just a vacation spot, it has a large number of full time residents that are looking for more economic opportunities and the higher quality of life that comes with full access to modern technology.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from her” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brown Skin Discrimination 21 mins – “When Kamal Al-Solaylee travelled to 10 countries to capture the experience of being brown, he concluded that a brown racial identity has been shaped by the cheap labour movement. His book Brown explores what being brown in today’s world means to everyone.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Author Kamal Al-Solaylee on how cheap labour shapes brown racial identity, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160817_78954.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Camp Century 4 mins – “By 2090, layer after layer of the Greenland Ice Sheet will vanish, exposing a once-top secret US military base established during the Cold War. Camp Century was part of a secret plan to test the possibility of deploying nuclear missles aimed at the Soviet Union under the ice in Greenland. That’s according to a new study that projects 75 years from now, Camp Century “will begin to experience more melt than snowfall, which means that each year, rather than having an additional layer of snow and ice accumulate on top of the camp, instead a layer of snow and ice will be removed from across the top of the camp.” Not only would the base’s once classified infrastructure be revealed, so too would the potentially hazardous waste left behind. This includes sewage, diesel fuel, toxic chemical compounds like PCBs — a multi-purpose industrial chemical—and some low-level radioactive waste from the camp’s nuclear generator. All that could re-enter the environment and potentially disrupt nearby ecosystems, says William Colgan, one of the lead authors of the study….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-u menu.

Canadian National P2 48 mins – “For almost fifty years, Mel Hurtig was a prominent voice in any discussion about the country that he loved. Kathleen Flaherty traced Mel Hurtig’s lifelong quest to shape a Canada that he passionately believed in.” At the link find the title, “Citizen Mel, Part 2 (Encore June 23, 2011), Aug, 2016,”right-click “Media files ideas_20160812_24581.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Use Decline 49 mins – “Think about a city around the world – big or small – and one common feature nearly all share are cars. Whether these urban centers were designed primarily for walking, metro or the automobile, drivers are everywhere. But Peter Newman, an expert of sustainability who has been researching car use since the early 1970s, sees a change underway. Newman says we’ve reached “peak car use” – a point in which driving will play a significantly less central role in how we get around, and that will change the nature of our cities. Guest host Susan Page and her panel discuss how cities are steering away from car-based planning and what it means for how we live and work.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Civil War Professor 60 mins – “Virginia Tech professor emeritus James Robertson discusses his book, [After the Civil War: The Heroes, Villains, Soldiers, and Civilians Who Changed America].” At the link find the title, “Q&A with James Robertson, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.449502.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Co-parenting 47 mins – “The simple fact is a lot of children’s parents don’t live together. They split up. They divorce. And suddenly, children have two homes. But they only have one childhood. How do you make it good? The childhood they need and deserve? Psychologist and divorce mediator Robert Emery says frankly that it’s hard – emotionally, practically, financially. But you can do it. He’s seen a lot of ways. He’s got advice. This hour On Point: New parenting plans. Making good childhoods in divided families.” At the link right-click the tiny arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coffee Production 56 mins – “Talking Biotech #45 discusses the viral threats to coffee. We’re joined by Dr. Michael Goodin, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology from the University of Kentucky. Coffee viruses are important threats to sustainable production. They are spread by insects, so insect control is a critical aspect of their spread. Dr. Goodin talks about the unusual molecular aspects of the virus, plus the reasons he enjoys researching coffee, as it is a high-value crop that helps farmers in the developing world, and is a product enjoyed by people worldwide. Nat Graham is a Graduate Student in the University of Missouri Biology Department.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Collection Museums 66 mins – “We talk about the significance of collection museums with Emily Grasile, Chief Curiosity Correspondent at the Field Museum; Shannon Bennett, Chief of Science at the California Academy of Sciences; and Jack Dumbacher, chairman and curator of the California Academy of Science’s Department of Ornithology and Mammalogy.” At the link find the title, “143 The Stories That Collection Museums Hold, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files d3ff72b8-cccf-498d-b855-9e08418f0b51.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Connect to the Land 58 mins – “Can we return to the primitive? Miles Olson on personal rewilding. Asoka Bandarage on the “middle way” out of collapse. Organic grow and cook with Barbara Damrosch of Four Season Farm.” At the link find the title, “Radio Ecoshock: Civilization: Change It or Leave It (Replay),” Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files ES_130612_Show_LoFi.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyclone Winston 13 mins – “Cyclone Winston is the worst storm ever recorded in the southern hemisphere. It had sustained winds of 185 miles an hour and killed 42 people. It also destroyed thousands of homes in Fiji, left many people without water and electricity and forced tens of thousands of Fijians to live in evacuation centers. Irshad Hussain, a radio station manager in Fiji, talks to Broadcast Committee member Irv Chapman about his experience surviving the category 5 storm. He was at the station when the cyclone hit on February 20, damaging the station’s antenna and knocking it off the air in parts of the Pacific Islands. Hussain explains in detail what it was like when the cyclone hit, how the media have covered the story and how Fiji is recovering.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Approval Process 17 mins – “The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has embraced a new model of drug testing and marketing called “adaptive pathways”, allowing new drugs for “unmet medical needs” to be launched on the market faster, on the basis of fewer data. While industry claims this is necessary, an analysis on thebmj.com looks at the assumptions underlying the new pathway, and raises concerns about the negative impact on patient safety and the cost of healthcare.” At the link find the title, “A maladaptive pathway to drug approval, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 278961505-bmjgroup-a-maladaptive-pathway-to-drug-approval.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Controls 58 mins – “100 years since the first UK drug law, we explore the controversial and confusing science behind the drugs debate. From the brain basis of addiction to how ecstasy could treat anxiety, what are the implications of the world’s war on drugs?” At the link right-click “Download as mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Costs 58 mins – “…Get tips on how you can save money on your medicines from Lisa Gill of Best Buy Drugs at Consumer Reports. The websites she mentioned are GoodRx.com and BlinkHealth.com. Vinay Prasad, MD, describes how critical treatments such as those for cancer or hepatitis C came to cost so much. He has objected to the superlatives used to promote these medications to physicians as well as to the public (JAMA Oncology, Jan., 2016). This Week’s Guests: Lisa Gill is deputy content editor of Best Buy Drugs for Consumer Reports. The website is http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/health/prescription-drugs/best-buy-drugs/index.htm The article, Is There a Cure for High Drug Prices? was published in the August 2016 issue of Consumer Reports. Vinay Prasad, MD, MPH, is assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Hematology Oncology in the Knight Cancer Institute. He is also a senior scholar in the Center for Health Care Ethics in the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Oregon Health and Sciences University. His website is http://www.vinayakkprasad.com/ Dr. Prasad is co-author, with Adam Cifu, MD, of the book, Ending Medical Reversal: Improving Outcomes, Saving Lives.” At the link find the title, “Show 1046: How to Save Money on Prescription Drugs, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files PP-1046SavingMoneyOnMeds.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electrifying America 57 mins – “The modern day Edisons have done their job. We need not wait any longer. We are poised to wake up to a world running completely on renewable energy. Waiting any longer is like saying we shouldn’t have used the personal computer in 1985 until the smartphone was invented. In their new book, “All-Electric America,” authors S. DAVID FREEMAN, former utility CEO, and LEAH Y PARKS, a journalist in the electricity industry, explain how making the transition to an all-electric, all renewable society by the year 2050 is necessary, practical, and achievable. An energy infrastructure powered by the sun and wind and running on electricity, for all our energy needs, will be reliable, cleaner, safer, and CHEAPER. It will be superior to the system we have today and will lead to a better future.” At the link right-click Download MP3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exoplanets 28 mins – “Has another Earth been discovered? by Ian Woolf
Chris Tinney talks about exo-planets – what they are, and how we find them.
Why is Earth called Earth? by Fred Watson
“ At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Nations Discrimination 22 mins – “The killing of Colten Boushie, a 22-year-old Indigenous man shot dead on a farmyard near Biggar, Sask. has set off a firestorm of hate-filled response online. Many are not surprised saying the death exposes long-simmering racial tensions in Saskatchewan.” At the link find the title, “Racial tensions flare in Sask. following killing of 22-year-old First Nations man, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160816_54984.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forest Systems 15 mins – “’A forest is much more than what you see,’ says ecologist Suzanne Simard. Her 30 years of research in Canadian forests have led to an astounding discovery — trees talk, often and over vast distances. Learn more about the harmonious yet complicated social lives of trees and prepare to see the natural world with new eyes.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geoengineering 25 mins – “Australian author Clive Hamilton on geoengineering & his new book “Earthmasters”. Plots by big oil, Bill Gates & nuke scientists. Shocking new science shows Arctic could melt at current carbon levels.” At the link MP3 download the MP3 as the segment linked to Clive Hamilton and “Earthmasters”. Right-click and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geoengineering 60 mins – “Can geo-engineering help us stave off even more dramatic climate disruption? Dr. Field and Dr. Neudermans will be interviewed by Gerald Harris, chair of The Commonwealth Club’s Science & Technology member-led forum. He will inquire about the latest approaches to geo-engineering to address climate change, the need for such work, the risks involved and the potential benefits. Mr. Harris has been consulting to the electric power industry on long-term planning for more 25 years and has been an executive at both Bechtel Engineers and Pacific Gas & Electric Company.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grand Canyon Rapids Ride 33 mins – “Each summer, the National Center for Science Education organizes a boat trip down the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon to bring visitors face to wall-face with striking examples of geologic and evolutionary processes.” At the link find the title, “Grand Canyon Rapids Ride for Evolution Education, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Party Candidate 47 mins – “As Bernie Sanders was at the Democratic convention in Philadelphia beseeching his backers to throw their support to Hillary Clinton or risk a Donald Trump presidency, Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein was outside with another message: Don’t compromise. Vote for me. Vote for a Green New Deal. Stein wants college debt forgiveness, free tuition, Medicare for all and an emergency transition to green energy, food, transportation. This hour On Point, the Green Party’s Jill Stein.” At the link right-click the tiny arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Security 60 mins – “Margot Hirsch, President, Smart Tech Challenges Foundation Matt Drange, Technology and Business Writer, Forbes With federal standards for smart guns coming this fall, along with grants for law enforcement to purchase smart firearms, there is renewed interest in technology to prevent the harm done when guns fall into the wrong hands. Each year there are 20,000 injuries and deaths caused by accidental shootings and teen suicides, nearly all of which advocates say could be prevented with personalized firearms. A recent Johns Hopkins study found that 6 in 10 Americans support the development of smart gun technologies, including modifications to the existing 300 million guns in America today—a rare middle ground politically.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Haptic for Blind 21 mins – “The new generation of watch. Ian Macrae demonstrates a watch which uses Haptic technology and enables you to tell the time by a series of vibrations. Tom Walker goes to Salford to meet Paralympic swimmer Hannah Russell as she makes her final preparations for Rio. She’ll be competing in the Fifty and One Hundred metres Freestyle, and the One Hundred metres backstroke. She made her Paralympic debut aged sixteen at London 2012, walking away with three medals. What can she achieve this time round?“ At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Complications 16 mins – “Skylar Bayer’s dreams of a career in scientific scuba diving are put in jeopardy when her heart begins acting strangely. Skylar Bayer is a PhD candidate studying the secret sex lives of scallops in the great state of Maine. Due to a mishap involving a fisherman, buckets of gonads, and an unlocked Chevy, she once lost all her research samples, but gained a segment on The Colbert Report. She has also appeared as a guest on MPBN’s Maine Calling and manages the blog and podcast, Strictlyfishwrap. Skylar has produced and hosted shows for The Story Collider throughout Maine.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Development 61 mins – “Myths. We tend to think they’re a thing of the past, fabrications that early humans needed to believe in because their understanding of the world was so meagre. But what if modern civilisation were itself based on a set of myths? This is the big question posed by Professor Yuval Noah Harari, author of ‘Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind’, which has become one of the most talked about bestsellers of recent years. In this exclusive appearance for Intelligence Squared, Harari argued that all political orders are based on useful fictions which have allowed groups of humans, from ancient Mesopotamia through to the Roman empire and modern capitalist societies, to cooperate in numbers far beyond the scope of any other species.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Incubator History 28 mins – “The story of the premature babies in incubators on display in amusement park on Coney Island, and how the man who put them there, Martin Couney, changed attitudes to premature babies and saved countless lives. At Coney Island amusement park between 1903 and 1943 there was an extraordinary exhibit: tiny, premature babies. ‘Dr Martin Couney’s infant incubator’ facility was staffed by nurses in starched white uniforms and if you paid a quarter, you could see the babies in their incubators. Journalist Claire Prentice has been following the story and tracked down some of those babies, now in their 70s, 80s and 90s, who were put in the show. She discovers how Dr Couney brought the incubator to prominence in the USA through World’s Fairs and amusement parks, and explores how a man who was shunned by the medical establishment changed attitudes to premature babies and saved countless lives.” At the link find the title, “Life Under Glass, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p044whml.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Injustice 24 mins – “In an engaging and personal talk — with cameo appearances from his grandmother and Rosa Parks — human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson shares some hard truths about America’s justice system, starting with a massive imbalance along racial lines: a third of the country’s black male population has been incarcerated at some point in their lives. These issues, which are wrapped up in America’s unexamined history, are rarely talked about with this level of candor, insight and persuasiveness.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Common Sense 47 mins – “In this radio interview with Ken Roberts, of Ken’s Bulls and Bears, Paul and Ken discuss an array of essential investor questions and concerns, including the following: Given that investors are at risk of responding emotionally to what’s going on in market, what should they do to keep their emotions in check? What are the simple investment decisions that can have the biggest impact on future returns? What is the best mix of stocks and bonds? Is there a point that we can have too much diversification? Why not make an attempt to protect our money against huge losses? What are the risks of taking too little risk? What investments aren’t worth the risk? How important is it to understand your investment expenses and their long term impact on returns? Why shouldn’t investors try to beat the market.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link kAs” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Recruiting 47 mins – “‘New York Times’ reporter Rukmini Callimachi says ISIS’ recruiting efforts focus on both the “mentally unwell” and those who have been “radicalized since birth.” At the link find the title, “August 11, 2016, Inside ISIS’ Movement To Spread Terror ‘All Over The World’” click the cricle with three dots and select “Download” from the pop-up menu.

Manhattan Project 60 mins – “This week, we’re looking back at a previous episode and learning about the power and peril of the atom, with two books about women who were instrumental in helping us unlock its secrets. We’re joined by Huffington Post editor Shelley Emling, to discuss her book “Marie Curie and Her Daughters: The Private Lives of Science’s First Family.” And we’ll speak to author Denise Kiernan about her book, “The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Manufacturing Decline 56 mins – “Both major candidates have promised to revive manufacturing jobs. We look at the root causes of its decline, including imports and automation. We explore what it would take to renew this sector, both in the U.S. and in New Hampshire, and identify the challenges in creating manufacturing jobs here in the state. Dean Spiliotes is guest host.” (4 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meatless Future 42 mins – “Today we go to a future where animal products are banned. What are the arguments for and against? How does banning meat impact different cultures? Does it help or hurt the environment? Can you really grow meat in a lab? And is that meat vegan? would really go down.” At the link find the title, “Where’s The Beef? Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation P1 87 mins – “Does the science live up to the hype? Dr. Rck Hecht, the director of research at the UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine looks at the effects of meditation on health and behavior. Recorded on 05/12/2016. (#31006)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation P2 88 mins – “Mindfulness is the practice of maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of one’s thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and environment. Dr. Kevin Barrows, the Director of Mindfulness Programs at the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine and a Clinical Professor at UCSF. explores mind-body medicine, with a special focus on the application of mindfulness practice in health care settings Recorded on 05/19/2016. (#31007)”” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mediterranean Diet 58 mins – “The Zone diet popularized by Dr. Barry Sears was one of the earliest to emphasize the importance of balancing protein, fat and carbohydrate consumption at every meal. Dr. Sears pioneered the idea that the food we eat is more powerful than any drug in controlling the activity of multiple hormones in our bodies. Many studies have pointed to the value of a Mediterranean diet for reducing heart disease, stroke, dementia and other chronic diseases. How does a Mediterranean diet affect inflammation? And what is a real Mediterranean diet? There are lots of countries around the Mediterranean sea, and typical meals and favorite foods vary from one to another. One thing the entire region has in common is a preference for vegetables and fruits rich in phytonutrients that give them strong flavors and bright colors. How do our bodies react to the colors on our plates and the flavors on our tongues? According to Dr. Sears, minimizing white foods (flour, sugar, shortening) as much as we can helps to control blood sugar and reduce inflammation, so long as we pay attention to the Zone way of eating. Find out about the power of polyphenols from plant foods and the importance of omega 3 fats to maintain good health for life. According to Dr. Sears, all we need is to use a hand, an eye and a watch to set ourselves up for success on the Mediterranean Zone. The ratios he mentions on the show are the ratio of triglycerides to HDL cholesterol (<1 is best) and the ratio of arachidonic acid (AA) to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Ideally, says Dr. Sears, AA/EPA is between 1.5 and 2.” At the link find the title, “Show 989: The Mediterranean Zone Diet (Archive), Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files PP-989MedZoneArchive.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Health 87 mins – “Dr. Descartes Li looks at how we understand mental disorders, cultural factors and the criteria used in the DSM-5. Dr. Li is the director of the UCSF Bipolar Program and co-director of the UCSF Electroconvulsive Therapy Service. Recorded on 05/11/2016. (#31000)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mormen Voters 52 mins – “…we’re putting Utah’s voters under the microscope, and we’re particularly curious about what motivates the state’s Mormon electorate. Utah has long been a sure bet for the Republican Party. This year, the party’s presidential candidate is putting Utah’s partisan loyalty to the test. But where does that loyalty come from? What matters most to the state’s electorate? And are voters here really all that different from the average American? A panel of guests will join us, and we hope you will, too.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muslim Misunderstandings 66 mins – “Get inside of Carla Power’s eye-opening story of how she and her longtime friend Sheikh Mohammad Akram Nadwi found a way to confront ugly stereotypes and persistent misperceptions that were cleaving their communities. Their friendship—between a secular American and a madrasa-trained sheikh—had always seemed unlikely, but now they were frustrated and bewildered by the battles being fought in their names. Both knew that a close look at the Quran would reveal a faith that preached peace and not mass murder; respect for women and not oppression. And so they embarked on a year-long journey through the controversial text.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nanotoxicology 26 mins – “Keith & Russ talk with Jason White, from the Department of Analytical Chemistry at the Connecticut Agricultural Experimental Station. White talks about testing the toxicity of nanomaterials against plants. He has found that smaller particles of nanomaterials such as silver tend to be more toxic than larger particles, especially when they begin to accumulate.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nora Ephron 42 mins – ““A Few Words About Breasts,” from May 1972, is Nora Ephron’s comic lament about how her late onset of puberty and earliest sexual experiences gave her a lifelong obsession with her breasts. Jessi Klein, head writer for “Inside Amy Schumer,” joins David Brancaccio to discuss Ephron’s famous Esquire story and its lasting influence on the way women perceive and voice themselves in writing and comedy.” At the link find the title, “A Few Words About Breasts, by Nora Ephron, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13153/4150951/A-Few-Words-About-Breasts-by-Nora-Ephron-repeat.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Production P2 23 mins – “Second of five episodes. Oil is priced down to the penny, and the price changes every day. Who sets that price?” At the link find the title, “Oil #2: The Price Of Oil, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160812 pmoney_podcast081216.mp3” and select “Save LinkAs from the pop-up menu.

Oil Production P3 27 mins – “Third of five episodes. The Planet Money oil faces a test, we sell it, and we meet the man who set off the fracking boom in America.” At the link find the title, “Oil #3: How Fracking Changed the World, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160817 pmoney_podcast081716.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Olympic Game Sites 22 mins – “Despite some headaches, The Rio 2016 Olympic Games appear to be a success so far. But what will happen when the world moves on? Will Rio be dotted with abandoned venues like in Athens? Maybe it’s time for a permanent Olympic Games site?” At the link find the title, “Should the Olympic Games have a permanent venue? Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160817_63453.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Olympic Minds 28 mins – “In Rio athletes from around the world have spent years training and they know that to get gold it’s essential to keep it together mentally in those crucial minutes or even seconds that will make all the difference. In the second of her series on the Olympic Mind, Claudia Hammond is looking at the psychology of losing that edge. Why is it that for athletes at the peak of their performance, sometimes it can all go wrong – very wrong. Just think of the England football team which has on many occasions missed penalties at a crucial time. To find out what happens in the mind at these all-important moments Claudia has been to talk to Professor Geir Jourdet at the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences. He explains how he helps footballers deal with performance stress. Former country cricketer and psychologist Steve Sylvester also talks to Claudia about how he has helped individual sportspeople overcome their fear of failing at key moments. Claudia meets the coaching team at the Norwegian Premier League football club, Lillestrom, as they consider how to use psychology to help them get back to winning matches….” At the link find the title, “Olympic Minds: Football, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p045013p.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Osteoporosis 89 mins – “Age-related bone and joint injuries are increasing as the population ages. Dr. Eric Meinberg looks at managing osteoporosis and its complications and Dr. Paul Toogoodlooks at broken hips and discuses joint replacement. Recorded on 05/31/2016. (#30990)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Planetary Science 14 mins – “’Venus is too hot, Mars is too cold, and Earth is just right,’ says planetary scientist Dave Brain. But why? In this pleasantly humorous talk, Brain explores the fascinating science behind what it takes for a planet to host life — and why humanity may just be in the right place at the right time when it comes to the timeline of life-sustaining planets.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Party Policy 45 mins – “On the eve of the Republican national convention in Cleveland, Aaron Blake of The Washington Post provides an insider’s look at the 2016 elections, with previews of both the GOP and Democratic conventions.” At the link find the title, “Election 2016 Update With The Washington Post’s Aaron Blake, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files IM_20160716.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Trends 48 mins – “[Wall Street Journal] political columnist Kimberley Strassel argues that the left is trying to usurp the political process.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Kimberley Strassel, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.445854.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politics by Fukuyama 65 mins – “Professor Fukuyama presents the keynote lecture of our special August series, Big Solutions for Big Problems. He asks whether our current “vetocracy” has made it easier to stop our government from doing anything than to accomplish something for the common good. Meanwhile, the presidential race has caused a lot of apprehension. The Republican Party has succumbed to Donald Trump’s hostile takeover, and the ultra-insider Hillary Clinton had to face surprisingly strong competition from Vermont socialist Bernie Sanders. Whatever the issue—from immigration to financial reform to trade to stagnating incomes—large numbers of voters from both ends of the spectrum have rejected what they see as a corrupt, self-dealing establishment, and turned instead to radical outsiders in the hopes of a purifying cleanse. But is that what we will be getting?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in America 52 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Department of Sociology, and titled “Foundational Violence: U.S. Settler Colonial Articulation of Racialized and Gendered Citizenship.” Our speaker is Evelyn Nakano Glenn, Graduate School Professor and founding Director of the Center for Race and Gender at the University of California, Berkeley.” At the link right-click the tiny arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racist Book 47 mins – “Historian Charles Dew was born in 1937 and grew up in St. Petersburg, Florida. His parents, along with every white person he knew, believed without question in the inherent inferiority of black Americans and in the need for segregation. In a new memoir, “The Making of a Racist,” he describes what he learned as a child and how he gradually overthrew those beliefs. Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Isabel Wilkerson details the crushing realities of the Jim Crow South from the other side of the color line. In her 2010 book, “The Warmth of Other Suns,” she documents the migration of black families in the 1930s, 40s and 50s in search of better lives in the North and in the West. Charles Dew and Isabel Wilkerson join us to talk about racism in American, then and now.” (2 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Railroad Across Panama 4 mins – “…Typically, a combination steam and sailing ship would leave New York and make the 2000-mile journey to Panama. The overland trip through terrible mosquito infested jungles from Atlantic to Pacific was only 47 miles, but it took the better part of a week. Then another ship made the 3500-mile trip to San Francisco. That 47-mile leg was a huge impediment, and these businessmen set out to replace it with a rail link….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save link As” from the pop-

Right to Die 57 mins – “Andrew Denton addresses the National Press Club in Canberra on the topic of assisted dying.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Andrew Denton, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_Denton_1008_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sand Usage 47 mins – “Sand is essential for modern construction. Almost every new office tower, road and shopping mall being built in Asia’s booming cities is made with concrete mixed with sand. And to get more sand, companies and people are pulling sand out of rivers and oceans at an unprecedented rate, say scientists. And in the deep ocean waters off the U.S., sand is being excavated to restore coastlines from Louisiana to New Jersey. Some estimate that extracting sand is a $70-billion industry. Diane and a panel of guests take a look at the increasing demand for sand, and concerns about the impact of dredging on river and ocean life worldwide.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Satire 36 mins – “In the political turmoil of mid-1990s Britain, a brilliant young comic named Harry Enfield set out to satirize the ideology and politics of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. His parodies became famous. He wrote and performed a vicious sendup of the typical Thatcherite nouveau riche buffoon. People loved it. And what happened? Exactly the opposite of what Enfield hoped would happen. In an age dominated by political comedy, “The Satire Paradox” asks whether laughter and social protest are friends or foes.” At the link right-click “Download” for Episode 10 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Abuse Case 52 mins – “Reporter Tennessee Watson was sexually abused by her gymnastics coach when she was a kid. Over 25 years later, when she learned he still was coaching children, she called the police. Her inside account of the arduous process of seeking justice in her own case exposes discrepancies in prosecutors’ responses to reports of child sexual abuse and spotlights a lack of accountability.” At the link find the title, “Dropped and dismissed: Child sex abuse lost in the system, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files Dropped-and-dismissed_Child-sex-abuse-lost-in-the-system_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Assaults in College 63 mins – “Are the current policies and laws in place regarding sexual assault on college campuses and in the broader community working as intended? The public is in deep public debate over the issue of sexual assault and whether existing standards are fair and meet their intended goals of educating and protecting students and the public-at-large, supporting survivors and holding college and communities accountable. Join INFORUM for a powerful panel discussion about the issue of sexual assault with leaders across the legal, academic, government and advocacy fields who are all playing a pivotal role in shaping how sexual assault is addressed on college campuses and beyond.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment at Fox 49 mins – “In 2005, Gretchen Carlson began working for Fox News. She rose through the ranks to become host of her own show, “The Real Story.” But in June, Fox News declined to renew her contract. A few weeks later, Carlson sued Roger Ailes, alleging the Fox News chief fired her because she refused his sexual advances. Ailes denies the allegations but has since left the network. Since then, more than 20 women have come forward with stories about Ailes sexually harassing them on the job. And investigators are now looking at what other Fox News executives knew about Ailes’s behavior. Diane and guests discuss the case against Roger Ailes and the challenges of confronting sexual harassment in the workplace.” (5 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Sonic Pi 80 mins – “Sam Aaron, the creator of Sonic Pi, explains how he live codes music on the Raspberry Pi, and teaches Leo some simple musical code.” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sports Science 34 mins – “David Epstein talks about his 2013 bestseller The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance and his recent Scientific American article “Magic Blood and Carbon-Fiber Legs at the Brave New Olympics.” At the link find the title, “Big Bang of Body Types: Sports Science at the Olympics and beyond, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Standing in Line 34 mins – “Standing in line represents a particularly sloppy – and frustrating – way for supply and demand to meet. Why haven’t we found a better way to get what we want? Is it possible that we secretly enjoy waiting in line? And might it even be (gulp) good for us?” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startups in Israel 62 mins – “A distinguished panel discusses the impressive contributions the tiny state of Israel (known as the Start Up Nation) has made in finding and sharing solutions to big problems threatening the environment, health and economies throughout the world. In particular, DCG Baer speaks to how the government supports Israeli technology, research and development, as well as assisting other societies, such as California with our drought.” (3 guests) At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stroke Research 28 minsWe’ve sent astronauts into outer space, but travelling to the inner space of the human body still remains the stuff of science fiction – or does it? A unique collaboration between art and science is now taking scientists and stroke patients on an immersive 3D journey inside the human body for an interactive experience designed to help foster research and education.” At the link right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syria-Russia-US 48 mins – “The U.S. under Barack Obama did not want to get too involved in Syria’s civil war. Russia did. Moscow moved in heavy last fall on the side of Syrian leader Bashar al Assad — who Washington said had to go. Now, Syria’s civil war is a kind of U.S.-Russia proxy war. With Cold War echoes, big new wrinkles, and a lot on the line. It’s raging right now in Aleppo. This hour On Point, the stakes. U.S. and Russian proxies, raging in Syria.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the tiny arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Archaeology 48 mins – “’Archaeology is supposed to be fun and interesting and apolitical and those are the reasons I love it, but none of this is now.’ Archaeologists like Jesse Casana have lived and worked on sites throughout Syria for years. He describes his feelings about the fate of friends and colleagues left behind. The excavation at Tell Qarqur that he oversaw before the war has now been bulldozed, but he says, “It seems like a fairly small concern compared to the human tragedy unfolding before our eyes.” Tell Qarqur is not the only monument of archaeological interest that has been destroyed. The statue of an 11th Century Arabic poet, atheist and vegetarian, al-Ma’arri, was decapitated Islamic militants in 2013. And Aleppo, thought to be the oldest city in the world, is now in ruins. Its sights are remembered fondly by the people who lived there including the elegant, 1000 year old mineret of the Great Mosque destroyed in April 2013.” At the link find the title, “The Museum of Lost Objects: Bombed and Bulldozed in Syria, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0456sbr.mp3” and select “Save Link Ass” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorist Security 48 mins – “After the 9/11 attacks, the government re-organized dozens of federal agencies and spent almost a trillion dollars to protect the country from terrorism. In the last 15 years, the overall FBI budget nearly tripled to fund counter-terrorism efforts. Intelligence sharing among federal agencies improved. And airport security was strengthened. But are we safer? With emerging threats of lone-wolf killers inspired by the Islamic State, national security and intelligence experts warn we will never be completely safe. A look at the strengths and weaknesses of homeland security and counter-terrorism today.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Tom Hayden 60 mins – “There are undercurrents of new movements in many countries. When and how does social change arise? On July 3rd, 2008 I recorded this speech by legendary American activist Tom Hayden. The speech was broadcast in Vancouver, but this is it’s first appearance on Radio Ecoshock. I call it “Birth of Movements”. With Trump and Sanders, or new parties in Europe, this 2008 speech by California activist Tom Hayden is important. Hayden was a founder of Students for a Democratic Society in the 60’s, was one of the Chicago Seven, and with his wife Jane Fonda was an early environmental activist. I recorded this speech at the University of British Columbia, following student protests there.” At the link find the title, “Radio Ecoshock: Tom Hayden – Birth of Movements, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files ES_160817_LoFi.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tourism in America 57 mins – “In this episode of BackStory, Peter, Ed and Brian explore the history of American tourism. We’ll hear how asylums and prisons were popular tourist destinations in the 19th century, and how the tiny community of Gettysburg, PA became a tourist town just days after the bloody battle. We’ll also look back on a western mountain resort that catered exclusively to black Americans during the era of segregated travel, and we’ll explore the links between tourism and the development of a national identity.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkish Spring 46 mins – “The failed military coup in Turkey has led to a government crackdown that’s purged more than 60,000 people from their jobs – judges, police, academics, reporters, military members. The Turkish president says he’s simply protecting his country, but US officials say that’s no way for a democracy to react. Meanwhile, Turkey claims a Turk living in exile in Pennsylvania orchestrated the coup and wants him extradited. It all makes for messy international politics.” (4 guests) At the link right-click the tiny arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Unconscious Mind 52 mins – “NPR’s Shankar Vedantam says that in some ways, human behavior is the ultimate frontier of science. After all, there’s a lot we don’t know about why behave the way we do. But if we can get a glimpse at the unconscious patterns that influence us, Vedantam argues we have the potential to make big changes in our lives and our world. Shankar Vedantam is host of the popular podcast Hidden Brain, and Tuesday, he joins us to explain how science and storytelling can improve the human experience. Shankar Vedantam is NPR’s social science correspondent and host of the Hidden Brain podcast. He’s also the author of The Hidden Brain: How Our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars, and Save Our Lives.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Violent Crime in America 60 mins – “Barry Latzer talked about his book The Rise and Fall of Violent Crime in America, in which tracks violent crime in America from the 1960’s through the 21st century and examines the factors behind the surge and downturns in violent crime. He was interviewed by Samuel Bieler of the Urban Institute’s Justice Policy Center. “ At the link you can listen or purchase the file. A copy is also included in the blog archive.

Vitamania 52 mins – “To many people, the term “vitamin” is shorthand for “health,” and so the more vitamins we consume, the healthier we’ll be. But what exactly do the 13 dietary chemicals we call vitamins actually do for our bodies? And how much of each vitamin do we need? The journalist Catherine Price went looking for answers to these basic questions. What she learned undermines much of what we thought we knew about nutrition. She joins us Thursday to talk about our quest for better health through nutrition perfection. Catherine Price has written for numerous publications, including the New York Times, Mother Jones, and Outside. Her book is called Vitamania: Our Obsessive Quest for Nutritional PerfectionAt the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vocational Education 46 mins – “The term “vocational education” has a reputation problem, triggering memories of shop classes and cosmetology courses that led to menial, low-paying jobs. But voc-ed has been re-branded. It’s now “career and technical education,” and supporters say it’s the ideal alternative to crippling college debt and worthless bachelor’s degrees. This is skills-based training for high-quality jobs, from audio engineering to welding to commercial diving. This hour On Point: the case for vocational training, sometimes instead of a college degree.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the tiny arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voice of America 47 mins – “Communicators visits Voice of America and several international broadcasting agencies sponsored by the Broadcasting Board of Governors to learn about their operations and how they create a U.S. message about news to send to other countries.” At the link find the title, “Communicators at Voice of America, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.439248.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Treatment 12 mins – “Our poop and pee have superpowers, but for the most part we don’t harness them. Molly Winter faces down our squeamishness and asks us to see what goes down the toilet as a resource, one that can help fight climate change, spur innovation and even save us money.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Treatment Problems 27 mins – Tackling Lead Contamination: Flint and Beyond (start time: 6:27) When you pour yourself a glass of water from the tap, do wonder whether it’s truly clean and safe? How would you know for sure? Flint, Mich., is a haunting example of how a breakdown in water-supply infrastructure, and political integrity, can result in lead contamination of a city’s tap water. Last year, thanks to the dogged investigation of an environmental engineer from Virginia, all of us nationwide were rattled by the disclosure that Flint residents were drinking poisoned tap water and that their city and federal officials were doing little to disclose the problem, much less tackle it. Since then, lead-poisoning outbreaks have emerged in Portland, Ore., Cleveland, Ohio, and elsewhere. Dr. Marc Edwards is the Virginia Tech professor who led the investigation in Flint, and previous water-contamination probes, most notably in Washington, D.C. He talks with How On Earth host Susan Moran about the public health, political and racial-justice facets of the Flint water crisis, and how many more similar crises around the country can be prevented in the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White House Slaves 59 mins – “Q&A with Jesse Holland Jesse Holland talked about his book, The Invisibles: The Untold Story of African American Slaves in the White House. At the link you can listen or purchase the file. A copy is also included in the blog archive.

Wildlife Photographer 21 mins – “Wildlife filmmaker John Aitchison has made his living watching predators stalk their prey. He joins The Current to talk about the beauty, brutality and inevitability of nature and shares what he’s learned watching for the perfect shot.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: ‘We have an obligation to care for nature,’ says wildlife filmmaker, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160819_32609.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wind Turbines Offshore 5 mins – “Construction on the five-turbine, $250 million project will finish this summer. When the wind farm starts generating power late this year, it will be the first to operate off the coast of the US. As offshore wind gets its start here, project developers have leaned heavily on expertise from Europe, where offshore wind has a 25-year head start….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WW II Tobruk and Stalin 50 mins – “Gen. Auchinleck’s Operation Crusader is finally launched, but Rommel does not react as predicted as his focus is still on taking Tobruk. AND Tsar Nicholas II guides Russia through the Great War. At its end, Stalin is freed.” At the link find the title, “Episode 167-Operation Crusader Part 3 & Episode 168-Stalin and The Great War, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files Ep_168-81416_2.58_PM.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus Research 67 mins – “Dr. Michael Diamond, 2016 Elizabeth O. King Lecturer, has worked for the past two decades investigating how viruses work, with a goal of defining basic principles of pathogenesis and host immune restriction. His talk in this podcast focuses on how his laboratory has studied three emerging mosquito-transmitted viruses (West Nile, Chikungunya, and Zika viruses) of global importance from a basic perspective, and how this information facilitates the development of diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines.” At the link right-click “MP3 Audio Only (65 megs” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 249 – Aug 19, 2016: Abu Ghraib Interrogator, Adopted Child, Afghanistani Refugee, Aging Population, AI for Therapy, Ancient Latin, Animal Welfare Program, Artificial Sweeteners, Athletic Stress, Attorney Fees, Ballot Box Laws, Blindness Onset, Brain Stimulating Drugs, Brain Surgery in Tanzania, Brain Swelling for Research, Brazilian Wealth, Brexit Britain, Canadian Nationalist, Cancer Pioneer, Class in America, Cloud Storage Failure, Darian Gap, David Attenborough, Death Fraud, Decision Making, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, Diamond Auction Failure, Disabled Doctor, Down Syndrome Test, Drought in California, Drought in New Hampshire, Economic Problems for Families, Editorial Cartoonist, Electronics Repairman, Epilepsy, Evilness, Food Hazards, Fracking, Fungal Network, Ghrelin, Green Party, Guns, Harambe Meme, Hurricane Threats, Intelligence Operations, Jello, Judy Blume on Puberty, Justice System Improvement, Kombucha Culture, Koramatsu WWII Case, Losing Aftermath, Machine Learning, Malawi’s Big Charity, Melatonin, Mennonites, Moral Monday, Mug Shot Scam, Obamacare and Same Sex Marriage, Obamacare in Court, Oil Business, Olympic Champions, Olympic Issues, Paleo Doctor, Patty Hearst, Performance Coach, Police Incidents Discussion, Policing the Police, Political Polarization, Productivity, PTSD, Quora Founder, Refugee Life, Religious Minority Freedom, Residential Canadian Schools, Rosenwald Schools, Russian Influence, Salton Sea, Seed Science, Slavery, Statin Pros and Cons, Suicide Story, Surgeon Shortage, Third Political Party, Tornado Aftermath, Tornado Aircraft, Trans Kids, Trans Pacific Partnership, Undercover Work Ethics, Visual Communication, Voting Access Laws, War Medicine, Washboard Bill, Witchcraft Book, Women and Power, Women in Politics, Women’s Entrepreneurship, Yoga History, Zika, Zora Neale Hurston

The 102 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 266 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 1o,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded.

Abu Ghraib Interrogator 60 mins – “Eric Fair talks about his experiences serving as an interrogator at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. He is interviewed by Raha Wala, director of National Security Advocacy for Human Rights First.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Eric Fair, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.438889.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Adopted Child 21 mins – “Phyllis Whitsell’s birth mother was incapable of giving her answers so Whitsell embarked on a journey where only one of them knew the other’s identity.” At the link find the title,”ENCORE: Nurse tracks down birth mother, cares for her without revealing identity. Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160802_78881.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Afghanistan Refugee 20 mins – “Gulwali Passarlay’s mother paid traffickers to get him out of Afghanistan in what became a journey of suffering, abuse and occasional kindness.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: A 12-year-old refugee’s harrowing escape from Afghanistan, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160809_71063.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Population 46 mins – “In an aging nation, what makes an age-friendly community? We look at what U.S. cities can do to help seniors live better.” At the link find the title, “Designing Communities For An Aging America, Aug, 2016”right-click “Media files npr_488393616.mp3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI for Therapy 28 mins – “Now that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs recognizes post-traumatic stress disorder as a significant issue among veterans, they’ve uncovered another problem—there aren’t enough therapists to go around. Virtual reality experts at the University of Southern California have a solution: robots. Reporter Anna Stitt explains how advocates see these “therapy bots” as enhancing the field of therapy; they don’t tire out, they don’t need a salary, and patients are often more honest with them than human therapists. The only problem? Some people are worried that these therapy bots will one day replace humans. Fears of artificial intelligence aren’t new, but they do seem increasingly common. Elon Musk declared that creating artificial intelligence is akin to “summoning the demon.” And Hollywood has done a solid job of convincing us that we’re approaching an age of artificial superintelligence—when machines’ capabilities will greatly exceed those of humans. We turned to philosopher and University of California, Berkeley professor John Searle to get his take on how realistic these concerns are. He says he takes the threat just as seriously as if someone said “shoes have been walked on for centuries. Any day now, they might come out of the closet and walk all over us.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Ancient Latin 24 mins – “A classics scholar is the the first to investigate centuries-old manuals on how to learn Latin, what she reveals about life in the ancient world may surprise you.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Translations of ancient Latin give unique insights into Roman culture, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160803_96492.mp3” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Animal Welfare Program 54 mins- “For those who eat animal products, there is a growing demand for assurances that the animals are treated humanely. Packaging for products like eggs, milk, cheese and meat are replete with phrases like, ‘free range,’ ‘cage free,’ and ‘pasture fed.’ But consumers who do their homework soon learn that those phrases may not mean what we envision, and may not ensure that the animals producing our food are well cared for. Today we’ll be joined by Andrew Gunther of the Animal Welfare Approved -AWA- certification program, whose food labeling standards have been named by Consumer Reports as the only ‘highly meaningful’ food label for farm animal welfare, outdoor access and sustainability. AWA is an independent, nonprofit farm certification program–and one of the nation’s Top 5 fastest growing food label claims. We will also be joined by Sarah Hoffman, founder of Green Dirt Farm, MO who will give us the farmer’s perspective on what it means to enact and maintain the standards of AWA.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Sweeteners 29 mins – “Proponents say they are safe and prevent diseases like diabetes, while critics say they may cause a variety of health problems. With so much conflicting information online, GP and guest reporter, Dr Zeeshan Arain unpacks the science on artificial sweeteners and how they impact or benefit our health….” At the link right-click “download video mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Athletic Stress 25 mins – “Between 1977 and 1987, Edwin Moses won 122 consecutive races in the men’s 400-meter hurdles—including his second Olympic gold—in a streak as fantastic and improbable as Joe DiMaggio’s fifty-six-game hitting streak. In his 1987 interview with Moses, Mark Kram, known for writing penetrating and lyrical boxing profiles, probes the champ’s cool, implacable exterior to discover what kind of person can sustain such excellence—and to measure the toll it took. With the Summer Olympics now under way in Rio, Sports Illustrated veteran Tim Layden joins host David Brancaccio to shed further insight on Moses, an enigmatic star who helped usher in the professionalization of what was previously an amateur sport, and who left a record that remains peerless.” At the link find the title, “Edwin Moses, by Mark Kram, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13153/4122992/Edwin-Moses-by-Mark-Kram.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Attorney Fees 54 mins – “Big Solutions to Big Problems, the 2016 August Forum series at the Club, investigates whether excessive legal fees in class action lawsuits can be reined in without eliminating the incentives needed to prosecute such actions. Schonbrun’s talk will discuss the recent California Supreme Court case, Laffitte v. Robert Half Int’l., Inc., which establishes the rules that courts must follow in awarding reasonable attorneys’ fees from class action settlements.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ballot Box Laws 22 mins – “On Ep. 4 of Amicus, a pre-election special. Dahlia sits down with UC Irvine law professor Rick Hasen, founder of Election Law Blog, to survey the landscape of state voter ID laws. They consider the effect of recent headlines on voters’ confidence in elections, as well as the enduring curiosity of judicial elections in America.” At the link find the title, “Amicus: Ballot-Box Special, Nov 2014,” right-click “Media files SM8544863048.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blindness Onset 50 mins – “Joyce welcomes Janice L. Lehrer-Stein, Member of the National Council on Disability -NCD- to the show. NCD is an independent federal agency that advices the President, Congress and other federal agencies regarding policies, programs, practices and procedures that affect people with disabilities. Ms. Lehrer-Stein will discuss her role as a member of NCD and share how her personal journey with disability led her to become an advocate for all Americans with disabilities.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Stimulating Drugs 44 mins – “If you could take a pill that would enhance your concentration, increase your productivity, and reduce your stress levels, would you do it? Or is that cheating? On today’s show, the science and ethics behind a growing class of so-called “smart-drugs” [first half of program]. Plus, a portrait of bias: in the aftermath of the great depression, the WPA commissioned hundreds of interviews with former slaves and descendants of slaves and recorded their stories as part of the Federal Writer’s Project. However, the circumstances under which the interviews were collected have given researchers pause.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Surgery in Tanzania 43 mins – “From Dr. Dilan Ellegala’s mission to bring life-saving surgery within reach of rural Africans, to a panel about the realities of living trans today… This is The Current with Connie Walker.” At the link find the title, “Full Episode for August 11, 2016 – The Current, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160811_80509.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Swelling for Research 13 mins – “Neuroengineer Ed Boyden wants to know how the tiny biomolecules in our brains generate emotions, thoughts and feelings — and he wants to find the molecular changes that lead to disorders like epilepsy and Alzheimer’s. Rather than magnify these invisible structures with a microscope, he wondered: What if we physically enlarge them and make them easier to see? Learn how the same polymers used to make baby diapers swell could be a key to better understanding our brains.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazilian Wealth 21 mins – “With the games underway, journalist Alex Cuadros explains why Brazil’s ultrarich, or “Brazillionaires,” will be the real winners of this Olympiad.” At the link find the title, “How Brazil’s wealthy benefit from the Rio Olympics, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160808_88274.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Britain 45 mins – “This panel session was part of Brexit Britain, an afternoon of debate and discussion produced by BBC Newsnight in partnership with Intelligence Squared at the Royal Geographical Society in London. In this, the second session of the day, Guardian columnist Owen Jones, Kwasi Kwarteng MP, former Northern Ireland secretary Theresa Villiers, and former advisor to the Chancellor Catherine Macleod, discussed the political fallout of the Brexit vote. The discussion was chaired by Newsnight’s political editor Nick Watt.” At the link find the title, “Brexit Britain – Political Fallout, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 276169445-intelligence2-brexit-britain-political-fallout.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Nationalist 57 mins – “For almost fifty years, Mel Hurtig was a prominent voice in any discussion about the country that he loved. Kathleen Flaherty traced Mel Hurtig’s lifelong quest to shape a Canada that he passionately believed in.” At the link find the title, “Citizen Mel, Part 1 (Encore June 22, 2011), Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160805_80257.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Pioneer 139 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Guest: Harold Varmus – The TWiV team is together in New York City for a conversation with Nobel Laureate Harold Varmus about his remarkable career in science.” At the link right-click “Download TWIV400” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Class in America 20 mins- “Author Nancy Isenberg on her book “White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America” and the roles of race and class in this year’s presidential election.” At the link find the title, “Modern American politics and the Untold History of Class in America, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160802_57626.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cloud Storage Failure 51 mins – “Rachel was a faithful user of a photo storage website called Picturelife, until one day all of her photos disappeared. As she investigated, she realized that every Picturelife user was having the same problem. Alex tries to find out if there’s any hope of getting her photos back.” At the link find the title, “#71 The Picture Taker, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT5679995980.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Darien Gap 47 mins – “The Darién Gap, the lawless jungle between Colombia and Panama. Migrants from around the world risk crossing it to get to the U.S.” At the link find the title, “Stories From The Dangerous Darién Gap, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_488547903.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

David Attenborough 22 mins – “David Attenborough has become a household name. His BBC nature documentaries have taken viewers to every part of the globe, sharing the intimate workings of the natural world. It began in 1979 with Life on Earth, and continued with The Living Planet, The Private Life of Plants, The Life of Birds, The Life of Animals and more. Many will remember his close encounter with mountain gorillas who, had they chosen, could have pulled David apart. Luckily for him and us, they didn’t. Gretchen Miller met David Attenborough in his home in London, as he celebrated his 90th birthday. She was joined by her twelve-year-old son Keir who shares his birthday with David. They reflect on David’s life on Earth, the changes he has observed, and the challenges that confront a world full of people.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death Fraud 43 mins – “Today on the show, a writer explores the greatest escape plan: pseudocide… We’ll hear about the global disappearance industry that plots, facilitates and forges documents for fake deaths – and the investigators who track them down. And from Team Refugee to Superfan Mavis, a rundown of Olympic tweets, memes, and illegal gifs… Including a very photogenic Tongan flagbearer.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Decision Making 53 mins – “Today, I am joined by my friend, Mike Lauria, to interview Gary Klein, PhD. Dr. Klein is a masterful cognitive psychologist. He is known for many groundbreaking works, including: the Recognition-Primed Decision (RPD) model to describe how people actually make decisions in natural settings; a Data/Frame model of sensemaking; a Management by Discovery model of planning to handle wicked problems; and a Triple-Path model of insight. He has also developed several research and application methods: The Critical Decision method and Knowledge Audit for doing cognitive task analysis; the PreMortem method of risk assessment; the ShadowBox method for training cognitive skills. He was instrumental in founding the field of Naturalistic Decision Making.” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals 60 mins – “August marks the fourth anniversary of implementation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Since its launch in 2012, DACA has provided a reprieve from deportation and temporary eligibility to work legally in the United States to more than 700,000 young unauthorized immigrants. And in light of the Supreme Court’s recent decision not to allow a more expansive deferred-action initiative for parents to go forward, DACA remains the only large-scale initiative that offers relief from deportation to unauthorized immigrants. This webinar marked the release of a new Migration Policy Institute issue brief that includes the most current estimates of potential DACA beneficiaries, which were generated using data from the 2014 American Community Survey (ACS) and MPI’s unique assignments of unauthorized status to noncitizens in the data….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diamond Auction Failure 21 mins – “The Lesedi La Rona diamond is the size of a tennis ball that some believed would fetch a record breaking multi-million dollar price at auction, but it didn’t — the story behind its failure to sell.” At the link find the title, “Intrigue and greed: the failed auction of a 1,109 carat diamond, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160805_22202.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Doctor 34 mins – “Jeff Gazzara wasn’t going to let his vision stop him from becoming a physician. Learn how he overcame obstacles and some possible biases on his journey.” At the link right-click “Direct download: PMY194.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Down Syndrome Test 29 mins – “At 81, Lee, a professor of genetics, is still running the lab she and her husband founded more than 50 years ago. Len died in 2013. The lab is a quirky place, even by Stanford standards. … the science that’s done here has changed the course of medicine. …Now, at just 10 weeks into a pregnancy, a whole range of things can be revealed with this test. Not just Down syndrome, but a host of other chromosomal abnormalities as well as the sex of the child to be. Until this test, doctors had to rely on amniocentesis, an invasive procedure that involves– inserting a needle in the womb to sample amniotic fluid, or biopsying the placenta — to tell them with any reliability whether a fetus had a chromosomal abnormality. These tests aren’t just uncomfortable, they come with a risk of miscarriage. By some estimates, in the last five years the number of these procedures performed in this country have plummeted by more than 50 percent….” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought in California 59 mins –California storms and droughts are getting more extreme, according to new research from Stanford examining recent rainfall patterns. The result is a new normal, with fewer average years and more dry times and also more wet times. Other forecasters warn that California might be entering an extended period of drought known as a megadrought. Uncertainty about changing rainfall is a challenge for the state’s water system built on the predictable arrival of snow and rain. What is California doing to prepare for bigger storms and droughts? How can an average person use water more efficiently and think about the water embedded in their food? Join us for a conversation about California’s water future in strangely wet and dry times driven in part by the high-pressure system hanging off the coast called the “ridiculously resilient ridge.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought in New Hampshire 56 mins – “The Granite State is experiencing its worst drought in years, with southeastern New Hampshire most affected.  And despite a little rain lately, dry conditions are expected to continue, affecting farms, fish, private wells, plus increasing fire danger. We’ll get the latest, including response from the state’s drought task force.” (5 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Problems for Families 60 mins – “In an increasingly insecure economy, it’s easy to get bogged down with statistics and lose sight of the human costs of the recession. Stanford sociologist and lead researcher for the book Lean In, Marianne Cooper wants to change that. In her new book, Cut Adrift, Cooper weaves together deep data analysis of our frightening economic condition with real-world stories of families struggling to adjust. Hearing from everyone from suburban soccer moms to those struggling to feed their children, we’re given an intimate look at the challenges facing modern families, and how financial anxiety penetrates the daily lives of those at every socioeconomic level. Whether it’s the wealthy seeking even stronger security or the poor trying to avoid further instability, Cut Adrift gives us a glimpse of changing gender dynamics and how families are coping in a go-it-alone economy. Hear Cooper in conversation with LeanIn.org Founder Sheryl Sandberg, as they unpack the worries all American families face and brainstorm what can be done about it.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Editorial Cartoonist 59 mins – “Editorial cartoonist and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Michael Ramirez talks about his career and his book, [Give Me Liberty or Give Me Obamacare].” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Michael Ramirez, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.424573.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronics Repairman 96 mins – “Louis Rossmann talks to Dave about repair, legislation about repair, the best tools for the repair job and philosophy around business and life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Epilepsy 56 mins – “Joyce welcomes Sam Estes, Co-chair of the Athletes vs. Epilepsy Initiative, a nationwide program for athletes, coaches, volunteers, and fans to raise awareness and funds for the Epilepsy Foundation’s mission to lead the fight to overcome the challenges of living with epilepsy and to accelerate therapies to stop seizures, find cures, and save lives. The program will also include Jerry Kill, Associate Athletic Director Kansas State University, Jeff Klauk, Professional Golfer, and Chanda Gunn, Ice Hockey Olympian.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evilness 69 mins – “The dichotomy between good and evil was popular long before Zoroaster was born, and it will probably continue to be long after Manichaeism’s last influences subside. But is evil a useful concept? Or an obfuscating one? The big solution to this big problem in understanding reality comes from comparing the concepts of good and evil to the less emotionally fraught concepts of hot and cold. They appear to be opposites at first, but are actually relative labels we apply to our experiences that depend both on an objective reality and on the relative perspective of the perceiver. Understanding evil this way vastly reduces the fears that have scared us silly for centuries, and provides a tremendous boost to the effectiveness of our pursuit of happiness—a big solution indeed.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Hazards 55 mins – “This week, Reveal revisits an hour of stories dedicated to food. We take a look at the complicated networks of labor, trade and regulation that carry meat, produce and other products to our tables.” At the link find the title, “[Update] Farm to fork: Uncovering hazards in our food systems, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files Update-Farm-to-fork_Uncovering-hazards-in-our-food-systems_podcast-rev2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking 43 – “We often hear stories about fracking that go like this: a gas company comes to a small town, starts drilling wells, and then terrible things start to happen. People get sick. Water burns from taps. Earthquakes ruin houses. And the climate will soon be destroyed. But, is fracking really a disaster unfolding? To find out, Science Vs speaks to Prof. Robert Jackson, Asst. Prof. Peter Rabinowitz and Prof. Bob Howarth. We’re also joined by Pennsylvanian resident James Hughes and Seneca Resources’ Rob Boulware and Doug Kepler.” At the link find the title, “Fracking, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT2425248954.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fungal Network 34 mins – “A forest can feel like a place of great stillness and quiet. But if you dig a little deeper, there’s a hidden world beneath your feet as busy and complicated as a city at rush hour. In this story, a dog introduces us to a strange creature that burrows beneath forests, building an underground network where deals are made and lives are saved (and lost) in a complex web of friendships, rivalries, and business relations. It’s a network that scientists are only just beginning to untangle and map, and it’s not only turning our understanding of forests upside down, it’s leading some researchers to rethink what it means to be intelligent.…Correction: An earlier version of this story misidentified naturalist David Attenborough as his late brother, actor Richard Attenborough. In addition, it dated the earliest scientific studies of fungi to the late 19th century, whereas naturalists have studied fungi since the 17th century. Lastly, we mistakenly stated that the oxygen that a plant respires comes from CO2, when in reality it comes from water. The audio has been adjusted to correct these facts. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ghrelin 6 mins – “…the chemistry that controls that most basic human desire – hunger, isn’t well understood. One peptide hormone that seems to be involved is Ghrelin, and Martha Henriques investigates….” At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Ghrelin.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Party 12 mins – When Green Party candidate Jill Stein ran for president in 2012, she walked away with .36 percent of the vote. In this election season, she’s found renewed support from voters dissatisfied with both major political parties and Washington as a whole – especially from disillusioned Bernie Sanders supporters. Since June, she’s risen from 2.5 to 3.5 percent in the presidential polls, according to RealClear Politics. The doctor-turned-activist and politician talks with guest host Susan Page about the 2016 presidential race and running as a third-party candidate.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Guns P1 Guns 40 mins – “We find out how many times a year guns are used in self-defense, how many times they’re used to murder someone, and what impact guns have on the crime rate. In this episode we speak with Prof. David Hemenway, Prof. Helen Christensen, Prof. Gary Kleck and New Jersey gun-range owner Anthony Colandro.” At the link find the title, “Gun Control (Pt 2), Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT3321712890.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guns P2 41 mins – “In last week’s episode, we learned that around 30,000 Americans die each year from guns. This week, we examine possible solutions. Do better background checks, buybacks, and gun registration lead to fewer shooting deaths? What happened in Australia after they got rid of all the guns? To find out, we talk to gun shop owner Bob Kostaras, former ATF special agent Mark Jones, Prof. Philip Alpers, and Prof. Peter Squires.” At the link find the title, “Gun Control (Pt 2), Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT7885207373.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Harambe Meme 33 mins – “This week, a Yes Yes No about gorillas, conspiracy theories, and glitter.” At the link find the title, “#72 Dead is Paul, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT8540693922.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Threats 52 mins – “As the country enters the peak of storm season this summer, we want to return to an issue we first talked about earlier this year. What would happen if a major hurricane hit Texas? The state is home to the Houston Ship Channel, one of the world’s busiest maritime waterways. And along the Ship Channel are refineries and chemical plants that make up the nation’s largest refining and petrochemical complex. It’s a pretty major economic hub. In this hour of Reveal, we revisit a story with The Texas Tribune and ProPublica that takes a look at what would happen if a worst-case storm hit the region in the not-so-distant future – a storm that scientists have dubbed “Mighty Ike.” At the link find the title, “[Update] Mighty Ike, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files UpdateMighty-Ike-1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Operations 24 mins – “The former chief spymaster — a leader in America’s intelligence through 9/11, the Iraq war and criticism over torture methods — on “Playing to the Edge.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Inside America’s intelligence with former CIA and NSA director Michael Hayden, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160804_85043.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jello 4 mins – “If you’ve ever boiled meat bones to make stock, you know that what you find in the refrigerator the next morning looks like a giant bowl of jello. That’s because it is. Bones, tendons, cartilage, and other connective tissues are largely made up of a protein called collagen which, when boiled, produces gelatin.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Judy Blume on Puberty 49 mins – “Today on Word of Mouth, a conversation with Judy Blume, recorded live at The Music Hall in Portsmouth for Writers on a New England Stage, a partnership between NHPR, and The Music Hall. Judy Blume was one of the first authors to write frankly about the confusing, and often humiliating transition from childhood to adolescence. Her best known books were published in the 1970s. Are You There God? It’s Me Margaret, Deenie, Blubber, and Forever offered young readers plain language and shame-free stories about periods, bullying, sexual urges and, even “doing it” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Justice System Improvement 66 mins – “Paulette Brown is the first woman of color to become president of the ABA and has been recognized by the National Law Journal as one of the “50 most influential minority lawyers in America.” She has been a municipal court judge, in addition to focusing on all facets of labor and employment litigation. Brown has devoted her presidency to “rebuilding the nation’s confidence in our justice system” by “working to eliminate bias and enhance diversity and inclusion” and offer “tangible, sustainable solutions that will have a positive impact on the perception of our justice system.” Join an important discussion of what’s being done to ensure that the legal system can better represent the under-represented across the United States. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kombucha Culture 44 mins – “If you haven’t tasted kombucha yet, you probably will soon. The sour-sweet, fizzy, fermented tea is becoming ubiquitous in trendy cafes, workplaces, and health food stores across America. Where did it come from, and how did it get so popular? And what in the world is the slimy, beige blob that produces it? From German POWs to Lindsey Lohan to a kombucha zoo at Tufts University, this episode explores the history and science of summer’s hottest drink.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Koramatsu WW II Case 66 mins – “The vulnerability of minority communities has always been a big problem, but it is particularly so when fear exacerbates ignorance. Not long ago, it was Japanese Americans; now it is Muslims. Professor Bannai illuminates this theme through the story of Fred Korematsu, a 22-year-old Oakland welder who refused to comply with orders that led to the incarceration of more than 110,000 people of Japanese ancestry during World War II. In Korematsu v. United States­, the wartime Supreme Court rejected his challenge to the government in one of its most infamous cases. More than 40 years later, Professor Bannai was part of the legal team that successfully challenged Korematsu’s conviction based on proof that the government had falsified the record. For Korematsu’s courage and for his work warning of the dangers of prejudice, President Clinton awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1998.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Losing Aftermath 22 mins – “While everyone is focused on the Olympic winners in Rio, we’re zooming in on loss. We have the story of how a world-champion judo player reacted to a devastating defeat, plus a Stopwatch Science on how losing affects us all.” At the link find the title, “Episode 41: Defeated, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160808 hiddenbrain_losing.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Machine Learning 5 mins – “Machine learning isn’t just for simple tasks like assessing credit risk and sorting mail anymore — today, it’s capable of far more complex applications, like grading essays and diagnosing diseases. With these advances comes an uneasy question: Will a robot do your job in the future?” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malawi’s Big Charity 27 mins – “Inside the secretive world of one of Malawi’s biggest charities – DAPP (Development Aid from People to People). For decades, governments including the US, UK and other European nations have donated many millions of dollars to DAPP for projects ranging from sanitation to teaching. But DAPP has a big secret – it is under the control of a Danish cult-like organisation called the Teachers Group. Simon Cox investigates. *Since uploading this programme the UK’s Department for International Development has suspended payments to DAPP and launched its own investigation*” At the link find the title, “Malawi’s Big Charity Secret, Aug, 2016” right-click “Media files p043bjh4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Melatonin 40 mins – “…Among other indignities that occur as you age, your pineal gland is calcifying, meaning it’s producing less melatonin at night. This is why older adults have a hard time staying asleep — they produce enough melatonin to fall asleep, but not enough to stay asleep throughout the night….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mennonites 36 mins – “A 98-year-old minister takes on his church over the subject of gay marriage—and teaches the rest of us what it means to stand up in protest.” At the link find the title, “Generous Orthodoxy, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files PP6772350337.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moral Monday 27 mins – “The Fourteenth Amendment to the US Constitution declares that anyone born on US soil “and subject to the jurisdiction thereof” is an American citizen. It was intended to give freed slaves guaranteed citizenship in the wake of the 1861-65 Civil War. But today, it also means the children of illegal immigrants to the US automatically become American citizens. This places it right at the heart of the huge controversy over immigration. Adam Smith, historian of 19th Century America, travels to Washington DC and North Carolina to find out.” At the link find the title, “The Battle for the US Constitution, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p043d1r9.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mug Shot Scam 45 mins – “Mugshots are considered to be public record by the American justice system. They’re also a multi-million dollar source of revenue for internet scammers. Today on the show, an investigation of extortionist websites that hold people’s images, and reputations for ransom. Plus, the chancellor of a very unusual school talks about the growing business of cannabis, and a troupe of Muslim women form a B-Girl dance group and show the western world that just because you wear a hijab, doesn’t mean you can’t bust a move.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obamacare and Same Sex Marriage 30 mins – “With the ink barely dry on two momentous Supreme Court decisions affecting marriage equality and health care, Dahlia discusses the history, high points, and likely impact of those decisions with Walter Dellinger, professor of law at Duke University, a Slate contributor, and the former head of the Office of Legal Counsel from 1993 to 1996. First, Dahlia and Walter reflect on Friday’s 5-4 decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, which ruled that same-sex marriage bans are unconstitutional. Next, they talk about Thursday’s 6-3 decision in King v. Burwell, which supported the Affordable Care Act’s subsidies for poor and middle class people….” At the link find the title, “Amicus: The Storm Arrives, Jun, 2015,” right-click “Media files SM9532358639.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obamacare in Court 42 mins – “As the Supreme Court prepares to hear arguments in the latest challenge to the Affordable Care Act — King v. Burwell — Dahlia Lithwick hears from experts on both sides of what could be the most important case in the Court’s entire term. First, she speaks with Jonathan Adler, a law professor at Case Western Reserve University and a one of the lawsuit’s chief architects. Then she hears from Abbe Gluck, a professor at Yale Law School and a co-author of an amicus brief submitted in the case.” At the link find the title, “The Letter of the Law, Feb, 2015,” right-click “Media files SM3721518129.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Business P1 18 mins – “First of five episodes. We’re getting into the oil business. We go to Kansas, and negotiate with a preacher to buy 100 barrels of crude.” At the link find the title, “Oil #1: We Buy Oil, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160810_pmoney_podcast081016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Olympic Champions P1 27 mins – “As the Rio 2016 Olympic Games play out, Claudia Hammond begins a series of three programmes examining the sporting mind. What does it take to become a world champion? Why does it sometimes all go wrong at the peak of an athlete’s career? And what happens to elite sportspeople when it’s all over and retirement looms? The physical abilities of gold medalists are visible for all to see, but we want to know what goes on inside the head of an Olympian. We start at the beginning, with young sportswomen and men, asking how lifetime psychological foundations can best be laid. Today we focus on tennis, a sport requiring considerable mental strength. Claudia travels to the Academia Sánchez-Casal in Spain, where three-time Grand Slam winner, Olympic and Davis Cup champion Andy Murray trained. Here, they offer psychological training to their young players to help them develop the mental strength not only to win, but to lose, or deal with the myriad other challenges involved in taking on a sporting career. Olympic men’s doubles silver medalist and academy founder Sergio Casal takes us on a tour of life as an elite young tennis player, along with sports psychologist Andrea Crosas and players hoping to become champions of the future. Dr Mustafa Sarkar, Senior Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Psychology at Nottingham Trent University, UK, has studied Olympic champions to find out what they attribute their success to. Is developing psychological resilience – along with a good dose of perspective – the key to success?” At the link find the title, “Olympic Minds: Tennis, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0444v0h.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Olympic Issues 29 mins – “If you’ve been tuning into the Olympics in Rio this week, you’ve probably watched your fair share of inspirational profiles of athletes. You may also have been following some of the stories emerging out of Brazil about the corruption, poor environmental stewardship, and social justice transgressions surrounding the Olympics. It’s enough to make the most ardent sports fan a little ambivalent. In Rio, athletes will be swimming or sailing in water that is literally crappy — some athletes may be taking home gold, silver, bronze, or just hepatitis. It may turn out that the more emotional story is not an athlete profile, but one of environmental malfeasance and social injustice — it tugs at the heartstrings, alright, but not in the way that NBC had hoped. This week on Sea Change Radio, we take a deep dive into some of the issues surrounding the thirty-first Olympiad as we are joined by Kate Zerrenner of the Environmental Defense Fund.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paleo Doctor 43 mins – “On this episode of the podcast we have guest Dr. Marc Bubbs ND, CISSN, CSCS. Dr. Bubbs is a board-certified Naturopathic Doctor, Strength Coach, Speaker, Blogger, and Sports Nutrition Lead for the Canadian Men’s Olympic Basketball Team. Join us as we talk nutrition for elite and professional athletes, health, carb tolerance and blood sugar, and more.” At the link right-click “Download Episode Here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patty Hearst 47 mins – “Hearst was abducted in 1974 and then declared allegiance to her captors. Legal expert Jeffrey Toobin does not believe Hearst was brainwashed, but rather, “responded rationally to the circumstances.” At the link find the title, “Aug, 2016 The Wild Saga Of The Kidnapping, Crimes And Trial Of Patty Hearst,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Performance Coach 98 mins – “I’m very pleased to welcome Tony Robbins (@tonyrobbins) back to the show. (You can check out our previous in-depth conversations here: Part 1 and Part 2). For those of you that aren’t familiar, Tony Robbins is the world’s most famous performance coach. He’s advised everyone from Bill Clinton to Mikhail Gorbachev to Serena Williams, and Leonardo DiCaprio to Oprah (who calls him “superhuman”). This time around, we discussed a number of topics we didn’t get to cover in our previous interviews. I also hit him with some new rapid-fire questions. Some of the highlights of our conversation include: Tony’s best investment ever; Quotes he lives by (and how he puts them into action); The worst advice he regularly hears; Why he changed his diet for the first time since age 17” At the link right-click “Media files Tim Ferriss Show, Tony Robbins.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Incidents Discussion 56 mins – “We pick up our recent conversation on race, policing and guns. Deadly encounters this summer between police and African Americans and the targeting of law enforcement by lone attackers have set many communities on edge. We get a Granite State perspective on this turmoil, as well as on efforts to repair a rift that many say has been long in the making.” (4 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Policing the Police 99 mins – “From Minnesota to Baton Rouge, Ferguson, New York and even here in San Francisco, the nation is struggling with an increasing number of incidents where images are captured depicting controversial uses of force by police on predominantly black and brown members of the community. The culture within law enforcement departments from coast to coast is under fire, with seemingly no end in sight. In San Francisco, the Blue Ribbon Panel on Transparency, Accountability, and Fairness in Law Enforcement was established by San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón as an advisory body in May 2015 following revelations that 14 San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) officers had exchanged numerous racist and homophobic text messages. Since then, the fatal officer-involved shootings of Mario Woods, Almicar Lopez, Luis Gongora and Jessica Williams have prompted outrage from the community. The Blue Ribbon Panel is comprised of three distinguished jurists, eight top-tier law firms and five law schools that investigated the SFPD’s use of force, stops, searches and arrests, personnel practices, culture, internal discipline, crime clearance and data, and external oversight. They recently released an extensive report detailing their findings and corresponding recommendations. The Commonwealth Club and GLIDE Center for Social Justice invite you to this important and timely discussion about the recommendations made by the Blue Ribbon Panel, as well as what it will take to achieve true justice and reform in police department culture both here and across the country.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Polarization 21 mins – “The recent Republican and Democratic conventions highlighted the deep divide in America today, but is this political polarization fact or perception?” At the link find the title, “America grapples with deep polarization ahead of election, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160801_97688.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productivity 56 mins – “Want to know how my productivity system works? This is the episode for you. I get questions from you guys every week about what task manager I use, how I keep track of multiple projects, how I organize my schedule, etc. So I thought it’d be fun to do an episode that dives into all of that. Today you’ll learn all the ins and outs of how we use our task manager of choice – Asana – here at College Info Geek. I’ll also explain all of the other systems that work alongside it. As usual, Martin joins me in this conversation, so you’ll also get to hear about how he handles his own personal productivity – there are definitely some key differences, which underlines one of my central beliefs about productivity: Productivity is highly personal. What works for me might not work for Martin, and it might not work for you. However, listening to this exposé on all my systems might give you some new ideas and inspiration to make changes to your own.” At the link right-click “download” at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PTSD 26 mins – “Junger argues it is the experience of returning home, and not the trauma of war, behind PTSD.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: War reporter Sebastian Junger on why peace can be more traumatic for vets than war, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160801_64694.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quora Founder 66 mins – “Adam D’Angelo, CEO of the question and answer website, Quora, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the history, evolution, and challenges of Quora. Along the way they discuss the aggregation of knowledge and the power of experiments for improving the day-to-day performance of the site.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Life 80 min – “We return to Greece with stories of people trying to move on with their lives in whatever way they can. We meet a couple who fell in love even though they weren’t expecting anything like that to happen, and even though her family didn’t approve. We also meet a shopkeeper in a camp who’s running what amounts to a cigarette charity” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Religious Minority Freedom 64 mins – “We are delighted to have Father Thomas Reese to talk about international religious freedom and the persecution of religious minorities around the world. Elizabeth Cassidy, the co-director of policy and research at the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, will be joining us as a discussant during the question-and-answer portion of the conversation. Father Reese is a senior analyst for the National Catholic Reporter, and recently became the chair of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom. Previously he was editor-in-chief of America magazine, and a senior fellow at the Woodstock Theological Center. He is also the author of a trilogy on the organization and politics of the Catholic Church….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Residential Canadian Schools 54 mins – “Lorena Fontaine is completing her PhD at the University of Manitoba and is battling to revive aboriginal languages. She argues that Canadian indigenous communities have a legal right to the survival of language.” At the link find the title, “Ideas from the Trenches – Undoing Linguicide, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160719_31973.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rosenwald Schools 59 mins – “Filmmaker Aviva Kempner discusses her documentary [Rosenwald], about the life of American businessman and philanthropist Julius Rosenwald.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Aviva Kempner, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.424002.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Influence 47 mins – “The U.S.-Russia relationship, this time with evidence that Russia meddled in our election, and with assurances from Trump that Russia would not go into Ukraine.” At the link find the title, “A Russian Intrusion In 2016 Politics, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_488393598.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salton Sea 20 mins – “The largest body of water in California was formed by a mistake. In 1905, the California Development Company accidentally flooded a huge depression in the Sonora Desert, creating an enormous salty lake called the Salton Sea. The water is about twice as salty as the Pacific Ocean. The ground beneath the southern end of the sea is volcanic and water bubbles to the surface in muddy pools. The only fish that can live in Salton Sea are tilapia, but even they struggle to survive.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seed Science 60 mins – “…we’re exploring the world of seeds: how they’ve become so successful, how they work, how humans depend on them, and what we still don’t understand about them. We spend the hour with Thor Hanson, conservation biologist and award-winning author, about his book “The Triumph of Seeds: How Grains, Nuts, Kernels, Pulses, and Pips Conquered the Plant Kingdom and Shaped Human History”. At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery 64 mins – “Ending slavery was a 19th century obsession that appeared quite successful, as did the attempt to end intemperance. But was slavery, like drunkenness, just pushed underground when it was criminalized? The intense psychological desire for hierarchical status, and the economic desires that reinforce that, explain why slavery is as hard to eliminate as other social ills, as is evidenced by the continuing mass incarceration of African-Americans and the endurance of various forms of female slavery. The big solution to this big problem is an easily understood and almost as easily adopted perspective that effectively undermines the psychological need for hierarchy. There are also legal incentives, and technical half-solutions, which could help minimize the demand for enslaving each other in the meantime.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Statin Pros and Cons 59 mins – “…Two Views on Statins: We speak with two experts on statins and heart disease to get to the heart of the matter. They have different perspectives on the value of statins, but their views on what else we should be doing to protect our hearts are not as divergent as you might imagine. Pros and Cons of Statins: Find out about the pros and cons of statins so you can determine if one of these drugs is appropriate for you. In addition to learning about statins and heart disease, you’ll also learn about other approaches you can take to keep your heart as healthy as possible. You’ll also find out how to judge your risk of heart disease through the Reynolds Risk Score that Dr. Nissen recommends or the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Cardiovascular Risk Calculator. He also suggests shared decision-making between doctor and patient to determine when a statin is appropriate. This Week’s Guests: Steven Nissen, MD, is chairman of the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. …David M. Diamond, PhD, is a professor in the Departments of Psychology and Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of South Florida. …The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free for four weeks after the date of broadcast. After that time has passed, digital downloads are available for $2.99….” At the link find the title,”Show 1044: The Truth about Statins and Heart Disease, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files PP-1044StatinsPro-Con.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide Story 47 mins – “Love, death and art. A friend remembers a powerful artist whose life was more than he could bear.” At the link find the title, “Grief And Gratitude After A Friend’s Death, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_488707675.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surgeon Shortage 20 mins – “Neurosurgeon Dr. Dilan Ellegala set about creating a new model to solve the chronic shortage of doctors and surgeons in rural Africa by putting the surgeon’s skills in their hands.” At the link find the title, “How brain surgery with a tree saw led to a rethink of medical aid, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160811_33820.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Third Political Party 56 mins – “Green Party candidate Jill Stein and Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson are gaining attention –boosted by the current penchant for outsiders, as well as dismal popularity ratings for the two major Presidential candidates. But whether this will translate into votes in November remains a question.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tornado Aftermath 35 mins – “This week on the show hosts Sam Bradley and Jamie Davis, the Podmedic are joined by regular guest Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group. We are joined by Penny James, trained in forensic photography for disaster events. In this particular segment, we address her experiences with the Oklahoma City Level F5 Tornado in 1999. Check it out.” At the link find the title,”Forensic Photography in OKC Tornado Event with Penny James, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files DisasterPodcast_20160811.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tornado Aircraft 110 mins – “During his career in the Royal Air Force, Dave Gledhill has been flying as a navigator in the Tornado ADV. After his career he wrote a book about this airplane, and its (not always problem-free) introduction into service with the RAF. In this episode we talk about the airplane, about his flying, about some of the challenges during its development and introduction into service, and how they were overcome to make the F.3 a capable interceptor after all.” At the link right-click Download MP3 File Directly” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Trans Kids 27 mins – “Earlier this year, North Carolina passed HB2, the so-called “bathroom bill.” The law bans anyone from using a public restroom that doesn’t match up with his/her biological sex. HB2 put the state in the middle of a national fight about gender. But North Carolina is also home to one of the few gender clinics for kids in the South, at Duke University’s Children’s Hospital. This week, we spend a day in that gender clinic, the only one in North Carolina. We wanted to know how a clinic like this one operates in this political climate. And we wanted to find out how these patients are coping. Dr. Deanna Adkins, a pediatric endocrinologist, started the clinic a year ago. Over the course of our day, we met three of her very different patients. Drew Adams is a 15-year-old trans man who came with his mom, Erica, all the way from Jacksonville, Florida. On the drive up, Drew wore a T-shirt with “This is What Trans Looks Like” printed on it. He told us he decided to change out of it before he stopped for a bathroom break in North Carolina; he used the men’s room. When Dr. Adkins told Drew that not only would he get a prescription for testosterone, but that he could give himself his first shot that very day, Drew stood up and cheered….” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Pacific Partnership 47 mins – “President Obama makes another strong push for the Trans Pacific Partnership, putting him at odds with Clinton, Trump, maybe you.” At the link find the title, “Global Trade And The Politics Of The TPP Backlash, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_488701784.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undercover Work Ethics 21 mins – “A B.C. Supreme Court judge ruled that John Nuttall and Amanda Korody could not have carried out a bomb plot without help from the RCMP, but how will their overturned conviction impact future terrorism investigations?” At the link find the title, “Police undercover tactics questioned after Canada Day bomb plot conviction overturned, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160803_59293.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Visual Communication 67 mins – “…It’s the 35th anniversary of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellows Program, the so-called “genius grants” that recognize exceptionally creative people who inspire us all. Past MacArthur Grantees include “Hamilton” creator Lin-Manuel Miranda, Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates, choreographer Twyla Tharp and world wide web inventor Tim Berners-Lee. Join us for a fascinating conversation with MacArthur Fellows from the Bay Area about creative problem solving. Cecilia Conrad, managing director of the MacArthur Foundation, will talk with computer vision technologist Maneesh Agrawala and digital artist Camille Utterback. Mr. Agrawala is a computer scientist designing visual interfaces that enhance our ability to understand large quantities of complex information. Ms.Utterback is an artist who uses digital technologies to create visually arresting works that redefine how viewers experience and interact with art. Ms. Conrad will also discuss 100&Change, MacArthur’s new competition for a single $100 million grant to solve a critical problem of our time.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Access Laws  46 mins – “One after another after another, voting laws nationwide that many people claimed were racially discriminatory are being struck down. Federal courts have ruled the laws were designed to make it harder for minorities to vote through tactics like requiring photo IDs or limiting early voting. But critics say some of these were common-sense reforms. This hour On Point, the legacy of race at the polls, and how much oversight is still needed to make sure everyone gets the right to vote.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Access Laws  46 mins – “Voter restriction laws struck down in North Carolina, Wisconsin and Texas. We’ll look at the battle over voting rights around the country.” At the link find the title, “Widespread Judicial Action On National Voting Laws, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_488547867.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Medicine  27 mins – “ …From dealing with blood loss to extraordinary advances in facial reconstructive surgery, conflicts like World War I have driven technological innovation. …On 1st July 1916 alone, there were 58,000 British casualties. The need for speedy and effective evacuation and treatment for the injured on the frontline was urgent. But the narrow trenches on the edges of the battlefields made it very difficult to carry the wounded to field hospitals. …a special stretcher – which could be adjusted to turn round tight corners – was used in the muddy trenches. …Many of the fields of battle were covered in animal manure and infection was a risk to injured soldiers. Anti-tetanus serum was given and antiseptic used to help keep wounds clean. Gadgets such as the Carrel Dakin apparatus were used to deliver antiseptic solution directly and continuously into a wound – via tiny rubber tubes. …When the Germans first started to use poison gas as a weapon, British physiologist John Scott Haldane – famous for bold self-experimentation – went to the frontline to try and identify the gases used. …A number of gases were used as weapons – chlorine gas on its own or mixed with phosgene, and later mustard gas caused severe blistering to the body. Doctors used paraffin to treat the blisters. …today some victims of gunshot wounds are far from the battlefield. In countries like Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of India and Latin America, so-called “celebratory” gunfire involves firing weapons up into the air in order to mark a positive event. They’re often considered to be a harmless show of strength or bravado, but Hugo Goodridge reports from the Lebanese capital Beirut, where a number of people have been killed or injured by guns fired in the city. It is illegal to discharge a gun in a public place in Lebanon and the police have used social media to try and change attitudes towards celebratory gunfire…. ” At the link find the title, “How War and Conflict Have Helped to Improve Medical Treatments, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03zx0vy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Washboard Bill 58 mins – “…Washboard Bill was born in Dupont, Florida on July 4, 1905. He was known as a percussionist, rooted in the minstrel tradition, as well as a captivating storyteller. During much of Cooke’s childhood, his mother operated a juke joint in Dupont. The young Cooke would secretly stay up past his bedtime listening to the music emanating from his mother’s establishment. These experiences shaped Cooke’s interest in music, and in his later life, would greatly influence his rhythmic style. At age six, Cooke began working for a local sawmill, making .25 cents per day, after his mother fell on hard financial times. In 1916, Mrs. Cooke closed her juke joint, and sent her children to live on their grandfather’s farm in Sanford, Florida. As times grew tougher and the Great Depression set in, Cooke grew weary of his life on the farm, and decided to leave home. For 10 years, he led the life of a hobo, traveling by train all over the East Coast. Although Cooke spent the majority of his younger years traveling outside of Florida, he still maintained a connection with the state, generally spending his winters in West Palm Beach. Between 1947 and 1963, he performed with a group called the West Palm Beach Washboard Band. They played in venues everywhere from the streets, to the estates of the Rockefellers and Kennedys. In 1956, he recorded Washboard Country Band with Sonny Terry, and folk legend, Pete Seeger. Cooke moved to West Palm Beach permanently in 1973. He performed in Florida, and throughout the country, until his death in 2003. For his musical and historical contributions, Cooke received the Florida Folk Heritage Award in 1992. In 1988, Cooke recited a personal narrative, A Hobo’s Birthday, for the Palm Beach County Folk Arts in Education Project, conducted by the Florida Folklife Program. Cooke’s story offers a fascinating account of life as a hobo during the Great Depression. His travels and experiences give the listener a vivid portrayal of transient life on the railroad tracks, and of the character Washboard Bill.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Witchcraft Book 57 mins – “Our ideas about witches and witch hunts may come from a manuscript found in the University of Alberta Library. It’s one of only four known copies. Written in the 1400s and now being re-translated from medieval French.” At the link find the title, “Tinctor’s Foul Manual (Encore May 13, 2013), Aug, 2016, right-click “Media files ideas_20160802_58939.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women and Power 47 mins – “The new film “Equity” looks at the lives of women on Wall Street, who navigate a world of men in pursuit of power and money. We talk with director Meera Menon.” At the link find the title, “’Equity’ And Women On Wall Street, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_488864814.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Politics 60 mins – “Hillary Clinton moved a giant step closer to becoming the first woman elected President of the United States when she accepted the Democratic nomination at the party’s convention in Philadelphia. Clinton stands on the shoulders of generations of women who fought for the right to vote. On this episode of BackStory, we look at the different ways women have influenced American politics, including: The bread riots by Confederate soldiers’ wives. The 1913 Women’s Suffrage Parade in Washington, D.C. Shirley Chisholm’s historic 1972 presidential campaign.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women’s Entrepreneurship 58 mins – “Jane Nelson and Sarah Thorn will discuss strategies to grow women’s entrepreneurship worldwide, with a particular emphasis on the role of the private sector. They will address the importance of public-private partnerships to train female entrepreneurs and facilitate the integration of women-owned businesses into global supply chains. This meeting is part of a high-level series on women and development, generously sponsored by the ExxonMobil Foundation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yoga History 41 mins – “This week, we found many surprising twists, turns, and holds in the story of modern yoga.” At the link find the title, “#18 Yoga, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT5545485653.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Cases 19 mins – “The CBC’s Dr. Brian Goldman travels to the front lines to meet the families affected by the Zika virus, the doctors trying to help and those trying to stop it.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Zika’s Ground Zero: Brazil hits 4,000 suspected Zika-related cases of birth defects, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160805_85952.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika in US 47 mins – “Over the last two years, the Zika virus has infected more than one million people, most of them in Latin America. Carried by mosquitos, the virus can be transmitted by a pregnant woman to her fetus, leading to possible birth defects. Zika is now found in 30 U.S. states. On Monday, the CDC warned pregnant women and their partners not to travel to a Miami neighborhood where 14 cases have been diagnosed. The new Zika infections are considered “locally grown” and came even after aggressive mosquito control efforts. Diane and guests discuss the spread of Zika in a South Florida neighborhood, how officials are responding and what it means for the rest of the country.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Zika in US 52 mins – “The Zika virus already has spread swiftly across the island territory of Puerto Rico. And now, Miami is reporting its first cases in people infected by local mosquitoes. This week, Reveal takes us to the front lines of the battle against the disease.” AT the link find the title, “From A to Zika, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files From-A-to-Zika_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zora Neale Hurston 39 mins – “Zora Neale Hurston was an African-American novelist and accomplished anthropologist whose rich literary work has inspired generations of readers. By 1938, she had already published Jonah’s Gourd Vine, Mules and Menand Their Eyes Were Watching God. Despite her reputation as a writer, there exists another side to Hurston’s career. In 1938 and 1939, during the Great Depression, Hurston worked as a folklorist and contributor to the Florida division of the Federal Writers’ Project (FWP), part of the Works Progress Administration (WPA). Through her work with the FWP, Hurston captured stories, songs, traditions and histories from African-Americans in small communities across Florida, whose stories often failed to make it into the histories of that time period. The Works Progress Administration — after 1939, the Works Projects Administration — was a work-relief program created in 1935 by the Franklin Roosevelt administration. It had employed over 8.5 million people by its demise in 1943. One of its programs was the (FWP), which included a folklore section. The staff conducted fieldwork and recorded songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. In 1939, Hurston went to a turpentine camp near Cross City in Dixie County, Florida, to find candidates for recording interviews, songs and life histories of interesting everyday people. Hurston’s essay, “Turpentine,” traced her travels through the pine forests with an African-American “woods rider” named John McFarlin. Her work on Florida’s turpentine camps is still considered authoritative. Back in Jacksonville, Hurston’s final major contribution to the Florida FWP was to arrange a recording session at the Clara White Mission. The African-American participants told stories and sang or chanted traditional music. Hurston also sang 18 songs herself, mostly work songs and folk songs.” At the link right-click Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 248 – Aug 12, 2016: Adoptions, Amputations, Anger Discussion, Attachment Parenting, Blind Author, Blindness Treatment, Bluberry Value, Bone and Joint Injuries, Brazil During the Olympics, Carbon Foam Bread, Chemical Engineer Interview, Chocolate History, Class in America, Clean Economy Agreement, College Life, Comic Book business, Consciousness, Cooperating People, Creativity, Democracy Debate, Dental Anesthesia, Diabetes Control, Diarrhea in Combat, Digital Addiction, Disaster Equipment, Drones for Inspection Work, Drug Access, Eating Habits, Ebola Voices, Education Curricula, Eleanor Amplified, Election Reform, Electric Car Discussion, Emotional Incest, Extinction Reversal, Farm to Table, Female President, First Nations Doctor, fMRIs of Brains, Food Politics, Genes Explained, Genetic Operations, Genetic Wizardry, Government Transformation, Graffiti, Graph Theory, Great Bear Rainforest, Handicapped Journey, Helping Children Succeed, High Voltage Engineer, Hip Hop for Clean Energy, Hiring for Top Firms, Homeland Security History, Homeless in New Hampshire, India Classics, Indian Farmer Suicides, Internet History and Security, Investing in Value Stocks, ISIS Impact, Junipero Serra, Knowledge Structure, Machiavelli Advice, Mariachi Women, Marijuana, Martial Arts, MCAT Course, Memphis Sound, Michael K Williams, Minimalist life, Nootropic Drugs, People Stories, Physics Professor, Pig Farming, Play Doh Invention, Pokemon Go, Protectionism in the US, Refugee Camps in Greece, Richard Dawkins, Roger Ailes, Rogue Justice, Science Value, Segregational Custody, Sewing Robot, Sound Engineer, Sports Business, Stings and Stingers, Stress Concepts, Supreme Court Role, Syrian Library, Taurine, Toyota Accelerator Scandal, Universe Intro, Ursula Franklin Tribute, Voting Rights Act, Walking in Cities, Welfare Reform, Wildfire Control Lessons, WW II Science, Yoga for Bones

The 161 podcasts where you can hear the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 332 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 1o,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded.

Adoptions 56 mins – “It was decades ago that adoption became a more open arrangement. Rather than no contact whatsoever and a secretive approach, birth and adoptive parents began communicating both before and after the adoption. Now there are all sorts of variations — from exchanging occasional letters and pictures to more frequent contact. Still, it can be a difficult decision that raises boundary issues, among others. In New Hampshire, the tendency has been toward more minimal involvement. We’ll look at this and other recent trends in adoption, including the rise of single parenting.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amputations 83 mins – “There are over 185,000 limb amputations per year and over 1.9 million people living with limb loss. Dr. Lisa Pascual looks at preventing limb loss and at pre and post surgery care in the case of amputation. Then, Certified Prosthetist Orthotists Aarti Deshpande and Hanna Dollard look at modern prosthetics and new advancements. Recorded on 06/07/2016. (#30991)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anger Discussion P1 50 mins – “On Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, Justice (2016). What role should we allow anger to play in our public life? Should systems of punishment be strictly impartial, or should they be retributive, i.e., expressive of public anger? Nussbaum thinks that anger necessarily involves the desire for payback, and that this is nearly always unhelpful. We should instead use anger (or rather, change it into “transition anger”) to look toward the future and prevent future harm. Whether in personal relationships, dealings with acquaintances, or in setting policy, anger as desire for payback tends only to further exacerbate bad situations. And “transactional forgiveness,” i.e., debasing someone and making them jump through hoops before you accept an apology, is a historical relic that also just expresses hostility. But what about social justice—can anger help us focus on achieving that? Doesn’t punishment need to express our collective anger against undesirable behaviors and those who perform them? Nussbaum is an engaging and provocative speaker, and Mark, Wes, and Dylan were happy to get to talk with her. Here’s the Huffington Post article she wrote on sexual assault that she mentions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Attachment Parenting 27 mins – “[Starts at 10 mins] Alex Blumberg interviews Wendy Zukerman, host of Gimlet Media’s newest show, Science Vs. Hear how Wendy found her way to Gimlet and enjoy the first half of the latest episode: Science Vs Attachment Parenting.” At the link find the title, “BONUS – Introducing Science Vs, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT6849433183.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Author 52 mins – “Laurie Rubin has been blind since birth, and she says people imagine her world to be a dark place. But the accomplished mezzo-soprano and lyricist experiences color all around her. She says yellow is an afternoon when birds are singing; green is her backyard; blue is an early morning or the key of G. Rubin is performing in Park City this weekend, and Thursday, she joins Doug to talk about growing up blind, learning to navigate the world, and dreaming in color. Laurie Rubin is a mezzo-soprano and has sung on stages around the world from Carnegie Hall and The Kennedy Center to Rome’s Parcol Auditorium della Musica and London’s Wigmore Hall. She’s Co-Artistic Director and Co-Founder of the performing arts program Ohana Arts in Hawaii. Her memoir is called Do You Dream in Color?” At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blindness Treatment 2 mins – “Gene therapy could help prevent blindness.” At the link find the title, “Episode 673 – August 04 2016,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_Aug4_2016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blueberry Value 42 mins – “ Are you what you eat? When it comes to your brain, the answer is a resounding yes. One brain-friendly food to add to your shopping list: blueberries. In episode 139, Dr. Robert Krikorian, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Director of the Division of Psychology at the University of Cincinnati, talks to Jesse about why you should eat blueberries to improve memory. The Benefits of Blueberries – There’s been plenty of talk in the media about how blueberries are the new superfood. We’re always hesitant to buy into this kind of hype (remember how margarine used to be “healthy” and eggs were horrible for you?). But in the case of blueberries, the science backs up the hype. Blueberries improve long-term memory (retention of information over time), access to words and concepts (crucial for dementia or Alzheimer’s sufferers), and short-term memory (aka working memory). They reverse loss of balance and coordination in older rats. The benefits aren’t confined to older people, though. One study found that blueberry juice improved memory and concentration in children. And if you’re worried about consuming too much sugar from fruit, blueberries even lower blood glucose levels. For more, check out Dr. Krikorian’s latest research on blueberries.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bone and Joint Injuries 59 mins – “Trauma injuries affect millions in the the global community every year. Hear from orthopoaedic surgeons who lead surgical missions and use the power of surgical education to save limbs and save lives in the developing world. Recorded on 06/14/2016. (#30992)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazil During the Olympics 58 mins – “Laurie Garrett, CFR Senior Fellow for Global Health, Shannon K. O’Neil, CFR Nelson and David Rockefeller Senior Fellow for Latin America Studies and Director of the Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program, and Neil Shearing, Chief Emerging Markets Economist, Capital Economic Ltd, discuss the issues facing Brazil as the country prepares to host the 2016 Summer Olympics. The experts examine the implications of Dilma Rousseff’s impeachment trial and Brazil’s deepening economic recession for the country’s future.  They also discuss the health concerns, including the Zika virus and widespread water pollution, that confront Brazil as the Olympic Games begin.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Foam Bread 2 mins – “Super-toasted bread used to create eco-friendly carbon foam.” At the link find the title, “Episode 671 – August 01 2016,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_Aug1_2016.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chemical Engineer Interview 64 mins – “Chris Welch joins Adam, Brian, Carmen, and Jeff to talk about the field of chemical engineering.Jeff believes in unicorns, even though he’s never seen one! From his childhood, Jeff recalls watching a DuPont film about “Better Living Through Chemistry.” Our guest for this episode is Chris Welch, a chemical engineer from New Brunswick, Canada, who works in the water treatment industry. Branches of chemistry include (but are not limited to): physical chemistry, organic chemistry, and analytic chemistry.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chocolate History 4 mins – “For many people, there’s nothing quite as satisfying as biting into good quality chocolate. The sweetness. The subtle smoothness as it melts on the tongue. But that’s not the way we find it in nature. A lot of processing takes place first. And one of the most important breakthroughs in making chocolate occurred in 1879 in Bern, Switzerland….” At the link right-click Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Class in America’s 52 mins – “We like to think of America as a class-free society where anyone who works hard can achieve economic success. Historian Nancy Isenberg says it’s a promise as old as our nation, and that it’s always been a myth. She argues that landowners and the elite have only valued the poor for their labor – while describing them as vagrants, crackers, squatters, and rednecks. Isenberg joins us Tuesday to trace what she calls the 400-year untold history of class in America. Her book is called White Trash. Nancy Isenberg is the T. Harry Williams Professor in American History at Louisiana State University. Among her books are Fallen Founder: The Life of Aaron Burr and her latest White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clean Economy Agreement 30 mins – “What would it take for North America to really reduce pollution? At a minimum, Canada, the U.S., and Mexico would have to jointly commit to increasing renewable energy sources and eliminating fossil fuel subsidies. Fortunately, these three nations just signed onto the North American Clean Economy Agreement, which includes these commitments and many others aimed at improving the environment. Author and sustainability consultant Andrew Winston joins us today on Sea Change Radio to explain the ins and outs of the agreement. Winston and host Alex Wise discuss its importance, dissect the specific pledges made by the three countries, and look at what steps must be taken to achieve the goals listed in this unprecedented agreement.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Life Q and A 68 mins – “It’s high… time we answered some of your questions again! (And, technically, it’s also high noon somewhere.) In today’s 5 Questions episode, we’ll be analyzing several different perplexing conundrums, including challenging ourselves to use more than five 3-syllable words in a row. Just kidding – though, if you’re keeping score, I just got seven.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comic Book Business 13 mins – “Comic books – and graphic novels, their book trade cousins – are no laughing matter. The characters between these covers are usually troubled souls, and the situations they confront range from disturbing to dire. The scenario for the comic book business is anything but dire, however. According to a recently published report on the North American market, sales in 2015 topped $1 billion for the first time. What makes comics sales pop? It’s a convergence of factors that have reshaped the marketplace in recent years, says Calvin Reid, Publishers Weekly senior news editor and PW Comics World co-editor. “We’ve seen the mainstreaming of comics publishing and comics reading,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. At the same time, “the market has expanded beyond the superhero genre. It’s also owing to the power of librarians. And at the end of the day, we’re seeing the evolution and the development of comics industry as part of the book trade.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness 40 mins – “Ever since Descartes famously split the world into “mind” and “‘matter”, the debate amongst philosophers and thinkers about conscious experience has raged. And with recent advances in brain imaging technologies, scientists now offer a new and exciting viewpoint on this quintessential human phenomenon. But are we any closer to revealing the mechanisms behind it? And can science offer anything other than objective measures? Under the watchful gaze of the cognitive neuroscientist Professor Anil Seth, Ian and Nicola delve into the murky world of consciousness in an attempt to unravel its mysteries. Along the way we meet UCL’s Dr Steve Fleming and Professor Christof Koch from the Allen Institute for Brain Science, to hear how experimental practice and theory are tackling this problem head on.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cooperating People 46 mins – “Humans – homo sapiens – rule the world.  For better or worse, some might say. My guest today looks at how that happened – why – and where we’re headed next.  It’s us and not others, he says, because of our affinity for myth-making and stories. We buy into big ideas that bind us together and have given us power. Religion. Money. Nation states. Now that power may threaten the planet. But evolution isn’t over. Homo sapiens may be in their last few hundred years, he says. Ready to merge with machines. This hour On Point, historian Yuval Noah Harari on the rise and maybe end of us, homo sapiens.“ At the link right-click the small cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity 15 mins – “What comes to mind when you hear the word “creativity”? A painter toiling away at a canvas into the wee hours of the morning? A composer spending hours on a new piece until it’s perfect? Or maybe an actor bringing an audience to tears with the right word said at just the right time? What about that final project you have due for your Intro to Anthropology class? I don’t know about you, but if you’d asked me a couple years ago if creativity had anything to do with course work, I probably would have said something like, “Well, sure, but only if you have a creative major like art, creative writing, music, drama, or dance.” What I’ve realized lately, however, is that my assumptions were all wrong. Creativity absolutely has a place in your studies, no matter what your major is. To excel at college-level work, you have to think creatively. That’s why in today’s post I’m going to break down what exactly creativity is, how you can practice it, and how you can apply it to your studies.” At the link find the title,”Cultivate Creativity to Study Better and Dominate Assignments (Narration), Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 43624.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Debate 46 mins – “Democracy is the worst form of government except all the others that have been tried. So said Winston Churchill and who would disagree? One man, one vote, the rule of law, equality and a free press. These are the principles which tens of thousands have been imprisoned or lost their lives for in despotic regimes from South America to Burma. But is the assumption that democracy always leads to a freer and more tolerant society correct? Many would argue that it can lead to quite illiberal outcomes especially where there is profound ethnic division. What if democracy were installed in Syria? It’s not hard to imagine what would happen to the minority groups who have enjoyed the protection of Assad’s regime. There have been successful transitions to democracy in post- war Germany and Japan, but free elections in countries such as Iraq and Egypt have not brought peace and prosperity. In this debate, from March 2014, Rosemary Hollis, Professor of Middle East Studies at City University, and Martin Jacques, academic and acclaimed author of ‘When China Rules the World’, proposed the motion. Opposing them were American political scientist Ian Bremmer and eminent Ukrainian MP Andriy Shevchenko.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dental Anesthesia 60 mins – “One of the best ways to build your practice is to become known by your patients and by people in your community as the ‘Painless, On Time Dentist’. In this Thriving Dentist Show interview Gary interviews Dr. Dan Davidian on specific tips that will help you deliver painless injections that will also improve your office efficiency. In this Show, Gary and Dan discuss; what motivated Dan to develop the Anutra Local Anesthetic Delivery System, The family connection and how his Dad inspired the development of this system, the history of local anesthetic from whiskey to cocaine to lidocaine, the science of buffering, what buffering is doing and the benefits provided by buffering, how he gained FDA approval for the one handed feedback aspiration syringe and how buffered anesthetic has changed Dan’s practice. You will enjoy learning the science of buffered anesthetic and Dan’s passion for helping patients enjoy a comfortable injection. “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diabetes Control 57 mins – “On this important episode we have guest Dr. Mark Cucuzzella. Dr. Cucuzzella is a Professor of medicine at West Virginia University medical school, Fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), family physician for over 20 years, Lt Col in the US Air Force Reserves, and an avid runner and running coach. Listen in as we discuss Dr. Cucuzzella’s experience in treating diabetes. Link to The Skinny on Obesity video mentioned in the podcast http://www.uctv.tv/skinny-on-obesity/. At the link right-click “Download Episode Here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diarrhea in Combat 37 mins – “Best-selling science writer Mary Roach talks about her latest book Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.” At the link find the title, “The Science of Soldiering: Mary Roach’s Grunt, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files podcast.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Addiction 48 mins – “The obsessive use of digital technology is a real problem for many teens and children, say parents and therapists. A recent study by Common Sense Media, a parent advocacy group, found that 59 percent of parents think their teens are “addicted” to mobile devices. A growing number of psychologists specialize in treating young people who use digital technology obsessively— some even to the point of not eating or sleeping. Yet the term “internet addiction” is controversial and not officially recognized as a mental disorder. Guest host Derek McGinty and a panel of guests discuss therapies designed to treat compulsive web use among young people—and what parents and teens should know.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Disaster Equipment 46 mins -”This is part two of a special double episode on wilderness EMS is full of great tips and discussion on what austere wilderness medicine has to teach every responder. Make sure you catch part one of this episode in last week’s show at DisasterPodcast.com. Host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and his co-host Sam Bradley are joined by a group of wilderness EMS experts to talk about this topic. This week on part two of the special wilderness EMS epsidoe, we have a group of excellent panelists on the subject of wilderness EMS as it relates to what the Urban medic can take from it. We have Kevin Reiter from WildSafety.com, Dr. Seth Hawkins from Hawk Ventures which supports a wide range of Wilderness EMS programs, including the flagship Carolina Wilderness EMS Externship program. also joining us is Dr. Ben Abo, DO, MPH an ER Doc and Wilderness EMS specialist, and paramedic David Fifer, NRP who is a wilderness search and rescue specialist with RedSTAR Wilderness Response Team, which lives online at redstarmedical.org.. We also have the regular Disaster podcast guest USAR doc, Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drones for Inspection Work 12 mins – “Unmanned aerial cameras – drones – are becoming a standard part of the infrastructure management toolkit. They are particularly useful for inspecting widely dispersed facilities in areas than can be difficult to navigate on the ground. Although there are important flight restrictions that preclude operations over populated areas, there is a growing set of applications in surveillance and inspection for large-scale infrastructure systems. In this discussion, Kevin Lewis of the Denver Department of Public Works describes the merits of using an off-the-shelf quadcopter drone to inspect critical flood control structures.” At the link right-clickListen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Access 50 mins – “The Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine and the Academy bring together patients, regulators, manufacturers, journalists, and experts to debate the difficult ethical issues surrounding “compassionate use” of pre-approved medicines.” At the link find the title, “Bioethics Meets R&D: The Ethics of Pre-approval Access, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 160602_bioethics.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eating Habits P1 27 mins – “Back by popular demand, this two-part Catalyst special investigates whether food could actually be our medicine? Unbeknownst to most of us, we each carry about 1.5 kg of bacteria – that’s trillions of tiny microbes that contribute 100 times as many genes as our genomes do. Scientists are now beginning to discover just how crucial these microscopic creatures are to our overall health … and what they’re learning is shaking the very foundations of medicine and nutrition.“ At the ink right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eating Habits P2 27 mins – “Could our food be making us sick – very sick? In the second episode of this two-part special, Dr Graham Phillips reveals new research about the interplay between food and the bacteria deep within our guts. This program was originally broadcast in 2014 but is back by popular demand.” At the ink right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Voices 49 mins – “Radio producer Penny Boreham and Sierra Leonean storyteller, Usifu Jalloh, travel from the UK to Kailahun district, the remote eastern area of Sierra Leone bordering Guinea and Liberia, to meet the children they have been working with remotely in a radio project.” At the link find the title, “Ebola Voices, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0428qkm.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Curricula 44 mins – “Increasing numbers of internationally branded schools serving local [rather than predominantly expatriate] populations and Ministries of Education engaged in educational reform, are adopting what they perceive as international best practice. This raises a number of questions and issues explored in this lecture. Is there such a thing as international best practice? Does globalization imply the need for a common curriculum and pedagogy in order to prepare students for the modern world? Should curriculum be about cultural transmission or transformation? A few principles and practices that might be helpful in building a curriculum that respects local and global realities are considered. Change, which is both desirable and inevitable, needs to be evolutionary and grounded in an understanding of local context and culture if it is to lead to beneficial outcomes. One curriculum prescription does not suit all.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eleanor Amplified 6 12 mins – “Our nation’s capital: come for the museums, stay for the intrigue… “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Election Reform 44 mins – “We Americans may love our democracy — at least in theory — but at the moment our feelings toward the federal government lie somewhere between disdain and hatred. Which electoral and political ideas should be killed off to make way for a saner system?” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Car Discussion 77 mins – “…One of the currently available electric hybrids is the Cheverolt Volt. Adam notes the Volt’s drive arrangement is similar to that of a diesel electric locomotive. Electric vehicles were first invented back in the mid-19th century. Although gas vehicles were less popular than either steam or electric vehicles in 1900, the gas engine was clearly established as the market leader by the 1930s. At one point, Ford suggested it might build a nuclear-powered passenger vehicle, the Ford Nucleon. General Motor’s entry in the electric vehicle field, the EV1, was made famous by the 2006 documentary Who Killed the Electric Car? Although not a “pure” electric vehicle, the Toyota Prius has been a popular electric hybrid. The first highway-capable electric vehicle mass produced for sale in the United States was the Tesla Roadster. Smaller gas pump nozzle diameters were introduced as automobiles transitioned from leaded to unleaded gas. Differing interfaces exist for charging electric vehicles. A common connector for charging electrical vehicles in North America is defined by the SAE 1772 standard. Tesla is building its Gigafactory 1 to produce lithium-ion batteries in high volume. A recent death in an auto-piloted Tesla will challenge the emerging self-driving vehicle industry. Some states are levying “green car” taxes to make up for lost gas tax revenues. Tesla has recently purchased solar power provider SolarCity. The U.S. Department of Energy provides a webpage that estimates emissions, on a state-by-state basis, for the electrical power used to operate electric and hybrid vehicles….” At the link find the title, “Episode 114 — Driven Electrons, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files TheEngineeringCommons-0114-DrivenElectrons.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emotional Incest 24 mins – “Neil Strauss was a music journalist when he turned an assignment on pickup artists into a book. The Game was wildly popular, even considered a bible for how to pick-up-women-for-sex. But after living the game, he eventually realized it was game over.” At the link find the title, “Emotional Incest ENCORE: Neil Strauss rethinks his pickup artist past, confesses ‘The Truth’ about relationships, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160727_71416.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Extinction Reversal 54 mins “From passenger pigeons to woolly mammoths, Britt Wray delves into the science, the ethics, and the implications of de-extinction for all animals, including us humans.” At the link find the title, “Undoing Forever, Jul, 2016” right-click “Media files ideas 20160727_75117.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm to Table 56 mins – “This week, Reveal revisits an hour of stories dedicated to food. We take a look at the complicated networks of labor, trade and regulation that carry meat, produce and other products to our tables.” At the link find the title, “[Update] Farm to fork: Uncovering hazards in our food systems, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files Update-Farm-to-fork_Uncovering-hazards-in-our-food-systems_podcast-rev2.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female President 47 mins – “It was a real contest in the Democratic Party this season. Two tough political fighters, battling all the way through the primaries. Last night, one clinched the formal nomination. And that one was a woman. Hillary Clinton. And with that, history was made. It’s never happened before. In November, she could be elected president. Bigger history. We’re weighing the moment, and how gender may play. This hour On Point, we talk with women about Hillary Clinton, gender, the issues, and the White House.” (4 guests) At the link right-click the small cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Nations Doctor 22 mins – “As the first female Indigenous woman to graduate from UBC’s medical school, Dr. Nadine Caron says there’s so much to be done to ensure Canada’s Aboriginal people get the health care they need. And she knows how hard it can be from her own experience.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Meet Dr. Nadine Caron, Canada’s first female First Nations surgeon, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160726_58330.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

fMRIs of Brains 39 mins – “fMRIs sound pretty scientific, right? But what if it turns out that some scientific results, backed by fMRI data, may be unreliable? That’s what Dr. Thomas Nichols, Professor and Head of Neuroimaging Statistics at the University of Warwick, has discovered in his recently published research: about 10% of the scientific literature that relies on fMRI data is contaminated with false positives. But how significant is that number, really? Keep reading (or listening) to find out.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Politics 30 mins – “Today we have the pleasure to begin with the broadcast of a series of shows that will be ongoing over the course of the summer. A group of dedicated citizens has gotten together to create a set of three seminars about food, and we were asked to participate by turning the series into a podcast. So here is the first installment in a three-part series, featuring Phil Pohl of Sandia National Labs and Greg Gould, self-described foodologist. To learn more about the speakers, have a look at their websites. Phil Pohl runs Sandia’s Food, Water and Energy program, and Greg has recently been host of the Foodology Show. Also, special thanks to Kathy Isaacson of Strategic Engagement LLC for organizing these seminars.”[Ep 21, Carbon Footprint of Food, is the last part of this series] AT the link righrt-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genes Explained 51 mins – “Monday, the writer and oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee is our guest. He’s written a new book that tells the epic tale of our quest to unravel the human genome. It’s the story of a long lineage of scientists—from Mendel, to Darwin, Watson, Crick, and countless others—and their efforts to understand the workings of the very threads of our existence. But how, Mukherjee wonders, can we best apply that knowledge? And what does it mean to be human when we can read and write our own genetic information? Siddhartha Mukherjee is the author of The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, which won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in general nonfiction. He is an assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University and a cancer physician and researcher. He has published articles in Nature, The New England Journal of Medicine,The New York Times, and Cell. His new book is called The Gene: An Intimate History At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Operations 30 mins – “In Ernest Hemingway’s house in Florida there is a family six-toed cats. Their appearance is caused by a mutation in the molecular switch that controls the Sonic hedgehog gene. These cats provided Kat Arney with the impetus to write a book that explaines how genes work and dispels some of the misconceptions created by the media’s misrepresentation of the subject.” At the link right-click “Download: Chemistry World Book Club – Herding Hemingways cats.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Wizardry 60 mins – “Today we mashup the science of genetics with the world of Harry Potter to get a better handle on how genetics works, and to find out what the odds are when it comes to getting a Hogwarts invite. (We can dream, right?) Dr. Tina Saey, who covers the molecular biology beat at Science News, helps us understand how to make a wizard with a little genetics 101. And Dr. Julian Knight, Professor of genomic medicine at the Wellcome Trust Center for Human Genetics at the University of Oxford, talks about his paper that looks to genetics for the origins of…” At the link find the title, “#380 Yer A Wizard Harry,” right-click “Media files Science for the People 380, Yer A Wizard Harry.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Transformation 64 mins – “How can government transform its capabilities by capitalizing on today’s new digital tools? Best-selling author William D. Eggers coined the term “government 2.0” more than a decade ago and now envisions an even more revolutionary era in government, enabled by cloud computing, mobile devices and analytics. Eggers chronicles the new generation of digital innovators who are “hacking bureaucracy” to reform and modernize long-standing bureaucratic processes and reimagine virtually every facet of what government does using digital tools—inspiring us to “think digital” when it comes to citizens, products and process.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graffiti in Brazil 27 mins – “Thousands of angry young Brazilians could not care less about the 2016 Olympics; they would rather paint Rio and São Paulo’s walls with their views about political turmoil, poverty and inequality. Steve Uruqhart meets graffiti writers and street artists in Brazil. Why do they choose to risk their lives, their limbs, their freedom, to highlight their social concerns?” At the link find the title, “Graffiti: Paint and Protest in Brazil, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0438cxx.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graffiti in Europe 27 mins – “Graffiti’s modern role is evolving rapidly. From Europe to Brazil, street artists are displaying their anger about inequality, invisibility, corruption and control. Artists including Blek Le Rat (the “father of stencil graffiti”), Roc Blackblock, Suriani and Vegan Bunnies defend their actions, and discuss whether such “freedom of expressiaon” on walls should have any limits.” At the link find the title, “Graffiti: Paint and Protest in Europe, Jul, 2016,”Media files p042khk9.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graph Theory 4 mins – “I first encountered the problem in elementary school. I was on a field trip to the Seattle Science Center. One of the instructors there showed us a picture. On it were four islands. Some were connected by bridges — seven in all. And she gave us a challenge. “Pick any island,” she said, “and see if you can find a walk that goes over every bridge exactly once and brings you back to the island where you started.” I tried one walk, then another. No luck. I always had to retrace at least one bridge. I drew the picture on a piece of paper and took it home to show my parents. The instructor had succeeded. She’d made me think. I ran into the problem many years later in a college course on graph theory. To mathematicians, a graph is a collection of islands connected by bridges or, more precisely, points connected by lines. Get a sheet of paper. Draw some points. Connect some of them with lines. You’ve got what mathematicians call a graph. Pretty simple. But graphs turn out to be remarkably interesting….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Great Bear Rainforest P1 8 mins – “In the summer of 1993, everyone I knew was chaining themselves to something. And where I grew up, on the west coast of Canada, the fight was over trees. Environmentalists and aboriginal communities united to stop a company from logging in a remote place called Clayoquot Sound, on the far western edge of Canada. More than 12,000 people blockaded a logging road into Clayoquot. Some chained themselves to bulldozers, others to trees. Almost 1,000 people were arrested in the largest act of civil disobedience in Canadian history….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Great Bear Rainforest P2 7 mins – “It’s a cloudless morning and just beyond the bow there’s rustling of trees and the sound of branches snapping. I’m holding my microphone as far out as I can — so that I can record the sound of a male grizzly, on the shore about 15 yards away. My guide here is Tom Rivest. “That is the sound that is called either chuffing or huffing. It sounds a little bit like bellows expelling air,” says Rivest. “The bears do that when they’re stressed — or excited, or a little both — which they probably are.” The reason this bear is excited is that it’s mating season and he’s following a female and her two cubs….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Handicapped Journey 24 mins – “When Robert Hoge was born in Brisbane, Australia, in 1973, his mother immediately knew there was something wrong. Instead of asking the doctors, “Is it a boy or a girl?” she asked, “Is my baby okay?” He wasn’t. He had a tumor the size of his newborn fist smack in the middle of his face. His legs were very short; his feet were missing toes and twisted out of shape.

Helping Children Succeed 51 mins – “A few years ago, Paul Tough wrote a book about new research showing that character traits like grit, self-control, and optimism are critical to a child’s success. Tough’s latest book builds on that research by explaining how to put it into practice. He argues that a child’s home and school environments are the principle barriers to his or her success. Improve the environment, Tough says, and you can improve the child. He joins us Wednesday to explain his theory of helping children succeed. Paul Tough is the author of the books How Children Succeed and Whatever It Takes: Geoffrey Canada’s Quest to Change Harlem and America. He is a contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine and a regular contributor to This American Life. His latest book is called Helping Children Succeed: What Works and Why At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

High Voltage Engineer 96 mins – “Stefan stops by to talk with Chris about High Voltage power supplies, conductive paint sensors, field testing solar chargers and working on HUGE art installations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hip Hop for Clean Energy 54 mins – “Today we’ll be joined by Hip Hop Caucus President and CEO Rev. Lennox Yearwood Jr. to discuss his work for climate justice and a new partnership with the 100 percent Campaign to support access to clean, affordable energy for all. Rev. Yearwood is known as one of the most influential people in Hip Hop political life. He works tirelessly to encourage the Hip Hop generation to utilize its political and social voice. A national leader and pacemaker within the green movement, Rev. Yearwood has been successfully bridging the gap between communities of color and environmental issue advocacy for the past four years. With a diverse set of celebrity allies, Rev Yearwood raises awareness and action in communities that are often overlooked by traditional environmental campaigns.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hiring for Top Firms 47 mins – “Lauren Rivera wants to understand how and why American elites keep reproducing themselves. Social and economic mobility in the US anow trail much of Europe’s. Concentration of wealth at the top is up. We have no titled aristocracy. No formal entitlement. We love our up-by-the-bootstraps, Horatio Alger stories. But American elites keep reproducing themselves from the same pool. Rivera has gone deep on hiring at top firms. Looking at how and why elites hire elites with such consistency. She’s with us. This hour On Point: “Pedigree.” Who gets the top jobs in America, and why. “ (3 Guests) At the link right-click the small cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeland Security History 49 mins – “In the years following 9/11, conversations about the threat of terrorism, and debates over the role of government in keeping us safe have been constant. Political scientist Matthew Dallek says there’s many parallels to the late 1930s and ’40s when fears of a Nazi attack in the U.S. were high. In a new book, “Defenseless Under the Night,” Dallek explores the history of the Office of Civil Defense, a precursor to the Department of Homeland Security. It was led by First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and New York City Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, whose competing visions set the stage for the debates we are still having today about security and democracy. Guest host Derek McGinty is joined by author Matthew Dallek to discuss the origins of homeland security.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Homeless in New Hampshire P1 56 mins – “It’s a question Granite State communities are grappling with, as progress appears to have stalled on finding housing for homeless people. Advocates agree a dearth of affordable housing exacerbates the problem. But there’s debate over whether providing temporary shelter can forestall lasting solutions on such challenges as unemployment and substance abuse….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in New Hampshire P2 8 mins – “Communities in New Hampshire are grappling with this question: where are homeless people supposed to go? Cities tend to answer that question by spelling out where homeless people can’t be, imposing bans on panhandling and camping. That’s often called criminalizing homelessness. We hear now about one city that recently came together to strike down one of those bans—Lebanon, N.H. Tim McNamara is on the city council there and was at the public hearing where over 100 people turned out. He joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk about these issues….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in New Hampshire P3 6 mins – “Ten years ago policy makers in New Hampshire made an ambitious promise: to end homelessness by 2016. We haven’t gotten there yet. As part of our special series on homelessness called ‘No Place To Go,’ NHPR’s Jack Rodolico and Natasha Haverty reported the story of one homeless man, Gene Parker, who lived on the streets of Concord for five years before being struck and killed by a car this winter. Cathy Kuhn directs New Hampshire’s Coalition to End Homelessness and joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss where the issue stands today.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Classics 46 mins – “Talk of the classics, classical literature, and minds quickly go to ancient Greece and Rome. To Greek and Latin. Homer and Virgil. But there are other, giant classical traditions, of course. One of the greatest, out of India. Essentially unknown in the West until 200 years ago Its surface still barely scratched in English translation. A huge new project aims to change that, with 500 new volumes. The first five are out. It’s a different setting: elephants, blood rice, moonbirds. And a different way of seeing human life. This hour On Point: we’re dipping into the new Murty Classical Library of India.” (2 guests) At the link right-click the small cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Farmer Suicides 2 64 mins – “ Talking Biotech Podcast #44 continues Kavin Senapathy’s interview with Dr. Ronald Herring. Dr. Herring is a Professor of Government and International Professor of Agriculture and Rural Development at Cornell University. Dr. Herring is a social scientist that has carefully studied the situation in India. This is the second part of the interview discussing the myths and facts surrounding Indian farmer suicides, a popular narrative in anti-genetic-engineering circles. Professor Herring provides first-hand illumination of the topic, from his experience in India, and scholarly examination of the facts around the topic.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet History 35 mins – “We originally planned this episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast to answer the question of “What is the Internet?” But as we started talking to our guest, Principal of Interisle Consulting Group Fred Goldstein, we quickly realized we first had to dig into a little bit of history. This is not the story of how the Department of Defense and university researchers created the ArpaNet. We are focused on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and telephone companies and how the FCC’s Computer Inquiries allowed the Internet to thrive. Fred lived it and offers a passionate retelling of key events, motivations, and more. This conversation is setting the stage for a future show – later this month – focused on answering the original question: “Just what, exactly, is the Internet?” And we’ll also talk about network neutrality and other hot topics in answering it. But for now, we hope you enjoy this show. We went a bit long and it is a bit technical in places, but we think the history is important and a reminder of how good government policy can lead to great outcomes….” At the link right-click “download this mp3 file directly from here”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Privacy 15 mins – “The computer or phone that you use knows a lot about you. It knows your secrets — and it might be giving them away.” At the link right-click “#548: Project Eavesdrop, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160729_pmoney_xxxx_eavesdrop_rerun_12.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Security 94 mins – “Nathan Freitas, Executive Director of the Guardian Project and Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, talks to Leo about Tor, privacy, securing mobile devices, and the Internet of Things.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing in Value Stocks 29 mins – “Paul explains the importance of adding value to your portfolio. The higher long-term returns of value stocks is not in question, but it is confusing to many investors as to why troubled and out-of-favor companies are expected to make more than great companies. To clarify this, Paul reads sections from both “Financial Fitness Forever” and “Live It Up Without Outliving Your Money.” And for those who aren’t interested in all these details, it’s important to know that almost every famous professional investor became famous using value stocks (e.g., Warren Buffet, Peter Lynch, John Templeton, and Michael Price).” At the link right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Q and A 54 mins – “For 10 years, Paul had a weekly “Outrage of the Week” on his Seattle radio show. He says it was never a problem finding something that made him hopping mad. In this podcast, Paul explains his recent outrage about one of America’s most trusted insurance companies giving their employees the shaft. He also answers questions from his listeners and readers at paulmerriman.com (Note to listeners: there are 12 Q&A’s mentioned on the podcast, but one was removed in order to better address it in a future Q&A).” At the link right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Impact 21 mins – “A young Yazidi woman’s life in Iraq took a horrific turn when her town was taken over by ISIS. She was captured, enslaved, and endured weeks of rape and torture. Now, she is calling on Canada to take in more refugees like her.” At the link find the title, “‘I wished I was killed’: Yazidi ISIS slave shares her harrowing story, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160725_92511.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Junipero Serra 47 mins – “Every California school child knows the story of Father Junípero Serra, the Franciscan priest who brought the mission system, New Spain and the Church north from Mexico and up the western shore of the New World. If you know San Diego, Santa Barbara and Santa Clara, San Francisco, you know his design. Build the missions, gather the natives, teach the Gospel, change the world. He is venerated for what he built, and – like Christopher Columbus these days – criticized for what he crushed. This hour On Point, a new history of California’s founding father and imperialist priest, Junípero Serra.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the small cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Knowledge Structure 51 mins – “The way that knowledge is structured has implications for the way we teach. Where the information that is presented in lectures fails to represent the knowledge structure of the discipline, then students have to resort to rote learning of materials. Where the curriculum structure aligns with the structure of the discipline, then students will be learning in more authentic ways and will have access to powerful knowledge. To get to this point, teachers first need to consider the structure of their own discipline and the values that underpin their teaching so they may reflect on the appropriateness of their professional practice. “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Machiavelli Advice 52 mins – “Niccolò Machiavelli lived hundreds of years ago, and though he was a gifted political strategist, he knew nothing about democratic republics. So the scholar Maurizio Viroli recognizes that it’s a bit extravagant to consult a 15th-century Florentine for electoral advice in 21st-century America. But Machiavelli, Viroli says, remains the most competent, honest and disinterested political counselor we could ask for. Viroli joins us Friday to examine what Machiavelli can teach us about choosing leaders. Maurizio Viroli is professor emeritus of politics at Princeton University, professor of government at the University of Texas, Austin, and professor of political communication at the University of Italian Switzerland in Lugano. His many books include Niccolò’s Smile: A Biography of Machiavelli and Redeeming “The Prince”: The Meaning of Machiavelli’s Masterpiece. His new book is called How to Choose a Leader: Machiavelli’s Advice to Citizens At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mariachi Women 48 mins – “When you hear the mariachi music, the visuals are right there too in our mind’s eye. The guys in their elaborate, silver-spangled outfits. The boots. The big sombreros. The machismo, Mexican-style. But when Flor de Toloache is playing, it’s a different picture. Mariachi, yes. But all women. Those great outfits, yes. But flowers in their hair. And Mexican is just the beginning. They’re from all over Latin America, beyond – and New York City. This hour On Point, the women of Flor de Toloache.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the small cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Conference 29 mins – “California, the nation’s most populous state, votes again this Fall on the legalization of marijuana. It’s yet another sign that the century-long prohibition may finally be lifting, one state at a time. This week on Sea Change Radio, we bring you four interviews from the National Cannabis Industry Association conference held recently in Oakland, CA. Host Alex Wise talks with “ganjapreneurs” Matthew Huron, Nancy Whiteman, Kevin Dolan and Shelly Peterson, about the horticulture, distribution, extraction, and marketing of the nation’s fastest growing crop, and learns what legalization would mean for their respective businesses.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Legalization 59 mins – “Scott Greaten, Executive Director, Friends of the Eel River Michael Sutton, Former President, California Fish and Game Commission Growing pot indoors consumes large amounts of water and energy. Growing illegal weed outdoors often involves trespassing on national or state parks. Runoff from cannabis farms pollutes streams and ecosystems. Could legalizing marijuana in California result in more efficient harvesting that uses less water and results in less environmental destruction? California voters will have a chance to weigh in on legalizing marijuana on the November ballot. Join us for a conversation about the climate, energy and water impacts of changing the way one of the state’s biggest crops is produced.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martial Arts 68 mins – “Join us on this episode as I talk with my good friend Roy Dean (Black Belt in Bjj, Aikido, and Judo) about Jiu Jitsu, Martial Arts, running a business, and much more.” At the link right-click “Download Episode Here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martial Arts Path 69 mins – “Richard Ryan is one of the world’s foremost authorities on martial arts, combative weaponry and self-defense. Recognized as a pioneer of the art and science of Reality Martial Arts, Ryan has taught his systems to countless civilians, law enforcement and military special ops in over 30 countries. Holding Black Belt level or above in more than 12 different martial arts, Ryan was also a U.S. Protective Service Agent and Master Firearms and Edged Weapons Instructor for the U.S. Marksmanship Academy and the world famous Gunsite Training Center where he created groundbreaking integrated force programs. …He is the founder of the Dynamic Combat martial art system regarded as one of the most sophisticated and effective fighting arts in the world today. …Richard’s programs and presentations are brutally honest, direct and highly enlightening and the success of his systems can be attributed to his no- nonsense approach to the martial arts and personal protection.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MCAT Course 22 mins – “Today’s session gives way to the inaugural episode of The MCAT Podcast, the newest member of the MedEd Media. The MCAT Podcast has been in the works for about eight months now. Being one of the biggest hurdles in getting into medical school, Ryan is motivated to giving students sufficient information they need to know to successfully crush the MCAT. The Medical School Headquarters has collaborated with Next Step Test Prep to create a whole new podcast called The MCAT Podcast, which is going to be its own separate weekly podcast that you can subscribe to on iTunes, Google Play, etc. Go to www.themcatpodcast.com and sign up to be notified when it’s going to be on iTunes….” At the link right-click “Direct download: PMY193.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memphis Sound 47 mins – “So much American history is the story of power, race and money. And that story runs extra deep and vivid in the old Tennessee river city of Memphis. On the Chickasaw Bluffs, above the Mississippi, Memphis moved after the Civil War, says my guest today, from slaves and cotton to sex and song. There was a furious battle for power. For a time, blacks won a notable share. It built Beale Street. The blues. The roots of the Memphis sound. This hour On Point: we’re walking in Memphis, and an amazing chapter in American history.” (2 guests) At the link right-click the small cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Michael K. Williams 37 mins – “Actor Michael K. Williams is known for playing morally ambiguous, sometimes violent characters. As Omar Little on The Wire, Williams was a fearless stick-up man who stole money from drug dealers. In Boardwalk Empire, he played Chalky White, a bootlegger in Prohibition-era Atlantic City. Now, in the new HBO series The Night Of, he’s a powerful inmate in New York’s notorious Rikers Island Prison. Williams tells Fresh Air‘s Terry Gross that playing such intense characters sometimes takes a psychic toll. “When I wear these characters to the extent that I wear them to, that [energy’s] gotta go somewhere,” he says. The dark energy of Omar Little, for example,was a little too close to home.” Williams struggled with addiction while he worked on The Wire and eventually sought help at a church in New Jersey. Now the actor practices prayer and meditation, which help him separate from his work. “One of the main things that’s changed from when I was first on The Wire and to now — in, particularly, The Night Of — is I know how to differentiate myself from the character. … I still go in just as deep, but now I have the tools … to pull myself out of that.” Williams is also the host of the new Viceland series Black Market, which explores underground economies in America and around the world.” At the link “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minimalist Life 47 mins – “A battle is being waged across the nation this summer – in closets, garages, attics, even drawers. It’s a struggle against…stuff. For some, the goal is to declutter, for others it’s much more – a desire to pare down on material objects and prioritize experiences instead. In a messy and complex world, many of us are seeking simplicity, but try as we may, getting it isn’t simple. Marie Kondo’s “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up” has sold nearly 6 million copies, while the duo known as “The Minimalists” attract 4 million visitors annually to their website and have just released a new film that tries to get us to focus on “the important things.” The appeal of minimalism…and why it’s so difficult to achieve.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Nootropic Drugs etc 44 mins – “If you could take a pill that would enhance your concentration, increase your productivity, and reduce your stress levels, would you do it? Or is that cheating? On today’s show, the science and ethics behind a growing class of so-called “smart-drugs”.

People Stories 51 mins – “When Jeannette Quinn first traveled to Uganda in the summer of 2006 she knew it would be an enriching experience. But then she met a little boy named Opiyo Ivan and her life took the most unexpected turn. Jeannette Quinn has started the Opiyo Ivan Memorial Fund, and proceeds will go to support her organization, AFENDS, which provides services for individuals (and their families) in northern Uganda who suffer from epilepsy or nodding disease/syndrome.” Three different and unusual stories follow this one. At the link click the circle with three dots, then right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physics Professor 29 mins – “Keith talks with Allen Hermann, a physicist who has worked and taught at universities such as the University of Colorado and Tulane University, and at scientific hubs such as the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Solar Energy Research Institute. Hermann talks about his past groundbreaking research, how he missed a chance at making millions with one of his discoveries, and about his rewarding life as a jazz trombonist.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pig Farming 24 mins – “Not long ago, the biggest moral dilemma would-be meat eaters faced, was whether or not to put meat on their forks. Today, with the proliferation of options like “humanely raised,” “grass fed,” “free range,” and on and on, there’s a lot more to chew on.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Is ‘ethical meat’ helping pigs or salving consciences? Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160728_69259.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Play Doh Invention 9 mins – “When no one wants your product, don’t change the product, change the name.” At the link find the title, “Episode 28: An Incredible Reinvention, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files Episode_28__An_Incredible_Reinvention.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pokemon Go 22 mins – “This summer’s craze features cartoon characters, smartphones and crowds of people roaming the streets. Pokemon Go is a game and a popular one. But critics say it isn’t just fun and games – it’s discriminatory. The Current looks at race, class and Pokemon.” At the link find the title, “Pokemon Go discriminates based on bias embedded in algorithm, says prof, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160728_68319.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protectionism in the US 26 mins – “Edward Stourton examines America’s long history of resistance to free trade, and asks why it has again become such a potent political force. Donald Trump’s most consistent policy has been opposition to free trade agreements, which he sees as unfair, particularly with China. On the Democratic side, Bernie Sanders has been equally opposed, if for different reasons, while Hillary Clinton has had to tack away from her previous support for free trade pacts.” At the link find the title, “Protectionism in the USA, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p042nqbj.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Camps in Greece 64 mins – “A bunch of us from our show went to refugee camps all over Greece. We found people falling in love, kids mad at their parents for dragging them to Europe, women doing their laundry in a baseball stadium locker room, and hundreds of people living at a gas station—sitting next to the pumps, smoking. Also: wild pigs. 57,000 refugees are stuck in Greece, making homes in some surprising locations. We hear what that’s really like.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Richard Dawkins 60 mins – “ In the 1960s and 70s, a revolution took place in the way we understand human nature. Out went Marx and Freud, and in came a rational, scientific approach to the way we see ourselves. At the vanguard of that revolution was Richard Dawkins, the evolutionary biologist whose book ‘The Selfish Gene’ changed the thinking not just of other scientists but of all of us, and propelled its author to intellectual stardom as the modern heir to Darwin. …It was Dawkins, too, who invented the word ‘meme’ to describe the cultural equivalent of a gene – an idea, belief or practice that replicates itself from person to person and is subject to the same selective pressures as genes – whether it’s an age-old religious practice or a modern fad such as the ice bucket challenge. And on the subject of religion, the publication of ‘The God Delusion’ a decade ago marked the moment when Dawkins became the patron saint of atheism. The book turned him into the world’s leading controversialist – hero-worshipped by atheists, demonised by believers. But throughout the hubbub of being the celebrity scientist and the non-believers’ poster boy, Dawkins continued his scientific studies at New College, Oxford, and in obscure corners across the world – where he honed the art of observing and writing beautifully about nature, conveying his sense of wonder at how organisms developed their complexity over the ages.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roger Ailes 31 mins – “Ailes resigned last week amid allegations of sexual harassment. Biographer Gabriel Sherman joins Fresh Air to discuss the accusations, as well as Ailes’ influence on political discourse in America.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Rogue Justice 59 mins – “Karen Greenberg, director of Fordham University’s Center on National Security, talks about legal questions arising from policies and laws enacted to fight the U.S. war on terrorism. She’s interviewed by Ali Soufan, author of [The Black Banners].” At the link find the title, “After Words with Karen Greenberg, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.443526.MP3-STD.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Value 54 mins – “British geneticist Sir Paul Maxime Nurse recently discovered some fascinating secrets about his own hereditary background, long after he made the discoveries that won him a Nobel Prize in 2001. On the occasion of being honoured with the 2015 Henry Frie…” At the link find the title, “The Eminent Dr. Nurse, Jul, 2016,” right-click “The Eminent Dr. Nurse (Encore Feb 17, 2016),” right-click “Media files ideas_20160722_70095.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Segregational Custody 22 mins – “After news of more suicides by prisoners serving time in solitary confinement in Canada, there’s renewed debate about ending or changing the practice. But one guard says given the challenges facing those who work inside prison walls, it just won’t work.” At the link find the title, “Deaths of two prisoners in segregated custody renew solitary confinement debate, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160729_91600.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sewing Robot 15 mins – “Building a robot that can sew even simple clothes is surprisingly hard. A retired professor in Atlanta thinks he’s solved the problem. It could bring textile manufacturing back to America.” At the link find the title, “#715: The Sewing Robot,” right-click “Media files 20160803 pmoney podcast080316.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sound Engineer 28 mins – “Inside a Victorian sewer, with fat deposits sliding off the ceiling and disappearing down the back of his shirt, Trevor Cox had an epiphany. Listening to the strange sound of his voice reverberating inside the sewer, he wondered where else in the world he could experience unusual and surprising noises. As an acoustic engineer, Trevor started his career tackling unwanted noises, from clamour in the classroom to poor acoustics in concert halls. But his jaunt inside a sewer sparked a new quest to find and celebrate the ‘sonic wonders of the world’. In this episode he shares these sounds with Jim Al-Khalili and discusses the science behind them.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sports Business 64 mins – “Fifty years ago, many of the best players in the National Football League took jobs in the off-season to augment the salaries they earned playing football. Matthew Futterman of the Wall Street Journal and author of Players talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how much football and so many aspects of sports–from tennis to golf to apparel to broadcasting to Olympics–has become incredibly more lucrative. Futterman shares the insights from his book and how all that money has changed sports, the athletes who compete, and the fans who watch. “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stings and Stingers 52 mins – “Entomologist Justin O. Schmidt is on a mission. Some say it’s a brave exploration, others shake their heads in disbelief. His goal: to catalogue the painful effects of stinging insects on humans, mainly using himself as the gauge. Most people regard stinging insects as horrible pests, but by investigating their lifestyles and adaptations, Schmidt hopes to spread his passion for the inherently interesting story every animal on earth has to tell. Schmidt joins us to explore the world of stinging insects. Justin O. Schmidt is a biologist at Southwestern Biological Institute and is associated with the Department of Entomology at the University of Arizona. His new book is called Sting of the Wild” At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stress Concepts 89 mins – “Did you know that broccoli is actually toxic? It’s true; every time you eat one of those delicious little trees, you’re subjecting your body to a small amount of toxicity. Oddly enough, though, that’s a good thing. It’s one of the reasons that broccoli is a “healthy” food. You see, our bodies and minds have adapted to the harsh conditions of this world in such as a way that they actually improve when subjected to stress. That’s right – stress can be a good thing. In the case of our toxic broccoli, the cells in your body experience stress in response to the chemicals it contains. This stress response ends up bolstering the cells – as long as the stress load isn’t too high and there’s time for recovery. Mark Mattson, the chief of the neurosciences lab at the National Institute of Aging, explains this phenomenon in Dr. John Ratey’s book Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain: “Many of the beneficial chemicals in plans – vegetables and fruits – have evolved as toxins to dissuade insects and other animals from eating them. What they’re doing is inducing a mild, adaptive stress response in the cells. For example, in broccoli, there’s a chemical called sulforaphane, and it clearly activates stress response pathways in cells that upregulate antioxidant enzymes. Broccoli has antioxidants, but at the level you could get from your diet, they’re not going to function as antioxidants.” Unfortunately, stress usually gets a bad rap in the press – undeservedly so. Stress itself isn’t bad – it’s chronic stress that should be avoided. Stress that persists for a long period of time is what can cause a lot of problems. So in this episode, Martin and I will do our best to break down stress. Specifically, we’ll tackle: The biology of stress; The negative effects of chronic stress; 10 things you can do to mitigate bad stress; How you can use stress to your advantage.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stress Neurobiologist 29 mins – “Keith & Russ talk to Lawrence Reagan, a stress neurologist with the University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Neuroscience. Reagan talks about how stress affects the brain, with an emphasis on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and the connections between obesity & depression….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Role 49 mins – “Jeffrey Rosen explores how the US Supreme Court, once derided as the third branch of government, has become the busiest and most powerful institution in American politics, and how that makes the court’s current vacancy a particularly valuable prize in this presidential year.” At the link find the title, “Court in the Centre, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p042zc95.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Library 27 mins – “Away from the sound of bombs and bullets, in the basement of a crumbling house in the besieged Syrian town of Darayya, is a secret library. It’s home to thousands of books rescued from bombed-out buildings by local volunteers, who daily brave snipers and shells to fill it’s shelves. In a town gripped by hunger and death after three years without food aid, Mike Thomson reveals how this literary sanctuary is proving a lifeline to a community shattered by war. Produced by Michael Gallagher and translated by Mariam El Khalaf. *Omar, the FSA soldier who was the last voice heard in this programme has been killed in fighting* (Photo: Omar Abu Anas, a Free Syrian Army soldier reads on the front line)” At the link find the title, “Syria’s Secret Library, Jul, 2016,” right-click ‘Media files p042rlqb.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taurine 6 mins – “..Scientific studies suggest that small amounts of taurine are needed for muscles to work properly, and it also seems to be important for keeping the liver healthy, and plays a role in the brain – including a possible role in helping to control body weight. Tests in rats show that it also boosts the heart rate, can cut cholesterol, and may even help to treat people with congestive heart failure – where the heart doesn’t beat strongly enough – by increasing the force of the heart’s muscle contractions, and potentially could help treat other heart conditions too. But what about the levels found in drinks? Luckily for fans of these energy-boosting beverages, there’s no evidence that the high doses of taurine found in these drinks is harmful. However, what is risky is the caffeine they contain – in some cases, up to 300 milligrams, more than three times the amount in a strong cup of coffee. And high doses of caffeine are definitely associated with jitteriness, heart rhythm problems, seizures and even – in extreme circumstances – death, so that’s a better reason to limit your consumption of the stuff….” At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Taurine.mp3“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Toyota Acceleration Scandal 41 mins – “In the summer and fall of 2009, hundreds of Toyota owners came forward with an alarming allegation: Their cars were suddenly and uncontrollably accelerating. Toyota was forced to recall 10 million vehicles, pay a fine of more than $1 billion, and settle countless lawsuits. The consensus was that there was something badly wrong with the world’s most popular cars. Except that there wasn’t. What happens when hysteria overtakes common sense? If you’re looking to go deeper into the subjects on Revisionist History, visit Malcolm’s collection on iBooks at http://www.apple.co/MalcolmGladwell — iBooks will update the page every week with new recommendations.” At the link find the title, “Blame Game, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files PP3573562692.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universe Intro 60 mins – “Does time exist? Was our universe born from a Big Bang, or from a Big Bounce triggered by a former universe imploding? Is this the only universe, or are there infinite ones, all expanding in parallel and out of sight of each other? These are just some of the questions that were tackled by world-renowned physicists Carlo Rovelli and Christophe Galfard when they came to the Intelligence Squared stage, in this event chaired by BBC science star Helen Czerski……Rovelli and Galfard have found a way of explaining the mysteries of physics that has made them the most popular science communicators in their countries. In Italy, Rovelli has consistently outsold Fifty Shades of Grey with his book ‘Seven Brief Lessons on Physics’, which last year became a Sunday Times bestseller. Galfard — who gained his PhD as Stephen Hawking’s graduate student — won France’s Science Book of the Year for his book on the cosmos ‘The Universe in Your Hand’. There could hardly be a better moment for Rovelli and Galfard to shed light on the revelations that physics is making about the universe. Technology is allowing us to observe for the first time in reality phenomena that have until now only been suggested in theory. Earlier this year, the LIGO observatory in the US made the first ever detection of gravitational waves — 100 years after Einstein predicted the existence of these ripples in spacetime. Galfard describes the discovery as the beginning of ‘a totally new era for mankind’. He states: ‘We haven’t lived through such a thing since the advent of Galileo’s telescope, which changed the whole face of the universe. This is history in the making. Mankind will probably remember this in 1,000 years.’ Being able to see these waves, Galfard and Rovelli will explain, will let us peer into the very origins of matter and time.” At the link find the title, “Carlo Rovelli and Christophe Galfard on the Architecture of the Universe, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 275959051-intelligence2-carlo-rovelli-and-christophe-galfard-on-the-architecture-of-the-universe.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ursula Franklin Tribute 54 mins – “To commemorate the recent death, and to celebrate the remarkable life of Ursula Franklin, we turn to the IDEAS archives, and sample over forty years of appearances by the public intellectual who delivered the 1989 CBC Massey Lectures — “The Real World of” At the link find the title, “Peace and Justice – A Celebration of Ursula Franklin, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160725_55125.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Rights Restrictions 37 mins – “The Voting Rights Act of 1965 outlawed racial discrimination in voting. But author Ari Berman says a 2013 Supreme Court ruling blocks the enforcement.” At the link “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Walking in Cities 39 mins – “On this week’s podcast, we take a stroll through history with Lauren Elkin, as we talk about her book Flâneuse. The book combines first person and historical accounts to build a history of the women who have explored the world at street level. Elkin talks about iconic wanderers – Martha Gellhorn, Jean Rhys, George Sand – and shares her tips for anyone who wants to wander a city with a true mindset of a flâneuse. Then we are paid a visit by the Bookshop Band: Beth Porter and Ben Please, who write songs inspired by literature. After years of performing, Beth and Ben spent a year recording 10 albums, all to be released between 2016 and 2017. They talk about turning books into songs and perform two songs – Curious and Curiouser, based on The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland, and Once Upon a Time, inspired by the first lines of classic books.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Welfare Reform 34 mins – “In 1996, President Bill Clinton and the Congress undertook a reform effort to redesign the welfare system from one that many believed trapped people in a cycle of dependence, to one, that in the President’s words, would give people “a paycheck, not a welfare check …. Today, we are ending welfare as we know it.” Many of the key components implemented by Clinton can be traced back to a bureaucrat named Larry Townsend and a pilot program he operated in California called GAIN (Greater Avenues for Independence). Head of the welfare office in Riverside County, Townsend didn’t have much patience for the education-and-training route of existing welfare programs—the ones which helped welfare recipients gain more skills so they would fare better in the job market. Townsend’s approach was much more straightforward: get people into jobs as fast as possible….” At the link right-click the down-pointing a link and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Welfare Reform 44 mins -”What’s the best path out of poverty–work or education? Twenty years ago, welfare reformers came to this fork in the road and had to ask the question: Is it better to encourage welfare recipients to get a job, any job? Or is it better to support them while they get training and education that will eventually help them get better-paying jobs?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow near the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Control Lessons 21 mins – “They call fire chief Darby Allen a hero. But when wildfire started tearing through Fort McMurray, he didn’t feel like one. He shares what was going through his mind and his fear that many would die in the fire as we look back at the battle of the beast.” At the link find the title, “Fort McMurray Fire: Three men in charge recall the firefight they will never forget, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160727_32001.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WW II Science 16 mins – “Scientists were put to good use during the Second World War. John Westcott’s secret project was to design radars. His work not only helped the war effort – it also led to new branches of science. Originally aired 19/07/2013.” At the link find the title, “REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast – July 1942, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yoga for Bones 58 mins – “Do you think of yoga as exercise? Many people don’t. Yoga doesn’t seem like exercise that can combat osteoporosis. Yet physiatrist Loren Fishman, MD, has shown that certain yoga poses can improve bone mineral density and reduce fractures. … Find out whether Dr. Fishman’s yoga exercises could help strengthen your bones, counteract osteopenia or combat osteoporosis. His DVD demonstrating the poses is sold at his website, sciatica.org. Dr. Fishman also describes how he treats scoliosis, sciatica and rotator cuff injuries with specific yoga poses. This Week’s Guest: Loren Fishman, MD, is medical director of Manhattan Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in New York City. He is the author of ten books, including Healing Yoga and Yoga for Osteoporosis. He is associate editor of Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation and on staff at Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons. His website is sciatica.org. He published his report, “Twelve-Minute Daily Yoga Regimen Reverses Osteoporotic Bone Loss,” in Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation in April, 2016. …The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free for four weeks after the date of broadcast. After that time has passed, digital downloads are available for $2.99. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99. Buy the CD Download the mp3” At the link find the title, “Show 1043: How to Strengthen Bones and Fix Your Body with Yoga, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files PP-1043YogaBones.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 247 – Aug 5, 2016: 3D Printing Fingertip, Aleppo, Asteroid Science, Atlantis, Autism History, Avian Flu and Potatoes, Bank Changes, Barbara Boxer, Brazil’s Problems, Castrati History, Chemophobia, Chestnut Trees and Lettuce, Climate Paradox, Climate Warming Labels, Conservation Groups, Corn and Beets, Creative Confidence, Democratic Convention of 68, DMT Drug, Dropout Success, Ego Control, End of Life Law, Entomology, Epilepsy Story, Europe’s Bad Neighbors, Financial Mistakes by Retirees, Food Production, Future Farm, Genius Conditions, Girl Stories, GMO Controversy, Grit by Duckworth, Happy Birthday Ownership, Hearing Protection, Indian Farmer Suicides, Infectious Disease Review, Influence Elites, Internet Communications, Internet Governance, Jingle Music Trends, Lab Pregnancies, Laughter Medicine, Lions of Africa, Lonely Hearts Fraud, Los Diablos Firefighters etc, Lusitania and Child Prisoners, Mailer on Kennedy, Malawi Sex Initiation, Military Taps History, Mobile Technology Trends, Money and Politics, Mosquito Control and Strawberries, MTV History, Music Copyright History, Music Instrument Tuning, National Health System Changes, Occupational Segregation, Paleo Life, Papaya Farming, Pesticides, PhD Prospects in Australia, Physical Exercise, Police Shootings, Policeman’s Memoir, Publishing Jobs Decline, Ramon Parat Story, Recycling Rare Metals, Russian Sports Doping, Salmon and Bananas, Shia Sunni Split History, South Africa Reconciliation, Stanford President Interview, Strawberries, Tape Recorder History, Tesla Master Plan, Tiny Tim Story, Tomato Breeding and Social Media, Turkish Education Disruption, Uganda Food Production, US Business, Washington Square Riot, Water Issues, Welfare Background, Windows 10 Problems, Wired Co-founder, Women in Space, World War One-Australia

The 93 podcasts where you can hear the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 297 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 1o,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded.

3D Printing Fingertip 27 mins – “Police in the USA are seeking to unlock a murder victim’s phone using a 3D replica of fingertips. Click talks to the researcher behind the effort, Professor Anil Jain from Michigan State University. [Also] Mobile 360 – Africa Click’s Sammy Awami reports from the Mobile 360 Series Africa summit in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on the roadmap for Africa’s increased access and use of mobile technology. [Also] actigaze Do you still need your mouse to click or could you just use your eyes to select a command or chose a webpage? This could be the next big thing after touch screens? Click’s Roland Pease has been testing out “actigaze” software that could make eyeballing web pages more natural.[Also] The Danger of Automated Vehicles San Francisco is hosting the world symposium on Automated Vehicles, featuring experts involved at the cutting edge of this technology around the world. It comes at a time following the controversy over the fatal crash of a Tesla car while the driver was using its autopilot feature. Tesla is currently being investigated by Federal authorities about this case and at least one other. Some commentators are speculating that this tragedy could stall the advancement of automated vehicles. Alison van Diggelen reports from San Francisco.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aleppo Siege 20 mins – “For civilians living in war torn Aleppo, circumstances are becoming increasingly dangerous and desperate now that Syrian government-allied forces have cut off the only road leading in and out of rebel-held parts of the city.” At the link find the title, “Aleppo siege: Doctor fears more civilian casualties with road closed to Turkey, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160719_77297.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Allepo Life 24 mins – “She is 30 years old, a Syrian who had a good job in the UK but she went back to Syria because it is Zaina Erhaim’s home, and as a journalist, she has work to do. Zaina Erhaim brings us into her troubled world.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Syrian journalist Zaina Erhaim shares harrowing stories of life between bombings, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160720_17724.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astroid Science 36 mins – “Space ballistics has shown that the eye of the ‘Man in the Moon’ – the huge crater Mare Imbrium was most likely made by the impact of a huge proto-planet smashing into it. London’s Geological Secrets Dr Ruth Siddall from UCL and London Pavement Geology takes Roland on a whistle stop tour around London. They check out some geological sites, and there’s not a mountain, river bed or quarry in sight. We see granite that’s been impacted by comets, 400 million year old squid fossils on the steps of St Paul’s, a Jurassic beach right here at the BBC and finish with a geological pub stop. Honeyguides It’s known that the bird the Greater honeyguide works with local African villagers to show them where to find wild bee nests and their honey stores. But new research has shown that the birds respond more, and are more likely to find a hive when the human honey-hunters use a special call. Preserving the Local Taste of Cheese The taste, smell and appearance of a cheese come from the native bacteria in the initial raw milk. Due to increasing regulations for milk pasteurization, cheeses are losing their particular flavours and authenticity. In Normandy, in France, cheesemakers started working with researchers to set up a microbial bank in order to save the microorganisms responsible for the cheesy flavours.” At the link find the tile, “Smashing into the Moon, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04255x0.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atlantis 51 mins – “Around 360 BC, the Greek philosopher Plato wrote about a marvelous city that disappeared millennia earlier. Atlantis is one of the world’s great unsolved mysteries, despite the efforts of scholars, amateur sleuths, psychics, and conspiracy theorists. The journalist Mark Adams went on his own quest – not to find Atlantis itself, but to understand the people searching for it. Friday, he joins us to talk about the sunken city and the place it holds in our imagination.

Autism History 72 mins – “A big fresh take on autism that begins with Patient Zero.Go back in the annals of history, read closely, and you will find people and behaviors that fit our modern understanding of autism. But until the middle of the 20th century, no one had given it a name that was more than an insult. Now, we are in the midst of what some call an epidemic of autism. But that may just be about our evolving understanding of the syndrome itself. A new history tells the story of how that understanding has deepened and spread. This hour On Point, how we’ve come to understand autism. Tom Ashbrook” (3 guests) At the link right-click the small cloud under the Play button and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Avian Flu and Potatoes 66 mins – This episode of Talking Biotech features stories of genetically engineered chickens that do not spread the avian influenza virus. This year over 45 million birds have died or have been euthanized because of illness from the avian flu. Prof. Helen Sang of the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, Scotland is part of the research team that engineered chickens using a clever strategy– they can catch the virus and become ill, but they do not transmit it. She discusses the technology and its hurdles to commercialization. In the second segment Dr. David Spooner from the USDA ARS and University of Wisconsin talks about the origins of potatoes, the evidence of his path to domestication, and aspects about the future of potato biotechnology. Special guest co-host Amira- Executive Chef.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bank Changes 52 mins – “In a new book, legal scholar Mehrsa Baradaran argues that America has two systems for personal banking. The rich have personal bank accounts at brick-and-mortar businesses, while the poor either don’t bank at all or rely on payday lenders and check cashers that charge exorbitant rates and fees. The result, Baradaran says, is a sadly ironic situation where “the less money you have, the more you pay to use it.” She joins us Monday to explain how we got into this mess, and how we might get out of it.

Barbara Boxer 65 mins – ““One goal of this memoir is to inspire people to fight for change. It takes what I call the ‘art of tough,’ and I’ve had to do it all my life.” —Senator Barbara Boxer Barbara Boxer has made her mark, combining compassionate advocacy with outspokenness in a political career spanning more than three decades. Now, retiring from the U.S. Senate, she continues the work to which she’s dedicated 30 years in Congress. She will share her provocative and touching recollections of service, and her commitment to the fight for women, families, quality, environmental protection—all in a peaceful world. Sometimes lauded, sometimes vilified, but always standing tough, Boxer fought for her values even when her personal convictions conflicted with her party or the majority rule.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazil’s Problems P1 50 mins – “OTM is in Brazil this week. We delve into the web of challenges ensnaring the country: a recession, crime waves, corruption scandals, the Zika virus… all in the run-up to the Olympic Games. Plus, the complex crises facing the media industry at a time when rigorous reporting is more essential than ever. And, when 30,000 journalists descend on the country from around the world in just a couple of weeks, many will likely produce facile reports about Rio’s notorious favelas. We hear from activists and community journalists trying to wrest back the narrative and spark a debate about policing and race not unlike what’s unfolding in America.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazil’s Problems P2 11 mins – “Brazil’s crises have been very good for Sensacionalista, a site that’s based on The Onion and now one of the most popular “news” sites in the country. Two years ago, the group had 30,000 likes on Facebook. Today, it has 2.8 million. At times, real Brazilian headlines can seem absurd. For example, military police killed a jaguar, the national animal, at an Olympic-torch lighting ceremony; the interim president’s new cabinet only has white men; and just weeks before the Olympics, the tourism minister has resigned. Bob met co-founders Nelito Fernandes and Martha Mendonca at their home in Rio de Janeiro (they’re married) to hear about how the Brazilian public has been reading the news through the lens of satire — and what news is too awful even for jokes.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Castrati History 29 mins – “It’s hard to believe, but only a few centuries ago, young boys were castrated for the sole purpose of preserving their high-pitched singing voices. These boys—commonly referred to as Castrati—started out singing the high parts in church choirs, but, with the surging popularity of opera, soon amassed fame reminiscent of our modern pop stars. Listen as Between the Liner notes talks with Castrati expert Martha Feldman and Switched on Pop’s Charlie Harding about this unique piece of Europe’s musical past.” At the link find the title, “09: Castrati, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files 5786f87228c4a4c579701290.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chemophobia 60 mins – “Today chemophobia rules supreme. From fast-food establishments to farming critics, everyone seems to be an expert, except the experts! Talking Biotech #19 features The SciBabe, Yvette d’Entremont (@TheSciBabe). She has experience in the chemical industries and a background in applied toxicology. This is a light-hearted discussion of “toxic”, what it means, and what we really need to worry about. In the second part, Kevin Folta answers your questions, covering Dr. Don Huber, IARC and glyphosate, using his slides for your presentations, and student tracts in science communication.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chestnut Trees and Lettuce 60 mins – “This Talking Biotech Podcast features Dr. William Powell from SUNY, where he is co-Director of the American Chestnut Research and Restoration Project. The American Chestnut was a dominant forest tree in Appalachia until the late 1800’s when it was destroyed by disease. Dr. Powell’s project has used a transgenic approach to confer resistance to the disease, with the goal of repatriating the forest with this dominant tree species. Dr. Richard Michelmore from UC-Davis talks about lettuce history, genetics, genomics and breeding, with surprising information about lettuce that will make you never look at a head of lettuce the same way again.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Paradox 57 mins – “In this episode, psychologist Per Espen Stoknes discusses his book: What We Think About When We Try Not to Think About Global Warming. Stoknes has developed a strategy for science communicators who find themselves confronted with climate change deniers who aren’t swayed by facts and charts. His book presents a series of psychology-based steps designed to painlessly change people’s minds and avoid the common mistakes scientists tend to make when explaining climate change to laypeople.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 081-Climate_Paradox.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming Labels 5 mins – “Imagine going to fill up your tank and seeing a label on the pump that says what you are doing was causing climate change. The city of North Vancouver in Canada is launching a new program to encourage drivers to think about being more energy-efficient when they drive — and that fossil fuels contribute to climate change. The city council heard about the plan during a presentation last summer by teenage climate change activist Emily Kelsall. At 18, she’s already a seasoned climate change campaigner and public speaker. She learned about an effort by the climate activist organization Our Horizon to get warning labels on gas pumps. Kelsall contacted Our Horizon founder Robert Shirkey. Shirkey worked with the teenager to help her make a compelling case to the mayor and city council. “She really got our interest, so we did some investigation and found out that, yes indeed, we do have the ability to do that,” says Darrell Mussatto, mayor of North Vancouver… The new gas pump labels will appear in Kelsall’s small Vancouver suburb in the coming weeks. Since North Vancouver adopted the idea, other Canadian cities have passed resolutions in favor of similar labels. And in the US, Berkeley, San Francisco, Santa Monica and Seattle are also considering the warning label concept.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conservation Groups 30 mins – “Do you ever wonder what impact well-known wildlife groups like the Nature Conservancy and the World Wildlife Fund are having? Our guest today on Sea Change Radio is Jeremy Hance, an environmental journalist whose recent four-part series for Mongabay.com, “Conservation, Divided,” thoughtfully investigates how the field of global wildlife conservation has changed over the past 30 years. In his discussion with host Alex Wise, Hance provides an overview of his investigation, evaluates the effectiveness of the four big global conservation groups, and talks about the philosophical and strategic debates that have emerged as these non-profits struggle to stop mass extinction.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corn and Beets 50 mins – “This episode of Talking Biotech invites you to be the investigator and data collector. The internet is littered with images that claim animals will not eat GMO corn, which is curious because 80% of it goes to animal feed. We have arranged to test that hypothesis through Biology Fortified. If you visit this URL you can make a donation and receive a kit that you can use to generate data for this effort. The podcast discusses the experiment and the acquisition of 2000 lbs of corn to do it! The second part is Dr. Lee Panella talking about the domestication, biology and breeding of sugar beets. For such widely used, versatile and profitable crop, we know so little about it. Dr. Panella provides some new insights into this important agronomic crop.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creative Confidence 65 mins – “David Kelley, Founder, IDEO; Co-author, Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All Tom Kelley, Partner, IDEO; Co-author, Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All In conversation with Robert Sutton, Professor, Stanford University; Author, Scaling Up Excellence Creativity pioneers David and Tom Kelley have defined the very landscape of design-thinking with their founding of IDEO and the Stanford d.school, and with their iconic innovations in product, company culture and design education. Under the Kelley brothers’ leadership, IDEO churned out several illustrious products of the digital generation — from the first mouse for Apple to the thumbs up/thumbs down Tivo button. They championed the avant garde approach of using design to tackle sticky problems and translated those techniques to academia. Now they’ve chronicled their design-thinking backgrounds into a compelling narrative, Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All, outlining principles and strategies to unlock the design-fertile right brain in each of us. Hear from the best in the business to unleash your innovation in your personal and professional endeavors.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democratic Convention of 68 52 mins – “The year 1968 was a turning point in American political conventions. The Democrat’s chaotic affair in Chicago—and the battles outside between police and anti-war protesters—helped Richard Nixon win the presidency that year. And it led the Democrats to alter the way they choose their nominee. The GOP also has seen its fair share of drama since the party held its first national convention in 1856 in Philadelphia. The first ever nominating convention took place in 1831. It was another hundred years before a presidential candidate actually attended one. Today, they’re week-long televised events to promote the party and its rising stars. A panel of experts takes us through the high and low points of America’s colorful convention history.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

DMT Drug 56 mins – “DMT is a compound that is so interesting that entire books could be written about it. And, in fact, they have been. Strassman himself became known to the public for his book DMT: The Spirit Molecule, which detailed his studies into DMT and their fascinating results – as reported by the DMT-recipient research subjects. During short, medically-supervised sessions (DMT quickly breaks down within the human body, and though extremely potent, the psychedelic “trips” it produces last under ten minutes), subjects on higher doses would completely lose the sense of their physical bodies and enter a mental “hyperspace.” Once there, feeling mentally clear but “somewhere else,” many would experience emotions ranging from bliss to terror, and describe parallel existences that they felt to be “more real than reality.” Many volunteers also came away from the DMT trips with the uncanny sense that DMT is not merely creating a biochemical illusion, but instead is some sort of gate-opener to normally inaccessible “free-standing dimensions of reality.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dropout Success 90 mins – “Nick Hazelton is a 17 year old yak and hog farmer from Oregon. He dropped out of school last year to pursue his farm business, Hazelton Farms, that he now runs with his father, the former principal of the school he dropped out of. Nick also hosts and co-hosts a few libertarian anarchist podcasts, including his own podcast, the Anarcho-Yakitalism Podcast, as well as the Freedom Feens Radio Show and The Lolberts Podcast.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ego Control 66 mins – “How does our attitude toward ourselves affect our success or failure in the world of business or in friendship? Ryan Holiday, author of Ego Is the Enemy, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the role of ego in business, our personal lives, and world history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

End of Life Law 67 mins – “The California End of Life Option Act was slated to become effective on June 9, 2016. Sneed discusses the options people have for dying based on their choices, including the new option of medical aid in dying. People will also have time to discuss what each of us can do to ensure our wishes can be fulfilled for a death with dignity. The audience will be provided with helpful supplemental material and afforded the opportunity to better understand the choices and protections inherent in this important legislation.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Entomology 48 mins – “This week we’re joined by Richard Levine, communications director for the Entomological Society of America.  We discuss bees, butterflies, insecticides and some of the current issues in crop protection from an entomological perspective.  We then turn to the idea of promoting artwork using a science podcast, and the important effort to get Dr. Barbara McClintock on the ten dollar bill, replacing some guy. We discuss the barriers to her participation in science, and describe why she would be such a fitting presence on our currency– not just because she was a woman, not just because she was a scientist, but because she broken down barriers. Sign the petition!!!  http://www.barbaraonthebill.com/” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Epilepsy Story 57 mins – “Joyce welcomes The Honorable Tony Coelho, author of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to the show. Mr. Coelho will discuss the efforts to pass the ADA leading up to July 26, 1990 and his tireless work on both the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). CRPD is an international human rights treaty intended to protect the rights and dignity of persons with disabilities. Parties to the Convention are required to promote, protect, and ensure the full enjoyment of human rights by persons with disabilities and ensure that they enjoy full equality under the law.” At the link rght-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Europe’s Bad Neighbors 53 mins – “This week we feature a discussion presented by the Boston University Center for the Study of Europe, titled “Bad Neighborhoods: Europe’s Crisis and the Challenges of its Peripheries.” Our speakers are College of Europe in Bruges, Belgium Visiting Professor, Jacques Rupnik, and Yale University Visiting Professor of Political Science, Jolyon Howorth.” At the link right-click the cloud with arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Mistakes by Retirees 51 mins – “Do you know what common mistakes can cost retirees a fortune and lead to many sleepless nights? Recalling Warren Buffet’s quote about success – “To be a success you only have to do a very few things right, as long as you don’t do too many things wrong” – Paul lists 20 mistakes, along with specific advice how to avoid them. If an investor can protect him/herself from one of these mistakes, it can be a life changer. If you can avoid all 20 mistakes, it will likely lead to less risk, more money to spend in retirement, more to leave to others, and fewer worries about money and the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Production 12 mins – “We’re heading for a world population of 10 billion people — but what will we all eat? Lisa Dyson rediscovered an idea developed by NASA in the 1960s for deep-space travel, and it could be a key to reinventing how we grow food.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Research 59 mins – “This week the Talking Biotech Podcast shares an intriguing discussion with Dr. Jayson Lusk. Dr. Lusk is an agricultural and food economist at Oklahoma State University. He has analyzed many facets of consumer choices, consumer behaviors, and the potential costs of policy change in agriculture. More importantly, he is a sought after speaker and author, sharing his expertise and experiences in many industry and public forums. He is a prolific author, and his books The Food Police and Unaturally Delicious are written for a familiar audience and contain interesting and colorful stories about the past, present and future of food technology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future Farm 37 mins– “Several weeks ago there was a request for Talking Biotech Podcast to interview Prof Graeme Martin. Prof Martin has a long career in animal reproductive biology, and in recent times has had more focus on how to test new strategies in supporting livestock, crops and the nation’s resident biodiversity. His “Clean, Green and Ethical” approach to animal production dovetails with novel strategies to sustainably raise crops in no-till systems as part of the Future Farm 2050 Project. The discussion describes some simple, logical, low-cost techniques to increase crop production with less impact on the environment and in the context of minimal water resources. This was a wonderful interview that jogs out-of-the-traditional thinking to address key issues in farm sustainability going forward. Please visit (and Like!) the Future Farm 2050 Facebook PageAt the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genius Conditions 52 mins – “Where does genius come from? Some people say geniuses are born, or that they’re made by thousands of hours of work. But what if genius is actually grown, like a plant? Travel writer Eric Weiner has scanned the globe and come to exactly that conclusion. He says genius arises in clumps at particular places and times when certain ingredients are present. Think Ancient Greece, 14th-century Florence, or modern-day Silicon Valley. Weiner joins us Tuesday to explain his theory of the geography of genius.

Girl Stories 52 mins – “Snap Judgment (Storytelling, with a BEAT) mixes real stories with killer beats to produce cinematic, dramatic, kick-ass radio. Snap’s raw, musical brand of storytelling dares listeners to see the world through the eyes of another. Produced by WNYC Studios and Snap Judgment.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Controversy 70 mins – “This week’s podcast is an important analysis of two published reports. First, the results from the famous Rothamstead wheat trial show that their transgene does not confer resistance to aphids, inconsistent with their laboratory findings. While this outcome was considered to be a successful, reliable answer, it was billed as an abject failure on anti-biotech activist websites. Today we revisit the issues of publication and peer-review, and the story of the threats of vandalism against the experiment. We then will speak with Prof. John Pickett from Rothamstead Research Institute. We’ll discuss the lab work the trials, and future directions. The second part of the podcast discusses the recent publication from Adyydurai et al that claims transgenic soy produces abnormal amounts of formaldehyde, relative to non-transgenic controls. The conclusion comes from a computational approach that was never experimentally validated. Since, I have extended an offer to test their hypothesis, yet they have no accepted the opportunity to examine if their prediction is in fact correct. Meanwhile, they are using this paper as a warning about transgenic crops.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grit by Duckworth 69 mins – “How important is grit relative to talent? Can grit be taught? Angela Duckworth of the University of Pennsylvania and author of Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance talks with with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the nature of success in work, play and life. How much does grit matter? Is grit malleable or something we’re born with? Duckworth discusses her research on these questions and how to think about what it means for a child and an adult to thrive.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Happy Birthday Ownership 35 mins – “Jennifer Nelson is a documentary film maker who wanted to make a movie about the song “Happy Birthday to You.” When she inquired about using the song in her film the owners of the song forced her to pay for it, and she did. However, while Jennifer Nelson was doing research for her film she uncovered some evidence that could prove that the people she paid may not actually own the song, and never did.” At the link find the title, “05: Who Owns Happy Birthday? Dec, 2015,” right-click “Media files 5786f87228c4a4c579701294.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hearing Protection 19 mins – “The United States Marine Corps buys a lot of foam ear plugs. …But there’s a problem with earplugs on the battlefield. Soldiers won’t wear them. If they do wear them, they may miss other important (softer) noises happening around them. The result is lots of service members coming home from battle with tinnitus or hearing loss. In fact, for as long as the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has reported such statistics, tinnitus and hearing loss have remained the number one and two most common injuries of service members. Doctor Eric Fallon, former chief audiologist at Walter Reed Medical Center and now on the staff at 3M, is looking for solutions. He says the noise environment of the modern battlefield can change very quickly….Eric Fallon believes the solution to all of these problems is a device called TCAPS (Tactical Communication and Protective Systems). Designed as either internal earbuds or external earmuffs, TCAPS protect a person’s hearing while still allowing them to hear the world around them through built-in environmental microphones. In some cases, these devices are integrated with radio capability.TCAPS diagram via the DoD … TCAPS have been around since the early 2000s, but so far have been mostly used by special forces (with little or no use by conventional ground forces). Eric Fallon says it’s been difficult to get the military to invest in this kind of hearing protection. He has to make the argument that TCAPS not only protect hearing but also make soldiers more effective on the battlefield….Over-the-ear TCAPS can be hot and sweaty, so many soldiers will seek relief by removing them. To a gear-laden foot soldier, they may end up being perceived as just one more thing to carry. Another factor limiting the use of TCAPS is expense: they cost anywhere from about $280 (for a set that does not connect to radio) to upwards of $2,000….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the episode title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Farmer Suicides 46 mins – “In discussion of genetically engineered crops there is frequent reference to farmer suicides in India. Claims are made that Indian farmers build massive debt for cotton seeds, they become beholden to Monsanto for the money, and then kill themselves. This story is repeated ad nauseum by Vandana Shiva and others that exploit the untimely deaths of farmers for political gain, and to foment anger against biotechnology. Today’s podcast features Dr. Ronald Herring. Dr. Herring is a Professor of Government and International Professor of Agriculture and Rural Development at Cornell University. Dr. Herring is a social scientist that has carefully studied the situation in India. Guest host Kavin Senapathy interviews Dr. Herring and provides perspective of a first-generation Indian-American in the discussion. Kavin Senapathy is a science writer and mom, who frequently writes for Forbes and other venues. Her twitter handle is @ksenapathy” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infectious Disease Review 24 mins – Infectious Disease specialist reviews literature with its current problems and trends. At the link find the title, “Puscast: July 1 to 15, 2016.,” right-click “Media files jula16.m4a” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Influence Elites 48 mins – “In this IPR Public Lecture Professor Janine Wedel – IPR Global Chair and Professor in the School of Policy, Government, and International Affairs at George Mason University – introduces a new breed of influence elite that has emerged over the past several decades. In contrast to the ‘power elites’ described by sociologist C. Wright Mills a half century ago, she argues, the muscle of today’s influence elites resides at least as much in social networks as in command-and-control bureaucracy. These novel elites are less visible, less stable, and more mobile and global in reach than their forebears. They hold sway through informal, flexible, and unaccountable means and use consulting firms, think tanks, nonprofits, and ‘grassroots organisations’, among other entities, as vehicles of influence, not to mention the Internet and social media. Professor Wedel also contends that today’s influence elites largely defy democratic oversight. Conventional concepts inadequately capture their modus operandi and roles in contemporary democratic states. Yet these players and their practices are systemic and widespread across at least some global venues and Western democracies in arenas ranging from energy and health care to finance and foreign policy. Understanding how today’s influence elites operate is crucial, she concludes – both because their practices are far-reaching and because they dominate decisions that affect the entire world. This IPR Public Lecture took place on 28 April 2016” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Communications 58 mins – “Virginia Heffernan, author of Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art, talks to Leo about growing up at the dawn of the digital age, raising good digital citizens, and the evolution of bullying – has Twitter civilized us, or made us more barbaric?” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Governance 59 mins – “…show # 256, May 20, my interview with Francesca Musiani of the French National Centre for Scientific Research, Profs. Derrick L. Cogburn of American University’s School of International Service (SIS), and Laura DeNardis of American University’s School of Communication, co-editors of The Turn to Infrastructure in Internet Governance. Francesca, Derrick and returning guest Laura, along with co-editor Nanette Levinson, have gathered leading scholars and thinkers on the state of Internet operations. This area is critically important as the Internet moves into governance by international, rather than American, organizations. Particularly given the chaotic state of our public discourse, it is essential for policymakers to understand the various forces that operate to expand and constrain the Internet. In our discussion, we covered a range of topics, from Internet governance politics to whether international bodies can take on this complex task. I greatly enjoyed this wide-ranging discussion!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jingle Music Trends 33 mins – “Jingles are traditionally defined as short songs about a product that are written for TV or radio, but—with songs like Poo-Pourri’s “Imagine Where You Can Go” being released on the internet—does the traditional definition need to be expanded? Listen as Tim Taylor, author of “The Sounds of Capitalism” and Helen Zaltzman, the host of The Allusionist, take us through the century long history of ad music, and examine what jingles sound like in the internet age.” At the link find the title, “10: Jingle Brains, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files 5786f87228c4a4c57970128f.mp3” nd select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lab Pregnancies 52 mins – “We talk to Hank Greely, director of the Center for Law and the Biosciences at Stanford University’s School of Medicine about his new book The End of Sex and the Future of Human Reproduction.” At the link right-click “142 Hank Greely – The End of Sex, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 5bf39516-94bb-4019-b881-a5d056adda3c.mp3,” right-click “Media files 5bf39516-94bb-4019-b881-a5d056adda3c.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Laughter Medicine 26 mins – “You’ve probably heard that laughter is the best medicine. This week, we set out to see if there’s any truth to this idea. First, our host Mary Harris went with Kurt Andersen, the host of Studio 360, to try something called laughter yoga. Its participants claim that laughing heals all kinds of ailments. It may sound far-fetched, but some scientists think laughter might actually have some measurable health benefits. Then reporter Amanda Aronczyk looked whether laughter can be good medicine for our doctors — especially when they’re dealing with taboo things like death and sex. To find out, she spoke to a medical ethicist who teaches improv to doctors and nurses. She discovered that what’s funny when doctors joke may depend on who is listening.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lions of Africa 50 mins – “The trophy killing of Cecil the Lion last year by an American dentist in Zimbabwe brought new attention to the plight of African lions. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service gave legal protection to African lions under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, and several airlines have since banned shipments of trophies of lions and other big game. Yet many conservationists and big cat experts says the real threat to lions is habitat loss and communities who retaliate—and understandably so—against these big cats who kill their livestock. Guest host Frank Sesno and a panel of [4] guests look at new efforts to save lions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Lonely Hearts Fraud 36 mins – “Jesse always wanted to fall in love. So when the perfect woman started writing him letters, it seemed too good to be true. Because it was. This week, a story about a con — with a twist. When the con was exposed, its victims defended the con artists. They still wanted to believe the lie.” At the link find the title, “Encore of Episode 7: Lonely Hearts, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160725_hiddenbrain_episode7.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Los Diablos Firefighters etc 45 mins – [First segment of several concerns the firefighters.] “In 2014, Southeast Asian was the new “it” cuisine. Then it was southern Mediterranean, then Peruvian… Now simple, “back to the land” cooking is decidedly on-trend. So why aren’t locavores swarming around Native American cuisine? Today on the show, the challenges of branding America’s truly native food. Then, in some of its darkest hours, America has turned to superhero comics for an escape – so have the nation’s citizens. We speak to the editor of an anthology exploring the relationship between writers and the heroes who inspired them.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lusitania and Child Prisoners 62 mins – “A captain’s log is a simple thing: the date, the time, maybe the weather — and the current status of a long journey. You wouldn’t know from the cryptic notations what weird worlds lurk beneath. On this week’s show, stories behind those cryptic notations — including a concentration camp in China that housed groups of Girl Scouts. Also, Aziz Ansari explains the significance of a Thanksgiving text message, and Etgar Keret destroys a marriage piece by piece.” At the link you can listen. Downloads cost $.99; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Mailer on Kennedy 24 mins – “Before anyone foresaw a time when a television celebrity could become president—hello, Cleveland—Norman Mailer wrote in Esquire that John F. Kennedy was a mythical hero who could finally unite the business of politics with the business of stardom. His legendary 1960 reported essay, “Superman Comes to the Supermart,” about J.F.K. and the Democratic political convention, changed the rules for how we understand our political candidates as brands, and how we’re allowed to write about them. Mailer archivist and biographer J. Michael Lennon joins host David Brancaccio to discuss Mailer’s legacy, what his essay wrought, and how it continues to ripple through our political culture and be proven prescient again and again.” At the link find the title, “Superman Comes to the Supermarket, by Norman Mailer, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13153/3907831/Superman-Comes-to-the-Supermarket-by-Norman-Mailer.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malawi Sex Initiation 26 mins – “Ed Butler explores the secretive and shocking world of Malawi’s ‘hyenas’. These are the men hired to sexually initiate adolescent and pre-adolescent girls – some said to be 12 years old, or even younger. It’s a traditional custom that is endorsed and funded by the communities themselves, even the children’s families. We meet some of the victims, the regional chief campaigning to stop the practice, and the hyenas themselves, and ask if enough is being done to stamp out a custom that’s not just damaging on a human scale, but is also undermining the country’s economic development.” At the link find the title, “’Stealing Innocence’ in Malawi, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0422cch.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Taps History 36 mins – “Taps is a 24 note bugle call that was composed during the American Civil War. It is the only piece of music that is required to be performed at a United States military funeral. Oddly, when it was written it was never intended to be played at funerals. It was supposed to tell soldiers when to go to sleep.” At the link find the title, “07: Extinguish Lights, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files 5786f87228c4a4c579701292.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mobile Technology Trends 30 mins – “Social media was briefly blacked out during the failed coup in Turkey. In past years the president has denounced social media but in the last week he has gone on Twitter and FaceTime to encourage his supporters to come out onto the streets to back him. Click talks to Arzu Geybullayeva from Global Voices. In each human brain, there are about 86 billion neurons interacting with each other. Visualising such complex networks, with their incredibly high number of elements and the various different forms of interaction between them, seems like quite a challenge. Some artists, however, find it stimulating and inspiring. The New York and Istanbul based artist and technologist Burak Arikan is tackling this challenge with his platform graph commons. Julia Lorke visited Burak in Istanbul to hear more about the interactive mapping tool and how the tense political climate in Turkey inspired him to discover new applications for this tool. Will Apple’s New Patent Push Delete on Ability to Record Police? Apple has patented a tool which may be able to use a laser to block smart phones from recording footage. Might this be used by police forces in the future to stop citizens from recording overzealous policemen carrying out arrests and using force beyond that which is reasonably required? Click hears from Nicole Ozer from the American Civil Liberties Union. GPS: Pinpoint Click looks at the history of GPS (the Global Positioning System). This space-based navigation system uses satellites to provide location information anywhere on Earth, where there is an unobstructed line of sight to the relevant satellites. So how ubiquitous has the use of GPS become in everyday navigation? It has been almost impossible to get lost – since the first iPhone equipped with GPS tracking and mapping was released in 2008. Click talks to Greg Milner, the author of a new book called Pinpoint, to find out more.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” (for 30 days) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Money and Politics 50 mins – “Since the Supreme Court’s Citizen’s United ruling six years ago, the flow of so-called dark money into federal elections has been well documented. A much less recognized phenomenon is spending by outside groups in state and local elections – mayoral races, public utility commission contests, school board votes. In 2014 the amount spent by unidentified donors on these smaller stages was nearly 40times the amount spent just four years earlier. And, critics say, a little money in these elections can go a very long way. A discussion about concerns over money and influence in state and local politics.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Mosquito Control and Strawberries 60 mins – “This week’s podcast discusses Kevin Folta’s public records situation for 60 seconds. That is followed by a talk with Dr. Andrew McKemey from Oxitec in Oxford, England. Oxitec has a technology that allows rearing of male mosquitoes that transmit a gene that disrupts offspring from developing. This technology has been show to work field situations, providing potential solutions to mosquito-borne disease. Dr. McKemey describes the technology and addresses ecological concerns. In the second part Dr. Phil Stewart from Driscoll’s Strawberry Associates talks about careers in plant breeding. There is a desperate need for plant breeders in both industry and academia. These high-paying, satisfying careers outnumber the supply of graduating students to fill the positions. Dr. Stewart discusses his job, the required preparations, and how interested students can target these lucrative and fulfilling career paths.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MTV History 47 mins – “In 1981, no one believed people would watch a cable channel that aired music videos 24 hours a day. This is the story about how MTV proved them all wrong.” At the link find the title, “03: I Want My MTV, Oct, 2015, right-click “Media files 5786f87228c4a4c579701296.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Appreciation 34 mins – “A new study has confirmed a sad truth about our listening habits – people stop discovering new music around age 33. Today on Word of Mouth, a seasoned music editor offers tips on how not to get stuck listening to the songs you loved in high school for the rest of your life.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Copyright History 36 mins – “Imagine if all your favorite songs were banned from the radio. Well, that actually happened during the Great Radio Boycott of 1941. The United State’s most famous songwriters collectively decided to pull their catalogues from the public airwaves. This was their response to the radio stations refusing to pay a fair price for the music they broadcast. The boycott lasted for only ten months, but the consequences were far reaching, especially for one entertainer named Sharkey. Sharkey was forced to watch as his radio career became collateral damage in this historic battle.” At the link find the title, “04: Why Won’t They Let Sharkey on the Radio? Nov, 2015,” right-click “Media files 5786f87228c4a4c579701295.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Musical Instrument Tuning 33 mins – “Back in the day, every A-list philosopher and scientist argued over the best method for tuning a musical instrument. The battles they fought were some of the fiercest intellectual scuffles the western world has ever seen. In 2003, Stuart Isacoff published a book about those scuffles. The book focused on the history of one particular tuning system called Equal Temperament and how it emerged from the tuning-wars more popular than ever. In a weird twist of historical irony, when Stuart Isacoff published his book about Equal Temperament he found himself caught in the middle of a tuning scuffle of his own.” At the link find the title, “02: The Tuning Wars, Sep, 2015,” right-click “Media files 5786f87228c4a4c579701297.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Health System Changes 18 mins – “The “internal market” was created after the 1987 UK general election focused attention on inadequate funding in the NHS, long waiting lists for elective surgery, and large unwarranted variations in clinical care. Economists attributed these problems to a lack of incentives for efficiency, and the remedies offered included increasing competition…” at the link find the title, “Should we scrap the internal market in England’s NHS, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 273811898-bmjgroup-should-we-scrap-the-internal-market-in-englands-nhs.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Occupational Segregation 38 mins – “Overt discrimination in the labor markets may be on the wane, but women are still subtly penalized by all sorts of societal conventions. How can those penalties be removed without burning down the house?” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paleo Life 60 mins – “For this episode we have my friend Jeff Tucker as our guest. Jeff is the director of CrossFit Gymnastics, former competitive gymnast, former firefighter, homesteader, and all around cool guy. Listen in as we talk coaching, business, running a gym, gymnastics, homesteading, and lots more.” At the link right-click “Download Episode Here,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Papaya Farming 82 mins – “The story of how genetic engineering saved the Hawaiian papaya industry gets lost in the discussion of agronomic crop uses of the technology. This story is important because this is not just a story of technology. It is the story of people. Joni Kamiya tells the story of growing up on her family’s farm and the changes that came with the virus and how the genetically engineered saved production of this traditional crop for their family. Follow Joni on Twitter at @HIFarmersDtr, and her blog at hawaiifarmersdaughter.com The second part of the podcast visits with Cornell plant virologist Dr. Dennis Gonsalves. He studied papaya ringspot virus in the 1970’s and 1980’s, designing clever solutions to treat the disease that plagued the industry in his home state. Into the 1990’s he teamed with others working in genetic engineering to develop a solution for papaya. While the first half of his interview is about the disease and the techniques used to solve it, the second half is about the satisfaction of being a kid growing up, going to university, studying under brilliant and kind supervisors that taught him to think about science, but to also think about people.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pesticides 56 mins – “The topic of “pesticides” is the new frontier in the opposition to agricultural biotechnology. Opponents of the technology blame new genetic improvement methods for perceived increases in chemical controls for plant, animal and fungal pests. However, scientists argue that our pest control strategies are increasingly focused, less toxic, and work better. This episode features an interview with Dr. Steve Savage. He is a life-long expert in chemical control of insects and weeds, and has practical experience in evaluating both organic and conventional strategies. He joins us on Talking Biotech to clarify many of the concerns about pesticide usage.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PhD Prospects in Australia 8 mins – “Karen Patterson is finalising her PhD ready for submission. It follows four years’ work. Karen investigated clinical associations of antibodies and DNA damage in the rare autoimmune disease, scleroderma. Despite publication of her work in a recognised journal, and an impressive list of awards and recognition, Karen describes a bleak outlook for her career options in Australia. She presents ideas for changes to PhD programs and science funding to get more money into scientific research. Kirsty Short is an early career researcher at The University of Queensland studying flu infections. She has funding for one year. Then it’s the big unknown.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physical Activity 12 mins – “Melody Ding discusses a new Lancet Series about physical activity and health, describing a global pandemic of inactivity that needs urgent attention.” At the link find the title, “Physical Activity Series: The Lancet: July 28, 2016,” right-click “Media files 27july.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Shootings 48 mins – “We hear from Tom Gibbons, a former Philadelphia police officer, who was shot three times. We’ll also hear from Eric Adams, who has marched against police brutality, and served as an NYPD officer. He was beaten by police when he was 15, and now, as a black father, he worries about his son. Mat Johnson reads an essay about what the craft of storytelling can offer us as we try to make sense of our times.” At the link click the circle with three dots, then right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Policemans Memoir 58 mins – “Former New York Police Department Deputy Inspector Corey Pegues discusses his book, [Once a Cop: The Street, the Law, Two Worlds, One Man], about his experiences in law enforcement.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Corey Pegues, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.444963.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publishing Jobs Decline 19 mins – “The fundamental quarrel for publishing and technology is the struggle between culture and commerce. This left brain/right brain dichotomy, says analyst Thad McIlroy, explains why the book business continues to fight an uphill battle in the Digital Revolutionary War. In June, the US federal government’s Bureau of Labor Statistics counted up the slaughter on that battlefield, reporting grim job losses for the book business specifically, and the media business generally. The number of book industry jobs have fallen by a quarter since 2006 (down by nearly 25,000 positions), and by almost a third since the peak years in the 1990s. Thad McIlroy sees the decline in publishing employment as primarily the consequence of business consolidation and workplace efficiency. The unintended consequence, he explains, throws up a roadblock to the digital transformation….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ramon Sabat Story 44 mins – “Ramón Sabat once owned Panart Records, the largest indie label in Cuba. Legendary Cuban vocalists like Celia Cruz and Olga Guillot made their first recordings with Panart. Nat King Cole recorded his first Spanish album in Panart Studios. Success, however, did not come easy to Panart. Ramón Sabat had to overcome the dirty tactics of a rival American-owned record label and surmount the prohibitive poverty that barred many Cubans from owning a record collection. The only force strong enough to stop Panart Records was the Cuban National Government.” At the link find the title, “06: That’s How Cuba Sang, Jan, 2016,” right-click “Media files 5786f87228c4a4c579701293.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recycling Rare Metals 13 mins – “Every time we buy new electronic devises, and discard old ones, we generate electronic waste. The most common are old computers, televisions and mobile phones. The value is in the metals used in circuit boards and wiring. Old batteries too contain valuable metals such as nickel. As Veena Sahajwalla explains, copper ore contains a maximum of 3 per cent copper, whereas a circuit board can contain up to 20 per cent copper. The challenge is to collect the material, and process it, ideally, locally. At the Centre for Sustainable Materials, Research and Technology at UNSW, researchers are investigating the economics and practicalities of e-waste recycling saving the embodied energy, and keeping rare resources, skills and jobs in Australia.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Sports Doping 20 mins – “With the Rio Games just weeks away, an independent investigation confirming widespread state-sponsored doping by Russian Olympic athletes. Can international sporting competitions ever be clean and should the IOC ban Russia from competing?” At the link find the title, “Should Russia be banned from the Olympics following McLaren doping report? Jul, 2016,” right-click Media files current_20160720_21565.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salmon and Bananas 83 mins – “Salmon is an outstanding food for protein, and undeniably great table fare. The AquaBounty company has produced the AquaAdvantage salmon, a fish that grows to production size in less time. This means the same amount of healthy fish using less food, labor, water, and other limited resources. Dave Conley speaks about the salmon, how the trait works, it’s deregulation, and addresses questions about safety and containment. The second part of the podcast visits with Professor Pat Heslop-Harrison, where we discuss banana origins, applications and the challenges to modern cultivation– with an eye on how breeders and biotechnologists might impact the future of this important fruit. Special Guest Host, Ms. Val Swenson.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shia Suni Split History 51 mins – “Journalist Lesley Hazleton says that if you want to understand headlines from the Middle East today, you have to understand the story of Islam’s first civil war. When the prophet Muhammad died, factions in the young faith became embroiled in a succession crisis. The power grabs, violence, and political machinations resulted in the schism between Sunni and Shia. Hazleton joins Doug to tell the story of Islam’s sectarian divide and to explain how that history influences current events.” At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Africa Reconciliation 58 mins – “It’s been twenty-one years since the end of Apartheid. Goldstone reviews the successes and the failures of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission in his lecture.” At the link find the title, “Reconciliation in South Africa: Has it Succeeded? Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160715_25575.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stanford President Interview 47 mins – “John Hennessy discusses his tenure as president of Stanford University and how he helped make it into an elite school: encouraging technological innovation on campus, working on ideas that push humankind forward and maintain academic excellence, and having one of the best athletic programs in the country. Hennessy notes that one key to Stanford’s success is building quality infrastructure around interdisciplinary themes in a cross-disciplinary space, making it possible to fire up smart people and challenge them with colleagues from varied backgrounds to develop innovative ideas and solutions to some of the world’s most complex problems.” At the link find the title, “A Conversation with Stanford President John Hennessy, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160714-hennessy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Strawberry History 63 mins – “Strawberry is a popular fruit with tremendous commercial value, and while everyone loves a good strawberry, are they actually getting better? This week’s podcast talks to Dr. Jim Hancock, strawberry breeder from Michigan State University. Dr. Hancock explains strawberry’s wild history, from cultivation by indigenous people in Chile, to colonists moving them around the world, to spies taking them home to the king. Modern challenges and solutions to sustainable production are discussed. In the second part of the podcast professional speaker and advocate Michele Payn-Knoper (Cause Matters Corp.) talks about effective ag communication and her favorite places to find good information on science and agriculture.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Strawberry Pesticides 48 mins – “In today’s Talking Biotech Podcast the first guest is Keira Havens. She’s the CEO of Revolution Bio, a company turned non-profit that is interested in using the power of plants to introduce the public to the power of genetic engineering. They have found good public support for genetically engineered flowers, and hope that this technology is a gateway to a broader understanding of the technology. In part two, Dr. Natalia Peres talks about the EWG’s Dirty Dozen, especially as the concept applies to strawberries. Strawberries are EWG’s #3 “dirty” fruit on their agenda, and Dr. Peres tells the facts about the pesticides used and their relative risks. Spoiler alert– your strawberries are safe, right out of the field!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tape Recorder History 29 mins – “In the aftermath of World War II, the United States Military assigned a tech savvy GI named Jack Mullin the mission of investigating secret inventions left behind by the Nazis. Mullin’s journeys around Germany led him to a makeshift radio studio that had a device called the Magnetophon, the first reel-to-reel tape recorder that realistically recorded sound. After overcoming numerous obstacles, Jack Mullin managed to ship two machines back home to San Francisco. When he was released from military service, he demonstrated the Magnetophons for all the movie studios in Hollywood, but faced rejection from each one. Eventually, a famous crooner gave him a shot and invited Mullin to a trial by fire audition that would change recorded sound forever.” At the link find the title, “01: Bing Crosby, Magnetophons, & Nazis, Aug, 2015,” right-click “Media files 5786f87228c4a4c579701298.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tesla Master Plan 13 mins – “Elon Musk releases his “master plan” for the next decade at Tesla. The company plans to offer a home solar energy storage solution, and will move beyond cars to develop electric trucks and buses. And if the air is really bad, like in the urban areas of places like Los Angeles, would you be better off getting in your car than riding your bike? We get an expert answer to a listener’s question.” At the link right-click “Download” by the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tiny Tim Story 43 mins – “Ten years before hippies grew their hair long and twenty years before rock stars like David Bowie began wearing makeup, Tiny Tim did both. His unique appearance complimented his high-pitched falsetto singing and small ukulele. Like a performer out of step with time, Tiny’s repertoire featured songs from an era of music most people had forgotten. The audience didn’t know what to think; some people thought Tiny was one red rubber nose away from being a clown, others saw a sincere musician channeling the spirit of a bygone era. The only thing everyone could agree on was that they could not take their eyes off Tiny Tim.” At the link find the title, “08: God Bless Tiny Tim, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files 5786f87228c4a4c579701291.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tomato Breeding and Social Media 41 mins – “Improving plants with biotechnology is not just genetic engineering, it is using tools of molecular biology and genomics to guide traditional breeding strategies. In this episode Dr. Harry Klee from the University of Florida discusses how the Plant Innovation Center utilizes such strategies to breed tomatoes with superior flavors. In part two, University of Manitoba student Chelsea Boonstra discusses how a classroom assignment turned into a social media sensation, and became the public face of her family’s dairy operation. We discuss the role of the farmer as a trusted source of ag information, and the importance of telling their stories using online media. Dr. Klee’s website – Here’s where you can get tomato seeds for a small donation to the breeding program!At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tomato Introduction 68 mins – “This episode is an introduction to tomatoes, popular fruits that provide great variation to the eye and palate, as well as the foundation of many recipes. Surprisingly, tomatoes are fragile fruits and the plants can be difficult to grow. They are under constant attack from pests and pathogens, and new varieties must deliver profits for growers and beautiful, flavorful fruits for industry and the consumer. Tomato improvement is happening in several ways. Dr. Sam Hutton is an Assistant Professor at the University of Florida Gulf Coast Research and Education Center outside of Tampa, FL. Dr. Hutton is a traditional breeder that uses molecular tools to speed development of new cultivars for Florida growers. He talks about the origins of tomato, it’s domestication, and the current breeding priorities. He also discusses the challenges to the industry and future opportunities. The second part of the podcast is Dr. Diana Horvath form Two Blades Foundation. Dr. Horvath discusses the BS2 transgenic tomato. The plant has been engineered with a gene from pepper that confers resistance to bacterial diseases. These diseases profoundly affect yields, and require use of anti-microbial compounds in both conventional and organic production. Adoption of the BS2 tomato could increase yields for farmers, decrease production costs, and require fewer pesticides.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkish Educational Disruption 21 mins – “As academics grapple with the government crackdown banning them from travel for work, Turkish officials maintain the severe response is justified and abides by democratic principles. The Current hears from Turkey’s ambassador to Canada on the rule of law.” At the link find the title, “Turkey’s ambassador to Canada defends travel ban for academics, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160721_20411.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uganda Food Production 59 mins – “This week features two discussions with fellows serving in the Global Leadership Program of the Cornell Alliance for Science. The first part is a discussion with Nassib Mugwanya, Outreach Leader for the Ugandan Biosciences Information Center. He discusses the state of biotech solutions in Uganda, both in terms of critical needs and the current pipeline. The second part is a discussion about the public Ask Me Anything event that was held near the university where I served as a panelist. Jayson Merkley is another Fellow in the program. We discuss the surprises and the lessons learned in the event.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Business 60 mins – “CFR Senior Fellow Edward Alden and EXIM Bank Chairman and President Fred Hochberg discuss EXIM’s new global competitiveness report and the challenges facing the United States in global economic competition.” At the link right click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Washington Square Riot – “Every Sunday since the end of World War II, musicians journeyed to Washington Square Park to sing folk-songs. Until one Sunday—after the City of New York denied the musicians a singing permit—they decided to protest instead. What resulted was a violent confrontation with authority.” At the link find the title, “12: 3,000 Beatniks Riot in Village, Aug, 2016, right-click “Media files 57958c162a0ab8c170d9b8f0.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Issues 26 mins – “Keith & Russ talk with geophysicist Kenneth Verosub, Distinguished Professor of Geology at the University of California at Davis.  Verosub talks about the tens-of-thousands of years it takes for the Earth’s magnetic poles to reverse, and he also discusses ways that countries might resolve water issues when a major water system is shared internationally, such as the Rio Grande along the US/Mexico Border, or the Jordan River or the Tigris/Euphrates in the Middle East.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Welfare Background 52 mins – “On this episode of Marketplace Weekend, David Lazarus of the LA Times fills in for Lizzie O’Leary. David speaks with Marketplace’s Andy Uhler and Newsweek’s Zoe Schlanger about what they’re long and short on in this week’s news. Lizzie report on Brexit from Germany in Stuttgart, a city with thriving industry and a population problem. We hear from listeners about the best and worst bosses they’ve ever had, and Marketplace’s Krissy Clark brings us sections from the final episode of the welfare podcast The Uncertain Hour. Moby takes the Marketplace Quiz.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Windows 10 Problems 35 mins – “Beware of online purchases, PayPal, Getting paid, Windows 10 tip, Rasomeware Prevention, Troubleshooting Outlook issues” At the link right-click ‘Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wired Co-founder 66 mins – “Much of what will happen in the next 30 years is inevitable, driven by technological trends that are already in motion. In his provocative new book, Kevin Kelly provides an optimistic road map for the future, showing how the coming changes in our lives—from virtual reality in the home to an on-demand economy to artificial intelligence embedded in everything we manufacture—can be understood as the result of a few long-term, accelerating forces. Kelly describes these deep trends—flowing, screening, accessing, sharing, filtering, remixing, tracking and questioning—and demonstrates how they overlap and are codependent on one another. He says that these larger forces will revolutionize the way people buy, work, learn, and communicate with each other. By understanding and embracing them, says Kelly, it will be easier to remain on top of the coming wave of changes and to arrange our day-to-day relationships with technology in ways that bring forth maximum benefits. Kelly engages people who seek guidance on where their business, industry, or life is heading—what to invent, where to work, in what to invest, how to better reach customers, and what to begin to put into place—as this new world emerges.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Space 58 mins – “The first footsteps on the Moon were one giant step for ‘man’, but from the early days of aeronautics women have also been involved in space travel. In Women with the Right Stuff, presenter, pilot and aspiring astronaut Wally Funk pays tribute to the pioneers, meets some of those involved within today’s space industry, and hears from the woman who might be among the crew for the first human mission to Mars. Wally has first hand experience of the early days of space travel in America. She undertook secret tests to become an astronaut in 1961 and, along with 12 other female pilots, passed the extremely tough physical tests to become an unofficial member of the ‘Mercury 13’ – the women who, given a chance, could have gone into space before Russia’s Valentina Tereshkova made history. Wally hears from astronauts Jessica Meier, Helen Sharman, Eileen Collins and Samantha Cristoforetti; mission control flight director Mary Lawrence; space historian David J Shayler; and shares her 1961 astronaut medical tests with NASA flight surgeon Shannan Moynihan. Over 50 years after those tests, Wally is still flying (she takes her producer above Dallas in a Cessna) but she is yet to get into space. However Wally is on the waiting list for one of the first commercial space tourism flights and is prepared to make history as yet another woman with the right stuff.” At the link find the title, “Women with the Right Stuff, Jul, 2016,” right-click Media files p041b3yq.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One – Australia 56 mins – “This week marks 100 years since the World War I battles of Fromelles and Pozieres — two of the deadliest and most gruesome in Australia’s military history. In an attempt to feint and distract German forces who were battling the French and British on the Somme in the south, Australian forces were sent into Fromelles, about 100 kilometres north, at 6:00pm on July 19, 1916. It was Australia’s introduction to the Western Front — the main theatre of the war — after spending months fighting in Gallipoli, and the results were disastrous.” At the link find the title, “ National Press Club: Brendan Nelson, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_BrendanNelson_2007_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 246 – Jul 29, 2016: Addiction Story, Aged Care, Algorithms to Live By, Antibiotic Quantum Dots, Arm Fractures, Autism History, Bacterial Resistance, Barcelona Tourism Problem, Battle of Reading, Battle of the Somme, Benghazi Report, Big Breakthroughs, Blind Help Rules, Blind People on Stage, Body on the Moor, Border Patrol Crimes, Brexit, Cancer, Chef Thing, Childhood Neurology, China in Africa, Chinese Economic Bubble, CIA Trends, Clothing Crutches, Coastal Flooding, College Trends, Conservation Movement, Constipation, Coyotes, Creativity, Cult Leader, Deep Canvassing, Depression Treatment, Desert Storm Legacy, Disability Discrimination, Disabled Devices, Disaster Equipment, Disaster Medicine, Donald Trump, Drug Abuse Issues, Educational Issues, Electric Grids, Energy Poverty, Eyes-On-Cops, Fact Checking, Fitness History, Food Waste Control, Four Seasons Restaurant, Future Possibilities, Gender Medicine, Haptic Conference, Health Workers Communication, Indian Publishing, Internet History, Internet Sale Locations, Jules Feiffer, Manufacturing Globally, Marijuana Impact, Mark Twain, Math Rant, Medical Team Performance, Middle Class Finances, Minimum Wage, Mississippi Pioneer Woman, Mississippi Scale Model, Mobile Phone Videos, MOOC on Cancer, Narcissism Effect, National Parks, Nitrogen Conservation, Noncomplementary Behaviors, PACE Trial Controversy, Panama Papers, Performance Enhancing Drugs, Personal Learning Network, Photonic Chips, Picric Acid, Police Incidents, Police PR, Police Torture in Chicago, Police Viewpoint, Policing in America, Population Growth, Price Fixing, Psychosis, Racism Panel, Renewable Energy, Robert Scoble, School of Life, Shark Conservation, Student Debt, Syrian Refugees, Test Pilot, Textbook Publishing, Tin Ears, Universal Basic Income, Veterans Affairs Modernization, Vulcanology, Welfare Programs

The best 106 podcasts from a larger group of 302 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 1o,000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least welve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded.

Addiction Story  18 mins – “Scoring a fix is cheap and today’s heroin is strong. But that’s just part of the reason why America got hooked. Today on the show, we trace the roots of America’s heroin epidemic with a dealer, a user, and a DEA agent.” At the link find the title, “#711: Hooked on Heroin, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160713_pmoney_podcast071316.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aged Care  57 mins – “The National Press Club hosts an Aged Care Forum on the topic ‘The Aged Care Conundrum: Meeting The Care Needs of an Ageing Population Without Blowing the Budget’. Featuring Paul Sadler, Lee Thomas and Ian Yates.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Aged Care Forum, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_AgedCare_1307_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Algorithms to Live By  65 mins – “Brian Christian, Author, The Most Human Human; Co-author, Algorithms to Live By: The Computer Science of Human Decisions Tom Griffiths, Professor of Psychology and Cognitive Science, UC Berkeley; Co-author, Algorithms to Live By: The Computer Science of Human Decisions All our lives are constrained by limited space and time, limits that give rise to a particular set of problems. What should we do, or leave undone, in a day or a lifetime? How much messiness should we accept? What balance of new activities and familiar favorites is the most fulfilling? These might seem like uniquely human quandaries, but they are not. Computers, too, face the same constraints, so computer scientists have been grappling with their version of such issues for decades. The solutions they’ve found have much to teach us. In this interdisciplinary work, author Brian Christian and cognitive scientist Tom Griffiths show how the algorithms used by computers can also untangle very human questions. They explain how to have better hunches and when to leave things to chance, how to deal with overwhelming choices and how best to connect with others. From finding a spouse to finding a parking spot, from organizing one’s inbox to understanding the workings of memory, Algorithms to Live By transforms the wisdom of computer science into strategies for human living.” At the link right-click Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Quantum Dots  26 mins – (starts 1:00) This programmable antibiotic might keep pace with quickly evolving superbugs. Unlike most drugs – it’s not derived from biological sources. It’s a tiny version of the semiconductors in everything from TVs to iphones to solar panels. This “antibiotic” is made of nanoparticles, known as quantum dots. CU Biofrontiers scientists Prashant Nagpal and Anushree Chatterjee explain their new invention. Shrinking Ozone Hole – (starts 15:24) The ozone hole is finally growing smaller – we’ll find out why and how long it will take to completely “heal” the ozone hole from Birgit Hassler, a researcher with the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), a partnership between the University of Colorado Boulder and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arm Fractures  87 mins – “Take a look at some of most common bone and joint injuries. Dr. Utku Kandemir explores the shoulder and elbow and Dr. Nicole Schroeder looks at the wrist. Recorded on 05/24/2016. (#30989)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism History  49 mins – “A big fresh take on autism that begins with Patient Zero.” At the link find the title, “Autism: A History, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_486149845.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bacterial Resistance  27 mins – “Claudia Hammond focusses on the attempts to discover new antibiotics, and alternative therapies for combating bacterial infection. Most of the antibiotics we use were discovered in the mid-20th century, but as the threat of drug resistant infections increases, the race is on to find new organisms that make novel medicines. We have only identified a tiny fraction of the microbes living on Earth and are “bioprospecting” for useful ones in wildly different locations. Antibiotics are not the only weapon in the war against bacteria. A hundred years ago, a class of virus that infect and destroy bacteria were discovered. They’re called bacteriophages. Phage therapies were used throughout the era of Soviet Russia, and still are in some countries, including Georgia. Phage researcher Prof Martha Clokie told us whether phage therapy might be coming to the UK. With expert comment from James Gallagher, BBC News health reporter. “ At the link find the title, “Fighting Antimicrobrial Resistance, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0422f38.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Barcelona Tourism Problem 27 mins – “Barcelona is one of the most visited cities in Europe, but has it become a victim of its own tourism success? Millions of tourists visit every year, crowding the narrow streets and public spaces, bringing noise and anti-social behaviour to once peaceful residential neighbourhoods. Local businesses have given way to tourist tat and multinational chains, and some residents are being driven out as apartments are rented to tourists. Tourism is a huge economic boost for Barcelona, but as well as those who are benefiting, Pascale Harter meets locals who are taking to the streets in noisy protests about the impact on their neighbourhood. Are they right to blame home-sharing websites like Airbnb? And all eyes are on Barcelona’s mayor Ada Colau, a former activist and one of the key representatives of the so-called “new politics” in Spain. Can she resolve a tension being felt by cities around the world – between the economic opportunities of tourism and keeping the soul and character of the city that its residents cherish.” At the link find the title, “The Battle for Barcelona, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p041cf12.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battle of Reading  20 mins – “When we left off, the Danes had occupied Reading, fortified it for several days, and then sent a detachment West along the river Kennet… In response, Ealdorman AEthelwulf of Berkshire had raised the local Fyrd, killed one of the Danish lords, and for the first time in a very long time, at Englefield, the West Saxons defeated the Danes in the field of battle.” At the link right-click “Download” from the pop-up menu.

Battle of the Somme  32 mins – “This week, a special issue on conflict. The psychological toll of war, how to count the dead, and predicting conflict in the 21st century.” At the link find the title, “Nature Podcast: 14 July 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Benghazi Report  58 mins – “Republican members of the House Select Committee on Benghazi release their report on the September 2012 attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, in which four Americans died, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens.” At the link find the title, “House Benghazi Committee Republicans Release Report on 2012 Attack, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.447191.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Breakthroughs  11 mins – “Throughout history, speculation has spurred beautiful, revolutionary science — opening our eyes to entirely new universes. “I’m not talking about science that takes baby steps,” says Eric Haseltine. “I’m talking about science that takes enormous leaps.” In this talk, Haseltine passionately takes us to the edges of intellectual pursuit with two ideas — one that’s already made history, and the other that’s digging into one of humanity’s biggest questions with admirable ambition (and a healthy dose of skepticism from many).” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Help Rules  19 mins – “In response to a recent programme discussion on how blind people should accept and then dispense with help, sighted listeners contacted In Touch asking for information on the best techniques and tips when giving help. Should you open doors or count steps? And how should you guide? Amie Slavin, blind since the age of 23, and Julie Smethurst give their views on the best ways sighted people can offer help, and some practical do’s and don’ts.” At the linkr ight-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind People on Stage  20 mins – “Notes on Blindness, a new film based on the true story of an academic losing his sight has just come out in the UK. So In Touch uses the film’s release to discuss the portrayal of blind people in film, TV and on the stage. Peter White is joined by Emily Davison, Kevin Mulhern and Red Szell, and they swap good and bad examples, and talk about problems and solutions.” At the link right-click Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Body on the Moor  27 min – “On 12 December 2015, a man’s body was found by a moorland track on Saddleworth Moor in northern England. He had nothing on him showing his identity. No-one knew who he was. And he had died from a rare kind of poisoning. Who was this man? Where did he come from? Why has nobody reported him missing? Their biggest lead was brought to the mortuary within the body itself. It was inside his left leg. And it’s a clue which took the inquiry to Pakistan. Police believe he took his own life but did he travel nearly 4000 miles to die in this particular place?” At the link find the title “The Body on the Moor, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0417qqd.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Border Patrol Crimes  54 mins – “The scenes of violence caught on video recently have been a painful reminder of the strained relations between the public and the police in our country. This friction is not new. What is new is the technology: cameras and smart phones that record and transmit the violence live or within minutes. In Minnesota, the person who captured the aftermath of an officer-involved shooting was in the car with the victim. In Baton Rouge, the videos were made by bystanders. And in Dallas, the first images we saw of the sniper shootings came from people on the ground, in the crowd. But there’s also an organized movement of people who consider it their jobs to police the police and they, too, are recording. Some people call them “cop watchers.” In light of recent events we’re revisiting a story we brought to you last year. It’s a look at the cop watching movement in Texas – including in a suburb of Dallas where tensions over the practice already were on the rise.” At the link find the title, “Update: Eyes on Cops, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files Eyes-on-cops.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit 19 mins – “Brexit is like a breakup. So today, a divorce story in two acts. We hear from both sides: The people who voted to leave, and the Europeans being left.” At the link find the title, “#711: Hooked on Heroin, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160708_pmoney_podcast070816.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit  45 mins – “On this episode of Slate Money, hosts Felix Salmon of Fusion, Cathy O’Neil of mathbabe.org, and Slate’s Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann. Topics discussed on today’s show include: -UK Property funds are in trouble post-Brexit -What it means for interest rates to be negative. -Italian banks are in crisis.” At the link find the title, “The Fallout Edition, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM7860674935.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Explained  67 mins – “The United Kingdom’s vote to exit the European Union has given new momentum to euroskeptic, nationalist, and anti-immigration movements elsewhere in Europe. While many of the policy impacts of the referendum will not be known for a while yet, the vote has pointed, in stunning fashion, to the rising public anxiety over immigration levels and concerns over governments’ ability to manage flows and foster successful immigrant integration. On this webinar, MPI Europe President Demetrios Papademetriou, who is also President emeritus of MPI, and experts associated with MPI’s Transatlantic Council on Migration discuss the political and policy lessons that can be learned from Brexit and applied to debatesin both Europe and North America, including how to address concerns over immigration, identity, and immigrant integration while managing migration in a globalized economy. The discussion will also touched on a Transatlantic Council report, Understanding and Addressing Public Anxiety About Immigration.” At the link right-click “Download(loading)and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Case  22 mins – “One of our first guests on the show last fall was the young poet Max Ritvo. Ritvo, 25, has spent years living with Ewing’s Sarcoma, an incurable cancer. Meanwhile he’s gotten married, taught at Columbia University, and performed in an improv comedy group. His first book of poetry, Four Reincarnations, comes out this fall. One work from that book, “Poem to My Litter,” was just published in the New Yorker. But Ritvo is more than his accomplishments. He’s someone who reminded us that there are many different ways to look at death, and dying, and some of them make you actually laugh at loud. He came back to visit us a few weeks ago on what he called his “farewell tour.” Even in his final days, Max says he keeps his sense of humor alive. “When you laugh at something horrible, you’re just illuminating a different side of it that was already there. If you make something sad funny you’re much more likely to remember it. It’s a mnemonic device that makes our suffering rhyme with joy.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Case  59 mins – “Mary Elizabeth Williams, Journalist; Author, A Series of Catastrophes and Miracles: A True Story of Love, Science, and Cancer In conversation with Peggy Orenstein, Author This program is part of our Good Lit series, underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation. Journalist Mary Elizabeth Williams was one of the first people in the world to get a new form of treatment for her stage 4 cancer diagnosis that’s revolutionizing cancer care: immunotherapy. In October of 2015, her treatment protocol became the first immunotherapy combination approved by the FDA; it’s the same treatment that former President Jimmy Carter underwent. In her witty, wry, and deeply moving new memoir, A Series of Catastrophes and Miracles: A True Story of Love, Science, and Cancer, Williams shares her personal journey with malignant melanoma in her early forties and how—thanks to cutting-edge science—she was restored back to health with no signs of disease.” At the link right-click Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Treatment  29 mins – “Advances in genomic medicine indicate that pediatric cancers may be quite different from their adult counterparts. Hear from experts on why this might be and what scientists are doing to understand it better.” At the link find the title, “Understanding the Biological Basis of Pediatric Cancer, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 160721_cancer.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Treatment  56 mins – “The second in our two-part series on Cancer in the Granite State. President Obama announced “a cancer moonshot” in his State of the Union address earlier this year, with increased funding for research and treatment in the hopes of accelerating the search for a cure. We look at advances in cancer treatment recently, including promising methods such as immunotherapy. We also examine the latest research and developments in the search for a cure. Plus, we delve into the financial and emotional stresses of dealing with the disease.” (4 guests) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chef Thing  166 mins– “Chris Young is an obsessive tinkerer, inventor, and innovator. His areas of expertise range from extreme aviation (world-record goals) to mathematics and apocalyptic-scale BBQs. Above all, he is one of the clearest thinkers I know. In this interview, we discuss a great many things, including his wild story and lessons learned from rainmakers like Bill Gates, Gabe Newell, Neal Stephenson, and many more. More topics we tackle: How he managed to get jobs working for the best in the world…despite having no credentials. Advice — and incredible questions — from self-made billionaires. Why raw foodism isn’t always what it’s cracked up to be. How geniuses show disappointment and ensure you correct yourself. The “emoji egg” breakfast. And much more…If you only have 5 minutes, I highly recommend listening to Chris’s secret to working with hard-to-reach people….” At the link find the title, “#173: Lessons from Geniuses, Billionaires, and Tinkerers,” right-click “Media filesChris_Young.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood Neurology  28 mins – “Self-taught Professor of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Faraneh Vargha-Khadem has spent decades studying children with developmental amnesia. Her mission: to understand how we form memories of the events in our past, from things we’ve experienced to places we’ve visited and people we’ve met. She talks to Jim about the memories we lay down during our lives and the autobiographies stored in our brains that define us as individuals. Faraneh was also part of the team that identified the FoxP2 gene, the so called ‘speech gene’, that may explain why humans talk and chimps don’t. Plus Faraneh discusses how her Baha’i faith informs her scientific thinking.” /at the link find the title, “Faraneh Vargha-Khadem, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03zw168.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China in Africa  88 mins – “Throughout the 2000s, Chinese demand for primary goods like oil, iron, copper, and zinc helped Africa reduce poverty more than it had in decades. Even so, China’s total investment in the continent’s natural resources has been smaller than many imagine, and, with growth shifting away from manufacturing and toward consumption, China’s appetite for raw materials will continue to diminish. China’s shifting economic growth model aligns with sub-Saharan Africa’s imminent labor force boom, presenting a significant opportunity for both sides. Maximizing mutual gain will depend on China and Africa cooperating to address a host of challenges: Can African countries limit the flow of Chinese migrants and foster domestic industries? Will Chinese investors adopt global norms of social and environmental responsibility? Where does the West fit in? On July 13, 2016, the John L. Thornton China Center and the Africa Growth Initiative (AGI) at Brookings launched Senior Fellow David Dollar’s new report, “China’s Engagement in Africa: From Natural Resources to Human Resources.” Dollar presented key findings from the study, and AGI Director Amadou Sy moderated a discussion with Dollar, Ambassador Oliver Wonekha of Uganda, and Wenjie Chen of the International Monetary Fund on the larger issues of China’s trade and investment in Africa, how it has benefited the continent, what could make it more effective, and lessons for the next phase of engagement.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Economic Bubble  75 mins – “China’s economy has achieved astonishing growth over the past three decades, but it may be undergoing its most serious test of the reform era. In his newly published book, “China’s Guaranteed Bubble,” Ning Zhu argues that implicit Chinese government guarantees, which have helped drive economic investment and expansion, are also largely responsible for the challenges the country now faces. As growth slows, corporate earnings decline, and lending tightens for small and medium-sized businesses, the leverage ratios of China’s government and its corporations and households all have increased in recent years. How desperate is China’s debt situation, and what can be done to avert a major crisis? On July 11, the John L. Thornton China Center at Brookings hosted Ning Zhu, deputy dean and professor of finance at the Shanghai Advanced Institute of Finance, Shanghai Jiaotong University. Zhu presented key findings from his research into Chinese sovereign, corporate, and household debt, and also introduced potential remedies to return China to the path of long-term sustainable growth. Following the presentation, Senior Fellow David Dollar moderated a discussion with Zhu before taking questions from the audience.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA Trends  63 mins – “Whether in Asia, the Middle East, Europe, or Latin America, the United States faces security threats on a number of fronts and by an array of actors, including extremist networks, rogue states, and emerging powers. The Central Intelligence Agency is charged with understanding these ongoing security challenges to the United States while also identifying emerging issues that will affect the nation’s security in the future. CIA has to evolve and innovate in order to effectively address today’s pressing problems without losing sight of those over-the-horizon issues. On July 13, the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence hosted the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency John O. Brennan for an address on the emerging threats facing the United States and the CIA’s strategy for meeting those challenges. Brookings Senior Fellow and Co-Director of the Center on 21st Century Security and Intelligence Gen. John Allen (USMC, Ret.) introduced Director Brennan, and Senior Fellow and Director of The Intelligence Project Bruce Riedel moderated a discussion following the director’s remarks.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clothing Crutches 61 mins – “Do clothes have the power to transform us? Lulu and Hanna bring us seven stories that explore how clothes can change us in quiet but surprising ways. We have help from Yowei Shaw, Chenjerai Kumanyika and Colin Dwyer. At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coastal Flooding  57 mins – “Crumbling flood control infrastructure, rising sea levels and lack of natural barriers leave the Bay Area open to devastating flood events. Many critical elements of the Bay Area’s infrastructure, including airports, hospitals, water treatment plants, and the headquarters of major employers are built at or below sea level. That means a severe storm or major flood could knock out huge parts of the regional economy, causing long-term damage to the Bay Area’s economic health. Failure to act presents potentially devastating consequences to the businesses and individuals that call the Bay Area home, as well as to California’s economy. Today we’ll talk about solutions to these problems with Jeremy Lowe, a coastal geomorphologist with 30 years of experience in tidal wetland restoration and sea-level-rise adaptation planning, and John Bourgeois, Executive Project Manager, CA Coastal Conservancy. Both gentlemen are feature in a new mini-documentary, The Water At Bay.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Trends  56 mins – “Nationwide, many smaller institutions are struggling to survive due to dwindling enrollment, rural locations, and doubt about the inherent value of a liberal education. We talk with two New Hampshire college presidents to find out how they’re facing these new economic realities and an uncertain future.” (3 guests) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conservation Movement  28 mins – “Despite decades of conservation work, in zoos and in the field, the rate at which species are going extinct is speeding up. Georgina Mace has devoted her Life Scientific to trying to limit the damage to our planet’s bio-diversity from this alarming loss. For ten years she worked on the Red List of Threatened Species, developing a robust set of scientific criteria for assessing the threat of extinction facing every species on the planet. When the list was first published, she expected resistance from big business; but not the vicious negative reaction she received from many wildlife NGOS. Her careful quantitative analysis revealed that charismatic animals, like the panda and the polar bear, are not necessarily the most at risk.” At the link find the title, “Georgina Mace, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p040hcxr.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constipation  17 mins – “In this episode, we discuss self-care of constipation including bulk-forming laxatives, hyperosmotic laxatives, emollient laxatives, lubricant laxatives, saline laxatives, and stimulant laxatives.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 046-OTC_constipation.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coyotes  55 mins – “One of nature’s success stories, coyotes have expanded from the Great Plains to most of North America, even living happily in urban parks. IDEAS producer Dave Redel reflects on the science and mythology of the wily coyote.” At the link find the title, “Coyotl’s Song,Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160713_82373.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity  22 mins – “…how (or if) humans can discover our greatest creative potential. Someone might be a brilliant novelist if they could find the time to write. In the right societal context and presented with good opportunities, a given person might change the course of modern dance, or unlock mysteries of particle physics, or become a great general. Today, there are thousands of self-help books, websites, counselors and consultants all promising to help people find their creative essence. These resources claim to offer insights about successful, effective and creative people and about how we can apply them in our own lives. Still, back in the middle of the 20th Century this idea that someone could even study or learn about something as elusive as creativity was as far-fetched as the pearly gates tale. At the time, creativity was seen as nebulous and unconscious, perhaps not accessible at all to scientific inquiry. Then, in the early 1950s, the Institute of Personality Assessment and Research (IPAR) at the University of California, Berkeley began developing new and different ways to analyze personalities. The scientists at IPAR attempted what many thought was impossible: to study creativity in a methodical and scientific way, working to determine what specific personality traits make certain people creative. IPAR invited creative people of all kinds to come to Berkeley and be studied, from authors of fantasy novels to research scientists and female mathematicians. They attracted literary stars including Truman Capote and William Carlos Williams. One of their biggest and most successful studies, however, involved an array of famous architects….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cult Leader  55 mins – “The story about Edward Wilson, better known as the infamous religious cult leader Brother XII, a wayward 1920s Theosophist at the centre of one of the most bizarre interludes in Canadian history.” At the link find the title,”The Dream of Brother XII, Tue, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160712_15632.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep Canvasing  63 mins – “Oddly enough, we don’t actually know very much about how to change people’s minds, not scientifically, that’s why the work of the a group of LGBT activists in Los Angeles is offering something valuable to psychology and political science – uncharted scientific territory. The Leadership Lab has been developing a technique for the last eight years that can change a person’s mind about a contentious social issue after a 20-minute conversation. This episode is about that group’s redemption after their reputation was threatened by a researcher who, in studying their persuasion technique, committed scientific fraud and forced the retraction of his paper. That research and the retraction got a lot of media attention in 2015, but the story didn’t end there. In the show, you will meet the scientists who uncovered that researcher’s fraud and then decided to go ahead and start over, do the research themselves, and see if the technique actually worked.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 080-Deep Canvassing.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Depression Treatment  55 mins – “What’s it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit’s end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there’s stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.” At the link find the title, “Wit’s End, Part 2, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160627_88772.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Desert Storm Legacy  119 mins – “By most metrics, the 1991 Gulf War, also known as Operation Desert Storm, was a huge and rapid success for the United States and its allies. The mission of defeating Iraq’s army, which invaded Kuwait the year prior, was done swiftly and decisively. However, the war’s impact on soldiers who fought in it was lasting. Over 650,000 American men and women served in the conflict, and many came home with symptoms including insomnia, respiratory disorders, memory issues and others attributed to a variety of exposures – “Gulf War Illness.” On June 16, the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence at Brookings and Georgetown University Medical Center co-hosted a discussion on Desert Storm, its veterans, and how they are faring today. Representative Mike Coffman (R-Col.), the only member of Congress to serve in both Gulf wars, delivered an opening address before joining Michael O’Hanlon, senior fellow at Brookings, for a moderated discussion. Joel Kupersmith, former head of the Office of Research and Development of the Department of Veterans Affairs, convened a follow-on panel with Carolyn Clancy, deputy under secretary for health for organizational excellence at the Department of Veterans Affairs; Adrian Atizado, deputy national legislative director at Disabled American Veterans; and James Baraniuk, professor of medicine at Georgetown University Medical Center.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disability Discrimination  58 mins – “Age and and Disability Discrimination Commissioner Susan Ryan addresses the National Press Club in Canberra.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Susan Ryan, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_SusanRyan_0607_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Devices  44 mins – “The manufacturers of Whill Model M, a new high-tech, compact wheelchair, boast that its tight turning radius and ability to handle any terrain will allow users to go anywhere you want. The only thing limiting accessibility? The price tag. Today we’re looking at the widening gap between innovation and affordability in the mobility device market. Then, it’s a lifesaving medication for millions of people – so why are so many trying to find alternatives to the effective, easy to use EpiPen?” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Equipment  45 mins – “This is part one of a special double episode on wilderness EMS is full of great tips and discussion on what austere wilderness medicine has to teach every responder… Host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and his co-host Sam Bradley are joined by a group of wilderness EMS experts to talk about this topic.This week on the show we have a group of excellent panelists on the subject of wilderness EMS as it relates to what the Urban medic can take from it. We have Kevin Reiter from WildSafety.com, Dr. Seth Hawkins from Hawk Ventures which supports a wide range of Wilderness EMS programs, including the flagship Carolina Wilderness EMS Externship program. also joining us is Dr. Ben Abo, DO, MPH an ER Doc and Wilderness EMS specialist, and paramedic David Fifer, NRP who is a wilderness search and rescue specialist with RedSTAR Wilderness Response Team, which lives online at redstarmedical.org. . We also have the regular Disaster podcast guest USAR doc, Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group.” At the link right-click “Download” ndselect”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Medicine 32 mins – “In this episode of the Disaster Podcast hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and Sam Bradley are joined by Dr. Andi Tenner, MD, MPH, FACEP, from UCSF Medical Center’s ER. She is on the faculty as well at UCSF Medical School and is an experienced emergency room physician and world medical responder. Andi comes on the show to talk with us about ER preparedness and how the docs and nurses in Orlando dealt with the tragic nightclub shooting patients brought to Orlando Regional Medical Center (ORMC). Any hospital ER could have been struck by this patient overload situation if the incident happened close to their doors. Find out Andi’s thoughts on how every ER and facility needs to prepare now for these types of disaster situations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Donald Trump  51 mins – “In 1996, New Yorker staff writer Mark Singer was assigned a profile of Manhattan businessman Donald Trump, and it wasn’t long before Singer realized this was no ordinary subject. The piece has been called one of the best pre-campaign portraits of Trump there is, but Trump wasn’t impressed. He wrote Singer a note to call him A TOTAL LOSER whose WRITING SUCKS! Well, Singer’s at it again with a book that revisits his deeply reported, psychological portrait, and he joins us Tuesday to talk about it. Mark Singer has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1974. His books include Funny Money and Somewhere in America. His latest is called Trump and Me At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Abuse Issues  41 mins – “Today we travel to a future where all drugs are legal. In this episode we discuss the history of drug laws, why some drugs are legal and others aren’t, and what would happen if we just let everybody lose to do whatever they want.” At the link find the title, The Altered State, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Issues  58 mins – “The American Enterprise Institute’s Gerard Robinson, who formerly served as Florida education commissioner and Virginia education secretary, discusses his career and education policy in the U.S.” At the eink find the title, “Q&A with Gerard Robinson, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.444499.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Grids  20 mins – “How does power get to the people who use it? In this episode we talk about one of the greatest engineering accomplishments of the 20th century — something we use every day, but often take for granted: the electric grid. We talk to an expert about how power travels to our electric sockets, and hear about how one city — hit with major power outages during Superstorm Sandy in 2012 — is preparing for the next storm with something called a microgrid. You can find lots more information, graphics and videos on our blog for this episode. How does power get to the people who use it? In this episode we talk about one of the greatest engineering accomplishments of the 20th century — something we use every day, but often take for granted: the electric grid. We talk to an expert about how power travels to our electric sockets, and hear about how one city — hit with major power outages during Superstorm Sandy in 2012 — is preparing for the next storm with something called a microgrid.” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Poverty  87 mins – “Energy is necessary for essential services ranging from heating and cooking to transportation, education, and healthcare. Today, an estimated 1.2 billion people around the world lack any access to electricity, and another 2.7 billion rely on the traditional use of biomass for cooking. Pollution from traditional sources such as biomass not only contributes to global warming but also causes respiratory diseases that kill over 3.5 million people each year, more than double the annual deaths attributed to malaria. Addressing global poverty requires taking steps to address energy poverty, but the best model for doing so is widely debated. Is centralized distribution the best way forward, or should energy projects focus on distributed generation? Can large-scale deployment of wind turbines and solar panels meet the needs of rural communities in the developing world? What role should nuclear power and fossil fuels play in expanding grid access? On May 24, the Energy Security and Climate Initiative (ESCI) at Brookings hosted a debate on solutions to increase energy access between Daniel Kammen, Class of 1935 distinguished professor of energy at the University of California, Berkeley, and Ted Nordhaus, co-founder and research director of the Breakthrough Institute. ClimateWire Editor Lisa Friedman moderated the discussion and audience Q&A.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eyes on Cops  18 mins – “The scenes of violence caught on video recently have been a painful reminder of the strained relations between the public and the police in our country. This friction is not new. What is new is the technology: cameras and smart phones that record and transmit the violence live or within minutes. In Minnesota, the person who captured the aftermath of an officer-involved shooting was in the car with the victim. In Baton Rouge, the videos were made by bystanders. And in Dallas, the first images we saw of the sniper shootings came from people on the ground, in the crowd. But there’s also an organized movement of people who consider it their jobs to police the police and they, too, are recording. Some people call them “cop watchers.” In light of recent events we’re revisiting a story we brought to you last year. It’s a look at the cop watching movement in Texas – including in a suburb of Dallas where tensions over the practice already were on the rise.” At the link find the link “Update: Eyes on Cops, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files Eyes-on-cops.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fact Checking  45 mins – “If you’re on Facebook, chances are tragic shootings and a hotly contested political climate have turned your social media feed into a forum for emotions, a place for sharing support, airing opinions and spreading lots and lots of misinformation. On today’s show, how Buzzfeed aims to combat internet hoaxes and fake news through their own tried and true method – an online quiz. And this summer’s hottest filming location – Nantucket?  We’ll speak with New England director Jay Craven about shooting a historical film off the cape on a shoestring budget and college students as crew.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fitness History  52 mins – “For years, Daniel Kunitz lived the life of the mind. His body though “became a trash depot.” Then he started running, which led to swimming, weightlifting, and eventually CrossFit. His health and his life steadily improved. Kunitz’s personal quest got him wondering how fitness culture has changed through the years. Why were the Greeks so buff? Why do guys do dumbbell curls? How have women changed exercise as we know it? Kunitz joins us to share what he’s learned about the evolution of fitness. Daniel Kunitz has served as editor in chief of Modern Painter, as well as an editor at the Paris Review and Details. His writing has appeared in Vanity Fair, Harper’s, and New York magazine. His new book is Lift: Fitness Culture, from Naked Greeks and Acrobats to Jazzercise and Ninja WarriorAt the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Waste Control  4 mins – “As the world’s population increases, so does the demand for food. One way to keep up with demand would be, logically, to just produce more food. Some argue that a better strategy would be to simply stop wasting so much food. Granite Geek David Brooks writes about food waste for his column this week in The Concord Monitor and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss his findings….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Four Seasons Restaurant  22 mins – “For two decades, the Four Seasons was the epicenter of culture in America. Jackie Onassis, Henry Kissinger, and Nora Ephron were just some of the regulars at the New York City restaurant, but the real stars were the creative power brokers in publishing, fashion, architecture, and advertising who convened in the massive, elegant bar room to make the decisions about what books we read, wine we drank, and clothes we wore. In his 1979 feature on the Four Seasons, former Esquire editor in chief Lee Eisenberg coined the phrase “power lunch”—to the everlasting envy of food critics. One such critic, the acclaimed Alan Richman, joins podcast host David Brancaccio this week to discuss the closing of what Richman considers the greatest restaurant in American history, what made it unique, and why it belonged to a vanishing world.” At the link find the title, “America’s Most Powerful Lunch, by Lee Eisenberg, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13153/3848240/Americas-Most-Powerful-Lunch-by-Lee-Eisenberg.mp3and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future Possibilities  55 mins – “How does the inner science of ourselves intersect with the outer science of the universe? A Stratford Festival Forum on the theme of discovery with Janice Gross Stein, Dr. Joe MacInnis, and Jay Ingram.” At the link find the title, “The Discovery of Other Worlds, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160707_87060.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Medicine  39 mins – “We talk to Marek Glezerman, professor emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology and currently chairman of the Ethics Committee at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University about his book Gender Medicine: The Groundbreaking New Science of Gender- and Sex-Based Diagnosis and Treatment.” At the link find the title, “141 Marek Glezerman – The Science of Gender Medicine, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 5836c8d1-b1fd-427b-8fca-d27801b78d5b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Haptic Conference  21 mins – “We get a feel for how the latest advances in haptic technologies are bringing us all closer together With the annual Eurohaptics conference as a backdrop, Nicola Davis delves into the world of ‘touch’ and haptic technology. Guided by the tech-savvy Timandra Harkness and UCL’s Dr Helge Wurdemann, we discuss how these technologies will change the worlds – both real and virtual – we all live in. We also hear from Professor Blake Hannaford, Dr Fernando Bello, Professor Hiroyuki Kajimoto, and Professor Stephen Brewster.” At the link right-click “Download MP3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Workers Communication 37 mins – “Dr Louise Aronson is Professor of Medicine at University of California San Francisco and directs the Northern California Geriatrics Education Centre and UCSFs Medical Humanities. Having graduated from Harvard Medical School and completed her residency at UCSF she has gone on to become a multi award wining writer and has contributed to a variety of outlets including The New York Times, JAMA and the New England Journal of Medicine. This is an fantastic conversation with someone who is truly changing how we communicate as physicians.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Publishing  54 mins – “Ganesh V is the Author of the book The Underage CEOs, which traces the stories of 11 entrepreneurs from small towns and Tier II cities of India. Ganesh is an engineer who worked in the area of marketing communication, and now is a writer with interest in travel, music, culture, lifestyle, health, communities, parenting and entrepreneurship.In this interview, we talk about Ganesh’s writing, his journey as an author, the process he followed to write the manuscript, experiences with publishing and finally, the feedback from readers and his upcoming book….” At the link find the link “Ganesh V Author of The Underage CEOs, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 4814284-ganesh-v-author-of-the-underage-ceos.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet History  47 mins – “It’s a remarkable ecosystem that allows each of us to exercise control over our lives. But how much control do we truly have? How many of our decisions are really being made by Google and Facebook and Apple? And, perhaps most importantly: is the Internet’s true potential being squandered?” At the link click the circle with the dots, rightclick “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Sale Location  5 mins –Jim Luty joins J.D. Dhein to discuss Internet Purchase Exchange Locations. When you purchase something online and you need to meet the seller, why not go to your local police station?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jules Feiffer  48 mins – “Jules Feiffer has been drawing and writing—comic strips, children’s books, plays—since the 1940s. His illustrations brought “The Phantom Tollbooth” to life, and his satirical cartoons for The Village Voice ran for more than four decades. Now in his 80s, Feiffer says he is doing some of his best work—in a totally new genre for the artist: graphic novels. His newest is a noir thriller titled “Cousin Joseph,” the prequel to 2014’s “Kill My Mother.” Cartoonist Jules Feiffer joins Diane to talk about his late turn to graphic novels, what satire can mean for the nation and feeling like a kid at 87.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Manufacturing Globally  177 mins – “Now the world’s second largest manufacturing economy since falling behind China in 2010, the United States relies on a robust manufacturing sector, which accounts for almost nine percent of American jobs. But manufacturing is constantly evolving as a result of changing technological capabilities, leadership approaches, and policy incentives. With the world economy more interconnected than ever before, solutions to the challenges facing the manufacturing industry take on an increasingly global perspective. On July 7, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted expert panelists for a half-day conference on the global context of modern manufacturing. Which innovations in leadership and workforce development have been successful around the world? How can effective policy initiatives foster manufacturing growth? What lessons can America learn from abroad? The conference marks the fifth annual John Hazen White Forum on Public Policy, which convenes leaders from academia, business, and government to discuss and identify solutions to the United States’ most pressing challenges.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Impact  106 mins – “Four states and D.C. have legalized recreational marijuana, and more may do so this fall. But legalization is just the beginning of policy development. After legalization come commercialization and regulation—processes sure to be influenced by corporations and interest groups. How will lobbying and corporatization affect the structure and regulation of the licit marijuana market? And how should policymakers respond? On June 16, the Center for Effective Public Management at Brookings released two papers examining these issues. Authors and Brookings Senior Fellows John Hudak, Jonathan Rauch, and Philip Wallach were joined by experts from government, private industry, the non-profit sector, and academia to assess the papers’ findings that state-level regulation can help rein in special interests and that big corporations can bring benefits as well as risks.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mark Twain  52 mins – “Monday, we’re telling the story of what author Richard Zacks calls Mark Twain’s “raucous and redemptive round-the-world comedy tour.” Twain was once America’s highest paid writer, but he was also a remarkably bad businessman. In 1895, with his career on the rocks and with what today would be millions in debt, Twain embarked on a 5-continent speaking tour he hoped would save him. Zacks joins Doug to talk about Twain’s wildly popular humor, his missteps, and what drove his quest for redemption. Richard Zacks is a journalist and author. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, and Harper’s Magazine among many others. His books include Island of Vice: Theodore Roosevelt’s Quest to Clean Up Sin-Loving New York and Pirate Coast: Thomas Jefferson, the First Marines, and the Secret Mission of 1805. His new book is called Chasing the Last Laugh: Mark Twain’s Raucous and Redemptive Round-the-World Comedy Tour At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Math Rant  66 mins – “Only one actually caller, but lots of great audience questions in this “call in” episode! We discussed power supplies, formal EE education, IC die photos, old calculators, math and more!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Team Performance  49 mins – “My friend, Chris Hicks, is an emergency physician and trauma team leader in Toronto, Canada. His niche and research work revolves around human factors, team performance, and stress management for individuals and teams. We brought him down to give a grand rounds lecture; this is a recording of that lecture.” At the link right-click “Download” for the lecture and select “Save Link As” from the pop up menu.

Middle Class Finances  30 mins – “Neal Gabler’s cover story about the hidden financial struggles of the middle class sparked a firestorm of attention. Here, we talk with him about the personal story behind his revolutionary confessional, and how it feels to live the truth.” At the link find the title, “Redefining Success: Neal Gabler on the Secret Shame of the Middle Class, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files PNC3277711169.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minimum Wage  10 mins – Discussion about minimum wage debates in many countries. At the link find the title, “Money talks: Minimum-wage mania, Jul, 2015,” right-click “Media files money_talks__minimum-wage_mania.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mississippi Pioneer Woman  47 mins – “A woman’s life on the American Frontier: we’ll open an old memoir of homesteading on the Mississippi Delta.” At the linkf ind the title, “One Pioneer Woman’s Story Of Life On The Mississippi Delta, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_486064589.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mississippi Scale Model  20 mins – Early in 1927, it began to rain in the Midwest. It kept raining all spring, and the Mississippi River became the collection point for this rainfall and the previous winter’s snowpack. As early as February, levees were strained, and started to give way. Over the course of the next three months, 145 levees would fail, and 27,000 square miles across ten states were put underwateThe total number of dead from this tragic event is unknown, but likely upwards of a thousand. In April, then Secretary of Commerce (and future President) Herbert Hoover, spoke to the American people by radio, calling the event “the most dangerous flood our country has ever known.”The following year, Congress took the first important step in regulating the Mississippi River and its tributaries by passing the Flood Control Act of 1928, which empowered the Army Corps of Engineers to study and alter the nation’s river systems—the Mississippi especially. The Army Corps would build infrastructure to corral and maneuver the river in order to control it. This was a task of enormous scale—much bigger than anything the Corps had undertaken before—and so they wanted a way to test out their building projects to make sure that they would work. The Army Corps began constructing crude models, mere ditches cut in the dirt with water flowing through them. These showed promise in their ability to predict flooding, and the effects of proposed dams. So the Army Corps of Engineers began building more sophisticated models….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow just under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mobile Phone Videos  14 mins -.”The deaths of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minnesota, were both captured on video. So were the deaths of Walter Scott, Eric Garner, and so many others. That’s not new. But technology has become more and more sophisticated, and so have the bystanders using it, primed by grim history to turn the camera on, and, increasingly, involve an audience. We explore the role of Facebook Live in the events of the last week and offer you our Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook: Bearing Witness Edition, for guidance on how to film the police, wisely and within your rights. Brooke speaks with journalist Carlos Miller of Photography is Not A Crime, former police officer and current law professor Seth Stoughton, and Jennifer Carnig, former communications director for the New York Civil Liberties Union. Find the ACLU’s apps for recording police action here.” At the link find the title, “Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook: Bearing Witness Edition, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files otm071116podextra.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MOOC on Cancer  52 mins – “Dr Momna Hejmadi, Dr Andrew Chalmers and Dr Lorenzo Caggiano summarise some of the latest developments in cancer research. This lecture was delivered as part of our MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), ‘Inside Cancer: how genes influence cancer development’. https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/inside-cancer.” (Over 200 free courses with many topics are also available at that link.) At the link find the title, “Inside Cancer, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 273805869-uniofbath-inside-cancer.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Narcissism Effect 26 mins – “It doesn’t take a psychologist to see narcissism in our culture of selfies. But we decided to talk to one anyway. Jean Twenge is a researcher and author of the books The Narcissism Epidemic, and Generation Me.” At the link find the title, “Episode 38: Me, Me, Me, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160708_hiddenbrain_podcast38.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Parks  48 mins – “On Aug. 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the act that created the National Park Service. One hundred years later, it protects more than 400 parks and monuments, from Yellowstone to Gettysburg and the Stonewall Inn, the first national landmark honoring the fight for gay rights. Still, there are challenges, like a $12 billion maintenance backlog and an ongoing ethics scandal. And some say a lack of funding could threaten America’s rich conservation legacy. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell talks with Diane about her vision for preserving green spaces for the next generation. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Nitrogen Conservation  26 mins – “Sustainable Agriculture (starts 3:06): We couldn’t feed the planet without nitrogen, a vital nutrient for crops. But most soils don’t produce enough of it to feed anywhere near our 7 billion-plus humans on the planet. So, for nearly a century we’ve been applying synthetic fertilizer—mainly nitrogen and phosphorus — to grow crops for animals and people. But we have overindulged, creating vast amounts of waste, in the form of nitrogen pollution of waterways and the atmosphere. State and federal regulations have pressured growers to dramatically reduce fertilizer runoff from their fields. But it’s not been enough. Another approach – call it the carrot versus the stick – is also taking hold. Major food retailers, wholesalers, and producers, such as Walmart, United Suppliers and Unilever are transforming their whole supply chains, making food production less carbon- and nitrogen-intensive. Suzy Friedman, a sustainable agriculture expert with the Environmental Defense Fund, discusses with host Susan Moran how programs such as SUSTAIN help large food companies shrink their environmental footprint.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Noncomplementary Behavior  60 mins – “Psychology has a golden rule: If I am warm, you are usually warm. If I am hostile, you are too. But what happens if you flip the script and meet hostility with warmth? It’s called “noncomplementary behavior” — a mouthful, but a powerful concept, and very hard to execute. Alix and Hanna examine three attempts to pull it off: during a robbery, a terrorism crisis and a dating dry spell.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PACE Trial Controversy  93 mins – “Host: Vincent Racaniello Guest: David Tuller Vincent speaks with David Tuller about flaws in the U.K’s $8 million PACE trial for chronic fatigue syndrome, and efforts to have the trial data released.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 397” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panama Papers  36 mins – “Frederik Obermaier explains how his German newspaper came to initiate the biggest data leak in the history of investigative journalism.” At the link find the title, “Journalist central to breaking Panama Papers reveals story behind the massive leak, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160715_32225.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Performance Enhancing Drugs  33 mins – “In this episode we talk to Chris Hoyte from RMPDC [Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center] about Lance Armstrong, blood doping, and the biological passport. This is the second part of a two part interview.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Personal Learning Network 34 mins – “Thank you all for ten YEARS of [TechChickTips] podcasting! Maybe we’ll go ten more! In this anniversary episode, we share 10 Bytes of Wisdom for our 10 Years of Podcasting.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photonic Chips  12 mins – “Just 13 years ago, photonic chips were a dream. These chips use light instead of electricity. Today photonic chips are found in the world’s major data centres and allow vast amounts of data to be processed. As a result, networks are faster and more energy efficient. As Ben Eggleton explains, the next frontier is getting photonic chips into smart phones. They bring with them the promise of greatly improved capability, such as the measuring and analysis of blood and saliva, and even the levels of pollution in the air. Photonics are estimated as the basis of a $7 trillion industry in Australia, being 10% of the economy.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Picric Acid  7 mins – “Once you start studying chemistry, you see the world differently. Entirely unrelated things can trigger a series of chemical questions, and some won’t rest until they’ve got to the bottom of them. And so it was that a dress once worn by a famous author set Michael Freemantle digging into the history of picric acid….” At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Picric_acid.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Incidents  49 mins – “Thousands of protesters took to the streets over the weekend nationwide after three days of fatal gun violence between African-American men and police. In the space of two days, two black men in Louisiana and Minnesota were killed by police. The shootings were caught on video and seen by millions. Then, a day later, a black war veteran killed five officers in a retaliatory sniper attack. Diane and a panel of guests discuss the latest on the shooting investigations, and look at continuing tensions over deadly police force against black Americans and the movement for justice.” (5 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Police PR  31 mins – “The Current hosts a panel discussion on how to best address long-standing tensions between police and minority communities in our country.” At the link find the title, “‘This mistrust is deep’: how to improve relations between minorities and Canadian police, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160714_30822.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Torture in Chicago  27 mins – “A tale of violence, payback, and how to make things right.” At the link find the title, “#713: Paying for the Crime, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160720_pmoney_podcast072016a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Viewpoint  15 mins – “Marc Rainford says growing polarization between law enforcement and those they are intended to serve compromised his ability to effectively police.” At the link find the title, “Toronto police constable quits, says tension with community contributes to decision, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160714_31340.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Policing in America  58 mins – “Manhattan Institute Senior Fellow Heather Mac Donald discusses her book [The War on Cops], in which she looks at policing in America. She is interviewed by John Jay College professor Delores Jones-Brown.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Heather Mac Donald, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.445446.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Population Growth  40 mins – “Roger Martin, Chair of Population Matters, delivers a lecture for the Institute for our Institute for Sustainable Energy & the Environment considering population growth and the environment.” At the link find the title, “It’s no use reducing your footprint if you keep increasing the number of feet, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 273805685-uniofbath-its-no-use-reducing-your-footprint-if-you-keep-increasing-the-number-of-feet.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Price Fixing  58 mins – “There are all sorts of situations in which we suspect the fix is in, but we almost never find out for certain. On today’s show, for once, we find out. The whole program is devoted to one story, in which we go inside the back rooms of one multinational corporation and hear the intricate workings—recorded on tape—of how they put the fix in.” At the link find the title, “#168: The Fix Is In,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychosis  54 mins – “What’s it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit’s end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there’s stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.” At the link find the title, “Wit’s End, Part 1, Jun, 2016, right-click “Media files ideas_20160620_74679.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism Panel  67 mins – “Libby Schaaf, Mayor of Oakland James Bell, Civil Rights Leader; Executive Director, W. Hayward Burns Institute for Juvenile Justice, Fairness and Equality Manuel Pastor, Demographer and Professor of Sociology, American Studies and Ethnicity, The University of Southern California Joshua Johnson, Creator/Host, Rockit Fuel Radio Podcast; Lecturer, U.C. Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism—Moderator This program is part of our special series focused on people, place and power in the Bay Area, sponsored by the San Francisco Foundation. The Bay Area is at a crossroads. We live in one of the most industrious, exciting places anywhere. We know that our vitality, ingenuity and broad array of cultural identities make the region special. Yet we also know that we have significant challenges. People are worried about jobs, housing, transportation, and about making sure that everybody has the chance to participate, prosper and reach their full potential, regardless of their race or the neighborhood in which they live. Is it possible to provide true opportunity for all residents of our region, or is the notion of Bay Area exceptionalism just a myth?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Renewable Energy  29 mins – “This week on Sea Change Radio, host Alex Wise chats with Daniel Kirk-Davidoff, a climate scientist at the University of Maryland and at MDA Information Systems. First, Kirk-Davidoff tells us about how the science of predicting changes in climate and weather influences how utility companies and futures markets behave. Then, we hear about the challenges the developing world faces to keep carbon emissions low even as populations expand. Last, he talks about how different the electric grid of tomorrow may look in a few decades.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robert Scoble  83 mins – “Leo Laporte talks with Robert Scoble, a heavy virtual reality and mixed reality enthusiast. He is also an entrepreneur in residence at uploadvr.comAt the link click “Download options,”right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School of life  42 mins – “We are bring back one of our all time most downloaded guests this week, Roman Krznaric. In this episode we discuss Roman’s most recent book, How Should We Live?: Great Ideas from the Past for Everyday Life. There are many ways to try to improve our lives—we can turn to the wisdom of philosophers, the teachings of spiritual guides, or the latest experiments of psychologists. But we rarely look to history for inspiration—and when we do, it can be surprisingly powerful. In this episode, the cultural historian Roman Krznaric explores twelve universal topics—including love, family, and empathy; work, time, and money—by illuminating the past and revealing the wisdom we have been missing. Roman is a cultural thinker, writer, and founding faculty member of The School of Life in London. He has taught sociology and politics at Cambridge University and City University, London, and advises organizations including Oxfam and the United Nations on using empathy and conversation to create social change. He has been named by The Observer as one of Britain’s leading lifestyle philosophers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shark Conservation  47 mins – “Marine ecologist Dr. Neil Hammerschlag has looked inside the mouth of a wild tiger shark and lived to tell the tale. He says that sharks pose only a small risk to people: “Humans are not on the shark’s menu.” Also, opera percussionist Patti Niemi talks about her journey from Juilliard to the orchestra pit, and her struggles with anxiety and OCD.” At the link find the title, “July 14, 2016,”Swimming With Sharks & What ‘Jaws’ Got Wrong,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Debt Crisis  53 mins – “Just about everyone involved in the student loan industry these days – banks, private investors and even the federal government – makes money off the borrowers. On this episode of Reveal, we explore how this happened and who’s profiting from student debt.” At the link find the title, “Who’s getting rich off your student debt? Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files Whos-getting-rich-off-your-student-debt_podcast.mp3and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Loan Dissection  34 mins – “Our Spotlight on Magazine series continues with a recent story by [Boston Globe] Magazine Staff Writer Neil Swidey about the amount of student loan debt tripling to $1.23 trillion.” At the link find the title, “Washington Journal: Spotlight on Student Debt, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.444257.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Lone Crisis  49 mins – “Forty-two million Americans owe $1.3 trillion in student debt. We’ll look at who made money on all that debt.” At the link find the title, “Why Student Loan Debt Exploded, Jul, 2016 ,” right-click “Media files npr_486053959.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugees  174 mins – “On Tuesday, June 14, the Foreign Policy Program at Brookings and its Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World hosted a panel discussion on “The Politics of Rescue,” which explored the current conflicts in the Middle East, the resulting refugee crisis, the international community’s response, and the political, social, and economic hurdles to addressing this global crisis. The discussion also explored how these issues are being addressed by the United States and how they are playing into the 2016 presidential election. Panelists included Senator John McCain (R-Arizona), David Miliband, CEO of the International Rescue Committee, and Leon Wieseltier, the Isaiah Berlin Senior Fellow in Culture and Policy at The Brookings Institution. Washington Post columnist David Ignatius moderated the discussion. This panel discussion was part of the larger conference, “Refuge and Responsibility: The Syrian Refugee Crisis in 2016.” The objective of the conference is to generate meaningful discussion and mobilize real steps among international government and non-government actors to respond to the ongoing Syrian refugee crisis. The conflict in Syria and the flight of millions of traumatized Syrian citizens have placed enormous stress on Syria’s neighbors, Europe, and more broadly on the international refugee and humanitarian systems. An effective response must recognize the distinct circumstances facing the international community and Europe’s cities specifically, which are at the frontline of the crisis, absorbing massive numbers of refugees. The Refuge and Responsibility conference will focus on the political, economic, social, and cultural implications as countries grapple with this crisis. Conference participants, which include Syria refugees now residing in the United states, will seek to generate new ideas and mobilize effective international action.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Test Pilot  125 mins – “This is the first of several episodes from my trip to Airbus Toulouse: we cover flight testing of the A350. We have two guests. First, we speak with Peter Chandler, a test pilot at Airbus, about envelope expansion, the relationship between simulation and the real airplane, and test flying in general. Our second guest is Pascal Verneau, a test flight engineer. We discuss his role in flight testing, as well as some special equipment installed in (some of) the testing aircraft.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 File Directly” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Textbook Publishing  17 mins – “…Over his career advising clients in a wide variety of publishing and entertainment transactions and disputes, Steve Gillen has explored the dark corners of contractual law and sheds light on what he found there in a new publication from the Textbook & Academic Authors Association, “Guide to Textbook Publishing Contracts.” …“But it may not be about money for a lot of textbook authors. Some of them – they’re at universities where publishing a textbook, particularly a market-leading textbook, would be considered in advancement and promotion and tenure considerations,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “If that’s the case, if this is a publication that they need for promotion or for tenure, then the focus ought to be not so much money, perhaps, but making sure that the book actually sees the light of day. So your attention is going to be focused on things like the manuscript acceptability clause and making sure that you maintain as much control over the content and the message that the book ends up delivering as is possible…. The Textbook & Academic Authors Association (TAA) provides professional development resources, events, and networking opportunities for textbook authors and authors of scholarly journal articles and books. TAA is the only national, nonprofit membership association dedicated solely to assisting textbook and academic authors. Steve Gillen is a long-time member of the TAA Council.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tin Ears  55 mins – “Many of us love to sing, but we’re not all good at it. Some of us can’t even carry a tune and are told not to sing. Tim Falconer dives into neuroscience, psychology — and music itself — to find out why he’s a bad singer.” At the link find the title, “The Ballad of Tin Ears, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160712_11940.mp3 The Ballad of Tin Ears” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universal Basic Income  49 mins – “The idea of a universal basic income has been around for centuries. Thomas Paine, one of this country’s founding fathers, was an early proponent. Later, it was taken up by progressives like Martin Luther King Jr., but conservatives and libertarians have been interested in the idea, too. Today, a leading voice in support of the concept is Andy Stern, who spent 14 years as president of the Service Employees International Union, a tenure that led some to call him the country’s most influential labor leader at the time. Diane talks with Andy Stern about technology, the future of work and why he is making a case for a universal basic income.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Veterans Affairs Modernization  60 mins – “With the demand for its services constantly evolving, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) faces complex challenges in providing accessible care to America’s veterans. Amidst a history of long patient wait times, cost overruns, and management concerns, the VA recently conducted a sweeping internal review of its operations.  The result was the new MyVA program. How will MyVA improve the VA’s care of veterans? What will it do restore public confidence in its efforts? What changes is the VA undergoing to address both internal concerns and modern challenges in veteran care?On June 20, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted VA Secretary Robert McDonald. Secretary McDonald described the VA’s transformation strategy and explained how the reforms within MyVA will impact veterans, taxpayers and other stakeholders. He addressed lessons learned not just for the VA but for all government agencies that strive to achieve transformation and improve service delivery.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vulcanology  60 mins – “UK Geo-hazards expert Dr. Bill McGuire (“Waking the Giants”) on recent quakes & links to climate change. Oregon Professor Robert Yeats new book “Earthquake Time Bombs” – most cities at risk from quakes or mega-tsunamis. About 12,000 years ago there was a period of “volcanic storms”, so many erupted. The Earth was unstable, rocking and rolling with Earthquakes. Geologists know climate change destabilized the Earth’s crust. Bill McGuire wrote an influential article in the Guardian newspaper about this in 2012. Does that sound too fantastic? The weight of ice miles thick poured into the sea as that latest ice age ended. Released from that weight, land rose. Long-standing pressure points reacted, and the world shook. As the article in Live Science says: “McGuire conducted a study that was published in the journal Nature in 1997 that looked at the connection between the change in the rate of sea level rise and volcanic activity in the Mediterranean for the past 80,000 years and found that when sea level rose quickly, more volcanic eruptions occurred, increasing by a whopping 300 percent.“ …Even if that time of extra volcanoes and quakes is farther into our future, the threat of everyday earthquakes and tsunamis is larger now. That is because so much of the doubled and tripled human population lives near the sea. We’ve built our mega-cities – and nuclear power plants – within tsunami range. Eight thousand years ago, an earthquake caused an undersea land-slide off Norway. The tsunami raced around the whole North Atlantic, reaching up to 30 meters high – that’s well over 90 feet. …We’ll talk about what happened the last time Tokyo was nearly levelled, and the next time, which Japanese scientists say is over 90% likely within the next couple of decades. The aftershocks would be in the world’s shaky financial system. Would a big quake in Los Angeles, Vancouver, or Tokyo be the trigger for a massive collapse in the global economy? That’s why our second guest, Dr. Robert Yeats from Oregon wrote his book “Earthquake Time Bombs”. We’ll go into that risk in depth.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Welfare Programs  53 mins – “Twenty years ago, President Bill Clinton vowed to end welfare as we know it. And he did. Today, only a quarter of welfare dollars actually goes toward basic assistance – housing, transportation or essential household items. On this hour of Reveal, we take a road trip with Marketplace’s new podcast “The Uncertain Hour” and find out the surprising ways different states use this money, for things such as relationship counseling and college tuition for well-off kids.” At the link find the title, “A welfare check, Jul, 2016,”right-click “Media files A-welfare-check.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 245 – Jul 22, 2016: 5G Communications, Abortion Bans, Addiction Treatment, Adventures of Eleanore Amplified, Alcoholism Management, America’s Future, Anatomy Class, Arms Dealer, Artificial Intelligence, Atul Gawande, Australian Ticks, Bangladesh Gay Love, Big Data and Privacy, Black Holes, Blind Astronomer, Cancer Overview, Chaos Theory, Child Welfare in Norway, Constitutional Law, Deaf Lawyer, Dionne Warwick, Douglas MacArthur, Drag Queen Wrestler, Drug Types, Dry Needling, Education Reform, Employment Trends, Entomologist, Eubie Blake Sound, Eurovision Explained, Fake Foods, Fearless Women, Federal Land Management, Fourier Math, Gaddafis Gold Gun, Gaming, Gender Identity, Genetics, Genius Prediction, Globilization Criticism, GMO Researcher, Gun Industry, Hearing Difficulties, Helium Resource, Hip Arthritis, Homeless in America, Honduras Activists, HPV Vaccine, Infectious Disease Specialist, Internet Future, Iraq’s Kurds, ISIS, Juno Probe, Ketamine for Depression, Kolkata Stories, Lead Belly Sound, Listening Better, Los Angeles Mayor, Malaria Research, Manto Pakistani Author, Mental Illness in Africa, Mental Illness, National Parks, Nerve Injuries, Neurology and Addiction, Neuroscientist, New York Stories, Nonviolent Resistance, Obesity Research, Pathology Researcher, Personality Changes, Perspectives, Photography History, Podcasting Ideas, Police Shootings, Poverty Goals of UN, Racism in Canada, Relax with Night Vale, Robert Kennedy, Rocket Girls, Romanian Sheep Protection, Rosemary Kennedy, Rosewood Smuggling, Rule of Law, Satellite Design, Sebastian Younger, Startup Problems, Stroke Prevention, Stutter Story, Supreme Court, Synthetic Biologist, Syrian Refugee Stories, Taxidermy, Telemedicine, Tesla Auto Death, Tornado Survivors, Transgender Judge, Virologist Peter Palese

The best 115 podcasts from a larger group of 281 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

5G Communications 29 mins – “Verizon Senior Vice President Kathy Grillo discusses issues that the company is focusing on with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and Congress, including net neutrality, privacy regulations, 5G, and the need for more spectrum.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Kathy Grillo, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.447210.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Abortion Bans 11 mins – “This week, the Supreme Court upheld constitutional protections for abortion rights. To mark the occasion we have a story about the history of abortion in the US that first aired last winter, when the spread of Zika and the resulting deformities in newborns was causing panic across South and Central America. Abortion is illegal in those traditionally Catholic countries, but so many women were giving birth to babies with microcephaly and the brain damage associated with it, that the UN high commissioner for human rights urged a widespread repeal of abortion bans. You may be surprised to know this wasn’t the first time an epidemic influenced the abortion debate. Leslie Reagan of the University of Illinois says it happened in the US, 50 years ago — and the epidemic was Rubella, or German measles.” At the link right-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Addiction Treatment 47 mins – “Tough love, interventions and 12-step programs are some of the most common methods of treating drug addiction, but journalist Maia Szalavitz says they’re often counterproductive. In her new book, ‘Unbroken Brain,’ Szalavitz argues against the notion of “addictive personalities” and instead makes the case that addiction is similar to a learning disorder. Her book is based on research as well as personal experience; Szalavitz was addicted to cocaine and heroin from the age of 17 until she was 23. Also book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews ‘Underground Airlines,’ a new novel of alternate history by Ben H. Winters that imagines the Civil War never happened, and that slavery still exists in a few states.” At the link find the title, “Jul, 2016, Why ‘Tough’ Treatment Doesn’t Help Drug Addicts,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Adventures of Eleanor Amplified 24 mins – “’The Radio Adventures of Eleanor Amplified’ is a new family-friendly podcast about an intrepid reporter (and radio host!) who foils devious plots and matches wits with cunning villains. It was created by Fresh Air producer John Sheehan. Find it at: http://eleanoramplified.com “ At the link find the title, “July 6, 2016, BONUS: Terry Gross Introduces ‘The Radio Adventures of Eleanor Amplified’ click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcoholism Management 27 mins – “The conventional treatment for chronic alcoholics is abstinence. Not in Ottawa. At the Oaks, a residence for those who were once homeless, occupants are given a measure of white wine at hourly intervals throughout the day. The ‘Managed Alcohol Program’ has improved the health of its participants, reduced their alcohol intake, and in some cases enabled them to stop drinking altogether. It’s also saved the city of Ottawa millions of dollars in public services – one man was hospitalised 191 times in the six months before joining the programme. Hours and hours of police time have been clawed back too – this is a population used to stealing to feed addiction, but the hourly ‘pour’ enables them to refrain from criminal activity. The Ottawa programme has been introduced in other Canadian cities, and it’s now attracting international attention. Linda Pressly spends time at the Oaks to find out how it works.” At the link find the link, “The City Giving Wine to Alcoholics, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p040n075.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America’s Future 61 mins – “Yuval Levin, author and editor of National Affairs, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in his latest book, The Fractured Republic. Levin argues that both major political parties suffer from a misplaced nostalgia–a yearning for a time when things were better even though the policies that created those good times are no longer as relevant to today. Levin argues for a strengthening of the intermediate institutions–institutions between the individual and the government such as religious communities and other non-profits as a way toward a better life for Americans.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anatomy Class 30 mins – “When the first-year medical students at Table 4 met their male cadaver, they weren’t pleased. The group was in the home stretch of anatomy class at NYU School of Medicine, and the final exam was a couple weeks away. They had dozens of vessels, nerves, and organ components to memorize. And this cadaver was an interloper. They had grown attached to the first body they were dissecting — an elderly woman whose chest cavity was nice and neat, but whose intestines were so ravaged by cancer there was no point in working on her anymore. But this new body on Table 4 proved more challenging, they said. “Now we can’t see anything in our new body [in the chest], and we can’t refer back to that first work we did,” said student Samantha Ayoub, expressing the frustration of her six-person group. Medical school instructors often refer to the cadavers as the students’ “first patient.” There are about 20,000 of them donated to U.S. medical schools each year, according to the Harvard Business School. The schools encourage students to be grateful and respectful to these bodies, but with rare exceptions, schools don’t encourage students to think too hard about the lives of these “patients” prior to the dissection table. And as it turns out, the body on Table 4 was far more than a collection of vessels and valves. Literally and figuratively, he was an instructor, guide and teacher. His name was Haig Manoukian, and he and his wife, Michele Piso Manoukian, decided to donate his body to NYU so he could continue being an educator….” At the link find the title, “Every (Dead) Body Has A Story, March 29, 2016,” right-click “Media files onlyhuman032916_cms588669_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arms Dealer 22 mins – “A young massage therapist in Miami beach gets the business offer of a lifetime. So he shakes hands with the devil and hopes for the best. Read the whole story in Guy Lawson’s Arms and the Dudes at guylawson.com.” At the link click the circle with the three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence 26 mins – “Should machines have a concrete Mr Spock-like regard for logic or are there times when the best decision is a more human one? Ian Sample takes a look at the future of machines – not the dystopian nightmares of science fiction but the real challenges and big wins that might come with ever-smarter robots. He’s joined by Paul Newman, professor of Information Engineering and head of Oxford University’s Mobile Robotics Group, and Joanna Bryson, who studies natural intelligence and robot ethics at the University of Bath.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atul Gawande P1 42 mins – “Surgeon and writer Atul Gawande explores the nature of fallibility and suggests that preventing avoidable mistakes is a key challenge for the future of medicine. Through the story of a life-threatening condition which affected his own baby son, Dr. Gawande suggests that the medical profession needs to understand how best to deploy the enormous arsenal of knowledge which it has acquired. And his challenge for global health is to address the inequalities in access to resources and expertise both within and between countries. This first of four lectures was recorded before an audience at the John F Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Dr. Gawande’s home town of Boston in Massachusetts. The other lectures are recorded in London, Edinburgh and Delhi.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atul Gawande P2 42 mins – “The surgeon and writer Atul Gawande argues that better systems can transform global healthcare by radically reducing the chance of mistakes and increasing the chance of successful outcomes. He tells the story of how a little-known hospital in Austria managed to develop a complex yet highly effective system for dealing with victims of drowning. He says that the lesson from this dramatic narrative is that effective systems can provide major improvements in success rates for surgery and other medical procedures. Even a simple checklist – of the kind routinely used in the aviation industry – can be remarkably effective. And he argues that these systems have the power to transform care from the richest parts of the world to the poorest. The programme was recorded at The Wellcome Collection in London before an audience.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atul Gawande P3 42 mins – “Surgeon and writer Atul Gawande calls for a new approach to the two great unfixable problems in life and healthcare – ageing and death. He tells the story of how his daughter’s piano teacher faced up to terminal cancer and the crucial choices she made about how to spend her final days. He says the teacher was only able to do this because of an essential honesty from her physicians and the people around her. Dr. Gawande argues that the common reluctance of society and medical institutions to recognise the limits of what professionals can do can end up increasing the suffering of patients towards the end of life. He proposes that both doctors and individuals ask a series of simple but penetrating questions to decide what kind of treatment is appropriate – or whether treatment is appropriate at all. And he praises the values of the hospice movement, in putting quality of life before prolonging life. The programme was recorded at The Royal Society in Edinburgh in front of an audience.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atul Gawande P4 42 mins – “The surgeon and writer Atul Gawande calls for a new focus on medical systems to ensure doctors work more effectively, alongside far greater transparency about their performance. Speaking to an audience at the India International Centre in Delhi, he describes the story of medicine over the last century through the prism of his own family. From a grandmother who died in rural India from malaria – a preventable disease – to the high-tech medicine of today. He argues that despite its scientific advances, medicine has failed to exploit its knowledge successfully. In both the developed and developing world doctors do not carry out basic procedures effectively and often do not act in the best interests of their patients. He calls for wide-ranging research into the systems by which medical care is delivered, alongside far greater transparency about performance.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Ticks 30 mins – “Do Australian ticks pose a greater health risk than we thought? For people suffering from Lyme-like disease, it’s a controversial mystery that science has so far been unable to resolve. For the first time, microbes inside native Aussie ticks are being probed, leading to new discoveries which may reveal the causes of unexplained illnesses in the future.” At the link right-click “download video mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bangladesh Gay Love 27 mins – “Lipika Pelham investigates a marriage between two Bengali women, and asks what this extraordinary love story says about attitudes to sexuality in this conservative nation.” At the link find the title, “Women in Love in Bangladesh, Jan, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03gqhhs.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Data and Privacy 56 mins -”IDEAS, CBC RADIO ONE in partnership with the MUNK School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto weighs the opportunities, the risks — and the trade-offs — as the world of Big Data relentlessly changes our lives.” At the link find the title, “Big Data, Part 2, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160630_94562.mp3” and select “Save LINK As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Holes 60 mins – “Janna Levin, Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College; Author, Black Hole Blues and Other Songs from Outer Space If black holes collide in outer space and no one can see it, does it make a sound? A black hole collision is an event more powerful than any since the origin of the universe. But when black holes collide, they will do so unilluminated—emanating only gravitational waves. The only evidence would be the sound of spacetime ringing. Levin shares the obsessions, the aspirations, and the trials of the scientists who embarked on an arduous, 50-year endeavor to capture these elusive waves and record the soundtrack of the universe.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Holes-Hawking P1 30 mins – “The Cambridge cosmologist Professor Stephen Hawking delivers the second of his BBC Reith Lectures on black holes. Professor Hawking examines scientific thinking about black holes and challenges the idea that all matter and information is destroyed irretrievably within them. He explains his own hypothesis that black holes may emit a form of radiation, now known as Hawking Radiation. He discusses the search for mini black holes, noting that so far “no-one has found any, which is a pity because if they had, I would have got a Nobel Prize.” And he advances a theory that information may remain stored within black holes in a scrambled form. The programmes are recorded in front of an audience of Radio 4 listeners and some of the country’s leading scientists at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London. Sue Lawley introduces the evening and chairs a question-and-answer session with Professor Hawking. Radio 4 listeners submitted questions in their hundreds, of which a selection were invited to attend the event to put their questions in person to Professor.” At the link find the title, “Black holes ain’t as black as they are painted, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03gnm5d.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Holes-Hawking P2 30 mins – “Professor Stephen Hawking delivers the first of his two BBC Reith Lectures on black holes. These collapsed stars challenge the very nature of space and time, as they contain a singularity – a phenomenon where the normal rules of the universe break down. They have held an enduring fascination for Professor Hawking throughout his life. Rather than see them as a scary, destructive and dark he says if properly understood, they could unlock the deepest secrets of the cosmos. Professor Hawking describes the history of scientific thinking about black holes, and explains how they have posed tough challenges to conventional understanding of the laws which govern the universe. The programmes are recorded in front of an audience of Radio 4 listeners and some of the country’s leading scientists at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London. Sue Lawley introduces the evening and chairs a question-and-answer session with Professor Hawking. Radio 4 listeners submitted questions in their hundreds, of which a selection were invited to attend the event to put their questions in person to Professor Hawking.” At the link find the title, “Do black holes have no hair? Jan, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03gnl47.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Astronomer 11 mins – “Wanda Diaz Merced studies the light emitted by gamma-ray bursts, the most energetic events in the universe. When she lost her sight and was left without a way to do her science, she had a revelatory insight: the light curves she could no longer see could be translated into sound. Through sonification, she regained mastery over her work, and now she’s advocating for a more inclusive scientific community. “Science is for everyone,” she says. “It has to be available to everyone, because we are all natural explorers.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Overview 56 mins – “In the first of a two-part series, we’ll delve into the most prevalent cancers in New Hampshire – bladder, breast and lung. We’ll also examine who appears to be most susceptible to these cancers and how genetics, lifestyle, or environmental causes might be contributing factors in the incidence of cancer in the state.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chaos Theory 15 mins – “This ten part history of mathematics from Newton to the present day, reveals the personalities behind the calculations: the passions and rivalries of mathematicians struggling to get their ideas heard. Professor Marcus du Sautoy shows how these masters of abstraction find a role in the real world and proves that mathematics is the driving force behind modern science. Today Henri Poincare, the man who proved there are certain problems that mathematics will never be able to answer: a mathematical insight that gave rise to chaos theory.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Welfare in Norway 27 mins – “Norway’s widely regarded as one of the world’s most progressive societies, yet it’s at the centre of an international storm over its child protection policies. Campaigners accuse its social workers of removing children – some from immigrant backgrounds – from their parents without justification, and permanently erasing family bonds. Tim Whewell meets parents who say they’ve lost their children because of misunderstood remarks or “insufficient eye contact” – and Norwegian professionals who call the system monstrous and dysfunctional. Is a service designed to put children first now out of control?” At the link find the title, “Norway: Parents Against the State, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03qylz6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constitutional Law 48 mins – “In 2015, the Supreme Court ruled that same sex couples have a right to marry under the Constitution, something that would have been unthinkable decades earlier. When the Supreme Court justices decided in 2010 that individuals have the right to bear arms, it again was a major departure for the court. In a new book, constitutional scholar David Cole says the decisions were the results of campaigns by citizens and civil society groups who used deliberate strategies, often outside the courts, to effect constitutional change. David Cole joins Diane to discuss his new book “Engines of Liberty: The Power of Citizen Activists to Make Constitutional Law.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Deaf Lawyer 13 mins – ““I believe that losing my hearing was one of the greatest gifts I’ve ever received,” says Elise Roy. As a disability rights lawyer and design thinker, she knows that being Deaf gives her a unique way of experiencing and reframing the world — a perspective that could solve some of our largest problems. As she says: “When we design for disability first, you often stumble upon solutions that are better than those when we design for the norm.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dionne Warwick 52 mins – “For the latest installment in our Through the Lens series, we’re trying something different and talking about an in-the-works documentary. Director Ellen Goosenberg-Kent is working on a film called Don’t Make Me Over about the life and career of famed singer Dionne Warwick. Recognized at an early age for her vocal talent, Warwick was one the greatest female voices of her generation and an outspoken advocate for social and political change. Warwick and others will join us to talk about her inspiring journey.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Douglas MacArthur 59 mins – “Hudson Institute Senior Fellow Arthur Herman discusses his book, [Douglas MacArthur: American Warrior].” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Arthur Herman, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.443773.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drag Queen Wrestler 27 mins – “Cassandro is no ordinary Mexican wrestler. He is an exotico – or drag queen – who wears long Liberace gowns, sequins and flamboyant make-up. Over an extraordinary 27-year-career, Cassandro has won two championship belts and pioneered the idea that a Mexican wrestler can be openly gay.” At the link find the title, “Cassandro – Queen of Lucha Libre, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03j17dh.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Types 35 mins – “In this episode, we discuss six pivotal drug classes that have been FDA approved within the past 20 years. This is part 2 of a 2 part episode.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 027-Six pivotal classes_II.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dry Needling 18 mins – “Dry Needling sure isn’t acupuncture. Nope. Not at all.” At the link right-click “Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Reform 14 mins – “Seema Bansal forged a path to public education reform for 15,000 schools in Haryana, India, by setting an ambitious goal: by 2020, 80 percent of children should have grade-level knowledge. She’s looking to meet this goal by seeking reforms that will work in every school without additional resources. Bansal and her team have found success using creative, straightforward techniques such as communicating with teachers using SMS group chats, and they have already measurably improved learning and engagement in Haryana’s schools.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Employment Trends 56 mins – “A roundup of Granite State economic headlines: It’s all about the labor force, according to a midyear economic review — businesses have plenty of job openings but there aren’t enough workers to fill them. Commercial real estate gets a makeover, with old shopping malls and a race-track finding new life. And reaction to a national study on manufacturing, which says a strong education system is the key to success. At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Entomologist 61 mins – “Dr. Matt O’Neal is an Associate Professor of Entomology at Iowa State University. He received his B.S. in Biology and M.S. in Entomology from the University of Illinois. Matt served as a Peace Corps Volunteer between those two degrees. After his masters he went on to receive his PhD in Entomology from Michigan State University. Next, Matt conducted postdoctoral research at Michigan State before joining the Faculty at the Iowa State where he is today. Matt’s honors and awards include the Team Achievement Award for the Crop Advantage Series from Iowa State University Extension, the National Excellence In Multistate Research Award from the American Public Land-Grant Universities, and the Integrated Pest Management Team Award from the Entomological Foundation. He has also received various awards from the Entomological Society of America, the American Society of Agronomy, and the Board Certified Entomologists of Mid-America for his educational and outreach efforts. In addition, Matt is co-host of the Soybean Pest Podcast with his colleague Erin Hodgson. Matt is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “341: Understanding Pollinators and Pests to Promote Optimal Crop Management – Dr. Matt O’Neal,” right-click “Media files 341_Matt Oneal_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eubie Blake Sound 47 mins – “Blake’s songs are back on Broadway, in the adaptation of his 1921 show ‘Shuffle Along.’ It was an influential musical that was written and produced by African Americans and had an all African American cast. Our tribute features live performances of his songs and interviews with singer Vernel Bagneris, pianist Dick Hyman, theater historian Robert Kimball and historian David Levering Lewis. Originally broadcast in 1998.” At the link find the title, “Jul, 2016, A Tribute To Composer Eubie Blake,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eurovision Explained 50 mins – “The Eurovision Song Contest is the most watched entertainment show on the planet with 200 million people tuning in to see singers compete under their national flags. But backstage, it is as much about politics as pop. Ahead of this year’s competition in Stockholm, the Swedish Ambassador to London, Nicola Clase, explains why diplomats take it seriously.” At the link find the title, “The Swedish Ambassador’s Guide to Eurovision, May, 2016,” right-click “Media filesp03tt194.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Fake Foods 49 mins – “When we try to be mindful about what we eat, we choose healthy fats like olive oil, lean proteins like seafood, and maybe we occasionally splurge on some fancy Japanese steak or a glass of champagne. But according to food and travel writer Larry Olmsted, too often such foods are not actually what we think they are. In fact, they are cheap substitutes. It’s not just a question of getting what you pay for: in some instances, these fake foods might be bad for your health. The author of the new book “Real Food, Fake Food” joins Diane to talk about how to sniff out those imposters and make sure you’re getting the real deal.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Fearless Women 65 mins – “Amanda Kahlow, Founder & CEO, 6sense Arum Kang, Founder and CEO, Coffee Meets Bagel Mada Seghete, Co-Founder, Branch Metrics Caitlin MacDonald, CEO, cred—Moderator According to a 2015 North American study by McKinsey & Company, women are almost four times more likely than men to think they have fewer opportunities to advance because of their gender. How can we change this? During this candid discussion, you’ll join three leading women in tech as they share their experiences of being a woman in the technology industry, what challenges they’ve faced along the way, how they overcame them and ways to encourage more women to pursue careers in tech.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Land Management 27 mins – “It’s high noon in the American high desert, and the cowboys are gearing up for the fight of their lives. The armed occupation of a wildlife refuge in the far western state of Oregon has highlighted a long and deepening land dispute between rural communities and the federal government in Washington DC, which owns vast tracts of isolated and scenic territory. Ranchers and farmers say the land should be kept available for their cattle to graze; they say their historic way of life will be doomed otherwise. But other Americans, especially those in cities, want to see federal land conserved and protected from overuse. For Assignment, Neal Razzell travels to Oregon to see how these differences are fuelling a cultural battle over what it means to be American.” At the link find the title, “America’s Angry Cowboys, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03l9mfj.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fourier Math 15 mins –This ten part history of mathematics from Newton to the present day, reveals the personalities behind the calculations: the passions and rivalries of mathematicians struggling to get their ideas heard. Professor Marcus du Sautoy shows how these masters of abstraction find a role in the real world and proves that mathematics is the driving force behind modern science. Today, the mathematics of Joseph Fourier. It’s thanks to his mathematical insight that you can hear Marcus on the radio and that Brian Eno can create sounds that have never been heard before.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gaddafi’s Golden Gun 27 mins – “Gabriel Gatehouse returns to Libya in search of Colonel Gaddafi’s golden gun, which was seized by rebels when the dictator was captured and killed more than four years ago.” At the link find the title, “Gaddafi and the Man with the Golden Gun, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03hfsw8.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gaming 64 mins – “Nick Earl, Vice President and General Manager of Electronic Arts shares his thoughts on the future of the gaming market. He discusses the changing global market space, the latest generation of consoles, mobile game distribution, user generated content, social networks and EA’s strategy in the online gaming space.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Identity 48 mins – “In 2004, journalist and author Susan Faludi received an email from her father. The two had been estranged for years. He had been a volatile figure in her life and as an older man he moved back to Budapest, the city he had fled under the Nazis. The content of the email was that Stephen Faludi was now Stefanie Faludi. Her father had undergone gender reassignment surgery. For Susan Faludi, who has spent her career writing about feminism, the news presented many new questions about gender. But her search to understand her complicated father ultimately became a bigger quest about the meaning of identity. Susan Faludi joins Diane in studio to discuss her new book “In the Darkroom.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Genetics 28 mins – “Charles Darwin described the eye as an ‘organ of extreme perfection and complication’. How this engineering marvel of nature forms out of a few cells in the developing embryo has been the big question for Veronica van Heyningen, emeritus professor at the MRC’s Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine at the University of Edinburgh. Veronica is a world lead in the genetics of the development of the eye. She tells Jim Al Khalili about her part in the discovery of a gene called Pax-6 which turned to be a master builder gene for the eye, in all animals which have eyes – from humans to fruit flies. As she explains, further research on this gene may eventually help people with the genetic vision impairment, Aniridia. It was Veronica’s research on patients with this condition which led to the gene’s final discovery. She tells Jim about why it’s important for scientists to engage in public discussion on the ethical implications of their work. Veronica also talks about her arrival in Britain as an 11 year old. Her family escaped from communist Hungary in 1958. Both of her Jewish parents had been sent to Nazi concentration camps during the Second World War.” At the link find the title, Veronica van Heyningen, Mar, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qglby.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genius Prediction 24 mins – “Travel writer Eric Weiner says if you want to predict genius, stop looking at the stars and find a map because genius is more about place than parentage.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Genius linked to geography more than genes, says author Eric Weiner, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160704_11429.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Globalization Criticism 47 mins – “Economist Jeffrey Sachs sees big problems with globalization as we’ve done it. Says we need to rethink our approach. He’s with us.” At the link find the title, “Economist Jeffrey Sachs On Globalization’s Risks, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_484976939.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Researcher 61 mins – “Dr. Richard Jefferson is the Chief Executive Officer of an independent, non-profit institute called Cambia. He is also Professor of Science, Technology & Law at Queensland University of Technology and Director of an open, public innovation resource called The Lens. In addition, Richard is a founder of the biological open-source initiative called Biological Innovation for Open Society. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Molecular Genetics from the College of Creative Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara and went on to complete his PhD in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Richard completed postdoctoral research at the Plant Breeding Institute in Cambridge and then worked as a Molecular Biologist for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations before founding Cambia. Richard has received many awards and honors during his career, and just to name a few, he was named an Outstanding Social Entrepreneur by the Schwab Foundation, he was among Scientific American’s List of the World’s 50 Most Influential Technologists and World Research Leader for Economic Development in 2003, he received the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) Leadership in Science Public Service Award, and Medalist of the Center for Science and Policy Outcomes. Richard is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “259: Developing The Lens for Transparency in Innovation – Dr. Richard Jefferson,” right-click “Media files 259_Richard_Jefferson_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Industry 57 mins – “Historian Pamela Haag traces the history of guns and examines when and how they became a part of American culture. She is interviewed by author William Doyle” At the link find the title, “After Words with Pamela Haag, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436670.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hearing Difficulties 21 mins – “When Rose* was growing up, she knew something wasn’t quite right about how she heard the world. She says it felt like she was isolated by an invisible wall. But when she got typical hearing tests at an audiologist’s office? She aced them, every time. Rose’s problem was particularly bad in noisy places. “It doesn’t take much,” she says. “It could be five computers in a room and a bunch of shuffling around — you lose me at that point.” It took Rose years, and plenty of doctors’ visits, to figure out what was happening. And when she did find out, it was thanks to the persistence of Professor Nina Kraus. Kraus runs an auditory neuroscience laboratory at Northwestern University. For decades, Kraus has been conducting research on Rose and other patients like her to learn just how vital our brains are to understanding sound. And she discovered how hearing difficulties can be a marker for all types of neurological issues — autism, dyslexia, learning delays — that have nothing to do with our ears.” At the link find the title, “Your Brain On Sound (Rebroadcast), Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files onlyhuman070516_cms635028_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Helium Resource 21 mins – “Interest in helium has been rising over the scarcity of the resource. Some even think kids’ helium balloons are now just too frivolous a use for a gas that’s necessary to make MRIs work. Prepare to burst your pre-conceived notions of helium.” At the link find the title, “Helium a finite resource, does much more than fill balloons, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160707_75924.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hip Arthritis 24 mins – “2.46 million people in England have osteoarthritis of the hip, and many of those go on to eventually have a hip replacement – which is now widely considered one of the most commonly performed and successful operations in the world. Jessamy Bagenal, clinical fellow with The BMJ, talks to Nick Aresti, a specialist registrar in trauma and orthopaedic surgery and one of the authors of a clinical update on hip osteoarthritis, recently published on thebmj.com. In a linked podcast, Nick Nicholas, a patient who has hip OA gives us his perspective.” At the link find the title, “Having hip osteoarthritis, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 272759006-bmjgroup-having-hip-osteoarthritis.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in America 48 mins – “Are you seeing the homeless as summer deepens? We’ll look at a big new San Francisco push to tackle homelessness.” At the link find the title, “Tackling Homelessness, In San Francisco And Beyond, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_485121654.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honduras Activists 27 mins – “In March the award-winning Honduran environmentalist, Berta Caceres, was gunned down at home. Of indigenous Lenca origin, for years she was a prominent critic of the government, and campaigned against the Agua Zarca hydro-electric project in the western highlands. Honduras is the most unequal nation in the Americas, but it is rich in minerals with an enormous capacity for the development of hydro-electric power. Since a coup in 2009 removed the left-leaning President, a business-driven government has granted dozens of concessions for the exploitation of precious national resources. But the race for development is creating bitter – and murderous – disharmony: Honduras has become the most deadly nation on earth to be a land or environmental activist. For Assignment, Linda Pressly, explores how the murder of Berta Caceres is emblematic of profound divisions in Honduras.” At the link find the title, “Honduras: After Berta, , Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03yfq3x.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HPV Vaccine 47 mins – “Cancer experts agree that getting the HPV vaccine – which fights some sexually transmitted infections – could help prevent tens of thousands of cancer cases. Yet just 40 percent of teenage girls and 22 percent of boys have been fully inoculated, according to the latest statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Oncologists blame pediatricians and family physicians for not recommending the vaccine to patients. Diane and a panel of guests discuss the new push by cancer experts to re-brand the vaccine as a crucial way to prevent cancer.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Infectious Disease Specialist 26 mins – “Dengue makes Zika worse. A fungi I never heard of. Worst UTI prevention study ever. And more.“ At the link find the title, “Puscast: June 15 to 31, 2016,” right-click “Media files junb16.m4a” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Future 34 mins – “The future of the internet is at risk if we do not act now says experts from the Global Commission on Internet Governance. Their report entitled One Internet contains recommendations to ensure secure, accessible and affordable online freedom for years to come. The two-year project by the Centre for International Governance Innovation and Chatham House has brought together almost 70 advisers from around the world to develop this strategy for internet governance. Wonderlab at the Science Museum – A new interactive permanent gallery is soon to open at London’s Science Museum. Its aim is to make visitors, and particularly young people, think like a scientists. LJ Rich has been for a sneak preview at the technology on show. Silicon Valley Oscars – Talk of revolution was in the air in Silicon Valley last week at SVForum’s Visionary Awards. With past recipients like Bill Gates, Elon Musk, and Esther Dyson, these awards have earned a reputation as the Oscars of SV. Reporter Alison van Diggelen speaks to some of the winners and how they see their innovations impacting on people’s lives – for the good. VR Conservation – A new virtual reality film called Valen’s Reef has been launched this week at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. The title comes from eight-year-old Valen, the son of a west Papuan fisherman who has become a coral reef scientist. The film shows you the variety of life on the reef and then the colourful thriving reef gives way to an underwater wasteland of bleached, dead coral. The team behind the work hope it will highlight the risks corals in the region are facing.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Irak’s Kurds 50 mins- “Twenty-five years ago, thousands of Iraqi Kurds lost their lives as they fled the forces of Saddam Hussein into the Zagros and Taurus mountains of northern Iraq, towards Iran and Turkey. Massively outgunned, many were killed by the helicopter gunship fire and tanks at the command of Saddam’s well trained and brutal troops. BBC Middle East correspondent Jim Muir revisits the exodus.” At the link find the title, “Iraq’s Kurds: From Flight to Freedom, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03vrbrw.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Activities 47 mins – “Is ISIS training from building a caliphate to spreading terror worldwide? We’ll look at the latest surge of far-flung attacks.” At the link find the title, “With Spate Of Attacks, ISIS Shifts To Global Terror Network, Jul, 2016” right-click “Media files npr_484973825.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Isis Analysis 48 mins – “On July 4[ 2016], bombings rocked three cities in Saudi Arabia. Two days earlier the deadliest car bomb this year exploded in Baghdad. On July 1 in Dhaka, Bangladesh gunmen held hostages at a bakery killing 22. Just over a week ago, three suicide attackers killed 41 people at Istanbul’s airport. ISIS claimed responsibility for some of these attacks. For others, they did not — but officials suspect the terrorist group’s involvement. ISIS had vowed to make the holy month of Ramadan deadly and as it came to a close, they have done just that. Diane and her guests discuss new attacks from ISIS and security questions for the U.S.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

ISIS Opposition 27 mins – “Chloe Hadjimatheou tells the astonishing story of a group of young men from Raqqa in Syria who chose to resist the so-called ‘Islamic State’, which occupied their city in 2014 and made it the capital of their ‘Caliphate’. These extraordinary activists have risked everything to oppose ISIS; several have been killed, or had family members murdered. IS has put a bounty on the resistance leaders’ heads forcing them to go into hiding. But the group continues its work, under the banner ‘Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently’. Chloe meets the group’s founders, who are now organising undercover activists in Raqqa from the relative safety of other countries.” At the link find the title, “‘Islamic State’s’ Most Wanted, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03rndlv.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Juno Probe 20 mins – “After five years and 1.4bn miles, the Nasa spacecraft has arrived at its final destination, but what is this plucky little probe hoping to find? Following the news this week that the spacecraft successfully dropped into Jupiter’s orbit, Ian Sample is joined by planetary scientists professor Fran Bagenal – a co-investigator on the mission – and Dr Adam Masters to discuss the probe.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Juno Probe to Jupiter 47 mins – “After a 1.7 billion mile journey, NASA’s Juno spacecraft is now safely in orbit around Jupiter. We’ll look at what’s coming from the massive planet.” At the link find the title, “Juno Probes The Secrets Of Jupiter, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_485276708.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ketamine for Depression 39 mins – “Ketamine has quite the reputation as a club drug. But research is showing its promising potential as a treatment for severe cases of depression.” At the link find the title, “Treating Depression with Ketamine, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files SDS135.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kolkata Stories 27 mins – “In the chaotic city of Kolkata in India, Catherine Carr hears from the feminist Shakespeare enthusiast to the man dying of AIDS and the woman still a little bit in love with her colleague; from the father and son begging by the roadside to the teenager dreaming of Olympic success. The brief portraits have been woven together with the sounds of the city, to create an unpredictable and poetic experience of Kolkata. This series, part of the Identity series, invites strangers to pause on their way from A to B and asks them one simple question: ‘Where Are You Going?’ The encounters reveal funny, moving, poignant and sometimes astonishing details about the lives of others. Image: Ayushi, a student at Kolkata’s Presidence University. “ At the link find the title, “Where Are You Going? – Kolkata, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03r1w5l.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lead Belly Sound 48 mins – “Going back to Lead Belly. The blues legend is back. His influences, as big as ever.” At the link find the title, “Tuning In To The Lead Belly Sound, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_484634655.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Listening Better 15 mins – “Tim Harford (the Financial Times’ ‘Undercover Economist’ and presenter of Radio 4’s More or Less) is joined by Malcolm Gladwell, David Kilcullen and Gillian Tett for a new series, ‘Pop-up Ideas’…Malcolm Gladwell, staff writer at the New Yorker and best-selling author of books such as The Tipping Point and Outliers, tells an extraordinarily powerful story about how listening more carefully might have shortened the Vietnam War. One of the world’s most influential counter-insurgency experts, David Killcullen, whose ideas were described by the Washington Post as ‘revolutionizing military thinking throughout the West’, talks about how future instability will emanate from rapidly-growing coastal megacities. The financial journalist Gillian Tett describes how her background in anthropology led her to predict the financial crisis in 2008. Tim Harford explores the concept of ‘The Tragedy of the Commons’ – a term coined by the American ecologist Garrett Hardin in a hugely influential 1968 essay. Tim compares Hardin’s work to that of the American political economist Elinor Ostrom, to reflect on the impact of mankind on the world around us.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Los Angeles Mayor 43 mins – “Eric Garcetti, the mayor of Los Angeles, has big ambitions but knows he must first master the small stuff. He’s also a polymath who relies heavily on data and new technologies. Could this be what modern politics is supposed to look like?” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malaria Research 28 mins – “Janet Hemingway, the youngest woman to ever to become a full professor in the UK, talks about her career at the frontline of the war on malaria. Whilst many researchers look for vaccines and treatments to this global killer, Janet’s approach, as a trained entomologist, has been to fight the mosquitoes – the vector – which transmits the malaria parasite.” At the link find the title, “Janet Hemingway, Jun, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qh1zn.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Manto, Pakistani Author 27 mins – “Sa’adat Hassan Manto was a writer who confronted social taboos in Indio-Pakistani society. Even though he died in 1955, an alcoholic and penniless, his work still speaks to 21st Century Pakistan. As a film and radio script writer, a journalist and most significantly as short story writer in Urdu, Manto chronicled the chaos that prevailed in the run up to, during and after the Partition of India in 1947.” At the link find the title, “Manto: Uncovering Pakistan, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03z21n8.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Illness in Africa 27 mins – “Gregoire is an ex garage mechanic whose mission in life is to help people in Benin, West Africa, with mental health problems who may otherwise be chained up in the spare room. With family approval he takes patients to his treatment centres, he cuts off their chains allowing them space and giving them help. Gregoire’s story and the attitudes that coalesce around it unfold against a backdrop of traditional healers, Western trained psychiatrists, ethnopsychiatry, Evangelical missionary work, Western attitudes to Africa and African attitudes to the West, and government ministries for whom mental health is a low and cash strapped priority.” At the link find the title, “The Mechanic and the Mission, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03jsfs5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Illness P1 55 mins – “What’s it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit’s end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there’s stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.” At the link find the title, “ Wit’s End, Part 1, Jun, 2016,” right-click “ Media files ideas_20160620_74679.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Illness P2 55 mins – “What’s it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit’s end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there’s stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.” At the link find the title, “Wit’s End, Part 2, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160627_88772.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Park Service 29 mins – “As we celebrate the Fourth of July, it’s fitting that we also recognize the centennial of the National Park Service. Today on Sea Change Radio we speak with author and environmentalist Jason Mark about the challenges that the national parks face moving forward. Mark is the editor of Sierra Magazine and author of a new book, Satellites in The High Country, which focuses on the state of wilderness in the U.S. We talk about the hidden wild gems that Mark encountered while researching the book, and discuss how environmental groups like the Sierra Club are approaching the issue of climate change which looms over the entire conservation landscape.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Parks 46 mins – “Ready, set, summer. New ways to get lost inside America’s National Parks with the writers of Outside Magazine.” At the link find the title, “Beyond The Scenic Drive: New Ways To Explore National Parks, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_484634640.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nerve Injuries 5 mins – “Dr. Herbert Geller is a Senior Investigator in the Developmental Neurobiology Section and Head of the Office of Education at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. He received his PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University and conducted postdoctoral research afterward at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. Herbert served on the faculty at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School for over 30 years before joining the NIH. He is a member of the Society for Neuroscience and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and he is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “209: Growing Excitement for Research in Potential Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury – Dr. Herbert Geller, Jan, 2015,” right-click “Media files 209_Herb_Geller_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurology and Addiction 29 mins – “Dr. Julie Kauer is a Professor of Medical Science and Professor of Neuroscience at Brown University. She received her PhD from Yale University completed a postdoctoral fellowships at the University of California San Francisco and at Stanford University… Julie is a leader in the field of synaptic function, over the years having discovered basic synaptic mechanisms that underlie synaptic strength changes in the hippocampus, ventral tegmental area and most recently, the dorsal horn. Over the years, Julie has made a major contribution to understanding synaptic plasticity at inhibitory synapses. For many years, inhibitory synapses were thought to act only as modulators of excitatory brain circuits, while excitatory synapses were thought to represent the major networks capable of synaptic strength alterations. The Kauer lab thoroughly characterized synaptic plasticity in the reward circuit at inhibitory synapses, and showed that this plasticity can be entirely blocked by a single exposure to any of a number of addictive drugs. They have recently added to this finding that a brief stressful stimulus also entirely blocks this form of LTP. The group has made strides in linking this neuroadaptation to stress-triggered reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in rodents. Most recently they discovered that kappa opioid receptor antagonists are highly effective at preventing reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in a rodent model of relapse, even given well after a stressful stimulus. Most recently Kauer’s group has begun working on inhibitory synapses in the dorsal horn, the part of the spinal cord that processes sensory and pain information. Although glycine is a major neurotransmitter in the CNS, relatively little is known about glycinergic synapses and plasticity in native tissues. They have now identified the first example of synaptic plasticity at glycinergic synapses in the mammalian nervous system. Moreover, this glycinergic plasticity is altered by the experience of peripheral inflammation, suggesting a role in the heightened pain responses that follow peripheral injury….” At the link find the title, “066: Working Out the Details of Synaptic Strengthening – Dr. Julie Kauer,” right-click “Media files 066_Julie_Kauer_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuroscientist 40 mins – “Dr. Brock Grill is an Associate Professor in the Department of Neuroscience at the Scripps Research Institute in Florida. He received his B.Sc. in Microbiology from the University of Alberta and was awarded his Ph.D. in Experimental Medicine from the University of British Columbia. Brock conducted postdoctoral research at the University of California Santa Cruz and at Stanford University. He served on the faculty at the University of Minnesota Medical School before joining the faculty at Scripps – Florida. Brock is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “298: A Scientist Who Acts On Guidance and Ingenuity to Extend Our Understanding of Neural Development – Dr. Brock Grill,” right-click “Media files 298_Brock Grill_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New York City Stories 27 mins – “One question – Where are you going? – yields countless surprises about the lives of strangers. We hear from a pigeon-catching drug addict, a woman who is married to her cat, a man dicing with death in his day job and a mother who is travelling to see her daughter who has cancer. “It’s not supposed to be that way round” she says. These unpredictable encounters come together to create a unique and fascinating audio portrait of New York City.” At the link find the title, “Where Are You Going? – New York, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03q2y65.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nonviolent Resistance 9 mins – “We’re not going to end violence by telling people that it’s morally wrong, says Jamila Raqib, executive director of the Albert Einstein Institution. Instead, we must find alternative ways to conduct conflict that are equally powerful and effective. Raqib promotes nonviolent resistance to people living under tyranny — and there’s a lot more to it than street protests. She shares encouraging examples of creative strategies that have led to change around the world and a message of hope for a future without armed conflict. “The greatest hope for humanity lies not in condemning violence but in making violence obsolete,” Raqib says.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obesity Research 28 mins – “Fat, sugar, salt – we all know we should eat less of them, and take more exercise, but as a nation with an ever expanding waistline we are becoming increasingly overweight. Jim al-Khalili talks to Professor Susan Jebb, the UK’s authority on obesity, who has spent much of her career trying to help us put those good intentions into practice. Her challenge is not for the faint hearted. When she first got interested in obesity, as a research scientist, rates were already on the rise. Yet no one took the problem seriously. Today, with over sixty percent of adults overweight or obese, Susan remains unwavering in her commitment to ensuring we do. As Professor of Diet and Population Health at Oxford University and Chair of the government’s Responsibility Deal Food Network, she wants all of us and the food industry to improve the nation’s health by translating the science of what we eat into practice. And health is what it’s all about. Obesity now poses such a danger that it’s been dubbed the ‘new smoking’.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pathology Researcher 38 mins – “Dr. Oliver Smithies is the Weatherspoon Eminent Distinguished Professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of North Caronlina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine. He received his PhD in Biochemistry at Oxford University and spent some time on the faculty at the University of Toronto, as well as the University of Wisconsin, Madison, before joining the faculty at UNC, Chapel Hill where he is today. Oliver is a distinguished scientist, and in 2007, he was a co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Among many other accomplishments, he is the recipient of the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research, the Wolf Prize in Medicine, the Massry Prize, and the University of North Carolina’s O. Max Gardner Award. Oliver is also a Member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, a Member of the U.S. Institute of Medicine, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Foreign Member of the Royal Society. Oliver is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “250: A Pathologist’s Path to Paramount Discoveries in Protein Separation and Genetic Recombination – Dr. Oliver Smithies,” right-click “Media files 250_Oliver_Smithies_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Personality Changes 15 mins – “What makes you, you? Psychologists like to talk about our traits, or defined characteristics that make us who we are. But Brian Little is more interested in moments when we transcend those traits — sometimes because our culture demands it of us, and sometimes because we demand it of ourselves. Join Little as he dissects the surprising differences between introverts and extroverts and explains why your personality may be more malleable than you think.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Perspectives 11 mins – “Perspective is everything, especially when it comes to examining your beliefs. Are you a soldier, prone to defending your viewpoint at all costs — or a scout, spurred by curiosity? Julia Galef examines the motivations behind these two mindsets and how they shape the way we interpret information, interweaved with a compelling history lesson from 19th-century France. When your steadfast opinions are tested, Galef asks: “What do you most yearn for? Do you yearn to defend your own beliefs or do you yearn to see the world as clearly as you possibly can?” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photography History 43 mins “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the development of photography in the 1830s, when techniques for ‘drawing with light’ evolved to the stage where, in 1839, both Louis Daguerre and William Henry Fox Talbot made claims for its invention. These followed the development of the camera obscura, and experiments by such as Thomas Wedgwood and Nicéphore Niépce, and led to rapid changes in the 1840s as more people captured images with the daguerreotype and calotype. These new techniques changed the aesthetics of the age and, before long, inspired claims that painting was now dead.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasting Ideas 70 mins – “Is this the last Podcasters’ Studio? No. But staying motivated after years of talking about the same subject will be a challenge every podcaster faces if you do it long enough. How do you stay motivated? In most cases, listener feedback and a love for the topic will keep the show going for as long as you want. However, other platforms such as YouTube, twitter, etc., have some built in capabilities that can help podcasters stay motivated through easy engagement with the audience. Easy of commenting and “liking” are just two ways in which these platforms and many like them help your audience engage with your content and as a result, provide an extra level of motivation to keep you producing content. I’d love to see a few more tools built into iTunes that gave podcast listeners an easier way to connect with the podcaster. More access to stats, a “like” button in the Podcasts App, email notifications for new subscriptions are a few things that YouTube provides its creators. And in some cases, YouTube works directly with creators to improve their channels. All of these are great for the platform as well as the creator, keeping eyes and ears on their platform while providing that extra fuel that could be the difference between a creator producing content or stopping. PodcastsConnect is now how you submit podcasts to Apple. Login and check out the new tools available to you as a podcaster on iTunes. Libsyn now helps make the process of posting a podcast a little easier. ID3 tags, metadata that lives inside each podcast file (mp3) can now be added to your file when you upload to Libsyn. Blubby has had this feature for long time and I’m glad to see it now come to Libsyn users as well. If you want the best podcast media hosting, these are the two services I recommend. You can use *promo code: podcasthelper on checkout to get your first month free. I found out about an interesting quirk of the Behringer Q802USB which doesn’t allow you to monitor your audio in both directions when using the USB in/out only. Here’s how to “fix” the Q802USB to monitor in and out via USB. On this episode I explain the process you see in the above video but you’ll also hear how well this sub $100 mixer handles gain hungry dynamic microphones, in this case the Heil PR40. I also cover the Mackie Mix8 mixer and you can watch that review as well: Take note of the added Google Play Music buttons in the subscribe sections (below and top right) of this website. If your show is in the GPM store, make sure to update your site to include an easy link to your show on GPM!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Shooting in Minnesota 20 mins – “Philando Castile and Alton Sterling were both fatally shot by police just this week. As people demand justice, what will it take for things finally to change?” At the link find the title, “Another victim shot to death by U.S. police spark calls for justice, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160707_33613.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Shootings 49 mins – “Last night, an African-American Minnesota man was shot to death in a car by police. This just a day after a black man died at the hands of police in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Parts of both incidents were captured on video. According to data from the Washington Post, these represent two of the 123 fatal shootings of African-Americans by police so far this year. About two years after the deaths of Eric Garner and Michael Brown, many are asking why more progress has not been made. The latest on the Baton Rouge and Minnesota shootings, and what they mean for race and policing in America.” (5 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Police Shootings in Dallas 21 mins – “A sniper turns a peaceful demonstration against police violence into a backdrop where police are the targets. Twelve Dallas police officers were hit, five are dead. The Current looks at the danger this recent shooting presents for race relations.” At the link find the title, “We are at a crossroads’: Police targeted at Dallas protest, 5 killed, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160708_31174.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Shootings in St Paul 47 mins – “A black man down and shot by white police officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. We study the tape and what it means.” At the link find the title, “The Shooting Deaths Of Philando Castile And Alton Sterling, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_485121640.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty Goals of UN 50 mins – “As the Sustainable Development Goals replace the Millennium Development Goals in January, Mike Wooldridge asks what are the realistic prospects for eradicating poverty by 2030? Can such strategies really “leave no one behind”?” At the link find the title, “The New Face of Development, Jan, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03gj9ct.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quarks and Gluons 27 mins – “Keith & Russ talk with Vladimir Skokov, a research associate with the Brookhaven National Laboratory.  Skokov talks particle physics, specifically quarks and gluons.  He also touches on plasma and String Theory. http://www.bnl.gov/physics/NTG/people/skokov.phpAt the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in Canada 21 mins – “With anti-immigrant sentiment being stirred up in the U.K. and in America, we explore racism in our own country and how some Canadians are challenging it.” At the link find the title, “Canadians challenge racism on their streets, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160704_72646.mp3

Relax with Nightvale 23 mins – “Anxiety, Stomach.” At the link find the title, “Within the Wires: Relaxation Cassette #2, Jul, 2016,” right-click “ “Media files 0220Within20the20Wires 20Relaxation20Cassette20232.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robert Kennedy 49 mins – “Robert Kennedy’s political transformation is the focus of a new biography by journalist Larry Tye. Kennedy began his career as an assistant counsel on Senator Joe McCarthy’s sub-committee investigating communists. When Bobby Kennedy was assassinated in 1968, he was the liberal hopeful in the Democratic presidential primary. Larry Tye was given access to 58 boxes of private Kennedy papers, and interviewed 400 people, including Robert Kennedy’s widow, Ethel Kennedy.” At the link find the title, “July 5, 2016, From ‘Cold Warrior’ To ‘Liberal Icon,’ The Story Of Robert Kennedy,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rocket Girls 56 mins – “Science writer Nathalia Holt discusses her book [Rise of the Rocket Girls], in which she chronicles an elite group of women’s contributions to rocket design, space exploration, and the first American satellite. She is interviewed by Lisa Rand.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Nathalia Holt, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.438295.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Romania Sheep Protection 27 mins – “Lucy Ash meets the sheep farmers who took on the government because of what they claim is a threat to their traditional way of life.” At the link find the title, “Romania: The Shepherds’ Revolt, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03ntwv4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rosemary Kennedy 52 min – “…biographer Kate Clifford Larson is with us to talk about the life of Rosemary Kennedy. She was a sister of John F. Kennedy, a vivacious beauty, and also intellectually challenged. As the Kennedy family’s power grew, her parents were anxious to keep her from the public eye. So at 23, she was lobotomized and institutionalized. Larson joins us to explain what Rosemary’s story reveals about the way we once dealt with disabilities, and how her life eventually inspired the Kennedys’ activism.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rosewood Smuggling 28 mins – “Peter Hadfield travels to Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam to investigate the illegal trade in Siamese Rosewood. Rosewood is a hard wood that is highly prized because it can be carved into ornate items of furniture, but the appetite for the wood is so voracious that Siamese Rosewood is now becoming critically endangered. The wood is traded on the black market and now the Siamese Rosewood tree is close to being totally eradicated. Not only that, those responsible for the smuggling are leaving a trail of death and environmental destruction in their wake. Peter Hadfield goes in search of the tree. He’s on the trail of the smugglers and discovers the measures being taken to try and safeguard the surviving trees.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rule of Law 42 mins – “The eminent economic historian Professor Niall Ferguson argues that institutions determine the success or failure of nations. In a lecture delivered at the London School of Economics and Political Science, he says that a society governed by abstract, impersonal rules will become richer than one ruled by personal relationships. The rule of law is crucial to the creation of a modern economy and its early adoption is the reason why Western nations grew so powerful in the modern age. But are the institutions of the West now degenerating? Professor Ferguson asks whether the democratic system has a fatal flaw at its heart. In the West young people are confronting the fact that they must live with the huge financial debt generated by their parents, something they had no control over despite the fact that they were born into a democracy. Is there a way of restoring the compact between different generations?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Satellite Design 163 mins – “In this episode we get a peek into how OHB System AG in Bremen develops satellites — mostly based on the Galileo navigation satellites. We speak with Christian Pauly about systems engineering, with Mathias Tausche about manufacturing and integration, with Andreas Wortmann about the software on the satellites, and with Ingo Engeln about the company as a whole. As a background, you may want to listen to omega tau 26 about satellite buses. omega tau 204 on Planet Labs’ small satellites may be interesting as a contrast.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 File Directly,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sebastian Junger 53 mins – “The journalist Sebastian Junger has noticed that for many veterans, and even some civilians, war feels better than peace, and he has a theory about why that might be. War, he says, compels us to band together and support one another in pursuit of a clear goal. But under the normal conditions of modern culture, we lose those connections, and we feel lonely and lost. Thursday, Junger joins us to discuss why we’re stronger when we come together and what tribal societies can teach us about leading meaningful lives. Sebastian Junger is a contributing editor to Vanity Fair and the author of a number of books, including The Perfect Storm, War, and A Death in Belmont. Together with Tim Hetherington, he directed the documentary film Restrepo. His latest book is called Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging … Junger recommends the book Sapiens…by Yuval Noah Harari if you’d like to learn more about the history of human cultural evolution from savannah-dwelling primates to earth’s lone surviving hominid species.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup Problems 44 mins – “Edgar Diaz has dedicated his life to dairy. He sees an incredible beauty in milk and the things that can come from it: soft cheese, rich dulce de leche, and creamy yogurt. He knows that to produce a really good yogurt, the conditions are just as important as the ingredients. You can use the freshest milk, but if your temperature is off or the timing inexact you risk ruining the whole batch. Edgar has a lot in common with some of the world’s most successful founders: intense passion, a deep knowledge of his product, and awards and acclaim from peers in his field. He seems to have all the ingredients for success, and the conditions seem right, so why is he so far from it?” At the link find the title, “Up in Flames (Season 3, Episode 9), Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT8206555017.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stroke Prevention 11 mins – “Professor Valery Feigin discusses an Article on the global burden of stroke and risk factors from 1990–2013.” At the link find the title, “Global burden of stroke: The Lancet Neurology: Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files laneur_160622.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stutter Story 11 mins – “Artist Safwat Saleem grew up with a stutter — but as an independent animator, he decided to do his own voiceovers to give life to his characters. When YouTube commenters started mocking his Pakistani accent, it crushed him, and his voice began to leave his work. Hear how this TED Fellow reclaimed his voice and confidence in this charming, thoughtful talk.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court 8 56 mins – “The Supreme Court ended it’s term June 30th, issuing a slew of decisions. We look at three rulings:  one involving gun ownership and domestic violence cases, another on affirmative action in college admissions and a third on political corruption. A look at how this unusual eight member court ruled and what ramifications these three particular decisions might have for New Hampshire.” At the link right-click th eplay button beside “Listen” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Decisions 49 mins – “It’s the last day of the Supreme Court’s current term. The biggest decisions are often announced in the final weeks. Last week the court handed down decisions on affirmative action and immigration. Today the court weighs in on what’s been called the most significant abortion rights case in a generation. The eight justices also issue opinions on the public corruption conviction of former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and a case involving the Second Amendment. We discuss these cases and how the court has been affected by a vacancy on the bench since the death of Antonin Scalia last winter.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Supreme Court Direction 35 mins – “…One of the things at stake in this presidential election is the future direction of the Supreme Court. Since the death of Justice Scalia, the court has had only eight justices and has sometimes been stalemated 4-4. Assuming Congress continues to block President Obama’s appointment of Merrick Garland, the next president will have at least one justice to appoint to the court, and that is likely to tip the balance. You can see the influence one president can have on the court by looking at Richard Nixon who appointed four justices. His first appointment, Warren Burger, in 1969, was also chosen by Nixon to be the chief justice. Nixon’s final appointment, William Rehnquist, became the next chief justice after Burger retired in 1986. The Burger Court has often been described as playing a transitional role between the liberal Warren Court and the conservative Rehnquist Court. But my guest Linda Greenhouse says that the Burger Court played a crucial role in establishing the conservative legal foundation for the even more conservative courts that followed. She co-wrote the new book, “The Burger Court And The Rise Of The Judicial Right” with Michael Graetz, a law professor at Columbia Law School and Yale University. Greenhouse covered the Supreme Court for The New York Times for nearly 30 years and now writes a biweekly column for The Times website. She also teaches at Yale Law School….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Synthetic Biologist 39 mins – “Dr. Karmella Haynes is an Assistant Professor in the Ira A. Fulton School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering at Arizona State University. She is also a senior judge for the International Genetically Engineered Machine Competition. She received her Ph.D. in Molecular Genetics from Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to joining the faculty at ASU, Karmella was awarded a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Teaching and Research fellowship at Davidson College, followed by an NIH postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School. Karmella is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “314: Expressing Her Creativity Making Epigenetic Machinery and Designing Biological Devices – Dr. Karmella Haynes,” right-click “Media files 314 Karmella Haynes_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugee Stories 27 mins – “Life as a refugee after fleeing the war in Syria to make a new life in Lebanon” At the link find the title, “The Listening Project in Lebanon, Jan, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03dnk1m.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taxidermy 26 mins – “Have you noticed any antlered rabbits mounted on the wall of your local coffee shop? Or maybe some geese with butterfly wings? That’s because taxidermy has made a comeback. Our producer, Mariel Carr, wanted to know why, so she spent a few months exploring the alternative—or rogue—taxidermy scene in Philadelphia. Rogue taxidermy takes an artistic approach to the traditional craft. It combines materials, and even animals, in unconventional ways. And it seems to involve a fair amount of glitter. Meet Beth Beverly, a young taxidermist; John Whitenight, an eccentric collector of Victorian taxidermy; and the polar bears and gorillas at the Academy of Natural Sciences. Together they explain taxidermy’s long history of combining art and science, and describe the role arsenic played in taxidermy’s rise to prominence in the 19th century.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Telemedicine 48 mins – “The doctor’s appointment goes digital. Virtual visits, high-tech self-monitoring are here. We’ll look at Telemedicine.” At the link find the title, “Digital Doctors And Virtual Medicine, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_484834298.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tesla Auto Death 21 mins – “Self-driving car technology has come so far, so fast, many don’t realize these cars are already on the road. Now that a man has died after using Tesla’s autopilot feature, some question if it all happened too fast without proper safeguards in place?” At the link find the title, “Death of Tesla driver tests future of driverless car, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160705_32780.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tornado Survivors 20 mins – “What happens when 24 people shut themselves in a beer cooler to wait out one of the strongest tornadoes in recorded history? Take a listen, because they recorded it.” At the link click the circle with the three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender Judge 25 mins – “When Phyllis Frye was in her 20s, a decision to come out as transgender cost her … her family, children and profession. Phyllis Frye shares her journey from being a trans law student in the 70s, to becoming the first openly transgender U.S. judge.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Transgender judge Phyllis Frye helped put the ‘T’ in LGBTQ, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160705_45407.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virologist Peter Palese 74 mins – “Host: Vincent Racaniello Guest: Peter PaleseVincent speaks with Peter Palese about his illustrious career in virology, from early work on neuraminidases to universal influenza virus vaccines.” At the link right-click “Download TWIV 396” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virology Researcher 39 mins – “Dr. James Pipas is the Herbert W. and Grace boyer Chair in Molecular Biology and Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. He received his PhD in Molecular Biophysics from Florida State University and completed his postdoctoral training at Baylor College and the John Hopkins School of Medicine. Jim has been a faculty member in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh now for over 30 years. Jim is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “221: Making Valuable Contributions to the Proliferation of Exciting Discoveries in Virology – Dr. James Pipas,” right-click “Media files 221_James_Pipas_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wahls Protocal 39 mins – “Dr. Terry Wahls talks functional medicine, ketosis, and implementing the Wahls Protocol in practice.” At the link find the title, “The Wahls Protocol: Fighting Fatigue With a Fork, Jul, 2016,” right-click “ “Media files SDS136.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 244 – Jul 15, 2016: Anger in America, Astrophysics, Auto Recalls, Bengazi Attack Report, Bernie Sanders Programs, Biological Engineer, Biology and Innovation, Biomedical Engineering, Black American Concerns, Black Lives Matter, Bone Cancer Specialist, Bone fractures, Boomer Retirements, Brain Aging and Circulation, Brexit, British Comedy, Campaign Finances, Cell Biology Researcher, China Water Concerns, Chinese Solar King, Clean Energy Geek Squad, Commons Overview, Community Power, Computational Innovator, Corruption in South Africa, Coyotes America, Crazy Artist, Creativity, Crisis Communications, Crystallography, Data Breach Reports, Decision Making, Discrimination Laws, Disease Research, Dust Bowl Recollections, Entomologist, Environment Researcher, Environmental Engineering, Eton Scholarships, Explosives Researcher, Fasting, Feminist Professor, Food Allergies, Food Waste Fix, Frames of Reference, Government IT Upgrades, Greenpeace Willcox Interview, Grunt Book, Gun Violence Control, Hamilton Play, Hearing Researcher, Hip Replacement, Informationist, Innovate Long and Short, Islam Overview, Ketogenic Diet, Land Fill Mining, Learning Researcher, Market Forces, Mass Spectrometry Expert, Medical Crusaders, Medical Simulation, Memory Researcher, Migrant Student Education, Multitasking Researcher, Music and Race, Neurologist with Dyslexia, Neuroscientist, North Korea Documentary, Open Data, Pain Control, Physical Therapy Researcher, Planetary Systems, Plant Evolution Researcher, Prebiotics Researcher, Referendums, Ribosome, Rust Belt Boy, Social Psychologist, Somalia Recovery, South Africa LGBTI, Speech Researcher, Startup Failures, Sustainability, Terrorist Identification, Thiomersal, Tissue Engineering, Toilet Upgrades, Treatment Options, Turkish Airport Attack, Ultrasound Researcher, Unpleasant Designs, Video Tracking, Vincent Racaniello Virologist

The best 100 podcasts from a larger group of 268 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Africa Solar Lights 30 mins – “Micro-solar lamps are now lighting parts of Africa that the grid cannot reach. Tom Heap investigates how the solar spread is emulating the wide reach of mobile phones in Africa. There are currently over 100 million kerosene lamps across Africa that are the main source of light in parts of the continent that are either off-grid or where people cannot afford to hook-up to the electricity grid. These lights are polluting, dangerous and expensive. Burning a kerosene light in a small room produces the same detrimental effect as smoking two packets of cigarettes. They are a fire hazard and they can cost as much as 15% of an average salary to fuel in some parts of the continent. Tom heap sets out to discover if a small desktop solar lamp that costs a fraction of the running expenses of a kerosene lamp can improve the health of millions of people and help to lift Africa out of poverty. This week’s programme is produced in conjunction with BBC Newsnight and BBC World’s ‘Our World’ programme. To watch the films made to accompany the programme visit the Newsnight and Our World websites.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Immigrant Stories 72 mins – “This fall, Beyond the Book marks its tenth year as podcast series. On the occasion of the Independence Day holiday in the United States, we reach into the BTB archives for a 2006 Miami Book Fair panel discussion, “Family Secrets, Family Truths: American Immigrant Stories.” Speaking with CCC’s Chris Kenneally ten years ago were Michael Patrick MacDonald, author of All Souls and Easter Rising: An Irish American Coming Up from Under; Maria Elena Salinas, Univision TV news anchor and author of the memoir, I Am My Father’s Daughter: Living A Life Without Secrets; and Sasha Su-Ling Welland, author of the memoir, A Thousand Miles of Dreams.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anger in America 46 mins – “How To Strike A Balance Between ‘Anger and Forgiveness’4 -Philosopher Martha Nussbaum with a deep meditation on anger and forgiveness. She join us.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astrophysics 54 mins – “Today we present a discussion from The World Science Festival in Brisbane held in March 2016 which saw four of the world’s top astrophysicists come together to chew over some big questions… and possible answers regarding the universe, its origin, where it’s going, and its possible future. Gravity waves, cosmic microwave radiation, dark matter and dark energy flow freely in this entertaining discussion.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Auto Recalls 46 mins – “Auto recalls. Volkswagen and Takata airbags are just the biggest in a long list. Recalls are on the rise. Millions affected. We look at why and what’s going.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bengazi Attack Report 46 min – “The long-awaited House Benghazi Report finds no new evidence of wrongdoing by Hillary Clinton. We’ll read the fine print and look at the big picture.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bernie Sanders Programs 60 mins -”In an exclusive interview with C-SPAN, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders talks about the presidential campaign and his plans to take his progressive message to the convention in Philadelphia and beyond November.” At the link find the title, “Bernie Sanders Discusses the Presidential Campaign, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.446561.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biological Engineer 35 mins – “Dr. Celeste Nelson is an Associate Professor in Chemical and Biological Engineering, as well as Molecular Biology at Princeton University. She is also a Member of the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and the Breast Cancer Research and Cancer Metabolism and Growth Programs. Celeste received her PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University and conducted postdoctoral research at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory before joining the faculty at Princeton. Celeste is the recipient of many awards and honors during her career. She has received the Princeton School of Engineering and Applied Science Distinguished Teacher Award, the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, the Allan P. Colburn Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Technology Review TR35 Young Innovator Award, and an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship in Molecular Biology. She is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “322: Creating 3D Structures in Culture to Study Tissues and Organ Development – Dr. Celeste Nelson,” right-click “Media files 322_Celeste Nelson_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biology and Innovation 61 mins – “Dr. Richard Jefferson is the Chief Executive Officer of an independent, non-profit institute called Cambia. He is also Professor of Science, Technology & Law at Queensland University of Technology and Director of an open, public innovation resource called The Lens. In addition, Richard is a founder of the biological open-source initiative called Biological Innovation for Open Society. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Molecular Genetics from the College of Creative Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara and went on to complete his PhD in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Richard completed postdoctoral research at the Plant Breeding Institute in Cambridge and then worked as a Molecular Biologist for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations before founding Cambia. Richard has received many awards and honors during his career, and just to name a few, he was named an Outstanding Social Entrepreneur by the Schwab Foundation, he was among Scientific American’s List of the World’s 50 Most Influential Technologists and World Research Leader for Economic Development in 2003, he received the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) Leadership in Science Public Service Award, and Medalist of the Center for Science and Policy Outcomes. Richard is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “259: Developing The Lens for Transparency in Innovation – Dr. Richard Jefferson,” right-click “Media files 259_Richard_Jefferson_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biomedical Engineering 28 mins – “European Inventor of the Year, Chris Toumazou, reveals how his personal life and early research lie at the heart of his inventions. As Chief Scientist at the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at Imperial College London, Chris inspires engineers, doctors and other scientists to create medical devices for the 21st century. Applying silicon chip technology, more commonly found inside mobile phones, he tackles seemingly insurmountable problems in medicine to create devices that bridge the electronic and biological worlds – from a digital plaster that monitors a patient’s vital signs to an artificial pancreas to treat diabetes. His latest creation, coined a ‘lab on a chip’, analyses a person’s DNA within minutes outside the laboratory. The hand-held device can identify genetic differences which dictate a person’s susceptibility to hereditary diseases and how they will react to a drug like warfarin, used to treat blood clots.” At the link find the title, “Chris Toumazou, Oct, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qg67b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black American Concerns 37 mins – “On Monday, June 27, I paid a visit to New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture to help a large gathering of the Schomburg’s devoted friends and visitors say goodbye — very reluctantly — to Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad. He’s been the beloved director of the Schomburg for the past five years and has done much to expand the reach and the influence of the Harlem institution that devotes itself to researching and disseminating the history of African-Americans. But Muhammad is also a scholar and he is now eager to evaluate everything he has gleaned about the contemporary concerns of black America from a new vantage point. He’s on his way to join Harvard University’s faculty as a professor of history, race and public policy at the Kennedy School of Government. This young historian is uniquely well suited to ponder the contradictions of the past, the present and the future. Muhammad grew up on Chicago’s Southside, he’s the great grandson of Elijah Muhammad, who led the Nation of Islam for decades and he’s the son of a Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalist and an educator. I first interviewed Muhammad in 2012 about the founding paradox of our country, that our constitution promised “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” despite the entrenched institution of slavery. In June, in front of a live audience at the Schomburg, Khalil Gibran Muhammad and I picked up where we left off, discussing how critical it is to know the past in order to challenge our turbulent times, and reshape our future.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Lives Matter 25 mins – “I’m holding in my hand what has been called “one of the most daring books of the 21st century,” a “book for the ages,” “bracing,” “unrelenting.” The title is Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul, and it breathes with prophetic fire. Its power comes because the author does not begin with “pristine principles or with assumptions about our inherent goodness.” Rather, its view of democracy, as he writes, “emerges out of an unflinching encounter with lynching trees, prison cells, foreclosed homes, young men and women gunned down by police and places where ‘hope, unborn, had died.’” Democracy in Black is rich in history and bold in opinion, and inconvenient truths leap from every page. For example, and I’m quoting the book again, “black people must lose their blackness if America is to be transformed. But of course, white people get to stay white.” The book opens in Ferguson, Missouri, with the author talking to three, dynamic young black women, newly born to activism, and it closes in the intimacy of the reader’s heart, where each of us wrestles with the question of whether we can indeed change the habits of racism and create together a new politics based on a revolution in values. The author is Eddie Glaude Jr. Glaude was raised in the Deep South, in Moss Point, Mississippi, and still remembers the Ku Klux Klan burning a cross at the fairground. He’s now a professor of religion and African-American studies at Princeton University, where he also chairs the Center for African-American Studies. This is his third book, and he’s a member in good standing of the black establishment, which he rigorously calls to account in Democracy in Black.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Lives Matter 50 mins – “Mukul Devichand and Mike Wendling travel around the United States, talking to Black Lives Matter activists, the parents of young black men shot by police, civil rights elders like the Rev. Jesse Jackson, and police officials. In an election year that will be crucial to the country’s future, can Black Lives Matter change America?” At the link find the title, “Black Lives Matter: The Story of a Slogan, Jan, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03gzyf1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bone Cancer 46 mins – “Dr. Wakenda Tyler is an Associate Professor in Orthopaedic Oncology and Metabolic Bone Disease and Adult Reconstruction at the University of Rochester Medical Center. She was awarded her M.D. And M.P.H. from John Hopkins University and completed residency in Orthopaedic Surgery at the Hospital for Special Surgery. Wakenda then completed a fellowship in musculoskeletal oncology at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center before joining the faculty at the University of Rochester where she is today. Wakenda is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “290: Treating Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors – Dr. Wakenda Tyler,” right-click “Media files 290_Wakenda_Tyler.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bone Fractures 88 mins – “The treatment of bone fractures has changed a great deal from the days of plaster casts. See what tools are available to doctors now to help bones mend. Recorded on 05/17/2016. (#30988)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boomer Retirements 64mins – “…This episode focuses on dealing with the loss of crucial information as seasoned engineers retire. Many baby boomers have not saved enough for retirement, and so are deciding to work longer. Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce published a 2011 study on STEM careers, noting that 10 years after graduation, 46 percent of STEM graduates have left the field. While the clamor for more engineering graduates continues, a number of authorities claim there is no engineering labor shortage. A 2013 article from National Defense Magazine explained that the “engineering shortage” is not a myth, although the engineers who commented on the article seemed to feel otherwise. The concern over retiring baby boomers dates back a while, with a July 2000 article (pdf) from Monthly Labor Review discussing the substantial effects to be felt by U.S. employers. Jeff references a white paper (pdf) from The Integrity Group that discusses the effect of Baby Boomer retirement on the energy industry. Harvard Business Review published a 2014 article examining the costs associated with retiring experts. A Bloomberg article from earlier this year discussed steps taken by defense and aerospace company BAE to prepare for upcoming retirements within their engineering ranks. Paying workers more money can overcome their reluctance to assume jobs they would not otherwise consider, suggests a Twin Cities Pioneer Press article. Jeff notes that many Baby Boomers are in no hurry to leave the job market. Many companies cope with the loss of retiring engineers by hiring them back on a part-time or flex-time basis. An infographic (pdf) from Kelly Services forecasts engineering job growth through 2023. Interested listeners can look up forecasts for engineering employment offered by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Aging and Circulation 45 mins – “Dr. Jeff Iliff is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine at Oregon Health and Science University, as well as an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Center for Translational Neuromedicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Jeff received his PhD in Physiology and Pharmacology from Oregon Health and Science University. Afterward, he conducted postdoctoral research, and later served on faculty, at the University of Rochester Medical Center before returning to OHSU where he is today. Jeff is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “268: Clearing Out Brain Clutter: A Glimpse into the Glymphatic System – Dr. Jeff Iliff,” right-click “Media files 268_Jeff_Iliff_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit 76 mins – “The UK has made the momentous decision to leave the EU. Intelligence Squared staged an emergency event to discuss the ramifications. A panel including Douglas Carswell, Jonathan Freedland, Josef Janning, Liz Kendall, Anand Menon and Adair Turner will examined: Who will be the next prime minister to steer us through the rocky negotiations with the EU that lie ahead? What kind of deal can we expect to get? Will the EU play tough with us in order to stop anti-EU contagion spreading to other member states? Or will Brexit be the wake-up call Europe needs to achieve real reform? Will the Brexit camp be able to deliver on its promises – on immigration, NHS spending etc? If not, will there be a backlash from the voters? Will we lose Scotland? Will George Osborne’s dire warnings about the economy be borne out? Is the second referendum which some Remainers are petitioning for a real possibility?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Discussion 48 mins – “Global financial markets show some signs of steadying this morning following Britain’s vote to leave the European Union. The vote last Thursday sparked a global market drop of $3 trillion. Yesterday U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew offered assurances that although the U.K. and the EU is in uncharted waters economically and politically, the U.S. is not facing a related financial crisis of its own. Still, it’s clear that Britain’s likely more distant relationship with European Union countries leaves the U.S. more removed as well – as least temporarily….” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Brexit Meaning 50 mins – “This show has a “chickens coming home to roost” feel to it, but maybe in a positive way. It was supposed to be about the recent British vote to leave the EU, but evolved into something larger. Surprise, surprise.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Comedy 30 mins – “The Frequency of Laughter is a six-part history of radio comedy, covering 1975-2005, presented by journalist and radio fan Grace Dent. In each episode she brings together two figures who were making significant radio comedy at the same time, and asks them about their experiences. This is a conversational history that focuses on the people who were there and the atmosphere within the BBC and the wider comedy world that allowed them to make great radio – or not. This final edition features Justin Edwards and Jan Ravens looking at radio comedy in the early 2000s. Justin is now known for his work on In And Out Of The Kitchen and Radio 4 Extra’s Newsjack, but got his first series in 2003 as part of the sketch team The Consultants. Jan’s association with radio comedy dates back to the early 1980s when she became the first-ever female radio comedy producer, but became beloved of the Radio 4 audience for her work on Dead Ringers, which started in 2000. Grace asks them about the atmosphere within the Radio Comedy department and within the BBC; they discuss the difference between topical comedy and satire, and whether the Radio 4 audience necessarily wants either; and they discuss the contribution a good sound engineer can make to a programme.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campaign Finances 27 mins – “The road to the White House requires stamina and plenty of money. Economist and US Citizen, Linda Yueh, makes a hypothetical run for Congress in the 5th district of Virgina, to find out why it costs so much money to run for office and the increasing importance of the internet in a campaign. On the way she gathers a campaign team, meets her voters and learns about the importance of pizza in politics.” At the link find the title, “Linda For Congress, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03hc9n2.mp3”and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cell Biology Researcher 46 mins – “Dr. Patrick Lusk is an Assistant Professor of Cell Biology at Yale University. He received his B.S. and Ph.D. in Cell Biology from the University of Alberta and went on to conduct postdoctoral research at The Rockefeller University before accepting his current position at Yale. Patrick is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, ”312: Having Fun Studying the Fundamental Mechanisms of Nuclear Transport in Cells – Dr. Patrick Lusk,” right-click “Media files 312_Patrick Lusk_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China Water Concerns 30 mins – “China has powered its development with water. When it needed energy for industry it built the largest hydro-electric dams in the world. When the farmland and factories of northern China were threatened with drought an enormous canal was built to pipe supplies from the south. China has the engineering skill, the capital and the will to challenge the limits that nature sets on development. But the exploitation of China’s water resources has come at a great cost, forcing millions from their homes, polluting natural lakes and rivers and pushing rare animal species to the brink of extinction. Isabel Hilton, editor of the China Dialogue website, assesses the progress of China’s water revolution and asks where its water will come from in the future. Can large-scale engineering continue to provide the answers or must government teach industry and the public to live within their means?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Solar King 27 mins – “Meet Huang Ming, the Chinese inventor who describes himself as, ‘the number one crazy solar guy in the world’. One of the prize exhibits of his museum in northern China is a vintage solar panel. It’s a water heater, installed by President Jimmy Carter on the roof of the West Wing of the White House. Back in 1979 the installation was meant to symbolise a new solar-powered future for America. Instead, oil prices fell and Ronald Reagan removed the White House panels. 37 years on and it’s China, not the US that’s embracing the idea of a solar-powered economy. Huang Ming, an engineer, prominent political figure and businessman is leading the way with his foundation of Solar Valley. In 800 acres of land south of Beijing he employs 3000 people in solar research, development and manufacture. Peter Hadfield visits Solar Valley to see the fruits of the sun, from a solar-powered yurt to the world’s biggest solar-powered building. He asks if Huang Ming can persuade his nation to turn its back on coal and oil and angle its face toward the sun. Producer: Alasdair Cross.” At the link find the title, “The Sun King of China, May 2016,” right-click “Media files p03t1tkw.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clean Energy Geek Squad 31 mins – “When you have a computer problem, you call tech support. When you have a ghost problem you call Ghostbusters. But who do you call when you have a clean energy problem? In this episode of Direct Current – An Energy.gov Podcast, Matt calls up the Clean Energy Solutions Center, a “help desk” that provides free expert advice on clean energy policy to governments all over the world. Allison talks to Nicky Phear, a professor who cycles hundreds of miles across Montana to teach her students about climate change. Nicky just received a big award at the C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium for her education work, and she’s basically an all-around awesome person. And Dan tries to convince Paul that there is a better way to measure energy — starting with the humble burrito.” At the link right-click “Download file” andselect”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Commons Overview 28 mins – “Tim Harford presents the last in the series, ‘Pop-up Ideas’. Tim explores the concept of ‘The Tragedy of the Commons’ – a term coined by the American ecologist Garrett Hardin in a hugely influential 1968 essay. He compares Hardin’s work to that of the American political economist Elinor Ostrom, to reflect on the impact of mankind on the world around us.” At the link find the title, “Common Tragedy, Jul, 2013,” right-click “Media files p02r7nqx.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Community Power 30 mins – “There’s no doubt that ‘People Power’ can transform a community, when keen volunteers come together to collectively improve their lot. But what happens when People Power can be measured in watts and volts? Communities up and down the country are taking the power back – literally – from the Big 6, and starting a variety of schemes to generate their own energy. They’re reducing their bills, strengthening community spirit – and helping the UK towards its renewable energy targets at the same time. And in January of this year, the government got fully on board with the movement too, publishing the first ever UK Community Energy Strategy. But just how easy is it to do? Can philanthropic locals really compete with the might of the UK Energy industry? And how does the money stack up? Tom Heap investigates.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computational Innovator 54 mins – “Dr. Stephen Wolfram is the Founder and CEO of Wolfram Research. In addition, he is the creator of the Wolfram Language, the computational platform Mathematica, and the computational knowledge engine Wolfram Alpha, as well as the author of the bestselling book A New Kind of Science. Stephen attended Oxford University and he received his PhD in Theoretical Physics from the California Institute of Technology. Afterward, he joined the faculty at Caltech and became the youngest recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship. Later, he founded the Center for Complex Systems Research and joined the faculty at the University of Illinois. Shortly afterwards, he founded his current company Wolfram Research and has made substantial advances in mathematics, physics, and computation. Stephen is here with us today to tell us all about his experiences along the way in life and science.” At the link find the title, “283: Strategic Scientist Creating Computation Automation and Innovation – Dr. Stephen Wolfram,” right-click “Media files 283_Stephen_Wolfram_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in South Africa 27 mins – “South Africa’s President Zuma is in deep trouble. Accusations of corruption and unexplained ministerial appointments have fuelled widespread suspicions that the South African state has been “captured”. At the heart of this accusation are the Gupta brothers – a secretive family of Indian-born entrepreneurs. From modest beginnings in the 1990s, the Guptas’ South African business empire grew dramatically. Boosted, it is said, by their alleged influence over state contracts, political appointments and President Zuma himself. In this edition of Assignment, Michael Robinson tells the story of “Guptagate” – how one of the fiercest political storms since the ending of apartheid has swept South Africa and its increasingly embattled President.” At the link find the title, “Capturing South Africa, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03w82hm.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coyotes America 53 mins – “Wednesday we’re talking about a homegrown American success: coyotes. The country has been at war with the iconic species since white settlers first reached the heartland plains. But coyotes, according to biologist Dan Flores, not only survived our assault on them, they simultaneously expanded their range across the continent and into our cities. Flores joins us Wednesday to explore the coyote’s fascinating story of resilience and adaptability and how it parallels our own version of Manifest Destiny. Dan Flores is the A.B. Hammond Professor Emeritus of Western History at the University of Montana and the author of ten books on aspects of Western US history. His new book is called Coyote America: A Natural and Supernatural History….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crazy Artist 13 mins – “These days you can find William Kitt in a small, bright solarium on the corner of 150th Street and Edgecombe Avenue in Manhattan, where he lives. Most hours on any day he sits here, sketching over a desk cluttered with colored pencils and pastels. What you could not know from looking at Kitt, a slender, laughing man who wears a beret and surrounds himself with drawings, is that he spent decades living on the streets. Kitt says he spent 34 years of his life being homeless and maddened by drug-induced hallucinations. Now he lives in an apartment owned by a housing nonprofit called Broadway Housing Communities, which was founded in 1983 and owns seven buildings housing over 600 tenants. Like most supportive housing projects, Broadway Housing Communities provides apartments and medical, psychiatric or other services to people who, like William Kitt, have physical or mental health problems or are low income. Kitt, now 65, has leased a room from this Broadway Housing property on Edgecombe Avenue for the past 13 years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity 28 mins – “A talk for the online lecture series TED in 2006 launched Sir Ken Robinson’s ideas to a global audience. He spoke about creativity in schools for 20 minutes, and the video has been watched more than any other TED Talk, with 27 million views so far. In conversation with Sarah Montague, he argues that modern teaching is a product of industrialisation, putting children through a factory model that prepares them for working life. But if we truly value innovation and creativity, why isn’t it taught? For the programme, Sir Ken returns to the former Margaret Beavan Special School in Liverpool, where he spent his primary school years in the 1950s, after contracting polio at four years old. He’s since advised governments and businesses around the world on how to harness creativity, and believes if schools were radically different, giving creative subjects equal status, children would find their true talents.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crisis Communications 14 mins – “On October 22, 2014 shots rang out downtown Ottawa, killing Corporal Nathan Cirillo as he stood guard at the National War Memorial. This unthinkable act devastated and sparked fear in citizens’ minds, causing a frenzy of conversations and rumours. Where did the assailant flee and where was he headed? Was there also an active shooter at the Rideau Centre? As these very questions and numerous other claims flooded the Internet, Ottawa Police Service (OPS) had already undertaken a number of crisis communications measures, with public safety as its number one priority. Anat Cohn, corporate communications specialist at Ottawa Police Service, recently sat down with our producer Ashlea McGrath at MARCOM Professional Development Annual Forum to discuss her experience in crisis communications on that tragic day in 2014, and the vital role social media played in helping OPS communicate with the public at such a crucial moment.” At the link right-click “Direct download: MarComm_ep.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crystallography 28 mins – “Jim al-Khalili talks to Professor Elspeth Garman about a technique that’s led to 28 Nobel Prizes in the last century. X- ray crystallography, now celebrating its 100th anniversary, is used to study the internal structure of matter. It may sound rather arcane but it’s the reason we now know the structure of hugely important molecules, like penicillin, insulin and DNA. But while other scientists scoop up prizes for cracking chemical structures, Elspeth works away behind the scenes, (more cameraman than Hollywood star), improving the methods and techniques used by everybody working in the field. If only it was as simple as putting a crystal in the machine and printing off the results. Growing a single crystal of an enzyme that gives TB its longevity took Elspeth’s team no less than fifteen years. No pressure there then when harvesting that precious commodity.” At the link find the title, “Elspeth Garman, Oct, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qhl4d.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Breach Reports 23 mins – “In the aftermath of the Panama Papers data breach many law firms have become hyper aware of their digital security risks. With the number of breaches on the rise what can lawyers do to keep informed of the most pertinent risks facing legal practitioners? In this episode of the Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek speak with Clark Hill PLC Of Counsel David G. Ries about data security, Mandiant’s M-Trends, and Verizon’s Data Breach Investigation Reports. David opens the interview with an explanation of what these reports are (summaries developed by security service providers on data breach trends during the past year) and talks about how they help to organize collected information for ease of use. He then analyzes the subtle differences between the two reports, like the way they define terms like data breach and security incident, and gives some insight into the ways each company acquires their data. David also covers the top three key findings provided by each report and gives examples of how this information can be invaluable to law firms seeking to shore up their security shortcomings. He closes the interview with his major takeaways from this year’s’ reports and tips for law firms on how this research can aid in strengthening your comprehensive cybersecurity program….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Decision Making 59 mins – “Dr. Simon DeDeo is external faculty at the Santa Fe Institute and Assistant Professor at Indiana University in Complex Systems and in Cognitive Science. He completed his undergraduate studies in Astrophysics at Harvard University and received a Master’s Degree in Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics from Cambridge University. Simon went on to receive his PhD in Astrophysical Sciences from Princeton University and conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Tokyo, the University of Chicago as a Kavli Fellow, and also at the Santa Fe Institute as an Omidyar Fellow. Simon is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “307: The Science Behind the Formation and Future of Human Societies – Dr. Simon DeDeo,” right-click “Media files 307_Simon_DeDeo_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Discrimination Laws 66 mins – “Last week, the court decided one of this term’s blockbuster cases — a case that could affect the future of affirmative action in this country. The plaintiff was Abigail Fisher, a white woman, who said she was rejected from the University of Texas because the university unfairly considered race as one of many factors when evaluating applicants. And while Fisher’s claims were the focus of the case, the story behind how she ended up in front of the Supreme Court is a lot more complicated.On this episode, we visit Edward Blum, a 64-year-old “legal entrepreneur” and former stockbroker who has become something of a Supreme Court matchmaker — He takes an issue, finds the perfect plaintiff, matches them with lawyers, and works his way to the highest court in the land. He’s had remarkable success, with 6 cases heard before the Supreme Court, including that of Abigail Fisher. We also head to Houston, Texas, where in 1998, an unusual 911 call led to one of the most important LGBT rights decisions in the Supreme Court’s history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disease Research 28 mins – “In October 2013, Jeremy Farrar was appointed Director of the Wellcome Trust – UK’s largest medical research funding charity. The Trust funded £750 million’s worth of health-related research – about the same as the government’s Medical Research Council. This means Jeremy Farrar is a major figure in British science. Since 1996, the doctor and clinical scientist had run the Wellcome-funded Oxford University Clinical Research Unit in Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam – a British-Vietnamese collaboration specialising in infectious diseases such as malaria, HIV, TB and avian flu. He lost close friends and colleagues when the SARS pandemic took off in East Asia in 2003, and dealt with the first cases of the dangerous H5N1 bird flu when it arrived in Vietnam the following here. In conversation with Jim Al-Khalili, Dr Farrar talks about the personal and professional impact of those experiences and of his feelings of impotence as a doctor treating HIV/AIDS patients as a junior doctor in London in 1980s. With his international perspective and his hands-on experience of the deadly potential of infectious diseases, he talks to Jim about the great health challenges faced by the world in the coming decades.” At the link find the title, “Jeremy Farrar, Jul, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qjl4g.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dust Bowl Recollections 27 mins – “A fierce drought in Oklahoma’s ‘No Man’s Land’ – a region that was the heart of the 1930s Dust Bowl – stirs up dust storms, memories and myths. In this parched terrain of ghost towns and abandoned ranches, the wells are running dr” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. , but the stories continue to flow.” At the link find the title, “Dust Bowl Ballads, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p040f864.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Entomologist 42 mins – “Dr. Erin Hodgson is an Associate Professor and Extension Entomologist at Iowa State University. She received her undergraduate training in Biology and Botany and her M.S. in Entomology from North Dakota State University. Erin was awarded her Ph.D. in Entomology from the University of Minnesota, followed by a postdoctoral research position also at the University of Minnesota. Erin served on the faculty at Utah State University before joining the faculty at Iowa State where she is today. Erin has received many awards and honors in her career, including the Editor’s Choice Award from the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation, the Iowa State University Outreach and Extension New Professional Award, and multiple awards from the Entomological Society of America for her educational and outreach efforts. In addition, Erin is co-host of the “Soybean Pest Podcast” with her colleague Matt O’Neal. Erin is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “333: Investigating Insidious Insects in the Field of Agricultural Pest Management – Dr. Erin Hodgson,” right-click “Media files 333_Erin_Hodgson_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environment Researcher 36 mins – “Dr. Benjamin Zaitchik is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Johns Hopkins University. Ben received his undergraduate training in Biology at Harvard University and went on to receive his M.S. in Crop and Soil Sciences from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in Geology and Geophysics from Yale University. Afterward, Ben conducted postdoctoral research as a Research Associate with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Hydrological Sciences Branch and the University of Maryland. He served as an American Association for the Advancement of Science Diplomacy fellow in the U.S. Department of State Office of Global Change before joining the faculty at Johns Hopkins. Ben has received the Meritorious Service and Superior Honor Awards from the U.S. State Department, the Peer Award for outstanding Research Associate from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and has been named a PopTech Science Fellow. Ben is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “296: Forecasting Climate Variability to Improve How We Cope with Change – Dr. Benjamin Zaitchik,” right-click “Media files 296_Ben_Zaitchik_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Engineering 82 mins – “…Environmental engineers plan, design and manage projects associated with environmental protection or remediation. Our guest for this episode is Bronwyn Bell, an environmental engineer from Western Australia with extensive experience in the Mining & Resources economic sector. An unfortunate early experience with Super Glue, while building a popsicle stick bridge, convinced Brownyn that she’d rather not be a civil engineer. Subsectors within the environmental engineering field include wastewater treatment, air pollution control, waste disposal, recyling, and public health management. Bronwyn managed to make spending time at a nearby beer brewery an integral part of her engineering studies. Our guest has worked in coal mines, iron mines, and diamond mines… and has also visited a number of gold mines. Kimberlite is an igneous rock that may contain diamonds. Alluvial diamond mining is usually associated with smaller-scale mining operations. Browyn has done a lot of work in the Pilbara region of Australia, which contains some of the Earth’s oldest rock formations. Tailings are the materials that remain after ore is processed to remove its more valuable components… Bronwyn notes that a good environmental solution is often a good financial solution, as waste reduction aids both. One of our guest’s projects received financial relief due to the presence of Asian green mussels.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from pop-up menu.

Eton Scholarships 27 mins – “Each year some of the poorest pupils in the country enter the hallowed corridors of Eton on full scholarships. Penny Marshall meets some of those applying for places and follows them and those they inspire as they prepare for exams that could change the course of their lives. Andrew Isama reflects on the move from one of Liverpool’s toughest comprehensives to the cobbled square, 15th century chapel and Olympic rowing lake at Eton. He says that preconceptions about the school get turned on their head when scholarship pupils like him arrive: far from being with boys who eat pate and listen to classical music he was surprised to find out just how normal his fellow pupils were: “People had the same interests as me.” The Headmaster at Eton, Simon Henderson, wants more bursaries for boys from disadvantaged backgrounds, so that anyone with the necessary talent can be financially supported at the £35,000-a-year school. Penny joins him and some of the pupils to find out what they hope to gain from the experience. The transition can be a difficult one and some struggle with the move to an institution which has educated 19 British prime ministers, including the present incumbent. But Andrew Isama believes that the influx of scholarship pupils like him also helps those who have come from privileged backgrounds – “A lot of them have never been exposed to anything else. They want to be successful but to do that they have to know how to get on with a range of people.” At the link find the title, “An Eton Experience, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03ly7ym.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Explosives Researcher 28 mins – “Jackie Akhavan, Professor of Explosive Chemistry, tells Jim al-Khalili all about the science of explosives. She explains exactly what explosives are and how to make them safer to handle. She started by working on how to make fireworks safer and has been involved in research with bees to see whether they can be used smell different types of explosives. Her current project involves testing the rocket fuel that will be used in Bloodhound, the British designed and built supersonic car that aims to reach a speed of 1,000mph. Her work involves finding out how to best detect explosives in airports and elsewhere, teaching security professionals how to differentiate between false alarms and the real thing. She also works on explosives used in warfare and discusses the ethical issues involved.” At the link find the title, “Jackie Akhavan, Sep, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qft7t.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fasting 35 mins – “Here are some things that the legendary bodybuilder Bernarr Macfadden believed in: Fasting to cure cancer. Fasting to cure asthma. Fasting to cure – here’s an interesting one – emaciation. “I mean, there’s the old idea of starve a fever, feed a cold,” said Mark Adams, who wrote a book about Macfadden called Mr. America. “For Macfadden it was starve a fever, starve a cold, starve a sore throat, starve cancer, starve kleptomania.” The alternative medicine enthusiast shook up the health scene in the early 1900s with his magazine, “Physical Culture.” He focused on exercise and cleanses and fasting, sometimes up to seven days, and brushed off modern medicine as “murderous science”.Macfadden’s ideas had a brief moment of popularity in the 20s and 30s but lost luster around World War II. Around the time penicillin started saving lives, alternative medicine – especially a starvation diet – didn’t seem as appealing a cure. Almost a century later, updated and repackaged as the “ketogenic diet”, one of Macfadden’s starvation cures is making waves again. “We know it works,” said Eric Kossoff, a pediatric neurologist at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center in Baltimore.“There are lots of different theories about how it works.” The ketogenic diet is not the same as fasting – instead it’s an extremely high-fat, low-carbohydrate regimen that essentially tricks the body into thinking it’s starving. And the diet has made inroads into the medical community for treating epilepsy in children.” At the link click the three dots in a circle, right-click “Download“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feminist Professor 19 mins – “Myra Strober became a feminist on the Bay Bridge, heading toward San Francisco. It is 1970. She has just been told by the chairman of Berkeley’s economics department that she can never get tenure. Driving home afterward, wondering if she got something out of the freezer for her family’s dinner, she realizes the truth: she is being denied a regular faculty position because she is a mother. Flooded with anger, she also finds her life’s work: to study and fight sexism, in the workplace, in academia, and at home. Strober’s generous memoir captures the spirit of a revolution lived fully, from her Brooklyn childhood (and her shock at age twelve when she’s banished to the women’s balcony at shul) to her groundbreaking Stanford seminar on women and work. Strober’s interest in women and work began when she saw her mother’s frustration at the limitations of her position as a secretary. Her consciousness of the unfairness of the usual distribution of household chores came when she unsuccessfully asked her husband for help with housework. Later, when a group of conservative white male professors sputtered at the idea of government-subsidized child care, Strober made the case for its economic benefits. In the 1970s, the term “sexual harassment” had not yet been coined. Occupational segregation, quantifying the value of work in the home, and the cost of discrimination were new ideas. Strober was a pioneer, helping to create a new academic field and founding institutions to establish it. But she wasn’t alone: she benefited from the women’s movement, institutional change, and new federal regulations that banned sex discrimination.” At the link find the title, “MIT Press Podcast- Sharing the Work, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files MITP_Strober.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Allergies 46 mins – “Auto recalls. Volkswagen and Takata airbags are just the biggest in a long list. Recalls are on the rise. Millions affected. We look at why and what’s going.we’re going to look at auto recalls. From airbags, to ignitions, to roll-away Jeep Grand Cherokees, automakers have racked up record recalls in recent years. One hundred million cars and trucks. And many – maybe yours – are still on the road, unrepaired.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Waste Fix 30 mins – In 2011 a major report involving 400 experts from 35 countries issued stark warnings about the future food supply. The Foresight report stressed in order to feed a growing world population there was an urgent need to produce more food sustainable but also to deal with waste. It claimed globally 30% of food is never eaten. So did anyone listen? The amount of food waste has often been raised but Kat Arney goes in search of the game changers , to find out who’s making effective changes to stop good food being binned while people are still hungry. She explores the widening gleaning movement – volunteers primed to hoover up the crops left in the farmer’s field – to those changing the food production chain. She hears how recent weather events, the economy and food scandals have forced changes in supply and use of food. So will that change stick for good?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Frames of Reference 60 mins – “What shapes the way we perceive the world around us? A lot of it has to do with invisible frames of reference that filter our experiences and determine how we feel. Alix Spiegel and Hanna Rosin interview a woman who gets a glimpse of what she’s been missing all her life – and then loses it. And they talk to Daily Show correspondent Hasan Minhaj about which frame of reference is better – his or his dad’s.” At the link find the title, “Frame of Reference, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160707_invsb_frame.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government IT Upgrades 29 mins – “Representative Will Hurd (R-TX), chair of the House Subcommittee on Information Technology, discusses cybersecurity and data security in federal government agencies, as well as a recent report card issued by his subcommittee on the subject.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Representative Will Hurd, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.446572.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greenpeace Wilcox Interview 55 mins – “We talk to Peter Willcox, Captain for Greenpeace for over 30 years and author of Greenpeace Captain: My Adventures in Protecting the Future of Our Planet.” At the link find the title, “139 Peter Willcox – Adventures in Protecting the Future of Our Planet,” right-click “Media files 1ea31114-7caa-4b84-9932-938fb2c0ff21.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Grunt Book 50 mins – “We welcome best-selling science writer Mary Roach back on the show to talk about her latest book Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.” At the link find the title, “138 Mary Roach – The Curious Science of Humans at War,” right-click “Media files 225dd023-9ed4-4516-bba8-2403d8562312.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence Control 50 mins – “Democrats in the House of Representatives staged a dramatic sit-in this week to protest inaction on gun legislation, but are they just preaching to the choir? This week, we look at bridging the gap over guns in America and how the media can better understand both sides. Plus, new algorithms claim to provide more accurate models for policing and sentencing, but they actually might be making things worse.” At the link click the three dots in a circle, right-click “Download“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hamilton Play 58 mins – “Author Ron Chernow discusses his 2004 book, [Alexander Hamilton], which has been adapted into the Broadway musical, “Hamilton.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Ron Chernow, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436397.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hearing Researcher 39 mins – “Dr. Fan-Gang Zeng is Director of the Center for Hearing Research and Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Biomedical Engineering, Cognitive Sciences and Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at the University of California Irvine. He received a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Science and Technology of China and his Master’s degree in Biomedical Engineering at the Institute of Physiology Academia Sinica in Shanghai. Fan-Gang then went on to earn his PhD in Hearing Science from Syracuse University. He served as a research Associate at the House Ear Institute and an Associate Professor at the University of Maryland before joining the faculty at UC, Irvine where he is today. Fan-Gang is a member of the Acoustical Society of America, The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Fan-Gang is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “254: Sound Science in Restoring Hearing with Cochlear Implants – Dr. Fan-Gang Zeng,” right-click “Media files 254_Fan-Gang_Zeng_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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