Media Mining Digest 184 – May 22, 2015: Creatine, Cuban Science, Currency Concepts, Dementia, Drone Construction, Freakonomics Insights, Free Speech – Cartoons, Hair Tragedy, Hedy Lamarr, HIV in Austin Indiana, Hyaluronic Acid, Iraqi Refugees, ISIS Propaganda, Israeli Dilemma, Japanese Internment Camps, Las Vegas Rejuvenation, Laughter, Meat Contamination, Migrant Child Disposition, Nancy Houston, Patient Power, Patriot Act, Peru Wildlife Trade, Powers of Two, Racism and Drones, Rebellion, Saudi Social Change, Social Media Propaganda, Stereotypes, Superpowers, Teen Driver Deaths, Teen Suicides, Trans Pacific Partnership, Ty Cobb Story, Underground Coffee, Vietnam War Photography, Walter Pincus, Wright Brothers, WWII – Crete, WWII Code Breaking, WWII Displaced Kids, WWII Rapes

The following audio files come from a larger group of 180 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 57 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Adaptation of Life 52 mins – “Darwinian evolution is adaptive and slow … millennia can go by before a species changes very much. But with the tools of genetic engineering we can now make radical changes in just one generation. By removing genes or inserting new ones, we can give an organism radically different traits and behaviors. We are taking evolution into our own hands. It all began with the domestication of plants and animals, which one science writer says created civilization. Today, as humans tinker with their own genome, is it possible we will produce Homo sapiens 2.0? Also, what happens to those species who can’t control their destiny? How climate change is forcing the biggest genetic reshuffling in recorded history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Students in Britain 27 mins – “Over 35,000 African students studied at British universities last year – part of a growing number of foreign students coming to the UK. Bola Masuro charts the progress of four students from Africa. What do they want to take back with them from the British way of life? And what could the UK learn from Africa?” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: African Students Abroad,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150513-0300a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up men.

AIDS History 27 mins – “AIDS Expert Dr Tony Fauci looks back at the scientific breakthroughs that have transformed HIV/AIDS from a death sentence to a disease that can now be treated and prevented. Archive clip from ‘How to Survive a Plague’ courtesy of Dartmouth Films & Public Square Films.” At the link find the title, “HealthC: The Truth About AIDS,” right-click “healthc_20150506-2005a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.”

Backyard Brains 87 mins – “…Greg Gage and Tim Marzullo of Backyard Brains! (hereafter annotated as “BB”) The focus of BB is to make simple to use electronics so that neuroscience is taught sooner in students’ lives. The Spiker box is a signal chain with bio instrumentation amp, then bandpass filtering, then an amplifier to output through a speaker; It turns out that plants also have electrophysiology (action potential firing). Especially – The cortex is done in layers, so the polarity lines up and the signals are detectible; The human brain initiative is part of a push from the Obama administration. It’s meant to increase the understanding of the brain. Tim did some predication of the future: 2035 neuromotes, silicon wrapped in biocompatible material [and] 2165 is the completely controllable to the single neuron layer. There is a bluetooth kit to control bugs by manipulating their antennae. It’s called The Roboroach; it uses similar science as to the experiments by Luigi Galvani on frog legs. Greg gave a TED talk about the human to human interface” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beatrix Potter 54 mins – “Most people only know Beatrix Potter as the author of children’s books such as The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Her books have sold more than 100 million copies in 35 languages. But Beatrix Potter only began writing seriously in her 30s and before this pursued an interest in the natural sciences. She made intricate drawings of fungi and lichens and worked as an amateur scientist. She even wrote a scientific paper which despite its quality was dismissed as it was written by a female amateur. Sharon Carleton traces the scientific life of author Beatrix Potter.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Billards 16 mins – “We live in a post-billiards age. There was an age of billiards, and it has been over for so long, most of us have no idea how huge billiards once was. For many decades, starting in the mid-19th Century, billiards was the one of the most popular amusements. A hundred years ago, there were 830 pool halls in the city of Chicago. Today, there are ten. Billiards is not what it used to be—but we continue to live in a world affected by its former prominence. The growth of billiards led to the development of a material that would come to define the modern world. Without billiards, we might never have discovered plastic. The story starts with a man named Michael Phelan, the father of American billiards.

Blind Guide Dogs 26 mins “Professor Paul Upchurch is a Palaeobiolgoist at London’s UCL. His interest in dinosaurs and the living world began when he was a small boy and he now regards his hobby as his work. Paul is registered blind and talks to Peter about the way his visual impairment impacts on his work and his personal life. Lee Kumutat has travelled to Torquay in Devon, to meet Steph Read. Steph has the hereditary connective-tissue disorder known as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and she uses a wheelchair. Steph has a dual assistance dog, called Vegas, to help her with both her visual impairment and her physical disability and she talks to Lee about the difference Vegas makes to her daily living. Producer: Cheryl Gabriel” At the link for a few weeks find the title, “InTouch 05 May 15: Dinosaurs and Dogs,” right-click “Download 9MB” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blindness for Beginners 19 mins – “In Touch revisits its ‘Blindness for Beginners’ series to look at shopping. Peter White is joined by broadcaster Richard de Costobadie and Diane Roworth, CEO of the York Blind and Partially-Sighted Society, who share their experiences and advice on what can make shopping trips easier. They discuss the best way to retain your independence and choice if you’re blind or visually-impaired. The emphasis is on staying in control and finding the best way to get exactly what you want without losing your autonomy …. or temper. Producer: Cheryl Gabriel” At the link, for a short time, find the title, “InTouch 12 May 15: Blindness for Beginners – Shopping, “right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boat Migrants 47 mins – “The boats out of Burma and Bangladesh are bobbing off of Malaysia and Thailand right now.  Jammed and desperate. You already know about the boats out of North Africa – Libya – coming in waves across the Mediterranean. Europe, debating whether to save them or sink them before they can leave their ports. The world is looking at another migrant crisis moment. Last summer it was kids on the Rio Grande.  In the future, with political upheaval and climate change, it could be all over. With tough choices attached. This hour On Point: desperate migrants on the move.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Future 36 mins – “In a lecture at the Canadian Literature Centre at the University of Alberta and in interview with Paul Kennedy, novelist Lynn Coady explores what happens if we separate the idea of ‘the book’ from the experience they’ve traditionally provided.” At the link find the title, “The Monster At The End,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150506_98892.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brewing and Distilling 53 mins – [starts at 12 m]“Adam Rogers is an editor at Wired and the author of Proof: The Science of Booze. On the show this week we talk to Rogers about alcohol and the science behind it—from yeast, to bourbon, to Star Trek’s synthehol.” At the link find the title, “86 Adam Rogers – The Science of Booze,” “Media files 205557655-inquiringminds-86-adam-rogers-the-science-of-booze.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil War Echoes 52 mins – “One hundred and fifty years have now passed since the end of the civil war. Pulitzer-prize winning historian James McPherson argues that most of today’s pressing issues – from racial inequality and voting rights to state sovereignty – can be traced back to this war. In a new book, McPherson says it is impossible to understand most contemporary issues without understanding their roots in the civil war era. We look at the enduring legacy of the conflict that nearly destroyed the country.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Civil War Thoughts 49 mins – “American historian David Blight explores the legacy of the American Civil War – especially regarding the issue of race-relations. He joins the dots between events from 150 years ago through to the American Civil Rights movement of the 1960s to more recent protests in the US cities of Baltimore and Ferguson.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Alistair Cooke Memorial Lecture 9 May 2015,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150509-2259a.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 56 mins – “In her new book, Driving the Future, Margo Oge (Former Director, Office of Transportation and Air Quality, United States Environmental Protection Agency) portrays a future where clean, intelligent vehicles with lighter frames and alternative power trains will produce zero emissions and run at 100+ mpg. With electronic architectures more like that of airplanes, cars will be smarter and safer, will park themselves, and will network with other vehicles on the road to drive themselves. Offering an insider account of the partnership between Federal agencies, states, environmental groups, and car manufacturers that led to the historic deal, she discusses the science of climate change, the politics of addressing it and the lessons learned for policymakers.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Thesis 47 mins – “ For many college seniors, it’s the last great intellectual exercise of their college careers. The capstone before donning the cap and gown. I’m talking about the senior thesis. That deep dive into the unexplored and unanswered. Original research. Fresh takes on the classics. Out of the box thinking on just about everything: neotropical migrant birds.  Feminism and fairy tales. An original musical. Must-reads, at least for the eyes of the thesis advisor — and hopefully mom and dad. And you’re in for a treat, too. This hour, On Point: the Class of 2015 presents their senior theses.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concrete Problems 7 mins – “You already feel guilty about the car you drive to work, but you might want to start feeling guilty about your workplace too. Reporter Daniel Gross takes a look at why concrete is helping destroy the environment.” At the link find the title, “How Concrete Is Crushing the Earth,” right-click “Media files GROSSCONCRETEWEBMIX.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conspiracy Theories 21 mins – “What is a conspiracy? Why do conspiracies – real or imagined –  matter to philsophy? Cassim Quaassam explores these questions in conversation with Nigel Warburton “ At the link right-clcik beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creatine 28 mins – “What is Creatine?  It’s long been known as a supplement-of-choice for athletes and weightlifters… but what cognitive benefits might Creatine provide?  To answer these and other questions, Dr. Maurizio Balestrino joins Jesse for an intellectual powwow this week.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Science 24 mins – [starts at 10 m]On this week’s show: Cuban science looks toward the future, and a roundup of daily news stories”At the link right-click “Download MP3 file for this show” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Currency Concepts 55 mins – “The world over, alternative currencies are helping societies solve key issues. Sheetal Lodhia explores how healthy communities can be built without money.” At the link find the title, “Why Money Isn’t Everything,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150512_56349.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia P4 46 mins – “In this episode of the Dementia Decoded series, we’ll look at new and innovative ways people around the world are addressing this problem, and offer some tools and strategies for people dealing with dementia in their own families and communities.” At the link find the title, “Dementia Decoded: Fighting Forgetting,” right-click “Media files 150400_dementia_decoded_ep4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Construction Lessons 109 mins – “In this week’s show we get a little deeper into FPV and talk about some of the cool Ground Stations we’ve seen – some are really stinking expensive, while others show that you can get the job done WITHOUT breaking the bank (these are MY favorite systems). Also, we get a chance to visit with Jake ‘FleshPilot’ Wells for the first time on the show. You may remember our referencing Jake in some previous shows, as he’s the guy that’s been putting out some of those awesome videos we’ve enjoyed from Washington state.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freakonomics Insights 47 mins – “Dubner and Levitt are live onstage at the 92nd Street Y in New York to celebrate their new book “When to Rob a Bank” — and a decade of working together.” At the link find the title, “Ten Years of Freakonomics,” right-click “Media files freakonomics_podcast051415.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Speech – Cartoons 47 mins – “On Sunday in the Dallas suburb Garland, Texas, two men with assault rifles were shot dead by an off-duty traffic cop. The men had come to kill attendees of a Muhammad Art Exhibit and Contest where there was a $10,000 prize for the best caricature of the prophet. Images considered sacrilegious by many Muslims. But the outspoken organizer Pamela Gellar says it’s all fine and well – it’s free speech. Others say, not so fast. This is hate. Bigotry. Racism. This was meant to provoke violence. So where is the line between free speech and hate speech? How far can you go? This hour, On Point: Free speech, hate speech.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hair Tragedy 14 mins – “Geneticist Chris Gunter worries about passing on a rare condition to her son. Chris Gunter is a human geneticist by training, and a science communicator by choice. She earned her Ph.D. at Emory University and then moved up and down the east coast, ending up as a Senior Editor at the journal Nature. Currently she serves as the Associate Director for Research for the Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, and as an Associate Professor in Pediatrics for the Emory University School of Medicine. If she had any spare time, she would probably garden or bake.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hedy Lamarr 42 mins – “Hedy Lamarr provides the classic case of a superbly bright woman constrained by the narrow views of her time as to what women should be allowed to do.   She is well known as a 1940s actor, and was promoted as “The Most Beautiful Woman in the World.”  But behind the gloss, Lamarr was a natural inventor and amateur engineer.  Together with composer George Antheil, she patented a new system of communication. That technology forms the basis of ‘spread spectrum technology’ which gives us our mobile phones today. Sharon Carleton traces the life of Hedy Lamarr, ‘the most gorgeous geek of all time’ and a very damaged woman.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV in Austin Indiana 48 mins – “Austin, Indiana, a town with just 4,200 people, is in  the throes of a HIV outbreak. Austin is poor. With a huge opiate addiction problem. Addicts are sharing dirty needles. The governor declared a state of emergency and Tuesday expanded a needle exchange program to address the crisis. The issues facing Austin – addiction, poverty, unemployment –aren’t unique to rural Indiana. Communities across the country face similar challenges. With dire outcomes. This hour, On Point: Indiana’s HIV outbreak, needle exchanges and America’s enduring drug problem.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hyaluronic Acid 6 mins – “If there’s one thing to make anyone with a scientific background cringe it’s when an advertiser starts pushing ‘the science stuff’. Probably the worst offenders are cosmetic manufacturers, and you don’t have to take in many of their adverts before getting the impression that hyaluronic acid is a wonder substance, a compound well worthy of study. Hyaluronic acid, also known as hyaluronan, is one of a group of naturally occurring complex organic compounds called glycosaminoglycans, that form long polysaccharide chains with a repeating formula of C14H21NO11. It was first found in the vitreous humour – the clear gel that fills the eye – which is where its name, combining ‘hyalos’, the Greek for ‘vitreous’, with ‘uronic acid’, originates. But hyaluronic acid also occurs widely in connective tissues, forming a major component of the matrix that supports cells in an organism. Its properties were first investigated by the German biochemist Karl Meyer at the University of California, Berkeley in the 1930s….” At the link right-click beside “Download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iraqi Refugees 47 mins – “Sometimes the story behind the story needs a lot more attention than it gets. And that’s the case now in Iraq. We’ve watched since last summer the advance of ISIS as it swept east from Syria into Iraq.  he black flags, the beheadings, the collapse of the Iraqi army. Now the pushback, with the help of Iran on the ground and the US in the air. But almost overlooked are the millions of Iraqis who had to flee all that fighting. And all those refugees, all those lost towns, a whole other layer of despair and challenge.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Propaganda 27 mins – “Dominic Casciani explores the way the so called Islamic State use social media to recruit people to their cause, and what can we be done combat this. Dominic travels to Canada to meet a mother whose son was recruited by IS and executed by the FSA, and the police chief who says a lot more needs to be done to counter IS online.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Islamic State’s Social Media Machine,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150505-0300a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Israeli Dilemma 54 mins – “Michael Enright in conversation with Ari Shavit, the author of the acclaimed book, My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel, and the award-winning, but highly polarizing Gideon Levy.” At the link find the title, “The Enright Files – Israeli-Palestinian Relations,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150504_56711.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Japanese Internment 52 mins – “Shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the U.S. began rounding up tens of thousands of Japanese Americans. They were sent to concentration camps in the western U.S. For nearly four years, men, women and children spent their lives enclosed behind barbed wire, watched by armed guards in towers. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and those who supported his executive order that paved the way for the camps said they were a military necessity. It was, after all, a time of war. But today many consider it to be one of the most shameful periods in American history. We look at how internment camps affected the lives of Japanese Americans for generations.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Las Vegas Rejuvenation 56 mins – “Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh has a wild vision and the dollars to try to make it real. But it still might be the biggest gamble in town.” At the link find the title, “Could the Next Brooklyn Be … Las Vegas?!” right-click “Media files freakonomics_podcast050715.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Laughter 17 mins – “Did you know that you’re 30 times more likely to laugh if you’re with somebody else than if you’re alone? Cognitive neuroscientist Sophie Scott shares this and other surprising facts about laughter in this fast-paced, action-packed and, yes, hilarious dash through the science of the topic.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As “ from the pop-up menu.

Meat Contamination 57 mins – “FRONTLINE investigates the spread of dangerous pathogens in meat particularly poultry.” At the link find the title, “The Trouble With Chicken,” right-click “Download File – 85.3 MB” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Migrant Child Disposition 52 mins – “Last spring, striking images of the U.S. border began showing up in the media: Children from Central America, many traveling alone, piling up at immigration facilities. By October, nearly 70,000 unaccompanied child migrants had arrived seeking entry to the United States. This year, the numbers have dropped by about 40 percent, due in large part to stepped up enforcement by Mexico. However, that still means tens of thousands of kids will be taken into custody by the U.S. immigration system, even as the government struggles to process last year’s arrivals. A look at the ongoing migration of children from Central America and the tension between protection and prevention.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Nancy Houston 55 mins – “Paul Kennedy talks to the writer Nancy Huston, winner of the 2015 Blue Metropolis Grand Literary Prize.” At the link find the title, “Literary Amphibuim – Nancy Huston,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150507_84074.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patient Power 28 mins – “Episode 12 of the health podcast from Slate and WBUR offers up three ways to take charge of your medical experience. There are specific ways to feel better about both the quality and cost of your medical care, says Dr. Don Goldmann of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Also, medical informatics wiz Dr. Isaac Kohane on pushing the “blue button” to gain real control of your own medical data. And, we’ll show how telling your own medical story can help you heal.” At the link find the title, “The Checkup: Power to the Patient,” right-click “Media files checkup15051102_checkup.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop up menu.

Patient Power 67 mins – “We’re in the middle of a healthcare revolution but it’s about more than marvelous life-saving and life-enhancing apps on our smartphone. Eric Topol of the Scripps Translational Science Institute and author of The Patient Will See You Now argues that the digital revolution will give us more control of our health information and data. More powerful patients will transform the doctor-patient interaction. Topol talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his new book giving us a glimpse of the changes coming to medicine from the digital revolution.” At the link right-click ‘Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patriot Act 47 mins – “We know because of Edward Snowden. The NSA – the National Security Agency – took the PATRIOT Act, passed after 9/11, and ran and ran with it. Including forcing American phone companies to pour their records directly into government computers. Where our “metadata” was at their fingertips. Everyone you called. Now, that PATRIOT Act provision is expiring. Should that NSA domestic surveillance be ended with it? Defenders say no. Say ISIS and more are a real and current threat. Opponents say end it. For privacy. For freedom. And we don’t need it. This hour, On Point: the NSA’s spying at home.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patriot Act Limits 52 mins – “Most Americans had no idea the U.S. government was conducting a daily dragnet of their phone records until two years ago. That’s when Edward Snowden made this and several other NSA operations public, sparking a firestorm. Last week, a federal appeals court ruled that the Patriot Act, as written, doesn’t allow this practice. Now it’s up to Congress to make a decision. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) supports re-authorizing bulk surveillance for five years, but a bipartisan group in the House is pushing for changes. If Congress doesn’t act, the program expires on June 1. We look at the future of the Patriot Act and what it means for your privacy and security.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Peru Wildlife Trade 27 mins – “Peru is one of the most biodiverse nations in the world. But its precious wildlife is threatened by traffickers. Crossing Continents goes on operations with the wildlife police.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Peru’s Wildlife for Sale – 14 May 2015,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150514-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Powers of Two 52 mins – “Forget what you think you know about creativity being the domain of the solitary genius. The writer Joshua Wolf Shenk says it’s a myth that’s outlived its usefulness. In his book Powers of Two, Shenk looks at hundreds of creative duos — like John Lennon and Paul McCartney or Marie and Pierre Curie — to understand what he calls the “electrified space” of their partnership. Friday, Shenk joins us to explain how these creative connections work, and why two heads really are better than one.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism and Drones 53 mins – “The deep historical roots of the Baltimore protests, shedding light on drone strikes, and combating sex worker stereotypes.” At the link find the title, “Unseen & Inscrutable,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rebellion 47 mins – “Chris Hedges went out into the world as a journalist. Covered war and more all over for years. And came back an activist. Warning first against war, and then more. Against what he calls a corporate takeover of power globally. Against the crushing of the possibility of real change through democracy. Against what he sees as a profit-driven rush to environmental catastrophe, and maybe the extinction of the human race. The only answer now, says Hedges, is revolt. Even if it hurts. It’s a hard message, and he knows it. This hour On Point: Chris Hedges on the case for revolt.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Social Change 27 mins – “Tarek Osman considers how the impact of the Arab Uprisings of 2011 was felt in Saudi Arabia. The country’s growing youth population faced high unemployment and was well adapted to social media. But unlike other Arab countries, they did not take to the streets. And, As King Salman takes power, what is the future of this traditional society and global banker of oil?” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Saudi Arabian Spring,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150506-0300a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Propaganda 27 mins – “The Jordanian social media campaign run in response to the burning of pilot Moaz al-Kasasbeh. Dominic Casciani examines Islamic State’s social media strategy and the attempts to combat it.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Jordan Takes On the Islamic State’s Digital Machine,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150512-1330a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stereotypes 11 mins – “Psychologist Claude Steele says stereotypes are even more important than we realize, and he explains the psychology that underpins them.” At the link find the title, “Looking Closer at Stereotypes,” right-click “Media files SteeleWebMix.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Superpowers 60 mins – “This is an updated version of a classic episode, featuring a new story from Snap Judgment. We answer the following questions about superpowers: Can superheroes be real people? (No.) Can real people become superheroes? (Maybe.) And which is better: flight or invisibility? (Depends who you ask.) Chris ware’s comic mentioned in the episode is here.” At the ink right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teen Driver Deaths 54 mins – “The number of young drivers killed on the roads is double what we’d expect. Despite clever advertising campaigns, psychologist Bridie Scott-Parker says there hasn’t even been a way of measuring young driver behaviour. Progress has not been made in road safety for young drivers.  Bridie Scott-Parker has taken the first step by bringing together information about the drivers, their behaviour and the environment as they all affect each other. At the Australian Academy of Science in Canberra, Bridie Scott-Parker describes her new approach to addressing safety amongst young novice drivers.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teen Suicides 47 mins – “Three Palo Alto, California teenagers took their own lives this winter. And it’s happened there before. In Newton, Massachusetts, three teens committed suicide last year. And another three in Fairfax County, Virginia. Is there too much competition in these hyper-competitive communities? Psychologists tell us that suicide clusters are rare. And caution against singling out any one factor. But with one in four kids now with a clinical diagnosis of depression or anxiety — something’s going wrong.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Pacific Partnership 50 mins – “The Democrats’ revolt against President Obama’s Trans Pacific Partnership has everything to do with the “giant sucking sound” of job loss echoing over Baltimore and St. Louis, Detroit and Gary… and still more to do with the inability of our own polarized and privatized society to repair the social contract at home. Only at the end of our untypically acrimonious hour did a moral come clear: the 30-year regime of expanding global trade could well founder for want of a firm public decision to share the pain and the profits in that transformation. The more we learn about TPP, the more it looks like a blunt instrument of the banking and corporate interests to protect their investments, and of Big Pharma, Hollywood and Info Tech to protect their “intellectual property” abroad.   Enforceable compensations for workers and communities, here and there, would be nice, too.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Pacific Partnership 47 mins – “The President wants a huge new Pacific trade deal, and he wants it fast so it doesn’t get bogged down and derailed. So China doesn’t write the rules. Yesterday, his own party said no. Senate Democrats rebelled without more assurances, protections, guarantees. And now, the fate of the Trans Pacific Partnership – the TPP – is way up in the air. The White House is calling it a “snafu.” Maybe. But it’s also a serious battle over how the world will work. How Americans workers, business and trade will fare. This hour On Point: the red hot politics of Pacific trade.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ty Cobb Story 48 mins – “’Ty Cobb. That name is hard-wired into the story of baseball and the roaring early days of 20th Century America. One of the game’s first superstars.  Babe Ruth admired him. His fans adored him. Other fans hated how he could hit, steal and run rings around their teams.  But somehow, after he died, he became baseball’s anti-hero. The guy who sharpened his spikes and used them. The violent man, the racist, the major league bully. Turns out, that whole anti-hero story is wrong. This hour, On Point: the true story of the great Ty Cobb.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Underground Coffee 50 mins – “This week we talk to Chris Hoke about finding spirituality within the darkness – Chris Hoke is a jail chaplain and minister to Mexican gang and migrant worker communities in Washington’s Skagit Valley. His experiences are recounted in his new book, Wanted: A Spiritual Pursuit Through Jail, Among Outlaws, and Across Borders, which Kirkus calls “a liberating, transformative chronicle of how spirituality can foster inspiration and hope while emboldening the downtrodden through their darkest days.” Through his work with the organization Tierra Nueva, Hoke co-founded a coffee-roasting business, Underground Coffee, which employs men coming out of prison and addiction, and connects them to agricultural partners in Honduras. Hoke’s work has been featured on NPR’s Snap Judgment and in SojournersImage JournalModern Farmer, and Christian Century. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam War Photography 54 mins – “Members of the U.S. Army’s 221st Signal Company, an official documenting agency for the U.S. Army, talk about their work chronicling the Vietnam War through photography and film.” At the link right-click “IM_20150509.mp3” beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Walter Pincus 60 mins – “Walter Pincus talked about the framework agreement on Iran’s nuclear program, U.S.-Israel relations, and defense department spending and budget sequestration. He also spoke about the 2003 war in Iraq, his career at the Washington Post, and his forthcoming book.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Walter Pincus,” right-click “Media files program.396138.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wright Brothers 52 mins – “On Dec. 17, 1903, Orville Wright, in a plane he designed with his brother Wilbur, becomes the first person to fly. For many of us, this is where the story of the Wright brothers begins and ends. But Pulitzer Prize-winning author and historian David McCullough says there’s so much more to what the two accomplished. By examining a trove of private letters, diaries and notebooks, McCullough finds the brothers extraordinary intelligent, intensely driven, loyal to their family and completely self-made. David McCullough gives us more insight into the men who taught the world to fly.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

WW II – Crete 52 mins – “Thursday, our guest is journalist Christopher McDougall who wrote the book that kicked off the barefoot running movement. While he was writing, McDougall came across the story of a Greek foot messenger who accomplished remarkable athletic feats during World War II. It got him thinking about what makes a hero, and he learned it’s not chance and you don’t have to be superhuman. McDougall is in Utah and joins us to explore how normal people can develop their natural skills to be ready in a crisis.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII Code Breaking and Quantum PCs 60 mins – “This week, we’re looking at technology for keeping secrets safe from prying eyes and ears. We’re joined by Dan Younger, professor emeritus of mathematics at the University of Waterloo, to discuss the remarkable work of his colleague Bill Tutte, who broke the German Lorenz Code during World War II [first 30 mins] And we’ll discuss the cutting edge of quantum security with Physics and Computer Science Professor Shohini Ghose [starts at 29 mins].” At the link find the title, “#317 Secure Communications,” right-click “Media files Science for the People_317_Secure_Communication.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII Displaced Kids 50 mins – “Following the end of World War Two, the BBC began a series of special radio appeals on behalf of a group of children who had survived the Holocaust but were now stranded as orphans in post-war Europe. Alex Last finds out what happened to the 12 children named in the recordings.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Lost Children of the Holocaust,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150506-2200a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII Rapes 50 mins- “Lucy Ash investigates the mass rapes committed by Soviet troops in Germany at the end of World II – in part as revenge for Nazi atrocities in the Soviet Union.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Rape of Berlin – 2 May 2015,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150502-1830a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 183 – May 15, 2015: Aggression and Violence, Airway Decisions, American Terrorist, Australia Inequality, Baltimore, Battery Progress, Bruce Jenner, Careers in sustainability, Chernoble Forest Fires, Cholesterol,CitizenScientists, Clinton Controversy, Cold War Ending, Collaborative Graphs, Comptuer Gener Gap, Corporate Justness, Disposable People, Drone Killings, Flying Skills, Free Press Threats, Gambling, Gay Marriage – Supreme Court, Genetic Engineered Food, Hacking Cars, Human Embryo Editing, Jellyfish Burgers, Jerusalem, Job Interviews, Joke Writer, Katmandu Quake, Leeuwenhoek, Luddite History, Malls, Microbiome – Antibiotics- Obesity, Military Bureaucracy, Millennial Workers, NAFTA Impact, Neuroscience History, Open Access Panel, Orishas in South America, Pests in the City, Plains Indians, Plastics, Podcasters, Population Growth, Reform in Australia, Rings of Saturn, Same Sex Marriage – Supreme Court, Sports Science, Startups, Stem Cells, Synthetic Biology, Syrian Refugees, Toxicology Cases, Trans-Pacific Partnership, Trash History, Vaccine Optimization, Vietnam Exodus, Violence and the Poor, Volcanoes, Waste Incinerators, WikiLeaks Controversy, Winchester Mystery House, Women in Combat

The following audio files come from a larger group of 203 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 66 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Aggression and Violence 57 mins – “In the last few decades, new sources of evidence have continued to indicate that male violence has played an important role in shaping behavior in the human lineage. The frequency and nature of such violence varies widely among populations and over time raises questions about the factors responsible for the variation. This symposium takes a fresh look at the causes and consequences of variation in aggression, both between and within species. Carol Ember (Yale Univ) begins with a discussion about Resource Unpredictability, Socialization, and War, followed by Polly Wiessner on Violence: What’s Culture Got to Do with It?, and Robert Kelly (Univ of Wyoming) who asks Do Hunter-Gatherers Tell Us About Human Nature? Recorded on 05/16/2014.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Airway Decisions 27 mins – This is a critique of critical comments about a previous podcast about the use of an emergency procedure to access the airway of a patient whose jaw was wired shut. It’s of interest to non-medical listeners, as well as professionals, because of the view it provides of the types of discussion that occurs amongst professionals about situations affecting life and death. The techniques and technology are impressive. The variety of professionalism is also instructive. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Terrorist 87 mins – “ FRONTLINE and ProPublica investigate American-born terrorist David Coleman Headley.” At the link find the title, “American Terrorist ,” right-click “Download File – 85.3 MB” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australia Inequality 58 mins – “Australian Council of Trade Unions secretary Dave Oliver addresses the National Press Club in Canberra.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Dave Oliver,” right-click “NPCc_DaveOliver_0605_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Baltimore Crisis 48 mins – “Second degree murder, involuntary manslaughter, assault and more. We’ll look at the charges announced for six Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray. Baltimore’s curfew was lifted yesterday, after a trying week of anger, protests, and violence. It comes after charges were announced Friday against six police officers in the death of Freddie Gray – the 25 year-old who died mysteriously after his arrest last month. Now ruled a homicide. The officers charged for crimes including murder and manslaughter. A sigh of relief from much of Baltimore. Now, a call for calm. A return to normalcy. But is this enough in a city shaken by unrest? What is it going to take to create lasting change? This hour, On Point: What’s next for Baltimore, and the country.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select ‘Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Baltimore Violence 51 mins – “Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan called in the National Guard to restore order Monday night in west Baltimore. Protests had turned violent just hours after a funeral service was held for Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man who died from a spinal cord injury while in police custody. Fifteen police officers were injured, and there were at least 25 arrests. Some say yesterday’s chaos reflects longstanding issues between police and the communities they serve, a relationship that has been strained in some cases by bystander cellphone videos that seem to contradict official police accounts. We look at the latest from Baltimore.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Battery Progress 16 mins – “While most technology is getting smaller and cheaper, batteries still suck. Today on the show, we learn exactly why, and meet some of the people trying to make batteries better.” At the link find the title, “#620: Why Batteries Suck,” right-click “Media files 20150501_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bruce Jenner 47 mins – “Bruce Jenner And Transgender Issues In America – Bruce Jenner opens up about his gender journey. We’ll look at the big picture of transgender life in America now.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Careers in Sustainability 26 mins – “Explore opportunities in the field of sustainability and discover what skills are needed to launch or further your career. Learn more about the Sustainable Business Practices professional certificate program and how it can help you reach your professional goals.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Chernoble Forest Fires 60 mins – “ Some interviews drive by, others stay for the deep record. This week I have two heavy-hitters for you. Right out of the international news, forest fires near the Chernobyl nuclear wreck in Ukraine have raised dangerous radioactive particles into the atmosphere – again. We have Dr. Timothy Mousseau, the world’s foremost expert on the impacts of Chernobyl, and Fukushima radiation on living things. Then Utah scientist Tim Garrett updates his work showing only a collapse of civilization could prevent terrible climate change. There are new discoveries, about our utter dependence on fossil energy, and where that leads.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cholesterol 89 mins – “Dr. Robert Baron, UCSF Professor of Medicine, explores guidelines for treating cholesterol and reducing cardiovascular disease.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link A” from the pop-up menu.

Citizen Scientists 52 mins – “Scientists make up only a tiny percentage of the U.S. labor force. And they’re continually in need of funding for their research projects. But the Internet has created opportunities for non-scientists to participate in and contribute to scientific research. This is happening in many fields, most prominently in astronomy, ornithology and ecology. These volunteer researchers are called citizen scientists. And they’re helping real scientists achieve things they could not do on their own. For this month’s Environmental Outlook, we look at the growing importance of citizen scientists.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Clinton Controversy 47 mins – “‘Clinton Cash’ Controversy Hits The Campaign. The author of the new book “Clinton Cash” on Clinton Foundation money and Hillary Clinton’s campaign.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cold War Ending 54 mins – “This week we have a panel-discussion titled “Lost in Unification: Post-Cold War Europe East and West – Remembering the Berlin Wall.” The discussion is presented by the Boston University Arts Initiative, the Boston University Center for the Study of Europe, and the Goethe-Institut Boston. Our speakers are: German filmmaker, Marten Persiel; Boston University Professor of International “ At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Collaborative Graphs 38 mins – “Inspired by a session at the NSTA 2015 Conference in Chicago, we talk with Plot.ly founder and COO Matt Sundquist.  As a relatively young graphing program, Plot.ly makes it easy to collaboratively analyze and visualize data.  Matt talks to us about Plot.ly, how it can be used in the science classroom, and how you can even import real data into this powerful online tool.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Gender Gap 54 mins – “Host Leo Laporte and guest Robin Hauser Reynolds talk about “CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap,” a documentary which exposes the dearth of American female and minority software engineers and explores the reasons for this gender gap.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corporate Justness 10 mins – “Paul Tudor Jones II loves capitalism. It’s a system that has done him very well over the last few decades. Nonetheless, the hedge fund manager and philanthropist is concerned that a laser focus on profits is, as he puts it, “threatening the very underpinnings of society.” In this thoughtful, passionate talk, he outlines his planned counter-offensive, which centers on the concept of “justness.‘” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Audio Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disposable People 52 mins – “Joyce welcomes back, Kevin Bales, world renowned author, expert on modern slavery, and co-founder of Free the Slaves.” At the link find the title, “Eradicating Modern Slavery,” right-click “Media files bender050515.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Killings 47 mins – “American drone policy and consequences. We’ll look at secret strikes and the evolution of drone war. The drones are always out there, and we know it. Their strikes are usually invisible to most Americans. They make headlines in the US when something goes wrong. Last week, the President told the world that an American and an Italian aid worker – captives of al Qaeda – were killed in a US drone strike in Pakistan in January. And for a moment, the curtain was pulled back again on lethal US power projection, via drone, from the sky.  s this the right way to fight? And how? And for how long? This hour On Point: inside the drone war. US drone warfare, under scrutiny again.” At the link right-click “Download this sotry” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flying Skills 183 mins – The first hour of this podcast covers the apparent loss of flying skills that result in air crashes when automated systems fail and pilots can’t cope with situation that autopilots also couldn’t handle.” At the link find the title, “ APG 163 – Preaching to the Choir,” right-click “Media files APG163.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Press Threats 48 mins – “Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Dana Priest moderates a panel that includes Kevin Kallaugher, a political cartoonist at The Economist and winner of the 2015 Herblock Prize for political cartooning; Thanassis Cambanis, a Middle East correspondent and author of “Once Upon a Revolution”; and Vanessa Tucker, vice president for analysis at Freedom House, an independent organization that promotes freedom around the world.” At the link find the title, “State of World Press Freedom,” right-click “Media files IM_20150429.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gambling 4 mins – “Today, luck and Las Vegas. The University of Houston’s College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them. Las Vegas is the very definition of audacious. Its buildings are too posh; its shows too extravagant; its signs too large and too bright — clouds of neon hovering over the desert. Love it or hate it, it’s uniquely Las Vegas. And it’s paid for with money from gambling.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save ink As” from the pop-up menu.

Gay Marriage – Supreme Court 48 mins – “Fight Over Same-Sex Marriage Hits Supreme Court – The Supreme Court hears the case for and against legalizing gay marriage across the nation, and we look at the law at a time of breakneck social change.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Engineered Food 18 mins – “Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to isolate a gene that allows rice to survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1990s — and makes the case that modern genetics is sometimes the most effective method to advance sustainable agriculture and enhance food security for our planet’s growing population. “ At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Audio Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hacking Cars 95 mins – “Steve Gibson with Leo Laporte discuss the week’s tamer-than-usual news, then we host a terrific interview of the team (recently featured on Sunday’s 60 Minutes) who have been working with DARPA to address the challenge of hardening high-tech networked vehicles — autos and UAVs — against malicious hacking attacks.” That interview starts at the 60 minute mark and lasts 30 minutes. At the link right-click ‘Audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Embryo Editing 47 mins – “New report out of China, with potential implications for the rest of human history. Human nature. Chinese scientists have used a new technique to “edit” the genes of human embryos. To snip and change the code. The recipe for human life itself. What gets inherited. They’re not perfect editors yet. But if and when they get it down, those edits will re-engineer human life. Maybe against disease. And for all kinds of traits. They’re searching for “genius genes.” Stronger. Faster. This hour on On Point: re-engineering human embryo genes. The implications, and the global moral debate. “ At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jellyfish Burgers 56 mins – “Marine biologist Daniel Pauly, University of British Columbia, warns that modern fishing practices, left unmanaged, will leave little but jellyfish and plankton in the sea for future generations to eat – a frightening vision of our oceans and our lives “ At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jerusalem 60 mins – “Jerusalem. How did this small, remote town became the Holy City, the desire of every empire, and the key to Middle East peace? In this dazzling talk from February 2011, Simon Sebag Montefiore revealed the ever-changing city through its many incarnations, bringing every epoch and character blazingly to life. Jerusalem’s biography was told through the wars, adventures, love-affairs and messianic revelations of the men and women – kings, empresses, saints, conquerors, prophets and whores – who created, destroyed, chronicled and believed in the Holy City. Its cast varies from Solomon and Saladin to Churchill, Cleopatra and Caligula, from Abraham, Jesus and Muhammad to Jezebel, Nero, Napoleon, Rasputin, Herod and Nebuchadnezzar, from the Kaiser, Disraeli and Lloyd George, to Yasser Arafat, King Hussein and Moshe Dayan.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Interviews 26 mins – “One of the hardest parts about getting a new job is not always finding the job, but getting through the interview. It can be scary, nerve racking, and you often only get one chance to make a good impression. Wouldn’t it be great if there was someone out there that could help you with this process, to give you tips on what to do and what not to do?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Joke Writer 43 mins – “Paul Begala, a political analyst and CNN commentator, interviews comedy writer Jon Macks about his new book “Monologue: What Makes America Laugh Before Bed.” Macks was the top writer for “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” for 22 years.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-upmenu.

Kathmandu Quake  48 mins – “Nepal and Kathmandu after the devastating earthquake. We’ll look at the geology, geo-politics, rescue and the hard way ahead. Nepal is magical and Nepal is poor and this week Nepal has been shaken to its mountainous core. Literally shaken. The first images out of Kathmandu showed lovely, fragile temples lying in heaps of stone and shattered eaves. And Nepalis fleeing for their lives from earthquake and aftershock and the terrible sense that no place was safe. Not Kathmandu, not the flanks of Mt. Everest where climbers died in the shaking, not the Nepali villages where help is slow and hard in coming. This hour On Point: more than 6,000 dead, a unique culture battered, and the epic challenges now in Nepal.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leeuwenhoek 34 mins – “n 1677, Antonie van Leeuwenhoek had a letter published in the Royal Society’s journal ‘Philosophical Transactions’, which was the first paper to describe microbes, opening up the world of microbiology we know today. This year is the 350th anniversary of ‘Philosophical Transactions’, so the Royal Society commissioned a special issue containing commentaries about some of the most important papers to appear in the journal. I spoke to Dr Nick Lane, from University College London, who’s written about Leeuwenhoek’s letter and its importance. Speaking of Royal Society journals, I also spoke to Dr Paul Parham from the University of Liverpool in this podcast. Paul has recently co-edited a themed edition of the ‘Philosophical Transactions B’, which concentrates on the effect that climate change is having on vector-borne diseases, such as those transmitted by mosquitoes or ticks. I asked Paul about how changes in climate are altering the behaviour and habit of these vectors, and what this might mean for diseases.” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Luddite History 20 mins – “Today on the show, the true story of the Luddites.” At the link find the title, “#621: When Luddites Attack” right-click “Media files 20150506_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malls 18 mins – “Retail spaces are designed for impulse shopping. When you go to a store looking for socks and come out with a new shirt, it’s only partly your fault.  Shops are trying to look so beautiful, so welcoming, the items so enticingly displayed and in such vast quantity, that the consumer will start buying compulsively. This is the Gruen Effect.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbiome – Antibiotics – Obesity 13 mins – “Martin Blaser talks with Eric Topol about how the microbiome influences health and disease, as well as what role the overuse of antibiotics may have played in the obesity epidemic.” At the link find the title, “Connecting the Microbiome and Antibiotics to Obesity,” right-click “842586.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Bureaucracy 62 mins – “Leonard Wong of the Strategic Studies Institute at the U.S. Army War College talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about honesty in the military. Based on a recent co-authored paper, Wong argues that the paperwork and training burden on U.S. military officers requires dishonesty–it is simply impossible to comply with all the requirements. This creates a tension for an institution that prides itself on honesty, trust, and integrity. The conversation closes with suggestions for how the military might reform the compliance and requirement process.

Millennials Workforce 51 mins – “Millennials – people ages 18 to 34 – today make up the largest share of the U.S. workforce. They have the education and tech savvy companies want, but demand more of their jobs and employers than previous generations. New research shows flexibility is a top concern for millennials in choosing where to take a job – and whether to stay. To attract and retain young talent, many companies are trying to adapt to the needs of this group. That can mean relaxed dress codes, offering the option to work from home, more opportunities for travel and including millennials in business decisions. But as millions of high school and college students prepare to graduate this spring, today’s job market may not give them the freedom they’d like to find meaningful, flexible work. A look at the millennial-majority workforce, and prospects for new graduates.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

NAFTA Impact 21 mins – “Deborah Riner, the chief economist at the American Chamber of Commerce in Mexico wraps up the Mexico Moving Forward 2014 with an assessment of how the North American Free Trade Agreement has impacted the economies on both sides of the border.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuroscience History 44 mins – “The early days of neuroscience relied on tragedy to strike—a rabies infection, a botched lobotomy—before doctors could peek inside the brains of humans. Today advanced technology, such as the functional MRI, helps scientists study brains (and healthy ones at that) far more easily. The revelations they’re making call into question conventional ideas of maturity and our capacity for free will. The story begins at a unique laboratory at Michigan Technological University, called the Mind Music Machine, where reporter Allison Mills talks to a cognitive scientist who’s trying to develop technology that can interpret our emotions.  Then we talk about the history of neuroscience with Sam Kean, a regular contributor to Distillations magazine and author of the recent book The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons. Frances Jensen, a neuroscientist and author of The Teenage Brain, brings us into the present and explains the science behind why teenagers drive their parents crazy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Access Panel 49 mins – “Open Access publishing models are a business reality in 2015 for an ever-growing number of scientific and scholarly publishers. Article Processing Charges (APCs) are making OA possible, but the revolutionary changes propelled by Open Access business models touch every aspect of publishing. New customers. New operations. New compliance requirements. New problems. The OA Challenge in 2015 is to identify end-to-end solutions that manage the change, minimize the business burden, and maximize the publishing results. Recorded at the 2015 London Book Fair, thought leaders and executives from across the scholarly publishing world addressed these issues in a lively, interactive discussion with CCC’s Chris Kenneally.” At the link right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Orisha in South America 54 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University African Studies Center, titled “Traveling the Road of the Orishas.” Our speaker is Cheryl Sterling, Liberal Studies Program Master Teacher at New York University.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pests in the City 60 mins – “This week, we’re exploring the ways human-made environments support – and shape – the lives of many species we think of as vermin. We’ll talk to Geography and Environmental Studies Professor Dawn Day Biehler about her book “Pests in the City: Flies, Bedbugs, Cockroaches, and Rats.” And we’ll speak to postdoctoral researcher Clint Penick about his research on the junk food diets of urban ants.” At the link find the title, “#315 Pests in the City,” right-click “Media files Science_for_the_People_315_Pests_in_the_City.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plains Indians 47 mins – “The Plains Indians of North America – Pawnee, Cheyenne, Comanche, Arapaho, Lakota Sioux and more – are vivid in the popular imagination for their horse-mounted mastery of the wide-open middle of the continent. A big new exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art has gathered a spectacular collection of the Plains Indians’ art. “Art of Earth and Sky,” they’re calling it. Ravishing artifacts – painted hides, sculpted pipes, astonishing headdress and horseback regalia – that open another view of life itself. This hour on On Point: Earth and sky and the astonishing art of the Plains Indians.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the tpop-up menu.

Plastics 83 mins – “Our conversation with mechanical engineer Jim Heilman delves into exciting advances being made with plastic materials, the types of molding equipment used to manufacture high-volume plastic parts, and whether or not the movie industry can be trusted to provide good career advice.” At the link find right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasters 63 mins – “Host Tonya Hall talks about podcasting and how to create good content, get more subscribers, and what it means to sell the ‘sizzle,’ not the steak with guests Lynett Young, Cliff Ravenscraft, and Paul Colligan. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Population Growth 56 mins – “Overdevelopment, Overpopulation, Overshoot (OVER) crystallizes the ecological and social tragedies of humanity’s ballooning numbers and consumption. It’s time to make millions of people acutely, immediately, and viscerally aware of the dangers and deprivations facing people and the planet. Our guest today is Bill Ryerson, founder and president of Population Media Center; he also serves as Chair and CEO of The Population Institute in Washington, DC. We will discuss ways to proceed into a sustainable, collaborative, and hopeful future using global communication systems.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reform in Australia 56 mins – “Business Council of Australia president Catherine Livingstone addresses the National Press Club on ‘Leading Australia through the Age of Disruption’.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Catherine Livingstone,” right-click “NPCc_CatLivingstone_2904” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rings of Saturn 58 mins _ “Delivered by Professor Carl Murray, Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy at Queen Mary University of London, this year’s William Herschel Society lecture focused on the mission of the Cassini spacecraft, which has been in orbit around Saturn since 2004. In his lecture, Professor Murray who in 1990 was selected as a member of the Cassini imaging team at the project inception, reviewed some of the results obtained over the last decade and looked ahead to some of the science that is planned for the final orbits before the Cassini mission ends in 2017.” At the link find the title, “The rings of Saturn and the Cassini mission,” right-click “Download MP3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Same Sex Marriage 52 mins – “The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a case that could determine if the Constitution guarantees same-sex partners the right to marry. Supporters consider it to be one of the great civil rights issues of the century. Many on both sides believe it should be decided by the states, not the Supreme Court. At the moment, 36 states and the District of Columbia allow same-sex marriage. The Supreme Court is also considering whether all states must recognize same-sex marriages performed in states where they are legal. We look at a divided court, the Constitution and the right of gays and lesbians to marry.” At the link you can listen, but not download; hwoever, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Sports Science 60 mins – “This week we’re exploring the ways that science and technology are changing sports, on and off the playing field. We’ll speak to journalist Mark McClusky about his book “Faster, Higher, Stronger: How Sports Science Is Creating a New Generation of Superathletes – and What We Can Learn from Them.” And we’ll get the scientific perspective on sports supplements with Dr. Bryan Chung, founder of Evidence Based Fitness.” At the link find the title, “#316 Sports Science,” right-click “Media files Science_for_the_People_316_Sports_Science.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup Publicity 31 mins – “For most of us, we don’t need to know about how to get media coverage…until we need to get media coverage. You could come up with the most brilliant business idea, or write the next best seller – but if no one talks about it, it’s just another particle out there in an atmosphere full of noise. But how do you get coverage? How do you convince a powerful media outlet to cover your story? It turns out, there are very specific tricks that you can use to give yourself the best shot of becoming the next new headline. Listen up this week and learn how to become a media darling (or at the very least how not to waste money on PR firms).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup School P2 31 mins – “Welcome to fundraising.” At the link find the title, “Another Side Of The Story (Season 2, #3),” right-click “Media files 204451712-hearstartup-another-side-of-the-story-season-2-3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stem Cells 89 mins – “Stem cells have the potential to transform the way scientists study human diseases, the way drug companies discover and test new drugs, and the way physicians treat their patients. Join Dr. Arnold Kriegstein, professor of neurology and director of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCSF as he dispels the hype and explains the science that is at work.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Synthetic Biology 31 mins – “Genetically engineered humans by Ian Woolf; Michael Molitor talks about innovating with synthetic biology; De-extinction of Thylacines, Mammoths and Neanderthals by Ian Woolf” At the link find the title, “Synthetic De-extinction,” right-click “Media files diffusion2015-04-27.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syria Refugees85 mins – “To date, almost 4 million refugees have fled the Syrian civil war, the vast majority seeking shelter in Jordan, Turkey, and Lebanon, but with growing numbers also moving to Egypt and Northern Iraq. At this Migration Policy Institute briefing, Erol Kekic from Refugee Council USA and Anastasia Brown from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, who recently visited the region, report on their findings on the space for humanitarian protection. Also joining the panel is Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Simon Henshaw, whose portfolio in the Department’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration includes Syrian refugees. He discusses recent developments in the region and in the U.S. humanitarian response. The discussion is moderated by Kathleen Newland, director of MPI’s Refugee Protection and Humanitarian Response Program.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download” again and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Toxicology Cases 82 mins – “Alan Wu looks at toxicology testing that solved forensic cases. Wu is Chief of Clinical Chemistry and Toxicology at San Francisco General Hospital and Professor of Laboratory Medicine, UCSF.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans-Pacific Partnership 52 mins – “Negotiators from 12 countries have been meeting for more than a decade on the Trans-Pacific Partnership. As the meetings draw to a close, a bill in the Senate aims to give the president “fast-track” authority that would allow an up or down vote on trade deals that Congress can’t amend. Critics say that would be undemocratic and lets negotiators insert provisions favorable to big business. Supporters of trade promotion authority say countries won’t sign onto the TPP without it. Diane and guests discuss debate over granting fast-track authority to the president, and what the Trans-Pacific Partnership could mean for the U.S. economy and American workers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; hwoever, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Trash History 52 mins – “This week on the show we’re picking through history’s waste basket. What does America’s garbage tell us about its past? How have ideas about what is disposable and what isn’t changed over time? And have Americans always generated so much junk? To get to the bottom of things, the Guys are salvaging all kinds of trashy stories… about filth-eating pigs that once ran amok in New York City… about Americans’ legal rights to their own garbage… and about how Big Soda promoted recycling to boost the industry’s own bottom line. Plus, find out what an anthropologist sees in the decades-old debris now washing ashore at a place called Dead Horse Bay….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccine Optimization 88 mins – “Dr. Katherine Julian, UCSF Professor of Clinical Medicine, looks at vaccines for adults. She looks at who should get vaccinated for measles, flu, whooping cough, pneumococcus, and shingles. She also discusses vaccines for young adults and teens: human papillomavirus and meningococcus.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam Exodus 47 mins – “How The Vietnam War Resonates 40 Years After The Fall Of Saigon – On the 40th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, we’ll look back on the end and long resonance of the Vietnam War.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Violence and the Poor 22 mins – “Collective compassion has meant an overall decrease in global poverty since the 1980s, says civil rights lawyer Gary Haugen. Yet for all the world’s aid money, there’s a pervasive hidden problem keeping poverty alive. Haugen reveals the dark underlying cause we must recognize and act on now.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Audio Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Volcanoes 59 mins – “Celebrating two hundred years since the devastating eruption of Indonesia’s Mount Tambora, this week we explore the science of volcanoes. We find out what causes volcanoes, we ask whether eruptions can be predicted, how we can keep people safe, and we re-create the physics of an eruption in the laboratory…

Waste Incinerators 51 mins – “As garbage landfills fall out of favor and recycling programs struggle to handle all of the trash, some cities and counties are beginning to rethink incineration. An emerging solution: Waste-to-energy facilities, incinerators that convert garbage into energy. While newer to the U.S., they are common in Europe. Proponents of these plants argue that these incinerators have state-of-the-art pollution controls and emit less greenhouse gases than landfills. But these facilities are expensive, often costing more than $1 billion. And some environmentalists warn these facilities still emit mercury, lead and other pollution.” At the link you can listen, but not download; hwoever, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

WikiLeaks Controversy 47 mins – “WikiLeaks was instrumental on NSA spying and Iraq War scandal. Has it now gone to gossip? WikiLeaks is at it again. This time publishing all of the documents hacked from Sony last November. Thirty thousand documents. Two hundred thousand private emails. And it’s not all business. Personal stuff like Amazon purchases, medical records, salaries are out there online.  For everyone’s eyes. WikiLeaks famously blew the whistle on big government and a snooping NSA. Now is it a gossip rag? In this technology age, can we assume any privacy when we post, tweet, buy, share? This hour On Point: WikiLeaks, and what’s at stake for privacy, security, and journalism.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Winchester Mystery House 20 mins – “According to legend, Sarah Winchester’s friends advised the grieving widow to seek the services of a Boston spiritual medium named Adam Koombs. The story goes, Koombs put Mrs. Winchester in touch with her deceased husband—but William had bad news. He told Sarah Winchester that she would always be haunted by the spirits who had been killed by Winchester rifles. Speaking through Koombs, William Winchester instructed Sarah to placate the spirits by building a structure that would perpetually grow to shelter the ever-increasing number of Winchester rifle victims. And if she did this, Sarah Winchester would gain immortality.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Combat 51 mins – “Five years ago, the Pentagon launched a pilot program to put women alongside U.S. Special Forces fighting in Afghanistan. So-called “Cultural Support Teams” were designed to overcome male–female cultural barriers and achieve counter-terrorism goals. Of the more than 100 women chosen for training, only half would make the final cut. One of those soldiers was First Lieutenant Ashley White from Alliance, Ohio. White was serving alongside Rangers forces when an improvised explosive device (IED) claimed her life. She was 24 years old. We hear the story of the pilot program, its first casualty, and how it paved the way for women in combat positions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 182 – May 8, 2015: Aerosol Science, Alibaba, Artificial Intelligence Future, Artificial Photosynthesis, Assisted Living Risk, Battery Future, Bee Poisoning, Biogas at the Zoo, Bird Flu Problem, Black Panthers by Angela Davis, Broadband Open Access, Careers in Sustainability, Cartilage Lesion Treatment in Joints, Cataracts, Catholic Church Finances, Cell Tower Deaths, Changing Minds, Climate Stories, Concentration Camps, CS Tear Gas, CSI Background and Issues, Darfu Genocide, Dementia, Diet Myths, Dinosaur History, Down Syndrome, Echolocation, Economic Devleopment, Electronic Connectors, Encepholapothy, Energy Storage and Systems, Geophysics, Glaucoma GMO Foods, Graphene Energy Storage, Haiti Rejuvenation, Indigo Dye, Inequality, Interest Rates, ISIS, Ketones, Ketosis, Knees, Leo Szilard Book, Lyme Disease, MS Relapse, Munitions Filling, Neuroanatomy Intro, NRA Issues, Organic chef, Pain Lecture, Pandemics, Paper Money, Pebble Mine Impact, Poisons in Gardens, Portugal Racism, Post Mortem Concerns, Poverty SOlution, Precision Medicine, Quitting Can Help, Refugee, Robert Reich, Russia Problem, Saudi Arabia History, Savings Quandry, Severed Heads, Sex Assaults on Campus, Sight Resotration, Startup School, Suicides Paradox, Teenage Brains, Telomeres, Terminal Illness, Tipping, Uranium Waste, Vaccines, Weapons Trafficking, Wild Bill Donovan

The following audio files come from a larger group of 225 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 90 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Aerosol Science 62 mins – “Professor Rob Price delivers his inaugural lecture on his research in the field of aerosol science.“ At the link find the title, “Crystals, particles & powders – Rob Price,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alibaba 15 mins – “A massive Chinese company, Alibaba, is about to have what could be the biggest initial public offering on ever on planet earth. You can think of Alibaba like Amazon or Ebay, except you can buy way more on Alibaba — you can get a used 747 airplane, or an oil tanker, or 500 million tiny screws. Today on the show: the company that made it possible for anyone anywhere to build almost anything they want. What that company means for China, for the rest of us and for some chickens in California.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence 29 mins – “Back in the 1990s, Jeffrey Hawkins became both rich and famous when he invented the Palm Pilot-a device that in no small way ushered in a whole new era of mobile computing. These days, though, he’s on a far more ambitious mission. His goal: to build a machine that can think and reason on its own by mimicking the workings of the human brain. In this edition of Up Next, Hawkins opines on the both risks and rewards of artificial intelligence.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” in the video window and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Photosynthesis 50 mins – “How can government, industry and business better work together to invest in long-term research to harness solar energy and transform carbon dioxide into energy fuel? In this lecture, Global Chair at the University, Professor Geoffrey Ozin talks about using carbon dioxide as a source of fuel rather than treating it as a waste product and pioneering advances in nano-chemistry.” At the link find the title, “Artificial Photosynthesis” right-click “Download File – 22.8 MB” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Assisted Living Risk 56 mins – “An audio version of FRONTLINE’s documentary “Life and Death in Assisted Living” airing July 30, 2013 on PBS and available for viewing online at pbs.org/frontline. It’s one of the most important and difficult decisions anyone can make: Whom should you trust with the care of your aging parents? FRONTLINE’s Life and Death in Assisted Living, a major, yearlong investigation in collaboration with ProPublica, explores the multi-billion dollar assisted living industry, and asks whether the business practices at America’s largest assisted living chain, Emeritus Senior Living, may be putting the lives of our loved ones at risk. asks whether the business practices at America’s largest assisted living chain, Emeritus Senior Living, may be putting the lives of our loved ones.” At the link find the title, “Life and Death in Assisted Living,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up

Battery Future 55 mins – “Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory battery scientist Venkat Srinivasan chats with Sabin Russell, former San Francisco Chronicle reporter turned Berkeley Lab science writer. They explore the problems that prevent lithium-ion batteries from being widely used in electric, hybrid-electric, and plug-in-hybrid-electric vehicles.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bee Poisoning 27 mins – The first half of this program concerns affects of neonicotinoids pesticides on bees: “Bees have been shown to prefer some harmful neonicotinoid pesticides in their diet; Roland Pease looks far into the future to see if Moore’s Law can be beaten with the likes of DNA computers, neural networks and quantum computing; Has selective breeding of dogs made them more of less co-operative?” At the link find the title, “SciA: Bees; Moore’s Law; Dogs,” right-click “Media files scia 20150423-2030a.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biogas at the Zoo 3 mins – “It’s breakfast time at the Toronto Zoo, and the smell in this indoor pen is — well, ripe. One 8-year-old zoo visitor describes the odor: “I think it smells like whatever it’s eating and whatever comes out the other end,” he says. He’s right: Vishnu produces about 25 pounds of dung per day, not to mention what’s produced by all the other animals at the zoo. “We have over 5,000 animals on site,” says Kyla Greenham, the zoo’s curator of conservation and environment. “From our large mammals, we’re looking at about 300 to 400 animals, and that’s why we can come up with 3,000 tons of manure a year.” Now the zoo is coming up with a plan to turn all of that poop into power. It has partnered with a company called ZooShare to build a biogas facility that will produce electricity by harvesting methane from the animal waste. Along with the zoo’s 3,000 tons of waste, it will also use 14,000 tons of organic waste from a large supermarket chain…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar ans select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bird Flu Problem 48 mins – “They’re killing chickens by the millions in the Midwest lately. Turkeys, too. And not for your table. Avian flu – bird flu – has infected American flocks. Brought in, it’s thought, by wild birds flying down over the Missouri River, the Mississippi. Down from Canada. With a virus that’s come across from China. When it gets into huge industrial US poultry operations, those birds have to be destroyed. Right now in Iowa and Minnesota, but well beyond too. It’s a quiet crisis that scientists pray doesn’t mutate and cross to humans. This hour On Point: inside America’s outbreak of bird flu.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Panthers by Angela Davis 86 mins – “Angela Davis, Professor in the History of Human Consciousness department at UC Santa Cruz and holder of a UC Presidential Chair in African-American and Feminist Studies explores the issues concerning criminal justice and race in the 21st century, in light of the history of the Black Panther movement. This presentation is part of UCSB’s Interdisciplinary Humanities Center series “Blow Back: Responding to the 1960’s”.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” in the video window and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Open Access 22 mins – “When we last wrote about the Mid-Atlantic Broadband Cooperative, it was a coop focused on open access middle mile connections. Now it has become the Mid-Atlantic Broadband Communities Corporation and is starting to work on some plans to expand open access last mile access. This week, we speak with MBC President and CEO Tad Deriso to learn more about their history and current approach. We discuss how they got started financially and lessons for other middle mile open access efforts. We also discuss their plan to expand the model to last mile businesses and homes in Martinsville in southern Virginia. And along the way, we learn how incumbent providers react differently to open access in the middle mile than in the last mile.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Careers in Sustainability 29 mins – “Explore opportunities in the field of sustainability and discover what skills are needed to launch or further your career. Learn more about the Sustainable Business Practices professional certificate program and how it can help you reach your professional goals.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cartilage Lesion Management in Joints 87 mins – At the link find (or click on it here) the title, “Management of Articular Cartilage Lesions,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cataracts 83 mins – “Cataracts: A Surgical Revolution” At the link at that title right-click ”Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Catholic Church Finances 20 mins – “The Catholic Church is not a corporation. It’s a religion, a cultural force, and a global power. Still, one of the things the new Pope will have to deal with is a classic business mess — a multi-billion dollar conglomerate that has stumbled and is losing money and relevance. On today’s show, experts (including a priest with a Harvard MBA) tell us what the church needs to do to turn things around.” At th elink right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cell Tower Deaths 35 mins – “An audio version of FRONTLINE’s documentary “Cell Tower Deaths” airing May 22 on PBS and available for viewing online at pbs.org/frontline. The smartphone revolution comes with a hidden cost. A joint investigation by FRONTLINE and ProPublica explores the hazardous work of independent contractors who are building and servicing America’s expanding cellular infrastructure. While some tower climbers say they are under pressure to cut corners, layers of subcontracting make it difficult for safety inspectors to determine fault when a tower worker is killed or injured.” At the link find the title, “Cell Tower Deaths,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Changing Minds 71 mins – “Can you change a person’s mind on a divisive social issue? The latest science says…yes. But it will require two things: contact and disclosure. In this episode you’ll travel to Mississippi to see how professional mind changers are working to shift attitudes on LGBT rights, and you’ll learn how a man in Los Angeles conducted 12,000 conversations until he was able to perfect the most powerful version of contact possible. In one 22-minute chat, Dave Fleischer can change people’s minds on issues they’ve felt strongly about for decades, and change them forever.” At the link right-click beside “Direct Download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Stories 60 mins – “Science fiction author Robert Marston Fanney selects 5 stories of science truth from his Robert Scribbler’s Blog. Excerpts from oil guru Nate Hagens. What is really going on? What are the big stories the media leaves out, while they fill the news with quirky headlines and fluff? All over the world, from pole to pole, the Earth and her species are going through big changes. The atmosphere is trapping heat into the oceans, air, and land. This week I’m going to cover five of those big stories, with the help of one of the world’s best risk watchers. He’s author Robert Marston Fanney, and his launching pad is called Robert Scribbler’s Blog. At the end, we’ll squeeze in a few words about the new oil poverty creeping into our lives, with a recent talk by former financial advisor and Oil Drum editor Nate Hagens.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” near “Download…”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concentration Camps 53 mins – “Historian Nikolaus Wachsmann joins Doug to talk about the brutal history of the Nazi Concentration Camps. Nothing embodied the brutality of the Nazi regime more than the concentration camps. Yes, they were hell on earth, but they were very much human creations, as the historian Nikolaus Wachsmann demonstrates in his new book about the camps. Known as the Konzentrationslager, they were first conceived of as penal colonies, then as camps for prisoners of war, and finally as factories. Wachsmann joins us Tuesday to examine the lifespan of the camps, their place in the Third Reich, and what life was like inside them. Nikolaus Wachsmann is a professor of modern European history at Birkbeck College, University of London. His new book is called KL: A History of the Nazi Concentration CampsAt the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

CS Tear Gas 6 mins – “Simon Cotton examines a compound banned in warfare but still used by police to disperse crowds: CS gas.” At the link find the title, “CS gas: Chemistry in its element,” right-click “CIIE_CSGas.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CSI Background 81 mins – “The Real CSI: Forensic Pathology and Death Investigation” At the link find the quoted title, right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CSI Issues 58 mins – “…From the courtroom to the living room (thanks to the hit television series CSI), forensic science is king. Expertise on fingerprints, ballistics and bite mark analysis are routinely called on to solve the most difficult criminal cases – and to put the guilty behind bars. But how reliable is the science behind forensics? A FRONTLINE investigation finds serious flaws in some of the best-known tools of forensic science and wide inconsistencies in how forensic evidence is presented in the courtroom. From the sensational murder trial of Casey Anthony and the FBI’s botched investigation of the Madrid terrorist bombing to capital cases in rural Mississippi, FRONTLINE documents how a field with few uniform standards and unproven science can undermine the search for justice. As part of the investigative series Post Mortem, Correspondent Lowell Bergman reports in a joint investigation with ProPublica and the Investigative Reporting Program at UC Berkeley.” At the link find the title, “The Real CSI – Audiocast,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Darfur Genocide 15 mins – “Rebecca Hamilton Reads from Fighting For Darfur” At the link find the same title as in the quotes, right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia P1 32 mins – “The first episode of our new five-part Dementia Decoded podcast series looks at what Alzheimer’s is, how it differs from other forms of Dementia, and whether is it an inevitable part of aging.” At the link find the title, “Dementia Decoded: A Special Illness,” right-click “Media files 150400 dementia decoded_ep1.mp3“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia P2 39 mins “In the second episode of our Dementia Decoded series, we look at the current state of knowledge about the basic physiology of Alzheimer’s, and how scientists are working to unlock its secrets.” At the link find the title, “Dementia Decoded: Plaques and Tangles,” right-click “Media files 150400_dementia_decoded_ep2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diet Myths 68 mins – “On the show this week we talk to Traci Mann, professor of psychology at the University of Minnesota and author of the new book Secrets from the Eating Lab: The Science of Weight Loss, the Myth of Willpower, and Why You Should Never Diet Again.” At the link right-click “Download” and select  “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dinosaur History 40 mins – “In this lecture Professor John Kricher provides a concise overview of what modern science currently knows about dinosaurs. A lifelong dinosaur lover, Kricher explains the basic facts, including size and weight ranges, dinosaur intelligence, and how they have survived into modern day in the form of birds. Ever since the first fossils were identified in the early 19th century, our dinosaur knowledge has evolved rapidly, and this lecture represents the most current developments.” At the link right-click “Download” (Not “audio download”) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Down Syndrome 79 mins – Living with Down Syndrome: The Journey and Lessons Learned from Parents Health Professionals and Personal Perspectives” At the link find the same title as in the quote, right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Echolocation 13 mins – “Daniel Kish has been blind since he was 13 months old, but has learned to “see” using a form of echolocation. He clicks his tongue and sends out flashes of sound that bounce off surfaces in the environment and return to him, helping him to construct an understanding of the space around him. In a rousing talk, Kish demonstrates how this works and asks us to let go of our fear of the “dark unknown.‘” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Development 92 mins – “Tyler Cowen and Jeffrey Sachs discuss the resource curse, why Russia failed and Poland succeeded, charter cities, Sach’s China optimism, JFK, Paul Rosenstein-Rodan, whether Africa will be able to overcome the middle income trap, Paul Krugman, Sach’s favorite novel, premature deindustrialization, and how to reform graduate economics education.” At the link click “Download,” then “OK” on the pop-up menu.

Electronic Connectors 70 mins – “Host Scott Wilkinson joins with Pete Putman to talk about current display interfaces and what to expect in the future.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Encephalography 28 mins – “This week we’re joined by QEEG Diplomate (yes, that’s a term!) and founder of Brain Science International Jay Gunkelman, to talk Electroencephalography.  After analyzing over a half-million EEG scans, Jay has a pretty robust set of human brain data at his disposal… And he uses that body of knowledge to guide the work of psychiatric and other health professionals who make proscriptive recommendations about patients’ brains. We’ll also hear about an already-on-the-market drug that could prevent the brain-fog that comes with old age, and hear how it might be possible to think ourselves stronger.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy and Community 50 mins – “The climate is going haywire, and politicians are bickering over what to do about it, or whether to do anything at all. But that’s only part of the story. Around the country, communities are taking matters into their own hands, publicly pledging to shrink their carbon footprints, then setting out to make good on their promises. Leading, they hope, from below. In this hour, guest producer Jonathan Miller gives us a tour of his uber-progressive but practical-minded hometown of Ithaca, New York, where citizens and civic leaders are hustling to wean themselves from fossil fuels.” At the link find the title, “Ithaca, NY: Power to the People,” right-click “Media files Ithaca_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Storage 65 mins – “Professor Peter Bruce of the the University of St Andrews talks about the need for a step change in the performance of energy storage devices for the future in order to help us achieve a low-carbon world.” At the link find the title, “ Research in the World: Energy storage: The Missing link – Peter Bruce,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Sustainability 59 mins – “MIT Professor Mildred Dresselhaus’ career has focused on advancing science and engineering in its more basic aspects, as well as advancing energy sustainability. Dresselhaus discusses the world energy outlook and sustainability, nanostructures and recent advances in thermoelectrics.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Systems 59 mins – “Daniel Kammen, a Professor of Energy at UC Berkeley, talks about how decentralized renewable energy systems will help the developing world and the planet.” Two parts: At the link find the titles, “Daniel Kammen: Electricity For All, Part I [and] II,” right-click “Media files SC-2015-04-28.mp3” and “Media files SC-2015-04-21.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menus.

Geophysics 29 mins – “ Keith talks with Benjamin Drenth, research geophysicist with the United States Geological Survey.  Drenth studies passive geophysics.  Seismic, or active, geophysics involves using outside energy sources needed to create sonic waves through the earth.  Whereas passive geophysics is a more subtle measuring of the earth’s gravitational or magnetic fields.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Glaucoma 57 mins – “Glaucoma: The Silent Blinding Disease” At the link right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Food Debate 51 mins – “Many plants we eat today are a result of genetic modifications that would never occur in nature. Scientists have long been altering the genes of food crops, to boost food production and to make crops more pest-, drought- and cold-resistant. Proponents of genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, say that farmers who grow these crops are able to use fewer environmentally damaging pesticides. The increased yields of GMO crops, they also argue, are essential to feeding the world’s growing population. And proponents say that numerous studies have shown that genetically modified foods are safe to eat. Critics, however, say the claims of those benefits are overblown. They say farmers growing GMO crops have actually increased their use of herbicides. And widespread use of the crops, they say, have also led to an increase in herbicide- and pesticide-resistant weeds and insects. And, they argue, there is still no scientific consensus on the long-term safety of these foods.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graphene Energy Storage 24 mins – “Affordable and efficient energy storage is the holy grail of energy technology. On this program, Maher El-Kady discussed the science and synthesis of graphene based storage devices.” At the link find the title, “3D Supercapacitors — Groks Science Show,” right-click “Media files groks040815.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Haiti Rejuvenation 17 mins – “An audio version of FRONTLINE’s documentary “An Optimist in Haiti,” airing Sept 27, 2011 on PBS and available for viewing online at pbs.org/frontline. Adam Davidson of NPR’s Planet Money returns to Haiti to meet a man with an unlikely plan to help turn around his country’s economy through tourism.” At the link find the title, “An Optimist in Haiti – Audiocast,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigo Dye 52 mins – “Dr Jenny Balfour-Paul, honorary research fellow at the University of Exeter and fellow at the Royal Geographical Society and the Explorers Club, tells a compelling story of indigo, the world’s oldest, most magical and best-loved dye.” At the link find the title, “Journeys in Indigo – Jenny Balfour-Pau,” right-click “ Download File”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inequality 9 mins – “The news of society’s growing inequality makes all of us uneasy. But why? Dan Ariely reveals some new, surprising research on what we think is fair, as far as how wealth is distributed over societies … then shows how it stacks up to the real stats.” At the link click ‘Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interest Rates 65 mins – “Scott Sumner, of Bentley University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about interest rates. Sumner suggests that professional economists sometimes confuse cause and effect with respect to prices and quantities. Low interest rates need not encourage investment for example, if interest rates are low because of a decrease in demand. Sumner also talk about possible explanations for the historically low real rates of interest in today’s economy along with other aspects of monetary policy, interest rates, and investment.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Background 59 mins -”Jessica Stern, co-author of ISIS: The State of Terror, talked about the genesis and growth of the organization, its goals, mission, and methods. She also spoke about the impact of terrorism in the Middle East, and how ISIS* differs from al-Qaeda and other terror groups. The program included clips of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of ISIS, as well as videos of other terrorist group leaders, recruitment videos used by ISIS, and U.S. State Department produced videos designed to counter the ISIS videos. Ms. Stern also addressed the role that other countries in the Middle East, such as Iran and Saudi Arabia, were playing in combating or supporting ISIS. This program contains videos that are violent and potentially offensive to viewers.” At the link click “Recent Programs” in the Q&A section, right-click the title, “Q&A: Jessica Stern” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Beginnings 58 mins – “FRONTLINE investigates the miscalculations and mistakes behind the brutal rise of ISIS. Correspondent Martin Smith, who made “Truth, War And Consequences,” “Beyond Baghdad,” “Private Warriors” and “Gangs of Iraq,” reports from Iraq on how the country began coming undone after the American withdrawal and what it means for the U.S. to be fighting there again.” At the link find the title, “The Rise of ISIS,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Panel Discussion 38 mins – “What do we know about ISIS? Who are they, and how do they make money and recruit fighters — and wives? On Nov. 6, WGBH hosted a public panel discussion, led by PRI The World’s Aaron Schachter, to answer some of those questions. Participants included FRONTLINE’s Martin Smith, who discussed his recent film “The Rise of ISIS,” Professor Mia Bloom of the UMASS Lowell Center for Terrorism and Security Studies, and Charles Sennott, a veteran foreign reporter who founded the GroundTruth Project to train a new generation of foreign correspondents” At the link find the title, “Understanding the Rise of ISIS: A Panel Discussion,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ketones 26 mins – “ Are Ketones the Key? (start time 6:40) A growing body of scientific research demonstrates health benefits for many people with a diet that’s lower in carbohydrates, and higher in fats.  In fact, some of this research indicates great therapeutic benefits,.  One reason why may be that, when carbohydrate consumption is low enough, the body enters a state of “nutritional ketosis,” where it transforms fats into a molecule called, beta-hydroxy-butyrate, or  “ketones”.  In the absence of sugar and carbs, the body can use ketones as its primary fuel. One of the scientists who has pioneered research into nutritional ketosis is Dr. Steve Phinney, and one of the populations who he believes gets special benefits from a ketone-producing diet is endurance athletes.  For 30 years, Phinney has studied nutritional ketosis and athletic performance — including performance among bicycle racers, the winners of 100-mile ultra-marathons, and recently, a two-person rowing team that was among the top finishers in a rowing race that went from California to the Hawaiian Islands – rowing the whole way on a very low-carb, high fat, ketone-producing diet.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ketosis  36 mins – “In Episode #39, Jesse talks with Dr. Emily Deans on the subject of ketosis. Ketosis is a biological state that occurs during fasting or a low-carb dieting when glycogen stores in the liver are depleted. This causes the body to burn acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate for fuel, instead of blood sugar. The effects of the “ketogenic state” go beyond kicking on the fat-burning furnace. Some people report a perception of higher cognitive function as well, and doctors have used ketosis to treat some otherwise unmanageable neurological disorders. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Knee Inuries 86 mins – “Dr. Christina Allen, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Division of Sports Medicine, discusses the causes, diagnosis, and possible treatment options for different types of traumatic knee injuries. Injuries may range from meniscus tears and ligament injuries, to cartilage and tendon injuries. Recorded on 03/11/2014.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Knee Replacement Issues  51 mins – “Modern knee replacement is a highly successful operation, relieving the pain and disability of knee osteoarthritis. However, it has limitations and these, combined with the changes in population demographics, present significant challenges for both current and future healthcare systems. Professor Richie Gill’s inaugural lecture ‘What is wrong with knee replacement?’ explores these issues and the research being done to overcome them.“ At the link find the title, What is wrong with knee replacement?” right-click “Download File: and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leo Szilard Book 50 mins – “The UC San Diego Library Channel presents a talk by William Lanouette, author of “Genius in the Shadows: A Biography of Leo Szilard.” Lanouette explains how Szilard’s fear of German dominance of nuclear research in the 1930’s inspired the Manhattan Project, which led to the creation of the atomic bomb used by the United States in World War II. Szilard could see its potential for mass destruction in the wrong hands and became a strong advocate for nuclear arms control and disarmament. Szilard spent his final days as a founding member of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lyme Disease 88 mins – “Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne infection in the United States. Over the last 15 years Lyme disease has become one of the most controversial and politicized diseases in medicine with vastly different views about how to make the diagnosis and how to effectively treat patients. Richard A. Jacobs, Emeritus Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases at UCSF, reviews the historical aspects of the disease and explores the often contentious controversies surrounding diagnosis and therapy.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

MS Relapse 20 mins – “Nicki Ward-Abel, a lecturer practitioner in MS at Birmingham City University, joins us to explain how to treat patients who are experiencing a relapse of their MS symptoms. She discusses what constitutes a relapse, which treatments are available, and what effect a relapse can have on a patient. At the link find the title, “Management of a multiple sclerosis relapse,” right-click “Media files 201094856-bmjgroup-ms-relapse.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Munitions Filling 50 mins – “In response to the shortage of munitions hampering military operations in France, in 1915 the British Government embarked on a programme of factory building unparalleled in history. This talk explores the construction of the major explosives and shell filling factories, the conditions within and the part played by “Tommy’s Sisters” in their operation.” At the link find the title, “No Job For A Woman: Insights into the Manufacture of Explosives and Shell Filling in the First World War,” right-click “Download File – 23.1 MBand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuroanatomy Intro 58 mins – “BSP 118 provides an accessible introduction to neuroantomy for listeners of all backgrounds. It is an edited version of BSP 32, which was a discussion of “Beyond the Zonules of Zinn: A Fantastic Journey Through Your Brain” by David Bainbridge.” At the link find the title, “BSP 118 Neuroanatomy for Everyone,” right-click “Media files 118-BSP-neuroanatomy-au.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

NRA Issues 58 mins – “FRONTLINE investigates the politics and power of the NRA.” At the link find the title, “Gunned Down ,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Organic Chef 52 mins – “When Nora Pouillon first walked the aisles of an American supermarket, she was stunned. In place of the fresh meat and greens of European shops, she found hormone-filled packaged beef and sad-looking tomatoes. Growing up a child of war on a farm in the Alps, the native Austrian learned early on that food is precious and healing. When she came to Washington D.C. in the 1960s, she sought out natural produce and meat at a time when few were paying attention to the benefits of organic food. In 1979, she founded what would become the first certified organic restaurant in the country. Diane sits down with pioneering chef Nora Pouillon.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Pain Lecture 120 mins – “Pain is the most common reason for a visit to the doctor’s office. Allan I. Basbaum, Professor and Chair, UCSF Department of Anatomy, presents the most current scientific understanding behind common pain disorders.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pandemics 9 mins – “In 2014, the world avoided a global outbreak of Ebola, thanks to thousands of selfless health workers — plus, frankly, some very good luck. In hindsight, we know what we should have done better. So, now’s the time, Bill Gates suggests, to put all our good ideas into practice, from scenario planning to vaccine research to health worker training. As he says, “There’s no need to panic … but we need to get going.‘” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paper Money 15 mins – “Every single dollar bill in the world — every $20, every $100, everything — is printed on paper made at one small mill in Massachusetts. That’s been the case for 130 years. On today’s show, we visit the mill. And we hear the story of the guy who jumped out a hotel window to win the government contract to print all that paper.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pebble Mine Impact 54 mins – “An audio version of FRONTLINE’s documentary “Alaska Gold” airing July 24 on PBS and available for viewing online at pbs.org/frontline. The Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska is home to the last great wild Sockeye salmon fishery in the world. It’s also home to enormous mineral deposits-copper, gold, molybdenum-estimated to be worth over $300 billion. Now, two foreign mining companies are proposing to extract this mineral wealth by digging one of North America’s largest open-pit mines, the “Pebble Mine,” at the headwaters of Bristol Bay. FRONTLINE travels to Alaska to probe the fault lines of a growing battle between those who depend on this extraordinary fishery for a living, the mining companies who are pushing for Pebble, and the political framework that will ultimately decide the outcome.“ At the link find the title, “Alaska Gold,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poisons in Gardens 36 mins – “In this lecture, Mr Russell Bowes, a freelance garden historian, will be sharing mysterious tales of how people have died in the garden, and how you can protect yourself against herbaceous murderers.” At the link find the title, “Say it with poison,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Portugal Racism 50 mins – “Does Portugal have a problem with police brutality and racism? The residents of Cova da Moura, a largely immigrant DocArchive: ‘Police State’ Portugal community, believe that it does. (Warning: contains strong language)” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: ‘Police State’ Portugal,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150423-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Post Mortem Concerns 55 mins “An audio version of FRONTLINE’s documentary “Post Mortem,” airing February 1, 2011 on PBS and available for viewing online at pbs.org/frontline. Every day, nearly 7,000 people die in America. And when these deaths happen suddenly, or under suspicious circumstances, we assume there will be a thorough investigation, just like we see on “CSI.” But the reality is very different. In over 1,300 counties across America, elected coroners, many with no medical or scientific background, are in charge of death investigations. Nationwide there is a severe shortage of competent forensic pathologists to do autopsies. The rate of autopsies — the gold standard of death investigation — has plummeted over the decades. As a result, not only do murders go free and innocent people go to jail, but the crisis in death investigation in America is also a threat to public health. FRONTLINE correspondent Lowell Bergman reports the results of a joint investigation with ProPublica, NPR and the Investigative Reporting Program at UC Berkeley.” At the link find the title, “Post Mortem – Audiocast,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty Solution 51 mins – “What is the best way to help the poor? Giving money to charities and non-governmental organizations that then determine how the money should be allocated? Or giving cash directly to those who need it most and letting them decide how to spend it? Economist Paul Niehaus offers evidence that suggests direct cash transfers are more effective in reducing poverty, and describes GiveDirectly, a program he co-founded that allows donors to select recipients and transfer cash through mobile phones. Niehaus is presented as part of the “Degrees of Freedom” series at UC San Diego.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Precision Medicine 107 mins – “Keith Yamamoto, Vice Chancellor for Research, UCSF, explores precision medicine, a new approach to make medicine more predictive, preventive and precise. In precision medicine, data of all types- molecular, clinical, population-based- would be continuously amassed from consenting patients and citizens, then analyzed in ways that reveal unexpected correlations that drive additional molecular discoveries, new knowledge that could be applied in lab or clinic, and an understanding of health and disease so detailed as to produce precision care for you as an individual.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quitting Can Help 58 mins – “You know the saying: a winner never quits and a quitter never wins. To which Freakonomics Radio says … Are you sure?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee 11 mins – “Photojournalist Barat Ali Batoor was living in Afghanistan — until his risky work forced him to leave the country. But for Batoor, a member of a displaced ethnic group called the Hazara, moving home to Pakistan proved dangerous too. And finding a safer place wasn’t as simple as buying a plane ticket. Instead, he was forced to pay a human smuggler, and join the deadly tidal wave of migrants seeking asylum by boat. He documents the harrowing ocean trip with powerful photographs.” At the link click ‘Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robert Reich – Economic Trends 54 mins – “Robert Reich, former Secretary of Labor and now Professor of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, looks ahead at US economic trends , the impact of globalization, and future job prospects in this “Homecoming” address to parents of UC students. Reich doesn’t promise perfect clairvoyance, but he does provide a way to think about the politico-economic issues that will shape this century.” At the link right-click .”Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. This site has another nine presentations by Prof Reich.

Robert Reich – Inequality 60mins – “Robert Reich, a visiting professor at the UC, Berkeley’s Goldman School of Public Policy and former U.S. Secretary of Labor talks about the inequality of income, wealth and opportunity in the United States and asks his audience to speculate on what will happen if these trends continue.” At the link right-click “Video MP4,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russia Problem 48 mins – “How should the West deal with Putin’s Russia? By isolation or by engagement? Highlights from the Munk Debate: The West vs Russia with journalist Vladimir Pozner , historian Stephen Cohen political dissident Garry Kasparov, and historian Anne Applebaum.” At the link find the title, “The New Russian Front,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150422_82769” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudia Arabia History . 27 mins – “Tarek Osman investigates the rise of the Kindgom of Saudi Arabia. In this second episode he sees how Saudi Arabia was suddenly challenged at the end of the 1970s by the Iranian Revolution and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan which gave rise to religious extremism, as well as the Arab uprisings.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Saudi Arabia: Sands of Time,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150429-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Savings Quandry 57 mins – “What do you do when smart people keep making stupid mistakes? And: are we a nation of financial illiterates?” At the link right-click ‘Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Severed Heads 60 mins “This week we’re looking at our scientific curiosity – and morbid fascination – about the human body and its amazing anatomy. We’ll speak to anthropologist and author Frances Larson about her book “Severed: A History of Heads Lost and Heads Found.” And we’ll discuss the experience of learning anatomy through human dissection, with Laboratory Supervisor Haley Linklater, and masters student Noah Mintz, from the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at Western University.” At the link find the title, “#314 Severed,” right-click “Media files Science for the People_314_Severed.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Assaults on Campus 52 mins – “When filmmakers Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering visited colleges to screen their previous documentary – an exposé of sexual abuse in the U.S. military – students constantly shared their own accounts of rape on campus. It was a subject Dick and Ziering knew they had to tackle. Their latest documentary, The Hunting Ground, follows undergraduate rape survivors pursuing both their education and justice. Ziering joins us Wednesday to explore those stories and the culture of rape at America’s colleges….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sight Restoration 54 mins – “Millions of people worldwide suffer from ocular diseases that degrade the retina, the light-processing component of the eye, causing blindness. A team from Lawrence Livermore National labs describes how the nervous system works and how neurons communicate then discuss the first long-term retinal prosthesis that can function for years inside the harsh biological environment of the eye.

Startup School 32 mins – “Dating Ring’s founders apply to the very competitive, very prestigious startup school Y-Combinator. And, they’re accepted – one of 76 companies in an initial applicant pool of 2000. Lauren, Emma, and Katie pack their bags and head to beautiful Mountain View, California to build the company The 20 min s- “ 3 months in Y-Combinator bring all sorts of challenges and surprises. An unconventional marketing strategy proves selling dates is nothing like selling cheeseburgers. A survey reveals new information about Dating Ring’s customers. After a series of matchmaking mishaps, the Dating Ring founders respond by changing a defining part of their business. And the whole time, they’re racing to grow fast and show results. All that pressure, leads to a lot of tension and a blowout fight among the founders. Lauren, Emma, and Katie try to recover in time to pitch 500 investors onstage at Y Combinator’s Demo Day.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicides Paradox 57 mins – “There are more than twice as many suicides as murders in the U.S., but suicide attracts far less scrutiny. Freakonomics Radio digs through the numbers and finds all kinds of surprises.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teenage Brains 77 mins – “How to Talk to Teens: A Developmental Approach” At the link find the title of the same name, right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Telomeres 59 mins – “Telomeres were first recognized in the late 1930s as important structures on chromosome ends. In the 1970s the sequence of these structures was identified in the ciliated protozoa Tetrahymena by Elizabeth Blackburn. In the 1980s telomerase was discovered as an enzyme that elongates telomeres and compensates for natural telomere shortening. Carol Greider, Director of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Johns Hopkins University, discusses the journey from these curiosity driven discoveries to the appreciation of the role of telomeres in human disease. Recorded on 03/05/2014.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” in the video window and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terminal Illness Discussion 33 mins – “The Long Tail, the Lottery and “Being Mortal,” At the link find the title, Inside Being Mortal with Atul Gawande and Tom Jennings,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terminal Illness Documentary 52 mins “FRONTLINE explores the intersection of life, death, medicine and what matters in the end.” At the link find the title, “Being Mortal,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tipping 48 mins – “Right alongside the big minimum wage debate in this country now, there’s another debate. About tipping. We’ve never done more of it. It’s spread to many corners of the economy. New technology is pushing it to new heights – the digital pad flipped around at the coffee counter or in the taxi to ask if you want to tip 20 or 25 or 30 percent! But is tipping a good way to compensate work? It’s arbitrary. It’s undependable. It leaves out the guy scrubbing pots. It lets the owner off the hook for paying more. This hour On Point: the tipping economy in America, and where it takes us.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tipping 39 mins – “As we all know, the practice of tipping can be awkward, random, and confusing. This episode tries to offer some clarity. At its center is Cornell professor Michael Lynn, who has written 51 academic papers on tipping “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uranium Waste 51 mins – “Utah nuclear waste disposal company EnergySolutions hopes to bring 700,000 tons of depleted uranium to a facility in Tooele County. Critics say that while it meets the criteria of Class A waste that EnergySolutions is licensed to store, depleted uranium gets “hotter” over time. The state’s decision is on hold as the company responds to concerns in the recent Safety Evaluation Report. Wednesday, we’re talking about what depleted uranium is and about the science and politics of EnergySolutions’ proposal.” At the link right-click th e play button beside ‘Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccine – Autism Controversy 18 mins – “In 1998 Andrew Wakefield, a British gastroenterologist with a history of self-promotion, published a paper with a shocking allegation: the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine might cause autism. The media seized hold of the story and, in the process, helped to launch one of the most devastating health scares ever. In the years to come Wakefield would be revealed as a profiteer in league with class-action lawyers, and he would eventually lose his medical license. Meanwhile one study after another failed to find any link between childhood vaccines and autism.” [from Amazon] At the link find the title, “Seth Mnookin reads from The Panic Virus” [2011], right-click “Download File” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccine War  56 mins “FRONTLINE investigates the science and the politics of vaccine safety.” At the link find the title, “Vaccine War,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Weapons Trafficking 6 mins – “The second part of the two-part podcast discussing the Small Arms Survey’s engagement in measuring SDG Goal 16, which focuses on peaceful and inclusive societies, access to justice, and accountable institutions. This episode examines SDG Target 16.4, which calls for a significant reduction in illicit arms flows. Beyond acknowledging the link between illicit weapons, armed violence, and insecurity, it is crucial to identify ways of measuring and understanding the illicit arms trade. Senior Researcher Glenn McDonald provides a comprehensive account of how this can be achieved in the framework of Goal 16. The Small Arms Survey has recently published a Research Note on the topic, ‘Reducing Illicit Arms Flows and the New Development Agenda’. The Global Burden of Armed Violence 2015: Every Body Counts, which offers a wealth of data relevant to security and the post-2015 sustainable development framework, is due for release on 11 May 2015.” At the link find the title, “Weapons Trafficking and the New Development Agenda: Reducing illicit arms flows and SDG Goal 16,” right-click “Media files SAS-Podcast-30-Weapons-Trafficking-and-the-New-Development-Agenda-Part-II.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wild Bill Donovan 16 mins -”Douglas Waller Reads from Wild Bill Donovan” He started the OSS, the predecessor of the CIA. At the link find the same title as in the quotes, right-click “Download File” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 35+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

 

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Media Mining Digest 181 – May 1, 2015: Autistic Adults, Blind New Gadgets, Bootstrap World, Caddilac Tax, Chinese Comedy, Civil WAr Aftermath, Cryptozoology, Death and Self, Deception in War, Dementia, Education, Elevator History, Eyes-Free Fitness, Fake Meat, Flor de Toloaches, Geothite, GM Food Debate, Hostage Situations, iPad for Lawyers, Iran’s View, Irrational Obedience, Job Passion, Lock Picking, Louis Armstrong, Meat Patents, Middle Class History, Migrant Integration, Movement Exercise, Pharmaceutical Disposal, PhD Propects-Australia, Political Challenges, Productivity, Puerto Rican Scam, Raccoons in Toronto, Resilient Cities, Resilient Cities, Robot Warriors, Russian Theater, Same Sex in Supreme Court, Sex Statistics, Sexual Reality Check, Smart Grid, SOCAP, Social Media in Science, Social Networking, Software Alchemy, Solar Car Race, Solar Flares, Solar on Homes, Square Deal Company, Startup Mechanics, STEM Jobs Decline, Steve Jobs, Stress Harms Us, Structural Biology, Stuffed and Starved, Subversives, Sugar Addiction, Sullenberger, Survive and Thrive, Symbiosis Background, Synthetic Biology, Tar Sands Impact, Tavis Smiley, Taxation Solutions, Tech Guru, Technology Trends, Teen Pregnancy, Text Mining, Thirty Year Plan, Thought Traps, Toxins Amongst Us, Tracy Morgan, Urban Farming, Urban Transport, Vietnam Evacuation, Vitamania, War-on-Terror Damage, Wine Appreciation, Workplace Mr Rodgers, World War One – Australia, Worst Case Scenarios, Wrestling, WWII Internment Camp, Wyatt Cenac, Y Combinator Grads, Zero Waste

The following audio files come from a larger group of 254 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 88 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Autistic Adulthood 47 mins – “As long as they’re in school, young Americans on the Autism spectrum – and there are more and more of those – have a fair amount of support. Programs. Special education. People engaged with them, and for them to engage with in return. But when school ends, that support ends. And these young adult autistic Americans, and their families, are pretty much on their own. Some, of course, can work and build fairly independent lives. Others cannot. For them, and their families, it can be an overwhelming moment. This hour On Point: a new report looks at “aging out” of America’s autism support system, and into a very challenging adulthood.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind New Gadgets 67 mins – The Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) produced a series of seven videos lasting about 60 minutes: “In this video series, Dr. Ana Juricic discusses and demonstrates some exciting, cutting-edge technologies and gadgets for people who are blind or partially sighted. Some of these products are developed specifically for this market, whereas others were created to be inclusive for everyone.” At the link you can watch the videos, but not download them, however, an audio file copy is included in the blog archive. A similar series of ten videos comparing two $800 and one free screen readers, and lasting about 60 minutes, is available at this link.

Bootstrap World 63 mins – “Host Leo Laporte interviews Emmanuel Schanzer who talks about Bootstrap, a curricular module for students ages 12-16 which teaches algebraic and geometric concepts through computer programming.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow beside “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cadillac Tax 47 mins – “Big employers, cutting back on full-coverage health care as Obamacare’s ‘Cadillac Tax’ begins to bite.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Comedy 27 mins – “Comedian Des Bishop finds out what makes the chinese laugh. He has learnt Mandarin to take his jokes to China. He finds that there is a long tradition of comedy in China called Xiangsheng, or Crosstalk, often in the form of two comedians playing off each other. Join him in a comedy club in Beijing to find out what goes down well – and what doesn’t!” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Stand Up for China,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150414-0300a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil War Aftermath 52 mins – “A lot happened in April 1865: Richmond fell to the Yankees, Lee surrendered at Appomattox Court House, Lincoln’s funeral train set out on a long and meandering route for Springfield, Ill., and four years of brutal conflict came to an end. But at the close of the Civil War — 150 years ago this month­ — no one knew how things would turn out for the United States and the defeated Confederacy. This time on BackStory, the Guys dwell on that moment and explore the uncertainty of 1865. Would the rebellion resurge? Would Southern leaders be hung for treason? Would freed men and women enjoy full citizenship? … How would a nation torn asunder ever rebuild?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cryptozoology 52 mins – “Monsters don’t exist. Except when they do. And extinction is forever, except when it isn’t. So, which animals are mythical and which are in hiding? Bigfoot sightings are plentiful, but real evidence for the hirsute creature is a big zilch. Yet, the coelacanth, a predatory fish thought extinct, actually lives. Today, its genome is offering clues as to how and when our fishy ancestors first flopped onto land. Meanwhile, the ivory-billed woodpecker assumes mythic status as it flutters between existence and extinction. And, from passenger pigeons to the wooly mammoth, hi-tech genetics may imitate Jurassic Park, and bring back vanished animals.” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death and Self 15 mins – “How does your view of the self affect your attitude to your own death? Shaun Nichols discusses this question in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.” At the link right-click beside “Direct Download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deception in War 22 mins – “During World War II, a massive recruitment effort targeted students from the top art schools across the country. These young designers, artists, and makers were being asked to help execute a wild idea that came out of one the nation’s most conservative organizations: the United States Army. The crazy idea was this: The United States Army would design a “deception unit”: a unit that would appear to the enemy as a large armored division with tanks, trucks, artillery, and thousands of soldiers. But this unit would actually be equipped only with fake tanks, fake trucks, fake artillery and manned by just a handful of soldiers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia P1 35 mins – “The first episode of our new five-part Dementia Decoded podcast series looks at what Alzheimer’s is, how it differs from other forms of Dementia, and whether is it an inevitable part of aging.” At the link find the title, “Dementia Decoded: A Special Illness,” right-click “Media files 150400_dementia_decoded_ep1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Cost 47 mins – “In the golden age of America’s middle class, American universities were a big part of the conveyor belt to opportunity. That’s still our vision. But stroll around many top college campuses these days and you can feel how affluence rules. Dominates. Colleges get racial and religious and geographic diversity. But spending the money to bring in low-income and middle class students can slip to a second-tier priority. And with that slips the goal of mixing economic classes, giving all a shot. This hour On Point: American colleges leaning toward the affluent, and the push to turn that around.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Roundtable – Clinton 65 mins – “Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton participates in a roundtable discussion with students and educators at the Jones County Regional Center of Kirkwood Community College in Monticello, Iowa.” At the link find the title, “Hillary Clinton Education Roundtable in Iowa,” right-click “Media files program.396592.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elevator History 7 mins – “There’s an invention that’s made the modern metropolis possible. No, it’s not the automobile or steel. It’s the elevator. Tom Sybert, host of the Elevator Radio Show, explains how the elevator completely transformed how we live.” At the link find the title, “Your Daily Pick-Me-Up,” right-click “Media files 0425-SybertWEB.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eyes-Free Fitness 20 mins – “Welcome to the first podcast for BlindAlive.com! In this first episode we talk about who Blind Alive is and what are goals are as well as get to know each other a bit.” At the link find the title, “Enjoy!Eyes-Free Fitness™ Podcast Episode 1 | Let’s Get Started,” right-click “Media files Blind+Alive+Podcast+Episode+1.mp3” and select L”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake Meat 48 mins – “Whatever you personally think of it, humans love meat. We brought mastodons down to get it. And vegetarians aside, we eat enormous quantities of it today. But here’s the problem: environmentally, meat is a killer. Industrial-scale meat production for a crowded planet guzzles water and land and gives off more greenhouse gases than transportation – cars and trucks and the rest. Yet we love it. There’s a big push on for fake meat. Vegetable-based. That would bring the protein, satisfy the craving, and spare the planet. This hour On Point: fake meat. We’ll taste it and ask how far it goes.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flor de Toloache 48 mins – “When you hear the mariachi music, the visuals are right there too in our mind’s eye. The guys in their elaborate, silver-spangled outfits. The boots. The big sombreros. The machismo, Mexican-style. But when Flor de Toloache is playing, it’s a different picture. Mariachi, yes. But all women. Those great outfits, yes. But flowers in their hair. And Mexican is just the beginning. They’re from all over Latin America, beyond – and New York City. This hour On Point: the women of Flor de Toloache.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geothite 5 mins – “Goethite: Chemistry in its element – It’s the strongest known biological material and one of the earliest pigments – Helen Scales discovers goethite.” At the link find “Goethite,” right-click “CIIE_Geothite_NEW.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GM Foods Debate 51 mins – “Many plants we eat today are a result of genetic modifications that would never occur in nature. Scientists have long been altering the genes of food crops, to boost food production and to make crops more pest-, drought- and cold-resistant. Proponents of genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, say that farmers who grow these crops are able to use fewer environmentally damaging pesticides… Critics, however, say the claims of those benefits are overblown…Four scientists recently took on those questions in an Intelligence Squared U.S. debate, facing off two against two on the motion, “Genetically Modify Food.” In these Oxford-style debates, the team that sways the most people to its side by the end is the winner.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hostage Situations 88 mins – “Deborah Tice, the mother of missing journalist Austin Tice, and former FBI Crisis Negotiation Unit Chief Gary Noesner join Peter Bergen and Barak Barfi to examine the nation’s hostage policy at a discussion held by the New America Foundation.” At the link find the title, “Discussion on U.S. Policy Toward Hostages Held Overseas,” right-click “Media files program.395681.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ipad for Lawyers 26 mins – “Most lawyers who listen to The Digital Edge are already aware of many benefits of tablet use in the courtroom. There are apps for note taking, document review, legal research, and, of course, trial presentation. But this is just the beginning! Having a tablet opens up many avenues of convenience for litigators, trial prep and during trial. Why is the iPad preferable to a Windows Surface or Android tablet?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran’s View 47 mins – “The US Congress is all over the Iran nuclear deal now, looking for leverage, looking for a voice, talking with John Kerry and the White House about how and whether it will all come down. Sanctions relief. The deal. Or maybe war if there is no deal, backers warn. What about on the other side of the looking glass? In Iran?  e saw cheering in the streets of Tehran when their negotiators came home. Hope for sanctions lifted. But there is long hostility too. Suspicion. Iranian strategic goals. This hour On Point: we turn to Tehran for the Iranian view of the big nuclear deal and what it may foretell.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Irrational Obedience 55 mins – “Serbulent Turan, an emerging political scientist at the University of British Columbia, asks why people willingly put up with oppression and — on the flip side — what’s needed to spark a revolution.” At the link find the title, “Ideas from the Trenches – Why We Obey,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150414_55552.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Passion 63 mins – “Today’s job market is anything but traditional. Job seekers have to go beyond the paper resume, leveraging social media tools and maintaining an online persona that highlights not only IQ but also EQ (emotional intelligence). How can you, as an applicant, use these new indicators of talent to better showcase your skills and convey competency, let alone find a job that you’ll love? Some say that cultural fit can be as important as title and salary, so how do you persuade an employer that you can not only do the job, but that you’re one of the team? Our panel of career coaches and modern job experts will help you craft your most-hirable self and conquer the evolving job market.” India Business Growth “Gurcharan Das, Columnist, The Times of India; Contributor, The New York Times; Author, India Grows at Night In conversation with Lata Krishnan, Chair, American India Foundation How could a nation become the world’s second fastest growing economy despite a weak, flailing state? Its recent economic slowdown is a sign that India may have begun to experience the limits of growing at “night” – private growth outside the scope of government involvement. What India needs, Das says, is a strong liberal state. Such a state would have the authority to take quick, decisive action; it would have the rule of law to ensure those actions are legitimate; and finally, it would be accountable to the people. But achieving this will not be easy, says Das, because India has historically had a weak state and a strong society.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lock Picking 18 mins – “The pursuit of lock picking is as old as the lock, which is itself as old as civilization. But in the entire history of the world, there was only one brief moment, lasting about 70 years, where you could put something under lock and key—a chest, a safe, your home—and have complete, unwavering certainty that no intruder could get to it. This is a feeling that security experts call “perfect security.” Sam Greenspan has the story.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Louis Armstrong 19 mins – “Terry Teachout reads from POPS: A Life of Louis Armstrong” Find that title at the link right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meat Patents 19 mins – “We visit the workshop of the meat inventor who came up with Steak-Umm and KFC’s popcorn chicken. And we try to figure out what meat inventors tell us about patents and innovation. (Today’s show originally ran in August 2012.)” At the link find the title, “#399: Can You Patent A Steak?” right-click “Media files 20150422_specials_planetmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Middle Class History 53 mins – “President Obama and his critics have been arguing a lot lately over whose policies best serve America’s middle class. And you can understand why when close to half of Americans identify as “middle-class.” In his State of the Union address, the president defined “middle-class economics” as “the idea that this country does best when everyone gets their fair shot, everyone does their fair share, everyone plays by the same set of rules.” Now, however you think of it, the middle class is a powerful idea in American culture. So on this episode, we explore the rise — and, some would say, the fall — of the middle class in the United States. What is the middle class, anyway? Who’s in it, and who isn’t? And how have middle-class lives and middle-class values changed over time?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Integration 73 mins – “On April 14, in a historic first, the recently convened White House Task Force on New Americans unveiled a report to the President that aims to improve and better coordinate federal strategies that support the successful integration of immigrants into U.S. communities. At this Migration Policy Institute event, Director of the Domestic Policy Council and Co-Chair of the Task Force on New Americans, Cecilia Muñoz, discusses the plan’s promise and implementation goals. The conversation also includes remarks by Director of MPI’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy, Margie McHugh, and President Michael Fix, along with Executive Director of the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition, Eva Millona, and Special Assistant to the President for Immigration Policy, Felicia Escobar.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Movement Exercise 46 mins – “In an online video, biomechanist Katy Bowman guides a tour of her home. It’s a lot of the usual stuff, but what’s missing is all the furniture. Katy and her family don’t have a couch or recliners or even chairs at the kitchen table. That’s so they have every possible opportunity for physical movement, which is a central idea of Bowman’s philosophy. She wants people to improve their health and their well being by exercising less and moving more and better. She joins us Monday to explain how and why.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pharmaceutical Disposal 57 mins – “In June 2012, Alameda County in California became the first local government body to pass a safe drug disposal ordinance that would hold pharmaceutical companies responsible for the safe collection and disposal of unused medications from the public. Now San Francisco and numerous additional local governments are on the cusp of doing the same. Today we’ll talk with former Center for Disease Control physician, Dr. Matt Willis; Heidi Sanborn, executive director of the CA Product Stewardship Council; Guillermo Rodriguez of the San Francisco Department of the Environment; and Conor Johnston, from the office of the President of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PhD Prospects – Australia 54 mins – “The education industry in Australia has been prodigious according to Peter Osborne. Many more masters and PhD graduates are produced per head of population than Japan, a country five times the size of Australia. So where do the new graduates go? Is the economy structured to offer enough jobs? No says Peter Osborne who cites a low base of high tech industries in Australia, fewer tenured positions in universities, and even technology that is taking the place of some laboratory positions. Peter Osborne compares the situation for new science graduates in Australia and Japan.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Challenges 55 mins – “Drawing on his book, Disposable Youth, scholar Henry Giroux speaks at the SPUR lecture in Toronto about how America is abandoning its youth.” At the link find the title, “Disposable Youth – Henry Giroux,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150417_97275.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productivity 76 mins – “What if, upon graduating college, you decided to turn down the great job offers you had on the table? What if you instead decided to spend an entire year dedicated to learning all you could about one specific topic? That’s what Chris Bailey did – with productivity as his chosen topic, he took 365 days after graduating to dive into a project he called A Year of Productivity. For an entire year, he read and practiced all he could around productivity, habit-building, mindfulness, time management, focus and concentration, and more. He also built a blog around the project in order to share what he learned. After the year ended, Chris decided to go full-time with the project, suitably re-dubbing it A Life of Productivity – which is now one of my favorite blogs. He’s also hard at work on a book about the project, which is due to drop in 2016. In this episode, I pick Chris’ brain about many of things he learned during the project (and in the days since), and we also discuss why beards are so great. Enjoy!” At the link select episode 60, right-click the down-pointing arrow in the episode description window and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Puerto Rican Scam 63 mins – “Stories of people, cities, and commonwealths touching their noses and proclaiming “not it!” Including the story of how one city used a rocking chair to take retribution against a late night TV show host, and an island that takes people it doesn’t want to deal with and ships them away.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Racoons in Toronto 4 mins – “Raccoons love to root around for food in the city’s garbage bins, using their finger-like front paws to open the lids and the weight of their big butts to tip the bins over…It’s a particularly tough battle in Toronto, which has been called the raccoon capital of the world. There are no predators in the area, and the city is built on a ravine system that provides plenty of access to fresh water. The estimated raccoon population in Toronto is about 200 per square mile, and they’re a force to be reckoned with. “They are huge,” Mills says. “These raccoons that we see are sometimes like the size of a medium-size dog.‘” At the link find the title, “Will new garbage bins bring Toronto victory in its war on raccoons?” Right-click “Media files 04232015_03.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Resilient Cities 7 mins – “Floods, drought, crime waves, terrorism, and superstorms. The modern city faces myriad catastrophes and crises. Judith Rodin, President of the Rockefeller Foundation, tells us how cities can cope with these challenges, and what they can do to bounce back.” At the link find the title, “How Crises Strengthen Cities,” right-click “Media files 0425-RodinWEB.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Warriors 48 mins – “It sounds like science fiction. Unfortunately, it’s not. Lethal autonomous weapons systems. Robot killers. They’re on the drawing board now. Their prototypes and early forms are beyond the drawing board. This week in Geneva, a big UN meeting is trying to keep the genie in the bottle. Human Rights Watch has launched its Campaign to Stop Killer Robots.  But technology and strategic competition are ratcheting up. Pushing toward weapons that target and kill on their own. If it sounds like a Terminator movie, it is. This hour On Point:  the rise and pushback.  Killer robots.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Theater 27 mins – “Teatr Doc is widely praised for its hard-hitting plays about contemporary Russia. Lucy Ash finds that for the country’s most controversial theatre company, the show must go on.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Who’s Afraid of Teatr Doc? 16 Apr 2015,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150416-0230a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Same Sex in Supreme Court 28 mins – “In anticipation of big decisions on marriage equality and Obamacare, many are talking about the balance of political power on the Supreme Court. Dahlia Lithwick speaks with two court watchers about the extent to which the Justices are political actors.” At the link find the title, “The Politics of Law,” right-click “Media files amicus150418_amicus.mp3,” and seelect “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Statistics 46 mins – “What are we all up to in the bedroom? How often? Do men really think about sex every seven seconds? Does any of this matter? And most crucially, can we believe any of these statistics in the first place? The Guardian’s Hannah Devlin and Ian Sample are joined by Professor David Spiegelhalter, Professor of Risk at the University of Cambridge and author of new book ‘Sex by Numbers’, and Professor Anne Johnson, Professor of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at University College London, who produced landmark 1990s sex survey the NATSAL report, to talk about one-night stands, the seven-year itch and everything in between.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Reality Check  22 mins – “Sexual Reality Check – On this podcast about sexual myths, penis size, and sex after 70, The Checkup sticks to the facts.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smart Grid 64 mins – Electric Transmission: Enabling a Smart Grid – As America continues to develop clean, non-carbon-based electricity, our century-old electric grid is emerging as a major bottleneck. Meanwhile, public-policy oversight of electric power is a hodgepodge of 50 different states’ approaches to regulation. Willrich illustrates the problem, with special insight into California’s situation, and lays out a program for developing a 21st-century system. Mason Willrich, Board Chair, California Independent System Operator; Director, California Clean Energy Fund; Senior Advisor, MIT Energy Innovation Project” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

SOCAP P2 66 mins – “Social Capital: The Intersection of Money and Meaning, Part Two SOCAP is a multi-platform organization dedicated to the flow of capital toward social good. Four sold-out conferences have connected innovators worldwide – investors, foundations, institutions and social entrepreneurs – to build a market where everyone wins. This year SOCAP returns to San Francisco. Join us for an exciting and informative preview of the ideas and issues of SOCAP 2011 in conversation with the team leading the upcoming conference. Gary Bolles, Founder and CEO, xigi; Consulting Producer, Google Zeitgeist; Sarah Brooks, Director of Social Innovation, Hot Studio; Fiona Hovenden, Ph.D., Vice President, Collective Invention; Co-author, The Gendered Cyborg; Kevin Jones, Founder, Good Capital; Convener, SOCAP; Kevin O’Malley, President, TechTalk / Studio – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media in Science 25 mins – “NSTA 2015: Talking Science: Join the hosts of the Lab Out Loud podcast to explore the benefits of using digital media in science education—helping to engage students and improve teaching practice. Have you wanted to reach out to other science teachers with your questions about NGSS?  Our guests this week can help.  Using Twitter, Fred Ende and Tricia Shelton moderate #NGSSchat – an online forum to learn and share around the Next Generation Science Standards and great science teaching.  Listen to the show to find out how you can “lurk”, learn and contribute to #NGSSchat. To listen to this episode right-click “Download” at the link and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. You have to scroll past many links and notes to find the “download” link.

Social Networking 65 mins –More than a billion people around the world are engaged in a massive and unprecedented experiment in how social media technologies are changing society, commerce, politics, health, innovation, love, work, the arts and more. But what is this new tech literally doing to our brains? How is it impacting who we are as humans, and how is it making us different from previous generations in how we interact with information, our environment and each other? This provocative panel will feature a neuroscientist who studies the impact of multitasking on our gray matter and those who believe new social networking may be leading us to a more connected and even better world, as well as those who are wary of the physiological and societal impact that social media has on humanity. Come participate in a mind-bending special event, check out clips from the film Connected and be social in the real world. Adam Gazzaley, Associate Professor of Neurology, Physiology and Psychiatry and Director, Neuroscience Imaging Center, UCSF; Josh McHugh, CEO, Attention Span Media; Tiffany Shlain, Founder, Webby Awards; Filmmaker, Connected: An Autobiography about Love, Death and Technology; David Ewing Duncan, Author, Experimental Man; Co-host, Tech Talk Radio – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Software Alchemy 74 mins An outspoken pioneer in the modern computing era and best known as the “Father of Visual Basic” and inventor of “personas,” Cooper will share rare insights into the evolution of software and interaction design based on human goals and needs – and a new vision for meeting the personal and business needs of the upcoming era. Alan Cooper, President and Founder, Cooper; Author, The Inmates Are Running the Asylum and About Face; In conversation with Chris Shipley, CEO, Guidewire Group; Former Executive Producer, DEMO Conference” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Car Race 31 mins – “(Starts at 6:00)Rob Ireland talks about the Sunswift solar racing car, ready for commuters?” In Australia. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Flares 66 mins –Through all the growing pains and political attacks, the U.S. solar industry is still moving ahead. Costs are down, new financing models are removing capital barriers for residential and commercial buyers, and sun energy is no longer just for hippies. What is the solar forecast for 2013? How will the trade spat with China impact the sector? The glut of cheap natural gas promises to undercut renewable energy, yet at the same time it can be a ready complement for when the sun is not shining and the wind isn’t blowing. Join us for a spin around the sun. Edward Fenster, Co-founder and co-CEO, Sunrun; Danny Kennedy, President and Founder, Sungevity; Marco Krapels, Executive Vice President, Rabobank; Lyndon Rive, Co-founder and CEO, SolarCity” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar on Homes 16 mins – “Just a few years ago, solar power was an expensive luxury for the environmentally conscious. Now it’s a good deal for lots of people. How did solar power get so cheap, so fast?” At the link find the title, “#616: How Solar Got Cheap,” right-click “Media files 20150410_blog_pmpod.mp3” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Square Deal Company 15 mins – “In the early 1900s, the president of the largest shoe company in the world tried to create a Utopia for his workers. He called his big experiment in welfare capitalism: The Square Deal.” At the link find the title, “#618: The Square Deal,” right-click “Media files 20150417 blog pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup Mechanics 57 mins – “Ron Gutman, founder and CEO of digital-health startup HealthTap, dares entrepreneurs to enjoy, not just endure, the journey by doing something that matters deeply to many people. A serial entrepreneur, inventor and big believer in the power of positivity, Gutman also describes how the heart of success is understanding human need at a granular level.” At the link hover over “Download,” right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

STEM Jobs Decline 18 mins – “If you’ve got an engineering degree, you’re pretty much set for life, right? Well, that might not be the whole picture, according to Rutgers Professor Hal Salzman, who argues that there’s entirely too many STEM graduates. And we get a peek at what the STEM job market is truly like, from a roundtable of students and recent grads.” At the link find the title, “The Reality Behind STEM Jobs,” right-click “Media files 0425-SalzmanSTEM.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Steve Jobs 67 mins –Apple co-founder Steve Jobs was a visionary and an inspiration to both tech geeks and luddites worldwide, with his products fusing technology and design in unprecedented ways. But much of the fiercely private businessman’s life was obfuscated by rumor and legend, and a full picture of the man and his astounding legacy has not emerged. Drawing on more than 40 interviews with Jobs himself, critically acclaimed and bestselling Benjamin Franklin and Albert Einstein biographer Isaacson presents a remarkable new account of Jobs himself. After two years of research, speaking with family members, friends, competitors and colleagues, Isaacson has compiled the story and life of one the most influential people of the modern era.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stress Harms Us 61 mins –Groundbreaking science by Nobel Prize Winner Elizabeth Blackburn and health psychologist Elissa Epel links psychological stress not only with disease but directly with aging, all the way down to our cells – in particular, our “telomeres,” the caps on the ends of our chromosomes that protect our DNA and a marker of biological aging. Indeed, the subjects in those studies who perceived themselves as being under the most stress had telomeres that were the equivalent of 10 years older than the telomeres of those who perceived themselves as being under the least stress. Stress Less, science/health writer Singer’s new book, springs from Blackburn and Epel’s remarkable discovery; it enlists a veritable Who’s Who of stress and telomere researchers to explore this new science as well as the cutting-edge research that shows how we can slow, or even turn back, that ticking clock. Join a discussion of the implications of this ongoing revolutionary research with the scientists at the center of the research.Elissa Epel, Ph.D., Health Psychologist, UCSF; Calvin Harley, Ph.D., pioneer in telomere biology; Jue Lin, Ph.D., Telomere/telomerase assay specialist in Elizabeth Blackburn’s lab, UCSF;Thea Singer, Author, Stress Less” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Structural Biology 29 mins – “Keith & Russ talk with P. Shing Ho, Professor & Chair of the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology at Colorado State University.  Shing is a structural biologist, and he explains how the function ofDNA or protein molecules can be altered if there’s a slight change in the molecular structure.  He also talks about discovering in 1979 how halogens inserted into DNA caused the DNA strands to split into a 4-stranded helical pattern.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stuffed and Starved 63 mins –Half the world is malnourished, the other half obese. Why is there such a large discrepancy between the haves and the have-nots for what we all need: food? Patel conducts a global investigation to make sense of the world food crisis and charges that “the food system is filled with choices made by a handful of powerful people, in smoke-filled rooms, over the objections of the majority.” Hear a story of nefarious false choices and of international resistance movements that takes you from seed to store to plate. Raj Patel: Stuffed and Starved, Still. Activist; Academic; Author, Stuffed and Starved, The Value of Nothing; In conversation with Rose Aguilar, Host, “Your Call” on KALW 91.7 FM” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Subversives 62 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy explores some until-now secret details about the history of Berkeley in the 1960s : How the FBI disrupted and infiltrated student groups, the faculty and the UC administration; how that influenced California state politics; and how Governor Reagan worked with the FBI to develop one leg of his national political power base. Seth Rosenfeld, Author, Subversives: The FBI’s War on Student Radicals, and Reagan’s Rise to Power” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sugar Addiction 60 mins – Sugar Addiction: Recovery from the Greatest Dietary Crisis of All Time – We have recently become aware of the appalling costs, to both adults and children, of our current intake of refined sugars. Sugar addiction, the dynamic that propels this dietary disaster, has been one of Ross’ primary areas of focus since 1983. While exposing the surprising contribution of low-calorie dieting to the overeating epidemic, Ross, a celebrated integrative pioneer and educator in the fields of addiction and eating disorders treatment, focuses primarily on how we can correct the faulty appetite chemistry that drives it. Her approach, based on neuronutrient research from the chemical dependency field, is widely known for its unique effectiveness. According to Ross, “The self-care and feeding of brain neurotransmitters like serotonin and endorphin is the key to regaining control of our diet, our weight, and our health.” Julia Ross, MA, MFT, NNTS, CEO, Recovery Systems; Author, The Diet Cure and The Mood Cure” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sugar Addiction 15 mins – “From WBUR and Slate, the solidly reported and also somewhat opinionated take on health news for you and your family. Hosted by two veteran health reporters, this installment explores the pleasures and perils of sugar, the viral vegetable kale, and whether kale devotees can have too much of a good thing. With a bonus yarn about a chia-seed induced emergency room visit.” At the link find the title, “The Checkup: Scary Food Stories,” right-click “Media files 150225 theCHECKUP 07_FINAL.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sullenberger 61 mins –The hero who landed the plane on the Hudson discusses the qualities that make for great leadership.  He reveals his own advice as well as the details of recent conversations with notables that include legendary baseball manager Tony La Russa, Costco founder Jim Sinegal, and Educator Michelle Rhee, among others.Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, Retired Airline Pilot; CBS News Aviation and Safety Expert; Author, Making a Difference: Stories of Vision and Courage from America’s Leaders. In Conversation With Dan Ashley, News Anchor, ABC 7 TV; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Survive and Thrive 65 mins –The Secrets and Science of the World’s Most Effective Survivors and Thrivers How do we bounce back from extreme adversity? Best-selling author and journalist Sherwood has the answer. From a scientific perspective, he explores the differences between those who overcome difficulties and those who do not; those who beat a life-threatening illness and those who succumb; and those who triumph despite economic hardship and those who falter. Sherwood is the founder and CEO of thesurvivorsclub.org, a resource web site for those struggling with everything from eating disorders to foreclosures. Sherwood is also the author of two critically acclaimed best-selling novels, including The Death and Life of Charlie St. Cloud, now a major feature film starring Zac Efron. Sherwood was also executive producer of ABC’s “Good Morning America,” as well as senior producer for “NBC Nightly News with Tom Brokaw.” Ben Sherwood, Journalist; Author, The Survivors Club; Gil Gross, Host, KGO Radio – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Symbiosis Background 10 mins – “Why do cells of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium, contain a chloroplasts, the plant organelle which allows plants to photosynthesise?  Why do most animals contain more harmless bacterial cells than cells of their own body? And how has it become that corals contain and animal and an algae living together? Sometimes the relationships can be understood as a benefit to both organisms. But not always.  How did such relationships emerge? These are the questions being studied by scientists in the Keeling Lab at the University of British Columbia. Lab leader Patrick Keeling describes a new theory which is being developed to describe the origin of these often strange and curious relationships.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Synthetic Biology 64 mins – “We eat genetically engineered foods, take drugs made in engineered bacteria and yeast, and someday soon may drive our cars using fuel produced by engineered microorganisms. The rise of synthetic biology marks a fundamental transformation in the relationship between biology and nature. When humans can control the genetic makeup of organisms to the extent foreseen by synthetic biologists, renowned molecular geneticist Church believes, nature will no longer be the exclusive arbiter of life, death and evolution. Church will discuss where these technologies came from and where they’re going.” Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School; Director, Lipper Center for Computational Genetics; Thomas Goetz, Executive Editor, Wired – Moderator“ At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tar Sands Impact 66 mins-In a world still largely dependent on fossil fuels, calls for a transition from the fossil fuel economy have been met with considerable resistance. The Keystone XL pipeline and the Canadian tar sands have become symbols of the dissension over America’s energy future. In his book, The Pipeline and the Paradigm, Samuel Avery writes that the project has inspired the largest expression of civil disobedience since the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. Sam Avery, Author, The Pipeline and the Paradigm; Greg Croft, Lecturer, St. Mary’s College of California; Cassie Doyle, Consul General of Canada in San Francisco; Dan Miller, Managing Director, Roda Group” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tavis Smiley 59 mins –Award-winning television and radio broadcaster Smiley gives a peek behind the curtain of success to share personal stories of his missteps, misdeeds and miscalculations. Smiley recounts 20 instances of perceived “failures” that were, in fact, “lessons” that shaped the principles and practices he steadfastly employs in his business and personal life today. Come learn how to turn your perceived failures into stepping stones for success from this legendary broadcast journalist.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taxation Solutions 61 mins – “Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform, talks about his book [End the IRS Before It Ends Us], in which he argues that Americans have reached a tipping point in their tolerance for the IRS and the tax system.” At the link find the title, “After Words: Grover Norquist,” right-click “Media files program.395920.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tech Guru 66 mins –Reporter; Television Host The lively and playful Worley comes to us for a discussion about how to make technology more accessible to the masses by eliminating the stresses associated with complicated new gadgets. A contributing reporter on “Good Morning America” and ABC and host of “Upgrade Your Life,” “The Next Frontier” and the Travel Channel’s “Cash and Treasures,” Worley aims to enlighten even the novice digital immigrant.In conversation with Quentin Hardy, Deputy Technology Editor, The New York Times; Technology and Business Expert” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Trends 32 mins – “Next week on Innovation Hub, we embrace nerdiness. It begins with Weird Al Yankovic: he just won a Grammy for his recent album — but he’s also been innovating for decades. We have a roundtable with Farhad Manjoo of the New York Times and investor Roger McNamee who talk about the big picture in today’s tech world, and whether the nerds of Silicon Valley are staying true to their roots. Author Annie Murphy Paul tells us how to define brilliance and how to continue getting smarter. Plus, drones, drones, and more drones!” At the link find the title, “2.21.15 Geeking Out,” right-click “Media files IHUB-022115-FullShow.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teen Pregnancy 67 mins –Teen pregnancy and young motherhood is an issue that spans education, politics, health, family life and more. It has received great attention recently with the federal decision to block over-the-counter sales of an after-sex contraceptive pill to girls under age 17. Given this ruling, as well as the creation of other new health-care legislation, what is the reality of teen pregnancy and teen reproductive care? How are our communities addressing this issue? Are there new barriers to birth control access and if so, what are they? To discuss this issue, we’re bringing together experts from the fields of health care, psychology, politics and more. Jane Mauldon, Associate Professor of Public Policy, Goldman School of Public Policy, UC Berkeley; Lynn Ponton, M.D., Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, UCSF; Lupe Rodriguez, Director of Public Affairs, Planned Parenthood Mar Monte; Dr. Sophia Yen, Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics-Adolescent Medicine, Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital, Stanford School of Medicine; Lisa Aliferis, Health Editor, KQED News – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Text Mining 45 mins – “How quickly do you read?  According to results of an online speed reading test by Staples, the office supplies company, the average senior executive reads 575 words per minutes, while the average college professor clocks in at 675.  The rest of us manage only less than half that volume, about 300 words per minute. Why […]” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thirty Year Plan 61 mins –The acclaimed Orion Magazine put some of America’s best thinkers to work on the question of what humanity needs to cultivate in order to improve its future. The result is a new book, Thirty-Year Plan: Thirty Writers on What We Need to Build a Better Future. One writer, Richard Louv, responded, “We need a new nature movement, one that includes but goes beyond traditional environmentalism and sustainability, one that paints a portrait of a compelling, inspiring society that is better than the one we presently live in.” Join us to hear from three thinkers who are part of this project, and share with us your own vision of the future. Rubén Martínez, Author, Desert America; Professor of Literature and Writing, Loyola Marymount University; Riane Eisler, Author, The Chalice, The Blade and The Real Worth of Nations; President, Center for Partnership Studies; Craig Childs, Author, Apocalyptic Planet; H. Emerson Blake, Editor-in-Chief, Orion Magazine” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thought Traps 62 mins – “Drawing on the latest research from disciplines ranging from anthropology to neuroscience and her own field experience, Lappé argues that the biggest challenge to human survival isn’t our fossil fuel dependency, melting glaciers or other calamities. Rather, she says, it’s our faulty way of thinking about these environmental crises that robs us of power. Lappé dismantles seven common “thought traps” that belie what we now know about nature, including our own, and offers contrasting “thought leaps” that suggest  our hidden power. Frances Moore Lappé, Author, Diet for a Small Planet” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Toxins Amongst Us 59 mins –Inside our homes we’re exposed to hundreds of untested chemicals – from additives in food to endocrine disruptors in soap and shampoo to fumes in household cleaners. These comprise your “body burden” and can exacerbate allergies, asthma, fatigue, cough, headache and more serious health conditions. Greer, best-selling author and lauded by such advocates as Deepak Chopra and Ralph Nader, will share bits of bite-sized wisdom to provide a greater awareness of what goes in you, on you and surrounds you, so that you might be able to radically improve your health and vitality. Leave with simple, affordable ways to make safe, healthy product choices; understand vague and misleading food, personal care and cleaning labels; and detect and eliminate electromagnetic radiation from cell phones, laptops and WiFi. Beth Greer, aka Super Natural Mom, Journalist; Environmental Health Advocate; Holistic Wellness Educator; Healthy Home Specialist; Author, Super Natural Home: Improve Your Health, Home and Planet … One Room at a Time” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tracy Morgan 14 mins – “Tracy Morgan reads from I Am The New Black” At the link find that title, “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban Farming 63 mins – “Enterprising city dwellers are bursting from their pre-packaged lives and taking back their choices for consumption. Urban farms foster community and healthy eating beneath towering city blocks, where fast and easy often supersede fresh and home-grown. Like SF’s own Alemany Farm and Hayes Valley Farm, these urban crop spaces allow neighbors to trade their Swingline staplers for pitchforks and break new ground. Fresh, organic veggies are grown and sold, and the locavore food economy is epitomized. What’s the appeal of throwing away the chain grocery store for the neighborhood till? Come hear from local leaders of the movement like Novella Carpenter, founder of Oakland’s Ghost Town Farm, and trailblazing San Franciscans Jason Mark, of Alemany Farm, Christopher Burley, founder of Hayes Valley Farm, and David Gavrich, “goat whisperer” and founder of City Grazing. They’ll discuss the urban farming movement’s place in the world of organic, local-grown culture, and how they’re bringing the farm to the city – goats included! Jason Mark, Co-manager, Alemany Farm; Editor-in-Chief, Earth Island Journal; Novella Carpenter, Founder, Ghost Town Farm; Author, Farm City; Christopher Burley, Founder, Hayes Valley Farm; David Gavrich, Founder, City Grazing; Novella Carpenter, Author, Farm City; Founder, Ghost Town Farm;Sarah Rich, Writer; Editor; Co-founder, The Foodprint Project; Co-author, Worldchanging: A User’s Guide for the 21st Century – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban Transport 30 mins – “Amanda Eaken of the Natural Resources Defense Council takes us on a tour of the latest innovations in urban transport. The post Getting Around: Urban Transport Solutions appeared first on Sea Change Radio.” At the link find the title, “Getting Around: Urban Transport Solutions,” right-click “Media files SC-2015-03-10.mp3” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam Evacuation 47 mins – “In the chaotic final days of the Vietnam War, a skeleton crew of U.S. military operatives was all that stood between the vindictive Viet Cong and South Vietnamese allies who had aided American forces. With the clock ticking, a number of heroic Americans took matters into their own hands. They saved as many South Vietnamese lives as they possibly could. It’s a little-known story of honor and tragedy chronicled in filmmaker Rory Kennedy’s latest documentary. She joins us Wednesday to talk about it.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vitamania 52 mins – “More than half of all Americans report that they take multi-vitamins and other dietary supplements. Vitamin deficiency is still a serious health problem for millions of people here and around the world. But new research indicates many Americans may be ingesting high amounts vitamins through a combination of pills and fortified beverages. And earlier this month, major retailers pulled some supplements off store shelves after tests indicated pills did not contain what was on the label. New concerns about dietary supplements.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive. 

War-On-Terror Damage 68 mins –Following the 9/11 attacks, Americans watched as the government implemented numerous pieces of antiterrorist legislation such as the Patriot Act in an effort to fight the war on terror. In recent years, however, many civil rights advocates have increasingly argued that these emergency measures may pry too deeply into the lives of not only suspected terrorists, but of nearly all Americans. ACLU President Herman contends that civil liberties have rapidly eroded in post-9/11 America. She will examine whether laws and policies, like the Patriot Act, are constitutional and effective, or just counterproductive. Susan N. Herman: The War on Terror and the Erosion of Democracy” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Wine Appreciation 65 mins – “Oenophiles and wine novices are being exposed to an ever-expanding universe of wines. Though providing an exciting opportunity for exploration, this staggering array of choices can prompt a feeling of being overwhelmed and make choosing a good wine a stressful experience. Happily, the chief wine critic for The New York Times and author of How to Love Wine is here to help. Join Asimov for an enlightening conversation on how to embrace variety and the quest for a fantastic vintage.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Workplace Mr Rodgers 70 mins –Fred Rogers is one of the great icons of American culture. The values and philosophy for which he is famous have endured for multiple generations. This panel brings those same values and philosophy to the workplace, where they are needed more than ever. Ian and Donna Mitroff have created a work applying carefully curated fables and stories that Mr. Rogers told, and bringing them with a unique application into business and to everyday life. Donna D. Mitroff , Independent Children’s Media Consultant and Critic; Author, Fables and the Art of Leadership: Applying the Wisdom of Mister Rogers to the Workplace; Ian I. Mitroff, Adjunct Professor, UC Berkeley; Author, Swan, Swine and Swindlers; David Newell, Actor, Mr. McFeely on “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One – Australia 50 mins – “Australia’s experience of WW1 is like no other country’s. In association with the British Council, BBC presenter Razia Iqbal and an Australian audience debate the role the “legend of Anzac” played in the hundred-year history of Australia since the first Anzac Day.” At the link find the title, “The War that Changed the World: Australia,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150418-1930b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Worst Case Scenarios 62 mins –Worst Case Scenarios by Borgenicht…:A worst-case scenario is the most severe possible outcome that can be projected to occur in a given situation. Conceiving of worst-case scenarios is a common form of strategic planning to prepare for and minimize contingencies that could result in accidents, quality problems, or other issues.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wrestling 30 mins – “When you think of professional wrestling, you probably picture cartoonish characters like Hulk Hogan and Macho Man Randy Savage. But after the Montreal screwjob, the real world lurked just beneath the scripted spectacle of professional wrestling. Simon Adler tells the story of one moment that tore a hole in the fiction of wrestling.” At the link right-clikc ‘Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII Internment Camp 60 mins – “Jan Jarboe Russell talked about her book, The Train to Crystal City: FDR’s Secret Prisoner Exchange and America’s Only Family Internment Camp During World War II, about the Texas camp, which was home to Japanese, German and Italian detainees.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a chop is included in the blog archive

Wyatt Cenac 89 mins –The former Daily Show correspondant sits down with the Champs to discuss all kinds of stuff.  In short, this is the most psychologically revealing Champs episode ever, guest-wise and host-wise.  Family stuff.  Good episode.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Y Combinator Grads 65 mins –Companies like Social Cam, Heyzap and WePay are all very different, but they have one mighty factor in common: they received their initial green and insider know-how from Y Combinator. Heralded by Wired as the “most prestigious program for budding digital entrepreneurs,” YC utilizes an expert formula of seed funding, peer networking and a three-month do-or-die boot camp to whip its mentees into startup shape. But how do the incubator’s graduates fare when the training comes to an end? What is it about this program that turns out such a wide range of wildly successful companies? Join us as some of Y Combinator’s illustrious graduates share stories of how to succeed and fail in the startup community and the lessons they’ve learned from the most infamous and celebrated incubator in the Valley. Ammon Bartram, Co-founder, Socialcam; Jude Gomila, Co-founder, Heyzap.com; Bill Clerico, Founder and CEO, WePay; Justin Kan, Co-founder, Justin.tv; Peter Delevett, Startups and Venture Capital Writer, San Jose Mercury News – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zero Waste 64 mins –Imagine a world in which nothing goes into a landfill or an incinerator, one where all of our discarded materials become resources for others to use. It may sound impossible, but Zero Waste proponents disagree. Across the nation, policymakers, business leaders and individuals are reinventing their relationship to waste in incredibly innovative ways – from outlawing the use of plastic bags to designing responsible product packaging to wearing water-less denim. Innovators are coming to understand that the pathway to a sustainable future can be paved with more than just recycling bins and compost heaps; they say it requires us to take a close look at the ecosystem that we’ve all played a part in creating. A San Francisco urbanite, an infrastructure expert, a business sustainability director and a political leader show us the 30,000-foot view of a sustainable city and dive into the everyday actions that could move us toward a zero waste future. Jared Blumenfeld, Pacific Southwest Administrator, EPA; ; Bea Johnson, Author, Zero-Waste Home; Shauna Sadowski, Sustainability Director, Annie’s; Mike Sangiacomo, President and CEO, Recology Inc.; Joel Makower, Chairman and Executive Editor, GreenBiz Group Inc. – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 35+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

 

 

 

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Media Mining Digest 180 – Apr 24, 2015: Adam Smith Background, Aging Disease, Aid Worker Targets, America Unbalanced, American Indian Ruins, Angelou by Smiley, Annual Physicals, Bouncing Bombs, Brain trauma, Burgundy vs Bordeaux, China Pollution Issues, Civil War Women, Computer Vision, Constitution Interpretations, Copy Editor, Drought in California, Economics Lecture, Egg Unboiling, Energy Management, Energy Storage, Female Leader, First Nations Female Homicides, GABA, Genetic Medicine Startup, Government Secrecy, Health Care Business, Hydrogen Power, Italian Cooking, Job Growth, Kid Camp and Islamic Marriage, Large Hadron Collider, Lead Ammunition, Lincoln Assassination, Martin Luther King Jr, Muslim Relations, National Security Issues, Nature of Things, Nature-Deficit Disorder, Navigation on Land, Negro Justice, Neighborhood Revival, Neurology and Behavior, Newspaper Future, Nietzsche, Nora Ephron, North Korea, Nuclear Threat, Nutrition and Longevity, Occupy Movement, Ocean Ecology, Oklahoma Earthquakes, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Opportunity Makers, Oxytocin, Pavlov, Peripheral Artery Disease, Plant Directed Behavior, Plato on Knowledge, Play Is Important, PMS Controversy, Power Choice, Predator Nation, Prison Entrepreneur, Productivity, Psychopath Identification, Public Broadcasting, Future, Public Shaming, Public Speaking, Rachel Maddow, Residential Solar, Right to Work Laws, Rosalyn Carter, Rwanda IT, Salmon Future, Salmon in the Trees, Samurai Spirit, San Antonio Mayor, Sandra Day O’Connor, Saudi Arabia, Science Talk, Seed Libraries, Self Publishing, Shari’ah Law, Sharing Economy, Stockmarket Future, Target Date Funds, Trade and Commerce, Vanguard Funds, Video Game Gender, Volcanoes

The following audio files come from a larger group of 205 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 93 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Adam Smith Background 64 mins – “Vernon Smith and James Otteson talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Adam Smith in front of a live audience at Ball State University. Topics discussed include Smith’s view of human nature, the relevance of Smith for philosophy and economics today, and the connection between Smith’s two books, The Theory of Moral Sentiments and The Wealth of Nations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Aging Disease 52 mins – “We all try to fight it: the inexorable march of time. The fountain of youth doesn’t exist, and all those wrinkle creams can’t help. But modern science is giving us new weapons in the fight against aging. So how far are we willing to go? Hear when aging begins, a summary of the latest biotech research, and how a lab full of youthful worms might help humans stay healthy. Also, a geneticist who takes a radical approach: collect the DNA that codes for longevity and restructure our genome. He finds inspiration – and perhaps genes as well – in the bi-centenarian bowhead whale. But what if age really is mind over matter? A psychologist’s extraordinary thought experiment with septuagenarian men turns back the clock 20 years. Will it work on diseases such as cancer as well?” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aid Worker Targets 20 mins – “Vincent Cochetel was held hostage for 317 days in 1998, while working for the UN High Commissioner on Refugees in Chechnya. For the first time, he recounts the experience — from what it was like to live in a dark, underground chamber, chained to his bed, to the unexpected conversations he had with his captors. With lyricism and power, he explains why he continues his work today. Since 2000, attacks on humanitarian aid workers have tripled — and he wonders what that rise may signal to the world.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America Unbalanced 19 mins – “Ten days after 9/11, a shocking attack at a Texas mini-mart shattered the lives of two men: the victim and the attacker. In this stunning talk, Anand Giridharadas, author of “The True American,” tells the story of what happened next. It’s a parable about the two paths an American life can take, and a powerful call for reconciliation.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Indian Ruins 52 mins – “The Lost World of the Old Ones Thursday, Doug’s guest is author and mountaineer David Roberts. Roberts first wrote about the prehistoric people of the American Southwest 20 years ago. He says that when he finishes a book, he generally leaves the topic for the next project. But he could never get the “Old Ones” out of his head. So he continued to explore remote canyons and precarious cliffs to find the remains of their lives. Roberts’ new book chronicles his journeys and what he’s learned about “The Lost World of the Old Ones.’” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Angelou By Smiley 35 mins – “Author and broadcaster Tavis Smiley shares the story of his 28-year friendship with renowned author, poet and activist Maya Angelou, the subject of his new book, “My Journey With Maya.’” At the link find the title, ”Tavis Smiley: My Journey With Maya,” right-click “Media files IM_20150411.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Annual Physicals 51 mins – “According to a recent Kaiser Family Foundation poll, 92 percent of Americans believe it’s important to see their doctor at least once a year for a head-to-toe physical examination. About 45 million Americans do just that. Conventional wisdom deems the annual physical to be valuable for early detection of disease and general well-being. But many doctors and medical researchers have begun to question the efficacy of an annual physical. They say it’s too costly for the U.S. health care system. And some go so far as to say it’s worthless for the patient. We look at rethinking the annual physical exam.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Bouncing Bombs 4 mins – “Today, archivist Robert Marlin tells us about bouncing bombs. The University of Houston’s College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them. It’s nighttime, May 16, 1943: British pilots fly 19 modified Lancaster bombers into German territory. Their raid was meant to degrade Germany’s industrial capacity. And it quickly became legendary. And for good reason: they’d just launched the first “bouncing bombs” into German dams.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. (See the blog topic, “Duxford War Museum,” for more story.)

Brain Trauma 24 mins – “In this episode, we discuss what is known about chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), an increasingly discussed issue due to its effects on current and former football players. We discuss who else CTE affects, what is happening in the brain of affected individuals, and how more research is needed to solve this serious problem.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Burgundy vs Bordeaux 60 mins – “On March 23rd Intelligence Squared brought together Britain’s two giants of wine writing, Hugh Johnson and Jancis Robinson, to go head to head in a debate on the world’s two greatest wines. Every audience member will be given a glass of each wine to help them decide which of the two should win the crown.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

China Pollution Issues 56 mins – “What do major fashion retailers and designers like HM, Target, Gap and Levi have in common? They are all working with the Natural Resources Defense Council NRDC to create clothing that uses less water and energy to produce, transport, and care for. Through implementation of the NRDC’s Clean By Design program, these corporate partners utilize their tremendous buying power as a lever to reduce the environmental impacts of their suppliers abroad. Clean by Design focuses on improving process efficiency to reduce waste and emissions and improve the environment. Tune in to hear Dr. Linda Greer discuss the program in detail, and learn how consumers can influence the growing sustainable apparel movement.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil War Women 52 mins – “American women in the Civil War era could not own property. In fact, if they were married, they were property – the property of their husbands. They also could not vote and certainly could not run for office. But they made a mark on the nation’s history nonetheless. Some became journalists, nurses or activists. Others wielded influence behind the scenes as political spouses – women who had the ears of powerful men. In a new book, NPR’s Cokie Roberts delves into the lives of these Washington women and shows how their passion and intelligence influenced the times. Join Diane and Cokie for a discussion of 19th-century wives of presidents and congressmen.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Computer Vision 18 mins – “When a very young child looks at a picture, she can identify simple elements: “cat,” “book,” “chair.” Now, computers are getting smart enough to do that too. What’s next? In a thrilling talk, computer vision expert Fei-Fei Li describes the state of the art — including the database of 15 million photos her team built to “teach” a computer to understand pictures — and the key insights yet to come.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constitution Interpretations 52 mins – “It’s the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. As the country reflects on his death and legacy, the author of a new book says one basic fact of Lincoln’s life cannot be overlooked: where he is from. Legal scholar Akhil Reed Amar argues that Lincoln’s home in Illinois was key to his views on slavery and secession, making geography central to Lincoln’s contributions to the U.S. Constitution. It’s just one example of how America’s distinct regional differences shape the law of the land. We take a Constitutional road trip with Akhil Reed Amar.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Copy Editor 47 mins – “Subject. Verb. Object. What’s so hard about that? But the English language, our grammar rules, our punctuation, the endless guidelines and exceptions have been giving school children nightmares since the first edition of the Merriam Webster dictionary was published in 1828. “That” vs. “Which”. “Me” vs. “I”. Luckily, Mary Norris, a top level copy editor at the New Yorker, has spent her life worrying about dangling participles, the Oxford comma, and what’s next in the dangerous days of texting and twitter. This hour, On Point: the New Yorker’s Comma Queen on life and grammar.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought in California 51 mins – “The drought in California is considered to be the worst since temperature and rainfall records were first kept in the late 1800s. With a population of almost 39 million and an important agricultural sector, the effects in California are widespread. Climate scientists point out the current drought is not limited to California. And although unprecedented in modern times, research suggests that in past centuries the region experienced droughts lasting for decades. We look at the drought in the West and what we can learn from ancient weather patterns.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Economics Lecture 92 mins – “Tyler Cowen and Jeffrey Sachs discuss the resource curse, why Russia failed and Poland succeeded, charter cities, Sach’s China optimism, JFK, Paul Rosenstein-Rodan, whether Africa will be able to overcome the middle income trap, Paul Krugman, Sach’s favorite novel, premature deindustrialization, and how to reform graduate economics education.” At the link click “Download” and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Egg Unboiling 6 mins – “The familiar change that takes place when we boil an egg – the runny egg white goes rubbery and becomes opaque- occurs because heat causes the proteins that make up the egg white to change their shape – or denature. Now, University of California, Irvine, scientist Greg Weiss has found a way to reverse the process or “unboil” an egg. And this could be a very useful technique for mass-producing proteins that we need to study, or for medical use, as he explained to Chris Smith…” At the link right-click “Download as MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Management  7 mins – “Too much solar and wind power. Really? Is that possible? It’s a good problem to have, because if we’re going to beat climate change, we’re going to need way more low-carbon energy than we get now. But it’s still a problem for Germany. Germany has brought on record amounts of wind and solar generating capacity in the last few years, helping it now meet more than a quarter of its electricity demand with renewable sources, and building toward its goal of 80 percent by 2050. But that also means it’s having to deal with problems that the rest of us who are farther behind can barely even see coming. Like, occasionally, too much intermittent wind and solar power for the electricity grid to handle without a lot of juggling.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Storage 8 mins – “Wolfram Walter is a man obsessed with things electric. …His home is his development lab, and when he’s not wiring up his vehicles, he’s working on the latest iteration of an invention that he thinks will help solve what might be the biggest problem in Germany’s energiewende — its historic transition from fossil fuels and nuclear power to mostly solar and wind power. Just a few years in, the country already gets more than a quarter of its electricity from renewables. But those sources aren’t always available, which limits their effectiveness. Wolfram Walter with his first home solar storage system, which he built when he was unhappy with any of the others he could find on the market. Barely a year after he started testing it out in his own house the Sonnenspeicher/Sun Storage system won an award for innovative renewable product of the year in Germany. …It’s a metal box about the size of a small refrigerator. Hook it up to solar panels on your roof, Walter says, and “you have a power plant working 24 hours day, 365 days a year.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Leader 14 mins – “Dame Stephanie Shirley is the most successful tech entrepreneur you never heard of. In the 1960s, she founded a pioneering all-woman software company in the UK, which was ultimately valued at $3 billion, making millionaires of 70 of her team members. In this frank and often hilarious talk, she explains why she went by “Steve,” how she upended the expectations of the time, and shares some sure-fire ways to identify ambitious women…” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Nations Female Homicides 24 mins – “More women and girls from Canada’s Aboriginal population go missing or are murdered than any other section of society. Joanna Jolly reports from the city of Winnipeg. At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Canada’s Red River Murders – 8 Apr 2015,” right-click “docarchive_20150409-0430b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GABA 25 mins – “This week we kick off the first episode in our “Know Your Neurotransmitters” series.   Jesse is joined by Dr. Matthew Broome – Senior Clinical Research Fellow in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Oxford – to talk about the neurotransmitter GABA.  Dr. Broome explains how GABA (or gamma-Aminobutyric acid for those who love a good tongue-twister) works, where it comes from, and how it affects our brains and bodies. We’ll also learn about the dangers of alcohol withdrawal, how trying to remember things could actually make us more forgetful, and the strange-but-true symptoms of Alice in Wonderland Syndrome.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Medicine Startup 56 mins – “Sean George, president and chief operating officer of genetics-information company Invitae, explains how the rewards of entrepreneurship come from facing the major challenges along the way. In this insightful talk, the serial entrepreneur also underscores the necessity of a team’s focus on mission to see a venture through adversity.” At the link hover over “Podcast,” then right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Target As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Secrecy 52 mins – “Since the dawn of time, leaders have tried to control access to information. Even in the early days of the democratic United States, the founding fathers struggled to define how open a society the new country should be. In this debate, Thomas Jefferson won the day and the American government, by and large, favored openness over secrecy. But Frederick A.O. Schwarz Jr., the author of the new book “Democracy In The Dark” says the U.S. government has shifted far from this founding principle and that we are currently living in a “secrecy era” in which a lack of transparency threatens to undermine democracy. He joins Diane in studio to talk about the culture of secrecy in American government.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Health Care Business 54 mins – “The practice of medicine has been subsumed by the business of medicine. This is great news for healthcare shareholders — and bad news for pretty much everyone else.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hydrogen Power 7 mins – “People have been fantasizing about hydrogen cars forever. It was the car of the future before the Prius and the Tesla were the car of the future. And it still is. …my companions and I are talking about the reason we’re here, Germany’s energiewende, perhaps the most radical energy transition ever undertaken. By the middle of this century, Germany plans to nearly eliminate fossil and nuclear power and get 80% of its electricity from renewable sources, including wind, solar, hydropower and biomass. It’s a response to the dangers of climate change, nuclear accidents and reliance on foreign sources of energy. Already, just a few years in, the country gets more than a quarter of its electricity from renewables. And by many measures, the energiewende has been a remarkable success. But I’m also getting a reality check on it. “We’re still right at the very beginning of a new energy system in Germany,” Weise tells me. And there are huge challenges ahead.”At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Italian Cooking 48 mins – “When Jody Scaravella’s mother and grandmother passed, he missed their cooking. Italian. Old country. The real deal. Nothing watered down or homogenized, but cooking that brimmed with the original flavors and culture of his Italian ancestry. The cooking of a grandmother or, in Italian, the “nonna.” So Scaravella opened his own restaurant, on Staten Island, and put the word out to all of New York that he wanted real Italian grandmothers – nonnas – to come and do the cooking.  And they did. Now they’re with us. This hour On Point:  Italian cooking, nonna-style.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Growth 46 mins – “It’s been a big string of strong months for job creation in the USA. Most everybody expected more of the same when the new jobs numbers for March came out on Friday. A quarter million new jobs created was the confident ballpark. More good news. Instead, the actual number posted by the Labor Department Friday was half that. Just 126,000 new jobs.  That’s a big pothole in the economic recovery story. What’s going on?  A lot depends on this. This hour On Point: the jobs pothole, and what’s really going on with work, wages and the US economy.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kid Camp and Islamic Marriage 55 mins – Two stories, the first about life in a camp for kids with difficult diseases. The second about complications during the arrangement of an Islamic marriage. At the link find the title, “Snap #609 – Eye Of The Beholder,” right-click “Media files npr_398701555.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Large Hadron Collider 51 mins – “Two years ago the team at Cern operating the Large Hadron Collider astounded the world with the discovery of the Higgs boson. Now, after a refit and upgrade almost doubling its power, they have their sights set on capturing dark matter, and making scientific history for a second time. But what will they find? The Guardian’s Ian Sample and Nicola Davis are joined by Mike Lamont, operations group leader at CERN; Jon Butterworth, professor of physics at University College London; and Daniela Bortoletto, professor of physics at the University of Oxford.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lead Ammunition 30 mins – “…We have known for a long time that lead is a neurotoxin that poses health and safety risks, and we have seen over the past several decades corresponding efforts to remove it from toys, paint, gasoline, and other household items. But lead is still quite commonly found in the ammunition used in hunting, and as a result lead enters into the food chain for animals like the highly endangered California Condor. So why hasn’t lead been removed from ammunition?….” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lincoln Assassination 47 mins – “To mark the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, author and historian James Swanson looks back at the event that shocked the nation.” At the link find the title, “James Swanson on the Lincoln Assassination,” right-click “Media files IM_20150412.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martin Luther King, Jr  58 mins -”Cornel West, editor of The Radical King, talked about Martin Luther King, Jr.’s, radical political thinking, a side of the late civil rights leader that the author argues has been diminished and sanitized. Mr. West spoke with Khalil Gibran Muhammad, dire ctor of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.” At the link find the title, “After Words: Cornel West,” right-click “Media files program.392229.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muslim Relations 64 mins – “Former State Department advisor for Afghanistan and Pakistan and best-selling author Nasr delivers a sharp indictment of America’s flawed foreign policy and outlines a new relationship with the Muslim world. Drawing on his in-depth knowledge of the Middle East and firsthand experience in diplomacy, Nasr offers a powerful reassessment of American foreign policy that directs the country away from its failing relationships toward more productive, and less costly, partnerships. Michael Nacht, Ph.D., Professor and former Dean, Goldman School of Public Policy, U.C. Berkeley;  Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Global Strategic Affairs, Obama Administration – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Security Issues  68 mins – “Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times senior writer Schmitt has covered the military, terrorism and national security affairs for two decades. He is currently covering the evolving story of the FBI Investigation that led to the resignation of CIA Director David Petraeus. He co-authored Counterstrike: The Untold Story of America’s Secret Campaign Against Al Qaeda. Since the September 11 attacks, he has made many reporting trips to Iraq and Afghanistan to cover American military operations there. He has also reported on counter-terrorism operations in Pakistan, Mali and Southeast Asia.  As Pentagon correspondent, he covered the Persian Gulf War from Saudi Arabia and Kuwait and also reported from Haiti and Somalia. Domestic reporting included covering Congress, following financial and business news, demographic and immigration issues, commercial aviation and the travel industry. Come hear his inside view on the conflicts and challenges facing the U.S. in the post-9/11 world and the latest on the breaking news of the day.” Eric Schmitt, New York Times National Security Senior Reporter; Stephen Zunes, Professor, Department of Politics/Middle East Studies, University of San Francisco – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nature of Things  70 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy hosts Harvard scholar and prolific author Greenblatt, who has crafted a stunning historical account and a thrilling story of discovery. Nearly 600 years ago, a cannily alert man took a thousand-year-old manuscript off a library shelf and soon realized it was the last surviving manuscript of Lucretius’s epic, On the Nature of Things. This rediscovery unearthed ancient but dangerous ideas: that the universe functioned without the aid of gods, that religious fear was damaging to human life, and that matter was made up of tiny atoms in eternal motion. Those ideas helped inspire the Renaissance and later influenced the scientific thought of Galileo, Freud, Darwin and Einstein, and the writing of Montaigne, Shakespeare and Thomas Jefferson.” Stephen Greenblatt, Author, The Swerve; Professor of English and American Literature, Harvard University. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nature-Deficit Disorder 69 mins – “Louv’s best-selling book Last Child in the Woods sparked a national debate that spawned an international movement to reconnect kids to nature. He coined the term “nature-deficit disorder,” influenced national policy and helped inspire campaigns in more than 80 cities, states and provinces throughout North America. Now, Louv delivers another powerful call to action, this time for adults, offering a new vision of the future, in which our lives are as immersed in nature as they are in technology. Richard Louv, Journalist; Author, The Nature Principle: Human Restoration and the End of Nature-Deficit Disorder” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Navigation on Land 55 mins – “You Are Here…but how do you know exactly where you are? And then how do you know how to get from there…to somewhere else? Dave Redel explores new ideas about why some people are wizards at navigation, while others get completely lost.” At the link find the title, “You Are Here. Feb 23, 2015,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150223_24137.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Negro Justice 62 mins – “The Negro and Equal Justice – Poole, Cecil F., 1914- Clemency secretary to Governor Brown of California, 1959-61; United States Attorney; U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit judge, 1979″ At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neighborhood Revival 17 mins – “Theaster Gates, a potter by training and a social activist by calling, wanted to do something about the sorry state of his neighborhood on the south side of Chicago. So he did, transforming abandoned buildings to create community hubs that connect and inspire those who still live there (and draw in those who don’t). In this passionate talk, Gates describes his efforts to build a “miniature Versailles” in Chicago, and he shares his fervent belief that culture can be a catalyst for social transformation in any city, anywhere.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurology and Behavior 60 mins – “Unlock the deepest mysteries of the human brain with the man Richard Dawkins has dubbed the “Marco Polo of neuroscience.” Ramachandran reveals intriguing and profound insights into the evolution of the human brain tracing back the strange links between neurology and behavior. With innovative approaches to answer age-old questions, Ramachandran takes on exciting and controversial topics including new directions for treating autism. Dr. V.S. Ramachandran, Director, Center for Brain and Cognition, UC San Diego; Author, The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Quest for What Makes Us Human” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Newspaper Future 65 mins – “The average San Franciscan is more likely to get their media from a screen than from a paper, so it’s no surprise that newspapers and magazines are shutting down all around us; the editorial space and the way we consume news has changed. What will editorial look like years from now? Will curated content really be king? Can non-digital publications stay afloat? Leading digital experts will share their experiences, honest thoughts and predictions for the future of publishing.” Clara Jeffery, Editor in Chief, Mother Jones; Mark Johnson, CEO of Zite; Laney Whitcanack, Chief Community Officer, Federated Media; Chris Taylor, Deputy Editor, Mashable; Peter Ha, Managing Editor, TechCrunch – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nietzsche 60 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy explores ideas in Friedrich Nietzsche’s Will to Power, including connecting Nietzsche’s focus on self-overcoming to Abraham Maslow’s theory of self-actualization. Schickel will investigate her favorite Nietzschean insights, followed by a Socratic dialogue with George Hammond and an open discussion with the audience. Denise Schickel, Nietzsche fan.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nora Ephron 65 mins – “Acclaimed director of Julie & Julia and  writer of When Harry Met Sally, Ephron offers her hilarious observations and insights into the past, present and future, sharing everything she hasn’t (yet) forgotten. She reflects on what women really think when they reach a certain age and what she’s learned along the way. Nora Ephron, Film Director, Sleepless in Seattle; Screenwriter; Author, I Feel Bad About My Neck and I Remember Nothing ; In conversation with Jane Ganahl, Author; Co-founder, Litquake” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea 67 mins – “North Korea shocked the world when it recently threatened nuclear war with the U.S. and announced it was severing the armistice signed in 1953 signifying the end of the Korean War. What does this threat mean for the U.S., and particularly for those living on the West Coast? Experts well acquainted with North Korea weigh in on both the political climate and military threat in the short as well as the long term. Please bring your questions. Philip Yun, Executive Director, Ploughshares Fund; Former Senior Member of U.S. Delegation and Negotiator, Peace Talks with North Korea; David Straub, Associate Director, Korean Studies Program, The Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, Stanford University; Former U.S. State Department Officer for Korean Affairs; Dr. Gloria Duffy, President and CEO, Commonwealth Club – Moderator”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Threat  66 mins – “Three distinguished statesmen discuss their vision for international security in these precarious times. Secretaries Shultz and Perry and Senator Nunn will assess the current state of nuclear threats, including Iran’s drive to build a bomb, the North Korean nuclear weapons program, and future prospects for limiting the spread of nuclear materials and eventually eliminating nuclear weapons.” George Shultz, Former U.S Secretary of State under President Reagan; William Perry, Former U.S. Secretary of Defense under President Clinton; Sam Nunn, Former U.S. Senator, Georgia (1972-96), Co-Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Nuclear Threat Initiative; Philip Taubman, Consulting Professor, Stanford University Center for International Security and Cooperation; Former New York Times Washington Bureau Chief; Author, The Partnership: Five Cold Warriors and Their Quest to Ban the Bomb – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nutrition and Longevity 88 mins – “Two new studies supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council have discovered a link between nutrition and increased immunity while aging, giving new meaning to the phrase, “You are what you eat.” Join Dr. Robert J. Marshall as he discusses the scientific connections between nutrients, regeneration and disease prevention.” Robert J. Marshall, Ph.D., CCN, DACBN. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Occupy Movement  64 mins –  “#OWS, pepper spray, book sharing, tents, mic checks and protest signs: Since September, the Occupy movement has staked a claim in every Facebook feed, almost every news program and in literally more than 100 major cities in the United States alone. Using the tools of collective assembly, occupiers have mobilized thousands in their fight for global change and against the richest 1 percent, but so many people are still less than sure what Occupy is all about. What have been the strategies and intent of this people-powered movement? Now that they have the world’s attention, what are they going to do with it? What is driving the movement forward?” Iris Brown, Organizer, Occupy Oakland ; Nadim Haidar, Nonviolent Direct-Action Trainer; Travelling Occupier, Denver, Boulder, Santa Fe, Oakland; George Lakoff, Cognitive Linguist & Professor, UC Berkeley; Jean Quan, Mayor, Oakland; Melissa Griffin, Columnist, San Francisco Examiner; Co-Host, Necessary Conversations- Moderator”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Ecology 62 mins – “Science and policy are not the only tools to improve ocean sustainability – entrepreneurs and investors are coming together to fashion solutions that empower coastal communities and preserve biodiversity. Using the SOCAP model of impact investing, these opportunities will be brought to life through a Ghanaian tech entrepreneur working with tilapia farmers, as well as the investor perspective which provides a framework for evaluating these complex market-based approaches to sustainability. Alloysius Attah, Founder and CEO, Farmerline; Kevin Jones, Founder, Good Capital; Convener, SOCAP; Monica Jain, Founder, Fish 2.0; Executive Director, Manta Consulting; Jeff Leifer, CEO, Circadian Media Lab – Moderator”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oklahoma Earthquakes 47 mins – “Until 2008, the state of Oklahoma averaged one or two earthquakes magnitude 3.0 or greater a year. Then the lid blew off those numbers.  Rising year by year. To 20. Then 42. Then hundreds. Last year, Oklahoma had 585 earthquakes that size. This year, it’s on track for more than 700. Walls shake. Bricks fall. It’s nerve-wracking. And, say experts, it’s all about how the state’s energy companies go after oil and gas. And huge volumes of water being pumped deep in the earth. Now the earth is moving. This hour On Point: the earthquakes of Oklahoma.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids 32 mins – “In episode #32, Dr. Michael Lewis, President of the Brain Health Education and Research Institute, joins us to discuss the positive impacts that Omega-3 fatty acids can have on the health and maintenance of the human brain… Dr. Lewis has several years of experience developing programs for the military involving the use of omega-3 fatty acids to treat traumatic brain injury.  He has been a pioneer in the clinical use of omega-3 fatty acids for the prevention, acute treatment, and rehabilitation of brain issues from physical to psychological trauma, including concussions, stroke, PTSD, and more. His insights  have impacted thousands of lives, and he is passionate about continuing to find improved solutions to the age-old problem of brain injury.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opportunity Makers  10 mins – “We all want to use our talents to create something meaningful with our lives. But how to get started? (And … what if you’re shy?) Writer Kare Anderson shares her own story of chronic shyness, and how she opened up her world by helping other people use their own talents and passions.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oxytocin  22 mins – “As part of our Science and the Seven Deadly Sins series, Dr. Paul Zak discusses his work studying the relation of hormones to human behavior. Specifically, his research focuses on oxytocin’s role in regulating generosity and greed.” At the link find the title, “Greed: Hormones and Moral Behavior, Jul 2013,” right-click “Media files greed.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pavlov 60 mins – “This week, we’re learning about the life and work of a groundbreaking physiologist whose work on learning and instinct is familiar worldwide, and almost universally misunderstood. We’ll spend the hour with Daniel Todes, Ph.D, Professor of History of Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University, discussing his book “Ivan Pavlov: A Russian Life in Science.’” At the link find the title, “#307 Pavlov,” right-click “Media files Science for the People 307 Ivan_Pavlov.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peripheral Artery Disease 65 mins – “Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) is a condition that results from blockage of arteries in the extremities, affecting between 8 and 12 million Americans and growing. Patients with PAD have 3 times the risk of a heart attack or stroke. Risk factors include hypertension, diabetes, smoking, age and menopause – 25 percent of women between the ages of 55 and 74 may have PAD and the rate is even higher for men. Many PAD sufferers have severe disabilities, with potential need for amputation. This disease is under-diagnosed and undertreated, and a concerted effort is needed to educate the public and physicians, and to accelerate research to develop new treatments. Michael S. Conte, M.D., Professor and Chief, Division of Vascular Surgery, UCSF

Plant Directed Behavior 18 mins – “What if human consciousness isn’t the end-all and be-all of Darwinism? What if we are all just pawns in corn’s clever strategy game to rule the Earth? Author Michael Pollan asks us to see the world from a plant’s-eye view.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plato On Knowledge 60 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy delves deep into Plato’s dialogue on knowledge. Mink will focus on the Platonic ideas that underlie the search for truth in a jury trial, which led to the development of the common law on hearsay. Mink’s analysis will be followed by a Socratic dialogue with Hammond and an open discussion with the audience.James Mink, Litigation Attorney; Classics Aficionado” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Play Is Important  55 mins – “Play: How It Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination and Invigorates the Soul – Have you played today? Brown explores the power and importance of play, drawing from his own clinical research, as well as the latest developments in neuroscience, social science and behavioral studies. Looking at the science of play, Brown expands on it and brings it into a broader context, maintaining that it ignites the tools one needs to succeed, whether on the playground or in the boardroom. Stuart Brown, M.D., Founder, the National Institute for Play, Co-author, Play: How it Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul (with Christopher Vaughan)” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PMS Controversy 15 mins – “Everybody knows that most women go a little crazy right before they get their period, that their reproductive hormones cause their emotions to fluctuate wildly. Except: There’s very little scientific consensus about premenstrual syndrome. Says psychologist Robyn Stein DeLuca, science doesn’t agree on the definition, cause, treatment or even existence of PMS. She explores what we know and don’t know about it — and why the popular myth has persisted.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power Choice 64 mins – “Rising interest in clean power is presenting electric monopolies with competition for the first time. Marin Clean Energy now gives consumers an alternative to PG&E, and San Francisco and Sonoma are preparing their own programs to offer consumers new options for powering their homes. Monterey and Santa Cruz counties are considering jumping on the consumer choice bandwagon, which is growing nationally. In San Francisco, Shell Oil won the contract to deliver electricity generated from 100 percent renewable energy. But city supervisors are worried that the customer base is lacking. Opponents such as the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers claim that higher rates would burden the community and point out that such local efforts are not required to generate new clean energy. How could community choice change the shape of electricity supply in San Francisco and other communities? Join us for a discussion of disruption, innovation and consumer choice. Kim Malcolm, Director, CleanPowerSF; Shawn Marshall, Mill Valley Council Member; Executive Director, Local Energy Aggregation Network; Marcie Milner, Senior Regulatory Manager, Shell Energy North America; Hunter Stern, Business Manager, Brotherhood of Electrical Workers” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Predator Nation 62 mins – “Could the global economic meltdown of the last few years have been prevented? Ferguson believes the crisis was no accident. After Inside Job won the 2011 Academy Award for Best Documentary Film, Ferguson started his acceptance speech by charging that there was a lack of accountability of the finance industry and Wall Street, pointing out that three years after the horrific crisis started not a single financial executive had gone to jail. Predator Nation continues to examine the important issues raised in Inside Job, arguing that an out-of-control finance industry took advantage of a deregulated atmosphere and purposely got rich at the expense of others. Through his extensive interviews with financial insiders and government officials, Ferguson exposes the “corrupted networks” that caused the economic collapse and offers a plan of action to help our country get back on track. Charles Ferguson, 2011 Academy Award Winning Documentary Filmmaker, Inside Job; Author, Predator Nation; Kirk O. Hanson, Director, Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University and Commonwealth Club Silicon Valley Advisory Council Member – Moderator insiders and government officials, Ferguson exposes the “corrupted networks” that caused the economic collapse and offers a plan of action to help our country get back on track. Charles Ferguson, 2011 Academy Award Winning Documentary Filmmaker, Inside Job; Author, Predator Nation”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Entrepreneur  16 mins – “Frederick Hutson is an entrepreneur whose biggest early venture landed him in prison for nearly five years—distributing marijuana through UPS and FedEx. While in prison, he realized that a lot of the problems of everyday prison life could use a business solution. And then, he got out. Today on the show, a businessman goes to prison, and decides he is going to disrupt the biggest captive market in America.” At the link find the title, “#610: The Prisoner’s Solution, Mar 2015,” right-click “Media files npr_392889455.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productivity 49 mins – “Laura Roeder – Social media is for real. To be honest, I wasn’t a believer. I think social media often times just adds to the noise. But after speaking with our guest this week, I realized that what I think doesn’t really matter. Social media is here and it’s a necessity for any business these days. Even more importantly is the specific way you interact on social media, what you share, how you share it, and what your strategy is. Love it or hate it, it’s time to step up your social media game. This week we interview entrepreneur and social media expert, Laura Roeder.” At the link find the title, “Episode 182 – Laura Roeder – Social Media is for Real,” right-click “Media files Episode_182_Laura_Roeder.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychopath Identification 68 mins – “What Is a Psychopath? – Ponder this chilling fact: Chances are, you’ve already met at least one psychopath. Psychopathy is a diagnostic term used to classify men and women who, due to an ingrained antisocial lifestyle, display prominent interpersonal problems and a marked lack of empathy and conscience, pose a unique danger to society. They’re not all in prisons, either. The great majority live in our communities. Murthy will explain how psychopaths can be diagnostically identified and how they are biologically different from the rest of us. Hari Murthy, Psychological Assessment Services Coordinator, San Quentin State Prison” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Broadcasting Future 67 mins – “Come meet the leaders of PBS and KQED. Ask them their plans for future programming and let them know your thoughts. Kerger is president and CEO of PBS, the nation’s largest non-commercial media organization, with more than 350 member stations throughout the country. Boland oversees KQED Public Media, including KQED Television – one of the nation’s most-watched public television stations during primetime, with more than 1.5 million households viewing per month – as well as KQED Radio, the most-listened-to public radio station in the country, reaching more than 745,000 listeners each week.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Shaming 59 mins – “Public shaming is back. Once done in town squares, the subjects of our ridicule locked in pillories and unable to avoid the rotten fruit and insults we hurled at them, now the shaming takes place on the internet. No longer our neighbors, the new targets are strangers and celebrities, and instead of courts meting out justice, it is the aggregate outrage of well-meaning people on Twitter just like you. Listen as author Jon Ronson describes his new book, “So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed,” in which he spends time with people who have had their lives ruined by modern, web-based public shamings in an attempt to reveal to each of us what can happen when, alone but together, we obliterate people for unpopular opinions, off-color jokes, offensive language, and professional faux pas.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Speaking 19 mins – “Public speaking has moved out of the limelight in recent years as online marketing continues to gain prominence in the industry. The Conversation Agent, Valeria Maltoni, talks about the value of public speaking, how she uses public speaking to establish herself as an authority in her industry, and how you can get over your stage jitters and do it, too. Connect with Valeria and Alex on Twitter @ConversationAge and @TechAlly, respectively.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rachel Maddow  68 mins –  “Rhodes Scholar, AIDS activist, civics geek, “blindly partisan” and even the “grand doyenne of liberal demagoguery” according to Gawker – Rachel Maddow has been called many things over the years, but until now, “author” has not been one of them. This year the sassy and smart-as-a-whip host of MSNBC’s politico program, The Rachel Maddow Show, joins the literary fold and takes on what she believes to be the debate between civilian life and the war machine in her new book, Drift. Join us for an organ intro, popcorn munchies, and an exclusive interview with Rachel Maddow.” Rachel Maddow, Host, The Rachel Maddow Show; Author, Drift in Conversation with Daniel Handler, aka Lemony Snicket, Author; Screenwriter; Accordionist”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Residential Solar 52 mins – “Residential solar is surging in the U.S. The price of the average solar panel is down more than 60 percent in the past five years, and more and more solar customers are earning credit for the extra energy they produce for the grid. But that practice – known as “net metering” – has some utilities worried about the future. In a number of states, utilities are fighting to cut back on net metering, as concerns grow about the cost of maintaining the grid and adapting to the changing energy picture. For this month’s Environmental Outlook, we look at what the surge in solar could mean for consumers…and for the future of the electric grid.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Right to Work Laws 51 mins – “Over the weekend, a few thousand union members gathered outside the statehouse in Wisconsin. They were there to voice their opposition to so called right-to-work legislation. If signed into law, which is expected, Wisconsin would become the 25th state with right-to-work laws on the books. These laws ban workers from having to pay union dues. Organized labor leaders say it’s another blow to their diminishing numbers. Supporters say the laws attract business and are good for economic development. Guest host Tom Gjelten and our guests discuss right-to-work laws and the future of unions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Rosalyn Carter 71 mins – “Rosalynn Carter: Ending the Mental Health Crisis – Former First Lady Carter is an icon and an advocate for mental health, early childhood immunization, human rights and conflict resolution through her work at The Carter Center in Atlanta. Carter will discuss her decades working in the mental health field. Following the program, she will also sign copies of her new book, Within Our Reach: Ending the Mental Health Crisis.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rwanda IT  20 mins – “As part of the BBC’s Richer World season, Alan Kasujja travels to three countries in his native east Africa to meet young Africans determined to build a better future. In the second programme, Alan travels to Rwanda, a country notorious for the genocide that took place there in 1994. Yet a bright new future beckons for some of its youth, as young female schoolteacher Jessie trains them in the high technology that promises to transform the nation.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: My Africa – Rwanda 17 Feb 15,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150217-0300b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salmon Future 64 mins – “The fight to restore salmon runs in the Pacific Northwest involves billions of dollars in public funds and politicking all the way up to the White House. This twisted story is captured in a new documentary airing on PBS this spring. Also this spring, a federal judge is expected to hand down a decision that will shape federal salmon policy in the Columbia River Basin. What impact will that decision have on the area’s ecosystems and economies? Can any lessons be applied to the fierce confrontations between fisherman, farmers and environmentalists in California?  Phil Isenberg, Chair, Delta Vision Task Force
James Norton, Filmmaker,  Salmon: Running the Gauntlet; Jonathan Rosenfield, Ph.D., Conservation Biologist, The Bay Institute

Salmon in the Trees 62 mins – “Most of us will never visit the vast wilderness of Alaska, so the phrase “Salmon in the trees” may seem a bit whimsical.  But in the Tongass rainforest, there really are salmon in the trees. Come to our Earth Day event to meet the award-winning conservation photographer Gulick, see her astounding photos, and hear what’s it’s like to live for months in the wilderness hoping to have a near-bear encounter.Amy Gulick, Conservation Photographer; Author”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Samurai Spirit 53 mins – “The Japanese samurai were a class of warriors who dominated Japan’s military, political and social culture for almost a thousand years. Ferocious warriors, they have become known as much for their “spirituality” as for their lethal swordsmanship. Hall, author of the Encyclopedia of Japanese Martial Arts, will discuss the training methods used by the samurai, which taught both martial skills and spiritual/psychological armoring. These methods, evolved over hundreds of years, have been preserved in a number of classical martial arts schools in Japan today. Join us for a fascinating look at martial arts and the spirit of the samurai. David A. Hall, Ph.D., Author; Professor; Ordained Buddhist Priest”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

San Antonio Mayor 67 mins – “San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro electrified the Charlotte audience during his keynote speech at the 2012 Democratic National Convention, reminding the audience that “The American dream is not a sprint, or even a marathon, but a relay!” Castro’s rise began in San Antonio, encouraged and inspired by his Mexican-American single mother, a political activist. Mayor Castro has prioritized creating economic and educational opportunities for his constituents, because he knows it can change the course of your life. Indeed, both Mayor Castro and his twin brother, Texas Congressman Joaquin Castro, went to Stanford University and Harvard Law School. Come hear from the man many say is a rising star of the Democratic Party.”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sandra Day O’Connor 66 mins – “In a rare public appearance, Justice O’Connor will discuss the need for a better-informed citizenry as well as her life, career, and views on the role of the U.S. Supreme Court. O’Connor, the first woman appointed to the Supreme Court, strongly believes that America suffers from a lack of civic education, and that is hurting Americans’ capacity to solve 21st century challenges. To revitalize civic education, she founded iCivics, which uses innovative methods such as video games to engage young people in learning about government and civic participation. Since 2009, iCivics has reached over 1.5 million young people and sparked a national discussion about this important cornerstone of our democratic heritage.” Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, Former Justice, U.S. Supreme Court in conversation with Dr. Mary Bitterman, President, Bernard Osher Foundation; Past Chair, Commonwealth Club’s Board of Governors. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Arabia 67 mins – “House has spent the last 30 years writing about Saudi Arabia — as diplomatic correspondent, foreign editor, and then publisher of The Wall Street Journal. Through observation, anecdote, extensive interviews and analysis she navigates the maze in which Saudi citizens find themselves trapped and reveals the mysterious nation that is the world’s largest exporter of oil, critical to global stability, and a source of Islamist terrorists. Join us for an in-depth examination of what all this portends for Saudi Arabia’s future, and for our own. Karen Elliott House, Author, On Saudi Arabia: Its People, Past, Religion, Fault Lines – and Future; Robert Rosenthal, Executive Director, Center for Investigative Reporting – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Arabia History 56 mins – “Chan will give a presentation about the fascinating exhibit, “Roads of Arabia: Archeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia”, which is at the Asian Art Museum until January 18. The San Francisco Chronicle described the exhibit as a “mesmerizing and astonishing journey to the Arabian Peninsula.” Some of the more ancient objects were discovered as recently as 40 years ago.” Dany Chan, Assistant Curator for Exhibition Projects, Asian Art Museum; Philippa Kelly, Educator, Author, Dramaturg At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Talk 61 mins – “The scientific literature is one of humanity’s greatest creations – a complete record of the ideas, experiments and discoveries of generations of researchers across the globe. While most of this corpus is now online, it remains as inaccessible to the public as it was centuries ago – with the physical limitations of print journals replaced by expensive publisher pay walls. Eisen, a leader in the movement to reinvent scientific communication, will discuss the origins of this absurd system, why it still exists, how the “open access” movement he helped to launch is finally bringing it to an end.Michael B. Eisen, Ph.D; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Associate Professor, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley; Co-founder, Public Library of Science” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seed Libraries 47 mins – “We all know what a library is. But do you know seed libraries? Not the corporate seed catalogs that plenty of people have already been scouring this season, to get their gardens going. But a seed library, where ordinary citizens – gardeners – check seeds in and out. Check them out when it’s planting time. Bring seeds back when you’ve harvested. To keep and celebrate the local, the regional, in veggies and more. To keep and celebrate diversity – bio-diversity – at a time when Big Food pushes toward monocultures. This hour On Point: the populist push in local seed libraries, to save the world.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Publishing P1 74 mins – “Program 1 – Options, Directions and Resources – Book publishing is undergoing a sea change. Come and participate in our dynamic and interactive three-part series covering all aspects of self-publishing, taught by front-line experts who have done it themselves Ð and succeeded. Attend one or all sessions of these in-depth seminars. The other events occur on April 12 and April 19. What does it take to publish a book, and how do you choose which route to follow? Discover your options – from traditional to cooperative to true self-publishing – with industry experts who’ve done it themselves. Get a clear direction and insider tips on the variety of strategies, resources and tools available. Lisa Alpine, Publisher, Good to Go Media; Co-author, Self-Publishing Boot Camp Workbook; Peter Beren, Literary Agent; Publishing Consultant; Author, The Writer’s Legal Companion; Carla King, Publisher, Good to Go Media;  Social Media Consultant; Author, Miss Adventuring Series.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Publishing P3 79 mins – “Book publishing is undergoing a sea change. Come and participate in our dynamic and interactive three-part series covering all aspects of self-publishing, taught by front-line experts who have done it themselves Ð and succeeded. Attend one or all sessions of these in-depth seminars. The other events occur on April 6 and April 12. Bookstores are closing; newspaper book reviews are almost gone; and online options can be overwhelming. What’s an author or publisher to do? Join the discussion with successful authors, who will share their stories of what has worked for them – from building relationships with independent bookstore buyers and distributors to using technology and social media in new ways; from digging into niche markets to selling directly to their fan base. Scott James, Columnist, The New York Times; Author (aka Kemble Scott), SoMa, The Sower; Elizabeth Block, Author, A Gesture Through Time; Recipient, the Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fiction Fellowship; Teresa LeYung Ryan, Author, Love Made of Heart, Build Your Name, Beat the Game: Be Happily Publishedn.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Publishing P2 76 mins – “Self-Publishing, Part Two: The Nuts + Bolts of Making Books – Book publishing is undergoing a sea change. Come and participate in our dynamic and interactive three-part series covering all aspects of self-publishing, taught by front-line experts who have done it themselves Ð and succeeded. Attend one or all sessions of these in-depth seminars. The other events occur on April 6 and April 19. What goes into making a book truly a book? What are the essentials of editing and page layout – and how can they make or break you? Learn from an insider panel of experts about the critical design and production of your book and the ins and outs of available formats, from traditional to e-books and apps. Find out how typesetting can be sexy, and how to create covers that will sell. Lee Foster, Owner, Foster Travel Publishing; Author, The Photographer’s Guide to San Francisco ; Joel Friedlander, Proprietor, Marin Bookworks; Blogger, TheBookDesigner.com; V. Vale, Publisher, RE/Search Publications; Founder, Search and Destroy.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shari’ah Law 74 mins – “What Is Shari’ah and Shari’ah law  in Islam? – Join Ali-Karamali, an attorney with a graduate degree in Islamic law and author of The Muslim Next Door: The Qur’an, the Media, and that Veil Thing, as she demystifies commonly used Islamic terms like “shari’ah” and “shari’ah law” and discusses how the rules of Islam were developed and have been implemented, with examples regarding women, finance and criminal law. Sumbul Ali-Karamali, Author, The Muslim Next Door” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharing Economy 66 mins – “With a slow economy consumers are looking for ways to spend less and waste less. New technologies and innovative business models are changing the way people consume and invest.  Yerdle is opening up the overstuffed garages of old trumpets, unused camping tents, and rarely used power tools to the wider community. Airbnb is making spare bedrooms and empty apartments available to thrifty travelers and homeowners looking to make a profit. Solar Mosaic is taking solar investment to the people to fund community solar projects around the country. Is crowd-funding the future of investment? Does sharing really cut down on waste? How is the sharing economy forcing slow moving tax and regulation models to change with the times? Andy Ruben, Co-founder, Yerdle; Bill Parish, President and Co-founder, Solar Mosaic; Lisa Gansky, Author, The Mesh: Why the Future of Business is Sharing” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stockmarket Future 58 mins – “Investors, economists, and quantitative finance experts discuss how technological innovations have hastened the growth of the markets.” At the link find the title, “Future of the Stockmarket, 2008,” right-click “Media files stockmarket.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Target Date Funds 28 mins – “This podcast was made to accompany the Marketwatch article on combining target date funds with small cap value. A major problem with target date funds (TDFs) is they don’t give enough exposure to the small cap or value asset classes. By simply adding a second position in a small cap value fund or ETF, most of the limitations of TDFs can be overcome. Paul compares the risk and expected additional return of the two-fund portfolio, as well as making sure you are aware of the nature of small cap value as an asset class. Paul suggests you have a copy of  The Four Fund Solution Table  to reference with this podcast.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trade and Commerce 49 mins – “‎This week on Innovation Hub, we’re ready for some tradeoffs. We’ve got author William Bernstein explaining how trade has shaped our daily lives, from camels to the compass to that cute new pair of shoes. Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers talks about what the government is trading away when it doesn’t fund science. Writer Andrew Winston sees if profit-driven companies might give something up in return for a healthier environment. Finally, engineering professor Anne Goodchild looks at the trade-offs of our new delivery economy.” At the link find the title, “4.18.15 Making Trades,” right-click “0418-FullShowWEBMIX.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vanguard Funds 39 mins – “Paul focuses on 10 important advantages that set Vanguard apart from it’s competition. The discussion includes the obvious quantifiable differences, as well as the qualifiable aspects that add to the likelihood of investors reaching their financial goals. Paul adds a huge bonus advantage he thinks will be a surprise to most investors.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Game Gender 17 mins – “Maddie Messer is 12, and she loves a good video game. One of her favorites is called Temple Run. In fact, it’s one of the most successful games out there. Temple Run is free to play—if you play as the default character, Guy Dangerous. But playing as a girl character can cost extra. Maddie found out this was true for a lot of games, and she didn’t think that was very fair. Today on the show: a 12-year-old girl takes on the entire video game industry.” At the link find the title, “#615: A 12-Year-Old Girl Takes On The Video Game Industry,” right-click “Media files npr_397387479.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Volcanoes 25 mins – “Island on Fire (04:45): In 1783, a crack opened up in the Earth, began to spew out lava and ash and poisonous gases, and didn’t stop for eight months. The volcano was Laki, one of many volcanoes in Iceland, and the effects of the eruption went global. Laki’s story is one of geology, chemistry, atmospheric science,…” At the link find the title, “Island On Fire: The Story of Laki,” right-click “Media files HowOnEarth-2015-03-31e.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 35+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

 

 

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Media Mining Digest 179 – Apr 17, 2015: 3D Roundtable, Australian Afghani Camelmen, Billie Holiday, Biomimicry, Book Trends, Brain Plasticity, Cancer Film, Cassava in Columbia, Chemical Pollutants, Children and Nature, China’s Hukou Reform, Drones for Conservation, Duxford War Museum, Economics Q and A, Environmentalist Hawken, Female Genital Mutilation, Financial Crisis Causes, Forensic Linguistics, Fridgenomics, Healthcare Randomized Evaluations, Heart Diet, Hispanics in America, Hollywood Blacklist, HPV Vaccine, Human Trafficking, Humor Helps, Ig Noble Awards, Immigration in America, India, Inside Job, Intelligence Testing, Internet Worm, Intuition Pumps, Islamic Religious Education, Islamic Women, Israel and Palestine, Japanese Internment, Job Search Skills, Kurds, Language Learning Quickly, Large Cap Value Funds, Larry Wilmore, Latin American Upgrade, Learning Tactics, Lee Kuan Yew, Less Traveled Road, Lethal Injections, Liberal Arts Education, Liberia Upswing, London Undocumented, Loneliness Hazard, Looted Antiquities, Louis Gossett Jr, Makers, Marijuana Future, Mark Twain On Truth, Martian Book, Math Education, Medicare Primer, Mental Enhancement, Merchants of Doubt, Metabolic Wellness, Mexico, Microchip Future, Mobile Device Dark Side, Morocco Evolution, Ms Pat, News Trends, Oil Price Impact, Oil Prices and Food, Parasitism Case Study, Permaculture, Podcasting Discussion, Premed Case Study, Prison Gangs, Public Shaming, Ravensbruck Camp, REITs, Ritalin, Shadow Banking System, Space Exploration, Supplements Quality, Trans Pacific Partnership, Violence Technology, Water History – America, Wealth Creation, Wondrous Women, Yellowstone Job

The following audio files come from a larger group of 248 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 97 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

3D Roundtable 96 mins – Mostly surveying related: photogrammetry, lidar. Autodesk, UAV use and reference to Catch 3d software that turns 2D photo series into 3D images. At the link find the title, “Taking 3D to the Next Level Roundtable Podcast,” right-click “Media files 2015-04-02, taking 3d to the next level septembers roundtable podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Afghani Camelmen 27 mins – “Dawood Azami focuses on the life and legacy of the Afghan cameleers, who first arrived in Australia in the 1860s. They played a crucial role in the development of railway lines, overland Telegraph line and provided supplies to remote mission stations and farms. They became part of the pioneering legend of inland Australia by opening up the Australian deserts, exploring it and enabling the early white settlers to survive.” That’s Part 1. In part two Dawood Azami talks to some of the descendants of the thousands of Afghan pioneers in Australia, Afghanistan and Pakistan, who, with their camels, first arrived in Australia in the 1860s and criss-crossed the harsh interior of Australia for several decades. He explores the adventurist nature and the entrepreneurial spirit of the Afghans and discusses their ancient and unwritten code of life called – Pashtoonwali. “At the link find the titles, “DocArchive: Australia’s Afghan Cameleers – Part One,” (and Part Two) right-click “Media files docarchive_20150331-0300a.mp3” for Part One and “Media files docarchive_20150407-0232a.mp3” for Part Two, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Billie Holiday 49 mins – “When Billie Holiday sang, it was like a soul opening up. Cautiously, enigmatically, powerfully. Her personal story – burnished and mythologized – had poverty and prostitution, racism, addiction, abuse, heartache. But in her music – says my guest today, jazz musician and scholar John Szwed – Billie Holiday was no victim.  She was a self-taught artist bringing a unique intimacy and emotion to song.  Breaking through to new terrain. This hour On Point: a meditation on the great Billie Holiday.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biomimicry 22 mins – “Today’s special edition of How on Earth, brought to you in conjunction with this week’s Conference on World Affairs is a conversation on Biomimicy as a new lens to view science and technology with Margo Farnsworth. Margo has coached two Top Twelve graduate teams for the International Student Biomimicry Challenge and currently serves as a Biomimicry Institute education fellow. She is also on the board of both the Missouri Prairie Foundation and South Carolina’s Experience Green. She has worked as a park ranger, science teacher, and mammalogist. With degrees in science education and parks administration, her professional accomplishments include research in environmental education, qualitative mammal studies, and involvement in numerous local and state environmental boards and committees. Farnsworth has written pieces for the Center for Humans and Nature as well as Treehugger, and has two biomimicry book projects pending.  She joins us live for an in-depth talk about how Biomimicry has the potential for changing scientific culture.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Trends 12 mins “…This week, the book world began poring over the findings, covering everything from shares of print and digital sales, to preferences for digital platforms. The two most intriguing findings confirm suspicions that the drive to digital is slowing. “First, the e-books share of new book sales increased only slightly in 2014 over 2013” reports Andrew Albanese, Publishers Weekly senior writer.  “And the share of sales through online retailers and bookstore chains actually dipped.” Recently, publishing pundits have trumpeted that the death of print is greatly exaggerated. Perhaps so, says Albanese, but the prognosis is mixed. “Print accounted for 70% of new book spending in 2014, and that is in fact a drop of seven percentage points from 2013. Reports that print sales are in fact on the rise are generally due only to authors named John Green, or Veronica Roth. Format-wise, the survey shows that the biggest print declines came in trade paperback and hardcover, while mass market paperbacks actually had a slight increase in their share of spending….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Plasticity 58 mins – “Norman Doidge, M.D., is a psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, researcher, author, essayist and poet. He is on faculty at the University of Toronto’s Department of Psychiatry, and Research Faculty at Columbia University’s Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research, in New York. On the show this week we talk to Doidge about neuroplasticity—once you reach adulthood, is your brain in a kind of fixed state, or does it keep changing? And can you do things to make it change?” At the link find the title, “80 Norman Doidge – How Plastic Is Your Brain?” right-click “Media files “19030762-inquiringminds-80 norman-doidge how-plastic-is-your-brain.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Film 52 mins – “Cancer was first mentioned in an ancient Egyptian scroll and through the modern era, its history is marked by the epic battles we’ve waged against it. Siddhartha Mukherjee is a cancer physician, and in trying to understand what his patients must endure, he turned a historical and literary eye on cancer. His Pulitzer-prize winning book is now a PBS documentary premiering Monday. So, we’re rebroadcasting our conversation with Mukherjee about the disease he calls “The Emperor of All Maladies.’” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer P1 52 mins -“For years, cancer was a shameful secret. Now, a huge number of us are “living cancer” – whether we’re being treated ourselves, or helping a family member or friend. Over the last 2,500 years, cancer has shifted from a disease in the shadows to one at the center of scientific research and public discussion. In the first of two special episodes, On the Media dives deep into the way we talk about cancer: in the news, in the hospital, and in our private lives.” At the link find the title, “The Cancer Show Part One,” right-click “Ply Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Part Two: “Today, the impact of cancer is not limited to patients and loved ones, not confined to hospital wards and research labs. It’s a powerful symbol appropriated by Hollywood, the news media, and every realm of expression to signify what we most fear. In the second hour of “The Cancer Show,” the stories we tell about cancer: on stage, on the big screen, and online.” Click the link, find “The Cancer Show Part Two,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cassava in Columbia 7 mins – “ASM traveled to Colombia to speak with and film the researchers behind an innovative biotechnology project that is producing exciting results. The international Swiss – Colombian collaborative research team from the University of Lausanne – Switzerland, the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, and the Universidad de la Salle – Utopia campus has been working to create and test novel strains of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to improve cassava production. AMF forms symbiotic relationships with the majority of the world’s plant species, including cassava and other major food security crops. By colonizing internal structures within the plant and extending its root system, AMF transports nutrients such as phosphate to the plants from inaccessible areas and sources in the soil. In exchange, the plant provides carbon to AMF species that have colonized the plant.” At the link you can watch, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in the blog archive.

Chemical Pollutants 29 mins – “Plastics will play as large a role in peace as they do in war. The 20th century gave rise to the chemical industry. It has revolutionised our world and transformed the way we live. After the Second World War, there was a sudden burst of activity in the chemicals industry and the environment has become flooded with new chemicals. Over 80,000 chemicals are used in everyday products. We handle them, they’re in our water, our food and in the air we breathe. It’s impossible to escape them. But now there’s growing concern that these chemicals are not safe. There’s no requirement to show that these chemicals are actually safe before people are exposed to them….: At the link find the title, “Catalyst – Episode 09,” right-click “Media files catalyst_15_16_09.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Children and Nature 52 mins – “Scott Sampson grew up outdoors: family camping trips … exploring the forest near his home. He says it’s part of the reason he’s a paleontologist and science educator today. Sampson cites studies that show how nature can combat obesity, reduce bullying, and boost grades for kids. So, here’s the question at the heart of his new book: why are American children staring at screens and not getting out into nature? Wednesday Scott Sampson joins Doug to talk about How to Raise a Wild Child.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China’s Hukou Reform 134 mins – “…At the March meeting of the National People’s Congress, Premier Li Keqiang announced that controls over China’s household registration system—or hukou—will be relaxed to ensure that migrant workers can become urban citizens. To facilitate this, he hopes to enhance the carrying capacities of smaller cities and counties while controlling the population sizes of mega cities. The success of these urbanization efforts will not only determine whether China can maintain robust economic growth, but also will have strong implications for sociopolitical stability and environmental sustainability.” At the link right-click “China’s urbanization and hukou reform” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drones for Conservation 27 mins – “Drones are being used to track rhino poachers in South Africa; Exploring the use of drones for conservation; What happened when ants were sent to the International Space Station?” At the link find the title, “SciA: Drones for conservation,” right-click “Media files scia_20150402-2030a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Duxford War Museum 36 mins – “Join me, Pilot Pip, for this special Bonus Easter episode as I talk about some of the great aircraft at the Imperial War Museum Duxford, UK.  No Squawks, no topic of the week, no news, just awesome aircraft from one of Europe’s biggest aviation museum.” At the link right-click “  Direct download: duxforda.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics Q and A 81 mins – “Peter Thiel and Tyler Cowen, both New York Times bestselling authors, are among today’s top global thought leaders and influential innovators. Listen as these two engage in a serious dialogue on the ideas and policies that will shape the future of innovation and progress in the coming years and decades. Peter Thiel is among the most impressive innovators of the past two decades. As co-founder of Paypal and seed-funder for Facebook, Thiel has been instrumental in the conception and growth of some of today’s most entrepreneurial and innovative companies. In his latest best-selling book, Zero to One, Thiel explains how to build a better future by capitalizing on innovation. A staunch optimist, he maintains that progress can be achieved anywhere the human mind is able to think creatively. Thiel describes how entrepreneurial thinking leads to innovation, which builds something new and moves the mark from zero to one. Note: Due to a technical malfunction, the audio quality briefly drops from 11:15 – 13:30.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmentalist Hawken 30 mins – “Paul Hawken on corporate social responsibility and the evolution of the open-source and sharing economy movements.” At the link find the title, “Paul Hawken: Cultivating Progress,” right-click “Media files SC-2015-03-31.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Genital Mutilation 27 mins – “The story of a Tanzanian safe house, a place where girls find refuge from female genital mutilation – a bloody and life-threatening rite of passage.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Escaping Tanzania’s ‘cutting season’ – 2 Apr 2015,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150402-0245b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Crisis Causes 59 mins – “Peter Wallison, a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, talks about his book [Hidden in Plain Sight], in which he argues that government housing policies caused the 2008 financial crisis.” At the link find the title, “After Words: Peter Wallison,” right-click “Media files program.388359.MP3-STD.mp” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Linguistics 51 mins – “Emails, texts and tweets may be changing how we solve crimes: Word choice, spelling and punctuation can all serve as virtual fingerprints. A look at how technology is changing criminal linguistic evidence in court.” At the link find the title, “How Technology Is Changing Criminal Linguistic Evidence In Court, right-click “Media files r2150401.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fridgenomics 50 mins – “What’s in your fridge? That’s the question former BBC Africa Service editor Elizabeth Ohene has been asking as she opens fridge doors on three continents to find out how the fridge has changed – and continues to change – millions of lives around the world.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Fridgeonomics 29 Mar 2015,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150329-2115a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Healthcare Randomized Evaluations 42 mins – “A lot of the conventional wisdom in medicine is nothing more than hunch or wishful thinking. A new breed of data detectives is hoping to change that….As we’ve regularly noted in the past, economists and other academic researchers have increasingly been using RCTs to study all sorts of things, including how to best fight poverty. At the forefront of this movement is J-PAL, or the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, at MIT. The award-winning economist Esther Duflo, one of J-PAL’s founders, has helped run many RCTs in India, Kenya, and elsewhere, trying to learn how best to prevent teen pregnancy and anemia, and drunk driving; and how to better incentivize nurses, small-business growth, and modern farming techniques.” At the link find the title, “How Do We Know What Really Works in Healthcare?,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Diet 81 mins – “Heart attacks are the number-one killer in the United States, but that doesn’t have to be true. The latest research shows that diet is strongly linked to heart attacks. Steve Blake suggests that there are plenty of fun, healthy foods that you can add to your diet to reduce your risk of a heart attack. He’ll also discuss how vitamin D deficiency is linked to heart attachs, and how certain oils can reduce risk and certain fats can increase risk. Through this inspiring discussion, you can learn how to implement heart-safe lifestyle options.” Steve Blake, ScD, Faculty Nutritional Biochemist, Hawaii Pacific Neuroscience LLC; Author, Vitamins and Minerals Demystified“ At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hispanics in America 12 mins – Impact and trends of Hispanics in America. At the link find the title, “America’s Hispanics,” right-click “Media files 20150311 david_sr.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Hollywood Blacklist 57 mins – “Allan Ryskind, son of Marx Brothers screenwriter Morris Ryskind, talked about his book, Hollywood Traitors: Blacklisted Screenwriters – Agents of Stalin, Allies of Hitler, about the Communist party in Hollywood in the 1930s. He spoke with Tucker Carlson, editor-in-chief of The Daily Caller.” At the link find the title, “After Words: Allan Ryskind,” right-click “Media files program.384674.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HPV Vaccine 64 mins -“The HPV Vaccine: Helpful or Harmful? – HPV can be deadly, and many studies have suggested that the new vaccine Gardasil can be effective in preventing most types of HPV. But controversies still surround the vaccine. Many women can’t get their hands on it because of its high cost and age requirements. Others worry about being forced to give the shot to their daughters when the long-term effectiveness is still unknown. Come hear a panel of experts discuss the health and socio-political issues surrounding Gardasil and the future of HPV prevention and treatment. Joel Palefsky, M.D., UCSF-Infectious Disease Specialist; Dean Blumberg, M.D., Associate Professor, Pediatric Infectious Disease, UC Davis Medical Center; Unpaid Speaker for Merck (maker of Gardasil);
Alina Salganicoff, Vice President and Director, Women’s Health Policy and KaiserEDU.org, Kaiser Family Foundation; Ph.D. in Health Policy, The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health; Sarah Varney, Health Reporter, KQED’s “The California Report” – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Trafficking 62 mins – “The distinguished panel of activists and experts will discuss the tragedy of human trafficking and efforts to combat what has been described as the fastest growing criminal industry, second only to drug trafficking in profitability, in the world. Human trafficking, considered a modern form of slavery, has historical roots in the Middle East, where it still thrives.” David Batstone, Founder & CEO, Not For Sale; Professor of Business, USF; Mimi Chakarova, Photo Journalist, Filmmaker, Price of Sex 2011; Correspondent, Center for Investigative Reporting; Dr. Dolores Donovan, Professor & Director of International Programming, USF School of Law; Author, Law Review & Journal Articles on Human Rights, Developing Law Systems and Criminal Justice Systems;
Joel Brinkley, Professor of Journalism, Stanford University; Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist. Author, Cambodia’s Curse – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Humor Helps 59 “Monday Night Philosophy laughs along with the enlightening philosophy of humor elucidated by Bhaerman (the man behind Swami Beyondananda). His hilarious and insightful talk will inspire you to use the magic of humor to gain wisdom, perspective and of course, joy. You’ll laugh while you learn and learn while you laugh! Steve Bhaerman, Author; Performer (as Swami Beyondananda) At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ig Noble Awards 13 mins – “As founder of the Ig Nobel awards, Marc Abrahams explores the world’s most improbable research. In this thought-provoking (and occasionally side-splitting) talk, he tells stories of truly weird science — and makes the case that silliness is critical to boosting public interest in science.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration in America 66 mins – “At The Commonwealth Club in 1984, Cesar Chavez said “The fight is never about grapes or lettuce. It is always about people.” The U.S. Committee of Refugees and Immigrants celebrated its 100th anniversary this year, and the Club is taking the opportunity to find out more about those at the center of the immigration debate, which dates back to the founding of the United States. In the Bay Area, the immigration conversation often centers around limited H1-B visas for techies, while most of the country broods over access to education, employment, social services and integration into the broader community. What does a “typical” immigrant really look like in the U.S. in 2012? How do immigration policies actually impact the lives of documented and undocumented immigrants? Our diverse panel dives deep into the issues. Come hear the true stories shared by more than 10 million individuals.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Biodesign 86 mins – “The emerging health-care needs of the rapidly expanding Indian population require the development of novel, cost-effective medical technologies that are relevant for the needs of the Indian people. However, the medical technology industry in India is still in its infancy, and there have been relatively few successful examples of medical technology innovation in that country’s history. Stanford University’s program in biodesign has been working closely with the government of India to promote medical technology innovation within industry and academia, with the goal of creating scalable medical technology innovation for the masses. Doshi and Mairal will share their experiences in medical technology innovation for India and discuss the opportunities and challenges for medical technology innovation in the future. Rajiv Doshi, M.D., Executive Director (U.S.), Stanford-India Biodesign; Consulting Assistant Professor of Medicine, Stanford University; Anurag Mairal, Ph.D., Director, Global Biodesign Exchange Programs, Stanford University” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Business Growth 66 mins – “How could a nation become the world’s second fastest growing economy despite a weak, flailing state? Its recent economic slowdown is a sign that India may have begun to experience the limits of growing at “night” – private growth outside the scope of government involvement. What India needs, Das says, is a strong liberal state. Such a state would have the authority to take quick, decisive action; it would have the rule of law to ensure those actions are legitimate; and finally, it would be accountable to the people. But achieving this will not be easy, says Das, because India has historically had a weak state and a strong society. Gurcharan Das, Columnist, The Times of India; Contributor, The New York Times; Author, India Grows at Night In conversation with Lata Krishnan, Chair, American India Foundation” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India’s Girls 60 mins – “Caputi describes how the age-old preference for sons in India, fueled by technological advances and a growing materialism, is leading to increased incidents of discrimination, violence and the eradication of millions of girls in that country. In regions where the sex ratios are skewed, female trafficking and bride buying run rampant. Caputi will address the reasons behind this phenomenon, the implications for India’s population and possible solutions. Nyna Pais Caputi, Producer and Director, Petals in the Dust: The Endangered Indian Girls” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Entrepreneurs 54 mins – “India’s pervasive resource and capital scarcity combined with massive diversity and growing connectivity are turning the country into a large-scale, living laboratory where grassroots entrepreneurs and corporations are coming up with frugal inventions that are both affordable and sustainable. Radjou explains how “indovations” have relevance not only within India but worldwide.Navi Radjou, Independent Consultant and Fellow, Cambridge Judge Business School; Former Executive Director, Centre for India & Global Business, University of Cambridg” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Immigrants 52 mins – “The story of India’s 30-million-and-growing worldwide diaspora is reshaping trade, identity and culture all around the globe. Hajratwala will speak on what she says Americans need to know today about the rapidly changing country to which nearly 2 million Americans trace their roots. Hajratwala will draw from the seven years of research that led to her nonfiction book, Leaving India, winner of a California Book Award (Silver) and other literary awards.M inal Hajratwala, Author.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Wealth and Power 64 mins – “Raghavan crisscrosses the globe to uncover the story of Rajat Gupta’s meteoric rise from Delhi’s hyper-competitive Indian Institute of Technology to the inner sanctum of corporate America as head of McKinsey & Co., and his tragic fall in 2012, when he was convicted on insider trading charges connected with an investigation of one of the world’s largest hedge funds, The Galleon Group. Raghavan peels back the curtain on the recent rise of Indian emigres (and children of emigres) up through the ranks of the United States’ most influential companies. Anita Raghavan, Former Reporter, Wall Street Journal; Winner, Overseas Press Club Award and the New York Press Club Award; Former London Bureau Chief, Forbes; Contributor, New York Times Dealbook and Forbes” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inside Job 66 mins – “Come hear from the filmmaker of this year’s Academy Award-winning best documentary feature film. Could the global economic meltdown of the last few years have been prevented? Ferguson believes that the crisis was no accident. His latest documentary, Inside Job, makes the powerful case that an out-of-control finance industry took advantage of a deregulated atmosphere and purposely sought to get rich at the expense of others. Through extensive interviews with financial insiders and government officials, Ferguson crossed the globe to find proof that the financial industry intentionally engaged in unethical behavior. His gripping account of the global recession is sure to evoke feelings of disgust, anger, and concern that this all may happen again unless our regulatory system is changed. Ferguson’s previous film, No End in Sight, was nominated for an Oscar, and Inside Job brought home the grand prize at this year’s awards ceremony. Charles Ferguson, Documentary Filmmaker, Inside Job and No End in Sight; Adam Lashinsky, Senior Editor at Large, Fortune magazine – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Testing 60 mins – “This week we’re learning about how scientists and society measure intelligence, and the relationship between smartness and success. We’re joined by cognitive psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman, to talk about his book “Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined.” And we’ll talk to Nathaniel Barr, postdoctoral fellow at the University of Waterloo, about research into the relationship between smartphone use and cognitive skills. Guests: Scott Barry Kaufman and Nathaniel Barr” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Worm 65 mins – “When the Conficker computer “worm” was unleashed in 2008, security experts were dumbfounded. Through a Windows security flaw, the worm infected 12 million computers, including machines vital to air traffic and banking systems. The worm then linked them together to form a network that could be controlled externally. Bowden explores the struggle between brilliant hackers bent on defeating the worm and those who exploit the Internet, whose origins and intentions remain unknown today. Mark Bowden: The First Digital War, Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair; Author, Black Hawk Down and Worm: The First Digital World War; Brian Hackney, Correspondent, “Eye on the Bay,” CBS 5 Television – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intuition Pumps, etc 63 mins – “Dennett will share the “imagination extenders and focus-holders” that he and others have developed for addressing life’s most fundamental questions, cognitive tools purpose-built for the most treacherous subject matter: evolution, meaning, mind and free will. Daniel Dennett, Co-director, Center for Cognitive Studies; Professor of Philosophy, Tufts University; Author, Intuition Pumps and Other Tools for Thinking; Roy Eisenhardt – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islamic Religious Education 58 mins – “Islamic religious education in Europe and the United States has become a subject of intense debate after Muslims raised in the West carried out attacks against their fellow citizens. People worry their states are doing too little or too much to shape the spiritual beliefs of private citizens. In her upcoming Brookings paper, Jenny Berglund explains the differences in publicly-funded Islamic education in Europe and the United States. Her report details existing religious education programs, teacher training, and ongoing political debates, grounded in the historical and religious norms of the countries. Berglund also recommends good practices for governments to further their citizens’ knowledge about Islam and promote inclusive citizenship and respect.” At the link right-click “Islamic religious education in Europe and the United States” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islamic Women 51 mins – “A Somali-born author and activist says a reformation of Islam is needed to address extremism and mistreatment of women. Diane and guests discuss the ongoing debate over the roots of Islamic extremism and the role of women in the Muslim world.” At the link find the title, “Islam, Extremism And The Role of Women,” right-click “Media files r2150331.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Israel and Palestine 60 mins – “Come hear firsthand experiences from seasoned Middle East reporters. Zacharia was the Washington Post’s Jerusalem bureau chief and has reported widely on the Middle East for Bloomberg, Reuters and Washington Week in Review. She will discuss her experiences in the region, especially in Israel and the Palestinian territories, with her Pulitzer Prize-winning colleague Brinkley, author and former New York Times Jerusalem bureau chief.” Janine Zacharia, Journalist; News Analyst; Visiting Scholar, Stanford University; Joel Brinkley, Professor of Journalism, Stanford University; Pulitzer Prize-winning Journalist. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Japanese Internment 74 mins – “70 Years On: The Japanese-American Curfew, Exclusion and Detention Orders and Civil Rights Today – In 1942, President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066, and as a result, 120,000 Japanese Americans, more than half of whom were U.S.-born citizens, were uprooted from their homes, businesses and friends and held in camps. A few, including Fred Korematsu, brought legal challenges against the imprisonment, and the Supreme Court ruled against them. Decades later, their convictions were overturned based on serious governmental misconduct. Join us to hear the daughter of Fred Korematsu, who is carrying on her father’s civil rights work, and the lawyers on the “pro bono” team that succeeded in overturning his conviction and others for defying the incarceration order, discuss the curfew, exclusion and detention, the legal challenges and their reflections on how the Japanese American experience informs the debate today about national security and civil liberties in the United States. Karen Korematsu, Co-founder, The Korematsu Institute, Civil Rights Activist; Dale Minami, Partner, Minami Tamaki LLP; Don Tamaki, Partner, Minami Tamaki LLP” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Search Skills 62 mins – “Today’s job market is anything but traditional. Job seekers have to go beyond the paper resume, leveraging social media tools and maintaining an online persona that highlights not only IQ but also EQ (emotional intelligence). How can you, as an applicant, use these new indicators of talent to better showcase your skills and convey competency, let alone find a job that you’ll love? Some say that cultural fit can be as important as title and salary, so how do you persuade an employer that you can not only do the job, but that you’re one of the team? Our panel of career coaches and modern job experts will help you craft your most-hirable self and conquer the evolving job market.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kurds 59 mins – “Educator, researcher and activist Faraj will discuss the history of the Kurdish people, who number more than 30 million and yet do not have their own country. Faraj received his masters degree in Laws in Kurdistan, Iraq, where he taught law. He has researched and led workshops on several subjects including human rights and has investigated violations such as honor killings.” Karaman Mamand Faraj, Student of International Legal Systems, Golden Gate University; Joel Brinkley, Professor of Journalism, Stanford University; Pulitzer Prize-winning Journalist” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language Learning Quickly 64 mins – “When Benny Lewis graduated college, he spoke just one language: English. Like me, and like countless other people, Benny spent years taking foreign language classes in high school – to no avail. When he started college, he had all but given up on the prospect of becoming bilingual. Today, the picture couldn’t be more different. […]” At the link find the title, “How To Actually Learn A New Language With Benny Lewis of Fluent in 3 Months (Ep. 19),” right-click “Media files 1707.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Large Cap Value Funds 58 mins – “Paul discusses 10 of the most important things you should know about value investing. Using stories about three of the most famous value investors, he explains why your long-term performance should be amongst the best in the industry. He compares two value funds so that you can understand why one made 3.5% more for 15 years. As Paul did in his podcast on the S&P 500, he also reviews the 1, 15 and 40-year track records and compares them to the S&P 500. It is recommended you listen first to the S&P podcast and read this article.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Larry Wilmore 7 mins – “Larry Wilmore is the co-creator of “The Bernie Mac Show” and “The PJs.” He was also a writer for “The Office,” the Senior Black Corresponent for “The Daily Show,” and has a new special on Showtime. He sits down with the Champs to dicuss all of it. Funny, interesting guy.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latin American Upgrade 36 mins – “Hinckley Forums: The Post Hemispheric Americans – Beyond Bridges and Borders in the 21st Century By Hinckley Institute of Politics • Mar 9, 2015; Evan Ward, Visiting Fellow, The Wheatley Institute, BYU” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Learning Tactics 76 mins – “A New Culture of Learning – Gaming, mentorship, increasing connection and design thinking converge in a world of constant change, and invite us to imagine a future of learning that is as powerful as it is optimistic. By exploring play, innovation and the cultivation of the imagination as cornerstones of learning, our panelists will show you how to create a vision that is achievable, scalable and grows along with the technology that fosters it and the people who engage with it. John Seely Brown, Co-chairman, Deloitte Center for the Edge; Author, The Power of Pull; Former Chief Scientist, Xerox Corp.; Director, Palo Alto Research Center; Douglas Thomas, Professor, USC Annenberg School for Communication; Author, Hacker Culture; Scott Stropkay, Co-founder and Partner, Essential;Kevin O’Malley, CEO, TechTalk / Studio – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lee Kuan Yew 27 mins – “Edward Stourton looks back at the remarkable life of Lee Kuan Yew, who transformed Singapore from a backwater into one of the world’s richest nations. He talks to critics and admirers as he assesses the record of the man who laid down the blueprint for the modernisation of the island nation.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Lee Kuan Yew: The Man who Made Singapore,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150329-1000a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Less Traveled Road 29 mins – “…Vincent Nguyen has held three internships at the same time, while still taking classes full-time. He’s reached out to some of the most popular and successful people in the online entrepreneurship world, and has build relationships with several of them. He’s written for several huge blogs, including LifeHack.org, Marc and Angel Hack Life, and UnCollege. He also started his own blog on personal development called Self Stairway, which is only around 10 months old but is already getting thousands of visitors and around 30 comments per post…. But here’s the craziest part: Vincent is only 19. So, how does a 19-year-old beginning blogger a college student (well, former – but we’ll get to the details about that in the episode) do all of this? Trust me, I was just as curious as you probably are – so I asked him to talk about it on the podcast….” At the link find the title,“The Less-Traveled Road To Success With Vincent Nguyen (Ep. 15),” right-click “Media files 1711.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lethal Injections 59 mins – “Hinckley Forum: Outstanding Professor Series By Hinckley Institute of Politics; Mar 6, 2015; Professor Jim Ruble,  Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Pharmacotherapy; College of Pharmacy Distinguished Teaching Award 2010-2011 and  2013-2014” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liberal Arts Education 47 mins – “A liberal arts education was, for a long time, the proud and distinctive hallmark of an American university education. Old Europe had a burnished few and a lot of trade apprentices. We, the young and vibrant United States, had citizens with a handle on the humanities. Philosophy, history, literature, arts. That served us pretty well. Lately, the humanities are in trouble at a lot of colleges. Politicians talking them down. Students fleeing for the sciences. History major, public thinker, Fareed Zakaria says don’t let them go. This hour On Point:  Fareed Zakaria, in defense of the liberal arts.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liberia Upswing 67 mins – “The Carter Center: Partnering in the New Liberia – After enduring 14 years of civil war and economic collapse, Liberia is on the upswing. Led by the continent’s first female president and supported by the international community, Liberia is held up as an example of development-work success. Learn how the Carter Center is waging peace and building hope through partnerships with local government officials, tribal leaders and civil society organizations. Hear from a group of Bay Area women philanthropists who recently traveled to this unique nation in Africa. Cate Biggs, Writer; Consultant; Founder, Writing for Global Engagement; Emilie Ogden, Community Activist; Trustee, World Learning; Kate Ridgway, Educator; Community Activist; Nancy Hitz, World Traveler; Winemaker; Trustee, the Worldwatch Institute and the Hitz Foundation” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

London Undocumented 27 mins – “Ahmed has spent much of the last three and a half years sleeping on London’s night buses. He fled to the UK from India in 2002 during the communal riots in Gujarat, fearing that he was going to be a target. He had his asylum application turned down but, still nervous about the situation at home, he stayed in the UK. Through Ahmed we enter a netherworld where many other failed asylum seekers like him exist.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Sheltering on the Night Bus,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150401-0300a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Loneliness Hazard 17 mins – “We’ll go to the doctor when we feel flu-ish or a nagging pain. So why don’t we see a health professional when we feel emotional pain: guilt, loss, loneliness? Too many of us deal with common psychological-health issues on our own, says Guy Winch. But we don’t have to. He makes a compelling case to practice emotional hygiene — taking care of our emotions, our minds, with the same diligence we take care of our bodies.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Looted Antiquities 27 mins – “As evidence grows that major historical sites are being looted in Syria, how much are groups such as Islamic State profiting from the global trade in illicit antiquities?” At the link find the topic, “DocArchive: ISIS: Looting for Terror – 5 Mar 2015,” right-click “docarchive_20150305-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Louis Gossett Jr 63 mins – “Gossett became a Broadway star at 17, starring with Sidney Poitier, Ruby Dee, and Ossie Davis in “A Raisin in the Sun.” He later won an Emmy for his performance in the “Roots” miniseries and an Oscar for best supporting actor for his role as Sgt. Emil Foley in An Officer and a Gentleman. Drawing on a theatre, film and television career that spans more than 50 years, Gossett will discuss some of his most memorable experiences as well as his personal efforts to end racism, violence and ignorance through the work of his Eracism Foundation. Louis Gossett Jr. Actor; Winner, Academy Award; Activist; Author, An Actor and a Gentleman” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Makers 65 mins – “You know that guy or girl who can make or fix anything? Yes, the same MacGyver wannabe who repairs a flat tire with an empty water bottle and a pen. You can now compete with these handy heroes. Especially now, in times of financial hardship, people want to fix and create useful and awesome gadgets from scratch. Make Magazine leads this “yes I can” attitude with tips for new self-sufficiency. From fixing your cracked iPhone screen to make-shifting an aerial camera rig from Popsicle sticks, a drugstore kite and Play-Doh, Make has it all. Find out where technophile and editor-in-chief Frauenfelder plans to lead this DIY movement. Mark Frauenfelder, Editor, Make Magazine; Dale Dougherty, Publisher, Make Magazine; Co-founder, O’Reilly Media; In conversation with Adam Savage, Host, “Mythbusters’” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Future 73 mins – “Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychoactive component of marijuana, has extraordinary therapeutic qualities, claims Lee. Discover the various molecular mechanisms through with CBD exerts its effects as an anticonvulsant, antipsychotic and neuro-protective compound. This lecture will also address recent efforts to reintroduce CBD-rich remedies and how the medical marijuana industry has responded to the rediscovery of CBD, which doesn’t make people feel high and can actually counter the psychoactive effects of THC. Beyond THC: Cannabidiol and the Future of Medical Marijuana Martin A. Lee, Author, Smoke Signals” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mark Twain On Truth 60 mins – “Mark Twain wanted to write a completely candid autobiography, without “shirkings of the truth,” so he decided to speak from the grave 100 years after his death. The Mark Twain Papers Project at the Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley has fulfilled that desire. Editor Smith will discuss Twain’s numerous observations about the difficulty of speaking the truth, and the strategies he adopted to remove his inhibitions, illustrating her talk with passages he suppressed during his lifetime. Come hear Mark Twain’s “whole, frank mind” highlighted by his characteristic blend of humor and ire.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martian Book 60 mins – “This week we’re exploring the limits of science exploration in both fictional and fact. We’re joined by “lifelong space nerd” Andy Weir, to talk about his debut novel “The Martian,” that pits human inventiveness and ingenuity against the unforgiving environment of the red planet. And astrophysicist and science blogger Ethan Siegel returns to explore so-called “impossible space engines,” and what news stories about them can teach us about journalism and science literacy.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Math Education 78 mins – “What kinds of math skills will the citizen of tomorrow require? Are we providing our children with the math education that will most benefit them? Join NPR’s math expert as he offers his thoughts on this vital issue.  Keith Devlin, The Math Guy, National Public Radio; Co- Founder and Executive Director, Stanford University’s H-STAR Institute; Angie Coiro, Radio Host, Live from the Left Coast – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicare Primer 59 mins – “2011 marked the year the first Boomers turned 65 and qualified for Medicare benefits. For most, a true understanding of what these benefits are, how to determine what options are best for you, and how to actually sign-up is not clear at all. Learn the realities of what you can expect, and more important, what not to expect. Here’s what every Boomer needs to know before they turn 65!” Esther Koch, Encore Management; Medicare Aging Network Partner, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Enhancement 74 mins – “When you think of the word meditation, what come to mind? Hippies? Connecting with your spirit animal? Becoming a badass monk who knows kung-fu? Let’s throw all those associated topics out the window right now, because meditation is not strictly limited to the realm of spiritual/zen practices. Rather, it’s a practice rooted in the idea […]” At the link find the title, “How To Strengthen Your Mind With Tony Stubblebine of Lift.do (Ep. 31),” right-click “Media files 4760.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Merchants of Doubt 30 mins – “A recent Pew survey found that 48% of Americans are still unconvinced that global warming is happening and that human activity is causing it. How can this high level of doubt persist in the face of overwhelming scientific evidence? Our guest today on Sea Change Radio is Naomi Oreskes, co-author of the book Merchants of Doubt. As the title suggests, Oreskes believes that seeds of doubt have been planted quite intentionally. The same playbook that was used by tobacco companies to hoodwink the public is now being applied to climate change….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Metabolic Wellness 95 mins – “Learn how you can assess the factors affecting your metabolism and what steps you can take to customize restoring your optimal metabolism. Each person’s metabolism is unique and influenced by lifestyle, diet, stress metabolism, genes, environmental influences and relationships. James LaValle, R.Ph.; C.C.N.; N.M.D.; Cofounder, Living Longer Institute; Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Cincinnati College of Pharmacy; Author, Cracking the Metabolic Code” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexican Relations 54 mins – “Hinckley Forum: The Future of U.S. – Mexican Relations by Hinckley Institute of Politics • Mar 9, 2015; Ambassador Alejandro Estivill-Castro, Deputy Head of Mission of the Mexican Embassy to the United States of America” T the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexico Future 69 mins – “Jorge G. Castaneda: Mexico’s Future and Its Relationship with the U.S. – Mexico’s future is most certainly dependent on its relationship with the United States. In fact, Mexico ranks third in total trade with the United States behind Canada and China. But in the midst of this positive relationship, there is also a drug cartel war that has claimed the lives of more than 34,000 Mexicans and over 100 Americans in the past four and a half years. Ongoing issues of immigration and border control are also high on the list of mutual concerns. Mexico’s foreign minister under former President Vicente Fox, Castaneda will offer a broad perspective on the future of the Mexican people and on relations between our two countries. Come hear from one of Mexico’s most profound social thinkers. Former Foreign Minister, Mexico; Professor of Politics and Latin American and Caribbean Studies, NYU; Author, Manana Forever? ; Mariano-Florentino Cuellar, Professor of Law and Political Science, Stanford University – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microchip Future 58 mins – “A single cellphone today has more computing power than all the computers in the world combined had before semiconductor chips were part of the equation. Mounting evidence shows that the rapid movement of integrated circuits’ cost and power will plateau. When and why might it happen and what are technologists doing about it? What does all this mean to consumers and the industry? Hu has been called a “microelectronics visionary” by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers for “achievements critical to producing smaller yet more reliable and higher-performance integrated circuits”. His new transistor, FinFET, is replacing the transistor that the industry has used for the past five decades. Chenming Hu, Distinguished Professor of Microelectronics, UC Berkeley” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mobile Device Dark Side 64 mins – “The Dark Side of Mobile Gadgets – If you thought your privacy was only threatened on the Web, think again. In an age when personal technology devices reign supreme, consumers take gadgets for granted. Award-winning journalist and cybercrimes expert Vamosi contends that the dangers inherent in certain gadgets far surpass their convenience. As technologies continue to develop, people continue to trust them, blindly, sacrificing their privacy and safety in ways they never imagined possible. Robert Vamosi, Author, When Gadgets Betray Us; Contributing Editor, PCWorld; Former Senior Editor, CNET. Chris O’Brien, Business and Technology Columnist, San Jose Mercury News – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Morocco Evolution 60 mins – “Well known in Europe and Africa for his work in business development, Azoulay was a leading architect of the remarkable economic reforms and growth Morocco has experienced over the last three decades. He is also a respected advocate of pluralism and inter-religious dialogue. He will discuss Morocco’s constitutional reforms and election following the Arab Spring and share his views on the future of Morocco and North Africa. André Azoulay, Senior Advisor to King Mohammed VI of Morocco” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ms Pat 63 mins – “Comedian Ms. Pat sits down with the Champs to discuss having her first child at 14, selling crack, and getting shot in the tittie. It’s wild, homey.” At the link find the title, “Ms. Pat, Friday, February 20, 2015,” right-click “Media files Ms._Pat_Output.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

News Trends 51 mins – “We are more exposed to media than ever before but pay less attention to the news. We explore trends in news consumption and what this means for an informed and engaged public.” At the link find the title, “Why Americans Seem To Be Paying Less Attention To The News,” right-click “Media files r1150401.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Price Impact 48 mins – “Oil inventories in the United States are at the highest level in 80 years, piling up as supply runs ahead of demand. An American boom in oil production – extraction – has made the United States now the number one oil producer in the world, ahead of Saudi Arabia. At the same time, oil prices have plummeted from over $100 dollars a barrel to forty-something. The last time oil prices cratered, Americans jumped into SUVs and stayed there. Alternative energy suffered. What about now? This hour On Point:  American energy production in a time of low oil prices, from drilling rigs to wind farms.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Prices and Food 60 mins – “Oil guru Richard Heinberg on life after fossil fuels. Five percent of the world’s oil tanker capacity is waiting to load up near Basra Iraq, where production is way up. The United States has only one month of oil storage capacity left. After that, what comes in must go straight to market, likely for as little as $20 a barrel. Is peak oil dead? And why isn’t the economy responding to cheaper oil? We’ll ask the guru, Richard Heinberg. He’s one of the people who popularized the oil squeeze, with his book “The Party’s Over”. Heinberg has a new book out: “Afterburn, Society Beyond Fossil Fuels”. After that, during this Spring in the Northern Hemisphere, a couple of us hope to persuade you to grow some of your own food. Marjory Wildcraft, from growyourowngroceries joins us. There’s a lot of reasons we need to pay attention to the food supply.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” besides “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parasitism Case Study 123 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, and Daniel Griffin discuss how filarial infection modulates the immune response to mycobacterial infection, and reveal a new case study.” At the link right-click “Download TWiP #86” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Permaculture 50 mins – “Join Jason Hartman as he interviews Paul Wheaton, founder of Richsoil.com and Permies.com, on the benefits of permaculture, which is a different way of gardening without irrigation… Paul’s definition of permaculture is  creating a more symbiotic relationship between himself and nature so that he can be lazier. Permaculture includes how you build your building, the energy used, social interaction, as well as the horticultural aspects…. As a certified master gardener and a certified permaculture designer, Paul Wheaton has written numerous articles (richsoil.com) and founded the permaculture forums (permies.com), which have since become the largest permaculture web site on the internet. …has been practicing and preaching this new way of gardening, farming and living for the last nine years….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasting Discussion 47 mins – “On this week’s episode of Slate Money, host Felix Salmon of Fusion, Cathy O’Neil of mathbabe.org, plus special guests Alex Blumberg of Gimlet Media and Will Mayo of Spoken Layer discuss the business of digital audio. This week’s podcast is sponsored by Automatic: a connected car adapter that pairs your car to your smartphone, empowering you to diagnose engine problems, drive more efficiently, remember where you parked, automatically notify emergency services in case of an accident, and more. Go to automatic.com/money to get 20% off.” At the link find the title, “The Podcast Podcast,” right-click “Media files SM15032801_money.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Premed Case Study 35 mins – “Matt tells his story of a failed start as a premed undergrad career and how he turned it around. Now he has a med school acceptance. Listen to his whole story!” At the link find and click on episode 123, then right-click the down-pointing arrow above the episode description and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Gangs 76 mins – “David Skarbek of King’s College London and author of The Social Order of the Underworld: How Prison Gangs Govern the American Penal System talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the written and unwritten rules in America’s prisons for the most violent and dangerous criminals. Skarbek explains how and why prison gangs emerged in the last half of the 20th century, their influence both inside and outside of prisons, and how their governance structure is maintained.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Shaming 52 mins – “Social media has made a judge and jury out of everybody. A poorly worded tweet, post or comment can upend our lives, ruin our careers, and fill us with regret. Journalist Jon Ronson says that we are reducing people to the worst thing they’ve ever done, and losing our own moral compass in the process. He joins Doug Thursday to give voice to the shamed and to explain why we all so easily become the shamers.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ravensbruck Camp 52 mins – “On a scenic lake 50 miles north of Berlin, Hitler opened a compound known as Ravensbrück — his only concentration camp for women. Opened in 1939, the camp initially held a few thousand political prisoners. By the end of World War II, nearly 130,000 women had passed through its gates. The prisoners there were subjected to slave labor and brutal forms of torture. Yet relatively little has been written about the camp. The SS burned all inmate records; the material that did exist lay locked behind the Iron Curtain for years. Now, a new book pieces together historical evidence to tell the stories of the women who lived and died at Ravensbrück.” At the link you can listen, but not download: however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

REITs 19 mins – “This podcast discusses the relatively short history of REIT returns. Paul informs investors about the long-term returns of this asset class, including long periods of mediocre returns. He also highlights what a great fit REITs have been with the S&P 500 due to their unusually high non-correlation. Listeners are encouraged to read both his MarketWatch REIT articles: 10 Things You Need to Know About Reits and Why REITs belong in your retirement portfolio” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ritalin 32 mins – “For Episode #69, we welcome back Dr. Jehangeer Sunderji, of Mind Body Medicine in Santa Monica, California, to speak about a household name among cognitive enhancers: Ritalin.  Dr. Sunderji runs through the benefits – as well as the risks – of this powerful smart drug and stimulant, and advocates the importance of careful diagnosis and responsible dosing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shadow Banking System 11 mins – “The shadow banking system is a term for the collection of non-bank financial intermediaries that provide services similar to traditional commercial banks. – Wikepedia. At the link find the title, “Special report: Shadow banking,” right-click “Media files 20140506 shadow banking ad.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Space Exploration 61 mins – “Does Space exploration benefit or suffer from the input of volunteers and Citizen Science?” At the find the title, “DigitalP: Space and Citizen Science,” right-click “Media files, right-click “digitalp_20150331-2005a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supplements Quality 47 mins – “Americans love herbal supplements. They spend billions a years on all kinds, hoping for relief, remedy, cure. This week, the New York attorney general reached a deal with the country’s largest supplement retailer, GNC, to guard against selling bottles that contain nothing of the herbs. The attorney general said four out of five tests of herbal supplements from GNC, Target, Walgreens and Walmart showed none of the product advertised was actually in the bottle. Other stuff was. This hour On Point:  we’re looking at the purity, safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements, in the supplement-crazy USA.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Pacific Partnership 50 mins – “The ideas of secrecy, democracy, special interests and international trade deals are interwoven into this episode that uses the negotiations over two upcoming international trade agreements to highlight current trends.” At the link find the title, “Show 290 – The Illusion of Control,” right-click “Media files cswdcc90.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Violence Technology 51 mins – “Advances in cybertechnology, biotechnology and robotics mean that more people than ever before have access to potentially dangerous technologies.” At the link find the title, “Benjamin Wittes and Gabriella Blum: “The Future of Violence’” right-click “Media files r2150330.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water History – America 52 mins – “The western United States is in the grip of a punishing drought. Reservoir levels are dropping, and farmers are struggling to ensure their access to water for crops and livestock. Consider California. According to a water scientist at NASA, the state has only a year’s worth of water left in its reservoirs. Some scientists even fear the West has reached “peak water” — the point at which water resources simply can’t keep up with water usage. In this episode, Brian, Ed and Peter look at how Americans have managed access to water across the generations. From early legal struggles over natural waterways to the shared irrigation systems of New Mexico, they’ll consider how Americans have divvied up water rights for private profit and public good. And they’ll dive into the debate over who could and couldn’t use swimming pools in the 1920s.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wealth Creation 59 mins – Host Leo Laporte interviews Peter Diamandis. “Peter Diamandis is an engineer and entrepreneur best known for being the founder and CEO of the X PRIZE Foundation, the co-founder and chairman of Singularity University, and the co-author of the New York Times bestseller “Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think.” His latest book is “BOLD: How to Go Big, Create Wealth and Impact the World.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the blue down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Wondrous Women 60 mins – “Guest host John Lithgow introduces two stories about strong women. The English writer E. Nesbit puts a satirical spin on the Rapunzel story in “Melisande.” The reader is Jane Curtin. In Barbara Kingsolver’s “Fault Lines,” the narrator has lost her husband to an industrial accident, and can’t come to terms with his death until her brilliant son, and an earthquake, realign her with the universe. Jill Eikenberry reads.” At the link find the title, “Wondrous Women,” right-click “Media files 198756653-selectedshorts-wondrous-women.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yellowstone Job 12 mins – “A summer job in Yellowstone National Park isn’t quite what Molly Payne Wynne had been expecting. Molly is the Monitoring Coordinator for the Penobscot River Restoration Trust, an unprecedented collaborative effort to restore 11 species of sea-run fish in New England’s second largest river, the Penobscot. Molly has pursued a variety of research topics in fisheries; most recently, river herring habitat use patterns through otolith chemistry at the University of Southern Maine and otolith growth and microchemistry as a research assistant at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) in Syracuse, NY. She loves the water and exploring Maine and awaits her next scientific adventure.” At the link find the title, “Molly Payne Wynne: An Accomplice To Fish Murder,” right-click “Media files 199079043-the-story-collider-molly-payne-wynne-an-accomplice-to-fish-murder.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 35+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 178 – Apr 10, 2015: Afghanistan – Iraq Failure, American Inequality, Arabian Nights, Ballerina Story, Balloon Bombs, Beale Street – Memphis, Biofuel, BRCA Cancer Gene, Broadband Barriers Removal, Broken Future, China’s Health Program, Circumcision, Coal Control, Cognitive Neuroscientist, Crime Scenes, Deforestation Control, Drought in California, Drs and Patients, Earthquakes, Ebola – African Efforts, Economic Inequality, Economics, Ecosystem Services, Education Future, Elder Abuse, Elder Exploitation, Electric Power Trends, Electricity, Elephant Protection, Encore Careers, Environmental Debt and Stewardship, Ethical Traveling, Ethiopia Land Grab, Facebook Conference, Farming Is Us, Fatigue Prescription, Federal Aviation Jobs, Female Circumcision, First Responders, Flying the Concord, Foreign Languages, Fracking, Freelancing, Frugal Innovation, Gateway to Freedom, Gay and Lesbians in India, Gaza Grand Piano, Gender Pay Gap, Genius Is You, Genius via Trauma, Genomic Research, Geoengineering, Getty Museum Loot, Global Business Trends, Global Crisis, Googlization of Books, Grace Hopper, Graphic Novels, Grasslands Importance, Growing Food, Guardians of Science, Guatemala Forensic Anthropology, Gun Laws Talk, Harvard Digital Issues, Health Care Costs, Horse Whips, Immune System Affects Brain, Internet Mechanics, Joan of Arc Film, Journalist Rescue Effort, Migrating Families, Mobile Money, MS Diet, New Yorker History, NYC Data, Pedestrian Deaths – NYC, Playing Outside, Prison Youth, Professional Wrestling, Psychedelic Therapy, Randomness, Recycling, Sandhogs, Seafood Consumption, Surveillance Awareness, Tech Trends, Ten Most Wanted Men, Universities, Wanderu

The following audio files come from a larger group of 242 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 93 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Afghanistan – Iraq Failure 59 mins – “General Daniel Bolger (Retired) talked about his book, Why We Lost: A General’s Inside Account of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. He also spoke about his deployments to the two war zones, the inherent dangers to U.S. troops there, his job commanding the training operations of Iraqi and Afghan police and military forces, and what he believes what went wrong. In addition, General Bolger discussed his views of other generals such as David Patraeus and Stanley McChrystal, and what he thinks we should have done differently in Iraq and Afghanistan.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Daniel Bolger,” right-click “Media files program.385449.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Inequality 47 mins – “American inequality is once again at historic levels. A second Gilded Age.  Everybody knows it. A top tier doing great. Scooping up every luxury. Building mind-boggling fortunes. And millions really struggling to get by. To keep hope alive of a better life. In the first gilded age, in the 19th century, Americans were in the streets over inequity. Marching. Brawling. Demanding change. This time, says my guest today, labor historian Steve Fraser, it’s weirdly quiet out there. The Age of Acquiescence, he calls it. This hour On Point: wealth, power and “where’s the protest?” in America.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arabian Nights 51 mins – “Perhaps you know the tale. In order to save her life, Sheherazade starts spinning stories for the vengeful King Shahriyar. One story leads to another that leads to another, on and on for 1,001 nights. For the scholar Robert Irwin, Sheherazade’s plight is our own, for what are our lives but stories related to countless other stories, all told under the shadow of death, the terminator of all stories? Irwin joins us Thursday as we explore the world of the Arabian Nights and ask what they can offer us today.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Ballerina Story 52 mins – “Misty Copeland went from a child living in poverty in a motel, to a breakout star in the world of ballet. She discovered her extraordinary talent at the late age of 13, and just four years later, escaped her tumultuous childhood to join the elite American Ballet Theatre. Today, she is the only African American soloist with the company and one of very few black women in the highest ranks of classical ballet nationwide. Now, she’s calling for change in an art form she says is still stuck in the past. Ballerina Misty Copeland shares her unlikely rise to stardom, and bringing color to the white world of ballet.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Balloon Bombs 30 mins – “During World War II, something happened that nobody ever talks about. This is a tale of mysterious balloons, cowboy sheriffs, and young children caught up in the winds of war. And silence, the terror of silence. Reporters Peter Lang-Stanton and Nick Farago tell us the story of a seemingly ridiculous, almost whimsical series of attacks on the US between November of 1944 and May of 1945. With the help of writer Ross Coen, geologist Elisa Bergslien, and professor Mike Sweeney, we uncover a national secret that led to tragedy in a sleepy logging town in south central Oregon.” At the link right-click “Stream m3u” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beale Street – Memphis 48 mins – “The Sweet Memphis Sound Of ‘Beale Street’ – Walkin’ in Memphis. We’ll look at the history of Beale Street and how the Memphis Sound came to be.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biofuel 23 mins – “Solazyme Co-Founder Dillon talks about growing biofuel maker Solazyme into a multi-million dollar, publicly traded company.” At the link find the title, “Solazyme Co-Founder Harrison Dillon,” right-click “Media files SC-2015-03-24.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

BRCA Cancer Gene 51 mins – “in an opinion piece for the New York Times filmmaker, Angelina Jolie Pitt describes her decision to have her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed. The surgery comes just two years after her choice to have a double mastectomy. Genetic tests had confirmed she carried a mutation in the BRCA gene which put her at greater risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Many doctors say her decision was a good one, but it highlights the kinds of challenges genetic test results can present: Please join us to discuss BRCA test results and efforts to stop breast and ovarian cancers before they start.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Broadband Barriers Removal 31 mins – “After anticipating this moment for many months, we have a ruling from the FCC that has restored local authority to build and expand networks in North Carolina and Tennessee. Though we have already pulled out the key passages for readers, we wanted to discuss the decision with Jim Baller of Baller, Herbst, Stokes, & Lide. Jim worked with Wilson and Chattanooga in crafting their petitions and sat down with me last week at the Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities Broadband Conference in Des Moines last week. We went over the key issues in the ruling, including why the FCC had authority to take action, how the state laws limited investment in advanced Internet networks, the impact of the ruling, and what comes next.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broken Future 60 mins – “Welcome to another round of Radio Ecoshock. I’m Alex Smith, with two of the world’s top climate scientists talking about the severe challenges we face right now, and in the future. From the United Kingdom, we have Dr. Kevin Anderson, who pulls no punches. Then Rutgers distinguished scientist Alan Robock tells us why geoengineering might not be a good idea. Open your ears and your mind to what’s coming next.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China’s Health Program 11 mins – “This Series marks an unprecedented scientific collaboration between The Lancet, Peking University Health Sciences Centre, and the China Medical Board. Health System Reform in China brings together the most recent scientific evidence on China’s major health challenges, strategies, and future. The Series was produced by a team of 63 scientists, with Chinese scientists constituting two-thirds of the authors, collaborating with an international team from 10 countries.” Documents for various aspects are available at the site. At the link right-click “Download” (below the video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Circumcision 60 mins – “This week we’re looking at the contentious medical and ethical history of circumcision. We’re joined by Sarah B. Rodriguez, medical historian and lecturer in global health and bioethics at Northwestern University, to talk about about her book “Female Circumcision and Clitoridectomy in the United States: A History of a Medical Treatment.” And we’ll discuss the medical and ethical implications of infant male circumcision with Brian Earp, University of Oxford Research Fellow in Science and Ethics.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Control 46 mins – “Coal And American Energy Futures – The new battle over American coal, before the Supreme Court and beyond.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cognitive Neuroscientist 41 mins – “Pioneering neuroscientist Dr. Michael Gazzaniga has written many wonderful books that share neuroscience with a general audience. In his latest book Tales from Both Sides of the Brain: A Life in Neuroscience he looks back on his 50+ year career from a uniquely personally vantage point. He shares the people and collaborations that have enriched his life and when I interviewed him for BSP 117  he said “My pitch to the young person is that there is nothing on this planet that compares to the pleasures of scientific discovery.” But he also emphasized the importance of finding a question that people really care about. “Is it a question anyone wants the answer to?” But the young scientist needs more than curiosity she also needs the impulse to question current explanations and the urge to find better answers.” For a limited time right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crime Scenes 60 mins – “From crime scene to court room and all the evidence in between. Join Chris Smith and Ginny Smith at our reconstructed crime scene to find out how science is used to help solve a forensic investigation, including dissecting pig organs, testing for drugs, planting false memories into our audiences’ brains and trying out the world’s first lie detector suit…” At the link right-click “Download as mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deforestation Control 10 mins – “The sounds of the rainforest include: the chirps of birds, the buzz of cicadas, the banter of gibbons. But in the background is the almost-always present sound of a chainsaw, from illegal loggers. Engineer Topher White shares a simple, scalable way to stop this brutal deforestation — that starts with your old cell phone.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought in California 48 mins – “New Solutions For Dire California Drought – California Governor Jerry Brown, and his billion-dollar emergency drought plan. We’ll look at dry California’s options, including turning to the sea.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drs and Patients 16 mins – “Wouldn’t you want to know if your doctor was a paid spokesman for a drug company? Or held personal beliefs incompatible with the treatment you want? Right now, in the US at least, your doctor simply doesn’t have to tell you about that. And when physician Leana Wen asked her fellow doctors to open up, the reaction she got was … unsettling.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Earthquakes 29 mins – “  Keith talks with Thorne Lay, Distinguished Professor and Director of the Center for the Study of the Imaging & Dynamics of the Earth at the University of California Santa Cruz.  An El Paso High School graduate, Lay talks about his path towards a career in seismology.  He also explains the difference between P- and S-waves, and why nuclear testing during the Cold War led to advances in seismic technology.” at the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola – African Efforts 27 mins – “How did the disease originate & how was its deadly progress checked? Statistician Hans Rosling & the WHO’s Margaret Lamunu discuss their experiences of fighting the disease.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Understanding Ebola,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150323-1500a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Inequality 50 mins – “If the statistics can be believed, over the last 30 years the gap between rich and poor in the West has grown as cavernous as it was in the Nineteenth Century. In the US, for example, the richest 1% of the population is estimated to own more than 40% of the country’s wealth. And it is a similar picture across the planet. But who are the 1%? How have they made their wealth? And why have the rest of us seemingly been left behind? Robert Peston speaks to leading policymakers and opinion shapers as he charts the new consensus that inequality is the biggest economic challenge we face.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Price of Inequality,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150301-2005a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Economics History 67 mins – “In his best-selling books in the Czech Republic, former advisor to Vaclav Havel Sedlacek shows how economics is woven out of history, myth, religion and ethics. Come listen to a fascinating ride that will take you from the Epic of Gilgamesh through the Bible and the Greeks to today’s pop culture in film – a fresh look at economics as part of our culture.” Tomas Sedlacek, National Economic Council, Prague; Lecturer, Charles University; Author, The Economics of Good and Evil; Advisor to Vaclav Havel” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economist Jokes 14 mins – “We got on stage at a comedy club to read a bunch of weird economics jokes. We bombed. Today on the show, we do what you’re never supposed to do: explain the joke.” At the link find the title, “#614: Two Radio Guys Walk In To A Bar,” right-click “Media files npr_396899726.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ecosystem Services 66 mins – “The many services that nature provides to humans are undervalued in commercial markets because it is difficult to put a price tag on them. Now, with increasing awareness about sustainability and resource limitations, companies are paying more attention to such ecosystem services. That means better understanding activities such as crop pollination, pest control and waste decomposition, and calculating economic impacts including the benefits of those services and the costs to companies and society if they are diminished. Join us for a conversation with a consultant advising Wal-Mart and other companies on how to think about ecosystem services and a visionary environmentalist working to preserve and value biodiversity around the world.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Future 66 mins – “From rising tuition costs to public concern over sexual assaults on college campuses, higher education faces a growing number of issues as 2015 begins. The University of California, with 10 campuses across the state, is no exception. The system is currently grappling with proposed tuition hikes, student protests and a statewide drop in funding. Join Napolitano and Yudof as they discuss the challenges currently facing America’s higher education system and, in particular, the University of California.” Janet Napolitano, President, University of California; Former Secretary of Homeland Security; Former Governor of Arizona; Mark Yudof, President Emeritus, University of California; Former Chancellor of the University of Texas System.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elder Abuse 62 mins – “You’ve heard it before – an unsuspecting elder puts his or her trust in a caregiver only to discover that person has stolen their life savings. Elder financial abuse is often referred to as the “silent crime.” It cuts across social status, gender, race and ethnicity. In many cases, a victim might not know someone is stealing from them, or be so embarrassed that they stay silent. Perpetrators are usually loved ones, family members and caregivers putting the victim in a vulnerable position of being reliant on their abuser for help. San Francisco is home to an increasing aging population making it ripe for elder financial crimes to occur. Our panel of speakers, including DA Gascón, will discuss current prosecutorial successes in curbing scams, real estate fraud and financial abuse targeting seniors. They will also provide useful tips to prevent and where to report elder financial abuse. George Gascón, San Francisco District Attorney; Hubert Horatio “Skip” Humphrey III, Assistant Director, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Office of Older Americans; Shay Matthews, Assistant District Attorney, San Francisco District Attorney’s Office; Helen Karr, Elder Abuse Special Assistant, San Francisco District Attorney’s Office” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elder Exploitation 62 mins – “Again and again, we hear stories in which older adults have been exploited by unfair, deceptive and abusive practices ­– Power of Attorney abuse, for example. Often these crimes are perpetrated by the victim’s own family, caregivers or another trusted individual. Our speakers will provide information on advances in combating the hidden epidemic of fraud and scams and other forms of exploitation that target that target older persons. They’ll address this pervasive issue in our society, providing tips on how to prevent, identify and report financial exploitation. Jenefer Duane, Sr. Program Analyst, Office for Older Americans, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau; Helen Karr, Elder Abuse Special Assistant, San Francisco District Attorney’s Office” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Power Trends 63 mins – “How will electric utilities adapt to a world of distributed generation and choice among formerly captive customers? Will utilities become a combination of eBay and UPS, shuttling electrons between many buyers and sellers? How will electric vehicles, renewables and smart meters fit into the equation? What policy and infrastructure changes will be required for mass adoption of electric vehicles? Join a conversation with leading lights rethinking the way California generates and uses electricity. Dian Grueneich, Former Commissioner, California Public Utilities Commission; Mark Duvall, Director of Electric Transportation and Energy Storage, Electric Power Research Institute; Ted Howes, Partner, IDEO.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electricity 52 mins – “Let there be light! Well, it’s easy to do: just flip a switch. But it took more than the invention of the light bulb to make that possible. It required new technology for the distribution of electricity. And that came, not so much from Thomas Edison, but from a Serbian genius named Nikola Tesla. Hear his story plus ideas on what might be the breakthrough energy innovations of the future. Perhaps hydrogen-fueled cars, nuclear fusion electrical generators or even orbiting solar cells? Plus, a reminder of cutting-edge technology back in Napoleon’s day: lighthouses.” At the link right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elephant Protection 57 mins – “The African elephant was originally listed as “threatened” by the U.S. Government in 1978. Since then, the species’ population has declined by about 60 percent, primarily due to poaching for the ivory trade. Habitat destruction and unsustainable trophy hunting also contributed to the decline. Today we’re joined by Peter LaFontaine, Campaign Officer, International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and Masha Kalinina, International Trade Policy Specialist, Humane Society International, who will discuss a recent petition filed with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to uplist African elephants from threatened to endangered under the Endangered Species Act.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Encore Careers 60 mins – “Alboher will give a comprehensive, nuts-and-bolts guide to finding passion, purpose and a paycheck in the second half of life. She will discuss how to plan the transition; how much you need to make; the pros and cons of going back to school; when to volunteer and when to intern; how to network effectively and harness the power of social media; and she’ll present an Encore Hot List of 35 viable careers.”  At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Debt 66 mins – “The traditional “grow now, clean up later” economy does little to account for unmeasured externalities like carbon pollution and health impacts. But as the national and world economies struggle with the mounting costs of pollution and climate change, many companies are drawing a connection between a degraded environment and a degraded bottom line. Amy Larkin says pollution can no longer be free and that government must play a vital role in catalyzing growth while preventing environmental destruction. John Hofmeister agrees that pollution and waste must be dealt with, but he points out that the American consumer might be less willing to pay the higher prices for electricity and fuel that would result from internalizing these costs. Come hear a conversation with a leading environmentalist and former oil executive on pricing pollution and finding business solutions for creating a sustainable economy. Amy Larkin, Author, Environmental Debt: The Hidden Costs of a Changing Global Economy; Director, Greenpeace Solutions; John Hofmeister, CEO, Citizens for Affordable Energy; Former President, Shell Oil Company” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Stewardship 62 mins – “The appeal of seeing nature as a vital asset – as natural capital – has spread like fire over the last decade. This concept appears in thinking about agriculture, water, energy, health, fisheries, forestry, protection from hazards, mining, cities and the infrastructure supporting these and other vast sectors – and it increasingly appears in the ways communities, corporations, governments and other institutions frame decisions. Despite this awareness and energy, however, our state and planet remain besieged by degradation and growing threats of catastrophic change. Leaders of The Natural Capital Project and The Nature Conservancy will talk about how they are using the power of open-source software tools to transform how communities and institutional leaders around the world include the value of natural capital in decisions improving outcomes for biodiversity and human wellbeing. Mary Ruckelshaus, Ph.D., Managing Director, The Natural Capital Project; Heather Tallis, Ph.D., Lead Scientist, The Nature Conservancy; Rich Sharp, Ph.D., Lead Software Developer, The Natural Capital Project”  At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethical Traveling  61 mins –  “Greenwald says one of the most important things savvy travelers can do is “vote with their wings,” supporting places that uphold core values like human rights and environmental protection. Every November, Berkeley-based Ethical Traveler releases its often controversial list of The World’s Best Ethical Destinations. Join a discussion of which nations made the 2011/2012 list, how the winners were selected, and why some wildly popular destinations may never make the cut.” Jeff Greenwald, Executive Director, Ethical Traveler; Malia Everette,  Director, Global Exchange Reality Tours” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethiopia Land Grab 60 mins – “Land Grab in Africa: The Case of Ethiopia – Though Africa is no longer threatened by armed colonizers, foreign exploiters are threatening Ethiopian farmers by obtaining fertile land from African leaders. The governments of many African countries are benefiting from these land transactions, but the people are left impoverished and hungry. Tolossa will suggest ways to improve the desperate situation for Ethiopian farmers. Fikre Tolossa, Ph.D.; Playwright; Author”  At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Conference 63 mins – “Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mike Elgan discuss the Facebook F8 developer conference as it streamed live. Facebook’s venture into virtual reality.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing blue arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Is Us 64 mins – “Did you know that our biological makeup is similar to that of soil? This fascinating fact led practicing family physician Miller to ask: What can a family farmer teach a family doctor? So she spent time on seven ecological family farms, meeting inspiring farmers and renowned biomedical scientists. She will present their insights and research along with stories from her own medical practice.Daphne Miller, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine, UCSF; Author, Farmacology”  At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fatigue Prescription 55 mins – “How in the world did you get so busy? The reasons are legion, and Clever will describe some of them. She will also outline consequences of overload and signs of trouble before she gives tips, self-assessment guides and a doctor’s best advice on how to deal with competing demands. The goal, she says, is to maintain or regain your sense of meaning, your creativity and even joy. She will show how taking care of yourself – body, soul, attitudes, relationships – is not selfish; it is self-preservation. Clever will provide practical and powerful ways to refresh, regroup and renew your energy, health and life. Linda Hawes Clever, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine, UCSF; Founder, RENEW”  At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Federal Aviation Jobs 90 mins – “With the growth in the number of federal job openings related to aviation you might want to satisfy your passion for aviation and serve your country at the same time. There are many benefits and rewards to working for the government but how does one go about finding jobs and applying?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Circumcision 19 mins – “ Khadija Gbla grew up caught between two definitions of what it means to be an “empowered woman.” While her Sierra Leonean mother thought that circumsizing her — and thus stifling her sexual urges — was the ultimate form of empowerment, her culture as a teenager in Australia told her that she deserved pleasure and that what happened to her was called “female genital mutilation.” In a candid and funny talk, she shares what it was like to make her way in a “clitoris-centric society,” and how she works to make sure other women don’t have to figure this out.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Responders 60 mins – “First responders include police, fire and emergency medical services. They have unique cultural norms that allow them to function individually and as a team during high-stress events. The ability to suppress emotions and remain functional despite what is encountered is an asset but can also be a liability when they need help. This presentation will discuss some common first responder cultural norms, how those norms affect treatment, and lessons learned at the West Coast Post-Trauma Retreat.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flying the Concord 126 mins – “Here is another episode in our ongoing (and hopefully never ending :-)) series on flying iconic airplanes. This time we talk with former Concorde pilot John Hutchinson about flying this Mach 2 airliner. We discuss the cornerstones of the design and construction of the aircraft, its operation (mostly with British Airways), flying characteristics as well as the infamous accident in Paris in 2000 (on which John has some very specific opinions).” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foreign Languages 64 mins – “Like me, and like countless other people, Benny spent years taking foreign language classes in high school – to no avail. When he started college, he had all but given up on the prospect of becoming bilingual. Today, the picture couldn’t be more different. Benny speaks 10 different languages, including Spanish, French, Italian, Mandarin Chinese, Irish, and German (and he knows American Sign Language as well).” At the link find and select episode 19, then right-click the orange down-pointing arrow next to the rss link and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Fracking 66 mins – “With a thriving natural gas market in the U.S., oil and energy companies are in a race for fracking rights across the country. The fracking bonanza has led to concern about the oversight of hydraulic fracturing practices. Some states, including Vermont, have reacted by banning fracking altogether until further research is done. Others are working to create regulations as fracking continues apace. Will fracking bolster U.S. economic competitiveness? What are the environmental impacts? How is fracking challenging the status quo in American energy? TJ Glauthier, Former Deputy U.S. Secretary of Energy; former board member, Union Drilling; Mark Zoback, Professor, Stanford University School of Earth Sciences; Kassie Siegel, Senior Counsel, Climate Law Institute Director”  At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking Debate 66 mins – “Supporters of hydraulic fracturing see it as a driver of affordable domestic energy that can create jobs. Opponents see a risk to water supplies, ecosystems and human health. Join in a conversation with reporters covering fracking in California and nationally on the dangers and potential of the natural gas bonanza. Will California pass a moratorium? Will the Monterey Shale really be developed? Is gas really better than coal? David Baker, Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle; Abrahm Lustgarten, Reporter, ProPublica” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking Regulation 51 mins – “…the White House released the first federal regulations on hydraulic fracturing. The new rules, which have been in the works since 2012, apply only to fracking that occurs on public land. But they are an attempt by President Barack Obama to set more uniform safety procedures for fracking throughout the country. The plan was met with immediate criticism from environmental and industry groups alike. Diane and her guests discuss reaction to the new fracking regulations and what the rules will mean for drilling for oil and gas.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Freelancing 17 mins – “Pepsi, GM, and Google are looking to hire journalists, and Contently co-founder Shane Snow is helping them do just that. He discusses the future of freelancing for journalists, and how big companies fit into the picture.” At the link find the title, “The Art (and Business) of Freelancing,” right-click “Media files IHUB-030715-Snow.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Frugal Innovation 62 mins – “Learn about a groundbreaking new paradigm – frugal innovation – being pioneered by visionary entrepreneurs, corporations and government agencies to innovate cost-effectively and sustainably under severe resource constraints. Using frugal innovation methods, these American pioneers are creating affordable solutions that deliver more value at less cost to consumers and citizens in sectors like health care, education and financial services. Beth Comstock, Chief Marketing Officer, General Electric; Mark Hatch, CEO, TechShop ; Halle Tecco, Co-founder and CEO, Rock Health; Jennifer Tescher, President and CEO, Center for Financial Services Innovation; Navi Radjou, Co-author, Jugaad Innovation: Think Frugal, Be Flexible, Generate Breakthrough Growth – Moderator.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gateway to Freedom 37 mins – “Eric Foner talked about his book Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad, in which he examines the efforts of free blacks and white abolitionists to secure freedom for fugitive slaves during the mid-19th century. In his book, the author recounts the development of the New York Vigilance Committee in 1835 as protection against slave kidnappings that occurred in New York City. This group spawned similar organizations throughout the North and ultimately lead to a network that secured the freedom of over 3,000 slaves. He spoke with Edna Greene Medford, chair of the history department at Howard University.” At the link find the title, “After Words: Eric Foner,” right-click “Media files program.389443.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gay and Lesbians in India 62 mins – “Growing up gay and lesbian in India imbues a broad world view consistent with the multi-culturalism of secular India and the pluralistic religions of the subcontinent. At the same time, Asian family pressures drive conformity amid strong expectations of an individual born to be part of a collective. Our speakers have each forged powerful identities as accomplished LGBT activists, authors and builders of a new class of LGBT world citizens equally at home in India and the United States. Devesh Khatu, Minal Hajratwala, Rakesh Modi, Dipti Ghosh” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gaza Grand Piano 27 mins – “Tim Whewell tells the story of how Gaza’s only grand piano is being restored and of how music – for so long played behind closed doors – is being re-introduced to school children.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Saving Gaza’s Grand Piano,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150326-0245a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Pay Gap 46 mins – “Actress Patricia Arquette got the Oscars fired up in a hurry Sunday night when she took the microphone – gleaming statuette in hand – to go after pay disparities for women.  “We’ve fought for everybody else’s equal rights,” she proclaimed from center stage.  “It’s our time to have wage equality.”  Meryl Streep was on her feet in a nano-sceond, fist pumping.  Jennifer Lopez was right beside her.  It’s a hot-button issue.  There was praise for Arquette.  And also questions about the numbers, the message.  This hour On Point:  Gender equity.  What women earn.  And the Arquette cry for equal pay.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genius Is You 59 mins – “Many people think, “If I were a genius, I would have to be as smart as Einstein or as creative as JK Rowing of Harry Potter fame.” Why is that a myth? Sullivan will explain that it’s not true that geniuses are limited to brilliant, highly successful people who have done something the world finds amazing. That widespread notion is actually a modern idea that distorts the original meanings and great potential for the word “genius.” She will discuss the top three things we can do to recover our lost five-year-old genius: First, we explore carefully the true meaning of genius. Next we deal with the elephants in the room: impending death or helplessness as we age ­­ ­– the things we weren’t supposed to see or talk about when we were children. Then, we develop a practice of listening to ourselves so we become fluent in the language of our own heart, and know what we are called to do with our lives. Pat McHenry Sullivan, Founder, Visionary Resources in Oakland, CA; Author, Your Natural Genius: Lost, Found, Ready for Adventure” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genius via Trauma 60 mins – “This week we’re looking at brain injuries, and the ways they change the lives of patients. We’ll talk to Jason Padgett and Maureen Seaberg, authors of “Struck by Genius: How a Brain Injury Made Me a Mathematical Marvel.” And we’ll speak to neuroscientist Dr. Adrian Owen about his brain imaging research detecting awareness in vegetative patients. Note: The article Accidental Genius by Darold A. Treffert can be found on page 52 of the August 2014 issue of Scientific American.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genomic Research 45 mins – “Advances in genomics are allowing us to see how a person’s DNA interacts with their environment and lifestyle to influence his or her health. On this episode, Dr. Eric Green discusses next-generation genomic technology and precision medicine.” At the link right-click Listen to episode” and select “Save Lin As” from the pop-up menu.
Genomic Research 45 mins – “Advances in genomics are allowing us to see how a person’s DNA interacts with their environment and lifestyle to influence his or her health. On this episode, Dr. Eric Green discusses next-generation genomic technology and precision medicine.” At the link right-click “Listen to Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geoengineering 65 mins – “On the show this week we talk to Ken Caldeira, a climate scientist working for the Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Global Ecology at Stanford University. He investigates issues related to climate, carbon, and energy systems. In the interview, we focus on geoengineering—the process of making big changes to the Earth’s climatic system in an attempt to solve issues related to climate change.” At the link find the title, “79 Ken Caldeira – Can Geoengineering Save the Planet?” right-click “Media files 197904675-inquiringminds-79-ken-caldeira-can-geoengineering-save-the-planet.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Getty Museum Loot 63 mins – “Felch and Frammolino led an investigation of the Getty Museum’s four-decade effort to build a world-class antiquities collection and revealed an astounding case of tax fraud, deceit and controversial acquisition relationships across the Mediterranean. Hear these intrepid reporters reveal some of the most shocking secrets and lies in the art world.Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino, Co-authors, Chasing Aphrodite: The Hunt for Looted Antiquities at the World’s Richest Museum” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Business Trends 59 mins – “The Internet is democratizing access to the global marketplace for millions of people around the world. Thanks to online platforms, payment systems and logistics services, companies, nonprofits and individuals can embark on global journeys like never before. In this conversation, Usman Ahmed — Policy Counsel for eBay Inc — and Jake Colvin — Executive Director of the Global Innovation Forum at the National Foreign Trade Council — explore the opportunities for economic development that the Internet unlocks, and the specific challenges that global entrepreneurs and micromultinationals in developing countries face.” At the link beside “Download” right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Crisis 54 mins – “The Global Environmental Crisis: Is There a Place for an Individual Response? Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Center for the Study of Europe and titled “The Global Environmental Crisis: Is There a Place for an Individual Response?”  Our speaker is Dr. Katia Vladimirova, visiting scholar at the Center.” At the link right-click “Download this story” ad select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Googlization of Books 69 mins – “Learn about the legal, cultural and economic implications of Google moving into the center of the publishing ecosystem. Will Google’s presence cheapen the value of “book culture,” or will the power of the service to connect people to information generate a boost to the hopes of those who wish to preserve “long-form” writing and reading? The panel will answer these questions and raise new concerns about our heavy dependence on Google to navigate the world. Siva Vaidhyanathan, Professor of Media Studies and Law, University of Virginia; Author, The Googlization of Everything (And Why We Should Worry); Brewster Kahle, Digital Librarian and Founder, Internet Archive and the Open Content Alliance” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grace Hopper 56 mins – “The Woman Who Invented the Information Age – When we think of the pioneers responsible for the information age, our thoughts often turn to Thomas Watson, Bill Gates, Andy Grove and Steve Jobs. But Beyer will share with us the amazing story of Grace Hopper, the woman whose achievements as a business executive, inventor and visionary created the technical foundation upon which the modern computer industry has been built. Beyer will also discuss the roots of the computer revolution, the role of government in the process of large-scale technical transformation, and the process of invention. Kurt W. Beyer, Author, Grace Hopper and the Invention of the Information Age” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graphic Novels 65 mins – “The popularity of graphic novels is exploding. For many years, these comics were not taken seriously by readers or critics; however, with the recognition and success of works like Ghost World, Persepolis and American Born Chinese, graphic novels have surged to a widely respected status in the literary and art landscape. How did this happen? Are we as a society simply tired of reading huge, verbose novels? Or does this shift illustrate a new appreciation of the synthesis between visual art and literature? Leaders of the form talk about these issues and more. Gene Yang, Creator, American Born Chinese; Andy Hartzell, Creator, Fox Bunny Funny; ; ark Pien, Creator, Long Tail Kitty; Colorist, American Born Chinese ; Dash Shaw, Creator, Body World and Bottomless Belly Button; Summerlea Kashar, Acting Director, Cartoon Art Museum” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grasslands Importance 63 mins – “Forests are often at the center of conversations about using natural systems to capture and store carbon pollution, but research shows grasslands and prairies are similarly important. How they are managed can potentially have a big impact on storing greenhouse gases so they don’t enter the atmosphere. Nudged by researchers and environmentalists, ranchers are learning new ways to handle livestock and the forage they graze on. Conservationists are also having to rethink their strategies as the changing climate pushes species up mountains, while others move toward the poles. How is climate affecting land conservation in the United States and other parts of the world? What is California doing to turn rangelands and cows grazing on them from part of the problem to part of the solution? Join conservationists and a researcher for a discussion about protecting ecosystems in the era of climate disruption.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Growing Food 69 mins – “A young farmer and an older one will speak about the joys and frustrations of food production in the wilds of Oakland and in a Hudson River village. From chard and soybeans to chicken and hogs; death lessons, life lessons, and growing lessons from the authors of Farm City and Growing, Older. Joan Gussow, Author, Growing, Older; Novella Carpenter, Author, Farm City

Guardians of Science 62 mins – Host Vincent Racaniello and guests Maria Julia Marinissen, Edward H. You, and David R. Howell at the ASM Biodefense and Emerging Infections Research meeting talk about alternative careers for scientists. At the link right-click “TWIM#99” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guatemala Forensic Anthropology 9 mins – “In Guatemala’s 36-year conflict, 200,000 civilians were killed — and more than 40,000 were never identified. At the Forensic Anthropology Foundation of Guatemala, Fredy Peccerelli and his team use DNA, archeology and storytelling to help families find the bodies of their loved ones. It’s a sobering task, but it can bring peace of mind — and sometimes, justice.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Laws Talk 66 mins – “Come hear a wide range of views and expert voices tackle one of the most polarizing issues vexing our nation. A spate of recent high-profile massacres, including the shootings in Newtown, Connecticut, has sparked a vigorous national conversation about designing new laws – at the state and federal level – that protect all citizens, including the rights of responsible gun owners. More than 30,000 people die in American annually from gun violence, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Our panel will discuss the national issues and California’s role in the dialogue regarding proposals to ban assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines, to pass stricter laws to buy and license guns and ammunition, to require gun vendors to do background checks on potential owners, and report sales so law enforcement can track guns and their owners. Nancy Skinner, Member, California State Assembly; Benjamin Van Houten, Managing Attorney, Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence; Sgt. Kelly Dunn, SFPD Special Victims and Psychiatric Liaison Units; Gene Hoffman, Chairman, The Calguns Foundation; Member, Board of Trustees, Second Amendment Foundation; John Diaz, Editorial Page Editor, San Francisco Chronicle – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Harvard Digital Issues 53 mins – “The Digital Problem-Solving Initiative (DPSI, or “dip-see”) at Harvard University, is an innovative and collaborative project, hosted through the Berkman Center. DPSI brings together a diverse group of learners (students, faculty, fellows, and staff) to work on projects to address challenges and opportunities across the university. In this talk DPSI participants showcase: a smartphone app to reduce campus assault; a method statisticians can use to protect the anonymity of their subjects; and an innovative, immersive documentary project.” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Costs 61 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy explores the ideas underlying the American health-care system, whose costs, compared to all other countries’, are out of control. Many people argue that our quality and safety of care and clinical outcomes do not justify these costs. Lundberg will describe the whats, the whys and the what-to-dos, followed by a Socratic dialogue with Hammond and an open discussion with the audience. George Lundberg, Editor-at-Large, MedPage Today; Editor-in-Chief, Cancer Commons” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Horse Whips 21 mins – “Race horses are bred to race, but does the whip really make them run faster, or is it just an unnecessary tool that inflicts pain? Dr Jonica Newby reveals some surprising new science about horse tissue and their nervous systems, and even takes a strike herself.” At the link right-click “MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. It’s a video file, but the blog version is audio.

Immune System Affects Brain 57 mins – “This week, how rogue antibodies turned one woman’s existence into a living nightmare of delusions, hallucinations and paranoia, we examine the evidence that ME – or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) – might be an autoimmune disease, and why the blues might be down to a hostile immune response. Plus, how tracking eye movements can be used to influence decisions, why remembering causes you to forget, a new 3d-printer inspired by Hollywood’s Terminator, and the genetic map of the UK: apparently the Romans didn’t fancy breeding with us very much… “ At the link right-click “Download as mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Mechanics 171 mins – “John tackles how the internet works – the most requested topic as voted by Pragmatic listeners in this, the penultimate episode of the show.” At the link and way down at the bottom of the page right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Joan of Arc Film 66 mins – “Composer Richard Einhorn, and CTO of MTI Film Kevin Manbeck talk about restoring the 1928 silent film “The Passion of Joan of Arc,” finding the long lost film print in a janitor’s closet, and correcting the film maker’s mistakes, such as anachronisms.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalist Rescue Effort 58 mins – “Australian journalist Peter Greste addresses the National Press Club after his release from an Egyptian prison.” (“On 29 December 2013, he and two other Al Jazeera English journalists, Mohamed Fadel Fahmy and Baher Mohammad, were arrested by Egyptian authorities. On 23 June 2014, Greste was found guilty by the court, and sentenced to seven years of incarceration. On 1 February 2015, a month after a retrial of Greste, Fahmy and Mohammad was announced, Greste was deported and flown to Cyprus. His colleagues were released on bail on 12 February 2015.”- Wikipedia) At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Peter Greste,” right-click “NPCc_PeterGreste_2603_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrating Families 60 mins – “The number of Central American unaccompanied children and family units arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border has surged in recent years, reaching a peak of 137,000 in 2014. In this Migration Policy Institute webinar, experts from MPI discuss the shifting pattern of Central American migration and expectations for 2015; why inflows present a particularly acute policy challenge; and how states, localities, the federal government, and other countries in the region are responding. Speakers Marc Rosenblum, Margie McHugh, and Doris Meissner provide recommendations on policies that advance both critical protection and enforcement goals in situations of complex, mixed-status flows as well as means to address impacts in communities where child migrants have settled.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mobile Money 50 mins – “When your smart phone is your wallet.  Swipe the phone.  Pay the bill.  We’ll look at life and cash in the age of mobile payment.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MS Diet 46 mins – “Dr. Terry Wahls is a clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa, where she teaches internal medicine residents, sees patients in a traumatic brain injury clinic, and conducts clinical trials. She is also a patient with a chronic progressive neurological disorder – secondary progressive multiple sclerosis – which confined her to a tilt-recline wheelchair for four years. But thanks to the Wahls Protocol™, based on her research into functional medicine and the Paleo diet, Dr. Wahls made a major recovery and now pedals her bike five miles to work each day.  She is the author of Minding My Mitochondria: How I Overcame Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis and Got Out of My Wheelchair, and teaches the public and medical community about the healing power of intensive nutrition.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New Yorker History 28 mins – “The first issue of The New Yorker was published in February of 1925, ninety years ago this month. In celebration of our anniversary, David Remnick, the magazine’s editor, hosts a special episode of Out Loud in which writers and editors revisit New Yorker history, share memories, and discuss how the tone and direction of the magazine have evolved since its founding editor, Harold Ross, first envisioned a publication of “gaiety, wit, and satire.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

NYC Data 12 mins – “City agencies have access to a wealth of data and statistics reflecting every part of urban life. But as data analyst Ben Wellington suggests in this entertaining talk, sometimes they just don’t know what to do with it. He shows how a combination of unexpected questions and smart data crunching can produce strangely useful insights, and shares tips on how to release large sets of data so that anyone can use them.” t the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pedestrian Deaths NYC 30 mins – “Stephen J. DUBNER: Hey podcast listeners. This week we’re replaying an episode from last year called “The Perfect Crime.” Here are a few things that have happened since we ran the episode. In 2014, 132 pedestrians were killed in traffic crashes in New York City, the fewest in a century; this was after 180 pedestrian deaths a year earlier, which was the highest number in a decade. The 2014 decline coincided with Mayor Bill de Blasio’s embrace of a traffic-safety plan called Vision Zero, an import from Sweden, which is meant to eliminate pedestrian deaths entirely within 10 years. Some of the elements of New York’s Vision Zero: a lower default citywide speed limit, 25 mph, down from 30; the aggressive reengineering of problematic intersections; and tougher enforcement of traffic laws, including some of the ones you’ll hear about in this episode. Unless you’re in favor of reckless driving and dead pedestrians, you will probably all of this is a good idea.” At the link find the title, “The Perfect Crime (Rebroadcast),” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Playing Outside 46 mins – “ Hey Kids! Go Outside, Already – American kids today spend only four to seven minutes a day playing outdoors. We hear a new call to raise the “wild child.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Youth 11 mins – “As a teenager, Ismael Nazario was sent to New York’s Rikers Island jail, where he spent 300 days in solitary confinement — all before he was ever convicted of a crime. Now as a prison reform advocate he works to change the culture of American jails and prisons, where young people are frequently subjected to violence beyond imagination. Nazario tells his chilling story and suggests ways to help, rather than harm, teens in jail.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up value.

Professional Wrestling 16 mins – “Five sons enter the wrestling ring, but only one walks out alive.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychedelic Therapy 16 mins – “In the nineteen-fifties and sixties, researchers explored the therapeutic effects of LSD on alcoholism, depression, and a number of other conditions. Then the counterculture came along, LSD became a recreational drug, and the research dried up. In this week’s magazine, Michael Pollan writes about a new wave of researchers who are using hallucinogenic drugs to help terminally ill cancer patients cope with the fear of death. On Out Loud, Pollan joins host Amelia Lester, the executive editor of newyorker.com, to discuss the history of psychedelics research, the difference between a recreational psychedelic journey and a therapeutic one, and why he finds the effects of these drugs so intriguing. Whereas we don’t typically trust the insights we have when we’re drunk or dreaming, Pollan says, patients who take hallucinogens report having “a sturdy, authoritative experience.” “It takes us into an interesting and difficult to navigate intellectual space,” he says. “It’s very exciting territory.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Randomness 65 mins – “Campbell Harvey of Duke University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his research evaluating various investment and trading strategies and the challenge of measuring their effectiveness. Topics discussed include skill vs. luck, self-deception, the measures of statistical significance, skewness in investment returns, and the potential of big data.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recycling 14 mins – “One day it’s profitable to recycle a bottle. The next day, some number in the global economy changes and that bottle suddenly becomes trash. The line between trash and recycling is moving a lot these days. For a bunch of reasons, it’s a tough time to be a recycler” At the link find the tile, “#613: Trash!” right-click “Media files npr_395868155.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sandhogs 26 mins – “Eighty years ago, New York City needed another tunnel under the Hudson River. The Holland Tunnel and the George Washington Bridge could no longer handle the mounting traffic between New Jersey and Manhattan. Thus began construction of the Lincoln Tunnel. But this is not a story about the Lincoln Tunnel. This is about the men who made it. The Sandhogs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seafood Consumption 5 mins – “Here’s yet another food dilemma for the 21st century: Ethically speaking, what’s left that you can actually eat from the ocean? Given how hard it is to know the backstory of the fish on your plate, is there any effort being made to draw down demand for seafood in this country? We put these questions to Paul Greenberg, the bestselling author of “Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food” and “American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood.” [Americans eat] 15 pounds of seafood per person per year. Compare that to Asia [where] you’ve got 35 to 40 pounds of seafood per person per year [or] with the American meat consumption, land food meats. That’s like 200 pounds per person per year. What’s the best fish to buy? The best fish you could buy isn’t a fish, it’s a mollusk. I’m really big these days on mussels, farmed mussels, particularly those grown in the United States — and Canada is not bad either….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right-end of the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Awareness 22 mins – “Yes, all of the usual corporate and government entities know you’re here. Google remembers everything you’ve ever searched, BuzzFeed knows how you’ve scored on all their quizzes, and your cell phone provider knows who you talk to and who you sleep with. Terms of Service agreements are an exercise in futility, encrypted email often takes more trouble than it’s worth, and yeah, sure, go ahead and give Facebook a fake name, but don’t think you’re fooling anyone. Companies are collecting your data from just about everywhere, storing it through time unknown, and using it however they want. Oh, and that’s where the FBI-and-friends find it. But Bruce Schneier, security technologist, cryptographer, and author of a new book called “Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World,” says the fact that you’ve taken the time to read this far means you’ve got the one reliable protection available to us in year 2015: awareness….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tech Trends 52 mins – “In Radio Berkman 216 we tackle the web as we know it in 2014-2015. Hate speech online, freedom of speech online, censorship and surveillance online, and, of course, whether our smart machines are out to destroy us….” At the link right-click “ or download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ten Most Wanted Men 38 mins – “FBI Deputy Director Mark Giuliano and FBI historian John Fox talk about the history and significance of the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted list, which marks its 65th anniversary in March.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Universities 12 mins – Their impact, demands and trends, worldwide. At the link find the title, “A special report on universities: Roll up, pay up,” right-click “Media files 20150325 sr universities_ad.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universities 12 mins – Their impact, demands and trends, worldwide. At the link find the title, “A special report on universities: Roll up, pay up,” right-click “Media files 20150325 sr universities_ad.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wanderu 47 mins – “We talk with Wanderu CEO Polina Raygorodskaya.” Wanderu claims it is the simplest way to book bus and train transportation. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing blue arrow.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 35+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

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