Media Mining Digest 264 – Dec 2, 2016: Addiction Problems, Advertising, Alan Greenspan Book, Alcoholic Mom Story, Alternate Reality Stories, Alzheimers Treatment, American Introspection, Ancient American, Bernie Sanders on Trump, Black Holes, Boredom, Breitbart Critique, Bridge Building, Broadband by Electrical Co-ops, Butter-Soup-Vegans, Cash and Charles, Catholic Priest Abusers, Cell Labeling, Charles Mingus, Chillwall.com, CO2 Production and Soil Carbon, Coal in Canada, Concentration Camp Music, Concussion Care, Corruption in Providence, Creativity, Cuban Women, Cyber Security, Dark Matter, De Tocqueville on Democracy, Disabled in Pennsylvania, Disco Music Death, Dollar Store Town, E-discovery, Elder Care, Electoral College, Engineering for Kids, FarmCrowdy in Nigeria, Fungi, Gender and Race, Genetic History, Global Changes, Glyphosate, Godfather Production, Good Samaritan, Haitian Coco Crop, Hal Linden, Hospital Noise, Immigrant Stories, Insomnia, Job Trends, Joe Hill Activist, Julia Child, Jupiter, Justice Clarence Thomas, Lead Poisoning, Leonard Cohen, Madness, Maker Revolution, Marijuana, Mathematics, Meat Eaters, Military Family Life, Millennials in Parents Homes, Mississippi Pioneer Woman, Mosul Battle, Multiple Sclerosis, Native American Myths, Nuclear Weapons Control, Oklahoma Earthquakes, Physics Story for Kids, Populism and Elites, Premed Gap Year, Refugee Rescues, Risk Management, Russian Cowboys, Russian Politics, Selective Attention, Skin Patch Monitor, Solar Research, Southwest Airlines Founder, StoryCorps Thanksgiving Stories, Sustainable Cities, Terminal Burrowing, Thomas Friedman Interview, Trade Policy by US, Trump, Tuberculosis, Turkish Politics, Veteran Flight Training, Women in Science, Working Women, World War One Stories, Zapruder Filmer

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 99 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 255 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 12,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 350 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

Addiction Problems 47 mins – “Addiction in the family. How to spot it, how to respond and help. The U.S. Surgeon General joins us.” At the link find the title, “How To Spot — And Treat — Addiction In Your Family, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_502907809.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Advertising 52 mins – “Wherever you turn these days, commercials, sponsored social media, and other advertising efforts await your attention. The influential thinker Tim Wu says we have the “attention merchants” to thank for that. In a new book, Wu argues that the concerted efforts of advertisers to attract our attention at every opportunity has made us more distracted and less focused than ever before. Wu joins us Monday to explore the rise of the attention merchants and the human costs of their efforts. Tim Wu is an author, policy advocate, and the Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. His writing has appeared in Slate, The New Yorker, Time, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and Forbes. His new book is called  The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alan Greenspan Book 58 mins – “Sebastian Mallaby discusses the life of Alan Greenspan in his book. He is interviewed by Alice Rivlin, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and former vice chair of the Federal Reserve.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Sebastian Mallaby, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.457480.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-upp menu.

Alcoholic Mom Story 58 mins – “Josh’s mother and younger brother were a mess. His mother drank too much. His brother got arrested a lot. Josh hadn’t lived with them since he was nine, and they didn’t play much of a role in his daily life—until duty called, and they took over his life.” At the link you can listen or pay for a download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Alternate Reality Stories 36 mins – “A therapist who creates virtual reality experiences for people with dangerous disorders, a grandmother who uses a headset to escape her surroundings and Ernest Cline on virtual reality in fact and fiction. Listen, decode, and decide: Can alternate realities save us?” At the link find the title, “S02-2: Alternate Reality, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files codebreaker 20161123_e2_322_20161114_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’s Treatment 66 mins – “Dale E. Bredesen, M.D., Augustus Rose Professor of Neurology, Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA; Founding President, Buck Institute for Research on Aging Alzheimer’s disease is a major global problem and now one of the leading causes of death in the United States. We have recently seen the publication of the first examples of the reversal of cognitive decline in early Alzheimer’s disease and its precursors, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and subjective cognitive impairment (SCI). The successful protocol is a personalized, multi-modal approach that involves subtyping of Alzheimer’s and addressing dozens of factors that contribute to cognitive decline.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Introspection 50 mins – “This election season, the media frequently looked to history in an attempt to explain the rise of Donald Trump. We consider how historical parallels don’t always serve us well. Plus, revisiting a notorious murder that the press got wrong; the long reach of a WWII slogan; and attempts in Ukraine to whitewash the nation’s history. A special hour on memory, both historical and personal, and how what we remember shapes our world.” AT the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select ‘Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Ancient American 36 mins – “Today, we’re introducing you to a new Gimlet Media podcast about how big news stories that we thought were over were actually the beginning of something else. It’s called Undone. We spoke with the show’s host, Pat Walters, and give you a peek of their second episode, ‘The Ancient One’. It’s about some very old human remains that two teenagers stumbled on in 1996 — and the 20-year-long fight to identify them.” At th elink find the title, “Introducing Undone, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT7978621410.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bernie Sanders on Trump 56 mins – ”Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT), who is now the outreach chair for Senate Democrats, speaks to reporters at a [Christian Science Monitor] breakfast about the election results, Donald Trump’s presidency, and what’s next for Democrats.” At the link find the title, “Senator Bernie Sanders Discusses Election Results and Trump Presidency, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.460931.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Holes 28 mins – “In a career of over fifty years Sir Roger Penrose has changed the way we see the Universe. He carried out seminal research on black holes and the big bang, and he’s questioned the current received wisdom on some of the most important ideas in science, such as quantum mechanics, artificial intelligence and where consciousness comes from. His ideas in geometry directly influenced the work of the Dutch artist M.C. Escher. Now Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford, Roger Penrose is one of the world’s most lauded mathematical physicists. He’s written a number of popular science books in which he certainly doesn’t shy away from the mathematics. Jim al-Khalili talks to Roger Penrose about his continuing fascination with the biggest questions in science.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boredom 56 mins – “Contributor Peter Mitton examines boredom and discovers a little-understood universal state of mind. From its obvious downsides and unexpected upsides, to its evolutionary origins and the way it’s shaping our future — boredom is anything but dull.” At the link find the title, “The Tedium is the Message, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161122_56442.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Breitbart Critique 31 mins – “Ben Shapiro is a pretty conservative guy. He’s written books like Bullies: How the Left’s Culture of Fear and Intimidation Silences Americans and The People vs. Barack Obama, and he’s a former contributor to Breitbart. But earlier this year, Shapiro quit the site over his editor’s unwillingness to defend reporter Michelle Fields, and he declared himself a never Trump-er. Now, he’s facing waves of anti-Semitic abuse by people on the self-declared alt-right. Shapiro is the editor-in-chief of the Daily Wire.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bridge Building 18 mins – “Cable stayed bridges have become increasingly common in the past few decade, and they seem to be the design of choice for modern bridges spanning 500 to as much as 2,000 feet. In this podcast we learn of the mechanics and the advantages of this architecturally appealing design from an expert in the field, Denny Pate, Senior Vice President and Principal Bridge Engineer with Figg Engineering in Tallahassee, Florida.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband by Electric Co-ops 36 mins – “Rural electric co-ops have started delivering high quality Internet access to their member-owners and our guest this week on Community Broadband Bits episode 229 is dedicated to helping these co-ops to build fiber-optic networks throughout their territories. Jon Chambers is a partner at Conexon and was previously the head of the FCC’s Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis. Jon is a strong proponent for ensuring rural residents and businesses have at least the same quality Internet access as urban areas. We talk about his experience and frustration at the FCC, which was content to shovel money at telcos for the most basic infrastructure rather than setting higher expectations to ensure everyone had decent Internet access. We talk about how Co-Mo rolled out fiber to its members without federal assistance, inspiring electric cooperatives around the nation to follow suit. In our discussion, I reference Jon’s blog post “FCC to Rural America: Drop Dead.” In it, he cites some of the reactions in the FCC from his advocacy for real rural solutions rather than signing big checks to big telcos for delivering slow and unreliable Internet access. One of quotes from a Democrat: “Republicans like corporate welfare, so we’re going to give money to the telephone companies to keep the Republicans on the Hill happy.” Neither political party comes off looking very good when it comes to rural connectivity, which fits with our impression. But Jon confirms another of our experiences when he says that when he works with rural communities, politics doesn’t come up. They just focus on solutions.” You can listen at the link or right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download it.

Butter-Soup-Vegans 50 mins – “Now that the long, stressful, divisive election season is behind us, maybe it’s time to talk about something that unites us in pleasure: food. Now, a cultural history of one food that makes everything a little bit better: butter. Plus, the resurgence of rainbow sprinkles. Whether you call them jimmies, funfetti or unicorn food, those brightly colored sugary bits that top cupcakes, cookies & ice cream sundaes, are having a bit of a moment. We’ll talk to a food writer from the New York Times about the current funfetti explosion.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cash and Charles 48 mins – “For Thanksgiving, two archival interviews with American music icons: Cash spoke to Terry Gross in 1997, Charles in 1998.” At the link find the title, “Johnny Cash / Ray Charles, Nov 2016,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Catholic Priest Abusers 56 mins – “In this hour of Reveal, we’re going to revisit an Oscar-winning movie about The Boston Globe’s investigative team that exposed the Catholic Church sex abuse scandal: “Spotlight.” We’ll take you behind the scenes of that investigation, look at the legacy of the groundbreaking story and see how other journalists went on to expose more crimes by Catholic priests around the world.” At the link find the title, “Glare of the spotlight, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files Glare-of-the-Spotlight_update_podcast-master.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cell Labeling 5 mins – “Kat Arney illuminates the story of a molecular ‘highlighter pen’ for growing cells. Like the story of 5-FU or fluorouracil, which we brought you recently, this tale is all about a modified version of one of the chemical building blocks of DNA. But unlike fluorouracil, which is used all over the world as a cancer drug, bromodeoxyuridine caused a lab-based revolution, providing scientists with a vital tool to detect growing and multiplying cells.” At the link find the title, “Bromodeoxyuridine: Chemistry in its element, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files Ciie_Bromodeoxyuridine.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charles Mingus 49 mins – “Jazz great Charles Mingus played every kind of jazz and with almost everybody. Big band, hard bop, bebop, Third Stream, free jazz. With Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Kid Ory, Charlie Parker, on and on. He was a great bassist, composer, band leader – but above all, Mingus exploded the emotional language of jazz. This hour On Point, the singular life and sound of Charlie Mingus.” At the ink right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ChillWall.com 53 mins – “Chillwall is your social community for discovering, managing and sharing local events that matter to you.” This program discusses loneliness in our ultra-connected age and how Chillwall is one means of making local connections. At the link find the title, “335: The lonely generation and more, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files spark_20161120_15547.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CO2 Production and Soil Carbon 60 mins – “Scientist Tobias Friedrich says Earth could heat up 6 degrees C., almost 11 degrees F, in a single lifetime. Richard Heede finds 83 companies, plus 7 countries, are responsible for 65% of all greenhouse gases. He names names. Then restoring carbon to the soil, with Murielle Trouillet from the Government of France.” At the link “Download…Lo-Fi” by right-clicking “Lo-Fi” and selecting “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Coal in Canada 19 mins – “Canada’s coal reserves are the fifth largest in the world but within 14 years Ottawa says it wants none of it to be used to make electricity. Industry workers say the cost in jobs will be high but environmentalists say the cost in lives is already high.” At the link find the title, “Nov 22: Canada’s plan to phase-out coal-powered electricity by 2030 sparks concern,” right-click “Media files current_20161122_78819.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concentration Camp Music 39 mins – “Today, voices of Terezin, the Nazi concentration camp used to divert attention from the final solution. We’ll hear about how prisoners held under brutal conditions created art and music amid the horrors of the holocaust Plus, what happens when a protest movement professing all-or-nothing absolutism splits in two? We’ll find out how a splinter group of vegan activists toned down their goals and built a powerful machine for change.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concussion Care 18 mins – “Concussion is a clinical diagnosis made after a head injury with consequent associated signs, symptoms, and neurological or cognitive impairment (infographic – http://bmj.co/conrecG). In the absence of strong evidence, most recommendations on the management and recovery from concussion are based on international expert consensus. In this podcast John Brooks, academic clinical fellow in general practice, and Simon Kemp, chief medical officer for the Rugby Football Union take us through the process of guiding a patient through recovery and back into everyday life, including sport.” At the link find the title, “What to do after a concussion, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 293652172-bmjgroup-what-to-do-after-a-concussion.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concussion Effects 6 mins – “Four years ago, Carla Ciccone was out for dinner when a stack of plates smashed onto her head. Diagnosed with a concussion which led to a deep depression, she says the experience turned out to be a because of what she learned along the way to recovery.” At the link find the title,”Nov 18: How a concussion led Carla Ciccone to value life’s fragility,” right-click “Media files current_20161118_16789.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in Providence 39 mins – “On today’s episode of Reply All we are bringing you the first episode of Gimlet’s new show Crimetown. Crimetown is by the creators of HBO’s The Jinx. This season is about organized crime and corruption in Providence, Rhode Island.” At the link find the title, “Introducing Crimetown, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media filesGLT9662626976.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity 10 mins – “Traditional education classifies students as being either artistic or scientific. Some say this rigidity ignores what links science and arts, and that’s creativity. So how is creativity encouraged? In 2014, The University of Sydney opened the Charles Perkins Centre aimed at fostering collaboration by linking Sydney’s biggest hospital, Royal Prince Alfred with the Medical School, and biomedical research. Herbert Huppert considers creativity in physics and how teams in different countries work together.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Women 27 mins – “From a Bolero concert to a cancer ward, and from the apartment of a guy who helps Cubans get foreign visas to an Afro-Cuban Santeria ceremony, reporter Deepa Fernandes finds out how ordinary Cuban women have lived, loved and invented their way through dwindling resources and political isolation.” At the link find the title, “Candela: The Lives of Cuban Women, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Meddia files p04hd9tx.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security 60 mins – “Minister assisting the prime minister for cyber security Dan Tehan addresses the National Press Club on the challenge of protecting Australian interests in the age of cyber warfare.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Dan Tehan, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_DanTehan_2311_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dark Matter 31 mins – “In 1933, Swiss astronomer Fritz Zwicky published a paper inferring the existence of what he called “dunkle Materie”, or dark matter. It was decades before this theory was taken seriously by the scientific community, but today the idea that the universe is filled with vast quantities of mysterious stuff that we can’t see and have never detected directly is considered mainstream science. But how has the world of science progressed in recent times? And does dark matter represent anything more than a proxy for our misinterpretation of the laws of gravity? To help reveal what we do know about dark matter, Hannah Devlin is joined in the studio by University College London astrophysicist Dr Andrew Pontzen. We also hear from Dr Peter Capak of the Nasa/JPL Spitzer Science Center at the California Institute of Technology, who is part of a consortium hoping to probe the nature of dark matter by mapping 30 billion galaxies in 2019. And finally, from Dr Sarah Malik of Imperial College London, who is a part of a team at the Large Hadron Collider hoping to detect the undetectable.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

De Tocqueville on Democracy 89 mins – “Democracy is in peril! So said Tocqueville in 1835 and 1840 when Democracy is America was published, and so would he likely say now. Democracy is always just one demagogue away from stripping us of our liberties, though certain structural and cultural features can make that more or less likely. Tocqueville liked our spirit of volunteerism, our civic activeness, our energy and inventiveness and competitiveness, and the pervasiveness of religion (at the time) in American culture. But he didn’t like our groupthink, our tendencies toward materialism and caring only about our own small circle (what he called “individualism”), our lack of philosophical curiosity, and was in favor of a strong separation between church and state. He thought that people in a democracy value equality over freedom, and that in the absence of a strong spiritual countervailing force, we’d spend more energy pursuing material comfort and so would be more likely to allow a tyrant who promises this to us to take control. He also feared the rise of a new aristocracy out of the business world, with bosses becoming the new de facto lords. Then again, he also feared a race war and thought for sure that if the South tried to secede, the federal government would be too weak to prevent this, so there’s that. This discussion was recorded live at Brown University 10/27/16 with Mark, Seth, Wes, and Dylan engaging the political moment and with an audience during the Q&A portion at the end.” At the link find the title, “Episode 152: Alexis de Tocqueville on Democracy in America (PEL Live!),” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled in Pennsylvania 58 mins – “Joyce welcomes Peri Jude Radecic, chief executive officer of the Disability Rights Network of Pennsylvania. During the show, Ms. Radecic will discuss the mission of the organization in depth, which is to advance, protect, and advocate for the human, civil, and legal rights of Pennsylvanians with disabilities.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disco Music Death 24 mins – “Hey Surprisingly Awesome listeners – we think you’ll love Undone, a new show from Gimlet Media. It’s about how the big stories we thought were over, were actually the beginning of something else. Hosted by Pat Walters and developed with help from the documentary series Retro Report, Undone challenges what you thought you knew about history.” At the link find the title, “Surprise Surprise! Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT7154500524.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dollar Store Town 18 mins – “Go into any dollar store in the United States and you’ll find the same kind of stuff. There are grocery items and cleaning products, some of them generic and others brand-named. But then there are other things for sale—toys and jewelry and knick-knacks that have a kind of generic cheapness to them. Dollar stores are not just a U.S. phenomenon. They can be found in Australia and the United Kingdom, the Middle East and Mexico. And a lot of the stuff—the generic cheap stuff for sale in these stores—comes from one place. A market in China, called the International Trade Market, or: the Futian market.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

E-discovery 24 mins – “The rapid embrace of emergent technologies has flooded the legal marketplace with new tools and processes to help make attorneys’ daily lives better in every way. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek sit down with CloudNine Vice President of Professional Services Doug Austin to discuss the hottest changes and trends surrounding e-discovery.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elder Care 58 mins – “Speaking from her recent book, Tips for Helping Your Aging Parents (Without Losing Your Mind), elder care expert Kira Reginato shares her best tips for keeping your mind, temper and sense of humor as you care for a loved one. Kira’s upbeat approach outlines the basics of how to take care of anyone as they age without sacrificing taking care of yourself. Reginato, a gerontologist and elder care consultant, draws on her three decades of expertise helping older adults and their families, as well as from being the primary caregiver for her father. She knows the weight gain, the interrupted sleep, the worry, the resentment, along with the funny and tender moments. She’s on a mission to reduce the caregiving burden she sees every day with her clients. She provides practical methods for combating “caregiving overwhelm” and helps you manage expectations of your loved one and yourself.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electoral College 56 mins – “Last week’s presidential election marked the fifth time that there was a split on the popular and electoral college vote. Of course, it wasn’t the first time it’s happened in the early years of 21st century, and that’s got a lot of people are asking: why do we have an electoral college? How’d we end up with this obscure voting method? Defenders argue it’s a cornerstone of the American republic, while opponents counter that it doesn’t value each vote equally. Thursday, we’ll hear from both sides of the debate.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineering for Kids 7 mins -”TED Resident Fawn Qiu designs fun, low-cost projects that use familiar materials like paper and fabric to introduce engineering to kids. In this quick, clever talk, she shares how nontraditional workshops like hers can change the perception of technology and inspire students to participate in creating it.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FarmCrowdy in Nigeria 27 mins – “Segment 4: FarmCrowdy (7m) – Nigeria’s first online platform to unite investors with millions of small farmers in the country and to release the potential of millions of acres on unutilised arable land. Click talks to the CEO Onyeka Akumah.” Segment 1: Pakistan Online Piracy (8m); Segment 2: Airway-on-a-Chip (6m); Segment 3: Fusing Robotics With Textiles (7m) At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fungi 28 mins – “Fungi are responsible for rotting fruit, crumbling brickwork and athlete’s foot. They have a mouldy reputation; but it’s their ability to destroy things that enables new life to grow. 90% of all plants depend on fungi to extract vital nutrients from the soil. And it’s probably thanks to fungi that the first plants were able to colonize land 450 million years ago. Professor Lynne Boddy shares her passion for fungi with Jim Al-Khalili and describes some of the vicious strategies they use to defend their territory. Direct strangulation and chemical weapons; it’s all happening underground.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender and Race 19 mins – “Now more than ever, it’s important to look boldly at the reality of race and gender bias — and understand how the two can combine to create even more harm. Kimberlé Crenshaw uses the term “intersectionality” to describe this phenomenon; as she says, if you’re standing in the path of multiple forms of exclusion, you’re likely to get hit by both. In this moving talk, she calls on us to bear witness to this reality and speak up for victims of prejudice.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic History 52 mins -”Friday, the writer and oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee is our guest. He’s written a book that tells the epic tale of our quest to unravel the human genome. It’s the story of a long lineage of scientists—from Mendel, to Darwin, Watson, Crick, and countless others—and their efforts to understand the workings of the very threads of our existence. But how, Mukherjee wonders, can we best apply that knowledge? And what does it mean to be human when we can read and write our own genetic information? Siddhartha Mukherjee is the author of The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, which won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in general nonfiction. He is an assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University and a cancer physician and researcher. He has published articles in NatureThe New England Journal of MedicineThe New York Times, and Cell. His latest book is called The Gene: An Intimate History” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Changes 28 mins – “The Vice-President of the Conservation Foundation in Washington, DC and renowned ecologist Sir Frank Fraser Darling explores the concept of Man’s responsibility for his natural environment in his Reith series entitled ‘Wilderness and Plenty’. In his fourth lecture entitled ‘Global Changes – Actual and Possible’, Sir Frank Fraser Darling explores the problem of overpopulation and its likely effect on the natural world. He considers the population problem in relation to other environmental factors such as increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, increased reliance on technology and the reduction in all natural environmental buffers. He ponders whether rises in prosperity and population might just signal the decline of the habitable world.” At the link right-click “Global Changes – Actual and Possible, Nov, 1969,” right-click “Media files p02qsl58.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Glyphosate 45 mins – “In the first part of this week’s podcast you’ll learn how to debunk a viral claim.  There are repeated claims that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the weed killer Roundup, is detected in a plethora of food, beverages and body fluids.  The reports are designed to scare people, especially targeting parents that are concerned about the food they feed to their families. This week a glossy brochure surfaced making claims that glyphosate was detected in Cheerios, Oreos, organic snack foods, and many other common groceries. However, this was not a legitimate report from a peer-reviewed journal and should not be given much weight.  Nonetheless, a well-meaning Snopes a response that gave the report undue credence.  Fortunately they corrected the record….” At the link right-click right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Godfather Production 53 mins – “Coppola was 29 when he signed on to direct a film based on Mario Puzo’s novel about an Italian-American crime family. “I was always just trying to bluff the studio to let me do it my way,” he says.” At the link find the title, “Francis Ford Coppola On ‘The Godfather’, Nov 2016,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Good Samaritan 9 mins – “Two decades ago, Camilla Gibb had set herself up for what she thought would be her dream job in academia — only to realize the realities of the ivory tower didn’t sit right with her. Then a man she barely knew gave her a gift that would change her life.” At the link find the title, “Nov 21: ‘Like a religious moment’: The gift that gave Camilla Gibb a new life,” right-click “Media files current_20161121_39224.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Haitian Coco Crop 4 mins – “If you’re into chocolate, and you’ve shopped at Whole Foods in the last couple of months, you might have seen Taza Chocolate’s stone ground Haiti bar. It hasn’t been easy, but cocoa production in Haiti has been on the rise in recent years, with more being exported. The Haitian cacao beans Taza buys come from that country’s northeast region, which was unharmed when Hurricane Matthew passed by last month. However, Haiti’s other big cacao-growing region was devastated. In the fall, in Haiti’s far southwest, carpets of cacao beans can be seen along roadsides, drying in the sun. This year is no exception. They lend a splash of normalcy to the wreckage left by Hurricane Matthew….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hal Linden 86 mins – “Emmy and Tony-winning actor and singer Hal Linden has done everything there is to do in show business, including sitcoms, movies, Broadway, nightclubs and even dubbing foreign language films. Hal joins Gilbert and Frank for a look back at his long and varied career and reveals why “Barney Miller” was considered the most authentic of all cop shows. Also, Hal covers Benny Goodman, backs up Perry Como, shares the screen with Harry Morgan and cuts the rug with Donald O’Connor. PLUS: Cab Calloway! Eddie “The Old Philosopher” Lawrence! “Godzilla vs. the Sea Monster”! The Chinese Bing Crosby! And Hal salutes the late, great Abe Vigoda!” At the link right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/4828820/bf6d6e32-5091-4e9c-9880-5e9252756bec.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hospital Noise 29 mins – “A noisy hospital makes it hard to sleep.Studies show it makes it hard to heal too, and when hospital staff experience ‘alarm fatigue’ it’s dangerous. Find out what alarm fatigue is, and meet an MD making a quieter, safer ICU, modelled on your iPhone.” At the link find the title, “Hospital noise is putting patients at risk. Here’s why. Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files whitecoat_20161111_90970.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Stories 27 mins – “This Thanksgiving, we remember that we stand on the shoulders of giants: Our immigrant parents, grandparents, and beyond. So how we live lives worthy of their sacrifices, while still being true to ourselves? Our Iranian-Jewish-American Mash-Up Roben Farzad, creator and host of Full Disclosure, has some surprising answers for us, and a whole lotta insight on how to create your own happiness while doing so.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Insomnia 27 mins – “Sleep disorders affect up to 40 per cent of Canadians. Find out how Dr. Brian Goldman won the battle against sleepless nights. And then: Why so many Canadians can’t get help for sleep apnea, and what one Canadian sleep expert is doing to change that.” At the link find the title, “Tired of waking up tired? Here’s help, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files whitecoat_20161118_94521.mp3 (MP3 – File)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Trends 71 mins – “Erik Hurst of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the state of the labor market in the United States. Hurst notes dramatic changes in employment rates for men and speculates about the causes. Two factors discussed in detail are declines in the manufacturing sector and the rise of high-end video games as a form of leisure.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Joe Hill Activist 52 mins – “…we’re talking about a new play that explores the trial and execution of labor activist Joe Hill. Playwright and legal scholar Debora Threedy says whether Hill was guilty or not, he didn’t get a fair trial. Her play looks at what went wrong, the efforts to save him, the complicated politics of his case, and how Hill’s words live on in music more than a century after his death. Threedy and researcher Jeremy Harmon join us to talk about the production. It’s called ONE BIG UNION.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Julia Child 29 mins – “Julia Child was the first television celebrity chef and one who broke all the rules. The Current looks back on the life of the American who mastered French cuisine and how the star in her 60s changed the way we eat and how we think about food.” At the link find the title, “Nov 21: ‘The revolutionary in pearls’: Julia Child’s recipe for success,” right-click “Media files current 20161121_51298.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jupiter 63 mins – “What are the conditions for planet formation and the emergence of life, and how does the Solar System work? These are the questions the European Space Agency’s latest JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) mission is seeking to address. In this William Herschel Society lecture, Dr Nigel Bannister, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leicester, talks about the engineering challenges of mounting a mission to the largest planet in the solar system which is scheduled to launch in 2022.” At the link click the “More” rectangle, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Justice Clarence Thomas 52 mins – “President-elect Donald Trump could potentially appoint enough Supreme Court justices to create a conservative majority unmatched in 80 years. Law professor RonNell Andersen Jones says that leaves Justice Clarence Thomas poised to be the “granddaddy of the conservative wing of the court.” So Wednesday, Jones joins us, along with scholar Amy Wildermuth, to talk about Thomas’ personality, his jurisprudence, and the contradictions Jones says make him one of the most interesting justices in generations.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lead Poisoning 46 mins – “[starts at 6 mins] The recent lead contamination crisis in Flint, Michigan has brought the dangers of lead exposure back to the forefront of national discussion.  But the really scary part is that almost everyone is regularly exposed to small amounts of lead — a silent pandemic.  And there is no safe level of lead exposure. Dr. David Bellinger, Professor of Neurology at Harvard University (you may remember him from Episode #58, covering neurotoxins in general) explains the dangers of lead, why lead removal is expensive but worth it, and how to treat lead exposure.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leonard Cohen 47 mins – “Before he died earlier this month, Cohen released a new album with songs that wrestled with mortality, transcendence and the question of God — themes he touched on in this 2006 interview with Terry Gross.” At the link find the title, “Remembering Leonard Cohen, Nov, 2016,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Madness P1 56 mins – “What’s it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit’s end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there’s stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.” At the link find the title, “Wit’s End, Part 1 (Encore June 20),” right-click “Media files ideas_20161116_52884.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Madness P2 56 mins – “What’s it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit’s end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there’s stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.” At the link find the title, “Wit’s End, Part 2 (June 27, 2016),” right-click “Media files ideas_20161117_85873.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maker Revolution 3 mins – “Episode: 3095 Making a Revolution.  Today, the Maker revolution.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Effects 27 mins – ”Legalized marijuana is on its way next year. And one of the big questions looming is what it will mean for Canadian teens. A CBC investigation looks into the potency of today’s pot.” At the link find the title, “Nov 25: How changes in today’s marijuana make it more addictive, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161125_39254.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana and Heart Attacks 3 mins – Researchers report that marijuana use can double user risks of heart attack. At the link find the title, “Interview, Nov 15, 2016,” right-click “Media files SoundsOfScience_Nov14_16.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mathematics 55 mins – “This week, Neil Tyson explores the language of the universe and the life of self-taught math genius Ramanujan. With Jeremy Irons and Matthew Brown from “The Man Who Knew Infinity,” co-host Eugene Mirman, mathematician Ken Ono, Mona Chalabi, and Bill Nye.” At the link click the rectangle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meat Eaters 58 mins – “Eating meat: some say we’ve evolved to do it. It’s in our DNA. It’s how we got our big brains. Now — perhaps more than ever — when it comes to the matter of meat, clear-cut answers can be hard to come by. Kevin Ball serves up the arguments.” At the link find the title, “The Matter of Meat: A history of pros and cons, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas 20161123_83641.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Family Life 9 mins – “Ginger Munson of Bedford has a rare perspective on being part of a military family. She is a veteran herself and her husband, George, serves in the N.H. Army National Guard. They met when they were both serving in Korea. She spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about life in a military family.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Millennials in Parents Homes 47 mins – “The Great Recession is in the rearview mirror. But nearly a third of millennials are still living at home with their parents. And here’s the big change: more Americans aged 18 to 34 are now living with their parents than with romantic partners for the first time since 1880, the first time we kept records. Why are a third of millennials not leaving home? It’s about jobs, loans, rent, pay, late mating. And maybe a culture shift. This hour On Point, millennials, staying home.” (2 guest) At the ink right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mississippi Pioneer Woman 47 mins – “We know that settling the American frontier was not all “Westward Ho!” hat-waving and cowboys singing Oklahoma. But just how hard it could be can elude us. The long-unpublished memoir of Mary Mann Hamilton should set us straight. Her frontier was the untamed Mississippi Delta. Her life was a story of Biblical suffering, labor, loss, fire, flood, isolation, despair – and somehow she lived to 90 and told that story with spirited beauty. This hour On Point, a woman homesteads the Mississippi Delta.”(3 guests) At the ink right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosul Battle 12 mins – “According to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Canadian special forces are in Iraq to train and “empower” against ISIS, but it’s not playing out that way. CBC’s Murray Brewster, embedded with the troops, says he saw them doing much more than that.” At the link find the title, “Nov 21: Embedded CBC journalist Murray Brewster on Canadian special forces mission in Iraq,” right-click “Media files current_20161121_72017.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Multiple Sclerosis 11 mins – “Jeff Cohen from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner School of Medicine discusses the Series—recent therapeutic progress, and remaining challenges.” At the link find the title, “Multiple sclerosis Series: The Lancet: November 23, 2016,” right-click “Media files 23november.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Native American Myths 39 mins – “From textbooks to westerns, Native American history and culture has often been reduced to stereotypes. Today, we’re breaking down the most pervasive myths about American Indians, including their role as welcoming host at Thanksgiving. Then, we’ll tackle an issue many of us will face when getting together with our families tomorrow:  passive aggression. Plus, the crew revisits the tense dinners of holidays passed.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Weapons Control 3 mins – “…President-elect Donald Trump will take control of America’s nuclear arsenal. In a time when nine countries have nuclear weapons, it’s a massive responsibility. But historically, it’s not a responsibility that presidents have borne alone. In the height of the Cold War, US leaders like Presidents Dwight Eisenhower and John Kennedy relied on experienced scientists who had witnessed the devastation caused by nuclear weapons. According to Audra J. Wolfe, a historian of Cold War science, nuclear scientists can help defuse tensions during diplomatic crises. “Scientists can remind the president of the very real damages that those kinds of weapons can do,” she said in an interview. “They can be a voice of reason. They can point to evidence. They can talk about radiation, they can talk about fallout.” In a recent article for The Washington Post, Wolfe looked to history for lessons about this kind of “science diplomacy.” In the 1960s, when the US and Soviet Union were locked in a nuclear arms race, scientists from the two superpowers met on a regular basis — and their work helped limit nuclear testing and prevent nuclear proliferation….In the end, though, nuclear weapons are the responsibility of the commander-in-chief. If a US president decides to order a nuclear strike, there’s little that scientists — or anyone else — can do to stop it.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oklahoma Earthquakes 35 mins – “Joining the gang this week on the Disaster Podcast is past guest from Oklahoma Chris Prutzman. We contacted Chris following an article we found on a recent spate of earthquakes in the Oklahoma region. Co-hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and paramedic Sam Bradley chat with Chris about how prepared the region is to handle these types of incidents. Check it out.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physics Story for Kids 14 mins – “Niraj Lal is a physicist working on improving the efficiency of solar cells. In 2016, he was part of the 5 Under 40 team of scientists who undertook a short residence with ABC RN Science. As well as producing radio and online pieces about his work and other areas of science, Nij has written children’s stories. One is about a flying emu. The short story gently introduces children to physical concepts around flight and the motion of satellites in orbit. Nij reads his story, Henry the emu that could fly.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save LinkAs” from the pop-up menu.

Populism and Elites 60 mins – “What is going on in the Western democracies? From Britain’s vote for Brexit, to Donald Trump’s election victory in America and the growth of populist movements across Europe, voters are expressing their dissatisfaction with the status quo. Economic anxieties go some way to explain the phenomenon, but as with the Brexit decision, people are voting in ways that seem – at least to their critics – likely to harm their own material interests just to give the establishment a bloody nose. In this special Intelligence Squared event, renowned American social psychologist Jonathan Haidt and politician Nick Clegg will examine the complex web of social, moral and political concerns that are driving the unrest. How can we explain the new illiberalism that is growing on both left and right, as authoritarian trends spread across campuses throughout the Anglosphere (the no-platforming of speakers being a typical example)? How should we understand the new ‘culture war’ emerging in Britain, America and elsewhere between the ‘globalists’ and ‘nationalists’? As deputy prime minister during the Coalition government, Clegg witnessed the upheaval in British politics from the inside. Haidt, author of the acclaimed bestseller ‘The Righteous Mind’, has long been studying the moral and cultural drives that divide people into different political camps.” At the lin find the title, “The Rise of Populism and the Backlash Against the Elites, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Premed Gap Year 27 mins – “In this episode, Ryan talks about taking gap years, the pros and cons, what to look at, and what to think about. He specifically mentioned similar questions from two students regarding their concern about taking gap years. Should you take it or not?….” At the link find the title, “PMY 209 : Taking a Gap Year Before Medical School? Should You Do It?,” right-click “Media files PMY209.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Rescues 16 mins – “When migrants making the perilous crossing of the Mediterranean radio for help, Commander Massimo Tozzi would answer the call. The former captain of an Italian military ship shares his experience rescuing desperate refugees wanting to start a new life.” At the link find the title, “Nov 21: Italian Navy Commander recalls ‘devastating’ memories of his year rescuing migrants,” right-click “Media files current_20161121_50464.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Risk Management 60 mins – “This week we’re talking about risks and resources. We speak with Dr. Lianne Lefsrud, Assistant Professor of Engineering Safety and Risk Management in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Alberta, about how engineers think about and evaluate risks, and her research into how language and conversations about resource development have changed over time. Then we’ll talk with Dr. David Sauchyn, Research Professor at the Prairie Adaptation Research Collaborative at the University of Regina about historical patterns of water resources, and how his research is being used for better planning. The Science for the People team are also pleased to welcome a new guest host into our midst! This episode is hosted by Marion Kilgour, a mechanical engineer and long-time friend and fan of the show.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Cowboys 18 mins – “Russia’s latest ambition: To build a steak empire. On today’s show, a fourth-generation American cowboy teaches Russian ranchers how to make American-style steaks. Some things get lost in translation.” At the link find the title, “#738: Russian Cowboys, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161125_pmoney_podcast112516.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Politics 64 mins – “David Satter, Former Moscow Correspondent, Financial Times; Fellow, Hudson Institute; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies; Author Satter was the first U.S. correspondent to be expelled from Russia since the Cold War. He will discuss the criminalization of Russia under Yeltsin and the role of the 1999 apartment bombings in saving the corrupt Yeltsin entourage and elevating Putin to power. He will describe what he says was Putin’s subsequent construction of an autocracy dominated by the security services, and Russia’s emergence as an aggressor state.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Selective Attention 5 mins – “Picture yourself in the grocery store. You’ve got an organized list in your hand and you’re looking for the things on that list. And as you go down the aisles you’re whizzing by dozens, maybe hundreds, of things on the shelves until your eye picks out that one jar of peanut butter that you have on your list. It’s an efficiency technique that helps you find what you’re looking for. So when you’re looking for that jar of peanut butter in the grocery store, you aren’t seeing all the other jars and boxes on the shelves. You’re subconsciously filtering out the items that don’t have anything to do with that peanut butter. This is called “selective attention,” a term you might recognize from psychology 101.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Skin Patch Monitor 27 mins – “A soft electronic skin plaster has been developed that can capture the detailed sound of valves opening and closing in the heart. It could help monitor heart murmurs in people with defective hearts. When the patch is placed on the throat however, it can help gamers give clear voice commands in a noisy room.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Research 27 mins – “Radiation from the sun relentlessly bombards the earth, and our atmosphere protects us from photons and solar wind.  How much does this solar radiation contribute to climate change?  On this program, we’ll visit with Judith Lean, researcher with the Naval Research Laboratory’s Space Science Division.  She’ll talk about solar radiation, solar cycles, and whether these cycles are reflected in the Earth’s ever-increasing surface temperature.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Southwest Airlines Founder 36 mins – “In 1968, competitors sued to keep Herb Kelleher’s new airline grounded. After a 3-year court fight, the first plane took off from Dallas. Today Southwest Airlines operates nearly 4,000 flights a day.” At the link find the title, “Southwest Airlines: Herb Kelleher, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161118_hibt_sw.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

StoryCorps Thanksgiving Stories 48 mins – “Last year, the interview-gathering group StoryCorps launched its Great Thanksgiving Listen. The idea was to get young Americans to sit down with a family elder at Thanksgiving and record family stories.  Some 50,000 recordings poured in. From all kinds of families. Stories and love and joy and hardship and loss and perseverance. Today, StoryCorps founder Dave Isay joins us to share some of that bounty.  This hour On Point, on the eve of Thanksgiving, we listen in on the Great Thanksgiving Listen.” At the ink right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainable Cities 52 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Institute for Sustainable Energy and the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future, and is titled “District Energy in Cities: Unlocking Efficiency, Sustainability and Resiliency through Infrastructure Investment.”  Our speaker is Rob Thornton, President and CEO of the International District Energy Association.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terminal Burrowing 54 mins – “’Tell Me Something I Don’t Know’ is a live game show hosted by Stephen J. Dubner of “Freakonomics Radio.” He has always had a mission: to tell you the things you thought you knew but didn’t, and things you never thought you wanted to know, but do. Now, with “TMSIDK,” he has a new way of doing just that. This new show is still journalism, still factual — but disguised in the most entertaining, unexpected, and occasionally ridiculous conversation you’re likely to hear. Audience contestants come on stage and try to wow a panel of experts with a fascinating fact, a historical wrinkle, a new line of research — anything, really, as long as it’s interesting, useful and true (or at least true-ish). The panel — an ever-changing mix of comedians, brainiacs, and other high achievers — poke and prod the contestants, and ultimately choose a winner. And there’s a real-time, human fact-checker on hand to filter out the bull. This debut episode features Barnard College president Debora Spar, New York Public Library president Tony Marx, and comedian Andy Zaltzman; Jody Avirgan from FiveThirtyEight handles the fact-checking.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thomas Friedman Interview 47 mins – “Three-time Pulitzer Prize winning columnist Tom Friedman told us the world was flat early on, as a metaphor for the globalization that has swept the planet. Now, from Washington to London and maybe beyond, walls seem to be going up. America, the great internationalist since World War II, has elected Donald Trump, who says no to globalism. Friedman says the hyper pace of change can save the world, or destroy it. Says he’s an optimist. This hour On Point, Thomas Friedman on the world now.Thomas L. Friedman, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times op-ed columnist and author. Author of the new book “Thank You For Being Late: An Optimist’s Guide To Thriving in the Age of Accelerations.” At the ink right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trade Policy by US 40 mins – “…hello, everyone, and thank you for joining this Council on Foreign Relations media call looking at the future of U.S. trade policy. I’m Robert McMahon, managing editor of CFR.org, and I’m going to be talking about the follow-on to the presidential elections, in which President-elect Donald Trump targeted U.S. trade policy as a top area of reform. His plan for the first one hundred days in office listed withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, renegotiating NAFTA, and labeling China a currency manipulator as his top three priorities. So with us to help understand trade policy and what could be developing next, we are fortunate to have Edward Alden, CFR senior fellow, and author of the indispensable new book Failure to Adjust: How Americans Got Left Behind in the Global Economy, and Myron Brilliant, who is executive vice president and head of international affairs for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The three of us will be talking for about twenty minutes or so, and then opening up the call to you all.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and the FCC 46 mins – “Robert McDowell and Michael Copps, former commissioners at the Federal Communications Commission, discuss tech issues facing the FCC and the incoming Trump administration.” At the link find the title, “Communicators Roundtable on Technology Issues and the Trump Administration, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.460778.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and the Press 21 mins – “With the failure of hard-hitting investigative reporting to sway voters on election day, and continued hostility from the president-elect, do journalists need to revise their approach in covering Trump?” At the link find the title, “Rethinking how the mainstream media should cover Donald Trump, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161123_92597.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Autocracy 15 mins – “Russian journalist Masha Gessen has lived in Vladimir Putin’s Russia, chronicled his governing style, and profiled the man himself. When she looks at U.S. president-elect Trump, she sees a very similar, autocratic leader in the making.” At the link find the title, “Nov 24: America should not take Trump lightly, says Russian journalist, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161124_45230.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tuberculosis Vaccine 49 mins – “The world is facing a major challenge in producing and supplying enough safe and nutritious food for a growing global population. Vaccination plays a major role in combating this crisis by improving animal health and thereby food security. This podcast from Dr Jean van Den Elsen looks at how our research is improving vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). We’re developing a unique adjuvant protein with the potential to provide easier delivery, increased safety and more accessible vaccination programmes. The technology we have developed is applicable for vaccines against other infectious diseases and could help address needs in areas including autoimmune disease and cancer.” At the link click the rectangle with three dots, right-click “Download” and slect “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkish Politics 66 mins – “A distinguished panel will discuss the unsettled situation in Turkey, one of the most important countries in the Middle East, after the unsuccessful coup attempt, a tightening of control by the regime of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and increased terrorism by Islamic State.” (4 guests) At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Veteran Flight Training 57 mins – “In episode 119 we answer listener mail. We have some great information on using VA benefits for aviation training and advice on accelerated versus non-accelerated training.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Science 54 mins – “New StarTalk All-Stars hosts, astrophysicists Summer Ash and Emily Rice, share their take on “Women Crushing It Wednesday” – reclaiming a sexist hashtag by celebrating women in STEM and examining the challenges women scientists face. Chuck Nice co-hosts.” At the link click the rectangle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Women P1 27 mins – “Unemployment rates in India have shot up in recent years, and around twice as many women are out of work compared with their male counterparts. Divya Arya travels across India meeting some of the women who are challenging gender stereotypes and breaking down social taboos in order to find work in areas traditionally the preserve of men.” At the link find the title, “Jobs for the Girls – Part One, Nov, 2016” right-click “Media files p04h7rv6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One Stories 52 mins – “At the center of author Richard Rubin’s latest book, The Last of the Doughboys, are several dozen extraordinary individuals, all more than a century old, all now passed away. They were the final survivors of the millions who made up the American forces that fought in World War I, 19th-century men and women living in the 21st century. Rubin’s book chronicles their remarkable stories and he joins us to to relate how the forgotten war and its forgotten veterans created the modern world. Richard Rubin has written for the New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, The Atlantic and Smithsonian. He’s the author of the book Confederacy of Silence. His latest book is called The Last of the Doughboys: The Forgotten Generation and Their Forgotten World War. At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zapruder Filmer 27 mins – “Whether you’re old enough to remember the assassination of JFK, the image that likely comes to mind is from an amateur film shot by Abraham Zapruder. His granddaughter shares the story of how the 486 frames of film still haunts America.” At the link find the title, “Nov 22: The personal history behind Zapruder’s JFK assassination film,” Media files current 20161122_35490.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 263 – Nov 25, 2016: African Nationalism, Ai Weiwei, Alt Right, Alt School, Anthropocene Epoch, Architectural Acoustics, Asteroid Impact, Attention Overload, Australian Aboriginal Music, Australian Indigenous Family Abuse, Bamboo Club Story, Black Holes, Blind Devices, Blind Kids and Smartphones, Blockchain Uses, Breech Births, British Rule in India, Broadband in Nebraska, Cancer Survivor Outcomes, Chicago Gun Violence, Child Raising, Climate and Health, Climate Talks, Connections, Corn History, Dakota Pipeline Protest and Facebook, Damages Calculations, Debt Collectors, Decision Making, Diarrhea, Digital Politics, Disabled Employment, Dog Training, Drone Strikes, Economics Noble Prize, Education in Inner Cities, Election Predictions, Emotional Intelligence, Employment Trends, European Union, Facebook Influence, Fake News, Food Waste, Francis Ford Coppola, Free Will, Gender Pay Gap, Hate Crimes, Health Care Innovation, Healthcare Under Trump, Hiring People, Holocaust Author, Honey, Hydroelectric Hazards, Immigration History, Industrial Science, International Criminal Court, Investment Q and A, Job Ends, Justinian Legal Code, Man’s Impact, Marijuana Legalization, Martin Luther King Death, Mathematics as Art, Meditation, Military Veterans in Workplace, Mindfulness, Narcan Warriors, Negative Emissions, Obama’s America, On the Media Goals, Patient Zero Myth, Pay Raises, Podcasting Styles, Police Abuses, Police Powers Online, Politics in Iceland, Pornography Status, Psychotherapy, RCMP Misconduct, Refugees in 1943, Rhythm Impact, Rumors for Profit, Science Education Problem, Self-driving Cars, South Africa Sanitation Problems, Statistics, Stephen Bannon, Surveillance Countermeasures, Texting for Health, Tidiness, Transgender Issues, Trump Trump Trump, Turkey Coup Backlash, Utopian Groups History, Video Games for Good, Virtual Engineering, Voting Concerns, Wine in California, Working Women, Workplace Diversity

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 108 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 304 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 12,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 350 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

African Nationalism 30 mins – “African affairs writer and lecturer Margery Perham discusses the effects of colonialism in tropical Africa. In 1939 she became the first female fellow of Nuffield College at Oxford University before being appointed as Director of the Oxford Institute of Colonial Studies in 1945. In her Reith series entitled ‘The Colonial Reckoning’, she highlights problems of colonial rule. In this lecture entitled ‘African Nationalism’, she explores the positive side of anti-colonialism, which is emancipation. She discusses how and why this force has started and tries to explain how it has led to African freedom from British and French rule. She analyses some of the converging events and influences which have turned the world into a hot-house for the forced and rapid growth of African nationalism.” At the link find the title, “African Nationalism, “ right-click Media files p02r6696.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ai Weiwei 56 mins – “Chinese artist Ai Weiwei in conversation with Eleanor Wachtel about his beautiful and subversive art and about his fight for freedom and democracy in China.” At the link find the title, “Wachtel on the Arts – Ai Weiwei, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161114_93544.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alt Right 50 mins – “In the months leading up to the election, some fake news stories generated more engagement on Facebook than real news stories. We consider the landscape of misinformation and how to separate truth from fiction. Plus: Steve Bannon, Trump’s chief strategist, hasn’t just influenced political discourse through the incendiary Breitbart News — he’s also sabotaged his chosen politicians through investigative journalism. And we interview a man who the Southern Poverty Law Center calls the “cultivated, cosmopolitan face of white supremacy” to find out what he wants wants from the Trump administration.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alt School 29 mins – “”We have an opportunity to do what we want – choose our path instead of the teachers making a choice for us.” Meet Piper, a blond, freckled 9-year-old from Brooklyn who talks like a seasoned grownup. She used to go to public school with Manoush’s son but now – with the help of financial aid – she’s enrolled in a new experimental school in her neighborhood: AltSchool. AltSchool is not your typical private school. Its founder is Max Ventilla, a former Google executive with a vision to reform education. Ventilla’s company, with over 100 million dollars from investors like Mark Zuckerberg and Marc Andreesen, uses tech to teach and track students’ social and academic skills. Ventilla’s idea is that over time, that data can build a more thorough picture of each student and determine how she is taught. This method of “personalized learning” (think Montessori 2.0) is being prototyped in eight “micro-schools” in Palo Alto, San Francisco, and New York City, with the goal of applying it to schools everywhere….” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” from the pop-up menu.

Anthropocene Epoch 27 mins – “Human impacts on the way our planet functions have now become so extreme many scientists are claiming the Earth has shifted out of the Holocene state and into a new geological epoch. They’re calling it ‘The Anthropocene’, the new age of humans, because millions of years after we are gone, the scar of our existence will be visible in the rocks of tomorrow. In this episode we look at how the last 60 years of socio economic growth has transformed the human race into a geological force to rival nature.” (Good video.) At the link right-click “download video mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Architectural Acoustics 21 mins – “There are two primary ways to control the sound of a space: active acoustics and passive acoustics. Passive acoustics are the materials in a space, like the padding in our studio or wooden floors or plaster walls. Materials like carpeting and drapery soak up sound, while materials like glass and porcelain make a room more echoey. Active acoustics are sound systems that use technology like speakers and microphones to boost or minimize certain sounds in a space…and the sonic control they offer can be dynamic and variable and quite dramatic.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asteroid Impact 27 mins – “The results from drilled geological samples of the Chicxulub crater have just been published. The crater off the coast of Mexico is thought to have been made by a meteor striking the Earth 66 million years ago. The strike and resultant ‘sterilisation effects’ on the planet are thought to play a major role in the demise of the dinosaurs. Core samples from the inner ring of the crater show that the impact was massive. Rocks from over 20 km down were brought up to the surface….” Also presented is oldest ice, insects and LED light, bees and light, and animal-free food. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Attention Overload 29 mins – “Think about where you go to find news. Podcasts? WNYC? The New York Times? Facebook? Twitter? Newsletters? Do you want us to stop asking questions? Welcome to the Attention Economy. There is fierce competition for your eyes and ears — (thank you for choosing correctly). Media companies know that a good way to find an audience is to write and speak like the people they’re trying to reach. It’s the reason Buzzfeed, Vice, Mashable and so many others are popular with Snake People. Identity Media is a big part of why theSkimm — a newsletter that targets Millennial women by rounding up the day’s news from Kanye West to Ban Ki-moon — has over 3.5 million subscribers. You might be one of them. This week we talked to theSkimm co-founders Carly Zakin and Danielle Weisberg about how they go about presenting the news. Identity Media is more than just a business model, it’s changing how we consume the news. To try and sort out why this “Skimm” approach to serious stories made her feel a little queasy, Manoush talked to John Herrman. He reports on the media for the New York Times. Together, Manoush and John embark on a mission to answer that age-old question: Do Justin Bieber and Hiroshima belong in the same sentence?….” At the link circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Aboriginal Music 27 mins – “Country music is commonly associated with downtrodden, lovelorn, white inhabitants of America’s rural south, but it has also long been a significant form of expression for Australia’s Aboriginal peoples. Country music became popular ‘down under’ during the first half of the 20th Century. Thanks to gramophone recordings, wind-up radios and touring bands, it even reached the bush where most Aboriginals lived, often more or less imprisoned on missions and government-controlled reserves. At a time when their own cultural heritage was being systematically erased, country music became a medium through which they could maintain their practice of sharing stories via the oral tradition. Its resonance was enhanced by melodies which tended towards the melancholic. As one musician put it “country music was all about loss, and we’d lost everything”. Through country music, Aboriginal people were able to give voice to their personal experiences and ongoing struggles for justice. Songs describe, for example, how babies and land were stolen, incidents of racism, poor living conditions, and high levels of incarceration. Country music, far from its origins, has thus become a deeply moving and powerful Aboriginal activism art form. With contributions from Auriel Andrew, Kev Carmody, Roger Knox, Sue Ray, Glenn Skuthorpe and Clinton Walker.” At the link find the title, “Country Down Under, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04gg5gt.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Indigenous Family Abuse 75 mins – “Three outspoken & fearless Aboriginal women: Professor Marcia Langton, Councillor Jacinta Price & lawyer/businesswomen Josephine Cashman speak on the topic Ending the Violence in Indigenous Communities.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Ending the Violence in Indigenous Communities, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_IndigViolence_1711_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bamboo Club Story 48 mins – “The Bamboo club was built for the people of St Pauls, in Bristol, England – the people who were victimised or not welcome elsewhere because of the colour of their skin. We hear from dozens of people who were members, musicians, or simply occasional visitors. They all share the same idea that there were two themes running through the club – community and music.” At the link find the title, “The Story of the Bamboo Club, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04gxg57.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Holes 55 mins – “If light can’t escape from black holes, how can we observe them at all? Find out from astrophysicist Janna Levin, co-host Matt Kirshen, and Shep Doeleman, the MIT astrophysicist leading the Event Horizon Telescope project to study black hole Sgr A* at the center of our galaxy.” At the link click “More” under the sound bar, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Devices 20 mins – “Peter White talks about guide dog waiting lists with BBC reporter and guide dog owner Ian Hamilton, who’s been waiting for a replacement dog for over six months. Ian Macrae and Hazel Dudley look at accessible watches. Ian reviews the smart watch from Apple and Hazel shows Peter two talking watches by Verbalise which she describes as ‘dressy’. Joy Addo presents her first column on being a blind Mum.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Kids and Smartphones 21 mins – “The Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired is stocked with all kinds of gadgets: singing calculators, talking typewriters, even video games that you navigate using only sound. Most are specialized and expensive — the school can afford them, but a lot of families can’t. There is one piece of tech, however, that almost every student has, and, absolutely every student wants. It’s a status symbol, it’s a social media machine, and it will read text out loud. Yes, it’s an iPhone. And ‘reading’ on a smartphone is gaining prominence as a reliable tool for the visually impaired. However this tool is the center of a larger question blind students and society at large are facing: Are iPads and iPhones rendering Braille obsolete? And if so, should advocates for the visually impaired be worried? At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Uses 15 mins – “Say hello to the decentralized economy — the blockchain is about to change everything. In this lucid explainer of the complex (and confusing) technology, Bettina Warburg describes how the blockchain will eliminate the need for centralized institutions like banks or governments to facilitate trade, evolving age-old models of commerce and finance into something far more interesting: a distributed, transparent, autonomous system for exchanging value.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Breech Births 27 mins – “Ottawa midwife Betty-Anne Daviss is a rare breed in health care. She does vaginal breech births.” At the link find the title, “Into the breech,” right-click “Download Into the breech” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Rule In India 29 mins – “This year’s Reith Lecturer is British lawyer Lord Radcliffe. He was Director-General of the Ministry of Information during the Second World War, and is most famous for his role in Partition, the division of the British Indian Empire, His work led directly to the creation of Pakistan and India as independent nations. He examines the features of democratic society, and considers the problematic notions of power and authority in his series of seven Reith Lectures entitled ‘Power and the State’. In his fifth Reith lecture entitled ‘British Rule in India’, Lord Radcliffe examines the early years of British administration in India. He argues that period until the Indian Mutiny succeeded more as a result of the character of its institutions than their excellence. He suggests this offers a classic example of how men really respond to the stimulus of great authority.” At the link find the title, “British Rule in India,” right-click “Media files p02r7nzn.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Nebraska 30 mins – “When we last spoke to people from Lincoln, Nebraska, about their innovative conduit program to improve Internet access, we focused on how they had done it – Conduits Lead to Competition, podcast 182. For this week and episode 228 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast, we focus more on the community benefits their approach has led to. We are once again joined by David Young, Fiber Infrastructure and Right of Way Manager in the Public Works Department. We offer a shorter background about the history of the project before focusing on the franchise they developed with local ISP Allo. Allo is building citywide Fiber-to-the-Home and has agreed to provision 15 VLANs at every endpoint. We talk about what that means and implications for schools specifically.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Survivor Outcomes 9 mins – “Highlights of new articles published in Annals of Internal Medicine.” which focus on poor quality of outcomes for cancer survivors. At the link find the title, “Issue Summary November 15, 2016,” right-click “Media files annals_20161115.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chicago Gun Violence 47 mins – “We sit down in Chicago with former Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. He’s trying to tackle Chicago’s violence with jobs.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Raising 11 mins – “Now that the election is over, many families are now asking “What next?” A psychologist offers suggestions for productive ways to move forward. A weekly thought-provoking conversation about the top topics and thorny issues around children of all ages. From the cloth vs disposable diaper debate to how to afford your kid’s college tuition, we talk to people, parents and experts, hoping to rediscover the meaning of family in the modern age.” At the link right-click “Download’ near the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate and Health 12 mins – “Nick Watts discusses the Lancet Countdown paper about importance of climate change to health, and tracking alterations to create positive changes for human health.” At the link find the title, “The Lancet Countdown: The Lancet: November 13, 2016,” right-click “Media files13november-countdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Talks 28 mins – “While the world has held climate talks for 22 years (This is COP – Conference of the Parties — 22) and the Kyoto Protocol talks about climate change have been held for 12 years, this year’s October’s climate talks in Paris mark the first time that  “entry into force” has been achieved.  You might think of “entry into force” as the time when a critical number of nations are ready to develop global treaties regarding climate and pollution and its effects around the world.  The 1st world meeting ever to talk about “Entry into Force” on climate issues is taking place right now, in Marrakech, Morocco.  200 nations have gathered to discuss these issues.  The meetings began just before the US elections.  Now Donald Trump is President Elect, and he has signaled that he will pull back from many of the nation’s current plans to reduce pollution and combat climate change.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Connections 68 mins – “Legendary science historian James Burke returns to explain his newest project, a Connections app that will allow anyone to “think connectively” about the webs of knowledge available on Wikipedia. Burke predicted back in 1978 that we’d one day need better tools than just search alone if we were to avoid the pitfalls of siloed information and confirmation bias, and this month he launched a Kickstarter campaign to help create just such a tool – an app that searches connectivity and produces something Google and social media often don’t – surprises, anomalies, unexpected results, and connections, in the same style as his documentary series, books, and other projects. In the interview, Burke shares his latest insights on change, technology, the future, social media, models of reality, and more. To support the Kickstarter campaign for the Connections app, here are some links: jbconnectionsapp.com, knowledgediscoveries.com, kck.st/2eIg21RAt the link right-click “Direct download: 089-Connections-James Burke.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corn History 31 mins – “Corn. It ultimately has a role in so much of what we eat.  From a sweet corn cob on the 4th of July, to the calories that made the steak possible, to fuel in our gas tanks, to the sweetness in a soda, corn is a central player.  This week’s podcast is an interview with one of the world’s leading experts in corn genetics, Dr. John Doebley from the University of Wisconsin.  Dr. Doebley is the world’s leading authority on the genetic events that made modern corn, the individual steps in domestication thousands of years ago, that can be traced back to discrete changes in DNA.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dakota Pipeline Protest and Facebook 56 mins – “The months-long protest against the North Dakota Access Pipeline finally received mainstream attention this week after a misdirection campaign on Facebook, but to what end? Plus, making sense of what you’ve been told about Russia’s role in the election; Bob talks to Glenn Beck about his recent transformation; and the all-too-predictable fallout from hiring partisans as cable news pundits.” At the link find the title, “On Shaky Ground, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files otm110416pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Damages Calculations 39 mins – “People tell little white lies all day long, to be polite, avoid confrontation…or just because they seem so harmless. Today, how wearing down our truth telling muscles affects the brain. Then, a reporter looks at the established legal practice of using race, class and gender to to calculate damages in wrongful death and injury cases – the result? Women and minorities lives are worth less. Plus, New Hampshire author Jacquelyn Benson talks about feminism, Indiana Jones, and the unconventional romance in her debut novel, The Smoke Hunter.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Debt Collectors 26 mins – “The story of a guy who tried to make something of himself by getting into a rough business. And the story of a time when the world went wild for debt.” At the link find the title, “#574: The Buffalo Talk-Off, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161116_pmoney_podcast111616.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Decision Making 35 mins – “Some of our most important decisions are shaped by something as random as the order in which we make them. The gambler’s fallacy, as it’s known, affects loan officers, federal judges — and probably you too. How to avoid it? The first step is to admit just how fallible we all are.” At the linkclick the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diarrhea 60 mins – “This week we’re taking on maggots, wounds, and diarrhea in an episode about medical problems that plague the military, so make sure your last meal is a few hours behind you before you tuck in your ear buds. We speak with Captain Mark Riddle, the director of the United States Military Diarrheal Disease Vaccine Research Program at the US Army Medical Research and Material Command, about new ways to prevent and treat travelers’ diarrhea. And we talk with George Peck, a medical entomologist, about using maggots to help wounds heal.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at end of sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Politics 52 mins – “In Donald Trump’s Presidential victory speech, he struck a tone that some found hard to believe after the vitriolic race. He called on Republicans, Democrats, and independents to “come together as one united people.” But if you’ve been on social media recently, you know that’s a tall order. So Thursday, we’re looking at the state of polarization in the country and the internet’s effect on our political views. We’ll also talk to activists who are imagining a “Reunited” America. On Saturday, November 12, Salt Lake Civil Network, Village Square and other community organizations are hosting the 2016 Utah Citizen Summit. The event is a gathering of citizens and leaders interested in productive conversation across political and social divides.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Employment 56 mins – “Joyce welcomes disability leader, Christine Griffin, and executive director of the Disability Law Center of Massachusetts to the show. Also included will be Tony Coelho, author of the Americans with Disabilities Act. They will discuss the future for people with disabilities in 2017 and beyond.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dog Training 123 mins – “Susan Garrett (@susangarrett) is an incredible dog trainer. She has a B.Sc. in animal science, and for more than two decades has been one of the most consistently successful competitors in the sport of dog agility. Susan has been on the podium of the world and national championship events more than 50 times, winning those events a total of 38 times. She was of great help to me when I first adopted Molly, my own pup, and her book Shaping Success (The Education of an Unlikely Champion) was selected as the 2005 dog training and behavior book of the year. Susan is a champ not only for her competitive track record, but for her ability to convey concrete tips and recommendations for: The most critical exercises for your dog; The three types of reinforcement; How to use crates properly; What you should do in the first 24 hours of adopting a puppy; How training a dog is like training an Olympic athlete…” At the link find the title, “#200: Susan Garrett — Master Dog (and Human) Trainer,” right-click “Media files The Tim Ferriss Show-Susan Garrett.mp3”

Drone Strikes 21 mins – “The Obama White House created guidelines to control targeted killings and drone strikes but they are not enforceable and not open to judicial review. The Current looks at how Obama’s anti-terror track record feeds into Trump’s anti-terror Inheritance.” At the link find the title, “Nov. 15: U.S. drone warfare needs more oversight and controls, says lawyer, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161115_14060.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics Nobel Prize 26 mins – “What happens when a creativity guru meets the winner of this year’s Nobel Memorial Prize in economics? You get life lessons in making art, and negotiating contracts.” At the link find the title, “#736: Messy Nobel, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161118_pmoney podcast111816.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education in Inner Cities 12 mins – “Define students by what they contribute, not what they lack — especially those with difficult upbringings, says educator Victor Rios. Interweaved with his personal tale of perseverance as an inner-city youth, Rios identifies three straightforward strategies to shift attitudes in education and calls for fellow educators to see “at-risk” students as “at-promise” individuals brimming with resilience, character and grit.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Election Predictions 28 mins – “On the morning after election day, pundits, pollsters, politicians, and citizens woke up feeling stunned. All signs, all year, had been pointing towards a victory for Democrat Hillary Clinton. So, what happened? We ask one of the few people who didn’t get it wrong: the historian Allan Lichtman.” At the link find the title, “Episode 51: What Happened? Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161114_hiddenbrain_51.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emotional Intelligence 30 mins – “Betty Liu, journalist, author, podcaster, and host of Bloomberg Television’s “In The Loop”, talks with us about her career and lessons she’s learned along the way. Betty shares her take on having a strong network, and the importance of emotional intelligence for success.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Employment Trends 56 mins – “New projections for the labor market what skills will be needed in the Granite State. Governor-elect Sununu’s business experience has grabbed the attention and hopes of business owners. Concern is rising about New Hampshire’s poorly funded public employee retirement plans.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

European Union 53 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Center for the Study of Europe, and the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, and is titled “In The European Night: Will The Union Survive?”  Our speaker is media activist and philosopher, Franco Berardi.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Influence 9 mins – “Those viral, fake news stories may have had a bigger impact on the U.S. presidential election then many people realize, according to MIT’s Sherry Turkle. She says internet and digital technology play a big role in political discourse and in real life.” At the link find the title,”Nov 17: Facebook, online culture, coarsened political discourse, says Sherry Turkle, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161117_56560.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 36 mins – “Last week’s election told us many things. Perhaps chief among them is how divided we are. We don’t agree on our most pressing problems, nor their solutions. Many say these divisions come from our increasingly segregated social media universes. We self-select of news and information to reinforce our respective worldviews, a development that’s particularly troubling given that much of what’s on Facebook and other social media isn’t news at all. It’s manufactured false information that brings in lucrative ad revenue but leaves us sorely misinformed. Join us to discuss how social media is shaping our world.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Food Waste 29 mins – “Five years ago, when we first started covering the food waste issue, America was throwing away enough food to fill the Rose Bowl every day. And, unfortunately, not much has happened to change that statistic. But this week on Sea Change Radio, we talk to someone who’s doing his best to change the status quo. First, we dig into the archives from 2011 as food waste expert, blogger and author of American Wasteland, Jonathan Bloom, gives us some perspective on the amount of food we waste from field to fridge in this country. Then, we hear from David Rodriguez, a Mexican immigrant turned Boston-based entrepreneur, who tells us about his startup company Food For All, a mobile app that allows diners a chance to purchase leftover food from restaurants at a steep discount.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Waste 56 mins – “In the U.S., about a third of all food produced is never eaten.  Yet, one in eight Americans struggle to put food on the table. And it’s not just the leftovers in the back of the refrigerator; it happens at every point along the supply chain. We’ll hear about a growing anti-waste movement and delve into the environmental consequences of food waste as well possible solutions that may help address issues of scarcity.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Francis Ford Coppola 76 mins – “Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather is universally praised as one of the greatest films ever made. The 1972 epic won best picture and best screenplay Oscars and was subsequently followed by two successful sequels. Join us for a rare conversation with Francis Coppola, who will take us behind the scenes of these legendary films, as spelled out in his just-published book, The Godfather Notebook. Here’s a chance to learn about Brando, Pacino, the casting and the filmmaking, along with the personal and professional qualities that turned director Francis Coppola into an American icon. An offer you truly can’t refuse.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Will 32 mins – “Free will has been debated by philosophers and theologians for centuries. Neuroscientists and psychologists have now entered the fray – but what new light can they shed? And just how free are we when it comes to “free” will? Arguably one of the oldest conundrums in the book, the paradox of free will has haunted scientists and philosophers alike for centuries. It would appear that we, as conscious agents, are able to make choices that change the world around us, despite many of the known laws of nature being deterministic. But is this freedom of choice all an illusion created by the conscious mind? And ultimately, is it even possible to act outside the bounds of our environment, our upbringing, and our genetic makeup? To delve into this and more, Ian Sample speaks to neurophilosopher and pragmatist Professor Patricia Churchland – who believes the key to studying free will lies in self-control and intention. We also hear from the University of Ghent’s Dr Marcel Brass how science is attempting to reveal more about the nature of free will through experimentation. Finally, Yale University’s Adam Bear explains how the conscious mind might play a role in the illusory nature of decision-making.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Pay Gap 33 mins – “Jean Chatzky is not just a personal finance expert, she’s an experienced journalist, best-selling author, entrepreneur, and much more. In this episode, she shares how she got to be the person she is now, and shares some useful personal finance tips.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Crimes 15 mins – “On February 10, 2015, Suzanne Barakat’s brother Deah, her sister-in-law Yusor and Yusor’s sister Razan were murdered by their neighbor in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The perpetrator’s story, that he killed them over a traffic dispute, went unquestioned by the media and police until Barakat spoke out at a press conference, calling the murders what they really were: hate crimes. As she reflects on how she and her family reclaimed control of their narrative, Barakat calls on us to speak up when we witness hateful bigotry and express our allyship with those who face discrimination.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Incidents 21 mins – “Amidst multiple reports of racist attacks and expressions of hate, there are concerns that the outcome of the U.S. presidential election there will enable and normalize hate crimes here in Canada — even when every day racism already exists.” At the link find the title, “Nov 16: Trump win gives ‘permission’ to racists, but hate crimes are nothing new in Canada, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161116_98383.mp3” and select ‘Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Innovation 58 mins – “Michael Ackermann, CEO of a med-tech startup that created a tear-stimulation device for those with dry-eye disease, explains how acquisition by a global pharmaceutical giant is helping him achieve his goal of reaching as many patients as possible. Ackermann, a graduate of the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign, also discusses why big tech companies have yet to disrupt healthcare and how that translates into big opportunities for entrepreneurs.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Healthcare Under Trump 46 mins – “Republicans in Congress have voted more than 50 times to repeal the Affordable Care Act without success. Now, they have an ally in President-elect Donald Trump, who promised on the campaign trail to “repeal and replace” the law. But over the weekend, Trump seemed to soften his stance. He told the Wall Street Journal he would consider leaving in place some provisions, including one that prohibits insurers from denying coverage for pre-existing conditions. Guest host Susan Page and guests discuss the future of President Obama’s signature legislation in a Trump administration and with a Republican congress.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Hiring People 26 mins – “You know that whole thing about hiring the best person for the job? Turns out, it’s not that easy. So how do applicants find out whether a job and workplace is right for them? And how do employers improve their strike-rate? The good news is there are plenty of ways we can improve the hiring process, as you’ll hear from the Dr Keri Spooner of the Wentworth Institute, Nova Franklin from Meld Studios and Laszlo Bock, responsible for recruitment at Google.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Holocaust Author 62 mins – “Saul Friedländer is widely regarded as one of the quintessential experts on the Holocaust. Forty years after his Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece, The Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945, Friedländer returns with When Memory Comes: The Later Years, bridging the gap between the ordeals of his childhood and his present-day towering reputation in the field of Holocaust studies. After abandoning his youthful conversion to Catholicism, he rediscovered his Jewish roots as a teenager and built a new life in Israeli politics and a lifelong fascination with Jewish life and history. Friedländer went on to spend his adulthood shuttling between Israel, Europe and the United States, armed with his talent for language and an expansive intellect. Join us for a rare conversation with this renowned historian, who will share his personal story and his insights on the relevance of the Holocaust to the world of 2016.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honey 43 mins – “Honey seems like a simple, comforting food, slathered on toast, spooned down to soothe sore throats, and beloved of bears, both plush and real. In reality, this sticky combination of bee spit and evaporated nectar is a powerful and ancient ingredient. For much of history, honey was humanity’s main source of sweetness, as well as our first vehicle for getting drunk. Unlike table sugar, honey also comes in an infinite variety of textures and flavors, influenced by the two million blossoms from which each jar is made. And, from ancient Egypt to modern medicine, honey has been valued for its healing powers. Join us this episode as we get stuck in the sweet stuff.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hydroelectric Hazard 3 mins – “The hidden environmental costs of hydroelectric power revealed.” At the link find the title, “Episode 710 – November 14, 2016,”right-click “Media files ScienceElements_Nov14_2016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Immigration History 60 mins– “Economist George Borjas examines the impact of immigration on the U.S. economy throughout history. He is interviewed by Edward Alden, senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and author of [The Closing of the American Border].” At the link find the title, “After Words with George Borjas,, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.457662.MP3-STD.mp3After Words with George Borjas” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Industrial Science 15 mins – “This year’s Reith Lecturer is the Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh Sir Edward Appleton. From 1939 to 1949 he was Secretary of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, and in 1947 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his contributions to the knowledge of the ionosphere, which led to the development of radar. In his Reith series entitled ‘Science and the Nation’, he considers the importance of science. In his fifth lecture entitled ‘Industrial Science’, Professor Appleton considers the functional uses of science. He explores the scientific research work carried out by industries in order to produce better products, and analyses how automation is expanding this kind of science.” At the link find the title, “Industrial Science,” right-click “Media files p02r79k9.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

International Criminal Court 26 mins – “From Brexit, to Trump, to some countries leaving the International Criminal Court. Are we entering a new, post co-operative world? The Current looks at the increased appetite for countries to “go it alone” and increased protectionism around the world.” At the link find the title, “Nov 17: From Brexit to Trump, are we entering a post co-operative world? Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161117_87281.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Q and A’s 54 mins – “What will market do under President Trump? And 12 other important investment Q&A’s. When Paul addressed members of the community in a seminar co-sponsored by the Bainbridge Community Foundation on Nov. 3, 2016, he was unable to answer all questions at the time but agreed to do so through this special podcast. Here are the questions addressed on this podcast: 1. What is the best source to determine the asset class of each mutual fund? 2. 8% seems like a high rate of return. Is it really a reasonable assumption for future growth? 3. Is it possible to get 8% with 20% or more in bonds? 4. What benchmark should I use to evaluate the performance of a portfolio? 5. Do you read the prospectuses that mutual fund companies send you? 6. How do you determine the total cost of owning funds like Vanguard? What about 401k fees? 7. Most U.S. companies are global. What percent of you have in international funds? 8. According to research only 15% of actively managed funds exceed the long term returns of the S&P 500. Why not invest most of your money in S&P 500 index funds or ETFs? 9. What is the difference between growth and value companies? Should you own both kinds? 10. What happens to the market when we have a cyber attack or the election ends undecided? (Note this was asked before the Presidential election) 11. My wife has followed your recommendations for years while I invest in individual stocks. Do think it is possible to compromise? And should we compromise? 12. There are so many index funds. Which are the most appealing? 13. How do you expect the market to do if Trump gets elected? (In my answer I address the reason I thought it was likely for Trump to win)” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Ends 26 mins – “’Your first loyalty is to your own career,’ says Patty McCord. “We need to all be more honest about that.” Patty McCord helped grow Netflix from their days of renting DVDs via the US postal service to being a global producer and provider of streaming videos. If you wanted to work and stay at Netflix, you had to impress Patty McCord. She has all kinds of wisdom to share about when your career’s best served by finding a new job and advice on firing someone if it’s time for them to go.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Justinian Legal Code 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the ideas brought together under Justinian I, Byzantine emperor in the 6th century AD, which were rediscovered in Western Europe in the Middle Ages and became very influential in the development of laws in many European nations and elsewhere.” (3 guests) At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Man’s Impact 28 mins – “The Vice-President of the Conservation Foundation in Washington, DC and renowned ecologist Sir Frank Fraser Darling explores the concept of Man’s responsibility for his natural environment in his Reith series entitled ‘Wilderness and Plenty’. In his second lecture entitled ‘Impact of Man on His Environment’, Sir Fraser Darling explores the continuous affect of man on his natural habitat. Taking examples from prehistoric man, the industrial revolution and modern day technology, he considers whether man has taken all he can from the world to increase growth and development. He explores and criticises how politics and political policies have had a lasting affect on the contamination of the world and its ecology.” At the link find the title, “Impact of Man on His Environment,” right-click “Media files p02qslk7.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Legalization 56 mins – “Four out of five states with ballot measures this year to legalize recreational marijuana did so, including our neighbors Maine and Massachusetts. We find out what this might mean for similar efforts in New Hampshire, and the impact on federal laws.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martin Luther King Death 30 mins – “In 1968, just hours after Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, the future Pulitzer Prize–winning author Garry Wills—then a young writer for Esquire—rushed to Memphis, Tennessee, where he watched as King’s body was embalmed at the mortuary; later, Wills traveled twelve hours by bus with mourners to King’s funeral in Atlanta. Nearly fifty years after its publication, Wills’s “Martin Luther King Jr. Is Still on the Case!” remains one of the most revealing and lasting portraits of King and his turbulent era ever written. Writer and director John Ridley—who won an Oscar for his screenplay for 12 Years a Slave—joins host David Brancaccio to discuss why Wills’s wrenching profile of King continues to resonate today, what has changed in America since it was written, and, most important, what still needs to change.” At the link find the title, “Martin Luther King Jr Is Still on the Case! by Garry Wills, Nov, 2016,” right-click “ Media files Martin-Luther-King-is-Still-on-the-Case-by-Garry-Wills.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mathematics as Art 17 mins – “Unlock the mysteries and inner workings of the world through one of the most imaginative art forms ever — mathematics — with Roger Antonsen, as he explains how a slight change in perspective can reveal patterns, numbers and formulas as the gateways to empathy and understanding.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation 62 mins – “I’m excited to bring you a little taste test of a new show format that I’ve been working on — The Tim Ferriss Radio Hour. After 200 conversations with a variety of fascinating people, including Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jamie Foxx, Tony Robbins, Maria Popova, Peter Thiel, Marc Andreessen, Amanda Palmer, Malcolm Gladwell, Rick Rubin, Reid Hoffman, Chase Jarvis, Sam Harris, Rainn Wilson, and so many others, I started to spot patterns. This is the premise of my new book Tools of Titans, which is a compilation of all of my favorite habits, philosophies, and tools of world-class performers… In this episode, we’ll be exploring meditation and mindfulness. You’ll hear from Chase Jarvis as he explains his top priorities for feeling fulfilled. I talk transcendental meditation with Arnold Schwarzenegger. I cover a wide spectrum with Sam Harris, and ask him about everything from hallucinogens to meditation techniques. And then I wrap up with Rainn Wilson, discussing how to handle life when you feel overwhelmed.” At the link find the title, “#201: The Tim Ferriss Radio Hour: Meditation, Mindset, and Mastery,”right-click “Media files The Tim Ferriss Show Radio Hour Meditation.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Veterans in Workplace 21 mins – “Amanda Veinott is passionate about creating career opportunities for veterans when they return to civilian life. In this episode she shares why hiring veterans is good for business, why career transitions are so tough, why internships are important and what is her best piece of advise for people in the military.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mindfulness 26 mins – “Mindfulness is quite the buzzword these days. Especially within Silicon Valley, where many tech workers have been known to seek out guidance and spiritual direction in Eastern practices. HBO’s Silicon Valley parodied the trend with a tech company CEO who seems to be attached at the hip to his spiritual advisor. Putting fiction aside though, we’ve talked a lot about information overload and our addiction to our gadgets. We’re living in a world where it is challenging to be mindful. And, well, we all can’t afford to have a spiritual guru following us around non-stop. So, we brought in an actual spiritual advisor from the actual Silicon Valley to help bring us more kindness, compassion, and happiness (especially during this election season). His name is Chade-Meng Tan and he’s a former Google software engineer … In his quest, he recently wrote Joy on Demand: The Art of Discovering the Happiness Within. And he stopped by N2S to share some simple exercises for us all to find more joy and happiness. Step one: take one very long inhale in and then slowly exhale, listening to the sound of your breath as you do so. Then hit “play” above to find some serenity now. “ At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” from the pop-up menu.

Narcan Warriers 24 mins – “From long-time addicts to teens experimenting for the first time, fentanyl is not discriminating in who it kills. The Current looks into how an antidote drug that counters a fentanyl overdose is taking a toll on patients and front-line health workers.” At the link find the title, “’He was blue as a smurf ‘: Fentanyl overdoses take toll on front-line workers, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161114_31655.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Negative Emissions 60 mins – “Sometimes, my research for Radio Ecoshock gives me a sickening feeling, like I’m falling into a bad hole. We all are, when it comes to the developing climate shift. This time, it’s a new article published in October by Kevin Anderson. In the UK, he’s a Professor of Energy and Climate Change at the University of Manchester, and Deputy Director of the renowned Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. His co-author is Glen Peters, a senior researcher for CICERO, the Center for International Climate and Environmental Research in Oslo, Norway. The title of the paper is deceptively simple: “The trouble with negative emissions.” It’s big trouble. We’ve had Dr. Anderson on Radio Ecoshock before, and I’ve run a speech or two by him. He’s a truth-teller who is somehow tolerated by the highest levels of established science, in the UK, and now in Sweden. Anderson has recently become the second person to hold the Zennström visiting professorship in Climate Change Leadership at Uppsala University.At the link right-click “Download…lo fi…” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obama’s America 27 mins – “In Mississippi in 2008, Chloe Hadjimatheou met a 15-year-old black boy with dreams of being a policeman. Eight years later, Chloe goes in search of him to find what became of him. Did he prosper in Obama’s America?” At the link find the title, “Searching for Tobias, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04gbgyw.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

OnTheMedia Goals 18 mins – “It’s the morning after in the offices of On the Media. Usually editorial meetings take place in Brooke’s office with Bob dialed in on the conference phone. This week we did it in the studio so you can hear the hosts talk about how they are feeling and how they envision the direction of the show in the Trump presidency.” At the link find the title, “Now What? Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files otm110916pod_extra.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patient Zero Myth 10 mins – “One of the most enduring myths of HIV/AIDS history has finally been laid to rest. The so-called “patient zero,” a Canadian flight attendant named Gaétan Dugas, was once blamed for igniting the entire AIDS epidemic in America. Media outlets fixated on his sexual promiscuity; the New York Post called him “The Man Who Gave Us Aids.” But new research published in the journal Nature reexamined the original blood samples taken from Dugas in 1983 and found that the strain of the virus he was infected with was already present in the country years before Dugas frequented the gay scene in New York and San Francisco. Bob talks with Michael Worobey, evolutionary biologist and lead author of the Nature paper, about how the patient zero story is an ongoing black comedy of mischaracterization.” At the link find the title, “Debunking the AIDS “Patient Zero” Myth, Nov, 2016” right-click “Media files otm110216podextra.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pay Raises 26 mins – “It’s one thing to want a pay rise; it’s another thing entirely to get one. First you have to ask the right questions of your boss, says psychiatrist and former FBI hostage-negotiation trainer Dr Mark Goulston. And if your boss won’t budge on pay, there are some other things you can negotiate apart from money too.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasting Styles 56 mins – “Best-selling author Gretchen Rubin has a podcast. So does her teenage daughter, Eliza. They’re basically a mother-daughter podcasting duo.” At the link find the title,”Episode 7: The Family That Podcasts Together, Nov, 2016,”right-click “Media files 20161117_biglisten_epi7.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Abuses 47 mins – “Reporter Wesley Lowery on hate crimes, protest, race relations and Black Lives Matter in the age of Trump.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Powers Online 21 mins – “The police have opened their files to CBC News in an effort to show specific cases where they argue they need enhanced online surveillance and interception abilities. Canada’s top cop acknowledges its not an easy ask but says it’s necessary.” At the link find the title, “Nov 16: RCMP commissioner calls for greater police powers online, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161116_55713.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politics in Iceland 19 mins – “With warmth and wit, Halla Tómasdóttir shares how she overcame media bias, changed the tone of the political debate and surprised her entire nation when she ran for president of Iceland — inspiring the next generation of leaders along the way. “What we see, we can be,” she says. “It matters that women run.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pornography Status 66 mins – “Less than 20 years ago, one of the most disruptive technologies in human history came to America—broadband Internet. Like most technical advances, it was immediately adapted for sexual purposes. When it brought free, high-quality pornography into 100 million American homes, the country was simply not prepared for it. Dr. Marty Klein says we still aren’t. He says that as a result, the United States is in the midst of what he calls a “porn panic,” marked by high levels of fear, outrage, misinformation, blame and demands for action. This is the background of the conflict many couples face about porn, of the anxieties of parents, and of the self-destructive uses of porn. In this talk, one of America’s experts on pornography discusses the context of our difficulties, with thought-provoking suggestions on how to respond. Using material from his new book His Porn, Her Pain, Dr. Klein will discuss building “porn literacy” in children, in couples and in porn consumers—while discussing the scientific evidence about how sexually explicit material actually affects consumers, their relationships and society. The subject of pornography sits at the intersection of politics, culture and our personal lives—and our audience last year found Dr. Klein so entertaining and provocative discussing “Sexual Intelligence” that we’ve invited him back again.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychotherapy 31 mins – “We have this idea of what therapy is supposed to look like. There’s a couch. An objective therapist sitting across the room scribbling notes. But of course it’s not that simple. What happens when your therapist is not really a therapist? Or the therapist is the one in tears? And of course, should you or should you not, try to have sex with your therapist? In this episode, six short stories, many from our listeners, looking at how the role of patient and therapist can get. complicated.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

RCMP Misconduct 18 mins – “In 2012, RCMP boss Bob Paulson was adamant his officers who broke the rules — or the law — would face serious consequences. Four years on, a CBC News investigation looking at RCMP officer infractions is raising questions about how punishment is doled out.” At the link find the title, “Nov 17: CBC obtains data on 700 disciplinary cases of RCMP members breaking rules or law, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161117_98353.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in 1943 24 mins – “Ana Maria Gordon watches the plight of Syrian refugee children with a deep understanding. She was four-years-old on the MS St. Louis ship that carried Jews across the Atlantic looking for refuge only to be turned away and forced into concentration camps.” At the link find the title, “Nov 16: Holocaust survivor shares lessons from ‘voyage of the damned’ on MS St. Louis, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161116_94988.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rhythm Impact 58 mins – “Acclaimed percussionist Dame Evelyn Glennie has a lifelong passion for understanding how we are impacted by rhythm. She explores the evolution of musical rhythm over several millennia through different cultures, demonstrating how migration has impacted many different styles of music across generations and regions, and how the resulting fusions gave rise to new rhythms in contemporary music.” At the link find the title, “The History of Rhythm, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04g0cl6.mp3” and select”Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rumors for Profit 4 mins – “…Voters in this election cycle were deliberately and cynically played by teenagers in a small town in Macedonia called Veles, home to at least 100 fake news sites dedicated to US politics. Most of them were pro-Trump. “There’s a fairly large group of young people in Macedonia, who, for a long time [have] been running dubious, on-the-edges websites about different topics, whether it’s health or other things,” says Craig Silverman, who co-reported the story for BuzzFeed News. Yes, health. You know, those sketchy health advice pages. They seek out clickbait, or come up with their own, to simply get clicks. Every click generates a tiny amount of advertising revenue — a fraction of a penny. But it can add up to a good living for creative kids in a poor town, in a poor country, like the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Their biggest hit was a story with a false quote from Hillary Clinton, saying a few years ago that Donald Trump should run for president. “She never said that,” says Silverman, “[but] it’s gotten over 480,000 shares, reactions and comments on Facebook.” That’s better than most scoops from leading news outlets like the New York Times or the Washington Post….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Education Problem 21 mins – “So many of our misconceptions about science come from where we first encountered them—the classroom. How can we do a better job of teaching science, both so we make sure we have a new generation of STEM professionals, but also a STEM-literate public? The second of the three-part series.” At the link find the title, “The Face of Science: Teaching Teachers, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 161004_faceofscience_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self-driving Cars 27 mins – “Audi of America President Scott Keogh discusses his company’s role in developing self-driving cars and his concerns about unrealistic consumer expectations due to industry hype.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Scott Keogh, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.456536.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Africa Sanitation Problems 20 mins – “In this country using a flush toilet in the privacy of our own home is something we take for granted. But in South Africa, people are fighting for safe, private toilets after a woman was murdered on her way to use a public bathroom.” At the link find the title, “Nov 15: ‘It’s not safe’: South Africans fear using public toilets after woman murdered, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161115_51559.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Statistics P2 25 mins – “We’ll revisit Statistics in this episode with Mindy McCann, Professor and Graduate Coordinator for the Department of Statistics at Oklahoma State University. She’ll discuss her early fascination with statistics, and familiarize us with the concepts of Multiple Comparisons, Confidence Intervals, and Error Rates.  McCann will also explain why one can never have a zero-percent error rate in statistical studies.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stephen Bannon 9 mins – “Now that Trump’s chief strategist Stephen Bannon has been appointed, critics are concerned the alt-right media mogul behind Breitbart News will promote populist ideals in the White House. Journalist Josh Green gives us a profile on Bannon.” At the link find the title, “Nov 15: Meet Trump’s chief strategist Stephen Bannon, the man behind alt-right Breitbart News, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161115_77419.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Countermeasures 20 mins – “Yes, all of the usual corporate and government entities know you’re here. Google remembers everything you’ve ever searched, BuzzFeed knows how you’ve scored on all their quizzes, and your cell phone provider knows who you talk to and who you sleep with. Terms of Service agreements are an exercise in futility, encrypted email often takes more trouble than it’s worth, and yeah, sure, go ahead and give Facebook a fake name, but don’t think you’re fooling anyone. Companies are collecting your data from just about everywhere, storing it through time unknown, and using it however they want. Oh, and that’s where the FBI-and-friends find it. But Bruce Schneier, author of the book, “Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World,” says the fact that you’ve taken the time to read this far means you’ve got the one reliable protection available to us in year 2016: awareness….” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Texting for Health 27 mins – “Researchers in Sydney are using all sorts of innovations to improve the health of Australians. Prevention is better – and cheaper – than a cure. But only half of patients who have had heart attacks and strokes actually take their medication which is prescribed to reduce their risk of further attacks. By sending four SMS/text messages a week to patients, public health experts have dramatically reduced their risk of dying. One patient Graeme Wilson now keeps a close eye on his diet, especially the salt content, thanks to the reminders he receives on his mobile phone. Preventing falls in the elderly is the goal of special exercise classes in Sydney. Researchers found that just 25 minutes of exercise a day to improve balance and stability, reduces the number of falls by nearly 40%. Aboriginal children used to have the best teeth – but sugary drinks are now causing decay. Researchers at the Poche Centre for Aboriginal Health at the University of Sydney found that they were reluctant to drink tap water instead because it was smelly and looked a strange colour. It is hoped that cool, clean water provided in schools and biodegradable toothbrushes will help to reduce decay.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tidiness 73 mins – “Tim Harford, journalist and author, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his latest book, Messy. Harford argues that we have a weakness for order and neat solutions causing us to miss opportunities to find happiness or success with messier, more disorderly processes and solutions. Hartford looks at a wide range of examples from business and personal life making the case that tidiness is overrated and that messy should get more love.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender Issues 27 mins – “Earlier this year, North Carolina passed HB2, the so-called “bathroom bill.” The law bans anyone from using a public restroom that doesn’t match up with his/her biological sex. HB2 put the state in the middle of a national fight about gender. But North Carolina is also home to one of the few gender clinics for kids in the South, at Duke University’s Children’s Hospital. This week, we spend a day in that gender clinic, the only one in North Carolina. We wanted to know how a clinic like this one operates in this political climate. And we wanted to find out how these patients are coping. Dr. Deanna Adkins, a pediatric endocrinologist, started the clinic a year ago. Over the course of our day, we met three of her very different patients. Drew Adams is a 15-year-old trans man who came with his mom, Erica, all the way from Jacksonville, Florida. On the drive up, Drew wore a T-shirt with “This is What Trans Looks Like” printed on it. He told us he decided to change out of it before he stopped for a bathroom break in North Carolina; he used the men’s room. When Dr. Adkins told Drew that not only would he get a prescription for testosterone, but that he could give himself his first shot that very day, Drew stood up and cheered.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Economics 47 mins – “The economy and Donald J. Trump. He ran on jobs and big growth. So, how will he do it? Can he do it?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Health Care 27 mins – “A joint podcast from Kaiser Health News and The Lancet – discussion of where US health policy might be heading when Donald Trump takes office early next year.” At the link find the title, “Where next for US health and health care? Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 11november-khn.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Promises 43 mins – “New Yorker writer Evan Osnos talks about the executive orders and other actions that Trump can use to undo existing agreements on climate change, immigration and foreign policy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Psychotherapy 31 mins – “We have this idea of what therapy is supposed to look like. There’s a couch. An objective therapist sitting across the room scribbling notes. But of course it’s not that simple. What happens when your therapist is not really a therapist? Or the therapist is the one in tears? And of course, should you or should you not, try to have sex with your therapist? In this episode, six short stories, many from our listeners, looking at how the role of patient and therapist can get… complicated.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Trade Policy 40 mins – “…thank you for joining this Council on Foreign Relations media call looking at the future of U.S. trade policy. I’m Robert McMahon, managing editor of CFR.org, and I’m going to be talking about the follow-on to the presidential elections, in which President-elect Donald Trump targeted U.S. trade policy as a top area of reform. His plan for the first one hundred days in office listed withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, renegotiating NAFTA, and labeling China a currency manipulator as his top three priorities. So with us to help understand trade policy and what could be developing next, we are fortunate to have Edward Alden, CFR senior fellow, and author of the indispensable new book Failure to Adjust: How Americans Got Left Behind in the Global Economy, and Myron Brilliant, who is executive vice president and head of international affairs for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The three of us will be talking for about twenty minutes or so, and then opening up the call to you all.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Transition 47 mins – “On the campaign trail, candidate Donald Trump promised to “drain the swamp” in Washington of a corrupt, money-driven establishment.  Politicians could be bought and sold, he said. He said he had done just that himself. Wall Street and lobbyists, he said, ruled. He would run them out. Now, Donald Trump’s transition team is digging in. What are they lining up to drain? What are they bringing in? This hour On Point, the real transition, and Donald Trump’s promise to “drain the swamp.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Trumps Campaign Promises 26 mins – “Candidates promise all kinds of things. But once they get into office, it’s not always possible to carry through on them. We ask, can Trump do the things he’s pledged to do?” At the link find the title, “#735: President Trump,” right-click “Media Files 20161111_pmoney podcast111116.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkey Coup Backlash 27 mins – “Public employee one day, enemy of the state the next. The post coup reality in Turkey.” At the link find the title, “Cleansing Turkey, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04gk7k5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Utopian Groups History 52 mins – “In his recent book “Utopia for Realists,” Rutger Bregman advocates a 15-hour workweek, universal basic income, and open borders.  Sounds like paradise to us! From the Oneida Community’s dream of open or “complex marriage” to the rise and spectacular fall of Pullman’s model company town, the Guys look at why the idea of “utopianism” has such strong appeal to Americans.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Games for Good 26 mins – “Video games are the new self-help, and Jane McGonigal is here to tell us why. …she’s the director of game research and development at the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto, California where she’s spent years researching our brains during what she calls, “the state of play.” After wading through tons of research, she found that gaming is a wonderland of possibilities to make us smarter, happier, and more creative people… In fact, gaming can help cope with depression and combat anxiety, but it’s all about the dosage (i.e. how much gaming you’re doing)… Here are Jane’s prescriptions: If you’re trying to lose weight: “When you feel a craving coming on, play a visual pattern-matching game on your phone — like Tetris or Candy Crush Saga – for ten minutes. These games have been shown in scientific studies to reduce cravings, by monopolizing your visual imagination and blocking your brain’s ability to picture the thing you crave. Research shows that players make healthier eating choices in the hour after they’ve played!” …Research shows that twenty minutes of these flow-inducing games, three times a week, will help you focus your mind and calm yourself, and improve your mood for hours afterward. (Believe it or not, I’ve met many Buddhist monks who play Angry Birds!)” If you could use a boost of extra energy and motivation: “Play a really tricky puzzle game, like Sudoku, Cut the Rope, or The Room. Research shows that trying to solve a difficult puzzle increases dopamine levels in your brain, which is the neurotransmitter that increases your work ethic and will power. It doesn’t matter if you successfully complete the game or not – just trying will do the trick, and the harder the better. So if you have a difficult project to tackle, or a complex problem to solve, prime your brain for success with fifteen minutes of puzzling first.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virtual Engineering 68 mins – “This episode of The Engineering Commons finds Adam, Brian, Carmen and Jeff predicting how virtual and augmented realities might soon be incorporated into daily engineering activities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Concerns 48 mins – “How did everyone miss the Donald Trump supporters who were hiding in plain sight? On Reveal, we’ll learn why they kept a low profile – until Election Day that is – and hear what they have to say now that their candidate is headed for the White House. We’ll also meet an emerging leader of the alt-right movement who is packing his bags and leaving rural Montana for Washington D.C., where he’ll advocate for a white supremacist agenda.” At the link find the title, “The secret Trump voter, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files Scars-and-gripes-forever_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Issues 50 mins – “Come election season, it’s easy to get cynical. Why cast a ballot if your single measly vote can’t possibly change anything? In our first-ever election special, we set off to find a single vote that made a difference. We venture from the biggest election on the planet – where polling officials must brave a lion-inhabited forest to collect the vote of an ascetic temple priest – to the smallest election on the planet – where there are no polling officials, only kitty cats wearing nametags. Along the way, we meet a too-trusting advice columnist, a Texan Emperor, and a passive-aggressive mom who helped change American democracy forever.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Wine in California 63 mins – “Join our distinguished panelists as they share their year-long journey toward the 2016 vineyard harvest and their commitments to environmental stewardship, social responsibility and the desire to keep land and businesses sustainable for future generations. Following the program, continue the conversation with our panel and celebrate the holidays with a tasting of their outstanding wines.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Women 29 mins – “Rachael Ellison and Leslie Ali Walker are two working moms who hatched the idea for Need/Done, an app that they think could help get more working parents — especially working moms — into top-tier positions, while also being present at home. How does the app work? Through a crowdsourced community of parents, the service provides reliable childcare, meal planning suggestions, and groceries delivered to your door. Think: Nextdoor meets Sittercity. In the second installment of our four-part series, the co-founders test out a prototype of the service on 20 Brooklyn moms, including one very eager and willing participant: Manoush….” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Workplace Diversity 24 mins – “The future belongs to those who embrace diversity, because one thing’s certain—a lack of it leads to dumb decisions and bad business. And it turns out you will find some diversity in Australian workplaces… it just varies by industry and level of job. In this episode of WorkLife, meet the firefighter who’s travelling around the world to learn how diversity’s being achieved elsewhere and hear from the youngest woman ever elected to an Australian parliament, whose workplace wasn’t even accessible to wheelchairs until her election. right-click “ At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 262 – Nov 18, 2016: Adrenal Physiology, African Books, American Fascism, Au Pair Story, Autism Story, Big Listen, Birth Control Research, Brain Activity, Broadband in Wisconsin, Butyric Acid, Cancer Drug Impotence, Capitalism Hazards, Carbon Dioxide Uses, Change in America, Chickungunya and Zika, Climate Change Pace, Climate Politics, Climate Warming, Clinton-Trump Campaign, Computer Repair Business, Consciousness, Copyright Future, Cosmic Shadows, Culture Defined, Dakota Pipeline Protest, Device Addiction, Disruptive Innovation, Economic Policies, Election Controversies, Election Messes, Genetic Engineering, Global Trade Decline, GMO Failure, Greenhouse World, Hacking for Defense, Happiness Report, Hillary Clinton Politics, Human Evolution, Hydroelectric Power, Iceland Rescue Teams, Immigration Issues in Australia, Inmate Decline in Netherlands, Investment Strategies, Jefferson Book, Lab Safety, Letters to Presidents, Longevity, Magic Johnson and AIDS, Male Contraception Trial, Marconi’s Radio, Meat Allergy, Medical Cannabis, Medical Specialties, Medical Training, Mekong Delta Sea Rise, Mental Efficiency, Mental Resources, Middle Class Changes, Military Concerns, Money Psychology, Mosul Battle, Music Mogul, Nuclear Strategies, Photographer Interview, Political Beliefs, Presidential Transiton App, PTSD Treatment,Public Health Goals, Saudi Women, Ship Sinking Story, Simulated Universes, Social Entrepreneurs, Social Innovation, Social Psychology, Sports Bra History, Statistics, Technology and Ethics, Time Travel, Truffle Market, Trump Administration Opposition, Trump Campaign Analysis, Trump Climate Opposition, Trump Election Impact, Trump Voters, Ugly Man Story, Ulysses S Grant, US Economy Trends, Veteran Problems, Virus Filaments

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 90 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 246 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 12,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 350 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

Adrenal Physiology 58 mins – “On this episode of the podcast we have guest Dr. Bryan Walsh. Dr. Walsh is a licensed, board-certified Naturopathic Doctor, an expert in biochemistry and human physiology, and currently delivers courses in biochemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology as an Instructor at Maryland University of Integrated Health. Listen in as we talk all about the myths and truths of “adrenal fatigue”, the causes of low cortisol, interaction with the immune system, testing, and more. This was a super interesting episode, and I even learned a good bit on the topic myself. Definitely give this one a listen!” At the link find the title, “Episode 342 – Dr. Bryan Walsh – “Adrenal Fatigue” and Low Cortisol, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files PaleoSolution-342.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Books 27 mins – “A panel of writers talk to Audrey Brown about the African books which have had the biggest impact on them, their writing and the wider world. What makes a great book? On the panel are black British rapper-poet Akala; Abdilatif Abdalla, the Kenyan poet and activist; Nigerian novelist Sarah Ladipo Manyika; and Yewande Omotoso, South African poet and academic.” At the link find the title, “African Books to Inspire, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04dw6bw.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

American Fascism 48 mins – “What does the Trump campaign, and the voters it’s mobilized, have in common with Fascism, not only in Europe but in America’s own dark past?” At the linkfind the title,”American Fascism: It Can’t Happen Here? Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161028_26920.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Au Pair Story 47 mins – “Au pair is a French term meaning “on par with,” a relationship of equals. Every year, thousands of young people travel to the United States as au pairs to provide child care for American “host families” while experiencing a new culture. But life as an au pair isn’t always easy. Reveal takes a look at the problems that can leave au pairs adrift and vulnerable to exploitation and abuse.” At the link find the title, “Host of problems, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files Host-of-problems_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Story 52 mins – “As a young boy, Owen Suskind went years without saying a single word. He was autistic, and his parents worried that he’d never be able to relate to other people. One day, they discovered they could communicate with the help of classic Disney animated films that Owen adored. He could recite the films verbatim, and they helped him understand the complex cues of social interaction. Director Roger Ross Williams’ film Life, Animated is about Owen’s emotional coming-of-age story, and he’ll join us to talk about it.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Big Listen 46 mins – “Warehouses are great places to listen to podcasts (says one former warehouse worker). Comedian Phoebe Robinson talks whether she’d date Terry Gross, and Nate Dimeo gives us the scoop on his favorite podcast genre.” At the link find the title, “Episode 6: Warehouse Workers, UNITE! Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161110_biglisten_ep06.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Birth Control Research 56 mins – “John Pienta, Levi Endelman, Kylie Miller, and Adam Erwood get to answer some probing questions: what’s the first thing a student wants to know upon starting a new clerkship? What’s the most important skill they’ve ever learned? And what medical specialty should Vladimir Putin pursue? Also, if you’re in a performance slump, science says you just need to be reminded that one day you will be worm food. And men seem to be having trouble with the idea of having minor procedures and experiencing side effects in exchange for the privilege of having sex without certain undesirable consequences like babies. And we discuss the apparent YouTube trend of DIY braces made by 13-year-olds from wires, superglue, and rubber bands. If you can ignore the risks of your face falling off, it’s a real money saver!” At the link find the title, “Do Better Because You Will Die Some Day. Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 152-helpful-hint-you-are-going-to-die.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Activity 27 mins – “Staring out of the window when you’re supposed to be working, you may find yourself daydreaming. But what’s actually going on inside the brain when you let your mind drift? Psychologists prefer to use the term “mind-wandering” for this activity, which fills up to half of our waking hours. Claudia Hammond has spent the last two years working as part of Hubbub – a group including poets, historians and neuroscientists examining the topic of Rest at the Wellcome Collection. So is the brain ever truly at rest? We all experience the world in different ways. By keeping a daydream diary Claudia discovers that she tends to mind-wander visually – often without words. She also visits the Max Planck Institute in Leipzig where her brain is scanned by scientists who want to understand more about the surprisingly busy “resting” brain, seemingly on standby for whatever the day throws at us. Brain scanners cannot yet detect what we are thinking. But monitoring the brains of trained meditators, one researcher claims to have pinpointed the part of the brain where mind-wandering starts – a region associated with memory. Activity then moves onto problem-solving regions – perhaps planning for the future by reflecting on the past.” At the link find the title,”What’s the Mind Doing When it is Daydreaming? Nov, 2016,”right-click “Media files p04frgnm.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Wisconsin 18 mins – “The second-largest city in Wisconsin and the home of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, is pursuing a path-breaking municipal Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) strategy. They have already started by deploying fiber to several low-income neighborhoods and working with local ISP ResTech to offer services. Madison CIO Paul Kronberger joins us for Community Broadband Bits episode 227 to discuss their plan. We start by discussing how they decided to deploy FTTH as a digital divide strategy. Like more and more of the communities considering this approach, Madison does not have a municipal electric utility. We also discuss how Madison plans to deal with the state law that limits municipal fiber network investments and why Madison has decided to work with a private provider even though the city will retain ownership of the network. Read more of Madison coverage here.” At the link right-click “…download this MP3 file….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Butyric Acid 6 mins – “Louise Crane reveals the compound that gives American chocolate and wet dogs their distinct aroma” At the link find the title, “Butyric acid: Chemistry in its element, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files CiiE_Butyric_acid.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Drugs Impotence 16 mins – “Despite considerable investment and innovation, chemotherapy drugs have had little effect on survival in adults with metastatic cancer. In this podcast, Navjoyt Ladher, clinical editor for The BMJ, talks to Peter Wise, former consultant physician and senior lecturer Imperial College School of Medicine, and author of a recent analysis on TheBMJ.com” At the link find the title, “Cancer drugs, survival, and ethics, Nov, 2016,”right-click “Media files 292580583-bmjgroup-cancer-drugs-survival-and-ethics.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capitalism Hazards 63 mins – ‘Leland Faust, Founder and Chairman, CSI Capital Management; Member, Sporting News Top 100 Most Powerful People in Sports; Author, A Capitalist’s Lament: How Wall Street Is Fleecing You and Ruining America In conversation with Roy Eisenhardt, Former President, Oakland Athletics Leland Faust, an outspoken financial services insider and investment advisor, believes our great free enterprise system has been hijacked by Wall Street for its own gains, and he claims “you are being fleeced and exposed to risks you know nothing about.” Presenting a high-level insider view, Faust shares his real-world experience both from representing high-profile celebrities and managing a successful mutual fund. He warns that the financial services industry misleads us, and he delivers an upbeat message, saying “learn how to get ahead instead of getting taken.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Dioxide Uses 30 mins – “Can we find a use for all that pesky climate-changing carbon dioxide? If we can turn excess CO2 into something useful we might just be able to slow down the rate of global warming. It’s a dream shared by lots of scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs. At the ACI Carbon Utilisation conference in Lyon, Tom meets the Germans turning CO2 into a fuel and the French researchers aiming to mimic nature’s photosynthesis process. In Oxford he talks to a company making fertiliser from waste and a chemist creating innovative plastics whilst in Avonmouth he sees CO2 transformed into concrete blocks that are already being used in house building around the country.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Change in America 56 mins – “How has the US changed since 2008? As the world chews its nails, waiting to see how the US election story ends, Lizzie O’Leary tries to do something a little different: looking at data to figure out how America is different now, in November 2016, from the country which elected its first black president eight years ago. Lizzie – from the US radio show Marketplace – is joined in New York City by the political analyst Amy Holmes, demographer Bill Frey and the journalist Meghan McArdle. She’s also armed with audiographs, illustrating some surprising data in sound.” At the link find the title, “Change in America, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04f75lj.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chickungunya and Zika 83 mins – “Michael Diamond visits the TwiV [This Week in Virolog] studio to talk about chikungunya virus and his laboratory’s work on a mouse model of Zika virus, including the recent finding of testicular damage caused by viral replication.” At the link right-click “Download TWIV 414” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Pace 27 mins – “We know that a changing climate is already affecting the plant world in many ways. There are changes in rainfall, drought, pests, and fires to name a few. But what we didn’t know until now is that an altered plant world can increase the pace of climate change, leading to unpredictable outcomes. Isabel Montañez is from the UC Davis Department of Earth and Planetary Science. Dr. Montañez is a geologist, President-Elect for the Geological Society of America, and helps edit a number of scientific journals. Isabel is the lead author of an important study published October 24th, 2016 in the journal “Nature Geoscience”. A group of scientists managed to study an ancient time relevant to our own. Their results from hundreds of millions of years ago are not comforting….” At the link you can listen to similar material, but not download anything; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Climate Politics 58 mins – “Bill McKibben, Co-founder, 350.org Terry Tamminen, CEO, Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation As we careen toward unknown climatic changes and near the end of an equally unpredictable election cycle, what will the political and planetary climate be in 2017? Is climate disruption an issue high on the minds of the voters and political leaders? As co-founder of 350.org, Bill McKibben has been working to influence major policy decisions around the world with campaigns such as Stop the Keystone XL Pipeline, Frack Free California and Break Free from Fossil Fuels. Have those demonstrations actually kept carbon in the ground? What has his organization 350.org been focused on this election cycle, and what are his thoughts on 2017? Join us for politics, activism and stories from 30 years of writing and fighting.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming 26 mins – “We didn’t hear very much about climate change during this election cycle — and social science research might give us some insight as to why not. This week, an encore of one of our favorite episodes about why it’s so hard for us to wrap our heads around climate change.” At the link find the title, “Encore of Episode 27: Losing Alaska, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161107_hiddenbrain_27.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clinton – Trump Campaign 63 mins – “It will be one day before the big election day; most of you will have already voted and are now biting your nails for the final outcome. We’ll take a moment to commemorate the career of our longtime panelist, C.W. Nevius, who will be leaving the San Francisco Chronicle in just a few weeks. Join us then as we explore the biggest, most controversial, and sometimes the surprising political issues with expert commentary by panelists who are smart, are civil, and have a good sense of humor. Join our panelists for informative and engaging commentary on political and other major news, audience discussion of the week’s events, and our live news quiz!” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Repair Business 67 mins – “Dave Greenbaum from Dr. Dave Computer Repair: My background was actually law. I left law school on a whim to run a computer lab.  Always intended to return but never did. I’ve been a tech since grade school.  When we had Apple IIes in the lab (before you were born!), I was responsible for them.  The first time I typed on a computer, nobody told me I had to save.  An hour’s worth of work was lost. I vowed revenge and that was 30 somewhat years ago. I come at this field more from the business and management end.  Before going out on my own in full time in 2003 (I had been doing it part time until then), I was running break-fix shops for other people.  I handled everything from hiring, to dispatching and accounting.  Most techs I think know the repair stuff, but not the back office stuff.  For about 6 years before going on my own, I had the back office stuff done pretty well…” At the link right-click “Direct MP3 Download…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop up menu. .

Consciousness 69 mins – “David Gelernter, professor of computer science at Yale University and author of The Tides of Mind, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about consciousness and how our minds evolve through the course of the day and as we grow up. Other topics discussed include creativity, artificial intelligence, and the singularity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Copyright Future 25 mins – “As was evident everywhere at the recent Frankfurt Book Fair, publishing today depends on technology, and technology is pressing copyright in ways never imagined in the days of printing presses. Copyright holders in the digital age are under challenge across the globe, not only from wide-ranging infringement, but also from so-called “reform.” In a panel discussion for The Markets Conference, a day-long event highlighting important national markets for publishing around the world, participants pondered over the future of copyright – and even more importantly, whether copyright has a future. The answer we heard was “Yes, but only if we want it to be.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cosmic Shadows 62 mins – “This episode is about the The Sunyaev–Zel’dovich Effect, where photons from the big bang are used to backlight giant galaxy clusters! My Physicists this episode are Dr. Michael Zemcov, and Dr. Danica Marsden.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Ep_68_The Shadows Of Creation.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Culture Defined 58 mins – “The philosopher and cultural theorist Kwame Anthony Appiah says the idea of “Western civilization” or “Western culture” is a mistaken one and that we should abandon it. He uncovers the history of the idea from its roots at the time of the Crusades to its modern incarnation in the second half of the 20th century. However, we have very little culturally in common with our forebears in say the England of Chaucer’s time. And indeed much of the knowledge supposedly at the heart of Western civilisation was actually transmitted via Islamic scholarship. No-one, he argues, can claim exclusive ownership of culture. “The values European humanists like to espouse belong just as easily to an African or an Asian who takes them up with enthusiasm as to a European,” he says. The lecture is recorded in front of an audience at New York University in Appiah’s adopted home city. The series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley The producer is Jim Frank.” At the link find the title, “Culture, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04fhn65.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dakota Pipeline Protest 47 mins – “In North Dakota, the tents and teepees have been up for months. Native Americans and environmental protesters trying to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline. Its sponsors want to ship oil to Illinois. Opponents say it’s a danger to water supplies and a desecration of sacred sites. Last week hundreds of police moved in hard. There were dramatic clashes and 140 arrests. The protesters are still there. Winter is coming. This hour On Point,  the standoff over the Dakota Access Pipeline.” (5 guests) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Treatment P2 33 mins – “In episode 329, Mike and James continue with their update on the treatment of dementia. We talk about prevention and how to figure out if an individual is getting a benefit from treatment. Bottom line, it is very tricky. We also talk about non-drug treatments and the latest new drug treatment.” At the link find the title, “Episode 329: A dementia update you will hopefully remember – PART II,” right-click “Media files Episode 329 A dementia update you will hopefully remember-PART_II.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Device Addiction 47 mins – “We all know the fear that people are spending too much time compulsively checking their digital devices. The head down pose. The constant urge to peek. The need to just look. Tristan Harris says that’s happening by design. The former “product philosopher” at Google says Silicon Valley set out to conquer our psyches, and it succeeded. Now, he says, it’s time to stop. Time for ethics in the “attention economy.” This hour On Point, a call to reshape software designed to addict.” (2 guests)

Disruptive Innovation 24 mins – “Back in the ’90s Clayton Christensen developed the business theory of “disruptive innovation” and watched as the Blackberry disrupted the laptop and then became disrupted by Apple. Our series The Disruptors looks at the theory that is often misunderstood.” At the link find the title, “‘Disruptive innovation’ theory often misunderstood, says creator Clayton Christensen, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161108_69895.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Policies 23 mins – “On today’s show, Planet Money’s economist-approved fake candidate makes his first ads. Then we nervously watch to see what a focus group thinks of them.” At the link find the title, “#413: Our Fake Candidate Meets The People, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161102_pmoney_podcast110216.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Election Controversies 47 mins – “It’s Election Day, and here we are. It feels like no other. More amped. More fraught. More divisive. And yet, Americans have been through head-spinning elections before. We want to learn from those presidential contests today – the ones that jolted, challenged, changed the country. When Thomas Jefferson called John Adams blind, bald, crippled, toothless. When FDR welcomed the hatred of his foes. This hour  On Point, we look back on the hard elections, and how the country dealt with them.”(2 guests) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Election Messes 44 mins – “It’s here – the day of reckoning for the most bitter, acrimonious, controversial election in recent memory. But not, it might be a relief to know, in American history. Today, some historical perspective on contentious elections with Brady Carlson: and spoiler alert – our democracy survived. Then we’ll check in with transhumanist presidential candidate Zoltan Istvan who is just one of the nineteen hundred people who decided to run for president this year. We’ll talk to him about what it was like to be on the campaign trail for over a year and what he learned.” At the link right-click the play book beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Engineering 40 mins – “The processes of biotechnology can be a bit of a black box, and that does not help further its understanding or acceptance.  Journey of the Gene is an interactive, multimedia resource that can aid in explaining the process of genetic engineering.  This week’s podcast features Dr. Don Lee, one of the central developers of the resource.  From teachers, to ag producers to extension professionals, this interactive web resource details the process of genetic engineering using the example of solving soybean disease Sudden Death Syndrome.  Hosted by Dr. Paul Vincelli (@Pvincell).” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Trade Decline 47 mins – “Something new is happening in global trade. It’s declining. After decades where Chinese factories boomed and the trend line was always up, it’s flat and down. Empty, idled container ships. US trade, too – down during a period of economic growth for the first time since World War II. On the campaign trail, trade-bashing is hot. That may be fighting the last war. Some say the great age of globalization is over. This hour On Point, what it means when trade goes flat.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Failure 47 mins – “The promise of GMOs – genetically modified crops – was of faster growth in harvests and less use of pesticides. We would feed the world and do it with a lighter chemical footprint. Last weekend, a big story in the New York Times asserted neither of those things is happening. North America has embraced GMO crops. Europe has banned them.  And, the report said, 20 years on, North America cannot show an overall advantage. That sparked a firestorm. This hour On Point, are GMOs delivering?” (4 guests) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Greenhouse World 60 mins – “Interview with deep time expert Dr. Robert Spicer of UK. Plus review of 2007 record weather; caution on Lovelock fatalism; limits to heating?; scientific activism.” At the link right-click one of the download options and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hacking for Defense 58 mins – “Retired serial entrepreneur Steve Blank, creator of the “Lean LaunchPad” methodology for startups, discusses Silicon Valley’s roots as the epicenter of electronic warfare in the mid-20th century and how the region’s innovation ecosystem formed. An adjunct professor in Stanford’s Department of Management Science & Engineering, Blank also walks through the lean-startup movement and how its principles are now helping the U.S. government innovate faster in the areas of basic science, health, national defense and international diplomacy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Happiness Report 60 mins – “This week we’re exploring what science can tell us about happiness. We’ll speak to John Helliwell, Co-Director of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) Programme on Social Interactions, Identity, and Well-Being, about the World Happiness Report, a global project that uses tools from economics, psychology, health statistics and more to study the happiness of people and nations. And we’ll speak to journalist  Michael Booth about his book “The Almost Nearly Perfect People: Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia.At the link right-click the down-pointing at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hillary Clinton Politics 58 mins – “A story about Hillary Clinton that offers a different picture than what we’ve been hearing from both sides during this campaign. And some funny stuff, because everyone’s tired of the election.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Evolution 56 mins – “This week on the Naked Scientists we’re exploring our human story, from the use of tools and fire, to ritualistic behaviour. Where did we come from and what makes us special? Chris Smith is joined by some of the world’s best fossil experts including one man who’s discovered two of our caveman ancestors, and a scientist who can get the original tissues out of remains that are millions of years old.” At the link right-click “Download as mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hydroelectric Power 33 mins – “Hydropower is America’s oldest and largest source of clean, renewable energy. But can it grow to meet our changing needs? Follow our hosts on a journey from hydropower’s origins to the new wave of technologies that could shape its future. Read on for more about the topics we covered in this episode, or head over to our Water Power Technologies Office for all things hydro — including the groundbreaking Hydropower Vision Report.” At the link right-click “download file” and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Iceland Rescue Teams 27 mins – “A family stranded in a snowfield. A woman with vertigo on a mountain. A hiker falling in lava. These are just some of the jobs for Slysavarnafélagið Landsbjörg (Ice-SAR): the Icelandic Association for Search and Rescue. Ice-SAR is an elite national emergency militia with a gallant reputation in Iceland. In place of an army, its skilled volunteers, all unpaid, are expertly trained, well equipped, self-financed and self-sufficient.” At the link find the title, “Iceland Rescue, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04fj0lj.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Issues in Australia 64 mins – “Leader of the Opposition in the Senate and Shadow Minister for Foreign Affairs Penny Wong addresses the National Press Club on the topic ‘Building Bridges Not Walls: The Case For An Open Australia’.” At the link find the title,”National Press Club: Penny Wong, Nov, 2016,”right-click “Media files NPCc_PennyWong_0811_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inmate Decline in Netherlands 27 mins – “There’s a shortage of criminals in the Netherlands. What are the Dutch doing about it?” At the link find the title, “Prisons for Rent in the Netherlands, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04g0b2d.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Strategies 20 mins – “How can young investors prudently reach for higher rates of return?  The most dependable approach is building a portfolio of all value ETFs or mutual funds. In the last podcast I focused on an all-value portfolio comprised of U.S. large and small-cap value asset classes.  But it even gets better (in the past) adding the same asset classes in both developed and developing international markets.  To learn more, click here for “The Ultimate Buy and Hold Strategy.” Also, check out The Ultimate Buy & Hold Worldwide Value Portfolio Performance Table.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jefferson Book 56 mins – “For an Election Day broadcast, we go back to our country’s founding with a recent book on Thomas Jefferson that challenges some of the cliches about our third president.  We talk with Annette Gordon-Reed, co-author of “Most Blessed of the Patriarchs,” about Jefferson’s life at Monticello, his sojourn in Paris, and his views on slavery and race.” At the link right-click the play book beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lab Safety 34 mins – “Making his third appearance on Lab Out Loud, co-hosts Brian Bartel and Dale Basler welcome Dr. Ken Roy back to discuss safety in science classrooms and other potentially harmful areas (such as makerspaces). This fall, Ken launched the NSTA Safety Blog to share commentaries on the latest safety issues, legal standards and better professional practices. Ken reminds us about important science safety practices such as yearly safety training, our duty of care when working with students in foreseeable harmful situations, and the need to make sure your eye wash station works before you do labs that might require its use. Listen to the show to hear how you can learn important safety tips and how to submit your own questions to the NSTA Safety Blog.” At the link find the title, “Safer Science and the Duty of Care, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files LOL154.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Letters to Presidents 16 mins – “When you send a letter to the president, it first passes through The Office of Presidential Correspondence, founded under President McKinley in 1897 to help his administration address the roughly 100 letters arriving for him per day. By the time Herbert Hoover was president, the office would receive around 800 letters daily. The current President of the United States gets tens of thousands of letters, parcels, and emails every day.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Longevity 44 mins – “On this episode of Slate Money, hosts Felix Salmon of Fusion, Cathy O’Neil, data scientist and author of Weapons of Math Destruction, and Slate’s Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann breakdown the cost of living forever.” At the link find the title, “The Live Forever Edition, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM2129030606.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Magic Johnson and AIDS 30 mins – “On November 7, 1991, Magic Johnson held a press conference announcing that he had contracted the HIV virus, effectively ending his Hall of Fame career with the Los Angeles Lakers. The news sent shockwaves through popular culture, as well as the more narrow subculture of millionaire athletes and the woman who pursue them. Magic Johnson was not only one of the most famous men in America on the court and on TV, he was the Hugh Hefner of professional sports. If Magic could get AIDS did that mean the party was truly over? Not for the intrepid woman profiled in E. Jean Carroll’s rollicking 1992 feature, “Love in the Time of Magic.” Carroll, longtime sex columnist for Elle, joins host David Brancaccio to discuss the virtues and sorrows—and above all, the sisterhood—of the beautiful women who pursued star NBA players like hunters chasing their prey.” At the link find the title, “Love in the Time of Magic, by E. Jean Carroll, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files Love in the Time of Magic by E. Jean Carroll.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Male Contraception Trial 47 mins – “A big report out on male birth control in the last week. The plug was pulled on global trials of a hormonal male contraceptive after men complained of side-effects: acne, mood disorders, injection site pain. A lot of woman quickly spoke up to say “You’re kidding me! We’ve been putting up with that and worse for years” on the pill and more. Is there a path to a male contraceptive? Will men walk it? This hour On Point, the trial that folded, and the future of male contraception.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Marconi’s Radio 56 mins – “Our wireless world owes thanks to Guglielmo Marconi who went on to win the Nobel Prize and changed how wars were fought. A conversation with McGill Professor Marc Raboy has just published a major biography of Marconi.” At the link find the title,”Marconi: The Man Who Networked the World, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas 20161110_70034.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meat Allergy 15 mins – “With summer on our doorstep, and the odd BBQ or bush walk planned, we thought it timely to revisit this story: mammalian meat allergy is on the rise in Australia and the surprising cause is a tick bite. Dr Jonica Newby meets Dr Sheryl van Nunen, the clinician who discovered the link, and this story is a must-see if you want the latest tips on how best to remove a tick.” At the link right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Cannabis 29 mins – “The anecdotal evidence that cannabis has a positive effect on a long list of medical conditions from epilepsy, pain, cancer, even Alzheimer’s Disease is building. However, to date there’s been scant clinical evidence to back up these claims. At long last that may be changing. In this half hour special, Dr Graham Phillips finds that researchers are now applying scientific rigour to convert anecdote into data and it turns out there could be plenty of promise in this so-called “wonder weed”.” At the link right-click right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Specialties 37 mins – “Today’s episode is a different one as Ryan presents live recordings of the premed students he got to talk with during the two back-to-back conferences this October, namely, the AMSA (American Medical Student Association) PremedFest at the University of South Florida and the UC Davis Pre-Health Conference in California. Soon, we will be launching the Specialty Stories, a podcast where Ryan talks with different specialists and what they’re doing in a non clinical role to give you an idea of what the future may hold and of what you can do now to set yourself for success in the future. Hear from these amazing students who attended either of these conferences and see if you can relate with them in terms of the specialties they’re interested in and their thought processes.” At the link find the title, “Session 206,” right-click “Media files PMY206.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Training 43 mins – “In this week’s episode, Ryan talks with Shiv Gaglani, co-founder of Osmosis, a project/business looking to append how medical information is disseminated online. Shiv talks about his journey to medical school as well as leaving medical school to start Osmosis, how this has led him to where he is right now, and the things they envision moving forward. Ryan also chats with Tanner Marshall who previously worked for Khan Academy Medicine and is now a Video Curriculum Developer at Osmosis. Today, Osmosis is an educational platform with over 65,000 users, seeing an incredible growth of 670,000 views on YouTube and millions of views on Wikipedia (being the largest provider of videos to Wikipedia.) With the help of the grant they received, they have created and curated thousands of open educational resources to help students overcome a lot of misinformation about medicine out there.” At the link find the title, “Session 207,” right-click “Media files PMY207.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mekong Delta Sea Rise 27 mins – “From the deep past, a shocking discovery that plants can shift the climate. Oh oh. From UC Davis, Isabel Montañez amazing science. Then veteran diplomat David Brown on the climate-driven demise of the Mekong Delta in Vietnam – the first mass casualty.” At the link find the title, “Radio Ecoshock: The Climate Shift, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files ES_161109_LoFi.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Efficiency 65 mins – “We are living in extraordinary times. Rapid advances in information technology continuously transform our lives in countless ways. But we are now aware that our increasingly information-saturated world, coupled with growing expectations of constant availability and immediate responsiveness, can place excessive demands on our brains. The consequences can include detrimental effects on our safety, education, workplace and relationships with family and friends. Dr. Adam Gazzaley, a neuroscientist and trailblazer in the study of how our brains process information, will take us on a journey into how and why we struggle with interruptions and distractions that emerge from both our inner and outer worlds. He will present a unique evolutionary perspective that the very essence of what has evolved in our brains to make us most human—our ability to set high-level goals —collides head-first with our brain’s fundamental limitations in cognitive control. He will conclude by offering practical strategies for modifying our behavior, as well as sharing his lab’s latest innovations in enhancing our brain’s function, so that we can better survive and thrive in the information age.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Resources 64 minsRick Hanson, Ph.D., Psychologist; Author, Hardwiring Happiness: The New Brain Science of Contentment, Calm and Confidence. Our ancestors evolved a frightened brain for survival in harsh conditions. Today, unnecessary and unwarranted fear can make it harder to speak from the heart, dream big dreams and stand up to the manipulations of advertisers and demagogues. Dr. Hanson will explore the practical neuroscience of courage in ourselves, our homes, offices and politics.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Middle Class Changes 47 mins – “‘New Yorker’ writer George Packer says years of neglect from the Democrats enabled Trump to exploit the biases of the white working class and turn them into a “self-conscious identity group.” Film critic David Edelstein reviews ‘Hacksaw Ridge,’ directed by Mel Gibson.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Concerns 43 mins – “Recorded on September 21, 2016 Although Americans have great respect for the military, most civilians have lost touch with it. This means that US citizens are not attuned to what the military needs because so few American volunteer to serve; this lack of understanding reduces not only battlefield effectiveness but the military’s role in American life. Schake talks about the effect of high levels of public support for the military combined with low levels of trust in elected political leaders. She also reflects on whether American society is becoming so divorced from the requirements for success on the battlefield that not only do we fail to comprehend the enormous responsibilities of our military but we also would be unwilling to endure a military constituted to protect us.” At the link find the title, “Kori Schake on Civil-Military Relations, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160921-schake.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Money Psychology 47 mins – “The way we think about spending and saving is frequently irrational. For example: The more something costs, the more careless we are about saving money on it compared with smaller purchases. But why? Psychology and neuroscience have some answers. While we may think we’re in control of our financial decisions, psychology lecturer Claudia Hammond says research shows we’re wired for certain behaviors toward money—some of which can hurt us. But she says learning about these tendencies can help us take back some control. Understanding the psychology of money and how science can teach us to make better financial choices.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included int eh blog archive.

Mosul Battle 20 mins – “In the thick of what is being called the toughest urban warfare the world has seen, Iraqi counter-terror troops have moved into Mosul to fight ISIS. And fleeing all the intense fighting are the civilians who carry trauma and fear in their escape.” At the link find the title, “Mosul civilians traumatized, desperately need support, says advocate, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161107_52567.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Mogul 33 mins – “L.A. Reid began his music career as a drummer. Then he co-founded LaFace Records, discovering dozens of future pop superstars. Reid is now one of the most influential executives in the music industry.” At the link find the title, “Music Mogul: L.A. Reid, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161104_hibt_epic.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Strategies 47 mins – “In the long Cold War years of hostile tension between the United States and the Soviet Union, the ultimate existential dread was of nuclear war. Annihilation. When the Cold War ended, the dream was of nuclear disarmament, or at least a stand down. The US and Russia moved toward cooperation. Lately, that tide has turned. Nuclear tensions are back up. Agreements are fraying. Sabers are rattling. The next president will have to deal with it. This hour On Point, nukes, and the next president.” (4 guests) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photographer Interview 78 mins – “Mikkel Aaland is the author of The River in My Backyard, a combination memoir and photography book. He is also one of the earliest writers about digital photography, starting with the 1992 book Digital Photography. He talks with Leo about his history in digital photography, and the tragic events in his family’s life that prompted him to write The River in My Backyard.At the link click “Download options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Beliefs 76 mins – “We team up with Stephanie Lepp from the Reckonings podcast and talk to sociologist Arlie Hochschild about whether or not this election is causing more people than usual to change their minds about politics. We then hear from two voters who did in fact make some kind of transformation during this election season—one young voter who was voting in his second presidential election and one long-time voter and political insider who has been voting for 40 years.” At the link find the title, “154 Changing Political Minds – The Deep Story With Arlie Hochschild and Reckonings, Nov 4, 2016,” right-click “Media files ef734d4c-fa5a-4660-b4cb-75185a258578.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Transition App 4 mins – “GAO’s New Transition Smartphone App” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PTSD Treatment 11 mins – “Before soldiers are sent into combat, they’re trained on how to function in an immensely dangerous environment. But they also need training on how to return from the battlefield to civilian life, says psychologist Hector Garcia. Applying the same principles used to prepare soldiers for war, Garcia is helping veterans suffering from PTSD get their lives back.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Health Goals 63 mins – “The Sixth Annual Lundberg Institute lecture focuses on Dr. Wen’s experiences as Baltimore’s commissioner of health during times of change, as our medical institutions are under pressure from all sides. She will also draw on her personal experiences as a child immigrant, who started learning English at age 8, but by 18 had already graduated summa cum laude from college. She will explain how those experiences have influenced her interest in improving patient-physician communication.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Women 24 mins – “The year was 2015 — the first time women were allowed to vote and run for office in Saudi Arabia. Now a New York Times documentary “Ladies First” gives a rare look into the differing views that exist within the ultra-conservative nation on women’s rights.” At the link find the title, “Documentary chronicles women running for office in ultra-conservative Saudi Arabia, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161111_60604.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ship Sinking Story 39 mins – “As he watched The Queen of the North rise vertically and then disappear into the waters of B.C.’s inland coast, the ship’s Captain Colin Henthorne did not yet know the full extent of what would unfold. He shares the story of that fateful 2006 night.” At the link find the title, “Captain of The Queen of the North recounts ‘heartbreaking’ night ship went down, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161107_35165.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Simulated Universes 55 mins – “Neil deGrasse Tyson investigates the nature of reality, from quantum physics and string theory, to the multiverse and “The Matrix.” With theoretical physicists Brian Greene and Stephon Alexander, philosopher David Chalmers, co-host Maeve Higgins, Chuck Nice and Bill Nye. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/” At the link find the title, ““Is Our Universe a Simulation?” with Brian Greene, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 291529021-startalk is our universe a simulation with Brian Greene.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Entrepreneurs 59 mins – “Four alumni of entrepreneurship-education fellowships offered through the Stanford Technology Ventures Program (STVP) return to share what starting businesses in the fields of virtual reality, med-tech, renewable and solar energy have taught them about these industries. In conversation with STVP Faculty Co-Director Tina Seelig, the panel discusses strategic decision-making, defining success, facing failure and the traits needed to be a strong leader.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Innovation 58 mins – “Cheryl Heller, Founding Chair, MFA in Design for Social Innovation, School of Visual Arts, New York City; Founder, CommonWise Over the past 10 years or so, the same methods used to spark love for new cars, technologies and toys have been used to design new ways for people to think and behave. Presenting the culmination of a lifetime of pioneering work on the front lines of design and communications, award winning designer and business strategist Cheryl Heller will preview her upcoming book through a series of highly visual case studies that illustrate where and how design is working to solve the daunting problems of our time: poverty,injustice, unsafe food systems, water, health and the effects of climate change. These are challenges that impact industry, governments, cities, foundations and every resident of the world. Learn the latest on how design today has a new, more direct and urgent purpose: to inspire healthier relationships—with each other, between us and the the earth, and with the machines and technology that have become such an integral part of our lives.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Psychology 19 mins – “Psychologist Jonathan Haidt studies the five moral values that form the basis of our political choices, whether we’re left, right or center. In this eye-opening talk, he pinpoints the moral values that liberals and conservatives tend to honor most.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sports Bra History 17 mins – “For this episode of Distillations we talked to Lisa Lindahl, an entrepreneur from Vermont, who in 1977 invented what was to become the modern-day sports bra. It’s a story about a runner who wanted running to be more comfortable. “It was the right product at the right time. It really struck a chord for so many women,” says Lindahl. “This product came into being because it was something I wanted.” We also talked to our museum team about their new exhibition, Second Skin: The Science of Stretch, and the roles stretch fabrics play in health and sports. Christy Schneider, exhibits project manager at the Museum at CHF, says it’s all about getting the body you want, whether you want to dance all night or run a marathon. “How do you that?” asks Schneider. “You clothe it in a second skin.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Statistics 27 mins – “Lawrence Hubert is Professor Emeritus in the Departments of Psychology, Statistics and Educational Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  He is also a co-author (with Howard Wainer) of the text, “A Statistical Guide for the Ethically Perplexed.”  He joins us on this program to talk about his “accidental” career path that began with Sputnik, and about the controversy that sometimes surrounds statistics and reproducibility.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Technology and Ethics 56 mins – “I’m pleased to post one new show, Show # 259, September 16, my interview with the amazing Prof. Shannon Vallor of Santa Clara University, author of Technology and the Virtues: A Philosophical Guide to a Future Worth Wanting. Shannon has written an exceptionally important and unique work focusing on what personal virtues should guide our integration of new technologies into society. Defining the contours of what she calls “technonormal virtues,” Shannon calls on informed citizens to become “moral experts” in a collective effort to create “a future worth wanting” (or, even better, demand for “useful tools that do not debilitate us.”) Because Shannon writes about philosophy and virtue as an applicable construct rather than an abstraction, her book should be required reading for anyone seeking better understanding of how we might achieve the best social and moral results from our technological advancements.” At the link right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Time Travel 24 mins – “The very possibility of travelling back in time, of second chances and missed opportunities, has captured imaginations for centuries. The pull is strong. Join author James Gleick through an excellent adventure through the space-time continuum.” At the link find the title, ‘‘Imagine what might have been’: Author James Gleick’s time travel adventure Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161110_46697.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Truffle Market 23 mins – “Truffles are a lumpy, smelly fungus. They’re also one of the most coveted foods in the world. Why are they so expensive? And why are people willing to pay so much for them?” At the link find the title, “#733: A Trunk Full of Truffles, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161104_pmoney_podcast110416_3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Administration Opposition 15 mins – “With inauguration day approaching and Donald Trump set to lead as the next U.S. president, many Americans are mobilizing to fight and protect the gains made during the Obama years — from immigration, to abortion, to the environment and Obamacare.” At the link find the title, “American groups mobilize to minimize Trump policy damage, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161111_86659.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Campaign Analysis 48 mins – “Donald Trump ran for president on his gut, and a lot of Americans responded. When he spoke of policy – what he would actually do – it was big and broad. Build a wall, drain the swamp, tear up the deal, lock her up. Now he’s president-elect. Republicans will run Washington, but Republican leadership and Donald Trump have not always been anywhere near the same page. So, what happens? This hour On Point, Washington, power and policy after the Trump election.”(4 guests) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Climate Opposition 23 mins – “If president-elect Donald Trump doesn’t believe the science, how do you combat climate change? The Current looks into the new reality of environment protection and how it will factor in Canada’s big decisions— from pipelines to carbon taxes.” At the link find the title, “What Trump’s climate change denial means for Canada,Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161111_67281.mp3” and select”Sve Link As” from the pop-up

Trump Election Impact 56 mins “Highlights from a recent Munk Debate on the U.S. election. The resolution: “Be it resolved, Donald Trump can make America great again.” Debaters: Newt Gingrich and Laura Ingraham, arguing for; Robert Reich and Jennifer Granholm, arguing against.” At the link find the title, “Making America Great Again, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas 20161107_70194.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Voters 54 mins – “How did everyone miss the Donald Trump supporters who were hiding in plain sight? On Reveal, we’ll learn why they kept a low profile – until Election Day, that is – and hear what they have to say now that their candidate is headed to the White House. This was the first presidential election in a half-century without the full protection of the Voting Rights Act, which was dismantled by a Supreme Court ruling. And over the past few years, states across the nation took steps to make it harder for African Americans and other minorities to cast their votes. So we sent reporters to several of these states to see how things played out on Election Day. Did voters face roadblocks? Yes. Did this help to swing the election? Probably not, but what we do know is that the discrimination that did happen often happened out of sight. And finally, we’ll meet an emerging leader of the movement that helped push Trump to victory: the alt-right. Richard Spencer soon will pack his bags and leave his home in rural Montana for Washington, D.C., where he plans to set up a think tank to advocate for a white supremacist agenda.” At the link find the title,” The secret Trump voter, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files Scars-and-gripes-forever_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ugly Man Story 24 mins – “When Robert Hoge was born in Brisbane, Australia, in 1973, his mother immediately knew there was something wrong. Instead of asking the doctors, “Is it a boy or a girl?” she asked, “Is my baby okay?” He wasn’t. He had a tumor the size of his newborn fist smack in the middle of his face. His legs were very short; his feet were missing toes and twisted out of shape. Robert had surgery to remove the tumor, but it left him with severe deformities. At first, his mother didn’t want to take him home from the hospital. She had four older children; she worried about Robert’s impact on them. Eventually, she relented. She hoped to give her son a normal life. But Robert’s life has been anything but normal. This week, Only Human spends some time with Robert Hoge. By all accounts, he’s been wildly successful: he was the first in his family to go to college. He became a journalist, then a spokesperson for an Australian politician. He even carried the Olympic Torch before the Summer Games in Sydney.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ulysses S Grant 47 mins – “At nearly 40, Ulysses S. Grant thought himself a failure, a nobody. By the end of the Civil War, he was an American hero – the rumpled, cigar-smoking general who accepted Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox. “I can’t spare this man,” Abraham Lincoln had said.“He fights.” By 1869, Ulysses S. Grant was president of the United States. Jim Crow–era historians were tough on Grant. A new biography sees moral courage. This hour On Point, Ulysses s. Grant – “American Ulysses.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Economic Trends 62 mins – “Charles L. Evans, president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, joins CFR’s Willem H. Buiter to discuss issues facing monetary policy in the United States. Evans discusses U.S. economic performance since the 2008 recession, long-term implications for monetary policy, and Federal Reserve strategies for growth.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Veteran Problems 56 mins – “We sit down with NPR correspondent Quil Lawrence. He’s covering the issues faced by millions of Americans who are deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan as they transition to life back at home. We’ll discuss the struggles faced by veterans, as well as his time as NPR’s bureau chief in Kabul and 10 years of reporting in Iraq.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Virus Filaments 40 mins – “As the Northern hemisphere approaches winter and the vaccines are in the process of being given before the annual flu season begins in earnest, the country starts to focus on these mysterious viruses that continue to infect us year on year. But if you look closely at influenza viruses, you’ll realise that there’s an awful lot we don’t know about them – especially how they spread from one person to person or even from one cell to another cell. For one, why do they make these impressive strands or filaments  emerge from an infected cell?  The 15th of October is Global Hand-washing Day, and this year’s theme was “Make Hand-washing a Habit!”, which continues to be an important way to stop some infections but did you ever wonder if it would stop the flu? To answer this question, for our podcast, we spoke to the CVR’s Ed Hutchinson – an MRC career development fellow – and Swetha Vijayakrishnan who is postdoc in the Bhella group, who share an interest in the shape of the virus particles produced by influenza and its role in virus infection and spread.  Ed and Swetha talk about the work they’re  doing currently at the CVR on using molecular techniques alongside new electron microscopy methods to understand how flu spreads and especially focusing on these filamentous forms of the virus. As the two explain in the podcast, washing your hands probably won’t help against influenza viruses because it can be transmitted through the air without the need of a ‘helping hand’” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 261 – Nov 11, 2016: AI Possibilities, Alzheimers Caregiver, American Apparel T-shirts, Antibiotic Resistance Future, Astronaut Story, Bad Science, Bank Loan History, Barbara Boxer Biography, Big Thing Production, Birth Control, Brain Injuries, Broadband in North Carolina, Calais Jungle Ends, Civility Declines, Click-Together App and Pepe the Frog, Container Ships, Craft Beer History, Crime Control Policy, Dakota Pipeline Protest, Direct Democracy, Drought in California, Educating the Poor, Energy Security, FBI Politics, Federal Agency Improvement, Food Delivery Engineering, Food Revolution and Catastrophes, Food Supply Concerns, Free Trade Globally, Ghost Stories, Health Care in US, Hurricane Matthew Response, Immigrant Story, Intelligence Operations, Internet of Things Security, Jiu-Jitsu Coach, Journalism Trends, LGBT Laws, Marijuana for Vets, Meat Allergies, Meat Impact Debate, Men Without Work, Microbiome Futures, Moral Duty, Mosquito Eradication Issues, Norman Conquest of England, Nuclear Dumps and Biohacking VR, Nuclear Power Future, Oklahoma City Bombing, Origami Applications, Patagonia Founder, Pedestrian Deaths Increase, Plastics in Oceans, Prolotherapy, Quantified Man, Russian Politics, Sex Bots, Silicon Valley History, Soil Spectroscopy, Sound Effects, Surveillance of Journalists, Sustainability, Swearing, Tim Ferriss Q and A, Translations and Interpreters, Tweet and Retweet, UFOs and Aliens, US Voting, Venezuela Options, Virus Control and Research

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 72 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 216 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 12,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 340 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

AI Possibilities 31 mins – “Okay, you asked for it, and I finally did it. Today’s episode is about conscious artificial intelligence. Which is a HUGE topic! So we only took a small bite out of all the things we could possibly talk about.” At the link find the title, “Rude Bot Rises, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files rudebotrises.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimers Caregiver 27 mins – “Meet a young caregiver who her life on hold to help her mother with early-onset Alzheimer`s.” At the link find the title, Still Kathryn,” right-click “Download Still Kathryn” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Apparel T-shirts 45 mins – “Season 4 of StartUp continues with the story of a well-known entrepreneur [Dov Charney] who built a widely recognized business, lost it all, and is now starting over—from scratch. Over the next several episodes, we’ll hear as this founder makes his second attempt at success, and creates an entirely new company in the shadow of his controversial past.” Atthe link findthe title, “Part 1: Labels (Season 4, Episode 4),” right-click “Media files GLT4763721113.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Resistance Future 15 mins – “Over the past 85 years, antibiotics have been miracle drugs. They’ve kept infections at bay and opened up a world of medical possibilities: organ transplants, heart surgery, chemotherapy. But they’re not going to work forever. The age antibiotic resistance is coming. So what does a world without these drugs look like?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronaut Story 41 mins – “Like many kids, Mike Massimino dreamed of becoming an astronaut. Against all odds, he turned that dream into reality. This is his storyStepping out onto the surface of the moon on 20th July 1969, Neil Armstrong boldly went where no man had gone before. In doing so, he inspired a whole generation of eager, space-dreaming, future astronauts. One of these was Mike Massimino, who joins Hannah Devlin in the studio this week to reflect on the unlikely tale that took him from the streets of New York to the Hubble Telescope and back.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bad Science 60 mins – “This week we’re talking about what bad science looks like, why good scientists with good intentions often use techniques of bad science in their work, and how we may be unintentionally selecting for bad science over good science in our culture. We speak with Michael Inzlicht, Professor of Psychology at the University of Toronto, about the replication crisis currently underway in the field of social psychology. And we talk with Paul Smaldino, Assistant Professor of Cognitive and Information Sciences at the University of California, Merced, about his recent paper “The Natural Selection of Bad Science” and how the incentives built into our science culture may also be creating an environment where bad science thrives.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As”from the pop-up menu.

Bank Loan History 52 mins – “In a new book, legal scholar Mehrsa Baradaran argues that America has two systems for personal banking. The rich have personal bank accounts at brick-and-mortar businesses, while the poor either don’t bank at all or rely on payday lenders and check cashers that charge exorbitant rates and fees. The result, Baradaran says, is a sadly ironic situation where “the less money you have, the more you pay to use it.” She joins us Tuesday to explain how we got into this mess, and how we might get out of it. Mehrsa Baradaran is an Associate Professor at the University of Georgia School of Law. Her new book is called How the Other Half Banks: Exclusion, Exploitation, and the Threat to Democracy” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Barbara Boxer Biography 66 mins – “Barbara Boxer, U.S. Senator (D-California); Author, The Art of Tough: Fearlessly Facing Politics and Life; Twitter @SenatorBoxer Holly Kernan, Executive Editor, News, KQED—Moderator This program is part of our Good Lit series, underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation. “One goal of this memoir is to inspire people to fight for change. It takes what I call the Art of Tough and I’ve had to do it all my life.” —Senator Barbara Boxer Barbara Boxer has made her mark, combining compassionate advocacy with scrappiness in a political career spanning more than three decades. Now, retiring from the Senate, she continues the work to which she’s dedicated 30 years in Congress. Her memoir, The Art of Tough, shares her provocative and touching recollections of service, and cements her commitment to the fight for women, families, quality, and environmental protection—all in a peaceful world. Sometimes lauded, sometimes vilified, but always standing tough, Boxer has fought for her values even when her personal convictions conflicted with her party or the majority rule.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Thing Production 74 mins – “Chris and Dave discuss Pro Bono engineering work, manufacturing big things in high volume, buying stuff from Shenzhen, attacking IoT devices, crazy VC fundraising and quickly copying kickstarters.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Birth Control 41 mins – “This episode we’re talking birth control: what happens when everybody has 100% control over when they do or don’t have babies? To find out I called up a bunch of people who know all about the past, present and future of baby making. Aaron Hamlin explains why male birth control has been so elusive. Haylin Belay explains what is keeping women from gaining access to birth control today. Alexis Madrigal talks about a future in which conception is perfected in the lab. And Elaine Tyler May talks about what we can learn about this future from the history of the birth control pill in America.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Injuries 42 mins – “There’s a lot of misinformation about traumatic brain injuries (TBIs).  One extreme example: people who go see their doctors about a possible concussion after a regular bump to the head, like hitting their heads on a low ceiling. The good news, according to Dr. Kathleen Bell, Professor and Chair of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Texas, is that the majority of people who suffer mild TBIs will recover. Episode 152 is a real treat, with not one, but two experts.  Dr. Martin Monti, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at UCLA, and Dr. Bell talk to us about the nature of traumatic brain injuries, when it’s a “no brainer” to go see a doctor, and how to create a brain resilient to injury.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 28 mins – “Pinetops, a town of about 1,300 outside Wilson, North Carolina, is suffering a double calamity as Hurricane Matthew has left floods and incredible damage in its wake. Less natural but no less frustrating is the unforced error by the North Carolina Legislature in effectively prohibiting municipal broadband networks. This week, we have a doubleheader interview with Will Aycock, the General Manager of Wilson’s fiber-optic Greenlight service, and Suzanne Coker Craig, a local business owner and town council member. They talk discuss the devastation from the hurricane and the threat from the town’s only broadband provider being forced to leave town by an ill-conceived state statute. We often talk about how important modern Internet networks are, but the Pinetops reaction to this storm is a stirring reminder of how true that is. Whether it was as the hurricane approached, hit, or left town, local leadership had to continue fighting to retain Wilson’s Internet service because it is that important to them. Fortunately, Wilson has announced that it will not cut off Pinetops as expected. Instead, it will offer free service, which is not prohibited by current law. Wilson is generously giving the state six months to fix the law so Pinetops is not economically harmed by losing high quality Internet access.> At the link right-click “…download this mp3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Calais Jungle Ends 27 mins – “Gavin Lee documents the final days of France’s notorious migrant camp, meeting inhabitants from as far afield as Gambia and Afghanistan to ask what the future holds for them now.” At the link find the title, “The last days of the Calais Jungle, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04dz7kf.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civility Declines 47 mins – “A recent survey of likely voters finds that 76 percent say civility has declined over the last decade, to the point where most Americans believe the lack of civility in politics is a “crisis.” In that same survey, twice as many voters blame Republican candidate Donald Trump for the rising incivility. He has called his opponent in this race “the devil,” “a liar” and “a nasty woman.” Some say what we are seeing in this election reflects a change in the culture of manners and decorum, including a blurring of the lines between private and public talk. Guest host Derek McGinty and guests discuss the decline of civility, a divisive presidential election and what it could mean for the democratic process.” (4guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Click-Together App and Pepe the Frog 35 mins – “One man tries to unite America. One Frog [Matt Furie] threatens to tear it apart.” At the link find the title, “#81 In the Tall Grass,” right-click “Media files GLT7149920831.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Container ships 26 mins– “Cheap clothes, electronics, food — all of it travels the globe by ship. And the true cost of shipping is higher than you may think. The Current looks into an eye-opening investigation into the murky world of shipping with the director of Freightened.” At the link find the title, “Documentary unveils murky world of shipping, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161028_12460.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Craft Beer History 35 mins – “In 1984, Jim Koch felt suffocated by his cushy but boring corporate job. So he left, dusted off an old family beer recipe, started Sam Adams, and helped kickstart the craft beer movement in America.” At the link find the title, “Samuel Adams: Jim Koch, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161025_hibt_samadams.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crime Control Policy 30 mins – “In the early 1980s, a couple of researchers wrote an article in The Atlantic that would have far reaching consequences. The article introduced a new idea about crime and policing. It was called Broken Windows. The idea was simple: A broken window is a sign of a neglected community, and a neglected community is a place where crime can thrive. The researchers said, if police fixed the small problems that created visible signs of disorder, the big ones would disappear. Today, we explore how ideas sometimes get away from those who invented them.. And then are taken to places that were never intended.” At the link find the title, “Episode 50: Broken Windows, Nov, 26,” right-click “Media files 20161031_hiddenbrain_50.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dakota Pipeline Protest 5 mins – “It started last April with two people from the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota praying in a teepee for others to come and help fight an oil pipeline they believed would threaten their land and water. And come they did — climate activists, social justice groups, Black Lives Matter, Native people from around the world and just down the road. Today the flags of nearly 300 tribes fly over a protest camp called Seven Council Fires, the epicenter of the growing fight over the Dakota Access oil pipeline. …Their collective target is a nearly $4 billion pipeline that would carry oil from North Dakota’s Bakken fields to Illinois, with a capacity to transport as much as 570,000 barrels of oil a day. All that oil could have a big impact on the climate — “it would increase emissions by the equivalent of 29.5 new coal-fired power plants,” said Kandi Mossett of the Indigenous Environmental Network — but for Native people here the fight is mainly about protecting sacred sites and the water of the Missouri River….“You have a blockade across a state highway,” Cass County Sheriff Paul Laney told protesters gathered at the site along State Highway 1806 on Oct. 26. “You’ve occupied private land. You’re forcing our hand.”… More than 50 protesters were treated for injuries and the arrested had numbers written on their arms. Most were held in Bismarck for hours, barefoot, in chain-link cages resembling dog kennels. … Meanwhile, construction on the pipeline continues. Drone footage taken by opponents this week shows it has nearly reached the Missouri River. And backers say there’s no reason to hold it up….They got a break recently when the US Army Corps of Engineers put a hold on the key Missouri River crossing next to the reservation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dakota Pipeline Protest 20 mins – “Indigenous activists in Canada and the U.S. are urging the Lakota Sioux to stand their ground in the Dakota Access pipeline dispute that they say has implications for Native lands. The company behind the pipeline says it’s safe but the standoff continues.” At the link find the title, “No end in sight for Standing Rock protest against Dakota Access pipeline, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161101_13523.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Direct Democracy 29 mins – “Today we travel to a future where America has converted to a direct democracy. Everybody votes on everything!” At the link find the title, “Swipe Right For Democracy, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files swiperightfordemocracy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought in California 53 mins – “Noah Diffenbaugh, Professor, Stanford University Peter Gleick, President, The Pacific Institute Karen Ross, Secretary, California Department of Food and Agriculture This program was generously underwritten by the S.D. Bechtel Jr. Foundation. California storms and droughts are getting more extreme, according to new research from Stanford examining recent rainfall patterns. The result is a new normal, with fewer average years and more dry times and also more wet times. Other forecasters warn that California might be entering an extended period of drought known as a megadrought. Uncertainty about changing rainfall is a challenge for the state’s water system built on the predictable arrival of snow and rain. What is California doing to prepare for bigger storms and droughts? How can an average person use water more efficiently and think about the water embedded in their food? Join us for a conversation about California’s water future in strangely wet and dry times driven in part by the high-pressure system hanging off the coast called the “ridiculously resilient ridge.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educating the Poor 14 mins – “Why should a good education be exclusive to rich kids? Schools in low-income neighborhoods across the US, specifically in communities of color, lack resources that are standard at wealthier schools — things like musical instruments, new books, healthy school lunches and soccer fields — and this has a real impact on the potential of students. Kandice Sumner sees the disparity every day in her classroom in Boston. In this inspiring talk, she asks us to face facts — and change them.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Security 59 mins – “Deputy Secretary Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall provides her perspective on the changing definition of energy security and the role of innovation in ensuring America’s energy future.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FBI Politics 16 mins – “Last Friday, FBI Directory James Comey informed Congress of a potential link between a device owned by disgraced former Congressman Anthony Weiner and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. The disclosure effectively reopened the investigation into Clinton’s private server and email activity during her time as Secretary of State. It also set off a firestorm of protests from both sides of the aisle. Just what is the role of the FBI when investigating politicians and did Comey cross a line with a move that many are interpreting as interfering with a presidential election within two weeks of Americans voting? In this BackStory short take, the Guys talk to Yale historian Beverly Gage about the history of the FBI’s involvement in U.S. elections.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Agency Improvement 42 mins – “A tiny behavioral-sciences startup is trying to improve the way federal agencies do their work. Considering the size (and habits) of most federal agencies, this isn’t so simple. But after a series of early victories — and a helpful executive order from President Obama — they are well on their way.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Delivery Engineering 11 mins – “Your company might have donated money to help solve humanitarian issues, but you could have something even more useful to offer: your data. Mallory Soldner shows us how private sector companies can help make real progress on big problems — from the refugee crisis to world hunger — by donating untapped data and decision scientists. What might your company be able to contribute?” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Revolution and Catastrophes 60 mins – “Michael Brownlee is the author of “The Local Food Revolution: How Humanity Will Feed Itself in Uncertain Times”. We glean tips and directions from his ten year struggle in Colorado localization. Robert Muir-Wood is a top adviser to governments, insurance, and business on preparing for natural disasters. Learn the real risks and how we all can do better. Not everything is climate change. A little later we’ll talk with one of the world’s top disaster experts, Robert Muir-Wood about his new book “The Cure for Catastrophe: How We Can Stop Manufacturing Natural Disasters.” By the way, my newest song “Wholly Nature” can be heard in this program, and downloaded at the bottom of this blog.” At the link right-click “Download… Lo-Fi…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Supply Concerns 60 mins – “Michael Brownlee is the author of “The Local Food Revolution: How Humanity Will Feed Itself in Uncertain Times”. We glean tips and directions from his ten year struggle in Colorado localization. Robert Muir-Wood is a top adviser to governments, insurance, and business on preparing for natural disasters. Learn the real risks and how we all can do better. Not everything is climate change. A little later we’ll talk with one of the world’s top disaster experts, Robert Muir-Wood about his new book “The Cure for Catastrophe: How We Can Stop Manufacturing Natural Disasters.” At the link right-click “ Download this program in Lo-Fi…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Trade Globally 59 mins – “Good morning. Welcome to today’s Council on Foreign Relations breakfast. I see many familiar faces. It’s a pleasure to have you all join this morning. I’m Zoe Baird, for those of you who don’t know me. I’m CEO and president of the Markle Foundation, and founder of SKILLFUL, which is an effort to build a skills-based labor market nationally to create many more opportunities for good jobs for those who don’t have a college diploma. We are very fortunate this morning to have Greg Hayes, the chairman and CEO of United Technologies to speak with us, and then to take a few questions from me and then questions from our members as well. So I will now turn over the microphone to Greg for a few opening remarks, and then we’ll have our question and answer session. Thank you….”At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ghost Stories 51 mins – “Monday, we’re taking a haunted tour of America with writer Colin Dickey. Don’t worry though, we won’t try to convince you that ghosts or the paranormal are necessarily real. Dickey’s new book explores the bigger cultural questions behind these tales. Traveling to haunted mansions, brothels, industrial ruins, parks, and more, he asks why we tell these stories and how they help us make sense of our world. Dickey joins us to talk about what he calls “an American history in haunted places.” Colin Dickey is a cultural historian and writer. His work has appeared in The Paris Review and The New Inquiry among many others. His book is called Ghostland: An American History in Haunted Places” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care in US 21 mins – “Discussion of the US election, and of the importance of underlying social determinants of health for the US health policy environment.” At the link find the title, “US Election: The Lancet: November 4, 2016,” right-click “Media files 04november-uselection.MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Matthew Response 30 mins – “In part two of this special disaster response segment for the Disaster Podcast is a visit with Dr. Joe Holley, we chat with him about his deployment with the federal response to Hurricane Matthew’s hit on the east coast of the U.S. Hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are joined again by Kevin Reiter from WildSafety.com and BJ Schneider from XiphosBooks.net to join our discussion. In this second half of the episode, Joe and the others discuss the operational concerns of the response after covering the preparations and logistical concerns last week on the show. If you haven’t checked out the first part of this podcast episode, check it out here – Hurricane Matthew USAR Response – Part 1.” At the link right-click Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Story 13 mins – “Trying to adjust to her life in the U.S., Reyna Grande turned to books. Her memoir, adapted for young readers, gives kids a window into the immigrant experience.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Operations 47 mins – “Sept. 11 was a turning point in America in innumerable ways. Foremost: For our national security, U.S. intelligence, military and law enforcement agencies had to find a way to work together. It was imperative that they put aside age-old competition for the good of the nation. In a new book, a veteran national security reporter tells how these agencies created a sophisticated, global security network spawned by 9/11. He argues that the nature of warfare has been forever changed. Diane talks with journalist and author James Kitfield about how a new style of U.S. security operations offers the best hope for defending the nation in an age of asymmetric warfare.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Internet of Things Security 46 mins – About the 23 min mark starts “…the second of my two security interviews, Brian Knopf, who is the director of security research at Neustar. Knopf has a deep history in working security for connected devices have worked at Belkin and Wink. We talk a bit about the challenges exposed by the Mirai botnet and what consumers should look for in connected devices.” The first part deals with products connected via the internet. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jiu-Jitsu Coach 123 mins – “Dave Camarillo (@DaveCamarillo) was my long-time Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) coach (see him kicking my ass repeatedly here). Put simply, he is a machine. On the Mat once said: “It’s funny that everybody in Judo is scared of David’s ne waza and everybody in Jiu-Jitsu is scared of his stand up. (We) guess people, in general, are just scared of him.” Dave is a very technical coach and an elite-level Jiu-Jitsu competitor. He dominated the lightweight and open weight classes at the 1998 Rickson Gracie American Jiu-Jitsu Association tournament; the legendary Rickson Gracie himself bestowed the honor of Most Technical American Jiu-Jitsu Fighter upon him. He has worked not only with people on the ground game, but many recognizable MMA (mixed martial arts) figures as a coach and as a corner man.” At the link find the title, “#196: Meet the Machine, Dave Camarillo,” right-click “Media files The Tim Ferriss Show – Dave Camarillo.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism Trends 42 mins – “Flagrantly unsubstantiated “facts”, misrepresented news, and deliberately false memes whooped up by the partisan fringes have been fast and furious this election… And thanks to Facebook’s algorithm, fake news stories continue to trend. Today, if you yell at the Facebook echo chamber to stop, does it only get louder? Then, in a contentious election season full of bombshells, boasts, and social media driving the outrage, how do newsrooms determine what deserves attention what doesn’t?….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

LGBT Laws 52 mins – “Late last week, the LGBT activist group Equality Utah filed a lawsuit against the Utah State Board of Education and others over what it calls “anti-gay school laws.” The law explicitly prohibits “the advocacy of homosexuality.” Opponents say it limits free speech, denies equal protection to LGBT students, and puts them in harm’s way. Others say there shouldn’t be any discussion of sex in public schools. Wednesday, we’re talking about the lawsuit and the effects of so-called “no promo homo” laws. At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana for Vets 26 mins – “Rob Martin is a retired Canadian soldier who’s using pot to treat his PTSD. He’s one of a growing number of former soldiers turning to medical marijuana, but some researchers say there’s not enough evidence that it’s an effective treatment for PTSD.” At the link find the title, “Veterans say medical marijuana helps treat PTSD, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161103_60273.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meat Allergies 33 mins – “Tuck your napkin under your chin.  We’re about to serve up a tale of love, loss, and lamb chops. For as long as she can remember, Amy Pearl has loved meat in all its glorious cuts and marbled flavors. And then one day, for seemingly no reason, her body wouldn’t tolerate it.  No steaks. No brisket. No weenies.  It made no sense to her or to her doctor: why couldn’t she eat something that she had routinely enjoyed for decades? Something our evolutionary forebears have eaten since time immemorial?  The answer involves mysterious maps, interpretive dance, and a collision of three different species. Produced by Annie McEwen & Matt Kielty with reporting help from Latif Nasser” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meat Impact Debate 62 mins – “…As polemical author and commentator George Monbiot will argue in this debate, livestock farming has a massive impact on the planet, producing around 14% of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions according to the UN. That’s roughly the same as the total amount of global transport emissions. Animals are extremely inefficient processors of the maize and soya that farmers grow to feed them. If we ate those crops ourselves instead of feeding them to livestock, we could free up hundreds of millions of hectares of rainforests, savannahs and wetlands where wild animals could flourish instead. And then there are the arguments about animal welfare. Recent scientific research indicates what many of us feel we already know – that animals have complex emotional lives not dissimilar to our own. Intensive farming – the kind that confines hens, pigs and cattle to squalid indoor pens – thwarts their instincts to move around freely and build social bonds with their group. Tens of billions of animals exist in this way, and that’s before their short lives are ended in the horror house of the abattoir. As for those who say a vegan diet isn’t healthy, elite athletes who have made the switch, including world tennis No 1 Novak Djokovic, prove you don’t need animal protein to excel at the highest levels in sport. On the other side of the argument, making the case for the meat munchers, will be sharp-tongued Sunday Times food critic AA Gill. The fact is, he will say, we developed as omnivores and every human culture has its culinary traditions, based on the taste and aesthetics of meat and dairy. Do we really want to live in a world where there is no beef Wellington or cheese soufflé? As for the environmentalist arguments, omnivores now have some serious eco-credentials behind them. A study at Cornell University shows that a diet that includes a few small portions of grass-fed meat a week may actually be greener than eating no animal products at all. And when it comes to animal welfare, rather than abandoning animal products altogether, couldn’t we do more good by pressing for genuinely transparent labelling of our meat and dairy? If consumers really know what they are getting, fewer people might be willing to buy the £3 chicken produced in the barbaric conditions of the agricultural industry. As for a vegan diet being healthier, we should stop giving airtime to self-appointed health experts and lifestyle bloggers. Some dieticians argue that there are nutrients we need that we just can’t get from plants alone. Yes, we can get calcium from kale and iron from beans, but the quantity, quality and bio-availability of such elements are far better when we get them from animal rather than plant sources.” At the link find the title, “Let Them Eat Meat: There is Nothing Wrong With Rearing and Killing Animals for Human Consumption, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Men Without Work 47 mins – “The unemployment rate today sits at 5 percent. That’s half of what it was at the height of the Great Recession. But some say that number hides darker truths about the American workforce, namely, a jobless epidemic among men. Last year, 20 million men of prime working age in the U.S. did not have paid employment. And seven million men between the ages of 25 and 55 are no longer looking for work. Though this trend has been growing for nearly half a century, many argue it hasn’t gotten anywhere near the attention it deserves. A look at why millions of men have left the workforce, and what can be done to bring them back.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Microbiome 26 mins – “Today we travel to a future where your microbiome becomes a key part of your identity. From health to your child’s kindergarten, here are all the ways knowing about your microbiome might impact your life. Let’s start with a definition: what is the microbiome? Simply put, the microbiome is the collection of microbes (mostly bacteria) that live in and on your body. It’s hard to say exactly how many microbes make up the human microbiome, but researchers estimate that somewhere between 500 and 1,000 different species of bacteria live in the human gut. And that’s just the gut, there are microbial communities in our mouths, on our skin, in the vagina, all over the place. To put things in another perspective, the average human body is made up of 30 trillion cells. And on top of those 30 trillion cells, the average human also carries around in and on it, 40 trillion bacteria. 40 Trillion! To learn how those 40 trillion cells might be leveraged in the future, we talked to Ed Yong, the author of the upcoming book I Contain Multitudes; Rachel Feltman, a science blogger at the Washington Post; and Jessica Richman, the cofounder and CEO of uBiome, a personal microbiome company. The three of them walk us through the pros, cons and surprising ways the microbiome might be used in the future….At the link find the title, “Micro But Mighty, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files microbutmighty.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbiome Futures 26 mins – “Today we travel to a future where your microbiome becomes a key part of your identity. From health to your child’s kindergarten, here are all the ways knowing about your microbiome might impact your life.” At the link find the title, “Micro But Mighty, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files microbutmighty.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moral Duty 83 mins – “Mark, Wes, Seth, and Dylan discuss our interview with Peter Singer. Does Singer’s asserting such a heavy moral burden on us successfully condemn us to changing our priorities and/or feeling perpetually guilty, or is there something wrong with the argument? Even if we admit the moral demand is legitimate, can we soften Singer’s position by seeking to balance the obligation to help the poor with numerous other obligations, even though the latter don’t rise to the level of life and death? And how is the evolutionary basis of morality relevant to deciding what counts as a legitimate moral obligation?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosquito Eradication Issues 25 mins – “Today we travel to a future where humans have decided to eradicate the most dangerous animal on the planet: mosquitos. How would we do it? Is it even possible? And what are the consequences?” At the link find the title, “The Ultimate Swatting, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files theultimateswatting.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Norman Conquest of England 101 mins – “In 1066, the course of English history was dramatically altered, as the realm was conquered by Normans from across the Channel.” At the link right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Dumps and Biohacking VR 27 mins – “Taking a nuclear dump on Australia by Ian Woolf Brennan Hatton talks about biohacking augmented reality” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Power Future 30 mins – “Our nuclear power stations are being pushed to run well past their planned life-span. Matthew Hill asks if this is putting us all in danger.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oklahoma City Bombing 58 mins – “In April 1995 a devastating bomb ripped through the Alfred P Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City and 168 people died and many more were injured. Emma Barnett travels to Oklahoma City to find out what happened afterwards. She hears stories of resilience, defiance and success against the odds as the city came together to support and help those who suffered.” At the link find the title, “Oklahoma City After the Bomb, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04dgv05.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Origami Applications 62 mins – “Roberg Lang, Origami Artist; Physicist Origami is the centuries-old Japanese art of folding paper into decorative shapes and figures. Lang, a world-renowned origami artist, has taken this traditional art form one step further. Lang is one of the pioneers of cross-disciplinary origami that combines mathematics, science, technology, engineering and design with origami. His applications have been used on medical devices, air bag designs and expandable space telescopes. With 50 patents awarded and pending on semiconductor lasers, optics and integrated optoelectronics, Lang has more than 500 designs catalogued and diagrammed and his artwork has been shown around the world in exhibits at the MoMA in New York, Carrousel du Louvre in Paris and the Nippon Museum of Origami in Japan. Hear more about the blending of art and technology what drives him to create such inspirational masterpieces.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patagonia Founder 61 mins – “Chouinard is a legendary climber, surfer and environmentalist. He is also the reluctant entrepreneur who founded Patagonia, Inc., one of the most respected eco- and socially conscious companies in the world. To celebrate the re-release of his best selling memoir, Chouinard recounts his early days of selling climbing equipment out of his car and explains how that led to accidentally creating a multi-million dollar sporting goods company committed to environmentally responsible design and production. Through Patagonia he has led the way with innovations in organic cotton, sustainable wool and traceable down. However, Chouinard has not been limited by textiles. He has also created a venture fund called 20 million & Change and spun out Patagonia Provisions, reflecting his belief that food and agriculture will help solve our biggest environmental challenges. As companies and consumers seek a more sustainable economy, Chouinard will discuss how entrepreneurs can create greatness and achieve net positive social impact at a point where doing less-bad is no longer good enough.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pedestrian Deaths Increase 20 mins – “There are moments when content on a smartphone can make you oblivious to your surrounding and at imminent risk. It’s called “distracted walking” and the push to criminalize it, or at least outlaw it, has begun in Calgary, Vancouver and Toronto. Heads up!” At the link find the title, “Would a ‘distracted walking’ ban make streets safer? Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161031_41892.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plastics in Oceans 27 mins – “Our oceans are choking from plastic water bottles washing up on the beach to tiny microplastic fibres beneath the sea. It’s not clear what the long-term effects will be. The Current explores the efforts to haul tons of plastic off Vancouver’s west coast.” At the link find the title, “Oceans ‘absolutely choked’ by plastic bottles and microplastic fibres, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161031_39601.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prolotherapy 47 mins – “Our guest this week is Dr. Chad Edwards. Dr. Edwards holds a B.S. in Exercise Science & Sport Medicine from Oklahoma Baptist University, and attended Medical School at Oklahoma State University College for Health Sciences. He is board certified in Family Medicine by the American Board of Family Medicine, he was a Flight Surgeon and a Dive Medical Officer in the US Army, and served 5 years with Special Forces as an enlisted soldier. He also served as the Special Operations Task Force-North surgeon in Iraq. He is a 3rd Degree Black Belt in Bo-Ju-Tae Karate, and the founder and Medical Director of Revolution Health and Wellness. Listen in as we discuss his medical practice, healing inflammation and tendon damage with prolotherapy, functional medicine, diet and health, diabetes, testosterone, the US health and insurance system, and much more.” At the link right-click “Download Episode Here(MP3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quantified Man 35 mins – “Today we travel to a future full of spreadsheet approved lives. A future where everything we do is tracked and quantified: calories, air quality, sleep, heart rate, microbes, brain waves, finances, happiness, sadness, menstrual cycles, poops, hopes and dreams. Everything. This episode is longer than our usual 20 minute jaunts to the future, because the future of quantified self is so huge. We cover everything from biased algorithms, to microbiomes (again), to the future of the calorie, and more….” At the link find the title, “My Everything Pal, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files myeverythingpal.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Politics 36 mins – “Is Russia’s recent military foray into the Middle East a permanent move, and what if anything can the 45th president of the United States do to limit Moscow’s mischief in the region without risking open confrontation and war between the world’s leading nuclear powers? Russia expert Anna Borshchevskaya shares a studied look into Vladimir Putin’s motives and objectives and offers concrete advice for how the next American administration can disrupt Russia’s disruptive Middle East adventurism.” At the link find the title, “Middle East 2017: Challenges and Choices – Russia with Anna Borshchevskaya, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files PolicyCast11POTUS45Borshchevskaya.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Bots 22 mins – “Right now there’s a whole lot of buzz about sex robots. Some people are really excited about them, and think we’ll be marrying robots by 2050. Other people are really worried about them, and are organizing whole campaigns against sex robots. This week, we travel to a future where sex robots are realized, and talk about everything from warranties to ethics. [A note: if you listen to our show with or near young kids be aware that today’s episodes discusses the future of sex, and goes into some detail about sex toys, sex work and other sexy time things. If your kiddos are ready for a calm, reasonable discussion of sex and the sex industry, carry on! If you’re not there yet, that’s cool, but maybe skip this one.]” At the link find the title, “Love At First Bot, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files loveatfirstbot.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Silicon Valley History 26 mins – “It was a meeting of two American masters: Robert Noyce, who, in inventing the integrated computer chip and founding Intel, willed Silicon Valley into being, and Tom Wolfe, who, in holding a magnifying glass over the social and class currents that shape America, rewrote the laws of what it meant to be a journalist. Their resulting Esquire story from 1983, “The Tinkerings of Robert Noyce,” remains one of the most revealing and entertaining portraits of early Silicon Valley and the personalities, imagination, and freewheeling moxie that triggered and continue to power the computer revolution. Kara Swisher, who spent two decades covering digital issues for The Wall Street Journal before cofounding the influential technology site Re/code, joins host David Brancaccio to discuss what both Noyce and Wolfe wrought, and how the influence of each—in computers and nonfiction writing, respectively—remains as powerful and mesmerizing as ever.” At the link find the title, “The Tinkerings of Robert Noyce, by Tom Wolfe, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files The-Tinkerings-of-Robert-Noyce-by-Tom-Wolfe.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soil Spectroscopy 4 mins – “…specialized forms of spectroscopy are being used to analyze soil. While it’s possible to do chemical analysis, spectroscopy is faster and cheaper. This opens up new worlds of analysis by making more data available. Rather than teach a group of farmers in a region how to treat soil in general, each farmer can receive individualized information. Spectroscopy can also be used to evaluate fertilizer, making sure it contains what it should. Adulteration is unfortunately all too common in impoverished regions. Spectroscopy provides a potential means for screening carcinogens produced by molds that find their way into grain. It’s a very real problem in tropical regions where virtually all of certain grains can become contaminated. Yet while the potential benefits are clear, soil spectroscopy faces hurdles. It’s relatively new, so researchers are focusing on both what to look for in soil, and the best spectrographic means by which to recognize what they’re looking for. The technology could really take off if lab equipment could be replaced by hand-held devices – a prospect that looks likely in the coming years. And what can we learn from the mountains of data that could be generated?….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sound Effects 17 mins – “Sound design is built on deception — when you watch a movie or TV show, nearly all of the sounds you hear are fake. In this audio-rich talk, Tasos Frantzolas explores the role of sound in storytelling and demonstrates just how easily our brains are fooled by what we hear.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance of Journalists 9 mins – “This week several journalists learned police were tracking their phone calls and texts in response to a complaint from a former union boss. The Current looks into the implications this kind of surveillance has for press freedom across the country.” At the link find the title “Surveillance of journalists sparks concern over Canada’s freedom of press, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161103_89654.mp3“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainability 29 mins – “What does it mean for a university to have sustainability practices?  At New Mexico State University and the University of Texas at El Paso, efforts are underway to reduce energy costs and they are already showing significant results.  We’ll visit with Joni Newcomer, Communications & Sustainability Manager at NMSU; and Luis G. Perez, Manager of Campus Sustainability and Energy Conservation at UTEP.  They’ll discuss the successes at their respective campuses, and what they hope to achieve in the future.” At the link right-click “Download’ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Swearing 52 mins – Benjamin Bergen is a cognitive scientist and he loves swearing. He actually studies it for a living. In a fascinating new book, Bergen examines why we use swear words, why they’re so powerful, and how they work in our language and on our minds.  Swearing, he says, can be useful, funny, and cathartic. It also helps us express the strongest human emotions. Doug spoke with Bergen earlier this week, and Thursday we’re airing that conversation. But don’t worry: we’ve bleeped all the swear words. Benjamin Bergen is a professor of cognitive science at the University of California, San Diego, where he directs the Language and Cognition Laboratory. His new book is called What the F: What Swearing Reveals About Our Language, Our Brains, and Ourselves” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Tim Ferris Q and A 110 mins – “By request, we have another drunk dialing episode (the most recent one can be found here, and the original can be found here).This one is a little different as it’s a Ladies Night edition. Some of you may have noticed that ladies were absent from the last drunk dialing fiasco. Why? It’s just math. Looking at the results of a recent poll of 11,463 respondents, my audience is 84.04% male, 15.83% female, and .13% other. The people who sign up first get called first. The last time, three out of the 20, which is exactly 15%, were female. Unfortunately, those women (and several guys) did not pick up. This time around, I decided to try the “ladies night” format.” At the link find the title, “ #197: Drunk Dialing — Ladies Night Edition!” right-click “Media files The Tim Ferriss Show – Drunk Dial Ladies Night.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Translations and Interpreters 35 mins – “We start this episode with Barry Slaughter Olsen, who’s the co-president of Interpret America. Barry tells us all about what interpreting and translation actually is, and why it will be really hard to replace human translation with machines. Then we talked to Julie Sedivy, a writer and language scientist based in Calgary. She helps us think about what these kinds of devices might do for language loss and cultural assimilation of immigrants. Do people still learn English when they move to America or Canada? Last we talked to Erin McKean, the editor of Wordnik, the world’s largest English Language dictionary. She walks us through a ton of fun future possibilities like branded Taylor Swift language plugins and online translation truthers.” At the link find the title, “Omnibot May, 2016,” right-click “Media files omnibot.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tweet and Retweet 35 mins – “What happens, when today’s teens start running for office? When their entire internet history is there, searchable, for us to read? What if these teens Tweet something at 15 that they might regret at 45? Do we learn to accept that their opinions have changed? Or do we go through every candidate’s entire social media history to find dirt on them? Does that tactic still work in the future? Or do we all just throw up our hands and admit that teens have bad opinions and that hopefully those opinions have changed?…” At the link find the title, “Revenge of the Retweet, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files revengeoftheretweet.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

UFOs and Aliens 51 mins – “Seth Shostak, SETI Institute Senior Astronomer, discovers what it’s like to host StarTalk All-Stars when he welcomes skeptic Ben Radford and new comic co-host Ray Ellin to discuss UFOs, aliens, government cover-ups, Roswell, and space-faring dinosaurs.” At the link find the title, “UFOs and Possible Aliens, with Seth Shostak – StarTalk All-Stars, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 290844868-startalk-ufos-and-possible-aliens-with-seth-shostak-startalk-all-stars.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Voting History 52 mins – “If the record TV viewership of the Clinton-Trump presidential debates is any guide, voter turnout for the November election could reach levels not seen since the Gilded Age.  It’s easy to be nostalgic for the consistently high voter turnout in the late 19th century, until you consider all the people who weren’t eligible to vote back then. In this episode of BackStory, the History Guys look at voting trends – from the changing mechanisms of voting to how the electoral college system maintained racial hierarchies in the South.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Voting Issues 45 mins– “In the wake of the Supreme Court’s 2013 decision in Shelby County v Holder, many states made changes to their voting laws that may disproportionately harm minorities. This week, lawyers in Ohio filed an emergency motion with the Supreme Court requesting a suspension of voting restrictions in their state. One of those lawyers, Subodh Chandra, joins us to explain why. We also speak with Wendy Weiser, director of the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, about the potential impact of Donald Trump’s recent warnings about vote-rigging. She explains why long-term neglect of our voting infrastructure is a much bigger threat than either vote tampering or self-styled poll watchers.” At the link find the title, “Intimidation Nation, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM1191970108.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela Options 75 mins – “Experts discuss U.S. policy options toward Venezuela in response to food and medicine shortages, soaring crime rates, declining oil production, and a government crackdown on the opposition. The Home Box Office What to Do About…series highlights a specific issue and features experts who will put forward competing analyses and policy prescriptions in a mock high-level U.S. government meeting.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Control and Research 72 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, and Paul Duprex Guests: Ralph Baric, Felix Drexler, Marion Koopmans, and Stacey Schultz-Cherry From the EIDA2Z [Infectious Diseases from A to Z] conference at Boston University, Vincent, Alan and Paul meet up with Ralph Baric, Felix Drexler, Marion Koopmans, and Stacey Schultz-Cherry to talk about discovering, understanding, protecting, and collaborating on emerging infectious diseases.” Reference is made to the Catch Box Microphone during the discussion. At the link right-click “Download TWIV 413” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 260 – Nov 4, 2016: AI History, Al Capone Biography, Alt Right Vengeance, American Right Class, Antarctic Researcher Dies, Anthony Bourdain, Antidepressants Value, Bacterial Ambushes and Spiders, Bats and Rabies, Bee Behavior, Billionaire Lives, Canadian Seagrams, Cancer in Kids, Caribou in Canada, Cat Concerns, Charity and Duty, Color of Regret Story, Complex Science, Composer Rebecca Clarke, Containment Labs, Copyright Office, Coral Reef Decline, Cuban Life, Death Rituals, Dementia Treatment, Dementia Update, Denial of Service Attacks, Dentistry and Health, Doctor and Mom, Economic Planks for Presidents, Election Process Problems, Electric Cars, Extraterrestrial Life, Eye Care, Face Blindness, Fact Checking, Fairphone 2 and BlindSquare, Genetic Science, Government Accountability Office, Headache Treatment, Hearing Researcher, High Tides Increase, Horror Stories in America, Human Knowledge Limits, Immigration Control in the US, Incrementalism, Indonesian Forests Burn, Infant Warmer, Intelligence Brief, Investing and Compounding, Jill Stein, Job Trends, Loneliness, Migration by Sea, Mill Town History, Millennial Congressman, Minimum Wage Discussion, Muslims in America, Nation States, Neuroplasticity, Neuroscientist Videogamer, Noise and Attention, North Korea Nuclear Threat, Nursing Home Murder, Obama Care Premiums, Obesity Intervention, Opiate Antagonists, Pegasus Story, Pest Management, Politicians Lie, Power-Grid, Prepper Movement, Presidential Debates, Psychoactive Drug Abuse, Pumpkin Mess and Crow Kills, Racism, Ralph Nader, Realistic Medicine, Refugees in Boats, Refugees in France, Ross Perot Conundrum, Rumors Judges and Trade, Russian Forest Fires, School Punishment, Shipping Costs, Skin Care Entrepreneur, Space Trash, Surgical Simulations, Tasers Effect, Terrorism, Testosterone, Truth Matters Discussion, Twitter Trolls, Undocumented Wall Street Executive, US Power Questions, US-Russia Rift, Voting Fraud, Voting Wars, Wildlife Extinction, Wives of Civil War Generals, WW II-Pacific

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 105 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 256 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 12,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 340 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

AI History 70 mins – “Jerry Kaplan has been working on artificial intelligence since the 1950s. He explains to Leo the difference between general artificial intelligence, machine learning, and automation. He also explains why he thinks the idea of the Singularity is nonsense, that the real thing the Turing Test describes is trickery rather than intelligence, and that much of the current hype over the development of AI is just that: hype. He does think that the current growth of machine learning can and will transform the economy – many jobs will be replaced through automation, but many other opportunities will be created.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up men.

Al Capone Biography 48 mins – “The real Al Capone. From Brooklyn kid to Chicago crime boss, a new biography gives the whole story.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alt Right Vengeance 20 mins – “The Anti-Defamation League has identified 2.6 million tweets containing anti-Semitic language by alt-right Trump supporters in the past year. Hundreds of journalists have been targeted, and the ADL says it won’t disappear after the election.” At the link find the title, “’Alt-right’ Trump supporters attack journalists online, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161027_82328.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Right Class 47 mins – “Sociologist Arlie Hochschild has gone deep into Trump country to talk with the angry white working class. She’s with us.” (2 guests) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antarctic Researcher Dies 4 mins – “We hear a lot these days about the big changes going on at the Earth’s poles, as the ice caps there start to melt under rising global temperatures. We hear less about the risks that scientists take in trying to understand these changes. But we’ve just had a stark reminder of the dangers with the death of Gordon Hamilton. The 50-year-old glaciologist at the University of Maine died over the weekend during a research trip when his snowmobile plunged into a 100-foot crevasse on a glacier in Antarctica. “Hamilton studied frozen water in all its forms — snow, sea ice, glacial ice, river ice, permafrost — to understand our planet’s changing climate,” says WGBH science reporter Ari Daniel, who followed Hamilton in Greenland a couple summers ago a climate science reporting trip sponsored by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. Hamilton’s research centered on understanding the relationship between melting ice sheets and rising sea levels, Daniel says. “He studied how glaciers are changing in terms of their size, their flow speeds, their behavior, and what those changes could mean for the rest of us, as glacial ice finds its wayintothe ocean.”  At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anthony Bourdain 49 mins – “The host of the CNN series ‘Parts Unknown’ talks about what food sends him into a “spiral of depression,” the perils of cooking bacon naked, and how he fell in love with Vietnam. His new cookbook, ‘Appetites,’ features recipes he cooks at home for his daughter. ‘Fresh Air’ contributor Mat Johnson describes his mother’s journey with multiple sclerosis.” At the link find the title, “Oct, 2016 Anthony Bourdain,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antidepressants Value 44 mins – “There’s an intriguing body of research that suggests the power of antidepressants doesn’t come from chemicals in the drugs, but from the power of placebo. Not everyone agrees, though. We speak to researchers and medical professionals on either side of the debate, and some wedged in-between — Prof. Peter Kramer, psychiatrist and author of Ordinarily Well: the Case for Antidepressants; Prof. Irving Kirsch, psychologist and author of The Emperor’s New Drugs: Exploding the Antidepressant Myth; psychiatrist and radiologist Prof. Helen Mayberg; and psychiatrist Prof. Gregory Simon.” At the link find the title, “Antidepressants, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT4311202767.mp” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bacterial Ambushes and Spiders 27 mins – “Strains of bacteria have been found lying dormant in our blood. These have been linked to diseases such as heart attacks, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and rheumatoid arthritis. It’s thought that excess iron in the blood, triggers the bacteria to wake up and produce a protein that alters the clotting ability of the blood, exacerbating or even causing these conditions. …Spiders are remarkable creatures. We’ve all heard about how incredibly strong their silk is. But it’s the water spider’s diving bell that’s currently intriguing scientists. The spiders spin a bubble of silk with a unique protein-gel coating, which has special gas-permeable properties, allowing the air-breathing spider to spend time underwater. Could this be a new kind of silk that could be copied in the lab? …Is fresh transfusion blood better than stored blood? After over 40 studies that have failed to adequately settle the issue, finally a study from McMaster University in Canada looking at the outcomes of over 30 thousand transfusion recipients have found that there is no significant difference to whether patients receive fresh or (up to 42 days) stored blood.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bats and Rabies 58 mins – “The 28th of September marked the 10th World Rabies Day, and this year’s theme was “Rabies; Educate. Vaccinate. Eliminate.” While most global efforts aimed at rabies control focus on spread by dogs and other carnivores, the Streicker lab working in the MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, and the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine at the University of Glasgow, are looking at how the rabies virus is transmitted from blood feeding vampire bats in Latin America, which are the major source of rabies in this region, in a bid to establish more effective strategies to prevent rabies transmission, which will aid global efforts to eradicate the virus as a public health concern. For the Contagious Thinking podcast, we spoke with University of Glasgow’s Dr Daniel Streicker – a Wellcome Trust fellow and 2015 National Geographic Emerging Explorer – and Dr Julio Benavides – a postdoc in Daniel’s lab and recent recipient of the George Baer Latin American Investigator Award from the international group, ‘Rabies in the Americas.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Bats Overview 47 mins – “We talk to ecologist, conservationist and wildlife photographer Merlin Tuttle about his book The Secret Lives of Bats: My Adventures with the World’s Most Misunderstood Mammals.” At the link find the title, “153 Merlin Tuttle – The Secret Lives of Bats,” right-click “Media files f7c20e54-0646-475b-a4db-471c884aa89c.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bee Behavior 44 mins – “Dr. Gene Robinson is the Swanlund Chair of Entomology, Director of the Institute for Genomic Biology, and Director of the Bee Research Facility at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his PhD in Entomology from Cornell University and joined the faculty of the University in 1989. Gene has received many awards and honors over the course of his career, including the Burroughs Wellcome Innovation Award in Functional Genomics, the Founders Memorial Award from the Entomological Society of America, a Fulbright Senior Research Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and an NIH Pioneer Award. He is also a Fellow of the Animal Behavior Society, a Fellow of the Entomological Society of America, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and member of the US National Academy of Sciences. Gene is here with us today to tell us about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “100: Investigating the Hive Mind and How Genes Influence Social Behavior in Bees – Dr. Gene Robinson,” right-click “Media files 100_Gene_Robinson_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Billionaire Lives 23 mins – “Several years ago, sociologist Brooke Harrington decided to explore the secret lives of billionaires. What she found, she said, shocked her.” At the link find the title, “Episode 49: Filthy Rich,” right-click “Media files 20161024_hiddenbrain_49.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Seagrams 26 mins – “‘He always had a big job. Charles Bronfman was born into wealth and privilege and stepped into the family distillery business, Seagram. But he faced self-doubt and complicated family relationships all of which he’s sharing in a new memoir, Distilled.” At the link find the title, “Nobody wins in a family war’: Billionaire Charles Bronfman on Seagram’s demise, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161025_43675.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer in Kids 28 mins – “Advances in genomic medicine indicate that pediatric cancers may be quite different from their adult counterparts. Hear from experts on why this might be and what scientists are doing to understand it better.” At the link find the title, “Understanding the Biological Basis of Pediatric Cancer, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 160721_cancer.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Caribou in Canada 57 mins – “No, it’s not a moose, which is what most people think it is. The animal is actually a caribou — one of the most important but misunderstood species in Canada. Paul Kennedy reports on the past and the future of Canadian caribou.” At the link find the title, “What’s On Our Quarter? The past and future of Canadian Caribou, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161025_47290.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cat Concerns 47 mins – “We talk to science writer Abigail Tucker about her new book The Lion in the Living Room: How House Cats Tamed Us and Took Over the World.” At the link find the title,”152 Abigail Tucker – How House Cats Tamed Us and Took Over the World,” right-click “Media files cc065848-ce13-478d-a106-c567a2d93d36.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charity and Duty 54 mins – “What do we owe the poor? Mark and Wes interview perhaps the world’s most influential living philosopher. We discuss his ongoing work rooted in his 1971 essay “Famine, Affluence, and Morality,” about the warped priorities of our consumerist society: We spend money on luxuries while innocent children overseas die from inexpensively preventable causes. For more about Peter, see http://www.petersinger.info. Listen to the follow-up discussion here, or get the whole episode ad-free via the Citizen edition with your PEL Citizenship. Check out the St. John’s College Graduate Institute: partiallyexaminedlife.com/sjcgi. Also, check out Gulf Breeze Recovery at www.gulfbreezerecovery.com.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Color of Regret Story 28 mins – Sefid’s aura was the same luminescent gray as storm clouds. ‘‘You will not regret this.’’ Yet he said it in that tone that people used when it was certain you would. Nasrin cleared her throat. ‘‘What is there to regret? I am grateful for the matches.’’ She shifted on the concrete bench and slid the matchbox into the pocket of her faded corduroy coat. As a city bus rolled around the corner, commuters across the street pressed closer to one another, blending the colors of their own varied auras. Sefid’s smile was merely a bristling at the center of his thick, black beard. It didn’t distract from the quick glance at his wristwatch. ‘‘You know as well as anyone how few of us there are in this province. Iran needs more people like your father. We trust that a daughter of Azad Rajavi won’t fail us.’’ At the link right-click “Download”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Complex Science 86 mins – “Today, more than ever, we can better understand just how complex our world is, from social groups to economic markets to neurons in the brain and our immune systems. But will these new complexity frontiers complement contemporary physics or upend it completely?” At the link find the title, “The Emerging Science of Complexity, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files 160804_poe3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Composer Rebecca Clarke 4 mins – “Rebecca Clarke was born in London in 1886. Her life stretched from the late Victorian era through the end of the 1970’s — a period during which the role of women changed unimaginably. Clarke was a distinguished violist who studied for many years at London’s Royal College of Music. She went on to make a living as a professional musician. Famed pianist Arthur Rubenstein went so far as to call her the “glorious Rebecca Clarke.” Clarke’s story is interesting for what she achieved as a performer. But it’s even more interesting for what she didn’t achieve as a composer.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Containment Labs 47 mins – “The National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL) building in Boston is a high-tech facility for the study of emerging, and re-emerging, microbial diseases of humans and animals. The building, part of Boston University, is equipped up to Biosafety level 4 (BSL-4), allowing the researchers there to safely study dangerous viruses like Ebola or Nipah. In this episode, we got special access to the facility to have a look round, guided by Professor Paul Duprex, a Microbiology Society member and an Editor of our Journal of General Virology. On the tour we got to meet the NEIDL’s Director, Professor Ron Corley, who told us about the building’s architecture and function, and talked with Dr Nahid Bhadelia who runs the facility’s back-up medical programme.” At the link find click “Download Episode,” click “Save File” from the pop-up menu and “OK”.

Copyright Office 14 mins – “…published reports announced the removal of Maria Pallante from her duties as the US Register of Copyrights, a role she had held since 2011. Subsequent reporting offers insights on what prompted the surprise move, and what it portends for the future of copyright policy in the United States. Just a year ago, Pallante had called on Congress to move the Copyright Office from under the control of the Librarian of Congress. Her removal, however, came shortly after the arrival of the new Librarian of Congress, Carla Hayden. As Andrew Albanese, Publishers Weekly senior writer, tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally, the story has impact well beyond the Beltway. “Copyright today is no longer about the entertainment industry. With the rise of social media, it touches people in a way that, historically, it never did,” Albanese explains. Given the heightened interest, many – and from all sides of the issue – have called for Congress to “reform” copyright. “Sources tell me not to expect that. In fact, copyright is yet another area where Congress is fairly gridlocked,” Albanese says. “You may see nibbles around the edges, but not wholesale reform, and that feels right to me.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coral Reef Decline 46 mins- “Outside magazine declared Australia’s Great Barrier Reef dead. Scientists pushed back, but say it’s in trouble. We’ll go under the sea.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Life 61 mins – “Casey Mulligan of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about life in Cuba. Mulligan, who recently returned from a trip to Cuba, discusses the economy, the standard of living and some of the peculiarities of communist control.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu,

Death Rituals 58 mins – “How do we meet the needs of the dead and to our own? Barbara Nichol talks with anthropologists and historians about the role that ritual plays in our attempts to cope with the conundrum of the corpse.” At the link find the title, “Dust to Dust: Notes on rituals for the dead, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161026_48295.mp3 Oct, 2016 Rigging An Election? It’s Not So Easy, Expert Says” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Update 32 mins _ In episode 328, Mike and James do an update of what is new for the treatment of dementia. We go over the scales used to assess dementia and then look at the latest trials for the commonly used drugs. Sadly, the treatments are still sorely limited.” At the link find the title, “Episode 328: A dementia update you will hopefully remember,” right-click “Media files Episode 328 A dementia update you will hopefully remember.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Denial of Service Attacks 47 mins – “A massive denial of service attack took down a chunk of the Internet on Friday, using webcams and DVRs. We’ll look at what comes next.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dentistry and Health 43 mins – “This episode’s guest is Dentist and preventative health advocate, Dr. Steven Lin. Join us as we talk with Dr. Lin about dentistry, mouth and teeth health, jaw formation, the work of Weston A. Price, and more. At the link right-click “Download Episode Here”and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doctor and Mom 36 mins – “In today’s episode, Ryan talks with Hanaan, a first year medical student who is married with three kids and worked as a nurse practitioner for three years. She initially wanted to become a doctor but aside from family obligations, the lack of mentorship during her premed somehow caused her to sidestep and follow the NP route. Not finding full satisfaction from it, she finally decided to pursue her lifelong dream to become a physician and take on the medical journey.” “At the link find the title, “205: Why She Left the Premed Track, Became an NP and is now an M1,” right-click “Media files PMY205.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Planks for Presidents 26 mins – “Behold the Planet Money economic platform, crafted by brilliant economists of all stripes, and pure poison to any politician who embraces it.” At the linkf ind the title, “#387: The No-Brainer Economic Platform,”right-click “Media files 20161026 pmoney podcast102616.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Election Process Problems 11 mins – “How do you teach an entire country how to vote when no one has done it before? It’s a huge challenge facing fledgling democracies around the world — and one of the biggest problems turns out to be a lack of shared language. After all, if you can’t describe something, you probably can’t understand it. In this eye-opening talk, election expert Philippa Neave shares her experiences from the front lines of democracy — and her solution to this unique language gap.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Cars 47 mins – “More than two-million electric cars may be on the road by year’s end. They are the future. It’s a real battle to see who will make the best.” ( 4guests) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Extraterrestrial Life 76 mins – “According to Enrico Fermi, there’s a high probability of extraterrestrial life, but we haven’t found any yet. Why is that? Listen in as top scientists discuss the question of what and who else might be out there.” At the link find the title, “Are We Alone in the Universe? Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 161022_poe5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Eye Care 20 mins – “Peter White is joined by Cathy Yelf, CEO of the Macular Society, who talks about their new report calling for more collaboration in the funding of medical research to find a cure for Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Neil Heslop, newly appointed CEO of Leonard Cheshire Disability talks about his new role and the way in which he plans to lead the organisation.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Face Blindness 27 mins – “Every day Mary Ann Sieghart blanks friends and colleagues in the street – some people think she is the rudest woman they know. She has prosopagnosia, more commonly known as face blindness. Sufferers have problems perceiving or remembering faces. It is thought around one in 50 of us has the condition – the chances are you or someone you know will have it – but many people do not even realise they have it. Stephen Fry and former UK Health Secretary Patricia Hewitt are two of the well known people who have the condition and here they share how they’ve found ways of coping with it to get by in their careers. In extreme cases, some sufferers do not recognise family members or even their own reflection. Concerns are rising that it could lead to issues in security, justice and misdiagnoses. Psychologists and psychiatrists are trying to learn more about the condition and its effects, calling for it to be recognised formally and screened for in schools and in jobs. Mary Ann has long dreamed of a solution. Could technology or even hormonal treatments help improve her ability? Or, will the best solution simply be to make people more aware?” At the link find the title, “Who Are You Again? Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04d4zft.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fact Checking 60 mins – “This week we’re sitting down with three experienced fact-checkers to better understand what the process of fact-checking looks like from the inside, and what the challenges are when news and politics collide. We speak with Brooke Borel, a contributing editor to Popular Science and author of the book “The Chicago Guide to Fact-Checking”; Michelle Ciarrocca, a researcher, reporter, and writer; and Dave Levitan, a science journalist and author of the upcoming new book “Not a Scientist: How Politicians Mistake, Misrepresent, and Utterly Mangle Science”.

Fairphone 2 and BlindSquare 27 mins – “Fairphone is honoured at this year’s Lovie Awards in the Emerging Entrepreneurs category. Fairphone tries to source all its component minerals from ethical mines and its handsets are also modular, so you can take them apart and replace components if they break. Blindsquare is an innovative smart app that helps blind people to navigate indoors and outdoors. Click’s Simon Morton reports on its use in New Zealand. Smartphone to Detect Cancer Biomarkers – The smartphone acting as a portable medical lab – researchers in the USA have developed a way of using a smartphone to detect cancer biomarkers. Click talks to the lead researcher, Professor Lei Li from Washington State University.” At the link “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Science 37 mins – “When it comes to the ethics of genetic technologies who decides how far we should go in our pursuit for perfection? In 2001, the journal Nature published the first sequenced human genome. Hailed by many as the greatest achievement of humankind, the Human Genome Project also caused its fair share of outrage – with many of the objections still being argued over today. But are these fears warranted? And with genetic technologies such as synthetic biology advancing rapidly, are we right to tinker with the book of life? To discuss this and more, Ian Sample is joined by a trio of bioethicists: Princeton University’s Professor Peter Singer, the University of Newcastle’s Professor Jackie Leach Scully, and the University of Oxford’s Professor Julian Savulescu.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Accountability Office 48 mins – “We take a field trip to the Government Accountability Office, learn about Sharia law on #GoodMuslimBadMuslim, occupy some federal lands and learn what podcasts the host of Gravy is snacking on.” At the link find the title, “Episode 4: Occupy This Episode 4: Occupy This Podcast,”Media files 20161028_biglisten_ep04and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Headache Treatment 58 mins -”Tension headaches, cluster headaches and migraines all call for different approaches to prevention and treatment. What should you know? Do you know how to treat a headache, beyond taking aspirin or acetaminophen? Can you get into trouble by taking your medication too frequently? (The answer is yes; this can make headaches worse.) … Cluster headaches recur with such extreme pain that they are sometimes termed “suicide headaches.” There are effective treatments, including oxygen, but first the patient must get the proper diagnosis. Some people benefit from taking a daily medication to prevent this type of pain.” At the link find the title, “Show 1055,” right-click “Media files PP-1055Headaches.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hearing Researcher 58 mins – “Dr. Christopher Cederroth is an Assistant Professor within the laboratory of Experimental Audiology working on tinnitus within the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. He received his PhD from the University of Geneva, Switzerland for which he was awarded the Denber-Pinard Prize from the University of Geneva. During that time, he also contributed to the launch of the start-up company Amazentis S.A. Before joining the faculty at the Karonlinska Institute, Chris was awarded a Swiss National Foundation Advanced Fellowship for his postdoctoral work conducted at Rockefeller University, as well as the Wenner Gren Foundation and Nicholson Postdoctoral Fellowship to support his research efforts at the Karolinska Institute. Chris is here with us today to talk a little about his research and tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “363: Dedicated to Discovering the Causes and Treatments for Hearing Deficits – Dr. Christopher Cederroth,” right-click “Media files 363, Chris Cedderoth Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop menu.

High Tides Increase 60 mins – “Oceanographer John Englander, author of “High Tide on Main Street” explains the march inland of rising seas. From UK, Dr. Ted Shepherd: how Arctic heating creates weird weather in Northern Hemisphere.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Horror Stories in America 52 mins – “Rooted in legend and culture, horror stories play on our fears while often providing a distraction from the real sources of anxiety.  In this episode of BackStory, the Guys look at the different forms horror has taken in American culture – from witches and vampires to slave revolts and haunted houses.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Knowledge Limits 76 mins – “Featuring cosmologist Neil Weiner, string theorist Eva Silverstein, and physicist Vijay Balasubramanian, with moderation from philosopher of science Jill North, this podcast explores what the future holds for physics.” At the link find the title, “Is There a Limit to Human Knowledge? May, 2016,” right-click “Media files 160512_poe1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Control in the US 47 mins – “Immigration Politics in the US – “Immigration and the presidential campaign. We’ll look at realities, proposals and the future face of the country.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Incrementalism 48 mins – “What do Renaissance painting, civil-rights movements, and Olympic cycling have in common? In each case, huge breakthroughs came from taking tiny steps. In a world where everyone is looking for the next moonshot, we shouldn’t ignore the power of incrementalism.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indoensian Forests Burn 30 mins – “Some of the last refuges of the Orangutan are under threat. As food manufacturers demand more palm oil for their processed products so the pressure grows on the forests of Indonesia which contain some the last of the Orangutan and some of the world’s densest reserves of carbon-capturing peat. Peter Hadfield travels to Borneo to witness the forest being cleared and the peat being destroyed.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infant Warmer 37 minsJane Marie Chen, co-founder and CEO of Embrace Innovations, describes how her social-enterprise startup’s infant warmer for premature and low-birth-weight babies came into the world. She discusses how passion fuels the drive to overcome setbacks big and small, how Embrace has expanded into retail to support its humanitarian efforts, and explains why we should “choose to see the world through the lens of beauty.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Brief 59 mins – “Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper joins PBS’ Charlie Rose to reflect on lessons learned over his six years as director of national intelligence. Clapper discusses challenges in U.S.-Russian relations, including cybersecurity issues, and critical intelligence concerns facing the next U.S. president.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing and Compounding 35 mins – “Examining 88 years of returns and risks of an all-value portfolio, Paul explains why young investors might legitimately consider a 100% all-value portfolio, while the combination of these asset classes should account for only a small part of a retiree’s portfolio. In the discussion of this 2-Fund Combo, Paul suggests a number of related and useful articles and podcasts, particularly for first-time listeners: This 4-fund combo wallops the S&P 500 Index; A half a percent that can change your retirement; The ultimate equity buy and hold strategy; Fine tuning your asset allocations; Retirement distributions 2016At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jill Stein 58 mins – We are joined this week by Green Party presidential candidate, Dr. Jill Stein,who talks with Ralph about Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, third parties, the media, the TPP, the Presidential debates, and much, much more! Dr. Jill Stein is a physician, who graduated from Harvard Medical School and practiced internal medicine for twenty-five years in Massachusetts.  In the 1990s Dr. Stein became increasingly concerned about the links between illness and environmental toxins, especially exposures to lead and mercury and dioxin contamination that comes from the burning of waste.  She helped lead the fight to clean up coal plants in Massachusetts, then known as the Filthy Five.  This ended up setting an example for how other states could raise the standards for their own coal plants.  Her first foray into electoral politics was in 2002 when she was recruited by Green-Rainbow Party activists to run for Governor of Massachusetts against Mitt Romney. She is the co-author of two widely-praised reports, “In Harm’s Way: Toxic Threats to Child Development,”  and “Environmental Threats to Healthy Aging.” She was the Green Party candidate for President in 2012 and again here in 2016.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-u menu.

Job Trends 27 mins – “You’ve heard it before — that there’s no such thing anymore as a job for life. Now even the minister of finance says contract to contract — short-term work — is the new reality. Others call the state of affairs, precarious. Does it have to be this way?” At the link find the title, “Are short-term jobs the new normal? Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161025_70912.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Loneliness 9 mins – “Loneliness is an epidemic in Canada and author Kio Stark argues the lost art of talking to strangers can help address the feeling of being alone. It can help the lonely, the person reaching out and may even alter political views.” At the link find the title, “Talking to strangers is good for us – and for politics, says author, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161027_50453.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migration by Sea 91 mins – “In recent years, dramatic images of migration—struggling boats crammed dangerously beyond capacity; two sisters, champion swimmers, towing their foundering boat to safety; a little boy’s body lying face down in the sand—have seized worldwide attention and catapulted unauthorized maritime migration onto national and international policy agendas. Whether it is the overwhelming Mediterranean crisis or movements across the Bay of Bengal and the Red Sea/Gulf of Aden, in the Caribbean, or around Australia, crisis has followed crisis, leaving almost intractable problems for policymakers. The challenges have only become more complex, widespread, and dangerous in recent years.  While the issues presented by unauthorized maritime migration are constantly evolving, the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) provides analysis, in a book discussed at this event, on some common themes that have emerged over the past decade, along with practical recommendations. This book, All at Sea: The Policy Challenges of Rescue, Interception, and Long-Term Response to Maritime Migration, is based on case studies of unauthorized movements by sea in several parts of the world. This book discussion explores the different facets of maritime migration—the multiple state and nonstate actors; the mixed flows of refugees and other migrants; the overlapping and sometimes contradictory legal regimes; fluctuating state policies; the secondary movements of people from countries of first asylum; the constantly shifting sources, routes, and destinations; and the inter-relatedness with other equally complex problems—and how these together create a “wicked problem” for governments, civil society, the private sector, and international organizations to tackle together.” At the link right-click “Download(Loading)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mill Town History 57 mins – “Founded in the 1830s, the Queen City’s Amoskeag Manufacturing Company became an industrial powerhouse of international renown, making Manchester a magnet for immigrant laborers and later, union activism. We’re talking with two Granite State historians about this period and its relevance today.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Millennial Congressman 59 mins – “Congressman Eric Swalwell has quickly made a name for himself as the voice of the millennial generation in Congress. The first person in his family to go to college, Rep. Swalwell is fighting for student loan reform and advocating for affordable housing and paid family leave. An avid user of social media platforms like Snapchat and Twitter, Swalwell has even inspired the popular hashtag #Swalwelling. He’s also believed to be the first member of Congress to Vine on the House floor and he has used Facebook Live to stream from the House chamber. Last year Swalwell created the bipartisan Sharing Economy Caucus with Republican Congressman Darrell Issa, which focuses on the opportunities and challenges related to the rise of companies like Uber and Airbnb. Rep. Swalwell is also a member of the United Solutions Caucus, created in 2012 by a group of incoming freshman lawmakers who are working across political party lines to address important policy matters. Join INFORUM to hear more from this political up-and-comer and to share your thoughts with him about the issues that matter most to you as we look toward the 2016 elections.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Minimum Wage Discussion 56 mins – “It’s a contentious issue in the upcoming election, and in the Granite State, politicians remain strongly divided. New Hampshire still has the lowest minimum in New England, at seven-twenty-five an hour.  State leaders remain divided on how to increase wages without harming business and raising prices.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Muslims in America 33 mins – “Hasan Minhaj is a comedian, our favorite Daily Show correspondent, and the creator and star of his one-man show, “Homecoming King,” which tells the story of New Brown America. He came to our studios to talk optimism, politics, guilt, the American Dream, hip hop, his infamous Congressional mic drop, biryani rice terrorism, the greatness of Zayn Malik, and so much more, including a new Mash-Up Avengers squad we’re forming. Taking sign-ups now.” At the link find the title, “Hasan Minhaj On The American Dream Tax. Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files MUA_102416_HasanMinhaj-f85bea86.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muslims in America’s 62 mins – “We are delighted to have Daisy Khan with us to talk about community efforts to combat extremism and Islamophobia in the United States. Daisy Khan is the executive director of WISE, the Women’s Islamic Initiative in Spirituality and Equality. Ms. Khan is a regular contributor to major media outlets—including CNN, Al Jazeera, BBC News—and has served as an advisor to a variety of documentaries. Born in Kashmir, Ms. Khan spent 25 years as an interior architect for various Fortune 500 companies. In 2005, she dedicated herself to full-time community service and building movements for positive change. In recognition of this work, she is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Interfaith Center of New York’s James Parks Morton Interfaith Award among others. She was also selected by Women’s eNews as one of the 21 Leaders for the 21st Century.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nation States 58 mins – “The philosopher and cultural theorist Kwame Anthony Appiah argues against a mythical, romantic view of nationhood, saying instead it should rest on a commitment to shared values. He explores the history of the idea, born in the 19th century, that there are peoples who are bound together by an ancient common spirit and that each of these nations is entitled to its own state. He says this idea is a mistaken one, illustrating his argument through the life story of the writer who took the pen name Italo Svevo – meaning literally Italian Swabian. He was born a citizen of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and became a citizen of the new republic of Italy, all without leaving his home city of Trieste. Appiah argues that states exist as a set of shared beliefs rather than membership of some sort of mythical and ancient group. “What binds citizens together is a commitment,” he says, “to sharing the life of a modern state, united by its institutions, procedures and precepts.” The lecture is recorded in front of an audience at the University of Glasgow. The series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley. Future lectures will examine the themes of colour and culture. The producer is Jim Frank.” At the link find the title, “Country, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04d0wwg.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuroplasticity 24 mins – “Traumatic brain injuries once considered permanent can now be treated with non-invasive techniques such as light and sound therapy to help re-align brain signals. It’s all thanks to discovering that the brain is plastic or pliable rather than mechanical.” At the link find the title, “How ‘plastic’ brain can heal from traumatic injuries, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161027_20156.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuroscientist Videogamer 42 mins – “Dr. Adam Gazzaley is a Professor of Neurology, Physiology and Psychiatry and the Founding Director of the Neuroscience Imaging Center at the University of California, San Francisco. Adam is also Co-Founder and Chief Science Advisor of Akili Interactive Labs, a company that is developing therapeutic video games. He received his M.D. And Ph.D. in Neuroscience at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Adam then completed his Internship in Medicine and Clinical Residency in Neurology at the University of Pennyslvania, followed by postdoctoral training in Cognitive Neuroscience at UC, Berkeley before joining the faculty at UCSF where he is today. Adam is the recipient of the Pfizer/AFAR Innovations in Aging Award, the Ellison Foundation New Scholar Award in Aging, the Harold Brenner Pepinsky Early Career Award in Neurobehavioral Science, and the UCSF 150th Anniversary Alumni Excellence Award. He is also an elected Member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation. Adam is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 317_Adam Gazzaley Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Noise and Attention 34 mins – “Where do you go to get focused work done? Library? Busy coffee shop? Noisy environments are actually better for focus, but only for certain people. The post Can White Noise Help You Focus? appeared first on Smart Drug Smarts.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korean Nuclear Threat 58 mins – “For over forty years, the Korean Peninsula has been trapped in a dangerous cycle of provocation. A Sharper Choice on North Korea: Engaging China for a Stable Northeast Asia, the report of a CFR-sponsored Independent Task Force, offers guidance to U.S. leaders in the face of the uniquely challenging threat posed by North Korea. The Task Force finds that current trends will progressively threaten the United States and its allies, and proposes new ideas to expand regional dialogue, restructure negotiations, protect the human rights of North Korea’s citizens, strictly enforce new sanctions authority, and deter and defend against a regime that seems determined to address in new and dangerous ways.|” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nursing Home Murder 21 mins – “Eight elderly victims allegedly murdered by a nurse in a long-term care home has triggered concerns far beyond the communities involved. How could these deaths go undetected for years? The Current looks into the oversights in nursing homes.” At the link find the title, “BC documentary captures life of asylum seekers on rescue boat, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161026_13511.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obamacare Premiums 47 mins – “Obamacare premiums will shoot up on average 22% next year. We’ll look behind the numbers to see what’s going on.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obesity Intervention 15 mins – “Paul Aveyard discusses a new trial regarding a primary care intervention to help obese patients lose weight.” At the link find the title, “Primary care obesity intervention: The Lancet: Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 24october.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opiate Antagonists 33 mins – “In this episode, we discuss two new naloxone devices (intramuscular Evzio and intranasal Narcan) and review new state laws that are expanding the role of pharmacists in dispensing these opioid reversal products.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 051-Naloxone.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pegasus Story 42 mins – “My horse was beautiful, yet still undeniably the raw work of a mere squire. Visible seams crisscrossed its body like  stitches in a quilt. The mismatched metal patches were proof I had pieced it together from a hundred different carcasses. Likewise, the completed wings against the nearby wall contained hundreds of feathers in a warm metallic array that stood in bold contrast to the steel bones. The full equine form had some sinuous grace–a cupped chin, tapered ears–but overall, like any Cavalry mount, it was built for strength and endurance. I picked up the metal heart, stroking it. I would soon know this soul with intimacy unlike any I had known. I crouched to place the heart in the chest cavity, and sang to Atanta all the while. I made the final connections within the body and stood, my hand on the halter. The enchantments I had pounded into metal and pressed into rubber thrummed to life like a swarm of bees. Onward I sang.” At the link right-click “Download”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Pest Management 62 mins – “Dr. Matt O’Neal is an Associate Professor of Entomology at Iowa State University. He received his B.S. in Biology and M.S. in Entomology from the University of Illinois. Matt served as a Peace Corps Volunteer between those two degrees. After his masters he went on to receive his PhD in Entomology from Michigan State University. Next, Matt conducted postdoctoral research at Michigan State before joining the Faculty at the Iowa State where he is today. Matt’s honors and awards include the Team Achievement Award for the Crop Advantage Series from Iowa State University Extension, the National Excellence In Multistate Research Award from the American Public Land-Grant Universities, and the Integrated Pest Management Team Award from the Entomological Foundation. He has also received various awards from the Entomological Society of America, the American Society of Agronomy, and the Board Certified Entomologists of Mid-America for his educational and outreach efforts. In addition, Matt is co-host of the Soybean Pest Podcast with his colleague Erin Hodgson. Matt is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “341: Understanding Pollinators and Pests to Promote Optimal Crop Management – Dr. Matt O’Neal,” right-click “Media files 341, Matt Oneal_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politicians Lie 43 mins – “Fred Barnes and Stephen Hayes discuss the media’s role in the 2016 presidential election and how the media’s role have changed and become much more biased in this election. They discuss what history will say about Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump and how history has treated past US presidents. In addition, Barnes and Hayes discuss Obama’s legacy including Obamacare, the Iran nuclear deal, Guantanamo, and the lack of economic growth. Part of Obama’s legacy includes the rise of Trump and Clinton. Their rise is also caused by government policies, the poor economy, lack of faith in our government, and the shift to the left that this country has taken. Barnes summed up Obama’s presidency saying Obama presided over America’s retreat both internationally and domestically.” At the link find the title, “The State of the 2016 Presidential Election, the Role of the Media, and Obama’s Legacy, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files Hayes-Barnes-20161011.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power-Grid 19 mins – “A variety of natural and intentional events can disrupt components of the U.S. power grid, including large and small storms, vandalism, and cyber attacks. In this podcast, Thomas Overbye, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign describes the functioning of the grid, some of the risks it faces, its resilience, and mitigation actions for both grid operators and households.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select”Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Prepper Movement 24 mins – ““Preppers” are the latest incarnation of the U.S. survivalist movement. They’re moving into remote, rural areas to set up safe havens against global warming and some are convinced that after the U.S. election this year, society will come unglued.” At the link find the title, “’Prepper’ movement brace for the worst after U.S. election, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161028_47185.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Debates 48 mins – “After three US presidential debates which have attracted some of the biggest viewing audiences in modern American political memory, what have we learned from these televised clashes? In one of the most bitter and polarised presidential campaigns, how much have Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton actually revealed about themselves, their policies and what they could bring to the White House?” At the link find the title, “The Debates Dissected, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04cry1q.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychoactive Drug Abuse 27 mins – “How synthetic psychoactive drugs produced in China make their way onto Britain’s streets.” At the link find the title,”’High Way’ To Hell, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04d7mh7.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pumpkin Mess and Crow Kills 57mins – “In this week’s episode, the rise and fall of the Keene Pumpkin Festival, a quaint New England tradition that took a dark turn when riots broke out during the 2014 festival. Plus, the calmest extreme sport you’ll ever witness: bird-watching. Sam answers a listener question about some rather nefarious crows and we travel to the most glamorous outdoor spot you’ve likely never noticed and discover it is teeming with microscopic life.” At the link find the title, “Outside/In: Go Big or Go Home, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files S02_E02.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism 50 mins – “NHPR and The Music Hall present Writers on a New England Stage with Jodi Picoult recorded live at The Music Hall in Portsmouth. Picoult is a phenomenally successful novelist, with more than 14 million books in print worldwide. Small Great Things is her most recent. Like previous books, it debuted at number one on best-sellers lists. Picoult devotees will recognize the relatable, everyday characters thrashing through controversial ethical issues seemingly ripped from the headlines. But for her, Small Great Things was different. It’s about racism, white privilege and the inherited inequities of America’s past and present. She says it was one of the hardest books to write. The Washington Post called it her most important.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Racism in Baltimore 58 mins – “In a bid to instill civic pride forty years ago, Baltimore was officially named “Charm City”. Today, some call Baltimore a war zone -over 300 homicides per year amid 16,000 vacant homes. Mary O’Connell takes us inside America’s great racial divide.” At the link find the title,”The Shadow of Charm City. Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161024_17224.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ralph Nader 66 mins – “Activist; Author, Breaking Through Power: It’s Easier Than We Think; Twitter: @RalphNader In this unprecedented election year, Nader makes an inspired case about how he thinks our country can—and must—be democratically managed by communities guided by the U.S. Constitution, not by big business or the wealthy few. Nader has fought for decades to give Americans back their political voice. He draws from his own experiences and shares his core political beliefs on how we can protect our rights to ensure democracy for all.”

Realistic Medicine 20 mins – “Catherine Calderwood has been chief medical officer for Scotland since March 2015 – her first CMO report, which she titled “Realistic Medicine” has created a stir beyond the borders of Scotland. The BMJ, sat down with Catherine at a the Preventing Overdiagnosis conference to find out what she intended with that report. “ At the link find the title, “Catherine Calderwood’s realistic medicine, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 290405079-bmjgroup-catherine-calderwoods-realistic-medicine.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in France 19 mins – “Among the thousands of refugees French officials are forcing out of the Calais camp called “The Jungle” are an estimated 1,200 unaccompanied minors. Many have relatives in Britain but the U.K. is divided on its obligations.” At the link find the title, “Uncertainty looms for refugees as Calais camp dismantled, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161024_75707.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in Boats 12 mins – “For nine days, the CBC’s Nahlah Ayed chronicled the desperation of asylum seekers and the efforts of rescue workers, filming it all for a documentary for the CBC’s Fifth Estate. Ayed shares the stories of what she saw and who she met.” At the link find the title, “BC documentary captures life of asylum seekers on rescue boat, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161026_17425.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ross Perot Conundrum 40 mins – “Ever since his 1992 dark horse candidacy captured nearly 19% of the popular vote, there have been arguments over the real role of Ross Perot. Was he a spoiler candidate, stealing the election from Bush? Did he de-legitimize Clinton’s victory by keeping him from winning a majority of the popular vote? Was there anything to learn from Perot’s popularity, or was the unpredictable, charismatic, idiosyncratic billionaire just a fluke? These are the questions our friends at FiveThirtyEight ponder in this week’s excellent documentary podcast, “Long Before Trump, There Was Ross Perot.” We like it and we think you will too.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rumors Judges and Trade 66 mins – “Ira talks about what’s alarming him about this year’s election: …He calls his Uncle Lenny, who gets his news from Fox and the Wall Street Journal, and lives with an entirely different set of facts, and Alex Nowrasteh, an immigration expert at the CATO Institute, who explains that the central issue in Donald Trump’s candidacy is based on something that isn’t true. (11 minutes) [then in] Act Two In this election year we look at the story of one small ballot initiative, in one state. We heard this referendum would gut Georgia’s Judicial Qualifications Commission (JQC), an independent organization that investigates ethics complaints about judges. Years ago, the JQC investigated a judge we did a whole episode about, Amanda Williams, and she resigned from the bench. We wondered why in the world someone would want to tamper with an agency that seemed to be doing a good job at a low cost. Producer David Kestenbaum went to Georgia to figure out what was going on. (21 minutes) [then in] Act Three Ira explains that when Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton all seemed to be against free trade agreements, he got genuinely confused. Is free trade good or bad? Was NAFTA good or evil? Are we down with TPP? He asked Jacob Goldstein of NPR’s Planet Money podcast to explain, once and for all, the pros and cons of free trade. (7 minutes)….” At the link right-click ‘Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Forest Fires 60 mins – “The Russian government is hiding the massive fires in Siberia, says Alexey Yarashenko of Greenpeace Moscow. From Germany, Isabel Rosa: new emissions baked in, no matter what we do. David Turnbull of Oil Change International – why there can be no new oil and gas wells or coal mines.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

School Punishment 44 mins – “Parenting blogs are full of forums discussing “no touch” policies at school around the country. Today, much less discussed among the nanny state is the physical punishment that’s still happening in some public schools. And then, in an effort to save public face, some universities have went all-in on chasing college rankings. While these lists don’t fully represent the college experience, the tangible, advertised results are invaluable to administrators. Momentum to abolish corporal punishment in schools started in the 1970s, and then stalled.  Now, its use is heavily concentrated in southern states. A new report from the Society for Research in Child Development found higher child mortality and poverty rates, less education spending per students, and lower graduation rates in districts where corporal punishment permitted, and racial and gender discrimination in applying punishment. The findings again raise the question of whether it is time to finally retire the practice. At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shipping Costs 26 mins – “Cheap clothes, electronics, food — all of it travels the globe by ship. And the true cost of shipping is higher than you may think. The Current looks into an eye-opening investigation into the murky world of shipping with the director of Freightened.” At the link find the title, “Documentary unveils murky world of shipping, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161028_12460.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Skin Care Entrepreneur 42 mins – “Jane Wurwand moved to Los Angeles with a suitcase and a beauty school diploma. She started what would become Dermalogica, an international beauty empire that set the standard for skin care.” At the link find the title, “Dermalogica: Jane Wurwand, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161020_hibt_hibtpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space Trash 21 mins – “…The universe may be infinite but orbital space is finite and the amount that we use regularly is even more limited. Most satellites end up in a few particular orbits (one can think of them as space freeways). Low Earth orbit, a region of space that extends up to an altitude of about 2000 kilometers, is particularly congested. When a satellite stops working in low Earth orbit it can sometimes stay in that region for hundreds of years….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surgical Simulations 47 mins – “Dr. Roger Smith is the Chief Technology Officer for the Nicholson Center for Surgical Advancement at Florida Hospital. He is also Graduate Faculty at the University of Central Florida, and President of Simulation First. Roger received his B.S. in Applied Mathematics, a M.S. in Statistics, a Master’s and Ph.D. in Business Administration, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science. In addition to his current appointments, Roger has held a number of exciting positions in academia, industry, and government sectors, including serving as an Instructor at Texas Tech University, Senior Engineer at General Dynamics, Technical Director of Mystech Associates, Technical Director of STAC, Professor at Florida Institute of Technology, Vice President of BTG Corporation, Vice President and Group Chief Technology Officer of Titan Corporation, Professor at Full Sail University, Chief Engineer at SPARTA Inc., Chief Technology Officer for U.S. Army Simulation, Training, and Instrumentation, Research Scientist for Texas A and M University, and Professor at Adventist University of Health Sciences. He has received many awards and honors during his career, including being named one of the top academic researchers in the world in Technology and Innovation Management from the International Association for Management of Technology, the Des Cummings Innovation Award from Florida Hospital, the Swartz Innovation Award from the Orlando EDC, and the PEO STRI Commander’s Award for Public Service. Roger is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “332: Creating Cutting-Edge Surgical Simulations – Dr. Roger Smith,” right-click “Media files 332_Roger_Smith_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tasers Effect 27 mins – “[First 7 mins]Tasers are used by police to immobilise people by in violent or potentially violent situations. They inflict physical agony, but what about their effect on the mind? A remarkable number of students volunteered to be tasered in the name of research –significantly reducing their cognitive skills for an hour afterwards. Gaëtan Dugas is known as patient zero: he was thought to have been the source of the HIV epidemic in the USA in the 1970s. New research exonerates him. Handwashing with soap is an effective way to prevent diseases linked to poor sanitation, but in Cambodia children still die from diarrhoea because of a lack of soap. Now a new source has been found – recycling the bars left by hotel guests. Plans have been announced for large trials in Colombia and Brazil to fight mosquito-borne diseases like Zika, using a bacterium called Wolbachia to infect the mosquitoes. Mass campaigns to vaccinate children against measles mobilise hundreds of health workers. Researchers found that tagging on other interventions at the same time – like giving out zinc supplements –could dramatically improve public health. And could a 30 second chat at the end of a doctor’s appointment help people lose weight?” At the link find the title,”Tasers’ Effect on the Mind, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04d7n6t.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism in Europe 56 mins – “FRONTLINE and ProPublica go inside Europe’s fight against terrorism — the missed warnings and the lingering vulnerabilities.” At the link find the title, “Terror in Europe, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 289765937-frontlinepbs-terror-in-europe.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Policy 32 mins – “From al-Qaeda to the Islamic State, the global terrorist threat has evolved rapidly in recent years, and will likely change further still in the next president’s term. Counterterrorism expert Matthew Levitt looks ahead to the next administration and the choices the 45th president will have to face to keep Americans safe from this adaptive global menace.” At the link find the title, “The Middle East 2017: Choices and Challenges – Terrorism with Matthew Levitt, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files PolicyCast10ME2017Levitt.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Testosterone 29 mins -”It’s said testosterone is the hormone that makes men… well, men. It sculpts the male body, increasing muscle mass and bone strength, and moulds the male mind, fuelling libido, risk-taking and the pursuit of status. But it’s selling the hormone well short to say that’s all it does, ’cause it has effects throughout the body. Its impact begins in utero. Those nine months that we’re in the womb may actually affect the rest of our lives. And it affects us all. Women have more testosterone circulating in their blood at any time than they have oestrogen, so testosterone’s a really important hormone for women….” At the link right-click “download video mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Truth Matters Discusssion 60 mins – “Not everyone tells the truth. ‘Read my lips: no new taxes.’ ‘This isn’t going to hurt.’ ‘I see no ships, my lord.’ ‘Of course I love you.’ When can we know what to believe? Four out of five of us don’t think politicians tell the truth, according to a recent MORI poll. But is telling the truth always the right or best thing to do? If it isn’t, what happens to trust? If it is, are there different kinds of truth? Do we always want to hear the truth? Do different professions need to have systemically different attitudes to truth-telling? Is there a moral difference between outright lies, falsehoods, deceits, dissimulation and just plain old ‘economy with the actualité’? In October 1013, Intelligence Squared headed to London’s Westminster Abbey to discuss truth with a politician (Jack Straw), a journalist (Max Hastings), a scientist (Professor Robert Winston) and a poet (Wendy Cope).” At the link find the title,”An Anatomy Of Truth: Conversations on Truth-Telling, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Twitter Trolls 49 mins – “How a platform designed for free speech enables Internet trolls. ‘National Review’ writer David French describes the hateful tweets he received after he criticized Donald Trump and the alt-right. ‘BuzzFeed’ reporter Charlie Warzel discusses what Twitter is and isn’t doing about trolls.” At the link find the title, “Oct, 2016 The Twitter Paradox” click the circle with three dots, right-click “

Undocumented Wall Street Executive 58 mins – “Julissa Arce discusses her life in the U.S. as an undocumented immigrant. She is interviewed by Doris Meissner, former Immigration and Naturalization Service Commissioner from 1993-2000.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Julissa Arce, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.453825.MP3-STD.mp3” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Power Questions 41 mins – “Recorded on September 22, 2016 Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses Russia, China, and the danger of American withdrawal from the world stage. In addition, Hanson talks about immigration and assimilation in the United States throughout time. Hanson notes that, when immigrants assimilate and embrace the United States, then immigration works and strengthens us, but that when immigrants seek to separate themselves and reject US values and culture, then immigration becomes detrimental. Hanson ends the interview talking about the 2016 presidential candidates and election.” At the link find the title, “Victor Davis Hanson on grand strategy, immigration, and the 2016 presidential election, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160922-VDH.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US-Russia Rift 47 mins – “Russian chess champion and political activist Garry Kasparov on Putin, Trump, and the deepening US-Russia rift.” (2 guests) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Fraud 58 mins – “Unless you’ve been caught up in the justice system, most Americans’ understanding of courts comes from what you see on TV. In popular dramas like “Law & Order,” everyone gets a lawyer, the crime is solved in a neat and timely way, and – of course – justice is served. But in real life, it doesn’t always work out that way. On this Reveal, we take a look at the cracks in the system that prevent people from getting a fair shake. And justice for some.” At the link find the title,”And justice for some, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files And-justice-for-some_podcast.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Wars 47 mins – “Rick Hasen, founder of ‘The Election Blog’ discusses Donald Trump’s warning about potential voter fraud. “He’s threatening the bedrock of democracy, and doing it to claim he’s not a loser,” Hasen says. Also, linguist Geoff Nunberg talks about vulgar language in the 2016 election.” At the link find the title, “Oct, 2016 Rigging An Election? It’s Not So Easy, Expert Says,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildlife Extinction 21 mins – “The planet’s biodiversity is under attack. New numbers tracking wildlife species over the past half-century reveal a dire prediction — two-thirds of wildlife will disappear by 2020. Is there anything that can be done to reverse the trend?” At the link find the title, “Two-thirds of wildlife may disappear by 2020 — because of humans, says WWF, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161028_13494.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wives of Civil War Generals 60 mins – “The story of the American Civil War isn’t complete without examining the extraordinary lives of Jessie Fremont, Nelly McClellan, Ellen Sherman, and Julia Grant, who were their husbands’ closest confidantes and had a profound impact on their ambitions and actions. Once shots were fired on Fort Sumter, the women were launched into a new world, where their relationships with their husbands and their personal opinions of the president of the United States had national and historical consequences. Using letters, memoirs, and photographs—and for the first time, maps of the women’s wartime travels—Hooper reveals how these four generals’ wives powerfully influenced our history.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WW II – Pacific 78 mins – “Our guests today are writers Bob Drury and Tom Clavin to discuss their latest book, Lucky 666-The Impossible Mission. Mavericks or “Screw ups” Jay Zeamer and Joseph Sarnoski, sent to the Pacific Theater to help defend Australia from invasion by Japanese Imperial forces, will end up rebuilding a dilapidated B-17 and volunteering to photograph the western coast of Bougainville for the impending U.S. invasion. Little do they know that they will be involved in the longest dogfight in history. One of them will not make it back alive.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode 174-102216_10.51_AM.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 259 – Oct 28, 2016: Alzheimers Caregiver, Alzheimers Genetics, Arabs in Politics, Armenian Unrest, Big Listen – African American, Biocontrol, Breast Cancer, Broadband in Chattanooga, Broadband in North Carolina, Car Free in Los Angeles, Carbon Dioxide Levels, Catastrophism, CFCs and HFCs, Child Care and Education, Chocolate Benefits, Climate Deals History, Conspiracies and Paranoia, Denial of Service Attacks, Detroit Repair, Disabled in Canada, Distracted Minds, Economic Trends, Eleanor Holmes Norton, Extraterrestrial Communications, Eyesight Loss, Farm Labor, Forensic Science, Gabapentin, Gender Bias, Gender Police and Race Relations, Green City Rebuild, Gun Violence, Gunshot Deaths Book, Healthcare Fraud, Hidden Brain, Highway of Tears, Horses in Military, Hostage Ransoms, House Squatters, Housing Bubble in Canada, Human Rights Activist, Innovation Guidance, Internships, Jihadist Viewpoint, Kidnapping and Ransom Business, Maintenance Value, Mars, McMansion Rant, Medical Students Discussion, Medical Tattoos, Memory Illusions, MERS, Middle East Wars, Moose Hazards, Mosul Battle, Necrobiome, Ocean Microbiology, Online Activism Failure, Oysters Discussion, Parenting, Plant Chemical Uses, Pornography, Premature Baby Issues, Premed Concerns, Residential Politics, Refugees in Germany, Russia Inside, Self-Checkout Equipment, Self-gentrification, Ships-Marines-Baseball, Slum Health, Speechless Series, Squatters in Homes, Subarus and Lesbians, Syrian Activists in Canada, Syrian Disabled Refugee, Time Travel, Truman and MacArthur, United States and Russia, Universal Basic Income, Venezuela Implosion, Venomous, Violence Intervention, Wedding Traditions, Wikileaks and Politics

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 88 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 254 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 11,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 340 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

Alzheimers Caregiver 43 mins – “When asked about what it was like to live with Alzheimer’s disease, Donald Burke said, “like standing on melting ice.” Today, a husband and wife dig into the metaphor to find meaning. [first 10 mins] Also today: how is it that humans can send rovers to Mars and 3D print organs, yet still not control rats?  For thousands of years, humans have been losing the battle against the vermin that destroy crops, spread disease, and proliferate on an almost unimaginable scale. We’re learning about a tech-startup run by a biologist Buddhist who may stumbled into a cruelty-free solution  – rodent birth control.” At the link right-click the play button beside :listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimers Genetics 21 mins – “Randall Bateman and Nick Fox discuss what they’ve learned from their papers on Alzheimer’s disease.” At the link find the title, “‘Autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer’s disease: The Lancet Neurology: 21 October 2016,” right-click “Media files laneur_161021.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arabs in Politics 34 mins – “Did you know that in many states, Arab numbers are equal to or greater than Jewish numbers — but for a variety of reasons, Arabs have never defeated a candidate with their clout. Why? In this episode, Arab American Institute president, Dr. James Zogby explains. He gets real about what it takes to achieve power in this country and he would know … For decades, he’s been working tirelessly in Washington to influence power in a pretty hostile climate. Don’t miss it!” At the link click “Listen,” right-click “Download stream” from the pop-up menu.

Armenian Unrest 24 mins – “A group of war veterans who stormed a police station in Armenia call themselves the Daredevils of Sassoun, inspired by an 8th century poem, but are they heroes or terrorists?” At the link find the title, “Armenia’s Daredevils, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04cjgtd.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Big Listen-African Americans 50 mins – “The host of The Show About Science gives Lauren some hot tips on interviewing, and we talk to the producer of Historically Black about the stories of everyday objects in African-American families.” At the link find the title, “Episode 1: Santa Is A Big, Big Fan, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161006_specials_biglisten.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biocontrol 58 mins – “When a Harvard professor accidentally let Gypsy Moths loose in the 1860s, he didn’t realize he was releasing a scourge that would plague New England forests for more than a century. Nothing could stop the moths except a controversial method of wildlife management called biocontrol. It’s the scientific version of “fighting fire with fire”: eradicate an invasive species by introducing another invasive species. Since then, there have been lots of biocontrol success stories, but also a few disastrous failures. In this episode, we ask whether biocontrol is the best–maybe the only way–to combat invasives, or if it’s just an example of scientific hubris.” At the link find the title,”Episode 15: Never Bring a Sledgehammer to a Scalpel Fight, right-click “Media files 4898285-episode-15-never-bring-a-sledgehammer-to-a-scalpel-fight.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biocontrol 56 mins – “ We kick off the second season of NHPR’s newest show, Outside/In, with a discussion of  biological control: using non-native species to combat destructive invasive pests and plants that are decimating a local species.  It’s the focus of the Outside/In episode titled “Never Bring a Sledgehammer to a Scalpel Fight.”  This approach to managing invasive species, used by scientists for over a century, has had some spectacular failures, but there have been many success stories as well.  We’ll look at the history of the approach, the arguments for and against, and examine the philosophical implications.  Is biological control messing with Mother Nature or our only hope against invasive species changing the landscape?” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Breast Cancer 4 mins – “Breast Cancer Education, Oct 20, 2016 – Audio interview by GAO staff with Marcia Crosse, Director, Health Care” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Chattanooga 25 mins – “Chattanooga, Tennessee, has a lightning-fast, publicly run broadband network that has attracted a lot of tech talent to the city. But as the city builds an economy around technology, one thing is becoming apparent: There’s a gaping divide between those who are tech-savvy and those who aren’t. In some neighborhoods, as few as 1 in 5 households have an internet connection. Can Chattanooga bridge its digital divide?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 23 mins – “In June, North Carolina released a report pronouncing that 93 percent of the state has access to broadband speeds. At the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, our Research Associate H.R. Trostle, who has been examining reporting data in North Carolina for the past year, came to some very different conclusions. In episode 224, she and Christopher talk about the report they co-authored, which gives a different perspective on the connectivity situation in the Tar Heel State.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file….”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Free in Los Angeles 12 mins – “The Ride’s Sue Carpenter continues her adventures with carlessness” At the link find the title, “‘The Ride: Tesla goes self driving and continuing the adventures of decarification, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files Audio_4_01-e3cc10b7.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Dioxide Levels 60 mins – “For some reason, perhaps deep in our past, humans easily fixate on catastrophe, whether real or imaginary. Does the nation, the economy, or even civilization need to collapse in order to start anew? Who benefits if we think like that….” At the link find the title, “Can We Count on Catastrophe? Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files ES_161019_LoFi.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Catastrophism 60 mins – “…The producers of the long-running radio program “Against the Grain” teamed up with others, to write an influential if controversial book about all that. It was published in 2012 with the title “Catastrophism: The Apocalyptic Politics of Collapse and Rebirth.” Why bring that back now? Three reasons: some listeners suggest I’m too fixated on collapse, at the expense of solutions. Meanwhile, in America Donald Trump, and others in Europe, feed on creating public fear. And finally, there are signs more people are afraid something awful is about to happen, or already happening behind the scenes. Not to mention the science of the rapidly developing climate catastrophe, which is all too real. I’ve reached out to one of the authors, Eddie Yuen. Eddie teaches in the Urban Studies Department at the San Francisco Art Institute. He is the co-editor, of the book “Confronting Capitalism: Dispatches from a Global Movement.” He’s written about popular movements, the politics of Right and Left, and the role of apocalypse in environmentalism. Along with Sasha Lilley, another author in the book, Eddie has been a radio producer for “Against the Grain” on KPFA, the Pacifica flagship station in Berkeley and the Bay area.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” near “Download…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CFCs and HFCs 30 mins– “The Montreal Protocol that was signed in 1987 is widely regarded as one of the most important pieces of international cooperation on environmental issues. It created a phased ban on chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, the principal culprit of the so-called hole in the ozone layer, now greatly diminished, due in large part to this agreement. Just this past weekend, nearly 30 years later, representatives from 140 nations gathered in Kigali, Rwanda to amend the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. This time, the aim was to phase out the use of hydrofluorocarbons or HFCs, which don’t affect the ozone layer, but are among the most potent greenhouse gasses that humans produce. This week on Sea Change Radio, we talk with one of the key figures behind the Montreal Protocol and Kigali Amendment, international environmental lawyer and founder of the Institute for Governance and Sustainable Development, Durwood Zaelke.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Care and Education 58 mins – “Opposition spokeswoman for early childhood education and development and TAFE and vocational education.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Kate Ellis, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_KateEllis_1910_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chocolate Benefits 36 mins – “In episode 327, Mike and James do a delicious podcast around the evidence for chocolate. We look at the cohorts and the RCTs that have looked at the effect of this heavenly food on outcomes like mortality, cardiovascular disease, blood pressure, depression and acne. The results make us happy and smile.” At the link find the title “Episode 327: Chocolate – evidently very beneficial, or is it?” right-click “Media files Episode 327 Chocolate evidently very beneficial or is it.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Deals History 80 mins – “In this IPR Public Lecture, University of Bath honorary graduate and Lenfest-Earth Institute Professor of Natural Resource Economics at Columbia University Scott Barrett discusses his work on international agreements. Known for his cross-cutting research, which combines economics and game theory with international politics, Professor Barrett here examines the relative success of climate deals over the last 25 years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conspiracies and Paranoia 32 mins – “Jesse Walker is the author of The United States of Paranoia: A Conspiracy Theory, a book that explores the history of American conspiracy theories going all the way back to the first colonies. Walker argues that conspiratorial thinking is not a feature of the fringe, but a fundamental way of looking at the world that is very much mainstream. Listen as Walker explains why we love conspiracy theories, how they flourish, how they harm, and what they say about a culture.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 087-Paranoia.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Denial of Service Attacks 44 mins – “A group calling itself New World Hacking took down the websites for BBC Global in January, 2016 through denial of service – or DDOS attacks. Other hacks have hit the Trump campaign and MasterCard. The hackers say it’s just the beginning. That could affect all of us, thanks to our increasingly connected lifestyles. Our tech dude explains the internet of broken things.[first 10 mins] Also, novelist Willa Cather wrote of pioneers on the plains from a farm in Peterborough. More than 65 years after her death, a series of local events and newly published letters reveal the hidden side of a fiercely guarded writer.” At the link right-click the play button beside :listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Detroit Repair 21 mins – “Over the last 40-plus years, Detroit has seen its economy falter and its population dwindle, leaving thousands of homes empty and starting a downward spiral of neighborhood decay. In this episode, join host Brian Babylon as he digs into how Loveland Technologies has used city support and funding from JPMorgan Chase to build an innovative crowdsourcing platform to help heal Detroit’s neighborhoods.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Disabled in Canada 21 mins – “The next generation of disability activists aren’t waiting for society to ‘help them’, they’re calling for a revolution. Meet young Canadians living with both visible, and invisible disabilities, fighting against gaps in funding, services, and attitudes.” At the link find the title, “Meet the next generation of disability activists ‘calling for a revolution’ Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161021_74314.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Distracted Minds 52 mins – “We all do it. Walking down the street–a quick check of the phone to see who emailed. Watching television–why not send out a tweet, too. Sitting at dinner with family–it will take only a second to read that text. Even when we know we should resist the temptation, it’s so hard to ignore technology. We pay for it in half-completed tasks, near accidents, and disjointed conversations. Why is this? It turns out our brains are not very good at driving away distraction, and technology has only aggravated it. Guest host Derek McGinty talks to neuroscientist Dr. Adam Gazzaley and psychologist Dr. Larry Rosen about our ancient brains in a high-tech world.” (2 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Economic Trends 69 mins – “Chris Arnade, former Wall Street trader turned photographer and social chronicler, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about what he learned from the front lines of the financial industry in the 1990s and 2000s when everything slowly and then very quickly began to fall apart. He also discusses his transition into observer and photographer of drug addicts, the poor, and the forgotten parts of America.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eleanor Holmes Norton 35 mins – “Washington may be the political center of the free world, but its 670,000 residents don’t have a say in the national legislature. What they do have is a nonvoting delegate in the House of Representatives. Eleanor Holmes Norton can introduce legislation and vote in committee, but she can’t vote on the House floor. Over the course of 13 terms, the “Warrior on the Hill” been fighting to change that.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Extraterrestrial Communication 50 mins – “Astrobiologist David Grinspoon and his guest, Hugo Award-winning sci-fi author and scientist David Brin weigh the pros and cons of attempting to contact extraterrestrials. Plus, Chuck Nice asks the pair Cosmic Queries about what we’ll do if aliens find us.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eyesight Loss 55 mins – “Singer and broadcaster Mônica Vasconcelos is slowly losing her sight. Originally from Brazil, she now lives in London, a busy city she finds harder and harder to negotiate safely. As her vision gradually fades, she goes in search of people who may show her new possibilities – new ways of being. They are, among others; her brother, who lives with the same eye condition, and who expertly masters the use of a white cane to navigate the city; her godson, Tiago, who takes her hand in the warm waves on the beaches of Brazil, and – in one of the last interviews he gave before his death – the writer and thinker Dr Oliver Sacks. Oliver Sacks was a neurologist who changed the way many people think about so called ‘disabilities’, and who Monica met in his New York flat. To her surprise, they found themselves discussing ways of approaching the onset of blindness not only with insight, but also with humour – especially at one magical moment when Sacks shared his own collection of canes with her. The canes, he explained, were acquired to help him get around the city, as his own sight fades. Swimming, he tells Monica, is the one place he feels free and in his own skin – try and find your own version of swimming he advises her.” At the link find the title,”Losing My Sight and Learning to Swim, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04c1682.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eyesight Loss 21 mins – “Peter White is joined by Brazilian singer and journalist Monica Vasconcelos, who is the subject of a World Service documentary, in which she talks of her sight loss. Tom Walker meets Tony North who has been using a new reading device called OrCam. The user wears it like a pair of spectacles and points to text or information for the device to read out. Assistive technology consultant Graham Page talks about other platforms which are available to help blind and partially-sighted people access the written or printed word.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Labor 98 mins – The slowdown in migration from Mexico since the 2008-09 recession has had a little-noted effect on farm labor in the United States: Increased use of the H-2A guestworker program. The H-2A program, long criticized by employers for cumbersome regulations, has doubled in size since 2007 and now provides workers to fill more than 150,000 farm jobs. Since agriculture relies on newcomers from abroad to replace farm workers who exit for nonfarm jobs, farm labor markets are ideal for observing employer adjustments to the reduction in the arrival of immigrant labor. Often identified as the source for unauthorized migration from Mexico because of the Bracero program, agriculture may also provide the template for future immigration reforms that involve legalizing currently unauthorized workers and making it easier to hire guestworkers in the future. This discussion features data that could help inform future reform debates. It also focuses on some of the adjustments that farm employers are making, including increased mechanization, improved wages and benefits, and the increased use of the H-2A program.” At the link right-click “Download(Loading)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Science 55 mins – “In these cases, emerging DNA evidence and the smell of death (yes, really) pushed the boundaries of what was technologically possible. But how reliable are they? To find out, we go to a body farm and talk to Assoc. Prof. Joan Bytheway, Asst. Prof. Sheree Hughes-Stamm, Matt Young, Dr. Arpad Vass, and Asst. Prof. Donovan Haines.” At the link find the title, “DNA and the Smell of Death, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT2954924539.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pp-up menu.

Gabapentin 6 mins – “Gabapentin has been described as a ‘wonder drug’ for its ability to treat neuropathic pain, restless leg syndrome, migraine, bipolar disorder, drug and alcohol dependence, attention deficit disorder, premenstrual syndrome, and much more. It is a pharmacologically active amino acid, created as a potential epilepsy drug in 1974 by the pharmaceutical company Parke-Davis, now owned by Warner-Lambert, a division of Pfizer. Although it was first approved as a treatment for partial seizures in 1993, Pfizer pleaded guilty to illegally marketing gabapentin for unapproved uses in 2004 and was heavily fined by the US Department of Justice for defrauding public health care programs….” At the link find the title, “Gabapentin: Chemistry in its element, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files CiiE_Gabapentin.mp3” nd select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Bias 21 mins – “A century after women won the vote in the US, we still see very few of them in leadership roles. Researchers say women are trapped in a catch-22 known as “the double bind.” Note: an early version of this episode incorrectly stated that Carol Moseley Braun was the first African-American U.S. Senator. She was in fact the first female African-American Senator.” At the link find the title, “Episode 48: Men: 44, Women: 0,” right-click “Media files 20161018 hiddenbrain hbepi48.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender, Police and Race Relations 92 mins – “A formal apology from the leader of the national police chiefs association, how fathers talk with their sons about respecting women, the little-known history of LA’s Wrigley Field.” At the link find the title, “A police chief’s apology, how fathers speak to their sons, the lost history of LA’s Wrigley field, Oct, 2016,” right-click “A police chief’s apology, how fathers speak to their sons, the lost history of LA’s Wrigley field, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files SHOW101816-744bff72.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green City Rebuild 28 mins – ”A decade ago, a tornado wiped out the small town of Greensburg, Kansas. But the town decided to rebuild—as a totally green community. Ten years out, has the green rebuilding program been successful, and is this a model that might be used by other towns? Or is going green harder than it seems?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence 27 mins – “The doctors in the U.S. who treat the epidemic of gun violence… and the researcher who is trying to prevent it.” At the link find the title, “The MD Who Spent A Million Dollars Researching Gun Violence,” right-click “Download The MD Who Spent A Million Dollars Researching Gun Violenceand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gunshot Deaths Book 52 mins – “On November 23, 2013, nearly a dozen children and teens were shot and killed in the United States. This did not happen in a mass shooting, but in cities, suburbs and towns across the country – like San Jose, California, where best friends played with a gun they thought was unloaded; Charlotte, North Carolina, where a disagreement escalated to gunfire; Dallas, Texas, where a case of mistaken identity left a 16-year-old dead on the street. These stories do not make this day remarkable. In fact, they make it a pretty average day in America. A new book tells the stories of these young people, and explores what their lives – and deaths – reveal about our country’s relationship with guns.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Healthcare Fraud 32 mins – “This week, we’re revisiting California’s workers’ compensation program that covers 15 million workers across the state. Reporter Christina Jewett discovered serious fraud in the system after reviewing thousands of documents. They showed that in the past decade, more than 80 people have been accused of cheating California’s workers’ comp medical system out of $1 billion. Find out what’s happened since we first aired that episode. And at the end of this week’s episode, we tell you about a big development in a different story – one that we’re actively reporting on.” At the link find the title, “[Update] Billion-dollar scam, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files Update-Billion-dollar-scam_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hidden Brain 52 mins – “NPR’s Shankar Vedantam says that in some ways, human behavior is the ultimate frontier of science. After all, there’s a lot we don’t know about why behave the way we do. But if we can get a glimpse at the unconscious patterns that influence us, Vedantam argues we have the potential to make big changes in our lives and our world. Shankar Vedantam is host of the popular podcast Hidden Brain, and Tuesday, he joins us to explain how science and storytelling can improve the human experience. Shankar Vedantam is NPR’s social science correspondent and host of the Hidden Brain podcast. He’s also the author of The Hidden Brain: How Our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars, and Save Our Lives.” At the link right-click the play button beside ‘Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Highway of Tears P2 24 minsThe Current devotes the program to a public forum on the issues surrounding missing, murdered Indigenous women along the Highway of Tears. With the launch of a public inquiry, families, community leaders and residents of Prince George search for justice.” At the link find the title, ““MMIW public forum: ‘We’d like to see something happen soon’ Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161017_14307.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Highway of Tears P3 23 mins – “Community leaders involved in the issue of murdered and missing Indigenous women hope the national inquiry will have an impact prompting the changes desperately needed to move forward. Many question if the necessary action will really happen.” At the link find the title, “MMIW: Trust a barrier with Indigenous girls and RCMP, says advocate, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161017_35563.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Highway of Tears P4 21 mins – “Ramona Wilson was 16 years old when she disappeared in 1994. Her murder remains unsolved. As a public inquiry looks into murdered, missing Indigenous women, families continue to search for answers about MMIW on the Highway of Tears and hope for justice.” At the link find the title, “’Not just a statistic, they are people’: Families of MMIW search for justice. Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161017_84524.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Horses in Military 52 mins – “…the story of a daring rescue of horses caught up in the Third Reich’s vision for genetic supremacy. Horses still played a role in the military, and Hitler aimed to use stolen purebreds to create the ideal war horse. But with the stud farm under imminent threat from the starving Russian army, the Nazi officer in charge asked General Patton himself for help. Author Elizabeth Letts joins us to explain why soldiers set aside alliances and risked their lives to save The Perfect Horse. Elizabeth Letts is a former competitive equestrian rider. Her books include the New York Times best seller The Eighty-Dollar Champion and her new book The Perfect Horse: The Daring U.S. Mission to Rescue the Priceless Stallions Kidnapped by the Nazis.” At the link right-click the play button beside ‘Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hostage Ransoms 61 mins – “A journalist named Meron Estefanos gets a disturbing tip. She’s given a phone number that supposedly belongs to a group of refugees being held hostage in the Sinai desert. She dials the number, and soon dozens of strangers are begging her to rescue them. How can she ignore them?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

House Squatters 30 mins – “Steven DeCaprio is known as one of the most knowledgeable squatters in the United States. For this old punk rocker, it’s not just a free home: It’s political. He believes it’s criminal that people are homeless while abandoned homes sit vacant. Could squatting help stem gentrification in Oakland, California? It might depend on who’s squatting—and who lives next door.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link Ass” from the pop-up menu.

Housing bubble in Canada 16 mins – “In a world of haves and have-mores, those without a home can be found in wealthy Western cities and in the rapidly urbanized spaces of developing countries. The UN’s special rapporteur on housing argues housing is not a commodity, it’s a human right.” At the link find the title, “Housing a human right not a commodity, says UN rapporteur, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161019_54365.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Rights Activist 26 mins – “Zafra Lerman is a Distinguished Professor of Science and Public Policy Emerita at Columbia College in Chicago.  Lerman is a scientist and a humanitarian, and she was recently recognized for her work with the 2016 Andrei Sakharov Award for human rights from the American Physical Society.  She joins us to tell us why she got involved in humanitarian issues…how she managed to sneak out at nighttime to meet with dissidents while visiting the USSR…and how an idea to bring Middle Eastern scientists together grew into the Malta Conferences, which aims to promote peace by bringing together scientists who might otherwise be stifled by their respective governments to build collaborations and partnerships.” At the link right-click the play button beside ‘Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Innovation Guidance 37 mins – “What is the number one cause for failure in early-stage startups? Team issues! In this episode of Stanford Innovation Lab, Tina Seelig interviews executive coach Michael Terrell. Michael is the founder and managing partner of Terrell Leadership Group, and co-author of The Inside Out Effect, which focuses on effective leadership. In this conversation, Michael shares his insights on effective team dynamics, his process for diagnosing team issues, and examples of how he works through team challenges.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Internships 66 mins – “Author Tam Pham talks about what it takes to get the internship you’ve always wanted.” At the link find the title,”How to Land Your Dream Internship (Ep. 129),” right-click “Media files 49966.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jihadist Viewpoint 17 mins – “”For a long time, I lived for death,” says Manwar Ali, a former radical jihadist who participated in violent, armed campaigns in the Middle East and Asia in the 1980s. In this moving talk, he reflects on his experience with radicalization and makes a powerful, direct appeal to anyone drawn to Islamist groups that claim violence and brutality are noble and virtuous: let go of anger and hatred, he says, and instead cultivate your heart to see goodness, beauty and truth in others.” At the link click “Download,: right-click Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kidnapping and Ransom Business 24 mins – “Journalist Loretta Napoleoni’s new book Merchants of Men is about human trafficking, kidnapping, and selling women for sex. For Jihadi groups including ISIS and al-Qaeda, those sources of human misery are sources of tremendous revenues.” At the link find the title, “How ISIS has turned refugee trafficking into multi-billion dollar business, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161019_13598.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maintenance Value 41 mins- “Has our culture’s obsession with innovation led us to neglect the fact that things also need to be taken care of?” At the link click the circle with thtree dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

McMansion Rant 16 mins – “Few forms of contemporary architecture draw as much criticism as the McMansion, a particular type of oversized house that people love to hate. McMansions usually feature 3,000 or more square feet of space and fail to embody a cohesive style or interact with their environment. Kate Wagner, architecture critic and creator of McMansion Hell, is on a mission to illustrate just why these buildings seem so terrible.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Student Discussion 62 mins – “WHO researchers in Uganda are keen to teach schoolchildren there how to spot dubious health claims. This leads Dave to ask Levi Endelman, John Pienta, and newcomers Alice Ye and Adam Erwood whether their generation was taught the principles of logic and scientific thought in a way more effective than his own generation was taught. On a related note, listener Jake writes in to remind John that even we on The Short Coat Podcast, careful as we are to disclaim any logic whatsoever, should be wary of “shallow/uncontrolled” arguments. We discuss emerging ideas on treating ICU patients in ways that minimize ICU delirium and PTSD, a problem once known as ICU psychosis, including changing the ways patients are sedated, their environments, the emphasis on convenience for healthcare personnel, and other factors that may be making patients crazy. Perhaps one day, ICU patients might receive some benefit from Kratom, which the DEA has now removed from the Schedule 1 drugs list after public outcry. And doctors are still better than online “symptom checkers” at diagnosing both common and uncommon illnesses. Take that, Doctor Google.” At the link find the title, “Against Logic there is No Armor like Ignorance. Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 149-No-Armor-like-Ignorance.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Tattoos 10 mins – “What if doctors could monitor patients at home with the same degree of accuracy they’d get during a stay at the hospital? Bioelectronics innovator Todd Coleman shares his quest to develop wearable, flexible electronic health monitoring patches that promise to revolutionize healthcare and make medicine less invasive.” At the link click “Download,: right-click Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memory Illusions 39 mins – “For decades now, we’ve known that our memories are not as infallible as we like to think. And with research now showing that researchers are able to plant entirely novel memories that never actually happened – the need for psychological research in the courtroom has never been more pressing. But as we find out, the world of false memory is a murky and uncertain one. Helping Ian Sample clear the way this week is London South Bank University Criminologist and Expert Witness Dr Julia Shaw, and – one of the field’s most prominent pioneers – Professor Elizabeth Loftus, who bravely used much of her expertise during the “Satanic Panic” of the 1980s.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MERS 19 mins – “Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is an acute viral respiratory tract infection caused by the novel betacoronavirus. Cases have been limited to the Arabian Peninsula and its surrounding countries, and to travellers from the Middle East or their contacts. The clinical spectrum of infection varies from no symptoms or mild respiratory symptoms to severe, rapidly progressive pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, septic shock, or multiorgan failure resulting in death. In this podcast Sarah Shalhoub, infectious diseases consultant at King Fahad Armed Forces Hospital, in Saudi Arabia joins us to discuss the history of the disease, clinical presentation, and what can be done to support those infected.” At the link find the title, “Middle East respiratory syndrome, Oct 2016,” right-click “Media files 289325473-bmjgroup-middle-east-respiratory-syndrome.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Middle East Wars 53 mins – “In a speech two years ago at West Point, President Barack Obama laid out what has come to be known as the “Obama Doctrine” for fighting terrorism: aiding other countries militarily without leading the fight. This week, in what many say is the ultimate test of that strategy, U.S. special operations forces began assisting Iraqi troops in their battle to retake the city of Mosul from Islamic State militants. In Afghanistan, Libya and Somalia, American troops are also aiding government forces, conducting airstrikes and other operations against Islamist insurgents. Guest host Derek McGinty and guests discuss where and how U.S. troops are being deployed in the fight against terrorism around the globe.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Moose Hazards 22 mins – “Fall is a busy time for Kristine Rines’s department, the moose are in rut (mating) and hunting season is open. She works for NH Fish and Game as the state’s first ever Moose Biologist. She received the distinguished “Moose Biologist of the Year” from her peers at the North American Moose Conference in 2006. Rines has announced her plans to retire after three decades on the job and sat down with Something Wild to reflect on her time studying the state’s moose….Ticks are a well reported problem for moose in the northern parts of the state, but as Rines points out brainworm is a problem in the south. “Both parasites are brought by white-tailed deer,” brainworms have no observable effect on deer, but are lethal to moose. Shorter winters are good for deer, so our deer populations are increasing, and so too is the occurrence of brainworm….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosul Battle 19 mins – “Considered the jewel in the crown of ISIS, the retaking of Mosul holds strategic significance as the campaign to liberate Iraq’s second-largest city is underway. But author Fawaz Gerges warns it’s likely ISIS will lash out after the epic battle.” At the link find the title,”Defeat of Mosul won’t be the end of ISIS, says author, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161018_81506.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Necrobiome 69 mins – “Decomposition is one of the most important functions that microbes perform in our environment.  As microbial ecologists, Dr. DeBruyn and her lab seek to understand how microbial communities work to recycle inputs in terrestrial environments.   Understanding decomposition and biodegradation is key to developing better solutions for waste disposal, environmental bioremediation, and predicting ecosystem response to perturbations.” At the linkr ight-click “Download the audio only…” under the video file and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Microbiology 68 mins – “Hosts: Vincent RacanielloElio SchaechterMichael Schmidt, and Michele Swanson – From the TWiM team, highlights of the Recent Advances in Microbial Control meeting in San Diego, and expansion of a gut pathogen by virulence factors that stimulate aerobic respiration.” At the link right click “download TWiM#137and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online Activism Failure 16 mins – “Today, a single email can launch a worldwide movement. But as sociologist Zeynep Tufekci suggests, even though online activism is easy to grow, it often doesn’t last. Why? She compares modern movements — Gezi, Ukraine, Hong Kong — to the civil rights movement of the 1960s, and uncovers a surprising benefit of organizing protest movements the way it happened before Twitter.” At the link click “Download,: right-click Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oysters Discussion 44 mins – “We’re living in a golden age for oysters. Just two decades ago, an ostreophile would have thought him or herself lucky to choose among a handful of options; today, in the U.S. alone, hundreds of varieties with exotic names like Moon Shoal, Hama Hama, and Kusshi tempt oyster lovers. What creates all those different flavors and textures—and what’s the story behind today’s oyster revolution?” AT the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Parenting 52 mins – “The psychologist Alison Gopnik is worried about modern day parenting, including her own. It’s too much like being a carpenter, she says, where you shape chosen materials into a final, preconceived product. Kids don’t work like that. In a new book, Gopnik suggests parents think less like carpenters and more like gardeners: creating safe, nurturing spaces in which children can flourish. Gopnik joins us Wednesday to discuss how we can raise better kids by changing our approach to parenting. Alison Gopnik is a professor of psychology and an affiliate professor of philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley. She writes the Mind and Matter column for the Wall Street Journal. Her new book is called The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us About the Relationship Between Parents and Children” At the link right-click the play button beside ‘Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plant Chemical Uses 41 mins – “You probably ate something toxic today.  But don’t panic!  It was actually good for you. Turns out, many plants produce chemicals that are poisonous in large amounts, but have health benefits in small doses. Dr. Mark Mattson, Professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Chief of the Laboratory of Neurosciences at the National Institute on Aging, is back on the podcast to talk to us about plant toxins — how our bodies protect us against those toxins and actually benefit from them. Phytochemicals are chemicals naturally produced in plants.  Many of them function to protect plants from being eaten, especially before the seeds are fully formed and ready to be dispersed. That’s why unripe fruit is so bitter.  The plant doesn’t want anyone eating the fruit until the seed(s) inside are mature.  Of course, once it is mature, all that sugar in the ripe fruit is there to entice passing animals to take a bite and help scatter the seeds. But even though green fruit is bitter to eat, small amounts are really good for you.  One example:  a chemical in green tomatoes is neuroprotective and has been found to increase the lifespan of worms.  But it disappears once the tomato ripens to red.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pornography 61 mins – “Hooray for porn! What would we be without it? Bored, repressed, frustrated. Porn allows the timid to indulge fantasies they’d never live out in real life and the adventurous to experiment with new forms of pleasure. Now that it has stepped down from the top shelf and waltzed across the internet we can all enjoy it. All we need to do is stop pretending it’s something dirty and come straight out and salute it. Or maybe not. Porn after all is selling a lie: that women are always eager to engage in extreme practices, that bodies are always tanned and buffed, orgasms explosive. Isn’t this a recipe for frustration and disappointment? And to attract the restless voyeur, porn is always having to up the ante – cyber-sex is getting ever more degrading and extreme. Men are finding it harder to be satisfied with their real world partners, women are feeling inadequate and pressured to live up to the cyber-competition – this is the reality of pornland. So which is it – the great liberator of the libido or a blight on human intimacy? Listen to pornographic film maker Anna Arrowsmith and erotica expert Dr Clarissa Smith, square up to renowned feminist Germaine Greer and addiction specialist Dr Robert Lefever.” At the link find the title, “Pornography is Good For Us: Without it We Would Be a Far More Repressed Society, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Premature Baby Issues 26 mins – “Born in the grey zone. Micro-preemies are babies born so premature, they’re on the edge of viability. Modern medicine means these babies can increasingly be saved. But with the advances, come thorny new questions about where life truly begins.” At the link find the title, “Born in the grey zone: Journalist parents explore medical frontier of micro-preemies, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161018_76460.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Premed Concerns  32 mins – “In this episode, Ryan talks about some of the most common things that he sees premed students struggle with, the students that he works with for application prep or those doing personal statement editing and mock interview prep. These are some common trends and themes that Ryan has seen as well as questions directly emailed to him and questions over at the OldPreMeds.org forum.” At the link find session 204, right-click “Media files PMY204.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Politics 60 mins – “[New York Times] columnist Maureen Dowd discusses her book, [The Year of Voting Dangerously: The Derangement of American Politics].” At the link find the title,”Q&A with Maureen Dowd, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.457203.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in Germany 54 mins – “It is now a year since the German Chancellor Angela Merkel threw Germany’s borders open to thousands of stranded Syrian refugees. We follow five of them and for most it has been a year of uncertainty, a year of unending bureaucratic hurdles, and a year of struggle with German grammar.” At the link find the title,”Die Klassen: Waiting and Hoping, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04c13df.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russia Inside 56 mins – “We sit down with Corey Flintoff, longtime NPR Russia Correspondent. Flintoff has returned to the U.S., with tales of his many years reporting overseas. We talk with him about some of the big stories he covered, including Russian aggression in Ukraine, and allegations of Russian meddling in America’s presidential election….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Checkout Equipment 21 mins – “A doctor treating psychiatric patients in an emergency room created the first self-checkout machine in his spare time. Now he can’t stand self checkout. So we take him shopping.” At the link find the title, “#730: Self Checkout,” right-click “Media files 20161019 pmoney podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Gentrification in Bronx 28 mins – “Majora Carter embraces the idea of “self-gentrification” in her native South Bronx. She founded a park in a spot slated to become a waste-transfer facility. She’s hired local gamers to test software and provide customer service for major tech outfits. And now she’s opened the first boutique coffee shop in Hunts Point, a marginalized neighborhood that, once upon a time, she swore she would leave forever.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Ships Marines and Baseball 52 mins – “Let Moss Hills take you on sea cruise …To learn more about the sinking of the Oceanos, be sure to check out: http://www.oceanossinking.com/ And you like that, you definitely won’t want to miss the video of the ship’s final moments: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfIZ6rcySuY [then] When Bill Babbitt realizes that his brother Manny has committed a crime, he must figure out what to do. Will he call the police, or get him a bus ticket out of town? Bill Babbitt finds himself responsible for his brother after he returns from the Vietnam War. Check out the documentary Last Day of Freedom. The film was directed by Nomi Talisman and Dee Hibbert-Jones http://www.lastdayoffreedom.net/ [and finally] Tara’s softball team was not afraid to shed a little blood in the ultimate game of boys v.s. girls. This story was recorded live at Sideshow Goshkosideshowgoshko.blogspot.com, a New York Times “Critic Pick” storytelling series that takes place the 4th Thursday of every month at the KGB Bar in Manhattan. Big news, Tara Clancy has a brand new memoir out!  It’s called “The Clancy’s of Queens.”  Get it here:  www.TaraClancy.comAt the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slum Health 11 mins -”Oyinlola Oyebode discusses the health problems of people living in slums, possible interventions, and the value in additional research needed for this neglected field.” At the link find the title,”The health of people living in slums: The Lancet: Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 16october-slumhealth.mp3” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Speechless Series 10 mins – “Josh Blue is a stand-up comedian who has been promoting Speechless, a TV comedy he says paints a realistic view of life with disability. He joins The Current to talk about finding humour in living with cerebral palsy.” At the link find the link, “Comedian Josh Blue says new show Speechless isn’t ‘delicate’ about disability, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161021_34384.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Squatters in Homes 28 mins – “Steven DeCaprio is known as one of the most knowledgeable squatters in the United States. For this old punk rocker, it’s not just a free home: It’s political. He believes it’s criminal that people are homeless while abandoned homes sit vacant. Could squatting help stem gentrification in Oakland, California? It might depend on who’s squatting—and who lives next door.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Subarus and Lesbians 19 mins – “Subaru’s sales had been slumping for years. So the car company took a big risk and targeted a group of consumers that just about everyone else was ignoring.” At the link find the title, “#729: When Subaru Came Out,” right-click “Media files 20161014 pmoney podcast101416.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Activists in Canada 24 mins – “In a way, she’s just a face in the crowd — one of millions of Syrian refugees who have fled their home in search of a better life. But young Nujeen Mustafa made her escape in a wheelchair and says next she’d like to head to the moon.” At the link find the title, “Teen Syrian refugee recounts journey to Germany in wheelchair, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161021_26501.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Disabled Refugee 24 mins – “In a way, she’s just a face in the crowd — one of millions of Syrian refugees who have fled their home in search of a better life. But young Nujeen Mustafa made her escape in a wheelchair and says next she’d like to head to the moon.” At the link find the title, “Teen Syrian refugee recounts journey to Germany in wheelchair, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161021_26501.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Time Travel 52 mins – “Neil deGrasse Tyson unravels time travel with the help of theoretical physicist Michio Kaku, “Back to the Future’s” Doc Brown, aka Christopher Lloyd, “Doctor Who’s” Missy, aka Michelle Gomez, and co-host Chuck Nice. Plus, Bill Nye takes a ride in the DeLorean.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Truman and MacArthur 53 mins – “In the years following World War II, Americans enjoyed a brief respite from global conflict. But in December of 1950, China entered the war against the U.S. and its allies in Korea. President Harry Truman assures the American people he will defend South Korea but also wants to avoid escalation into a third world war. His commander of forces in the Pacific is Douglas MacArthur, beloved hero of World War II. MacArthur wants to fight the Chinese and North Korean forces all the way out of Korea. The two leaders soon clash over strategy and President Truman ultimately fires MacArthur. Diane talks with historian H.W. Brands about the struggle for power between an untested president and a powerful general, and how it changed the course of history.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

United States and Russia 63 mins – “Experts discuss the current state of relations between the United States and Russia, including cooperation on strategic initiatives in Syria, tensions surrounding the ongoing conflict in Ukraine and the post–Cold War expansion of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and recent allegations of Russian-sponsored cyberattacks.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universal Basic Income 105 mins – “In this IPR Research Seminar, Dr Malcolm Torry – Director of the Citizen’s Income Trust – gives an introduction to the concept of universal basic income, and discusses its feasibility with reference to trials around the world. This IPR Research Seminar took place on 11 October 2016.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela Implosion 19 mins – “Venezuela has just about every economic advantage a country could ask for: fertile land, good climate, educated population, and oil, lots and lots of oil. So how did it go so wrong?” At the link find the title, “#731: How Venezuela Imploded,” right-click “Media files 20161021 pmoney podcast102116.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venomous 60 mins – “This week we’re looking at some of the animals, insects, and creatures we fear the most and the venom that makes them so powerful. Biologist and science blogger Christie Wilcox returns to talk about her first book “Venomous: How Earth’s Deadliest Creatures Mastered Biochemistry”. And Jim Olson, a physician scientist and Director of Project Violet, tells us about “Tumor Paint”, a fluorescent molecule that binds to solid tumors to help guide surgeons during surgeries, which was partially derived from the venom of the deathstalker scorpion.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Violence Intervention 27 mins – “A groundbreaking program at a Winnipeg ER helps youth escape the cycle of violence on that city’s streets.” At the link find the title, “When Heather Met Ricky,” right-click “Download When Heather Met Ricky” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wedding Traditions 39 mins – “Something borrowed, something blue, something that explains why weddings look the way they do.” At the link find the title, “#23 The Wedding,” right-click “Media files GLT8129824178.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wikileaks and Politics 53 mins – “WikiLeaks has published thousands of Clinton campaign emails over the past week obtained by hackers. The content of the emails has led to embarrassing headlines about the Clinton Foundation, internal campaign disputes and talks with Goldman Sachs. The Clinton campaign is neither confirming nor denying the authenticity of the emails. John Podesta, Clinton’s campaign chairman, alleges the Russian government is behind the hacks. U.S. intelligence agencies are investigating. WikiLeaks, Russia and the 2016 presidential race.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 258 – Oct 21, 2016: ADHD Prisoners, Aero Crew News, Alcosynth, Aleppo Siege, Alexis de Tocqueville, Altruism Effectiveness, American Revisited Discussion, Appendicitis Case, Astrophysics Questions, Broadband in Utah, Cancer Advances, Change my View, Climate Change in Mumbai, Climate Warming Speed, Clinical Trials, Clothing Guides, Colombia Truce Rejection, Communications Plan, Coral Bleaching, Culture Wars, Design Thinking, Digital Citizenship, Disruptive World, Dolly the Sheep Story, Drug Abuse and Teeth, Economic Stagnation, EMP Report, Female Genital Cutting, Fix Items for Tax Break, Glass Full of Miracles, Gluten Tolerance, GMO Controversy, Greg Mortenson Controversy, Haiti Post Hurricane, Half a House Program, Highway of Tears Documentary, Hip and Knee Problems, Human Future, Immigrant Activists, Immigrant America, Inequality Issues, Interactive Media, Interbike Show, ISIS Opponents, Justice Stephen Breyer, Lee grant, Lobotomies, Manufacturing History, March-Book 3, Marijuana History, Maternal Deaths Increase, Memory Illusions, Mental Problems, Mexican Justice, Mexico Illegal Logging, Millennial Workers, Minds and Memories, Miracle Apple, Neurologist, New Hampshire Economics, Parkinsons Diet, Peanut, Philosophy Defined, PJ ORourk on Presidential Campaign, Plasma, Plato and Sustainability, Polyethylene, Premed Questions, Psychiatrist Shortage in New Hampshire, Radical Solutions, Sexual Assault Shaming, Sexual Relations, Sierra Club Founder, Smallpox Eradicator, Snowden Update, Social Values, Somalia Recovery, Sono Motors, Special Needs Kids, Startup Podcast Talks, Supernational Tribunals, Talk Radio Impact, Thousand Days Program, Thyroid Problems, Trail of Tears Update, Tree Preservation, Tuna Documentary, Undesirable Talents, US Access Board, Vice Magazine Creator, Virology Researcher, Virtue Ethics, Website Design, Wells Fargo Scandal, Wildlife Bridges, Yemeni Children Starve, Zika Virus Research

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 99 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 242 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 11,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 340 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

ADHD Prisoners 25 mins – “If they were in school and suffering from ADHD, they’d likely be diagnosed and treated. But prisoners — youths and adults — usually go without. And some say that fixing that could go a long way to reducing recidivism.” At the link find the title, “Lack of treatment for prisoners with ADHD leads to recidivism, says advocate, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161014_87956.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aero Crew News 72 mins – “In this episode we have two interviews. The first with Craig Pieper the Editor in Chief and Founder of Aero Crew News. And the second interview is with Christian, a student from Central Florida Aerospace Academy in Lakeland, Florida.” At the link right-click “Download” nd select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcosynth 25 mins – “Is it too good to be true?” At the link find the title, “A new synthetic alcohol promises good times drinking without the headaches and hangovers, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161011_89045.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aleppo Siege 50 mins – “The Syrian civil war has lasted five years and claimed more than 400,000 lives. Since Russia entered the conflict a year ago, more than 3,000 civilians have been killed. Last week, a bombing of Aleppo by Syrian government forces killed hundreds, including more than 100 children. On Monday, Secretary of State Kerry ended peace talks following the Aleppo attack. In Tuesday night’s vice presidential debate, Governor Mike Pence called for a tougher approach to Russia and for the establishment of “safe zones” inside Syria. And Hillary Clinton has called for a no-fly zone. Guest host Tom Gjelten and guests debate what to do about Russia’s escalation in Syria and the humanitarian crisis there.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Alexis de Tocqueville P1 55 mins – “Nearly 200 years ago, Alexis de Tocqueville travelled the United States trying to understand its strengths and weaknesses. Less than a month before Americans go to the polls, Paul Kennedy considers the ongoing relevance of Tocqueville’s observations.” At the link find the title, “Tocqueville’s America Revisited, Part 1, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161014_48948.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alexis de Tocqueville P2 55 mins – “Nearly 200 years ago, Alexis de Tocqueville travelled the United States trying to understand its strengths and weaknesses. Less than a month before Americans go to the polls, Paul Kennedy considers the ongoing relevance of Tocqueville’s observations.” At the link find the title, “Tocqueville’s America Revisited, Part 2, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161021_78772.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Altruism Effectiveness 60 mins – “This week, we’re learning how science can boost the effectiveness of philanthropy. We’ll talk to philosophy professor William MacAskill about his book “Doing Good Better: Effective Altruism and How You Can Make a Difference.” And we’ll speak to education researcher Brendan Rigby about the ethics and impact of “voluntourism.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America Revisited Discussion 46 mins – “The final programme in the series brings together five of the speakers from the road trip” At the link find the title, “America Revisited: The Discussion, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04btk4t.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Appendicitis Case 15 mins – “Appendicitis ultrasound follow up case from The Great White North.  Cool stuff!  #FOAMED Last episode we revisited appendicitis ultrasound.  Let’s continue that visit.  What better way to keep visiting than with a case, right?Luckily, Dave Kirschner….the Canadian, has an awesome case to share with us.  Dave is a brilliant ultrasound guru from up north who we met through The Ultrasound Leadership Academy, and now he teaches with us as much as we can convince him to.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astrophysics Questions 55 mins – “Curious about general astrophysics? Join us for class this week as Prof. Neil Tyson and assistant Leighann Lord explain some of the basics. Now extended with 12 minutes of Neil, Bill Nye and Steven Soter swapping Carl Sagan stories in the ‘Cosmic Crib.’” At the link find the title, “Extended Classic: Cosmic Queries: General Astrophysics 101, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 286586499-startalk extended classic cosmic queries general astrophysics-101.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Utah 25 mins – “In the north central region of Utah, eleven communities are now served by a regional open access fiber-optic network operated by the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency or UTOPIA. UTOPIA’s Executive Director, Roger Timmerman, and Mayor Karen Cronin from member community, Perry City, take time to speak with us for Community Broadband Bits episode 223. One of the great advantages UTOPIA has brought the region is the element of competition. Rather than facing a choice of only one or two Internet Service Providers like most of us, people in UTOPIA cities sign up for a connection to the network and then choose from multiple providers who offer a range of services via the infrastructure. Competing for business brings better products, better prices, and better customer service.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Advances 13 mins – “Learn about the latest advances in the war against cancer from Stanford researcher Adam de la Zerda, who’s working on some cutting-edge techniques of his own. Using a remarkable imaging technology that illuminates cancer-seeking gold particles injected into the body, de la Zerda’s lab hopes to light the way for surgeons to remove even the tiniest trace of deadly tumors.” “ At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Change My View 77 mins – “For computer scientist Chenhao Tan and his team, the internet community called Change My View offered something amazing, a ready-made natural experiment that had been running for years. All they had to do was feed it into the programs they had designed to understand the back-and-forth between human beings and then analyze the patterns the emerged. When they did that, they discovered two things: what kind of arguments are most likely to change people’s minds, and what kinds of minds are most likely to be changed. In this episode you’ll hear from the co-founder of Reddit, the moderators of Change My View, and the scientists studying how people argue on the internet as we explore what it takes to change people’s perspective and whether the future of our online lives is thicker filter bubbles or the whittling away of bad ideas.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 086-Change_My_View.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Climate Warming Speed 60 mins – “Plants are failing to absorb our carbon emissions, decades before expected, says Dr. James Curran from Scotland. Then celebrated Indian author Amitav Ghosh on new book ‘The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable’.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” near “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clinical Trials 6 mins – “Interview with Dr. Jeffrey Drazen on a new article series, The Changing Face of Clinical Trials. Supplement to the N Engl J Med 2016; 374:2167 Jeffrey Drazen is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal. Stephen Morrissey, the interviewer, is the Managing Editor of the Journal.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” andselect “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clothing Guides 58 mins – “Antonio Centeno [RealMenRealStyle.com] talks about how dressing better can be the catalyst for improving your confidence, presentation, and performance.” At the link find the title, “How to Upgrade Your Wardrobe and Dress Better (Ep. 128),” right-click “Media files 49550.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Colombia Truce Rejection 34 mins – “Bernard W. Aronson, managing partner of ACON Investments and former U.S. assistant secretary of state for inter-american affairs, joins CFR’s Matthew M. Taylor to discuss Colombia’s failed peace deal with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and its implications for the country’s future.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Plan 24 mins – “Former president of IABC Ottawa and host Sherrilynne Starkie caught up with Caroline Kealey, principal of Ingenium Communications, to chat about Caroline’s recent Gold Quill award at the IABC World Conference in New Orleans. Ingenium Communications is a boutique firm here in Ottawa, specializing in strategic communications, change management, and training. Caroline Kealey shares with Sherrilynne Starkie on how to build an award-winning communications plan, from the beginning to the end and where her communications career has brought her today.” At the link right-click “Direct download: The Voice Episode 102.mp3” and select “Save Link As”from the pop-up menu.

Coral Bleaching 27 mins – “This summer, large parts of the Great Barrier Reef saw the hottest sea temperatures and the most severe coral bleaching ever recorded – so before the next impact hits, scientists are racing against time to understand the demise of reefs and the prospects for their recovery. Catalyst explores the lethal threat of bleaching to the Great Barrier Reef, and the challenges we all face to protect this global treasure.” At the link right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Culture Wars 52 mins – “A few years ago, as the debate raged over the so-called Ground Zero Mosque, religion scholar Stephen Prothero watched and wondered what all the fuss was about. Hoping to better understand our current culture wars, he began researching similar clashes in America’s past, and he arrived at a provocative conclusion. Conservatives, Prothero says, almost always start the culture wars, and, equally often, liberals end up winning. Thursday, we’ll talk to Prothero about America’s long history of moral and religious battles and why liberals win.On …his new book Why Liberals Win the Culture Wars. ” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Design Thinking 53 mins – “In the 1960s, a group of Stanford professors developed a method of problem-solving that’s come to be know as design thinking. The approach has been used for years at companies like Apple and Google to develop new products. Two Silicon Valley veterans thought these same principles could be applied to tough life questions like “what do I want to be when I grow up?” And “how do I live meaningfully?” They turned their idea into a class called “designing your life”—now wildly popular at Stanford. In a new book, they describe their method and say it can be used at any age. Bill Burnett and Dave Evans on how to use design theory to answer questions about work, life and happiness.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Digital Citizenship 27 mins – “In a week which saw reports of Twitter being bought come and go, its Head of Public Policy in India, Mahima Kaul tells Click about efforts to use Twitter to promote social justice, such as empowering women, encouraging citizenship for youngsters and even helping in emergencies. Sovereign Internet Identity – Who are you? How do I know you are you and not some other you? Is there someone I ask? Doc Searls has been thinking in the field of Internet Identity for many years. Ahead of this month’s Internet Identity Workshop in the US, he talks to Click about the current trends and dangers. WILD App for Conservation – In Kenya a new app is available to help conservation agencies and scientists track real world animals and wildlife. The BBC’s Michael Kaloki spoke to Tirus Kamau, of @iLab, Strathmore University, about the hopes and dangers. A Naked Mole-Rat Eutopia -At an exhibition in London’s Somerset House, a new piece by Julie Freeman uses data from a live naked mole-rat colony to ask questions about a possible future of human society to ask possible questions about human society. Julie joins Click to explain more.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disruptive World 48 mins – “Disruptive innovation guru Clay Christensen on disruption now, from politics to Uber. Disruption has been the word of the new millennium and more now. In business, economics, politics, society. My guest, Clayton Christensen, put the word in big play in the heady 1990s, when he first wrote about “disruptive innovation.” He was talking business. Now the meme is everywhere. Not everyone likes it. He’s got new thinking on it. This hour On Point, Clay Christensen on disruptive innovation, and what needs doing, changing now.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under th eplay button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dolly the Sheep Story 28 mins – “Dolly the sheep was born near Edinburgh, twenty years ago this summer. She was the first mammal to be cloned from an adult animal, (named after Dolly Parton because she was created from a breast cell). And became a global media star, inspiring both amazement that an animal be created with three mothers but no father,and fear. Many worried about where such a development might lead. The papers reported: ‘dreaded possibilities are raised’; ‘cloned sheep in Nazi storm’. Professor Ian Wilmut,the man who created Dolly, was compared to Frankenstein. Jim talked to Ian in front of an audience at the Edinburgh Festival and asked him why he decided to try and clone a sheep; how he and the team did it; and whether cloning humans is now a real possibility. Producer: Anna Buckley.” At the link right-click “Ian Wilmut on Dolly the sheep, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04b979k.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Abuse and Teeth 27 mins – “Drugs like crystal meth and opiates wreck the teeth as well as the mind. In America, more than just about any country, good teeth are a sign of success and so dentists like Dr Bob Carter are helping fix addicts’ teeth.” At the link find the title, “Drugs and the Dentist. Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04bmp2h.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Stagnation 49 mins – “Research suggests that in the last few decades at least a third and as many as a half of all American families have, in economic terms, either stayed the same or lost ground. For these families the American dream remains just that, and now more than ever in recent memory, it’s an unrealistic aspiration. Join us to discuss how a stagnating quality of life for many Americans is taking its toll on our country and what we can do about it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

EMP Report 55 mins – “The loss of the grid would not have been a threat 100 years ago because the population of the country was only about 76 million people. At that time, the production of food was not yet dependent on electrical power, and few homes were entirely electric.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Genital Cutting 38 mins – “This week, refugee mental health, better neural nets, and changing attitudes to female genital cutting.” At the link find the title,”Nature Podcast: Oct 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fix Items for Tax Break 24 mins – “Fix your clothes, appliances or whatever you’re tempted to take to the curb. It’s part of a burgeoning “fixer movement” that not only is good for the environment and pocket but in Sweden repairing what’s broken can actually give you a tax break.” At the link find the title, “Sweden offering tax breaks to repair – not replace – broken objects, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161012_80092.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Glass Full of Miracles 48 mins – “Violet Grgich, Vice President for Sales and Marketing, Grgich Hills Estate In conversation with Sasha Paulsen, Features Editor, Napa Valley Register In the 40 years that have passed since he crafted the iconic Chateau Montelena Chardonnay that beat its French counterpart in the famous 1976 Judgment of Paris wine tasting competition, Miljenko “Mike” Grgich has garnered wide acclaim as an industry pioneer while his wines have been served at White House state dinners. Having grown up alongside her father in the winery, trying her hand at everything from the bottling line to the tasting room, Violet Ggrich will share her personal recollections on publishing her father’s newly released memoir, A Glass Full of Miracles, as well as the family’s plans for the future. We will be enjoying a tasting of Grgich Hills Chardonnay and Zinfandel.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gluten Tolerance 37 mins – “Our guest this episode is Nadine Grzeskowiak, otherwise known as the Gluten Free RN. Nadine is a Registered Nurse, author, speaker, and celiac disease and gluten intolerance educator. Listen in as we talk about her journey with celiac disease, gluten, and gluten intolerance.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Controversy 64 mins – “Caitlin Shetterly, Author, Modified: GMOs and the Threat to Our Food, Our Land, Our Future GMO products are among the most-consumed and the least-understood substances in the United States today. They appear not only in the food we eat, but in everything from the interior coating of paper coffee cups and medicines to diapers and toothpaste. Shetterly discovered the importance of GMOs the hard way. Shortly after she learned that her son had an alarming sensitivity to GMO corn, she was told that she had the same condition, and her family’s daily existence changed forever. She takes a deeper look at how GMO products are currently infiltrating our food, our land, and how that affects our health and future.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greg Mortenson Controversy 55 mins – “In his book Three Cups of Tea, mountaineer Greg Mortenson details his humanitarian efforts to build schools in Pakistan. His story brought him worldwide acclaim and sold lots of books. There’s just one problem, says the writer Jon Krakauer: Mortenson’s story is a lie. Krakauer has written at length about holes he’s found in Mortenson’s tale, allegations the journalist Jennifer Jordan pushes back against in a new documentary film. Jordan and Krakauer join us Monday to discuss the controversy over Three Cups of Tea.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Haiti Post Hurricane 21 mins – “In the wake of Hurricane Matthew, people in southern Haiti say there’s nothing left. And the worst may still be in store: starvation, cholera, most likely more deaths. Warnings about where to donate has The Current looking into how aid is helping Haiti.” At the link find the title, “Haiti devastation post-Hurricane Matthew pose challenges for aid organizations, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161012_61755.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Half a House Program 22 mins – “ On the night of February 27th, 2010, Luis Enriquez had just gotten home from his job at a lumber factory in Constitución, Chile. At around three o’clock in the morning, Luis started to feel the earth shake. It was an earthquake—a bad one. With a magnitude of 8.8, the quake that hit Constitución was the second biggest that the world had seen in half a century. The quake and the tsunami it produced completely crushed the town. By the time it was over, more than 500 people were dead, and about 80% of the Constitución’s buildings were ruined. As part of the relief effort, an architecture firm called Elemental was hired to create a master plan for the city, which included new housing for people displaced in the disaster. But the structures that Elemental delivered were a radical and controversial approach toward housing. They gave people half of a house.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Highway of Tears Documentary 9 mins – “The Current has produced a virtual reality documentary about the notorious Highway of Tears where dozens of Indigenous women have gone missing or been murdered. Anna Maria Tremonti is in Prince George, B.C. hosting a public forum and shares more details.” At the link find the title, “Monday: Watch The Current’s virtual reality Highway of Tears documentary, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161013_75563.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hip and Knee Problems 40 mins – “Musculoskeletal disease is responsible for the majority of the global health burden, yet receives little national or international attention in terms of media awareness. This podcast from Professor Richie Gill describes some major challenges for global healthcare provision and give an overview of the research work being performed at the University of Bath to meet these challenges.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Future 55 mins – “In his new book “Homo Deus”, Yuval Harari argues that humankind is on the verge of transforming itself: advances creating networked intelligences will surpass our own in speed, capability and impact. But where will this leave us?” At the link find the title, “When Man Becomes God – Yuval Harari, Oct, 2016,”.right-click “Media files ideas_20161011_37894.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Immigrant Activists 13 mins – “In politics, representation matters — and that’s why we should elect leaders who reflect their country’s diversity and embrace its multicultural tapestry, says Sayu Bhojwani. Through her own story of becoming an American citizen, the immigration scholar reveals how her love and dedication to her country turned into a driving force for political change. “We have fought to be here,” she says, calling immigrant voices to action. ‘It’s our country, too.’ “ At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant America 23 mins – “Our airwaves are filled with debates about migrants, refugees, and undocumented immigrants… Who should be in the United States, who shouldn’t, and who should decide? Immigration is, without question, a flash point in this year’s political debates. It’s an issue that seems to get to the core of who we are, who we want to be, and where we’re headed as a nation. Today we’re going to take a fresh look at the issue by exploring what history can teach us about the patterns and paradoxes of immigration in a nation of immigrants. It’s one of a series of shows in the next few weeks that will speak to issues that have bubbled to the surface in politics this year, that reveal something about us — and human nature. Historian Maria Cristina Garcia joins us.” At the link find the title, “Episode 47: Give Me Your Tired…, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161007 hiddenbrain_47.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inequality Issues 64 mins – “Nobel Laureate in Economics Angus Deaton of Princeton University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the economics of trade and aid. Deaton wonders if economists should re-think the widely-held view that redistribution from rich nations to poor nations makes the world a better place. The conversation focuses on the challenges facing poor Americans including the rising mortality rate for white Americans ages 45-54.” At the link right-click “Download’ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interactive Media 17 mins – “Jane Friedhoff is a game designer, creative researcher, and experimental programmer whose work focuses on experimenting with media forms in order to create new, unusual, and even playful relationships between people.  While at the New York Times R&D Lab, she developed an interactive journalism model called Membrane that has the potential to transform a reporter’s article into a community’s conversation. She is currently on the staff at The Office for Creative Research, a hybrid research group working at the intersection of technology, culture, and education. A self-identified “creative technologist,” Friedhoff focuses “on thinking about technology that tries to project into the future – how technology will be used, what ramifications it has, how it affects people – and not just how it works today.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interbike Show 20 mins – “Electric bikes have finally come into their own. That’s Alonzo’s opinion after spending a few days at the big trade show, Interbike. Sue reminds him that Americans buy more bicycles every year than they do cars. We feature an excerpt from our live show earlier this month at LA’s Petersen Auto Museum. It’s a little game show we did with tech writer Ashlee Vance, and flying car inventor Dezso Molnar. And Alonzo’s bicycle mechanic, Travis Engle, stops by to tell us about the Critical Mass bike movement. The group sponsors urban rides in cities across the country, and the LA version often has as many as 4000 cyclists for their big, monthly mass ride.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Opponents 24 mins – “Dillon Hillier spent three months with Kurdish militias in northern Iraq.” At the link find the title,”Canadian Army vet on fighting ISIS in Iraq, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161010_39278.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Justice Stephen Breyer 49 mins – “Today, NHPR and the Music Hall present Writers on a New England Stage with Stephen Breyer, recorded live at the Music Hall in Portsmouth. Breyer was appointed Associate Justice of the Supreme Court by President Clinton in 1994. He is now 78 and author of several books throughout his distinguished career. Some are academic, others displaying his unbridled enthusiasm for the democratic system and belief that it is the court’s job is to make government work for real people living today. His most recent book  The Court and the World makes the case that in an age of global interdependence, America’s government, business, citizenry, and conflict transcend national boundaries. International issues are now more common on court dockets, requiring federal judges to better understand foreign reasoning and laws. “Judicial awareness can no longer stop at the border,” he writes, which is akin to poking at a hornet’s nest of his conservative critics – and fellow justices. Justice Breyer buoyantly stepped out on the stage of the Music hall’s historic theater to argue that American judicial isolationism is no longer possible.”

Lee Grant 88 mins – “Gilbert and Frank visit the home of Oscar-winning actress and director Lee Grant, who speaks openly and candidly about everything from her years on the Hollywood blacklist to her friendships with Hal Ashby, Grace Kelly and Walter Matthau, to her decision to turn down a classic sitcom role. Also, Lee remembers Sharon Tate, praises the talents of Rod Steiger, shares the stage with Peter Falk and flips the bird on “The Tonight Show.” PLUS: “The Landlord”! “Divorce American Style”! Olivia de Havilland takes a swim! Gilbert crushes on Warren Beatty! And the only Jewish James Bond villain!” At the link find the title,”#124: Lee Grant,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/4598783/e8587e04-4380-4d1f-b59a-5b31d20f215f.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lobotomies 35 mins – “When a surgeon cut into Henry Molaison’s skull to treat him for epilepsy, he inadvertently created the most important brain-research subject of our time—a man who could no longer remember, who taught us everything we know about memory. Six decades later, another daring researcher is cutting into Henry’s brain. Another revolution in brain science is about to begin.” At the link find the title, “The Brain That Changed Everything, By Luke Dittrich, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files The Brain That Changed the World-by-Luke Dittrich.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Manufacturing History 57 mins – “Both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have talked about loss of manufacturing jobs, and the importance of having things “Made In America.”  From 18th century colonists struggling to produce that most coveted of items — porcelain — to the invention of nylon stockings and the TV picture tube in the 20th century, Peter, Ed, and Brian explore the surprising history behind five inventions and innovations.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

March – Book 3 49 mins – “A comic book about Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Montgomery bus boycotts helped inspire a generation to take up the fight for civil rights. This included a teenager in Alabama named John Lewis. Congressman Lewis became a student leader in the movement and was at the forefront of some of the most pivotal moments in civil rights history. He has recently completed a trilogy of graphic novels to tell his own story in comic form. The third installment was just nominated for a National Book Award. Congressman Lewis and his co-authors on the trilogy “March,” and their hopes that it will inspire a new generation of social justice activists.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Mariuana History 48 mins – “Author John Hudak says federal law makes it hard to prove the medicinal value of marijuana. “As a Schedule 1 drug it is very difficult to do research on the plant,” he explains. Ken Tucker reviews ‘Blue Mountain,’ a solo album from Grateful Dead founding member Bob Weir.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maternal Deaths Increase 50 mins – “While the rate at which women die during pregnancy or childbirth has fallen in many nations, maternal deaths have been rising in the U.S. over the last fifteen years, according to several new studies. But the mortality rate differs depending on the state. It doubled in Texas from 2000 to 2014, but decreased in California. A look at what’s behind the increase in U.S. maternal mortality rates.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Memory Illusions 24 mins – “Forget everything you think you know about memory. Canadian criminal psychologist and author of The Memory Illusion, Julia Shaw, says our memories are usually unreliable. She may even have you questioning everything you think you know about yourself.” At the link find the title, “Chances are your memories are untrue and unreliable, says criminal psychologist, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161014_85466.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Problems 51 mins – “On the next Snap…”Tin Man.” What if you were born without a heart? Featuring stories about the DMZ, face blindness, and psychopaths.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexican Justice 44 mins -”When foreign nationals commit a crime in the US, their consulates work to avoid what the majority of UN member states consider to be barbaric: execution. Today, we’ll hear what the government south of the border is doing to their nationals off death row. Also today, 80s movies like Back to the Future and The Breakfast Club banked on the boredom, buying power and  dramatic urges of teenagers – but were they groundbreaking cinema classics?  A superfan says John Hughes and his teen flick colleagues got at truths beyond adolescence angst and suburbia.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexico Illegal Logging 27 mins – “The story of Cheran – a Mexican town that chased out the cartels, and the police and politicians who collaborated with them.” At the link find the title, “Mexico: The Town that Said ‘No’, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04bt5bh.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Millennial Workers 16 mins – “Millennials have a reputation for job hopping, and for good reason: On average, a Gen-Y worker changes jobs every two years, by contrast to Baby Boomers, who make a switch every 15 years or so. That has costly implications for companies — and increasingly so, as Millennials in the workplace are projected to represent approximately 75 percent of the workforce in the next 10 years. It’s critically important for companies to address this retention problem, says Ryan Avery, co-founder of Avery Today and a Gen-Y expert who trains business leaders on ways to motivate Millennials. “This is not a thing to focus on — it’s the thing to focus on when you’re serious about growing your business,” he says. A member of Gen Y himself, Avery explains that there are several fundamental shifts that companies need to make to retain Millennials for the long haul….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minds and Memories 45 mins – “Science and the humanities are too often poles apart, so two of the UK’s most distinguished institutions decided to do something about it. At a special event hosted at the Royal Society in London, and co-presented by the Royal Society of Literature, travel writer and novelist Colin Thubron took to the stage with neuroscientist Jon Aggleton. They discussed issues of memory, emotion and brain structure raised by Thubron’s latest book, a tale of six tenants and a landlord whose innermost thoughts and values are illuminated by a conflagration in the house where they all live.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Miracle Apple 12 mins – “How we got from mealy, nasty apples to apples that taste delicious. The story starts with a breeder who discovered a miracle apple. But discovering that apple wasn’t enough.” At the link find the title, “#627: The Miracle Apple, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161012 pmoney_pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurologist 48 mins – “In his memoir ‘Do No Harm,’ Henry Marsh confesses to the uncertainties he’s dealt with as a surgeon, revisits his triumphs and failures and reflects on the enigmas of the brain and consciousness. [Originally broadcast May 2015] Film critic David Edelstein reviews ‘Birth of a Nation.’ “At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New Hampshire Economics 56 mins – “According to a Census Bureau report, household incomes have gone up. Global trade is a hot campaign issue, and we’ll  look at how it impacts New Hampshire. And JP Morgan Chase plans to move six hundred jobs out of Salem.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parkinson’s Diet 64 mins – “Parkinson’s disease involves a deficiency of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Symptoms can include tremor, rigidity and slow movements. In this program, you will learn about changes in dietary protein that have been found to reduce these symptoms by half. Neurodegeneration is the loss of function and death of our brain cells. Why do our brain cells lose function and die? Learn about specific pollutants in certain foods that can damage our ability to make dopamine, and which foods harbor these persistent organic pollutants and how to avoid them. In contrast, certain foods and nutrients can help protect brain cells and slow degeneration. Since Parkinson’s disease symptoms do not often show up before half of the dopamine-producing brain cells are gone, all of us can benefit from proactive risk reduction. Steve Blake is faculty nutritional biochemist at Hawaii Pacific Neuroscience. He is a research scientist who has just finished a clinical study successfully using nutrients to combat neurodegeneration. Among his publications, he authored the Diet Doctor software to analyze dietary nutrients.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peanuts 37 mins – “The peanut is a valuable crop for American farmers and is extensively cultivated worldwide.  It is an important source of protein and healthy oils.  At the same time the public is concerned about peanut allergies and aflatoxins.  What is the reality, and how is technology coming to the rescue to address these problems?   Dr. Peggy Ozias-Akins is a Professor and peanut expert at the University of Georgia’s Tifton campus, and she talks about past and contemporary issues in peanuts.  In the second part of the podcast I talk about communicating concepts in genetic engineering with family and friends.  How do we reach people we care about that have been tainted by non-scientific opinions?  We can do that, but it takes following a strategy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Philosophy Defined 26 mins – “We asked a range of Philosophy Bites interviewees the simple question ‘What is Philosophy?’…Here are some of their answers:” At th link right-click “Listen to What is Philosophy?” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

PJ O’Rourke on Presidential Campaign 60 mins – “As Donald Trump faces Hillary Clinton in what has been one of the most vitriolic and unpredictable races in recent US election history, we were joined by America’s leading political satirist PJ O’Rourke, just a month ahead of US election day, as he cast his merciless eye over both candidates. He is known for taking no prisoners on either side of the political divide. He has already called Trump ‘a flying monkey’ and Clinton ‘Jimmy Carter in a pantsuit’. As author of such bestsellers as ‘Don’t Vote: It Only Encourages the Bastards’, and with more citations in ‘The Penguin Dictionary of Humorous Quotations’ than any other living writer, O’Rourke has been lambasting American politics for some 40 years. Such is his stature that even President Nixon conceded: ‘Whether you agree with him or not, PJ writes a helluva piece.’ O’Rourke will delved into why, in his own words, ‘America is experiencing the most severe outbreak of mass psychosis since the Salem witch trials of 1692’. As a sign of how the race for the White House is upending loyalties, O’Rourke, a lifelong Republican supporter, has shocked his allies by recently backing the Democrats, declaring: ‘I endorse Hillary Clinton for president. She is the second-worst thing that could happen to America.’ PJ O’Rourke was in conversation with Nick Robinson, presenter on Radio 4’s Today programme and former BBC political editor.” At the link find the title, “PJ O’Rourke on the US Presidential Clash, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plasma 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss plasma, the fourth state of matter after solid, liquid and gas. As over ninety-nine percent of all observable matter in the Universe is plasma, planets like ours, with so little plasma and so much solid, liquid and gas, appear all the more remarkable. On the grand scale, plasma is what the Sun is made from and, when we look into the night sky, almost everything we can see with the naked eye is made of plasma. On the smallest scale, here on Earth, scientists make plasma to etch the microchips on which we rely for so much. Plasma is in the fluorescent light bulbs above our heads and, in laboratories around the world, it is the subject of tests to create, one day, an inexhaustible and clean source of energy from nuclear fusion. With Justin Wark, Professor of Physics and Fellow of Trinity College at the University of Oxford; Kate Lancaster, Research Fellow for Innovation and Impact at the York Plasma Institute at the University of York, and Bill Graham, Professor of Physics at Queens University, Belfast.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plato and Sustainability 15 mins – “What can Plato teach us about sustainability? According to Princeton’s Melissa Lane, author of Eco-Republic, quite a lot. Melissa discusses this topic with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. Philosophy Bites is made in association with the Institute of Philosophy.” At the link find the title “Melissa Lane on Plato and Sustainability, Dec, 2011,” right-click “Media filesand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Polyethylene 6 mins – “Find a plastic bottle. There’s probably one not far from you. Now look at its bottom: do you see a little triangle with a number one inside? Well, that means the bottle is made from the compound polyethylene terephthalate. Yes, it’s a bit of a mouthful. That’s why lazy chemists usually call it PET. PET is a polymer. This means it’s a macromolecule made out of thousands of repeating units called monomers. To produce PET chemists use two different kinds of monomers: terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol. Both units undergo a reaction called esterification, where an organic acid and an alcohol combine to form an ester and water. Esters are usually compounds with nice and fruity smells. But PET is not a normal ester – it’s a polymer, hence a poly-ester – and properties are very different. We’ll talk about them in just a moment…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy is included in the blog archive.

Premed Questions 24 mins – “Ryan answers questions that have come in through our Facebook group, and email. We cover a lot of different topics, so there will be something for you.” At the link find the title, “203: Premed Q&A – Maximizing Gap Years, Residency Merger and More, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files PMY203.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychiatric Shortage in New Hampshire 56 mins – “Even as the state moves forward with plans for meeting the mental health needs of Granite Staters, workers in this field, from psychiatrists to specially trained nurses, are scarce. The factors are many, ranging from inadequate salaries to licensing boards that make it difficult for job seekers to cross state lines.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radical Solutions 45 mins – “What happens if our nation’s problems become too large to realistically imagine our politicians solving? What if voting doesn’t help? Dan reminds us that he’s not a moderate, and that you probably aren’t either.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Assault Shaming 14 mins – “We need a more considered approach to using social media for social justice, says writer and activist Ione Wells. After she was the victim of an assault in London, Wells published a letter to her attacker in a student newspaper that went viral and sparked the #NotGuilty campaign against sexual violence and victim-blaming. In this moving talk, she describes how sharing her personal story gave hope to others and delivers a powerful message against the culture of online shaming.” “ At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Assaults 49 mins – “On Wednesday, four women came forward to say they were touched inappropriately by Donald Trump. The allegations, on the heels of taped remarks in which trump boasts about pushing himself on women, have again brought sexual assault and harassment into the spotlight. It’s one of several high-profile cases this year, including accusations against former Fox News CEO Roger Ailes and a controversial sentencing in the Stanford rape case. All have prompted more dialogue about how we talk about, and treat, women in 2016. But to many, it can feel like we’re repeating the same conversation, even after reform to the law and college and workplace policies. Diane and a panel talk about why sexual assault and harassment are so common and what that says about our culture.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Sexual Relations 33 mins – “Esther Perel, Flemish-Belgian-Jewish-American Mash-Up and world-renowned expert on sex and relationships, sits down with Amy to discuss fetishes, why Americans are terrible at flirting and why we’re obsessed with “productive” sex — and we’re not talking about making babies. Also discussed: Amy’s “First Asian Rule” and Esther’s tips for having the best sex of our lives. We’re here for you, fam.” At the link find the title, “Oct, 2016, Sex, Relationships, And Asian Daters,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sierra Club Founder 52 mins – “David Brower is widely regarded as the father of the modern environmentalism movement. He served two decades as executive director of the Sierra Club and fought fiercely to defend wilderness and rivers in the American West. Supporters admired his passion, vision, and unyielding efforts, while his opponents found him polarizing and reckless. In a new book, the journalist Robert Wyss explores Brower’s complicated personal life and his fearless stewardship of the environmental movement.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smallpox Eradicator 60 minsLarry Brilliant, Chairman, Skoll Global Threats; Former Executive Director, Google.org; Author, Sometimes Brilliant: The Impossible Adventure of a Spiritual Seeker and Visionary Physician Who Helped Conquer the Worst Disease in History; Twitter: @larrybrilliant Brilliant’s life has taken him across continents and countercultural movements. He is responsible for some of the most significant medical, spiritual and social achievements of the past century, working with leaders and icons including Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Steve Jobs, Wavy Gravy, the Dalai Lama, and President Barack Obama. Brilliant was the executive director of Google.org and chaired the Presidential Advisory Committee on Bio-Surveillance. He lived in India for more than 10 years working as a United Nations medical officer, where he played a key role in the World Health Organization smallpox eradication program in South Asia. He also co-founded The Seva Foundation, an international NGO whose programs and grantees have given back sight to more than 3.5 million blind people in more than 20 countries. Learn more about Brilliant’s inspiring life and journey.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Snowden Update 65 mins – “Ben Wizner – Hosted by Leo Laporte – Ben Wizner, Edward Snowden’s Lawyer and Director of the ACLU Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project” At the link click “Download options, “ right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Values 58 mins – “How do we go about building an equitable society, where the voices – How do we go about building an equitable society, where the voices – and the values – of diverse communities are listened to and respected? A Stratford Festival panel discussion….” At the link find the title, “A Seat at the Table: the future of a pluralist society, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161013_86847.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Somalia Recovery 24 mins – “Death threats haven’t deterred Fadumo Dayib from running to be Somalia’s next president. The first-ever female candidate for Somalia’s presidency shares with The Current her plan to put an end to corruption in politics by the male-dominated clan system.” At the link find the title, “Could Fadumo Dayib become Somalia’s first female president? Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161013_86032.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sono Motors 28 mins – “You know how hot your car gets on a sunny day? Wouldn’t it be great if all that sun-absorption could actually fuel your ride? Well, this week on Sea Change Radio we profile a small German startup called Sono Motors which is working on making that very thing happen. Sono Motors co-founder Jona Christians outlines how this automobile, draped in solar panels, will charge a battery for up to 250 kilometers of sun-powered driving, discusses the market landscape for this sort of technology, and tells us how the company recently raised $200,000 in crowd-source funding to make their vision real. Then, we revisit host Alex Wise‘s interview with Mike Tinskey from Ford Motors who, in 2014, talked about the company’s promising C-Max Solar Energi Concept car with solar panels built right into the roof.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Special Needs Kids 12 mins – “Ines Kuperschmit of the Learning Rights Law Center says parents need to learn to fight smart, and remember that they don’t have to take no for an answer.” At the link find the title, “How to get the best education for your kid with special needs, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files KidsDisabilities2_BROOD_PODCAST-35c80b42.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startalk Astrophysics Questions 54 mins – “Curious about general astrophysics? Join us for class this week as Prof. Neil Tyson and assistant Leighann Lord explain some of the basics. Now extended with 12 minutes of Neil, Bill Nye and Steven Soter swapping Carl Sagan stories in the ‘Cosmic Crib’.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup Podcast Tasks 36 mins – “Growth. It can be exciting, it can be motivating, and it can be really stressful. In this week’s episode, we take a look at the tensions that Gimlet’s growth spurt is creating. We speak with the team producing one of our upcoming shows to see what it’s really like to build a podcast from the ground up. Each of them is being asked to step up to the plate in a way that they never have before, and some are realizing that the support they expected, it just isn’t there. People are pushed to their limits, emotions run high, and things that have remained hitherto unsaid are finally aired.” At the link find the title,”You Can’t Wear a Suit Here (Season 4, Episode 2), Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT2184139976.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supernational Tribunals 55 mins – “On this episode of Slate Money, hosts Felix Salmon of Fusion; Cathy O’Neil, data scientist and author of Weapons of Math Destruction; and Time correspondent Haley Sweetland Edwards talk about Haley’s new book on shadow courts, the current plight of active managers, and congestion pricing.” At the link find the title, “The Shadow Courts Edition, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM2997694188.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Talk Radio Impact 37 mins – “In the midst of an election that has exposed deep and sometimes ugly rifts in American society, WNYC and The Nation have partnered for a new podcast series called “The United States of Anxiety.” Each week they look to understand how we arrived at this point by diving deep into the polarized economic, social and political landscape as it exists in communities on Long Island, New York. This week, we’re sharing their latest episode,which looks at the role of the media in creating a narrative of anxiety in the U.S — particularly conservative talk radio. First, WNYC’s Arun Venugopal visits Patty, a Donald Trump supporter who lives in Long Island, to find out about her media diet and how Trump’s messaging speaks to her. Then, WNYC’s Matt Katz talks to The Nation’s Kai Wright about how conservative media reflects the changes taking place in our country and why its followers are distrustful of mainstream news. You can (and should) find more episodes of The United States of Anxiety on iTunes or by going to their website. “ At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thousand Days Program 37 mins – “Beginning at conception, a new human’s development and long-term health are critically dependent on the availablity of proper nutrition.  The right nutrients at the right time can have profound impacts on individuals, but also have effects on whole societies.  Today’s guest is Lucy Martinez-Sullivan, Executive Director of 1000 Days. She talks about the critical need for pre- and neo-natal nutrition, and how our scientific and social interventions can reshape the lives of many.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thyroid Problems 53 mins – “This week we have fantastic guest Dr. Amy Myers joining us. Listen in as we talk about her new book The Thyroid Connection, functional medicine, thyroid issues and autoimmune thyroid conditions, research, treatment, etc.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trail of Tears Update 50 mins – “  Poverty, suicide, and alcohol and drug abuse are disproportionately high among the two million Native Americans in the U.S. — and at crisis levels on reservations. On today’s show, we’ll look into one economic impediment: property rights. Plus, this Columbus Day we take a look at the allure and bias of maps, with a look at cartographers who create fictional maps for fantasy novels like Lord of the Rings or Game of Thrones. We’ll discover that a good fantasy map must be rooted in reality.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tree Preservation 47 mins – “America’s cities are full of trees but despite encountering them all the time we tend to take them for granted or know little about their natural history and civic virtues. But in a new book, “Urban Forests”, author Jill Jonnes says trees play an extraordinarily important role in our cityscapes and they are the dominant component of what is now called green infrastructure. For this month’s Environmental Outlook Diane looks at the history of America’s urban trees and what they mean for the health of our city’s today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Tuna Documentary 24 mins – “As with any fishy story, there’s a dispute over facts.” At the link find the title, “Conservationists fear surplus of Atlantic bluefin tuna does not equate to healthy stock, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161011_34472.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undesirable Talents 61 mins – “San Francisco’s Spider-Man burglar was remarkable. He dropped into buildings from skylights, leapt 10 feet from one roof to another. But mostly, his talent got him into trouble. This week, his story, and stories of other undesirable talents.” At the link click “Download” and “OK” on the pop-up menu.

US Access Board 55 mins – “Joyce welcomes Tim Creagan, Senior Accessibility Specialist-Information Technology, with the U.S. Access Board. The Access Board is an independent federal agency that promotes equality for people with disabilities through leadership in accessible design and the development of accessibility guidelines and standards. Created in 1973 to ensure access to federally funded facilities, the board is now a leading source of information on accessible design. The Access Board develops and maintains design criteria for the built environment, transit vehicles, telecommunications equipment, medical diagnostic equipment, and information technology. It also provides technical assistance and training on these requirements and on accessible design and continues to enforce accessibility standards that cover federally funded facilities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vice Magazine Creator 37 mins – “Suroosh Alvi was a recovering addict when he started a scrappy underground magazine in Montreal. It grew into VICE Media — a multi-billion dollar company that has shaken up the world of journalism.” At the link find the title, “VICE: Suroosh Alvi, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161006_hibt_vice.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virology Researcher 26 mins – “Michael Rossmann is the Hanley Professor of Biological Sciences at Purdue University.  He joins us to talk about viruses, namely the Zika virus.  The structure of the Zika virus was discovered by a team at Purdue, and this discovery will provide insights for researchers looking to discover a vaccine or a cure.  We’ll learn that the Zika virus was first detected decades ago in Ugandan monkeys, but it is a major health concert today because of the virus’ cross-species jump to humans.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virtue Ethics 15 mins – “Julia Annas explains what Virtue Ethics is for and how it differs from other approaches to the question of how we should live in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.” at the link find the title, “Julia Annas on What is Virtue Ethics For? Dec, 2014,” right-click “Media files Julia Annas on What is Virtue Ethics For.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Website Design 51 mins – “Jeremy Osborn is the Academic Director of Aquent Gymnasium, an innovative MOOC for designers, developers and marketing professionals, and the author of popular books on web technology and design software, including his latest, HTML5 Digital Classroom. He and Jeffrey Zeldman discuss the rapidly changing landscape of modern web design; how to keep learning and stay inspired; remembering the human being you’re designing for, and the joy of stress cases.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wells Fargo Scandal 19 mins – “We take you inside the headquarters of Wells Fargo bank. It’s a place where a bunch of young, stressed-out workers were rewarded for doing some very bad things.” At the link find the title, “#728: The Wells Fargo Hustle, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161007 pmoney_pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildlife Bridges 30 mins – “Motorways kill animals. That’s unavoidable. But can road builders minimise the death toll with badger tunnels, bat flyovers, and green bridges covered in plants rather than tarmac? Tom Heap travels to the Gwent Levels and the Netherlands to find out.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yemeni Children Starve 18 mins – “Week after week, Yemen’s civil war grinds. To date, almost 3,000 children have been killed or injured in the conflict. As 370,000 severely malnourished children face a greater risk of death, many question why the plight of Yemen has been overlooked.” At the link find the title, “‘No one is speaking for Yemen’ as 370,000 malnourished children face risk of death, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161013_49658.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus Research 121 mins – “Hosts: Vincent RacanielloAlan DoveRich Condit, and Kathy Spindler [with] Guests: Sharon Isern and Scott Michael Sharon and Scott join the TWiV team to talk about their work on dengue antibody-dependent enhancement of Zika virus infection, and identifying the virus in mosquitoes from Miami.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 410” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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