Media Mining Digest 194 – July 31, 2015: 3D Manufacturing, Advanced Care Planning, Aging, Alan Alda, Alternative Currencies, Americans with Disabilities Act, Antisocial Media, Artificial Intelligence, Broadband in Illinois, Career Skills, Carminic Acid, Catalytic Women, Cities in Trouble, Civil Rights Movement, Civility, Climate and Energy, Climate Change, Coal Power in Africa, Colbert and Stewart Shows, Color-Class-Race, Concrete Impact, Conflict Reduction, Corporate Behavior, Creativity and Imagination, Cyber Security and Privacy, Drought Economics, Drug Policy Problems, Drug Resistance, Drug Supplies, Education Testing, Food Supply, Fossil Fuels, Garbology, Gender Equity, Gender Threats, Globalization of Terror, GMO Food, Growth and Resources, Health Care Reform, Higher Ed Future, Human Error, Immigration Enforcement, Immigration Stories, Income Inequality, Innovation Challenges, Internet Addiction, Internet Business, Internet Impact, Internet Value, Islam, Journalism Hazards, Keystone Politics, Latin America Issues, Makers, Market Disruptors, Mathematics, Money Alternatives, Muslim Culture, Nacre, Oil Warfare, Pain Neurologist, Patient Power, Police State, Politics and Fear, Politics of Race, Poverty Issues, Practical Lessons, Programming Bacteria, Race in America, Radical Islam and Women, Retirement Distributions, Robot Waiters, Russia, Science Ethics, Sex Assaults on Campus, Shaming Impact, Statin Issue, Study Habit Rehab, Surviving and Thriving, Surviving the Future, Technological Threats, Terrorism Definition, Water Trends, White House Staff

The following audio files come from a larger group of 244 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 86 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

3D Manufacturing 11 mins –What we think of as 3D printing, says Joseph DeSimone, is really just 2D printing over and over … slowly. Onstage at TED2015, he unveils a bold new technique — inspired, yes, by Terminator 2 — that’s 25 to 100 times faster, and creates smooth, strong parts. Could it finally help to fulfill the tremendous promise of 3D printing?” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Advanced Care Planning 36 mins – “Dr. Rebecca Sudore, Associate Professor of Me”Audiodicine at UCSF, explains that the goal of advanced care planning is to make sure that the medical care a person gets is the medical care that is in line with her or his life goals and values and to prepare people and their loved ones to make informed choices based on what is most important. Recorded on 05/26/2015.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” in the playback window and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging 76 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the process and impact of human aging. At the link find the title, “3115 Aging: It’s Personal, right-click that title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alan Alda 48 mins – “Actor Alan Alda is best known for his TV and movies roles. He played Hawkeye Pierce on the television show MASH; later, he played Sen. Owen Brewster in the film “The Aviator,” which won him an Academy-Award nomination. But Alda also has an alternate career: Science advocate. He’s long had a passion for biology, physics and chemistry and has several science shows, including the PBS series “Scientific American Frontiers” and “The Human Spark.” Alan Alda joins us to talk about his passion for science and efforts to help scientists communicate better with the public.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Alternative Currencies 76 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about past and current replacements for money. At the link find the title, “4981 It’s the Economy Alternative Currencies,” right-click and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Americans With Disabilities Act 48 mins – “More than 50 million Americans have a disability. As a group, they’re the nation’s largest minority. When the Americans with Disabilities Act was signed in 1990, it extended civil rights protections to disabled people for the first time. It guaranteed equal opportunity in employment, transportation, government services and public accommodations like hotels and restrooms. Some say the costs of the ADA are too great. Others argue they’re small when compared to the contributions of disabled people who have access to education, transportation and other things many take for granted. Diane and her guests assess the ADA at age 25.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Antisocial Media 76 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the impact of antisocial media on the internet. At the link find the title, 2765 (Anti)social Media,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence Control 48 mins – “Managing The Artificial Intelligence Risk – Making artificial intelligence work for, not against, humanity. We’ll look at a big new push to get it right.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence Trends 17 mins – “Artificial intelligence is getting smarter by leaps and bounds — within this century, research suggests, a computer AI could be as “smart” as a human being. And then, says Nick Bostrom, it will overtake us: “Machine intelligence is the last invention that humanity will ever need to make.” A philosopher and technologist, Bostrom asks us to think hard about the world we’re building right now, driven by thinking machines. Will our smart machines help to preserve humanity and our values — or will they have values of their own?” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Illinois 22 mins – “The southern Illinois cities of Urbana and Champaign joined the University of Illinois in seeking and winning a broadband stimulus award to build an open access urban FTTH network. After connecting some of the most underserved neighborhoods, the Urbana-Champaign Big Broadband (UC2B) network looked for a partner to expand the network to the entire community.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select “Save Link Ass” from the pop-up menu.

Career Skills 72 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about practical efforts that job hunters can use to find and hold jobs. At the link find the title, “2465 Kick-ass Career Advice: Skills to Build NOW,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carminic Acid 6 mins – “Anger, love, lust, power, sacrifice – the colour red has symbolized them all. The story of one particular red dye has all of these elements and more. This dye’s history is a prickly tale – and not just because it involves prickly pear cacti.Empires and monarchs, church leaders, tradespersons and tycoons, artists – all sought to control a particular red dye. A red dye we now know as cochineal, carminic acid, or carmine….” At the link right-click “Download:…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Catalytic Women 72 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado by women with strong leadership and creativity skills. At the link find the title, “2764 Catalytic Women,” right-click that title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 2165 Lessons from Unsustainable Cities 9:30-10:50

Cities in Trouble 57 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about U.S. cities that are in decline or are undergoing major shrinkage due to business and job losses. At the link find the title, “2165 Lessons from Unsustainable Cities,” right-click that title and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Civil Rights Movement 72 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about civil rights issues and efforts in the United States. At the link find the title, “2166 The New Civil Rights Movements,” right-click that title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civility 70 mins – Panel discussion about the humorous and serious, private and political, social, cultural and historical aspects of civility. At the link find the title, “2315 Civility,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate and Energy 43 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about climate warming and energy usage. At the link find the title, “3711 WALTER ORR ROBERTS DISTINGUISHED LECTURE Ways Forward on Climate and Energy: Getting Good from What We Do and Don’t Know,” right click that title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 68 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the use of geo engineering to correct climate change. (Sound quality varies.) At the link find the title “2914 Geoengineering to Counter Climate Change” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Power in Africa 26 mins – “South Africa is suffering rolling blackouts that are expected to continue for years. Neal Razzell reports on a crisis that some fear could threaten the country’s very stability” At the link find the title, “South Africa Unplugged,” right-click “Media files p02xrfwg.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Colbert and Stewart Shows 77 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the impact of Jon Stewart and the Colbert shows, and suggestions about future activities. At the link find the title, “5111 Jon Stewart and the End of a Colb-era,” right-click that title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Color, Class and Race 41 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about racial conflict, abuse problems and police issues. At the link find the title, “ 4579 The Color Conundrum: A Real Discussion of Race” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concrete Impact 6 mins – You already feel guilty about the car you drive to work, but you might want to start feeling guilty about your workplace too. Reporter Daniel Gross takes a look at why concrete is helping destroy the environment.” At the link find the title, “How Concrete Is Crushing the Earth,” right-click “Media files GROSSCONCRETEWEBMIX.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conflict Reduction 61 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the difference between conflict resolution, reduction and warfare. At the link find the title, “4767 Conflict Resolution with Iran, Ukraine and Russia ,” right-click the title and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Corporate Behavior 10 mins – “Paul Tudor Jones II loves capitalism. It’s a system that has done him very well over the last few decades. Nonetheless, the hedge fund manager and philanthropist is concerned that a laser focus on profits is, as he puts it, “threatening the very underpinnings of society.” In this thoughtful, passionate talk, he outlines his planned counter-offensive, which centers on the concept of “justness.‘” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity and Imagination 80 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about creativity and imagination. At the link find the title, “3861 Creativity and Imagination” right-click and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security and Privacy 60 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the private and government At the link find the title, “4161 Cyber Security and Privacy: We’re All H@cked,” right-click on it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought Economics 22 mins – “On today’s show: the screwed-up economics of drought, and why the rational thing to do in California right now is use more water.” At the link find the title, “#640: The Bottom Of The Well,” right-click “Media files 20150722_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Policy Problems 80 mins – Panel discussion at Colorado University about U.S illegal drug policy, bureaucracy, stigmatization and marginalization problems, policy failures, and criminalization impact. Side issue also raised about antibody resistance, especially concerning animal antibiotics. 2161 Our Tangled Drug Policy 9:30-10:50

Drug Resistance 17 mins – “Penicillin changed everything. Infections that had previously killed were suddenly quickly curable. Yet as Maryn McKenna shares in this sobering talk, we’ve squandered the advantages afforded us by that and later antibiotics. Drug-resistant bacteria mean we’re entering a post-antibiotic world — and it won’t be pretty. There are, however, things we can do … if we start right now.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Supplies and Suppliers 69 mins – Panel discussion about the drug supply business, international competition, impact on HIV, and result of suppression efforts on favelas of Brazil. At the link find the title, “2461 Global Drug Supply, Legal and Illegal,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Testing Problems 74 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about standardized testing, the common core of subjects and common sense. At the link find the title, “5314 Education: Common Core and Common Sense,” right click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Food Supply 74 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about how we feed ourselves. At the link find title, ”1116 How We Feed Ourselves,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fossil Fuels 74 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the worlds’ food supply and problems with future production. At the link find the title, “4611 Energy from Fossil Fuels: Yay, We’ve Got Gas!” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Garbology 46 mins – “Have you ever thought about how much trash you create? Honestly, have you ever stopped to consider how many trash bags you go through, how many trips to the curb you take, or how much food you throw out? Probably not…most of us don’t. But the sad truth is the average American produces 102 tons of garbage across a lifetime and $50 billion in squandered riches are rolled to the curb each year! …and it’s creating a massive problem. This week we speak with Pulitzer Prize-Winning author, Edward Humes about trash – what’s in it, how much we pay for it, how we create so much, what’s wrong with it all and how we fix it. Edward’s amazing book, Garbology: Our Dirty Love Affair with Trash, is raising awareness of trash consumption and is sparking nationwide action.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Equity at Work 79 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the continuing problem of women treated and compensated less than male counterparts. At the link find the title, “2311 Gender and Workplace Equity,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Threats 78 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about gender discrimination in science and corporate management. At the link find the title, “5313 Discrimination in Science and Geek “ right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Globalization of Terror 79 mins – A three-person panel discussion about the appearance and impact of terrorism around the world at University of Colorado. At the link find the title, “1111 The Globalization of Terror,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Food 18 mins – “Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to isolate a gene that allows rice to survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1990s — and makes the case that modern genetics is sometimes the most effective method to advance sustainable agriculture and enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Growth and Resources 78 – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the problem with population increases and available resources. At the link find the title, “4163 Growth, Resources and Global Development,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Reform Review 60 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about how the current Affordable Care Act came to be passed in its current form. At the link find the title, “2766 Health Care Reform Revisited ,” right-click that title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Higher Education Future 79 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the future of education in the United States. At the link find the title, “4912 CU in 20 Years: The Future of Higher Ed,” right-click that title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Error 28 mins – “The human brain is fallible. In emergency situations it can be easily overloaded with information or be unable to override social rules of hierarchy and deference. This can have disastrous consequences, particularly in scenarios like aeroplane failures or surgical emergencies. On 27 March 1977 one of the deadliest ever air crashes happened in Tenerife, killing 583 people. There was nothing technically wrong with either plane involved in the collision. The overriding factor was found to be the authority gradient in the cockpit of one plane with the high status captain overruling the co-pilot who thought they were not cleared for take-off. This was a game changing event for the airline industry. Claudia Hammond investigates how years of research in aviation psychology have made events like that a rarity and have given rise to huge improvements in understanding human behaviour and how mistakes are made so deathly disasters can be prevented. The world of aviation has embraced a so called ‘just culture’ where reporting errors and near misses are encouraged to prevent a similar mistake turning into a disaster in the future. But what has medicine learned from aviation psychology and how close is it to a similar just culture? Surgical check lists have been introduced to try and prevent errors like operating on the wrong limb and making sure teams communicate with one another. But how effective are they and could surgery learn more from aviation about the psychology of safety and being open about errors to prevent them in the future?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Enforcement 83 mins – “In November 2014, President Obama announced a series of executive actions on immigration policy. While much of the immediate attention focused on the expansion of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) initiative and creation of a new Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) program, the announcement also included major changes to federal immigration enforcement practices. MPI analysts presented findings from a new report, which explores these new enforcement priorities and estimates the number of unauthorized immigrants now considered priorities—and nonpriorities—for enforcement. Current and former DHS officials joined the discussion, commenting on the historical context for these enforcement actions and plans for implementation of these new policies.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Stories 62 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about immigration problems confronting families, children and individuals around the United States. At the link find the title, “3511 Immigration: The Tragedy of Doing Nothing,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Income Inequality 68 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about large differences in what people earn world-wide, why this is so, the resulting impact and difficulties facing efforts to reduce improve the situation. At the link find the title, “3864 Income Inequality and the Global Economy,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Challenges 59 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about challenges facing innovators in the the business community. At the link find the title, “5312 Challenges for Business Innovators,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Addiction 48 mins – “Internet Addiction Is Real – Boot-camp style rehabilitation centers in China to treat Internet addiction, and the problem here in the US.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Business 49 mins – “This week on Innovation Hub: the thrill of anticipation, and the agony of computers that can read your mind. Author Dan Mongan talks about how companies will charge us wildly different prices, once they’ve got all our information. Rosalind Picard explains the link between computers and emotions. Peter Moore tells us the history of our quest to predict the weather. And finally, Emma Pierson gives us the lowdown on how she used stats to analyze her love life.” At the link find the title, “7.18.15 Waiting in Anticipation,” right-click “Media files 071815FullShowWebmix-REV.mp3” right-click and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Impact 70 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the global disruptive impact of the internet. At the link find the title, “1712 The Internet: The Real Weapon of Mass Destruction,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Value and Impact 53 mins – “This week’s episode of the Intelligence Squared podcast features two sessions from our recent Digital Summit with Vanity Fair. In the first session, ‘Who are we on the web?’ we examined how deeply the internet is affecting us as human beings. Our panel of experts comprised blogger, journalist and science fiction author Cory Doctorow; author of ‘The Dark Net’ Jamie Bartlett; Director of the 2013 film ‘InRealLife’ Beeban Kidron; and Director of the Governance Lab at NYU Beth Simone Noveck. It was chaired by the UK editor of Vanity Fair Henry Porter.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up.

Islam Revived 49 mins – “Early in the post-colonial era, politics in most Muslim countries were framed in secular and nationalist terms. During the last thirty years, the Islamic revival has dramatically changed this picture. David Cayley talks to anthropologist Saba Mahmood.” At the link find the title, “The Myth of the Secular, Part 3,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150716_12485.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islamic Factions 81 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about moderate and radical types of Islam in the Middle East. At the link find the title “3863 Moderate Versus Radical Islam in the Middle East,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism Hazards 80 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the hazards of being a journalist. At the link find the title, “5116 Armed with Only a Pencil: The Dangers of Being a Journalist,” right-click that title and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Keystone Politics 70 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the Keystone oil pipeline project and its significance, or lack thereof, in dealing with climate change and energy issues.At the link find the title, “2463 Politics of Keystone,” right-click that tile and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latin America Issues 60 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about issues in Latin America. At the link find the title, “4313 Burning Issues in Latin America,” right-click that title and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Makers 57 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the maker movement and its disruptive effect with mention of communication problems and solutions in situations like 9/11 and the Pentagon plane impact. At the link find the title, “1715 Makers: The Movement that Captures the Imagination,” right-click that title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Market Disruptions 67 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about factors causing changes in markets world-wide. At the link find the title, “3811 Market Disrupters: Makers, Shakers and Sharers,” right-click that title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mathematics 60 mins – “This week, we’re diving into the fascinating math that describes the world around us. Guest host Rachelle Saunders speaks to Malcolm Roberts, PhD Applied Mathematician at the University of Alberta, about fluid dynamics, the math that models motion in fluids, gasses, plasmas, and reveals the secret to pouring the perfect beer. And Desiree Schell talks to theoretical astrophysicist Ethan Siegel, about building a reliable science and health news aggregator.” At the link find the title, “#153 Mathtastic! Part One,” right-click “Media files Skeptically_Speaking_153_Mathtastic_Part_One.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Money Alternatives 57 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about efforts to replace older versions of currency with versions that do not require the use of financial institutions in their management. At the link find the title, “1512 The End of Money as We Know It: Bitcoin, ApplePay and Beyond,” right-click that title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muslim Culture in the West 65 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the numbers of Muslims and how they live and impact on communities in North America and Europe. At the link find the title, “2167 The Rise of Muslim Culture in the West” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nacre 5 mins – “It’s well known that the pearls found inside mussels, oysters and other molluscs owe their gleaming iridescence to mother-of-pearl, known also as nacre. Molluscs use nacre to protect themselves from parasites and bits of irritating grit that find their way into their shells; they smother invaders in thin layers of nacre, turning them into smooth, harmless orbs. But that’s not all nacre does…. They all do it not to look pretty, but to make their shells crack-resistant. If a mollusc is attacked by a crab’s claws or fish’s jaws, cracks will most likely begin to spread through the outer shell, composed of a chalky, prismatic form of calcium carbonate. But the cracks will stop when they reach the inner layer of nacre, also made essentially of calcium carbonate – the key difference is nacre’s unique inner structure….” At the link right-click “Download:…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Warfare 72 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the economic impact of oil price manipulation and profit uses. Saudi Arabia, Russia and the U.S. are the biggest producers, but smaller producers are included in the discussion, including the Beverly Hillbillies. At the link find the title, “1513 The Oil Aristocracy Deposed: Economic Warfare,” right-click the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Neurologist 58 mins – “In Understanding Pain: Exploring the Perception of Pain,  Dr. Fernando Cervero does a wonderful job of condensing his 40+ years of research and immersion in the field of pain research into a concise but readable account.  It’s a great introduction, and it’s bound to inspire a new generation of physicians and researchers.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patient Power 19 mins – “Episode 12 of the health podcast from Slate and WBUR offers up three ways to take charge of your medical experience. There are specific ways to feel better about both the quality and cost of your medical care, says Dr. Don Goldmann of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Also, medical informatics wiz Dr. Isaac Kohane on pushing the “blue button” to gain real control of your own medical data. And, we’ll show how telling your own medical story can help you heal…. The Checkup podcast is produced at WBUR by George Hicks. Carey Goldberg is the co-host of WBUR’s CommonHealth blog, and a former Boston bureau chief of the New York Times. Rachel Zimmerman is a former health and medicine reporter for The Wall Street Journal.” At the link find the title, “The Checkup: Power to the Patient,” right-click “Media files checkup15051102_checkup.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police State 79 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the concept of a police state and policing issues. At the link find the title, “3117 Hands Up, Don’t Shoot: Requiem for an American Police State,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politics and Fear 76 mins – Panel discussion at Colorado University about the many uses of fear, how and why it affects public and private impressions and initiatives when dealing with internal and external issues from Iran and Russia to civil rights in the U.S. At the link find the title, “3061 LIVE RADIO BROADCAST A Public Affair Politics and the Culture of Fear” right-click that title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politics of Race 76 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about bureaucratic and political issues that adversely affect people of color in the United States. At the link find the title, “4762 The Politics of Race,” right-click that title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty Issues 78 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the causes and consequences of being poor. At the link find the title, “4461 No Country for Poor Men or Women or Children,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Practical Lessons 67 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about how to deal with people, learn from others and deal with life. At the link find the title, “3512 Lessons Not Learned in School,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Programming Bacteria 4 mins – “Liver cancer is one of the most difficult cancers to detect, but synthetic biologist Tal Danino had a left-field thought: What if we could create a probiotic, edible bacteria that was “programmed” to find liver tumors? His insight exploits something we’re just beginning to understand about bacteria: their power of quorum sensing, or doing something together once they reach critical mass. Danino, a TED Fellow, explains how quorum sensing works — and how clever bacteria working together could someday change cancer treatment.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race in America 68 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about many aspects of race in America: white privilege, migrant workers, multitude of ways people of color are overlooked, ignored, mistreated and emperiled. At the link find the title, “2612 Race in America: The Melting Pot Is Boiling Over,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radical Islam and Women 80 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the impact of radical Islam on women in the Muslim world. At the link find the title, “4614 Radical Islam and Women,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Retirement Distributions 42 mins – “Paul Merriman discusses ten lessons for those investors planning to retire on a fixed distribution strategy. Fixed distribution strategies are those built on a base need with the long-term requirement of increasing distributions due to increases in inflation. Paul references the Fine Tuning Table as well as 3 tables on fixed distributions. He recommends printing those tables for use during this podcast.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Waiters 17 mins – “We go out for pizza and meet the latest group of workers getting replaced by machines: servers.” At the link find the title, “#624: I, Waiter,” right-click “Media files 20150516_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Role 68 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the role of Russia in regional and international conflict, economics and politics. At the link find the title, “3713 The New Russia Is the Old Soviet Union,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Ethics 68 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about science ethics in dealing with the environment. At the link find the title, “2615 Science Ethics: Means and Ends” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Assault on Campus 62 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about the problem of sex assaults on campuses. At the link find the title, “2614 Sexual Assault on the College Campus,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shaming Impact 22 mins – “Public shaming as a blood sport has to stop,” says Monica Lewinsky. In 1998, she says, “I was Patient Zero of losing a personal reputation on a global scale almost instantaneously.” Today, the kind of online public shaming she went through has become constant — and can turn deadly. In a brave talk, she takes a hard look at our online culture of humiliation, and asks for a different way.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Statin Issue 47 mins – “New Science On Old Methods For Cholesterol Reduction – A lot more people should be on statins to lower cholesterol, according to new studies. We’ll look at the science and risks. Plus: the broad successes in a Colorado effort to decrease unplanned pregnancies.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Study Habit Rehab 42 mins – “Some failures follow you. Some can restrict your future choices. But most don’t spell game over. Failing a class – heck, even an entire semester – is something that can be recovered from with new habits, better study strategies, and a better work ethic. Case in point – Clarissa Rodriguez graduated high school (which came easy to her) and ended up failing classes all throughout her first three years of college.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surviving and Thriving 68 mins – Panel presentation at the University of Colorado by women who have experienced catastrophes and were able to carry on with their lives. At the link find the title, “4311 Stories of Surviving and Thriving,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surviving the Future 74 Panel discussion by David Brin, Jamais Cascio, and Andy Ihnatko at the University of Colorado about trends and problems they may bring about for the world or parts of it. At the link find the title, “4462 Science: Surviving the Future,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technological Threats 81 Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about various technological threats and how to cope with them. At the link find the title, “4162 Working Women: The Struggle Continues,” right-click the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Definition 72 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado about evolving aspects of terrorism. At the link find the title, “3529 The Changing Face of Terrorism,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Trends 8 mins – “The reason New England was snowed under — and California went dry” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White House Staff 28 mins – “Kate Andersen Brower discusses her book, [The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House] on the first family’s private moments as seen through the eyes of White House staff, including chief ushers, butlers, maids, chefs, and florists.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Kate Andersen Brower,” right-click “Media files program.398007.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic library of 7000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually (right-click “Podcast Encyclopedia” there to download the zip).  Over 240 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 193 – July 24, 2015: Abortions, Abuse of Women, Alcohol Effect, Bad Research, Big Science, Blogging for Profit, Broadband in Massachusetts, Calculus Wars, Cargo Ships, Cell Phone Radiation, Chemistry Elements, Civil War Women, Conspiracy Skeptic, Contagion and Commerce, Dark Matter, Driverless Cars, Drugs of Abuse, Economic Decline of the U.S., Educational Tech Startups, Energy Systems, Entrepreneurship, Exercise and Fitness, Fecal Transplants, Food Science, Forest Fires, Globalization of Terror, Habits, Health Controversies, Human Resources, Hyaluronic Acid, India’s Parsis, Innovation, Leadership Character, Market Disrupters, Mathematics, Medical Device Innovation, Mental Hospital, Networking and Trust, Newton, Nobel Prize Women, Nuclear power, Palliative Care, Personalized Medicine Innovation, Population Growth, Pyramid Schemes, Rabies, Salt History, Singapore, Skeptical Thinking, Skeptical Women, Social Media Disadvantages, Software, Speech Recognition, Waste Management, Water Contaminants, Water History, Water in Jamestown, World War One

The following audio files come from a larger group of 267 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 63 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Abortions 11 mins – “Abortion is extremely common. In America, for example, one in three women will have an abortion in their lifetime, yet the strong emotions sparked by the topic — and the highly politicized rhetoric around it — leave little room for thoughtful, open debate. In this personal, thoughtful talk, Aspen Baker makes the case for being neither “pro-life” nor “pro-choice” but rather “pro-voice” — and for the roles that listening and storytelling can play when it comes to discussing difficult topics.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Abuse of Women 17 mins – “With his signature resolve, former US President Jimmy Carter dives into three unexpected reasons why the mistreatment of women and girls continues in so many manifestations in so many parts of the world, both developed and developing. The final reason he gives? “In general, men don’t give a damn.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcohol Effect 60 mins – “In honor of your possible New Year’s over-indulgence, we discussed alcohol with Dr. Rob Tarzwell and Dr. Ken Mukamal. How does intoxication work? When is alcohol actually good for you, and how much is too much? And of course… how to get rid of a hangover.” At the link find the title, “#40 Alcohol,” right-click “Media files Skeptically_Speaking_040_Alcohol.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bad Research 60 mins – “Cognitive psychologist Barbara Drescher joins us to discuss the common mistakes scientists make, and what happens to the science when their research goes wrong. And on Speaking Up, journalist David Dobbs explains the case against Marc Hauser, a prominent Harvard evolutionary biologist who was recently found guilty of scientific misconduct.” At the link find the title, “#77 Bad Research,” right-click “Media files Skeptically Speaking 077, Bad Research.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Science 55 mins -”On the show this week we talk to Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Michael Hiltzik about his new book Big Science: Ernest Lawrence and the Invention that Launched the Military-Industrial Complex.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blogging for Profit 45 mins – “When you think about professional blogging, what’s the first thing that comes to your mind? Mommy bloggers of course! The term “mommy blog” has become part of our common lexicon due to the insane success of so many mothers turned bloggers. And this week we are fortunate to interview the queen of mommy blogs, Deedra Determan. Deedra created a blog initially targeted towards moms in her local community and quickly turned it into a 7-figure business with national reach. In this episode Deedra teaches us how to start small, find your niche, create a profitable business, market on a zero dollar budget, and much more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Massachusetts 10 mins – “Why are over 450 towns in the US building their own high speed Internet networks? Let’s look at the example of the small town of Holyoke, Massachusetts. A few years back the town’s mayor asked if the local cable or telephone companies wanted to build a fiber network to serve local schools and municipal buildings. The companies declined. The project was turned over to the local gas and electric utility, HG&E. Eighteen years later, HG&E have expanded this network to serve local businesses, and even other towns in the area. And it turns out this investment has more than paid for itself. On this week’s episode we talk about what happens when municipal utilities and companies compete to provide local Internet services.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Calculus Wars 60 mins – “We talk to Jennifer Ouellette, author of The Calculus Diaries: How Math Can Help You Lose Weight, Win in Vegas, and Survive a Zombie Apocalypse. We’ll find out how much advanced math figures into our daily lives, and how even the mathematically challenged can learn to love the language of numbers. And hip-hop science advocate Baba Brinkman returns to discuss his new project, The Rap Guide to Human Nature. Find out more about Baba’s crowdfunding drive for the Rap Guide to Evolution DVD!” At the link find the title, “#87 The Calculus Diaries,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cargo Ships 50 mins – “In our globalized world, it only takes a click to buy something from China and have it delivered right to your doorstep. But that product sailed across the ocean on a cargo ship before it got to you. Over 90 percent of global trade travels across the ocean by ship. In this episode, we’ll step on board some of these ships and meet the sailors who work there. What’s it like to live for months at sea, isolated with only your co-workers? And when a ship stops in the USA, how do sailors spend the few precious hours they have on shore? Tune in to this hour with guest producer Allison Swaim to find out.” At the link find the title, “Truckers of the High Seas,” right-click “Media files Truckers_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cell Phone Radiation 60 mins – Researcher and Scientopia blogger Scicurious returns to discuss the fact and fiction of mobile phones. What effect do they have on brain cells? What about sperm cells? And do they have anything to do with declining populations of bees? And we’re joined by medical physicist Dr. Marc MacKenzie, to discuss the science of microwave radiation.” At the link find the title, “#115 Cell Phone Science,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chemistry Elements 60 mins – “Guest host Rachelle Saunders talks to science writer Sam Kean, about his book The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements. And we’ll learn about cutting edge research into light-bending metamaterials, with Dr. Peter Palffy-Muhoray, Professor, of Chemical Physics and Associate Director of the Liquid Crystal Institute & Chemical Physics Program at Kent State University. At the link find the title, #128 Elemental Intrigue,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil War Women 40 mins – “Cokie Roberts talks about her new book “Capital Dames: The Civil War and the Women of Washington, 1848-1868.” The book profiles the wives, sisters and female friends of the men leading America into, and through, this unprecedented conflict.” At the link find the title, “Cokie Roberts,” right-click “Media files IM_20150711.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conspiracy Skeptic 60 mins – “We talk to Karl Mamer, host of The Conspiracy Skeptic, a podcast that examines the breathless claims and the actual evidence behind today’s most tenacious conspiracy theories. On Speaking Up, we speak with geneticist Josh Witten on what irrational beliefs can teach us about evolutionary theory, and Skeptic North Blogger Kim Hebert examines 21 studies claimed to support homeopathy. You can read the blog post that inspired Josh Witten’s Speaking Up on The Finch & Pea. You can also read Kim Hebert’s examination of all 21 of these studies at Skeptic North.” At the link find the title, “#74 The Conspiracy Skeptic” right-click “Media files Skeptically Speaking 074, The_Conspiracy_Skeptic.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Contagion and Commerce 60 mins – “This week, we’re looking at some of the less savory effects of global trade and market economies. We’ll speak to Mark Harrison, Director of the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine and Professor of the History of Medicine at Oxford University, about his book Contagion: How Commerce Has Spread Disease. And we speak to Nora Szech, Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Bamberg, about her research into the ways that markets influence moral decision making.” At the link find the title, “#217 Money Matters,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dark Matter 60 mins – “What do you get when all the stuff in the universe can’t account for the mass we observe? You get Dark Matter, that mysterious source of gravity that might be the only thing keeping galaxies from flying apart. This week, guest host Rachelle Saunders talk to Carsten Krauss, assistant professor at the physics department of the University of Alberta, about what Dark Matter is, how we discovered it, and how we know it’s there if we can’t actually observe it. And Desiree Schell talks to David Grelli from the Edmonton New Technology Society.“ At the link find the title, “#165 Dark Matter,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Decentralized Disruption 57 mins – “In this podcast, innovative thinkers Frank Diana, TCS and Timo Elliott, SAP  along with a renowned futurist discuss the exciting disruption that will occur when de-centralization accelerates. In the i” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. ndustrial age, businesses grew by utilizing centralized services. Railroads and electric power companies are two examples of industries where companies expanded to improve the services they delivered. The bigger they became, the better they could service their markets. In the paradigm shift that is emerging in 2015-2020, technology is enabling de-centralization.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Driverless Cars 15 mins – “Statistically, the least reliable part of the car is … the driver. Chris Urmson heads up Google’s driverless car program, one of several efforts to remove humans from the driver’s seat. He talks about where his program is right now, and shares fascinating footage that shows how the car sees the road and makes autonomous decisions about what to do next.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drugs of Abuse 60 mins – “…and drugs are a hell of a science. Researcher and blogger Scicurious returns to examine the various substances that we use to alter consciousness. How do they affect us, how do we study them, and do they have any uses beyond their recreational properties? And we’ll speak to Dr. David Kroll, Chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at North Carolina Central University, about cannabimimetics, synthetic compounds that mimic the effects of marijuana.” At the link find the title, “#142 Science is a Hell of a Drug,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Decline of the U.S. 57 mins – “Lee Ohanian, Arnold Kling, and John Cochrane talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the future of freedom, democracy, and prosperity. Recorded in front of a live audience at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution as part of a conference on Magna Carta, the three guests give their perspective on the future of the American economy and the interaction between politics and economics. Each guest makes a brief presentation at the start followed by a moderated conversation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Tech Startups 57 mins – “Jennifer Carolan, managing director of the NewSchools Seed Fund, talks about the opportunities for technology companies interested in contributing to the changing landscape of education. In conversation with Stanford Engineering Consulting Associate Professor Steve Blank, Carolan discusses common mistakes of ed-tech founders and the need for engineers and consumer technologists in creating innovation in education.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download mp3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Systems 60 mins – “This week, we’re  joined by Maggie-Koerth Baker, Science Editor at Boing-Boing, to talk about her new book Before the Lights Go Out: Conquering the Energy Crisis Before It Conquers Us. Maggie will discuss the economics and social incentives that spurred the growth of our existing energy system, and what we can do to prepare for a new energy future.” At the link find the title, “#160 Before the Lights Go Out,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Entrepreneurship 53 mins – “People, passion, perseverance. Former AOL CEO and Chairman Steve Case describes these words as the bedrock of successful entrepreneurship. Heading into what may be a “golden era of entrepreneurship,” he says that he relies on the “three p’s” as assessment tools to help guide his direction and goals. When all of the three parts are in balance, an entrepreneur can achieve success like that of AOL; when they aren’t, you get the failure of the AOL-Time Warner merger.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download mp3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Entrepreneurship Successes 55 mins – “Alon Cohen, co-founder and president of Houzz, a leading platform for home remodeling and design, shares insights on being an immigrant entrepreneur in Silicon Valley, and how the drive to work hard and persevere are more essential than mere talent. Cohen explains that success rests on building products that are both useful and simplify complicated tasks.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download mp3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exercise and Fitness 60 mins – “This week, we’re looking at what the evidence has to say about common claims about diet, exercise, weight loss and other hot health topics. We’re joined by health law professor Timothy Caulfield, to talk about his book The Cure for Everything! Untangling the Twisted Messages About Health, Fitness and Happiness. And researcher and science blogger Scicurious looks at a new study of coffee consumption, and the effect it may – or may not – have on life expectancy.” At the link find the title, “#166 The Cure for Everything,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fecal Transplants 60 mins – “This week, we’re skipping to the tail end of the digestive tract, to learn some fascinating facts about feces. Rachelle Saunders welcomes science journalist Maryn McKenna back to the show to discuss human gut bacteria, and the biome-boosting power of fecal transplants. Desiree Schell speaks to anthropologist Cecil Lewis about what studying ancient poo can tell us about the evolution of the human microbiome. And Rachelle speaks to zoologist Eric Warrant about how some species of dung beetles can navigate by the light of the night sky.” At the link find the title, “#233 Poop,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Science 60 mins – “This week, we’re exploring the everyday experiments that take place in our very own kitchens. Desiree Schell speaks to Guy Crosby, Science Editor for America’s Test Kitchen, about his book “The Science of Good Cooking.” And geneticist and science writer Torah Kachur returns to the show, to take a scientifically informed look at the future of food.” At the link find the title, “#232 Food Science,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forest Fires 60 mins – “Three key interviews on new role of fire during global warming. John Betts on super fires and what we can do. Tom Gower on science of burning north lands. Marc-Andre Parisien on mega-fires in Canadian North. As forest fires rage across the Western half of North America, I’ve prepared a special show for your summer listening…This week I’ve pulled three of our best Radio Ecoshock interviews on the new age of super fires. And there’s a super fire raging right now in the Canadian prairie province of Saskatchewan. In the north is a fire burning over 100,000 hectares, about 250,000 acres of boreal forest. Our guest John Betts tells us about the new age of super fires, their causes and what communities and individuals can do to reduce the risk of unstoppable fires in the age of global warming.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” in the download area and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Globalization of Terror 79 mins – Panel discussion about terrorism types, locations, causes and implications. At the link find the title, “1111 The Globilization of Terror,” right-click it then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Habits 27 mins – “ …Our guest is Charles Duhigg. He’s the author of The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business and it’s basically a summation of all the research that’s been going on in recent years about the science of habit formation. What goes on in our brain in every form to have it? And Charles Duhigg has basically laid out this process that we go through in order to form our habits called the habit loop. And he talks about how you can use the habit loop and hack it to transform bad habits into good habits and how to make new habits.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Habits and Addiction 32 mins – “According to recent studies, 45 percent of your life is beyond your control… not in a metaphorical way, but quite literally: much of your day is spent moving through the learned behavioral patterns we often call habits. Habits include everything from your daily exercise routine (or lack thereof) to how you put one foot in front of the other, and how you use a fork or spoon. These are things we do “mindlessly,” out of habit. Charles Duhigg, a reporter for the New York Times, has been researching the scientific and social history of habits for his new book, The Power of Habit. In it, he discusses the unique ways that habits shape our lives, both neurologically and practically. He learned that habits are powerfully hardwired into your brain — and stored separately from your memories — making them rather easy to develop and very difficult to change. Essentially, habits clear up space for the brain to tackle harder task. According to Duhigg, “Habits are a cornerstone of higher cognition.’” At the link right-click Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Controversies 60 mins – “We’ll talk to medical physicist Dr. Marc MacKenzie about the new scanning equipment that’s causing a stir at U.S. airports. How do the machines actually work, and is their radiation dangerous? And Dr. Brian Goldman, the host of CBC’s “White Coat, Black Art” shares his expert opinion on Dr. Paolo Zamboni’s Liberation Therapy, a treatment that claims to drastically reduce the symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis. We also spoke briefly to Kim Hebert about the 2010 Skeptic North Awards.” At the link find the title, “#89 Health Controversies,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Resources 60 mins – “This week, we’re taking a break from live recording. Guest host Marie-Claire Shanahan spends the hour looking at the infrastructure that makes our modern, increasingly urbanized lives possible. She’s joined by journalist Scott Huler, author of the book On the Grid: A Plot of Land, an Average Neighborhood, and the Systems that Make our World Work. And she’ll speak to environmental journalist and urban design critic Tim De Chant, about his population density blog Per Square Mile.” At the link find the title, “#170 Infrastructure and You,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hyaluronic Acid 6 mins – “…Hyaluronic acid, also known as hyaluronan, is one of a group of naturally occurring complex organic compounds called glycosaminoglycans, that form long polysaccharide chains with a repeating formula of C14H21NO11. It was first found in the vitreous humour – the clear gel that fills the eye – which is where its name, combining ‘hyalos’, the Greek for ‘vitreous’, with ‘uronic acid’, originates. But hyaluronic acid also occurs widely in connective tissues, forming a major component of the matrix that supports cells in an organism. Its properties were first investigated by the German biochemist Karl Meyer at the University of California, Berkeley in the 1930s. The compound is also a significant component of skin, where it has a role in tissue repair, hence the enthusiasm of the cosmetic manufacturers….” At the link right-click “Download:…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian’s Parsis 18 mins – “India’s Parsi population is in steep decline. Now the government’s funding fertility treatment and advocacy to encourage the community to make more Parsi babies.” At the link find the title, “Saving India’s Parsis,” right-click “Media files p02wzdfj.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation 17 mins – “What’s the secret to unlocking the creativity hidden inside your daily work, and giving every great idea a chance? Harvard professor Linda Hill, co-author of “Collective Genius,” has studied some of the world’s most creative companies to come up with a set of tools and tactics to keep great ideas flowing — from everyone in the company, not just the designated “creatives.’” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leadership Character 45 mins – “We’ve all been taught the golden rule – “treat others as you want to be treated”. Our parents raise us with the best intentions – they tell us to be nice to one another, and not to step on others to get ahead. But is that actually good advice? Is it better to have high moral character and put others first, or is it a dog eat dog world where nice guys finish last? This week we speak with Fred Kiel, co-founder of KRW International, leadership researcher, and author of the new book, Return on Character: The Real Reason Leaders and Their Companies Win. In this book (and episode), Fred summarizes seven years of research on the connection between the character of the CEO and return on assets.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Market Disrupters 80 mins – Panel discussion about forces that disrupt for good and those that pose obstacles in need of disruption, such as communications problems during the 9/11 attacks. At the link find the title, “3811 Market Disrupters: Makers, Shakers and Sharers,”right-click it and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mathematics 60 mins – “This week, guest host Rachelle Saunders is back for part two of our two-part series on the fun and fascinating world of math. Rachelle spends the whole hour with Ian Stewart, mathematician, professor of Mathematics at the University of Warwick, and author of over two dozen books, on topics from chaos theory to symmetry, and the history of math itself.” At the link find the title, “#154 Mathtastic! Part Two,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Device Innovation 60 mins – “Josh Makower, CEO of ExploraMed, speaks briefly about his experience working in medicine and technology. Dr. Makower also discusses at length the numerous political, financial, and regulatory hurdles against future medical innovation, and calls for audience involvement in the tangled web of healthcare, patents, and insurance reimbursement.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download mp3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Hospital 53mins – “Back in 2004, staff producer Laura Starecheski visited a state mental hospital in Queens, New York, called Creedmoor. She stumbled on to a mystery there that would take almost ten years to unravel. In this special hour, we bring you just this one story: an artist stuck in the catch-22 of a lifetime.” At the link find the title, “The Hospital Always Wins,” right-click “Media files TheHospitalAlwaysWins_Podcast1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Networking and Trust 60 mins – “This week, we’re talking about trust and cooperation, and the implications these social values have for security in the era of global networking. We’re joined by security technologist and author Bruce Schneier, to talk about his book Liars and Outliers: Enabling the Trust Society Needs to Survive. And anthropologist/blogger Greg Laden returns to discuss speculation about cognitive limits on the use of social networks. For more on the debate between Bruce Schneier and Sam Harris over the effectiveness of profiling in airport security, check out Harris’ essay, Schneier’s response, and the resulting debate.”#167 Liars and Outliers right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Newton 60 mins – “This week, we’re digging into a fascinating and little known chapter in the life of one of the giants of modern science. Guest host Marie-Claire Shanahan spends the hour with Tom Levenson, Professor of Science Writing at MIT, to talk about his book Newton and the Counterfeiter: The Unknown Detective Career of the World’s Greatest Scientist.” At the link find the title,“#163 Newton and The Counterfeiter,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Noble Prize Women 60 mins – “Author Sharon Bertsch McGrayne returns to tell us about more about the most influential women in the history of modern science. Part 1 of the episode is…[at Episode 51]. And on Speaking up, we talk to our own Ryan Bromsgrove explains everything you need to know about Quantum Misappropriations, and to Nicole Gugliucci with an update on Dark Skies, Bright Kids.” At the link find the title, “#75 Nobel Prize Women in Science Part 2,” right-click “Media files Skeptically Speaking 075, Nobel Prize Women, Part 2.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Power 60 mins – “Fascinating discussion on nuclear power with Dr. Jeremy Whitlock, reactor physicist and author of the website The Canadian Nuclear FAQ, and Elena Schacherl, founder and Co-chair of Citizens Advocating the Use of Sustainable Energy (CAUSE), which is a member of the Coalition for a Nuclear Free Alberta.” At the link find the title, “#11 Nuclear Power,” right-click “Media files Skeptically_Speaking_011_Nuclear_Power.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Power 62 mins – “Robert Stone is a documentary filmmaker. One of his most recent works is ‘Pandora’s Promise,’ which makes the environmental case for nuclear energy. He recently co-founded the non-profit clean energy advocacy group Energy for Humanity based in London, and is a co-author of the Ecomodernist Manifesto.” At the link click on “Download,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Palliative Care. 81 mins – “Palliative Care: Who is it For What Does it Do Why Should I Want it and When?” At the link find the title, “Palliative Care: Who…,” right-click “Media files 29714.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Personalized Medicine Innovation 56 mins – “Sean George, president and chief operating officer of genetics-information company Invitae, explains how the rewards of entrepreneurship come from facing the major challenges along the way. In this insightful talk, the serial entrepreneur also underscores the necessity of a team’s focus on mission to see a venture through adversity.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download mp3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Population Growth 60 mins – “The human population of planet Earth is rapidly approaching 7 billion. This week, we’ll look at how fast our numbers are growing, what they mean for things like resources and the environment, and what we can do about it. Maybe. We’re joined by William Ryerson, President and Founder of Population Media Center and President of Population Institute. And on the podcast, we’ll get a lesson in how population projections are created, and how reliable they are, with Dr. Ronald Lee, Director of the Center on the Economics and Demography of Aging, and professor in the Department of Demography at the University.” At the link find the title, “#125 Global Population,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pyramid Schemes 60 mins – “This week, we’re joined by Robert FitzPatrick, founder of Pyramid Scheme Alert, and co-author of False Profits: Seeking Financial and Spiritual Deliverance in Multi-Level Marketing and Pyramid Schemes. He’ll discuss the promises and pitfalls of schemes, and how to tell legitimate direct selling from multi-level marketing scams. And we speak to Paul Piff, researcher at the Institute of Personality and Social Research at the University of California, Berkeley, about his research on the relationship between social class and unethical behavior.” At the link find the title, “#161 False Profits,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rabies 60 mins – “This week, we’re talking about a viral menace that’s one of the scariest – and deadliest – known to science. We’ll talk to WIRED editor Bill Wasik  and veterinarian Monica Murphy about their book Rabid: A Cultural History of the World’s Most Diabolical Virus. And on the podcast, we’ll speak to post-doctoral researcher Elisabeth Whyte, about a crowd-funded project to use computer games to help adolescents with autism improve social skills and face processing abilities.” At the link find the title, “#190 Rabid,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salt History 48 mins (2 parts) – “Steph McGovern sets out to explain the role of Salt in our history. She hears how it has taken root in our language, visits a chemistry class to find out about how it is produced and its importance to our physical well being. She talks to history professor Peter Wallenstein about the unexpected importance of salt in military strategy right up until the 20th Century. …turns her attention to salt’s role in our diet. She begins in Wales at the Halen Mon sea salt company, learning how they produce their salt from the waters of the Menai Straits, then moves on to learn more about the wide variety of artisan salts that have become so popular in recent years – from French Fleur du Sel to the beautiful pink Himalayan Rock Salt. She goes on to address the issue of salt and health.” At the link find the title, “Salt and its Diverse History – Part One,” right-click “Media files p02x2v0v.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part Two at “Media files p02xpl0w.mp3”.

Singapore 10 mins – “…Singapore is, to use a word its leaders favour, an “exceptional” place: the world’s only fully functioning city-state; a truly global hub for commerce, finance, shipping and travel; and the only one among the world’s richest countries never to have changed its ruling party. At a May Day rally this year, its prime minister, Lee Hsien Loong, asserted that “to survive you have to be exceptional.” This special report will examine different aspects of Singaporean exceptionalism and ask whether its survival really is under threat. It will argue that Singapore is well placed to thrive, but that in its second half-century it will face threats very different from those it confronted at its unplanned, accidental birth 50 years ago. They will require very different responses. The biggest danger Singapore faces may be complacency—the belief that policies that have proved so successful for so long can help it negotiate a new world….” At the link find the title at the bottom of the page, “Special report: Singapore,” right-click “Media files 20150715_sr_singapore.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. (Watch the video here.)

Skeptical Thinking 60 mins – “We spoke to Jonathan Strickland, senior writer and “TechStuff” for howstuffworks.com, about the importance of critical thinking when examining new technology, and when determining whether the tech we use now does what it claims. And on Speaking Up we talk to Tyson Wozniak on skeparent.com.” At the link find the title, “#50 Investigating Technology,”right-click “Media files Skeptically Speaking_050, Investigating_Technology.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Skeptical Women 60 mins – “In honor of Ada Lovelace Day, author Sharon Bertsch McGrayne joined us to discuss the lives, careers and Nobel Prize-winning research of women scientists. And on Speaking Up we talk to Heidi Anderson previews She Thought.” At the link find the title, “#51 Nobel Prize Women in Science,” right-click “Media files Skeptically Speaking, 051_Nobel Prize Women.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Disadvantages 16 mins – “Today, a single email can launch a worldwide movement. But as sociologist Zeynep Tufekci suggests, even though online activism is easy to grow, it often doesn’t last. Why? She compares modern movements — Gezi, Ukraine, Hong Kong — to the civil rights movement of the 1960s, and uncovers a surprising benefit of organizing protest movements the way it happened before Twitter.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Innovation 54 mins – “Alec Ross, Senior Advisor for Innovation in the Office of Secretary of State and Co-founder of global non-profit One Economy, discusses in detail innovation policy and how it can change national diplomacy. In addition, Ross offers advice to global innovators, stressing quality time management, effective hiring practices, the mutual benefits of mentoring, and assertive risk practices.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Software CEO 46 mins – “Lew Cirne, founder and CEO of New Relic, discusses his experiences as a serial entrepreneur, in conversation with Stanford Engineering Professor Tom Byers. Cirne talks about finding one’s strengths as a leader, the challenge of discovering a company’s second act, and why the best engineers must possess real empathy for the users of their products.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download mp3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Speech Recognition 76 mins – “Bertrand and Gerald of Audeme tell us about speech recognition without the aid of cloud processing and without the requirement of audio training. A private, language model based platform for controlling projects.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Waste Management 24 mins – “The 2013 Edition of the American Society of Civil Engineers’ Infrastructure Report Card gave its highest grade – a B minus – to the category of solid waste management, up from a C plus in the 2009 report card. According to the ASCE, while recent figures show that Americans generate about 250 million tons of solid waste annually, about 85 million tons of that – or 34% – is recycled. As well, the generation of waste per person today is less than it was 20 years ago. The hosts discuss what the U.S. is doing right in regard to solid waste – and how we still might improve – with Debra Reinhart, a Professor in the Civil, Environmental and Construction Engineering Department at the University of Central Florida, who was in charge of the solid waste evaluations for the 2013 ASCE Infrastructure Report Card.” At the link find the title, “Solid waste management – an overview of improvements in the U.S.,” right-click “Media files Solid-Waste-Management.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Contaminants 60 mins – “This week, we take another look at water, and what happens to it after it goes down the drain. Researcher Liz Borkowski joins us for a look at the connection between sewage and civilization, and the struggle to introduce modern sanitation in the developing world. And we’ll talk to Dr. Alistair Boxall, about the sources and effects of pharmaceutical contaminants in the environment. Unfortunately, we had some issues with Dr. Boxall’s recording that we couldn’t overcome in post-production. As a result, his interview is not up to our usual technical standards. We apologize for the inconvenience.” At the link find the title, “#103 Sewer Science,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water History 60 mins – “This week, we’re looking at the science and the history of the water that makes life and society possible. We’ll speak to law and environment professor James Salzman, about his book Drinking Water: A History. And we’re joined by Juewen Liu, chemistry professor at the University of Waterloo, to talk about his work using DNA to detect water-borne impurities that could make water unsafe.” At the link find the title, “#209 Drinking Water,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water in Jamestown 6 mins – “For the English colonists who arrived in Virginia in May 1607, Jamestown Island seemed like the perfect spot to settle down. 60 miles inland from the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, it. was situated at a deep channel in the James River that allowed English ships access to the fort. The site seemed easy to defend from both the enemy Spanish and any hostile Native Americans. On top of that, the colonists had access to the James for drinking water. When they arrived in the spring, they noted that the water was “sweet,” the term then used for fresh water. But just a few months after their arrival, the new site didn’t seem nearly as attractive as it once had. Many colonists began to feel sick, and by September, more than half the colonists had died from a disease they called the “bloody flux” —better known today as dysentery. Now, this wasn’t the first time the colonists had seen the disease in action, and they knew what was to blame: the water. What had once had been “sweet” had become, as colonist George Percy put it, “full of slime and filth.’” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One 55 mins – “World War I was sometimes called “the war to end all wars.” But a hundred years after the fighting began, it’s become a war that’s often forgotten in American history, or viewed as a prelude to WWII. In this episode, we explore some of the ways the conflict affected Americans far beyond the battlefields of Europe — from debates about the meaning of free speech, to the fight over how the war would be remembered.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic library of 6500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually (right-click “Podcast Encyclopedia” there to download the zip).  Over 240 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

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Media Mining Digest 192 – July 17, 2015: African Business, American Revolution, Animals and Crime, Bear Markets, Book Thefts, Broadband in Massachusetts, Buddah Solution, Child Pornographer Error, Counterfeiting, Cricket Flour, Dairy Cows, DNA Food Detectives, Drive By Shooting, Engineering Failures, FBI Inormants, Fossil Fuel Divestment, Fruit and Vegetable Toxins, Gateway to Freedom, Hate Crime Victims, Internet Crime, Justice in America, Kale of the Sea, K-T Extinction Event, Landslides, Lincoln Assassination, Marijuana Protestor, Mau Mau Revelation, Microbe Revolution, Monty Python, Music Guru, Nuclear Energy, Nuisance Flooding, Pig History, PMS Crimes, Police Shooting, PTSD History, Puerto Rico, Raymond Chandler Death, Richard Nixon, Road Tax Success, Snail Farms, Startups in Iran, Suicide, Syrian Refugees, Transgender Couple, Trans-Pacific Partnership and Drugs, Tweets for Business, Twitter, Vaccination Law, Venus Flytrap Theft, Work Declines

The following audio files come from a larger group of 188 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 52 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

African Business 6 mins – “In this short, provocative talk, financier Sangu Delle questions whether microfinance — small loans to small entrepreneurs — is the best way to drive growth in developing countries. “We seem to be fixated on this romanticized idea that every poor person in Africa is an entrepreneur,” he says. “Yet, my work has taught me that most people want jobs.” Delle, a TED Fellow, makes the case for supporting large companies and factories — and clearing away the obstacles to pan-African trade.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Revolution 52 mins – “When thinking about the American Revolutionary War, the founding fathers, Paul Revere and militia men fighting for independence from Britain are first to come to mind. But an historian at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill says there is much more to the story. In a new book, professor Kathleen DuVal explores how marginalized groups who lived outside of colonial society changed the outcome of the war. Slaves and Cajun exiles along the gulf coast fought against the British for their own reasons. And some Native Americans Indians chose not to assist the British at crucial moments. We hear a new take on the American Revolution.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the program is included in the blog archive.

Animals and Crimes 19 mins – “In 2001, a woman was found dead in a pool of her own blood. Her husband was convicted of her murder. But a curious neighbor had a different theory… one that brings new meaning to man vs. beast.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bear Markets 29 mins – “We have no idea how soon the next bear market will strike but there is enough history to know it will likely be very unsettling to many investors. How big will the losses be?  How long will it last? What can you do to protect against those losses? In the podcast Paul discusses 10 things you should know about bear markets. He also refers to a graph that helps give give perspective to the length and depth of bear markets, as well as the bull markets that have made the risk of bear markets worthwhile.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Thefts 22 mins – “Hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of rare books have been disappearing across America since the late 90s, and haven’t resurfaced in the marketplace. They’ve just vanished, never to be seen again. But unlike most thieves, this thief is motivated by something more abstract and romantic than money, which makes him extremely difficult to catch.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Massachusetts 28 mins – “Our second episode of Community Broadband Bits featured an interview with Monica Webb, Chair of the Wired West Board and Spokesperson. Three years later, we are excited to have Monica on the show again to update us on their recent progress. As we recently noted, the state has decided to contribute significantly to the capital costs of a network connecting these rural towns and the towns are currently voting on whether to move forward. In our discussion, we discuss Wired West and what it is like to live with very poor Internet access in 2015.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3 file directly….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Buddha Solution 16 mins – “Dan Stevenson has lived in Oakland’s Eastlake neighborhood for 40 years. He says crime has been an issue for as long as he can remember, but he isn’t one to call the police on drug dealers or sex workers. He’s a pretty “live and let live” kind of guy. Or he was. Before he finally got fed up and took matters into his own hands.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Pornography Error 20 mins – “In June 2014, authorities released information about a massive child pornography ring being conducted in North Carolina. Four suspects had already been arrested, and the police were asking the public for help finding a fifth suspect. But they didn’t need to look very hard — the suspect was about to turn himself in, almost by accident.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Counterfeiting 17 mins – “With the advent of the Inkjet printer, counterfeiting money became as simple as a trip to Staples. By the year 2000, there were 72 million of these homemade dollars in circulation. The real question is… who was behind them all?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cricket Flour 20 mins – “Trade in your burgers and chicken wings for cricket flour and meatless protein. Bitty Foods’ Megan Miller and Beyond Meat’s Ethan Brown tell you why your dinner is going to look radically different in 20 years.” At the link find the title, The Plate of the Future: Cricket Cookies and Meatless Meat,” right-click “Media files 041115-FOODROUNDTABLE.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dairy Cows 36 mins – “In 1900, the average dairy cow in America produced 424 gallons of milk each year. By 2000, that figure had more than quadrupled, to 2,116 gallons. In this episode of Gastropod, we explore the incredible science that transformed the American cow into a milk machine—but we also uncover the disturbing history of prejudice and animal cruelty that accompanied it.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Detectives 21 mins – “DNA: it’s the genetic information that makes plants and animals what we are. Most of the time when you hear about it in the context of food, it’s to do with breeding. But in this short episode, we bring you two DNA detective stories that show how genetic analysis can rewrite the history of agriculture and fight food fraud—at least some of the time.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drive-By Shooting 17 mins – “In March 1964, a 35-year-old African American woman named Johnnie Mae Chappell was walking along the side of the road in Jacksonville, Florida. At the same time, four white men were driving around listening to the race riots on the radio. They had a gun on the dashboard. As they passed Chappell, one of the men leaned out the car window and shot her. As the police investigated her death, evidence began to mysteriously disappear, making it impossible to punish the men who admitted to committing the crime.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineering Failures 81 mins – “In this episode, Chris and Jeff discuss the role of failure in advancing engineering knowledge. All things fail at some point. Engineers advance their own knowledge, and that of the profession, by analyzing these failures. As a guideline for our discussion, we reference the book, “To Engineer is Human: The Role of Failure in Successful Design,” authored by Duke University professor Henry Petroski….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FBI Informants 52 mins – “Wednesday, we continue our Through the Lens series on documentary film with an exposé of the government’s controversial domestic counterterrorism tactics. The filmmakers behind (T)ERROR were on the ground as Saeed Torres, an aging Black revolutionary turned informant, aided the FBI in an active sting operation. Torres is just one of a growing number of covert operatives in America who straddle the murky line between preventing crimes and inciting them. Director David Sutcliffe joins us to talk about his film.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fossil Fuel Divestment 52 mins – “It began on college campuses, students lobbying their schools to pull out of investments in coal, oil and gas companies. Recently, however, the fossil fuel divestment movement has expanded beyond university walls. Last year, heirs to the Rockefeller oil fortune announced they’d purge a portion of their portfolio of coal and tar sand investments. Earlier this month, Norway voted to cull coal stocks from the holdings of its government pension fund, worth $890 billion. Many see these developments as a victory for climate change activism, but others argue divestment is both ineffective and actually hurts the cause it claims to help. For this month’s Environmental Outlook, a look at fossil fuel divestment.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the program is included in the blog archive.

Fruit and Vegetable Toxins 52 mins – “Your mother was right when she told you to eat your vegetables, but maybe not for the reasons you think. New research suggests it may not be the vitamins and nutrients in fruits and vegetables that are so good for you – it may be their toxins. Plants naturally produce chemicals to ward off insects and other would–be predators. When we eat fruits and vegetables,these chemicals stimulate our nerve cells and seem to boost our body’s resistance to disease. We hear more about the benefits of toxins in fruits and vegetables, and other anti-aging research.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the program is included in the blog archive.

Gateway to Freedom 52 mins – “Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Eric Foner talks about his book [Gateway to Freedom], in which he examines the efforts of free blacks and white abolitionists to secure freedom for fugitive slaves during the mid-19th century.” At the link find the title, “After Words: Eric Foner,” right-click “Media files program.389443.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Crime Victims 14 mins – “On April 13, 2014, former KKK member Frazier Glenn Cross pulled into a Jewish Community Center and ambushed a grandfather and grandson, killing both. He then killed another woman a short distance away. What does the family left behind do when they are thrust into a national spotlight? How do they figure out what to disclose and what should be private?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Crime 16 mins – “In 1999, most of America’s tech hysteria centered around Y2K. But at that same time, a teenager in Canada was messing around in chat rooms, meeting hackers, and learning tricks. At 15, he decided to put his knowledge to the test. To push up against the Internet’s limits, and in some places, break them. He managed to pull off something no one had ever seen before.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Justice in America 51 mins – “The United States has the world’s largest prison population. In 2012, there were 2.3 million people in American prisons or jails – and even more under some kind of “correctional supervision.” In fact, if you added up all the people in America in prison, on probation, or on parole, it’d total about 6 million – just a little smaller than the population of New York City. The system is vast, but how well is it working? In this episode, we explore how a few communities across the country have responded creatively to problems with police, courts, and prisons.” At the link find the title, American Justice,” right-click “Media files Justice_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

K-T Extinction Event 33 mins – “We’ve all heard the story of what happened on the day the dinosaurs died, right? Well, we thought we had. Turns out, high-powered ballistics experiments, fancy computer algorithms, and good old-fashioned ancient geology have given us a shocking new version of the events on that day, 66 million years ago. It’s a new theory that is so scarily precise — and hot — it’s terrifying and nearly unimaginable.” At the link right-click “Stream m3u” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. A video version of the program can be seen on YouTube here.

Kale of the Sea 39 mins – “Call off the search for the new kale: we’ve found it, and it’s called kelp! In this episode of Gastropod, we explore the science behind the new wave of seaweed farms springing up off the New England coast, and discover seaweed’s starring role in the peopling of the Americas. The story of seaweed will take us from a medicine hut in southern Chile to a high-tech seaweed nursery in Stamford, Connecticut, and from biofuels to beer, as we discover the surprising history and bright future of marine vegetables. Along the way, we uncover the role kelp can play in supporting U.S. fishermen, cleaning up coastal waters, and even helping make salmon farms more sustainable.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Landslides 33 mins – “On March 22, 2014, during a month of heavy rains, a significant landslide occurred near the rural town of Oso, WA, about 50 miles north of Seattle, on the steep slope above a river – a slope with a history of landslide occurrences. The slide destroyed about 50 homes and killed 43 people. The event has raised questions about landslide causes and about the feasibility of landslide warning systems. Professor Schofer discusses the Oso landslide, and the topic of landslides in general, with Jeff Keaton, principal geologist for AMEC Americas in Los Angeles. He is a member of the Geotechnical Extreme Events Reconnaissance Association team, also known as GEER, which is supported by the National Science Foundation. GEER teams survey extreme event locations immediately following the occurrences, and did so at Oso.” At the link find the title, “The Oso, Washington landslide – causes, impacts, information learned,” right-click “Media files Oso-Landslide.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lincoln Assassination 52 mins – “On the night of April 14, 1865, Abraham Lincoln was shot at Ford’s Theatre. He died early the next morning. It was the first time a sitting president had been murdered. On this episode of BackStory, we mark the 150th anniversary of Lincoln’s assassination by exploring how his death came to pass — and how a changed nation moved forward.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Protestor 52 mins – “William Bennett, former director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy under President George H.W. Bush, talks about his book [Going to Pot], in which he argues against the legalization of marijuana.” At the link find the title, “After Words: William Bennett,” right-click “Media files program.389973.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mau Mau Revelation 45 mins – “Just down the road from a pub in rural Hanslope Park, England is a massive building — the secret archives of the biggest empire the world has ever known. This is the story of a few documents that tumbled out and offered a glimpse of histories waiting to be rewritten. When professor Caroline Elkins came across a stray document left by the British colonial government in Nairobi, Kenya, she opened the door to a new reckoning with the history of one of Britain’s colonial crown jewels, and the fearsome group of rebels known as the Mau Mau. We talk to historians, archivists, journalists and send our producer Jamie York to visit the Mau Mau. As the new history of Kenya is concealed and revealed, document by document, we wonder what else lies in wait among the miles of records hidden away in Hanslope Park.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbe Revolution 38 mins – “Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the past couple of years, you’ve probably heard about the human microbiome. Research into the composition, function, and importance of the galaxy of bacteria, fungi, and viruses that, when we’re healthy, live in symbiotic balance in and on us has become one of the fastest moving and most intriguing fields of scientific study. But it turns out that plants have a microbiome too—and it’s just as important and exciting as ours.vIn this episode of Gastropod, we look at the brand new science that experts think will lead to a “Microbe Revolution” in agriculture, as well as the history of both probiotics for soils and agricultural revolutions. And we do it all in the context of the crop that Bill Gates has called “the world’s most interesting vegetable”: the cassava.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monty Python 52 mins – “Witch weighing, African swallows, a bloodthirsty bunny, God himself… We’re talking of course about Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Sure, the movie is epically silly, but behind the humor lay countless cultural and historical references. According to BYU film studies professor Darl Larsen, in crafting their 1975 cult-classic film the Pythons drew from Arthurian legend, the Medieval period, and the hard times of 1970s Great Britain. Larsen joins us Thursday for something completely different. EDITOR’S NOTE: Please accept our apologies for the technical difficulties attending today’s podcast audio. We are working forthwith to remedy the situation. Bear with us.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Guru 68 mins – “Guests: Ted Cohen – Ted Cohen is a digital entertainment industry executive; having worked in senior management positions at EMI Music, Warner Bros. Records, and Philips Media. He is currently the Managing Partner of TAG Strategic.” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Energy 77 mins – “We enjoy a wide-ranging conversation about nuclear power with guest Akira Tokuhiro in this episode of The Engineering Commons podcast. Out at the road construction job site, Adam notes that most of the energy is provided by diesel fuel. Our guest, Dr. Akira Tokuhiro, is a Professor of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering at the University of Idaho.” At the link find the title, “Episode 39 — Nuclear Energy Media files,” right-click “TheEngineeringCommons-0039-NuclearEnergy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuisance Flooding 27 mins – “‘Nuisance flooding” is a term for minor flooding that is not catastrophic or life-threatening, but which causes various problems for cities and towns, including overflowing storm water management systems, roads that must be closed to traffic, and deterioration of infrastructure not designed to be under water and in contact with salt-water. Much has been written in recent years about climate-related sea level rise, but a study released this July by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, focuses on the impacts of sea level rise as manifested in increasing frequency and magnitude of nuisance tidal flooding – and the findings are dramatic. Titled “Sea Level Rise and Nuisance Flood Frequency Changes Around the United States,” the report shows that nuisance flooding occurs much more frequently today than in the 1960s – in fact, 300 to 925 percent more frequently. Professor Schofer discusses this important topic with the lead author of that report, William Sweet, oceanographer at NOAA’s Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services.” At the link find the title, “Nuisance Flooding – what it is and why it’s on the increase in the U.S.,” right-click “Media files NuisanceFlooding.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pig History 52 mins – “The history of the domestic pig is a tale of both love and loathing. We cherish pigs for the delicious meat they supply. But, as an animals that eats and roots in filth, swine are often met with contempt. In a new book of porcine history, the writer Mark Essig follows the humble pig’s journey from Neolithic villages to modern industrial farms. Essig joins us Tuesday to explore the pig’s vast importance, the tragedy of its modern treatment, and its complicated relationship with humanity.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

PMS Crimes 11 mins – “What does it mean when a woman commits a crime and attributes her actions to PMS? How can the scientific community study severe premenstrual symptoms without perpetuating the utterly unscientific idea that menstruating women aren’t mentally competent or liable for crimes they commit?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Shooting 22 mins – “Police officer John Edwards was patrolling a quiet neighborhood in Bellaire, Texas when he saw an SUV driven by two young African-American men. It was just before 2am on December 31, 2008. Edwards followed the SUV and ran the license plate number. His computer indicated that the SUV was stolen, and Edwards drew his gun and told the two men to get down on the ground. It wasn’t until later that he realized he’d typed the wrong license plate number into his computer. He was off by one digit. By the time he realized his mistake, one of the men had already been shot in the chest at close range.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PTSD History 58 mins – “David Morris, a war correspondent and former Marine infantry officer, talks about his book, [The Evil Hours], about the history of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and the 27 million Americans, including himself, who suffer from it.” At the link find the title, “After Words: David Morris,” right-click “Media files program.387463.MP3-STD.mp3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.”

Puerto Rico 52 mins – “Nelson Denis talks about his book, [War Against All Puerto Ricans]. He is interviewed by Teresite Levy, Latino and Puerto Rican Studies Professor at CUNY’s Lehman College.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Nelson Denis,” right-click “Media files program.399215.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Raymnd Chandler Death 16 mins – “Raymond Chandler is often called the greatest American crime novelist, famous for murder mysteries like The Big Sleep and Farewell, My Lovely. He’s the subject of several biographies, and his correspondence and manuscripts are archived at Oxford. But something very, very important to Chandler had gotten lost. No one noticed until a pair of Chandler’s biggest fans, newlyweds in their seventies, got on the case. “At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Richard Nixon 59 mins – “Evan Thomas talked about his book, Being Nixon: A Man Divided, about the life and career of Richard Nixon. In his book, Mr. Thomas explores President Nixon’s early years and family life, his courtship and marriage to wife Pat, the inner turmoil he experienced throughout his life, and his relationships with political advisers, friends, and staff.” Aat the link find the title, “Q&A with Evan Thomas,” right-click “Media files program.404670.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Road Tax Success 28 mins – “Six years ago, transportation planners across the U.S. watched with great interest the progress of the November 2008 elections in Los Angeles County, California, where a proposed sales tax to fund transportation projects – called Measure R – was on the ballot. Measure R passed in that election, and its proposal was implemented: a half-cent sales tax on each taxable dollar spent in Los Angeles County, used to fund specific transportation projects for the next 30 years. This month, on the 6-year anniversary of Measure R’s passage, Los Angeles County is the scene of five major highway and transit projects under construction at the same time – an unprecedented accomplishment in U.S. metropolitan areas, where “no new taxes” is the popular mantra. Professor Schofer talks about Measure R, its process and products, with David Yale, Managing Executive Officer, County-Wide Planning and Development, for the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority, also known as Metro.” At the link find the title, “Measure R – the innovative transportation funding process that benefits Los Angeles County,” right-click “Media files Measure-R.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Snail Farms 29 mins – “Finally, Gastropod is tackling gastropods! In this episode, Cynthia visits one of America’s first and only snail farms. Though Gastropod is, as regular listeners know, a podcast about the science and history of all things gastronomical, we do share a name with Gastropoda, the taxonomic class that includes slugs and snails. And, as it turns out, the history and science of heliciculture, or snail farming, is completely fascinating. Join Cynthia on a trip to rural Washington State to learn how to raise snails and whether fresh and vacuum-packed taste any less rubbery than canned. Plus, you’ll hear about the earliest evidence for human snail consumption, how the Romans fattened theirs up, and all about the bizarre world of snail sex.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startups in Iran 20 mins – “In this special international edition of the a16z Podcast, Nazanin Daneshvar, co-founder and CEO of Takhfifan, the “Groupon of Iran”, shares her experiences and broader observations about the startup ecosystem and tech infrastructure in Iran with guest interviewer Christopher Schroeder (former entrepreneur, D.C. investor, and author of Startup Rising). How did she do it? (Hint: With a bit of subterfuge and clever cloaking.)What are the attitudes toward failure in a time and place where startups aren’t really considered a real thing? This is the second installment in a special series on tech startups in Iran, part of a larger theme around.” At the link click “Download” to get the podcast.

Suicide 24 mins – “No one disputes that it’s against the law to take another person’s life, but is it against the law to sit with someone and watch while they commit suicide? We meet an elderly woman who sneaks around the country as an “exit guide.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugees 85 mins – “To date, almost 4 million refugees have fled the Syrian civil war, the vast majority seeking shelter in Jordan, Turkey, and Lebanon, but with growing numbers also moving to Egypt and Northern Iraq. At this Migration Policy Institute briefing, Erol Kekic from Refugee Council USA and Anastasia Brown from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, who recently visited the region, report on their findings on the space for humanitarian protection. Also joining the panel is Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Simon Henshaw, whose portfolio in the Department’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration includes Syrian refugees. He discusses recent developments in the region and in the U.S. humanitarian response. The discussion is moderated by Kathleen Newland, director of MPI’s Refugee Protection and Humanitarian Response Program.” At the link find the title, “No End in Sight: The Worsening Syrian Refugee Crisis,” right-click “Media files 201554NoEndInSightSyriansEvent.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans-Pacific Partnership and Drugs 18 mins – “International trade deals once focused primarily on tariffs. As a result, they had little direct effect on health, and health experts could reasonably leave their details to trade professionals. Not so today. Modern trade pacts have implications for a wide range of health policy issues, from medicine prices to tobacco regulation, not only in the developing world but also in the United States….” At the link right-click “Download” below the authors photo and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender Couple 13 mins – “Someone decides to transition from one gender to another, it’s obviously a big deal in their life. But what’s it like for their spouse?” At the link find the title, “SOTRU Short: A Couple Twice” right-click “Media files Podcast_AcoupleTwiceBorn.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tweets for Business 85 mins (two parts) – Part One lists ten ways Twitter will changeAmerican business, along with related news. Part Two adds further comments about the list of ten and more related news. At the link right-click the down-pointing triangle beside the play icon and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu. Do the same for the Part Two (Episode 57) here. .

Twitter Followers 17 mins – “Rachel Foster, @CopywriterTO, is a specialist in B2B copywriting who can develop persuasive copy that motivates sophisticated business buyers to take the next step in the sales cycle.  Join us as she shares some Twitter tips and offers our listeners a free special download.” At the link click the play button to download the podcast.

Twitter for Beginners 40 mins – Interview with author of a free book about tweeting plus news about viruses. At the link click the play button to download the podcast.

Twitter Geolocation 21 mins – “Join Bo and Ryan as tey speak with Michael O’Connor on Geolocation – the new feature within Twitter that allows location identification of your Tweets. How can businesses use this data?” At the link click the play button to download the podcast.

Twitterville 36 mins – Interview with Shel Israel, author of “Twitterville” about the impact of social media on culture. At the link click the play button to download the podcast.

Vaccination Law 52 mins – “California’s new school vaccine law is one of the toughest in the nation: It requires all students to be vaccinated before they can attend public or private school. Medical exemptions are still allowed, but parents will no longer be able to forgo vaccinating their children because of religious or personal objections. Public health officials are praising the move. But California’s vocal anti-vaccine contingent is up in arms. A movement is already underway for a ballot initiative to repeal the law that Gov. Jerry Brown signed this week. We look at mandatory vaccines across the country — and the battle between parental rights and public health.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the program is included in the blog archive.

Venus Flytrap Thefts 21 mins – “Every year for the past few years, tens of thousand of flytraps have gone missing – from the wild, from gardens, from nurseries. And, really, nobody knows where they go. What’s cropped up in rural North Carolina is essentially a Venus Flytrap crime ring — with lackies, middle men, and a mysterious end buyer who’s perpetuating the market.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Work Declines 52 mins – “America has valued the rewards of hard work since its founding. Even so, we’ve long anticipated a future when machines would free us from the toil of labor, and that day may be close at hand. Computer scientists and software engineers are developing technologies that could replace jobs at an exponential rate. And what then? What would our world be like without work? The journalist Derek Thompson investigates that question in a new article for The Atlantic magazine, and he joins us Wednesday to talk about it.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic library of 7000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as four zipped files totaling 45+ GB, or individually.  Over 250 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

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Media Mining Digest 191 – July 10, 2015: Aarhaus Model, American-chinese Food History, Americas Energy Future, Anonymous Group, Antibiotic Resistance, Archiving the Internet, Autism History, Automation Paradox, Bitcoin in Argentina, Broadband in Kansas City, China Jukou Reform, China of the 20s, Chinese Civil War, Chinese in Mexico, Chronic Pain, Climate Skeptic, Coco Chanel, Cuba Devleopment, Cultural Revolution, Dave Itzkoff, Dick Cavett, Displacement After Crisis, Duvall, Ecological Efforts, Economy by Merkel, Energy Futures, Feminism, Greek Bailout, Han Dynasty, Helen Hunt, Helpfulness in Business, High Tech Billionaires, Hong Kong, Information Policy Research, Internal Displacement, Internet Access Growth, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Kublai Khan, Lasers, Liberal Viewpoint, Libraries Matter, Medical Scribes, Michael Keaton, Migration Crisis in Europe, Ming Dynasty, Opium History in China, Pain Pioneer, President Obama, Radiation Disasters, Reality Question, Roger Corman, School Rehab Solution, Seafood Sources, Shanghai Massacre – 1927, Silk Road, Social Media Concerns, Somalia Counterterrorism, Stroke Rehab, Tang Dynasty, Trade Negotiations, Web and AI Tech, Wes Anderson

The following audio files come from a larger group of 204 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 52 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Aarhus Model  24 mins – “Denmark’s second city has been attracting attention for its project to prevent its young people from going to Syria to fight for Islamic State. Is the Aarhus Model working?” At the link find the title, “Returning Jihadis: a Danish solution?” right-click “Media files p02w1w2r.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Chinese Food 46 mins – After a record-breaking pause in the action Laszlo is back with one last episode to finish of 2013.  This time we look at the interesting and amusing history of Chinese cuisine in America, an oft requested topic here at the China History Podcast.  This is a history that goes hand in hand with the earliest Chinese immigration to the US.  If you’re interested to learn more on the subject check out Andrew Coe and Jennifer 8 Lee’s books: Andrew Coe – “Chop Suey;” Jennifer 8. Lee – “The Fortune Cookie Chronicles”  At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Americas Energy Future 17 mins – “Robbie Diamond, Founder, President and CEO of Securing America’s Future Energy, talks with T. Boone Pickens about how we can bring alternative energy solutions into the market so the United States isn’t totally dependent on oil” At the link find the title, “Episode 6: Robbie Diamond, Securing America’s Future Energy,” right-click “Media files 3266057-episode-6-robbie-diamond-securing-america-s-future-energy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anonymous Group 59 mins – “…Prof. Gabriella Coleman of McGill University, author of Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous. Biella has written a remarkable anthropological study of Anonymous, the ubiquitous collection of technology activists who were born out of the “lulz” (i.e., pranksterism plus). Over many months, Biella got to know an assortment of individuals involved in Anonymous, and through that interaction paints a complex and surprising picture of their operations. In our discussion, we talked about both her research methods and the insights that she developed through her work. In an era of networked interactions that exist on the spectrum from public to secret, Biella’s work is both groundbreaking and essential….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Resistance 63 mins – “In 2011, the NIH Clinical Center had a cluster of infections of a pathogen that tops the CDC’s list of urgent threats: antibiotic-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. This bacteria, which can cause bloodstream and other infections, has recently developed resistance to the class of antibiotics known as carbapenems. The outbreak at NIH started with a single infected patient who was discharged weeks before any other cases were detected. This story of antibiotic-resistant infections is becoming more common around the world, and is especially dangerous in hospitals. Dr. Julie Segre, a senior investigator at the National Human Genome Research Institute, discuses how the outbreak was traced using state-of-the-art DNA sequencing.” At the link find the title, “MWV96 – Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria,” right-click “Media files MWV96_-_Antibiotic_Resistant_Bacteria_iDevice.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Archiving the Internet 101 mins – “The Internet Archive is a treasure trove of digitized culture — films, software, audio, websites and more. How it it being collected, and how might the Internet Archive be our best hope for preserving the history of this era, as we invent the web? Jason Scott joins Jen Simmons to talk about the challenges of archiving in the digital age.” At the link right-click MP3 Audio beside “Download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism History 14 mins – “Decades ago, few pediatricians had heard of autism. In 1975, 1 in 5,000 kids was estimated to have it. Today, 1 in 68 is on the autism spectrum. What caused this steep rise? Steve Silberman points to “a perfect storm of autism awareness” — a pair of psychologists with an accepting view, an unexpected pop culture moment and a new clinical test. But to really understand, we have to go back further to an Austrian doctor by the name of Hans Asperger, who published a pioneering paper in 1944. Because it was buried in time, autism has been shrouded in misunderstanding ever since.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Automation Paradox 20 mins – “…For nearly as long as there’s been an auto industry, there have been dreams of a car that drives on its own. In 1956, the year that “Key to the Future” was shown at Motorama, there were nearly 38,000 vehicle-related deaths in the United States. Since then, there hasn’t been year with fewer than 30,000 people killed in car accidents. And because more than 90% of all automobile accidents are all attributable to human error, for some industry people, a fully-automated car is a kind of holy grail. However, as automation makes our lives easier and safer, it also creates more complex systems, and fewer humans who understand those systems. Which means when problems do arise—people can be left unable to deal with them. Human factors engineers call this “the automation paradox.” Last week, in our story about automation in aviation, we heard about various ways the industry is people trying to deal with this paradox. …Google has a very different approach. Their plan for solving the paradox is to take human drivers out of the equation entirely.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin in Argentina 21 mins – “Users, entrepreneurs, and investors are harnessing bitcoin’s “workaday utility” in Argentina, a place where bitcoin is arguably more widespread among everyday people than anywhere else. What conditions led to this? Is it indicative of what may happen someplace else? Or is it just an isolated case or even a stopgap? In this episode of the a16z Podcast, NYT journalist Nathaniel Popper, author of the new book Digital Gold on the “inside story of the misfits and millionaires trying to reinvent money”, shares his insights on the phenomenon taking place in Argentina; what lessons other countries should (or shouldn’t) take away from it; and why email is the best analogy for email. And why the people behind bitcoin really do matter … especially because — not in spite of! — bitcoin being a “blank slate” to build on top of.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Kansas 17 mins – “Every now and then, we stumble across something, read it twice, and then decide we need to verify it. In North Kansas City, a municipal fiber network operating in partnership with KC Fiber, is delivering a gig to residents at no ongoing charge after a reasonable one-time fee. To get the story, our interview this week for Community Broadband Bits is with Brooks Brown, Managing Partner of KC Fiber. KC Fiber is now running the North Kansas City municipal fiber network, liNKCity. The network delivers a free gigabit to the schools and after a one-time fee of $50-$300 (depending on desired connection capacity) residents can get a high quality fiber Internet connection with no additional charges for 10 years….” At the link right-click “…can download this Mp3 …” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China Hukou Reform 134 mins – “With five of the world’s 10 most populous cities, China is renowned for its urban landscape. The country today is hardly recognizable to those who visited at the beginning of the reform period in 1980 when more than 80 percent of the population lived in rural areas. Now, with more than half of its population living in cities, China’s urbanization process has been the most rapid in human history and has served as a key engine of China’s economic growth. At the March meeting of the National People’s Congress, Premier Li Keqiang announced that controls over China’s household registration system—or hukou—will be relaxed to ensure that migrant workers can become urban citizens. To facilitate this, he hopes to enhance the carrying capacities of smaller cities and counties while controlling the population sizes of mega cities. The success of these urbanization efforts will not only determine whether China can maintain robust economic growth, but also will have strong implications for sociopolitical stability and environmental sustainability.” At the link right-click the titl just above “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China of the 1920s 18 mins –The 1920’s in Republican era China was anything but quiet and uneventful.  In this episode we focus in on the general situation in China during the period of the early 1920’s.  This was a time when the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) and KMT (Kuomintang) were in the same bed dreaming their different dreams.  It was a period where China was divided with warlords Zhang Zuolin, Wu Peifu and Sun Chuanfang controlling China from the Yangzi north.  The south was the domain of the KMT-CCP alliance where revolution was always in the air.  In 1927 Chiang Kai-shek will turn on the CCP and this sets a chain of events in motion that will lead to the Communists victory in 1949.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Civil War 177 mins – (4 parts) “…a multi-part series covering the Chinese Civil War from 1945 to 1949.  In China this is known as the War of Liberation involving Mao’s Communists and the Nationalists led by Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek.“ At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4.

Chinese in Mexico 52 mins –The story of the Chinese Mexicans is typical in some respects.  They came to Mexico either because they wanted to and saw it as a land of opportunity or they came because it was the next best thing to emigrating to the United States.  Many stayed in Mexico despite great hardships and the usual racism directed against them.  But most either moved on to try their luck in the US or they were forced out by racist and nationalistic anti-Chinese immigration policies. …more about this subject: The Chinese In Mexico 1882-1940, Robert Chao Romero, University of Arizona Press; Making the Chinese Mexican – Global Migration, Localism and Exclusion in the US-Mexico Borderlands, Grace Peña Delgado, Stanford University Press and Chinese Mexicans; Transpacific Migration and the Search for a Homeland 1910-1960, Julia María Schiavone Camacho, University of North Carolina Press.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Pain 44 mins (2 parts) – “…a two part series on caring for patients with chronic pain. Pearls: With few exceptions, opiate therapy should be reserved for the short-term treatment of acute somatic pain due to tissue injury. Patients with acute pain should be informed early on that once tissue healing starts, opiates will be discontinued and the goal of therapy will be to improve function.  The goal is not a painless life. Opiates are an unfavorable option for those with chronic pain.   Patients who cannot tolerate chronic pain may choose maladaptive substances, such as alcohol or tobacco, as a means of “chemical coping.”…Set realistic expectations when treating patients with chronic pain. For the vast majority of patients, antidepressants are the first-line pharmacologic choice for the treatment of chronic pain. Patients who present after the acute phase of a painful condition, whether it’s 1 week or 2 years from the injury, are treated the same.“ At the link right-click “Direct Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu; the same here for Part 2.

Climate Skeptic 67 mins – “Science writer and author Matt Ridley discusses climate change with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Based on his reading of the scientific evidence, Ridley describes himself as a “lukewarmer.” While Ridley agrees that humans have made the climate warmer, he argues that the impact is small or positive over some temperature ranges and regions. He rejects the catastrophic scenarios that some say are sufficiently likely to justify dramatic policy responses, and he reflects on the challenges of staking out an unpopular position on a contentious policy issue.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coco Chanel 12 mins – “Mistresses, Nazis, and lost love — the story behind Chanel No. 5 isn’t just about perfume. Tilar Mazzeo, author of “The Secret of Chanel No. 5,” explains how Coco Chanel invented modern glamour.” At the link find the title, “The Genius and Tragedy of Coco Chanel,” right-click “Media files IHUB-0704-Chanel-Webmix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuba Development 270 mins (2 parts) – “In light of the significant shifts underway in the U.S.-Cuba relationship, new questions arise about Cuba’s development model, and its economic relations with the region and the world. …the Latin America Initiative at Brookings hosted a series of panel discussions with various experts including economists, lawyers, academics, and practitioners to examine opportunities and challenges facing Cuba in this new context. Panels examined macroeconomic changes underway in Cuba, how to finance Cuba’s growth, the emerging private sector, and themes related to much-needed foreign investment.” At the link right-click the titles for the two parts, just above “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cultural Revolution P1 23mins – By popular demand Laszlo begins to trace the history of the Cultural Revolution.  This week’s episode looks at the events leading up to the moment in 1966 when Mao called for the people to Bombard the Headquarters and to tear down the government.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cultural Revolution P2 27 mins –This week Laszlo takes us up to August 1966 with this Cultural Revolution overview.  After a nine month hiatus down in the Hangzhou, Shanghai and Wuhan, Mao is now back in Beijing and ready to mount his attack on the party leadership and unleash the Cultural Revolution on the entire country.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cultural Revolution P4 36 mins – The second half of 1966 and into 1967 saw some of the worst excesses of the Cultural Revolution.  In this episode the violence spreads throughout China and anyone with something to hide about their class background is tracked down and forced to endure the most horrible of fates. Mao is liking what he sees and keeps fanning the flames using all the tools at his disposal.  Opportunists from the CCRG down to the meanest individuals with petty grievances all grab hold of this chance that the Cultural Revolution has given them to get back at their enemies.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cultural Revolution P5 47 mins –In the fifth installment of our China History Podcast overview of the Cultural Revolution we look at the milestone events of 1967: The February Countercurrent, 8 Point Program, 10 Point Program and the Wuhan Incident.  Lots of blood and violence during this difficult year in China.  Added to this was no small amount of political, military and social upheaval.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cultural Revolution P6 36 mins – In this episode we finish off 1969, a year that not only saw internal revolt and anarchy but also saw armed border confrontation with the Soviet Union in the freezing northeast.  Chairman Mao Zedong pulls out all the stops to quell the violence and rebellion that he himself called for at the outset of the Cultural Revolution.  Mao’s chosen successor, Lin Biao loses favor with The Great Helmsman. As China enters the 1970’s the Cultural Revolution, though tarnished, still has plenty of life left in it.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cultural Revolution P7 42 mins –In this week’s episode we get all the way up to the end of 1975.  With Zhou Enlai ailing and Mao Zedong also not long for the world, there is a sudden urgency to find a successor to the chairman.  Now more than ever the two opposing camps take every measure to defeat the other.  To the victor will go the leadership of the Chinese nation.  To the loser there is certain loss of power and perhaps of freedom.  Everything is building up to the fateful year of 1976.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dave Itzkoff 29 mins – “Dave Itzkoff: Mad as Hell – New York Times culture reporter Dave Itzkoff discusses Paddy Chayefsky’s ‘wandering in the desert,’ and the making of his 1976 classic, “Network.‘” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dick Cavett 62 mins – “Comedian, author and talk show icon Dick Cavett drops by Gilbert’s New York City apartment to sip Merlot and share personal memories of Groucho Marx, Johnny Carson and John Lennon, among others. Dick also talks about the time a guest dropped dead on his set (yes, it actually happened) AND favors Gilbert with some dead-on impersonations of his favorite obscure character actors!” At the link find his name, right-click (there or here) “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/1313896/dick-cavett_2015-04-27-091900.8126.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Displacement After Crisis 86 mins – “When Super Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) hit the Philippines in November 2013, it was one of the strongest storms ever recorded and resulted in a massive displacement crisis with more than four million people forced from their homes. One and a half years later, the reconstruction process is well under way, but major challenges remain as survivors struggle to rebuild their homes and regain their livelihoods. As new disasters and displacement crises are unfolding in countries such as Nepal, experiences in the Philippines represent an important source of insight for governments, international organizations, NGOs, and disaster-affected communities alike.” At the link right-click the title just above “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Duvall, Dobkin, Downey 32 mins – “Robert Duvall, David Dobkin, and Robert Downey, Jr.: The Judge – Director David Dobkin and stars Robert Duvall and Robert Downey, Jr. discuss their new film . CONTAINS EXPLICIT LANGUAGE.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ecological Efforts 60 mins – “SUMMARY: The coming unstable tropics, seen through an ancient world. From the UK, Dr. Jessica Whiteside. Former NASA scientist James Hansen says 2 degrees warming is unsafe and “crazy” to set that as a goal. Huge Canadian rainforest on cusp of mega-deal to save it. Activist Valerie Langer. Radio Ecoshock 150701.” At the link find the title, “Hot Minds in Motion,” right-click “Lo-Fi” beside “Download…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economy by Merkel 47 mins – “The stakes couldn’t be higher, as Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras seeks a new agreement on a bailout and German chancellor Angela Merkel refuses any talks before this Sunday’s referendum. What will happen is anyone’s guess, but for anyone looking for background information, Intelligence Squared is posting again the podcast of our 2013 debate ‘Angela Merkel is destroying Europe’. Listen to The New Statesman’s Mehdi Hasan and Greek MP Euclid Tsakalotos take on historian Anthony Beevor and Belgian-born veteran journalist Christine Ockrent. The debate was chaired by journalist and broadcaster Nik Gowing.At the link click “Download” to download the file.

Energy Futures P3 42 mins – The waste generated in any big city is immense—unused food, garden waste, commercial and industrial waste. But can it be considered a source of energy? And what of the waste when electricity is generated  in far off places rather than where it is needed. This third episode of Energy Futures explores bioenergy and efficiency. Producer Carl Smith visits a giant hole in the ground to see how one fifth of Sydney’s waste is being transformed back into power. And he investigates Australia’s energy generation network to see which links can be shortened and which can be removed for major boosts to efficiency.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Futures P4 46 mins – In the final episode of Energy Futures, Carl Smith looks to the sun—the source of much of our planet’s energy. Australia is one of the best-resourced countries for solar power. There are wide open spaces, and long hours of sunshine beating down on a continent much of which is desert. So is it best to harness that energy using rooftop systems or giant fields of solar panels? Or perhaps both!” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feminism 11 mins – “When writer Roxane Gay dubbed herself a “bad feminist,” she was making a joke, acknowledging that she couldn’t possibly live up to the demands for perfection of the feminist movement. But she’s realized that the joke rang hollow. In a thoughtful and provocative talk, she asks us to embrace all flavors of feminism — and make the small choices that, en masse, might lead to actual change.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greek Bailout 16 mins – “What do you do when your country’s future is put in your hands? On today’s show: The referendum in Greece.” At the link find the title, “#636: Yes Or No,” right-click “Media files 20150701_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Han Dynasty P1 22 mins – In this week’s episode we look at only the first few decades of the Western Han Dynasty.  The Western Han lasted from 202BC to 8AD.  We’ll focus in on the fall of the Qin and the rise of Liu Bang who went on to found the Han Dynasty.  Liu Bang would reign as Emperor Gaozu.  Today we will look at his rise to power, his reign, his death and its gruesome aftermath.  Next week we will pick up with the reigns of Emperors Wen, Jing and Wu.  The periods of Wang Mang and the Eastern Han will wait until the 3rd installment of our Han Dynasty overview.  On another day we will return and focus in on many of the amazing stories of this golden  period.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Han Dynasty P2 30 mins –Today we present the second part of the Western Han Dynasty overview where we will look at the great Han emperors Wendi, Jingdi and perhaps the greatest of them all, Han Wudi.  It was a golden age in Chinese history and saw the first indirect contact between the Roman Empire in the west and Han China in the east.  The Silk Road of course was the conduit between these two great empires. Next week we will continue on with the short-lived Xin Dynasty of Wang Mang and the Eastern Han Dynasty.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Helen Hunt 29 mins – “Helen Hunt: Ride – Helen Hunt learns to surf in her second feature, Ride, as writer, director and star.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Helpfulness in Business 16 mins – “Organizations are often run according to “the superchicken model,” where the value is placed on star employees who outperform others. And yet, this isn’t what drives the most high-achieving teams. Business leader Margaret Heffernan observes that it is social cohesion — built every coffee break, every time one team member asks another for help — that leads over time to great results. It’s a radical rethink of what drives us to do our best work, and what it means to be a leader. Because as Heffernan points out: “Companies don’t have ideas. Only people do.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

High Tech Billionaires 12 mins – “If you’re over 30 and you haven’t sold a tech company worth $10 billion… what are you doing with your life? Randall Lane, editor of Forbes and author of “You Only Have to Be Right Once,” takes a peek behind the hoodie to examine the customs and morays of our new tech royalty.” At the link find the title, “The Pharaohs and Princes of Silicon Valley,” right-click “Media files IHUB-0704-Lane-Webmix.mp” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hong Kong P1 35 mins –Laszlo is back after another long delay.  In this shorter than usual episode, The China History Podcast presents Part 1 of a multi-part series that will explore the history of Hong Kong. In this introductory episode, Laszlo starts at the very beginning and traces Hong Kong from the Devonian Period all the way up the end of the Ming Dynasty in the 17th century.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hong Kong P10 55 mins –In this episode we will conclude our History of Hong Kong overview.  We’ll look at the years following the 1967 riots and the reforms championed by Governor Murray MacLehose in the 1970’s and 80’s.  We’ll close out this series by looking at the dramatic lead up to and the signing of the Joint Declaration, the Basic Law and the handover on July 1, 1997.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hong Kong P2 40 mins –In part two of Laszlo’s overview of the history of Hong Kong, we look at the Canton System and the leadup to hostilities that culminated in the Treaty of Nanjing that ceded Hong Kong in perpituity to the British crown.  In this episode we’ll get as far as the Convention of Chuenpi of January 20, 1841. Here, Hong Kong was ceded to Britain but neither side was satisfied with this temporary settlement.  In Part 3 we’ll see this Convention repudiated and hostilities will quickly resume which ultimately leads to the first of the despised (on the Chinese side anyways) unequal treaties.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hong Kong P3 38 mins –TERMS FROM THIS EPISODE – Chuanbi Caoyue: The Convention of Chuen-pi; Nanjing Tiaoyue: The Treaty of Nanjing; Qishan: Manchu official and Elliot’s counterpart in negotiations; Daoguang Emperor: Emperor of China during the Opium Wars; Huangpu: Port of Whampoa; Amoy: City of Xiamen in Fujian, referred to as Amoy in the old days; Fuzhou: City and capital of Fujian province; Zhoushan: Coastal city near Ningbo; Yang Fang  Successor to Qishan as chief negotiator with the British; Yishan: Successor to Yang Fang as negotiator with the British; Gough Hill: Ge Fu Shan – Pricey area on The Peak named after Sir Hugh Gough:; Bai Jia Shan: Mt Parker; Zhenjiang: Zhenjiang, city in Zhejiang known for vinegar; Bu Pingdeng Tiaoyue: Unequal Treaties; Bo Dian Zha: Henry Pottinger” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hong Kong P4 41 mins –We continue this overview series on the history of Hong Kong.  This time we pick up right after the Treaty of Nanjing and look at the early efforts to get this colony up and running.  The first couple decades of Crown Colony of Hong Kong weren’t easy and many considered throwing in the towel early.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hong Kong P5 42 mins –In this fifth installent of our Hong Kong history overview we look at the final couple decades of the 19th century.  Hong Kong’s second generation is coming to the fore.  They are a better educated and more sophisticated lot than those Chinese who came before them. This time period saw the governorships of MacDonnell, Kennedy, Hennessy, Bowen, Des Voeux and Robinson (a different Robinson from before). We close this epsidoe during the time of Governor Sir Henry Arthur Blake.  Although the colony would experience a disaster here and a disaster there, progress was being made.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hong Kong P6 41 mins –In this latest installment of the CHP History of Hong Kong overview we look at the years from Governors Nathan to Peel.  The modern age comes to Kong Kong along with plenty of fallout and spillover from the upheavels going on in China in the 1920’s and 30’s. This was a period when the great pillars of HKL Chinese society rose to fame and fortune: Shouson Chow, Robert Hotung, Kai Ho, Robert Kotewall and others.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hong Kong P7 41 mins –Jiu yi ba: 9-18, September 18, 1931; Mukden (Shenyang) Incident Wong Nai Chong Gap: Gap on rocky Hong Kong island where one can go from north to south. San nian ling bage yu: The 3 years and 8 months (of Japanese occupation); Kempeitai: The Japanese Military Police; Yingjun Fuwutuan:  The British Army Aid Group; Sham Shui Po District in Kowloon, site of an internment camp during the occupation; Song Meiling: Madam Chiang Kai-shek zhide kan:  Worth reading; Song Jiaoren: great Chinese revolutionary, intellectual, KMT co-founder assassinated March 1913, subject of a great article by Economist writer Gady Epstein.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hong Kong P8 44 mins –After a bit of a break we pick up after the the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong.  The 1950’s was a stressful time for Hong Kong with Britain managing a diplomatic balancing act trying to be a good neighbor to the new PRC and  to their closest ally, the USA.  Thanks to the exodus of Chinese industrialists, from Shanghai mostly, Hong Kong will usher in a manufacturing boom that will transform the economy and the territory’s place in the world.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hong Kong P9 38 mins –In this week’s episode we look at the year 1967 in Hong Kong.   The words “riots” and “1967” go hand in hand when talking about Hong Kong history.  Although the events that went down between May and December of 1967 caused death, mayhem and destruction throughout the territory, when it was all over it led to a sea change in labor rights for Hong Kong workers.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Information Policy Research 57 mins – “…interview with Prof. Arvind Narayanan of Princeton University on Bitcoin, cryptography, privacy and web transparency. Arvind does a range of information policy-related research and writing as a professor affiliated with Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP). …Through studying the operation of and security challenges surrounding the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, Arvind has been able to assess cryptography as a privacy-enhancing and dis-intermediating technology. To that end, we had a wide-ranging discussion, from the varied roles of cryptography to commercial surveillance and transparency….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internal Displacement 169 mins – “On June 26, the Brookings-LSE Project on Internal Displacement hosted a culminating event to look back on over 20 years of ground-breaking accomplishments and identify future challenges for working on issues of internal displacement. This is a remarkable story of how international law was made and the humanitarian world changed through the collaboration between an independent U.N. expert and a U.S. think-tank, supported by international lawyers, governments, NGOs, and academics. Speakers included key actors in putting internally displaced persons (IDPs) on the international agenda, including Francis Deng, Walter Kälin, and many others.” At the link right-click on the title just above “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Access Growth 56 mins – “In 2000, only eight million Americans had broadband in their homes; by 2009, that number had grown exponentially to nearly 200 million. As a result of this expansion, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 mandated that the Federal Communications Commission develop a National Broadband Plan, to “ensure that the entire broadband ecosystem—networks, devices, content and applications—is healthy.” Among its long-term goals, the plan aims to bring broadband to another 100 million U.S. homes and position the United States as a world leader in mobile innovation. What progress has been made over the last five years to fulfill these goals?” At the link right-click on the title above “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Julia Louis-Dreyfus 29 mins – “Julia Louis-Dreyfus: Veep – I’m not as nuts as these characters I play, but anxiety is a friend of mine, says actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus of her roles on Seinfeld, Watching Ellie, and now, Veep.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kublai Khan 18 mins – “Kublai Khan was a great 13th Century Mongol Khan who also went down in history as one of China’s greatest emperors.  He ruled during a great golden age in China.  It was this warrior and emperor who received Marco Polo at his magnificent palace.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lasers 54 mins – “Our guest is Aaron Fischer, who is a really great guy! we talk about all sorts of laser business. how lasing works, stimulated emission, space death rays, blu-ray players, laser fission, laser cooling. laser everything. Physicists: Tia Miceli, Abby Shockley” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Liberal Viewpoint 43 mins – “In this episode of Uncommon Knowledge, Richard A. Epstein, the Peter and Kirsten Bedford Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, discusses inequality, taxes, globalization, free markets, politics, health care, and gay marriage. Epstein states that the central theme of his book The Classical Liberal Constitution is to develop sufficiently stable government structures and individual rights to raise everybody simultaneously when the government has to regulate or tax. The prevailing politics is ÒI win, you lose,Ó and the Supreme Court has done nothing to slow this trend. Epstein notes that a shrinking economic pie is always a losing proposition. He refers to the famous quote concerning his philosophy, ÒMay justice reign even if the heavens fall.Ó Epstein also discusses other Supreme Court decisions, including the constitutionality of gay marriage.” At the link find the title, “Richard Epstein’s Gold Mind Enriches Us with His Ideas on Inequality, Taxes, Politics, and Health Care,” right-click “Media files 20150701.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Libraries Matter 68 mins – “Anyone seeking to participate in the 21st century needs to understand how to find and use the vast stores of information available online. Libraries play a crucial role in making these skills and information available, and yet are at risk. John Palfrey — Head of School at Phillips Academy, Andover and President of the Board of Directors of the Digital Public Library of America — discusses his new book, BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever In An Age of Google, in which he argues that libraries must make the transition to a digital future as soon as possible by digitizing print material and ensuring that born-digital material is publicly available online, while continuing to play the vital role as public spaces in our democracy that they have for hundreds of years.” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download the…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Scribes 23 mins – “Our guest today is Bailey, a medical scribe recruiter at Elite Medical Scribes. Bailey is in-charge of finding students to feel scribe positions. In this episode, we talk about what a scribe is, what they do, who makes a successful scribe, what this company is looking for, and all that jazz. Based in Bloomington, Minnesota, Elite Medical Scribes is located in 27 states where they focus more regionally. Now perhaps you will find out from this episode why being a scribe is one of the best premed experiences that you can have. Not only will you get paid, but you get exposure to the medical field and some physicians as well as start building relationships and finding mentors….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Michael Keaton 29 mins – “Michael Keaton: Birdman – Michael Keaton on how his intense degree of focus and concentration took him from unknown comedian to Oscar-nominated actor.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migration Crisis in Europe 79 mins – “In recent months, political upheaval and economic deprivation across North Africa and the Middle East have triggered a massive influx of migrants and refugees to Europe. The magnitude of the crisis is staggering. Last year, the European Union received over 625,000 asylum applications, an increase of over 40 percent from the previous year and the highest total since 1992. Beyond the documented migrants, the number of persons arriving illegally by land and sea crossings has increased by five times since 2010. Most grievously, from January to April of this year some 1,800 migrants died crossing the Mediterranean compared to fewer than 100 over the same period last year. The EU recently adopted a plan to tackle migrant smuggling, but is it the right way to respond to the crisis? Beyond addressing the problems on its shores, what can the EU do to help mitigate the dire conditions in the migrants’ home states that are forcing them to flee?” At the link right-click the title just above “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ming Dynasty P1Laszlo is back, finally, after a longer layoff than expected.  This week we look at the end of the Yuan dynasty and the founding of the Ming Dynasty.  We look at the first emperor Ming Taizu, a.k.a. The Hongwu Emperor.  With the establishment of the Ming Dynasty, once again Chinese are in control of the Middle Kingdom.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ming Dynasty P2In this week’s episode we examine the second great emperor of the Ming Dynasty, the Yongle [Yong – Leh] emperor who reigned 1402-1424.  This tireless emperor waged campaigns against the Mongols in the north, the Vietnamese in the south and sent sailing expeditions throughout Asia, the subcontinent and the east coast of Africa to engage the peoples of these faraway lands and bring the splendor of China to them. These legendary voyages of the eunuch Admiral Zheng He were the brainchild of the Yongle emperor.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ming Dynasty P3In today’s  episode we look at Ming Dynasty China from the reigns of Xuande to Jiajing.  This period in Chinese history was witnessing momentous changes.  The dynasty suffers a terrible debacle in 1449.  Portugal was becoming a regular visitor and sets up down in Macao.  This was also a time when evil self-serving eunuchs spread their tentacles throughout the government.  By the close of the Jiajing emperor’s long reign the best days of the Ming were already behind them.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ming Dynasty P4We finish off our overview of the Ming Dynasty in this episode and also trace the rise of the Manchu’s.  The period from the Jiajing emperor to the tragic suicide of the Chongzhen emperor saw a slow and steady decline in the fortunes of  the Ming dynasty.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opium History in China 40 mins – “In this episode Laszlo examines remarks made by distinguished UCLA Professor of Public Policy Mark Kleiman who had commented on Britain’s participation in the Opium War.  The main point was that the cause of the Opium War was due more to protecting imperial tax revenues and the domestic market than trying to stamp out the opium problem. Opium’s history in China began centuries before, at least during the Tang and maybe as far back as the Eastern Jin.  The focus of this episode is on opium’s history in China prior to the Opium War.” At the linkr ight-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Pioneer 14 mins – “For the longest time, doctors basically ignored the most basic and frustrating part of being sick — pain. In this lyrical, informative talk, Latif Nasser tells the extraordinary story of wrestler and doctor John J. Bonica, who persuaded the medical profession to take pain seriously — and transformed the lives of millions.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

President Obama Interview 67 mins –Marc welcomes the 44th President of the United States of America, Barack Obama, to the garage for conversation about college, fitting in, race relations, gun violence, changing the status quo, disappointing your fans, comedians, fatherhood and overcoming fear. And yes, this really happened.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radiation Disasters 59 mins – “On March 11, 2011 a massive earthquake and tsunami led to explosions and meltdowns of multiple reactors at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. These types of radiologic events are rare, but can have serious consequences for the health of individuals and communities. Dr. Brian Savino focuses on the basic terminology, pathophysiology and treatment options regarding radiation exposures to the human body. Recorded on 03/12/2015.” At the link find the title, “Fukushima and Beyond: The Principles of Radiation Disasters,” right-click Download File – 26.6 MB” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reality Question 22 mins – “Cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman is trying to answer a big question: Do we experience the world as it really is … or as we need it to be? In this ever so slightly mind-blowing talk, he ponders how our minds construct reality for us.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click ‘Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roger Corman 64 mins – “Legendary B-movie king ROGER CORMAN has produced and directed over 400 films, giving early career breaks to actors like Robert De Niro, Sandra Bullock, Bruce Dern, Charles Bronson and Dennis Hopper and helping to launch the directing careers of Ron Howard, Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese and Peter Bogdanovich (among others). Gilbert and Frank phoned Roger in his Hollywood home to learn more about his life and fabled career, including where/how he first met longtime friend and collaborator Jack Nicholson, why the Hell’s Angels threatened to murder him AND take him to court, and why “a monster should always be bigger than a leading lady.” Plus: “The Beast with (not quite) a Million Eyes”! Roger experiments with LSD! Peter Lorre messes with Boris Karloff’s head! The “acceptable level of insanity”! And the enduring mystery of “The Terror”!” At the link find the title, “Roger Corman,” right-click (there or here) “Enclosure: …”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School Rehab Solution 17 mins – “On Linda Cliatt-Wayman’s first day as principal at a failing high school in North Philadelphia, she was determined to lay down the law. But she soon realized the job was more complex than she thought. With palpable passion, she shares the three principles that helped her turn around three schools labeled “low-performing and persistently dangerous.” Her fearless determination to lead — and to love the students, no matter what — is a model for leaders in all fields.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seafood Sources 13 mins – “That shrimp you serve at your cocktail party? It might have traveled 9,000 miles to end up on your plate. “Four Fish” author Paul Greenberg talks about the revolution in modern fishing.” At the link find the title, “The Changing Tide of the Fishing Industry,” right-click “Media files IHUB-0704-Seafood-Webmix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shanghai Massacre 1927 22 mins – Today we’re back with more history.  We look at the Shanghai Massacre of April 12, 1927.  This was the defining moment when Chiang Kai-shek and his allies and supporters made a bloody break with the Communists.” At the link right-click “Download Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Silk Road and Marco Polo 31 mins –In this farewell look at the Silk Road, we discuss a few more interesting things and then give the travels and adventures of Marco Polo a once over.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Silk Road Early Days 27 mins –CHP-073-The Early Years of the Silk Road” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Concerns 57 mins – “…interview with Jacob Silverman, author of Terms of Service: Social Media and the Price of Constant Connection. Jacob has written an insightful critique of the costs associated with information socialization and sharing. …Focusing on the meaning of status, visibility and followers, Jacob runs through a range of concerns surrounding social media, including sentiment analysis, privacy and “dataveillance.” We probed several areas in our discussion, from the meaning of the monicker “Luddite” to whether technology is, in fact, neutral….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Somalia Counterterrorism 63 mins – “For years, the war-torn and famine-ravaged Somalia has been a haven for international terrorism, as demonstrated again in the recent horrific attack in Garissa, Kenya. International counterterrorism efforts – ranging from air strikes to proxy wars to the deployment of African Union forces – have provided limited results at best. International efforts to build more inclusive and less corrupt state institutions in Somalia have similarly struggled. While Somalia has set goals to reform its government and revise its constitution by 2016, most of these commitments remain in grave doubt. And as Somalia prepares for national elections in the year ahead, insecurity within the country continues to rise.” At the link right-click on the title just above “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stroke Rehabilitation 50 mins – “I have just posted the second half of my recent interview with Dr. Ed Taub the pioneer of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CI Therapy), which is a revolutionary approach to rehabilitation for stroke and other central nervous system injuries. In BSP 119 Dr. Taub explained the principles behind CI Therapy, which is probably the first rehab technique that explicitly harnesses brain plasticity. In BSP 120 we explore the crucial role of learned non-use (lose it or lose it) and how CI Therapy overcomes this obstacle to recovery.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3” and select
Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tang Dynasty P1 25 mins – As the Sui peters out, Li Yuan, the Duke of Tang, seizes power and establishes the Tang Dynasty in 618.  Along with the Song, the Tang Dynasty is considered the pinnacle of China’s long history.  In culture, art, poetry, painting, ceramics, science, navigation, diplomacy this was a golden age.  Buddhism made even greater inroads into Chinese society. And Chang’an was the center of the world where the great and mighty Taizong emperor ruled and people came from as far away as Persia to marvel at China’s greatness and might.  In this week’s episode we look at the founding of the Tang up to the demise of the third emperor Gaozong.  With her husband’s death in 683, the Empress Wu Zetian came to the fore and began ruling in her own name.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tang Dynasty P2 27 mins – Laszlo is back after a holiday illness to continue where we left off in 705 with the passing of Wu Zetian.  After an initial golden age during the Taizong emperor, the Tang will reach new heights of glory under Tang Minghuang a.k.a. the Xuanzong emperor.  The magnificent city of Chang’an is once again the center of the world where the arts flourished like never before and traders, travelers and explorers from around the world came to gather and marvel at the splendor of Tang Dynasty China.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tang Dynasty P3 31 mins – In today’s final installment covering the history of the great Tang Dynasty, we look at its agonizing decline until 907 when it is pushed aside and another period of disunity sets in.  Five Dynasties reign in the north, all short lived and not spectacular by any means.  In the south, after the Tang falls you have a total of ten kingdoms that exist independently.  While not the most interesting period in Chinese history, the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period acted as a kind of buffer between the two greatest dynasties in China’s long history: the Tang and Song.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trade Negotiations 24 mins – “Big trade deals like the Trans-Pacific Partnership are often negotiated in secret. On today’s show, trade negotiators tell us what happened when they were locked in a hotel for days on end, and told to hash out a deal.” At the link find the title, “#635: Trade Deal Confidential,” right-click “Media files 20150626_blog_pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Web and AI Tech 49 mins – “This week’s episode of the Intelligence Squared podcast features two sessions from our recent Digital Summit with Vanity Fair. n the first session, ‘This is For Everyone: The hopes of the pioneers’, we explored the hopes and memories of the internet’s early days – could the internet have developed in any other way than the one we know today? Our panel of experts featured former Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger; entrepreneur and co-founder of lastminute.com Martha Lane Fox; journalist, blogger and science fiction author Cory Doctorow; and Chief Executive Officer of Telefónica UK (O2) Ronan Dunne. It was chaired by the UK editor of Vanity Fair Henry Porter. In the second session, ‘Artificial Intelligence: Are we engineering our own obsolescence?’ we looked forward to how we will meet the daunting but thrilling challenge of advanced artificial intelligence. We were joined by leading AI expert Nicholas Bostrom; Professor of Cognitive Robotics at Imperial College London Murray Shanahan; neuroscientist Daniel Glaser; and transhumanism advocate and tech investment consultant Riva-Melissa Tez. The session was chaired by science writer and broadcaster Adam Rutherford.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wes Anderson 29 mins – “You might think of Wes Anderson as a filmmaker with a very singular vision. So many of his films, from Rushmore to The Life Aquatic, have a particular elegance and showmanship about them, and a particular aesthetic that makes you say, ‘this must be a Wes Anderson film.’ The truth is, Anderson is one of the most collaborative filmmakers working today. Whether it’s with Owen Wilson, Noah Baumbach, Roman Coppola, or Jason Schwartzman, Anderson has co-written every one of his feature films. He co-wrote the story for his eighth feature as co-writer/director, The Grand Budapest Hotel, with new collaborator Hugo Guinness. He says he needs that collaboration in order to enhance his own vision. These writers are friends, and each partnership results in a product that reflects their particular friendship. “I want to make an experience that people feel things and that’s entertaining and interesting and engaging in whatever way. I need help for that.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic library of 6500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually (right-click “Podcast Encyclopedia” there to download the zip).  Over 240 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 190 – July 3, 2015: 3D Printing Trends, African Economy, Asteroid Hazards, Astronauts, Black Plague, Boxer Rebellion, British Scandals, Broadband Overview, Climate Warming, Communications Studies, Cortisol, Data Management, Dr Pinault-Aerospace, Economic Concerns, Energy Futures, Estonia and Russia, Eye in the Sky, Food Supply Basics, Home Food Production, Individual Rights, Interpol, ISIS Background, Learned Helplessness, Methanol, Mexican-American War, Nazi Germany Insider, Negotiation Fallacies, Opium History in China, Podcast Women, Racism in America, Raisin Outlaw, Russo-Japanese War, Shortwave Report, Silencers, Social Media and Pilots, Sugar Concerns, Terrorist Creation, The Super, Two Gun Cohen, Water Management Breakdown, Water Management in Lima, Women in Science, World War One – Canada, WW II Female Agents

The following audio files come from a larger group of 204 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 53 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

3D Printing Tends 53 mins – “On the show this week we explore the future of 3D Printing. To do so, Indre goes to SolidCon—a conference about “Hardware, Software & the Internet of Things”—and talks to people from two companies in attendance: Will Walker, a sculptor, designer, and educator from Formlabs and Kevin Czinger, the founder and CEO of Divergent Microfactories, Inc.” At the link click “Download” then “OK” from the pop-up menu.

African Economy 72 mins – “Morten Jerven of Simon Frasier University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his new book, Africa: Why Economists Get It Wrong. Jerven, who will be joining Noragric at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences this fall, argues that economists have misread the economic history of Africa, ignoring successful episodes of economic growth while trying to explain a perpetual malaise that does not exist. Jerven is critical of many of the attempts to explain growth using econometric techniques and suggests that a richer approach is necessary that is aware of the particular circumstances facing poor countries.” AT the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Airplane Automation Issues 31 mins – “On the evening of May 31, 2009, 216 passengers, three pilots, and nine flight attendants boarded an Airbus 330 in Rio de Janeiro. This flight, Air France 447, was headed across the Atlantic to Paris. The take-off was unremarkable. The plane reached a cruising altitude of 35,000 feet. The passengers read and watched movies and slept. Everything proceeded normally for several hours. Then, with no communication to the ground or air traffic control, flight 447 suddenly disappeared. Days later, several bodies and some pieces of the plane were found floating in the Atlantic Ocean. But it would be two more years before most of the wreckage was recovered from the ocean’s depths. All 228 people on board had died. The cockpit voice recorder and the flight data recorders, however, were intact, and these recordings told a story about how Flight 447 ended up in the bottom of the Atlantic. The story they told was was about what happened when the automated system flying the plane suddenly shut off, and the pilots were left surprised, confused, and ultimately unable to fly their own plane….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asteroid Hazard 39 mins – “Millions of asteroids have struck Earth in the past. The vast majority have been relatively small, equivalent to the impact of a typical hydrogen bomb. But a few have been much larger: in the 100m hydrogen bomb category, destroying much of life on the planet in short order. To discuss the threat we face from asteroids, and how we might protect life on Earth, Ian Sample is joined down the line from Cambridge University by Lord Rees, the astronomer royal, and co-founder of the Centre for Study of Existential Risk. In the studio, is Clemens Rumpf from Southampton University who is a member of the EU’s Stardust Research Network, which studies the space dust and asteroid situation. Also in the studio is Hannah Devlin, the Guardian’s science correspondent.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronaut Jones 52 mins – “In this very special episode of the Talking Space Podcast, we have author and four-time space shuttle astronaut Dr. Tom Jones. With Dr. Jones we discuss his books Sky Walking, Planetology: Unlocking The Secrets of the Solar System, and Hell Hawks!along with his view on where NASA is going and much more! A special thank you to Dr. Jones also for coming on to participate in this interview and giving his insight.” At the link fright-click “Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronaut Mullane 124 mins – “Three time astronaut Mike Mullane talks about his life and book Riding Rockets. Best selling author Rowland White updates us on his space shuttle project and Gene Mikulka from Talking Space discusses space launches, space travel and what’s happening around the solar system.” At the link fright-click “Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Plague Overview 53 mins – “Tens of thousands of Londoners developed painful, apple-sized, pus-filled boils before dying from the dreadful disease within days. But just as the ordeal of the Black Death seemed to be subsiding, the Great Fire struck the city. But did the conflagration actually save the lives of thousands? In this scorcher of a show, we go in search of the cause of the plague, explore the origins of the Great Fire, and ask whether history might repeat itself? “ At the link right-click “Download as mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boxer Rebellion 60 mins – “The Boxer Rebellion is not a rebellion, and it has nothing to do with boxing, or people that box. However, it is absolutely fascinating, so take a look! I cover the main gripes of the Chinese at this time, and look at why the Boxers were able to rise as quickly as they did. Lemme know what you thought history friends!” At the link find the title, “WDF 15: The Boxer Rebellion ,” right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Scandals 39 mins – “This week’s podcast puts the Guardian’s former editor Alan Rusbridger across the table from one of Britain’s most eminent lawyers, the Queen’s Counsel Jeremy Hutchinson, at a Guardian Live event.They discuss how the second half of the 20th century was shaped by confrontations in the high court. Hutchinson recalls the moment Christine Keeler walked into his chambers and conjures up the atmosphere of early 1960s Britain. He remembers how DH Lawrence’s prose made the case against the censor in the Lady Chatterley’s Lover trial, and pays tribute to Edward Snowden in a post-privacy age.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Overview 66 mins – “Broadband is the defining infrastructure of the 21st century, and the impact of high-speed wired and wireless connectivity is just beginning to be realized. The government institution at the forefront of U.S. broadband policy and implementation is the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), helmed by Chairman Tom Wheeler. On June 26, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings and the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings hosted FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, who discussed his vision for maximizing the benefits of broadband. Chairman Wheeler’s remarks outlined the ways technology is changing network economics and highlight a series of policies aimed at driving fast, universal, and open broadband in this new environment.” At the link right-click on “Maximizing the benefits of broadband” just above “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming 4 mins – “You’d think that in this day and age, no one would die from heatstroke any more. This story is based on a radio interview. Listen to the full interview. What’s the use of all that energy we generate if you can’t power a simple fan to cool down? Well, it’s not that simple. And we’re seeing that play out in Pakistan right now. The country is being blasted by a heat wave, with temperatures well over 110 degrees Fahrenheit. And the supply of electricity is inconsistent in Pakistan. That’s a deadly combination. Hundreds have died. “It’s been a challenging four days or so,” says Karachi-based writer and journalist Bina Shah. “I’m still a lot more fortunate than many people in the city who have just been suffering.” The heat hit her hometown hard. Water supplies are pumped with electricity. The power’s been out. So, at times, there’s no water.  It’s been particularly difficult for the blue collar workers. They’re forced to go out into the intense heat. Plus, it’s Ramadan. “That means no food or water from sunrise to sunset,” says Shah. “In these extreme conditions, taking on a challenge like that is deadly.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Studies 20 mins – “This week on The Voice, our host Gabriela Warrior Renaud chats with Tim Schwab, Associate Professor for the Department of Communications Studies at Concordia University, about the Communications Studies program is structured, and what it offers students who are looking to start a career in Communications.”  At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cortisol 6 mins – “Brian Clegg investigates a compound that calms inflamed joints and excites the stressed brain: Cortisol” At the link find the title, “Cortisol & Hydrocortisone: Chemistry in its element,” right-click” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Management 65 mins – “Universities are drowning in data, not only data produced by their researchers and students, but also data they collect about their communities. Research data are subject to sharing and retention requirements by funding agencies and journals. Data from course management systems, faculty personnel records, security cameras, and social media are being used as indicators for decision making. In this talk Christine L. Borgman — author of the new book “Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World” and Professor and Presidential Chair in Information Studies at UCLA — identifies challenges faced by universities in managing and governing these complex categories of data.” At the link right-click “Download the MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dr Pinault – Aerospace 62 min – “In this special episode, Xtended gets an exclusive interview with one of the most influential people in aerospace today, Dr Lewis Pinault. Covering everything from his life as a Consultant to working for NASA and the UK Government, Dr Lewis shares his views on being short listed for the Mars One flight and what does it feel like to be on the one way flight; space junk and his exciting role for Lunar Mission One.” At the link fright-click “Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Concerns 24 mins – “We ask three economists: Is there some falling anvil that’s about to crush the economy?” At the link find the title, “#634: Worst Case Scenario,” right-click “Media files 20150619_blog_pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Futures P2 54 mins – “Wind and water—these are the forces of nature which shape much of our world. But could they be harnessed to power a nation? In sunny South Australia, wind now supplies 30 per cent of the state’s electricity. Ten years ago it supplied none. In this second episode of Energy Futures, looking at Australia’s energy options beyond fossil fuels, Carl Smith gets inside wind turbines and bobs up and down on waves to discover the energy generating potential of wind, ocean waves and hydro-power.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Estonia and Russia 27 mins – “Neal Razzell reports from the Estonian city of Narva, which is in NATO but almost entirely Russian. Could this be the west’s weak spot? Here, the Estonian government says, Moscow is trying to destabilise it by exploiting local grievances – just as NATO says it did in Ukraine. So Estonia is mounting an urgent campaign to win hearts and minds among its Russian population. Ethnic Russians account for a quarter of all Estonians, and most say their economic prospects are best served by living in the west. But many are also profoundly ambivalent about their identity, culturally and linguistically at odds with the majority, and asking questions about what it means to be an Estonian. Produced by Michael Gallagher” At the link find the title, “Estonia’s Russian Problem,” right-click “Media files p02vmcr8.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evolution 52 mins – “It’s hard to imagine the twists and turns of evolution that gave rise to Homo Sapiens. After all, it required geologic time, and the existence of many long-gone species that were once close relatives. That may be one reason why – according to a recent poll – one-third of all Americans reject the theory of evolution. They prefer to believe that humans and other living organisms have existed in their current form since the beginning of time. But if you’ve ever been sick, you’ve been the victim of evolution on a very observable time scale. Nasty viruses and bacteria take full advantage of evolutionary forces to adapt to new hosts. And they can do it quickly. Discover how comparing the deadly 1918 flu virus with variants today may help us prevent the next pandemic. Also, while antibiotic resistance is threatening to become a major health crisis, better understanding of how bacteria evolve their defenses against our drugs may help us out. And the geneticist who sequenced the Neanderthal genome says yes, our hirsute neighbors co-mingled with humans. It’s Skeptic Check … but don’t take our word for it!” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eye in the Sky 29 mins – “Ross McNutt has a superpower — he can zoom in on everyday life, then rewind and fast-forward to solve crimes in a shutter-flash. But should he? In 2004, when casualties in Iraq were rising due to roadside bombs, Ross McNutt and his team came up with an idea. With a small plane and a 44 mega-pixel camera, they figured out how to watch an entire city all at once, all day long. Whenever a bomb detonated, they could zoom onto that spot and then, because this eye in the sky had been there all along, they could scroll back in time and see – literally see – who planted it. After the war, Ross McNutt retired from the airforce, and brought this technology back home with him. Manoush Zomorodi and Alex Goldmark from the podcast “Note to Self” give us the low-down on Ross’s unique brand of persistent surveillance, from Juarez, Mexico to Dayton, Ohio. Then, once we realize what we can do, we wonder whether we should.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Supply Basics 16 mins – “Our food supply is so integral to our lives that few may notice the degree of processing involved. On this episode, Megan Kimble discussed unprocessed foods.” At the link find the title, “Unprocessed — Groks Science Show 2015-06-24,” right-click “Media files groks062515.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Home Food Production 92 mins – “Episode-1592- Ben Hewitt on Nutrient Dense Food Production – Ben and his wife, Penny, along with their two sons, have transformed a worn out Vermont hillside into a thriving homestead, which currently provides more than 90% of their food, along with most of their building materials, all their heating and cooking fuel, and many other essentials. They call their style of homestead scale food production “practiculture,” reflecting the fact that they draw on many different methodologies while always striving to make this work “doable.” They are the authors of the recently-published book The Nourishing Homestead. Ben’s previous book is Home Grown, which explores his experience with the public ed system (he’s a high school dropout) and his family’s experiences “unschooling” their two sons.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Individual Rights 52 mins – “With the Supreme Court ready to rule any day now on gay marriage rights, Brian, Ed and Peter wade into America’s long history of struggles over rights. How have Americans claimed, framed and changed their rights over time? Where do we think “rights” come from anyway… is it God, nature, the government, the founding documents? Join the Guys as they explore moments from the past that reveal how Americans have asserted their rights and — sometimes in the same breath — denied them to others. We have stories about freedom suits, religious liberty, labor law and… smoking rights?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interpol 27 mins – “Interpol is the world’s biggest and most powerful international policing organisation. Spanning almost every existing country – with the notable exception of North Korea – it carries out vital work in combatting worldwide organised crime. Increasingly important in our globalised era, but lacking in accountability and surrounded with an aura of mystery, it has to cope with new scrutiny. In this age of accountability and transparency, how long can it withstand demands for change” At the link find the title, “Inside Interpol,” right-click “Media files p02vc6nv.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Overview 89 mins – “Though insurgent groups are a fixture of contemporary politics and warfare, the Islamic State or ISIS is unprecedented in its mix of brutality, media savvy, territorial gain, and recruitment. In ISIS: The State of Terror, two of America’s leading experts on violent extremism and terrorism explain the genesis, evolution, and impact of the Islamic State. Drawing on their unique access to intelligence and law enforcement and through their own groundbreaking research, Jessica Stern and J.M. Berger detail ISIS’s strategies and techniques – and challenge our own conceptions of terrorism in a rapidly changing jihadi landscape.” At the link right-click the title, just above “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Learned Helplessness 46 mins – “Stuck in a bad situation, even when the prison doors are left wide open, we sometimes refuse to attempt escape. Why is that? In this episode learn all about the strange phenomenon of learned helplessness and how it keeps people in bad jobs, poor health, terrible relationships, and awful circumstances despite how easy it might be to escape any one of those scenarios with just one more effort. In the episode, you’ll learn how to defeat this psychological trap with advice from psychologists Jennifer Welbourne, who studies attributional styles in the workplace, and Kym Bennett who studies the effects of pessimism on health.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download: and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Methanol 6 mins – “Tempted by a tipple of home-brewed moonshine? Andrew Turley examines the risks associated with drinking methanol.” At the link find the title, “Methanol: Chemistry in its element,” right-click “Media files CIIE_Methanol.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexican-American War 57 mins –After a small break, we return with a bang in the form of the 1846-48 war between Mexico and America. It is quite the story! Texas gets looked into, as does Santa Anna, as does Tabasco, so check it out! I also have some pretty exciting news for you all AND a new BEFIT reminder. What more could you possibly want? You are so very welcome my history friends!” At the link find the title, “EP11-Mexican_American War,” right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nazi Germany Insider -87 mins – “Episode 100-Nazi Germany from Within – The following is my 100th Episode Celebration. After thanking those who have shared this journey with me, I interview Henry Niemann who grew up in Germany during the Nazi Period and was then drafted near the end of the war. Thank you to everyone who listens to my attempt at bringing this amazing story to the current generation and podcasting world.” At the link right-click “Media files Episode100.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Negotiation Fallacies 14 mins – “You can’t always get what you want – or can you? Stanford Business School professor Margaret Ann Neale argues that you can negotiate successfully; it just takes a little help from science.” At the link find the title, “The Art of Negotiation,” right-click “Media files NealeWebMixReal.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opium History in China 40 mins – “In this episode Laszlo examines remarks made by distinguished UCLA Professor of Public Policy Mark Kleiman who had commented on Britain’s participation in the Opium War.  The main point was that the cause of the Opium War was due more to protecting imperial tax revenues and the domestic market than trying to stamp out the opium problem. Opium’s history in China began centuries before, at least during the Tang and maybe as far back as the Eastern Jin.  The focus of this episode is on opium’s history in China prior to the Opium War.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasting Women 46 mins – “Episode 57 is the first episode of Books and Ideas that I have produced in 2015. It is a conversation with experienced podcaster Elsie Escobar. Elsie brings a unique perspective to the question Why Podcast? because she does it all: she hosts and produces 2 shows, works for Libsyn, the company that hosts my shows and many others, and she listens to more podcasts than seems humanly possible.” At the link find the title, “BI 57 Why Podcast? with Elsie Escobar,” right-click “Media files 57-BI-Escobar-au.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in America 47 mins – “Dylann Roof could not have been much more clear about his motives. He chose one of the most prominent black churches in America for his night of terror. He shot nine black church members in cold blood. Eyewitnesses quote him saying you’re “taking over our country. You have to go.” He has reportedly confessed he wanted to start a race war. His online selfie features a Confederate battle flag. What fed all that? What is this nut of hatred? And what about the rest of us? This Hour, On Point: Race in America now and what needs to be said, what needs to be done, after Charleston.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in South Carolina 51 mins – “Investigators continue to sift through evidence about the man who gunned down nine parishioners Wednesday inside an historic black church in Charleston, South Carolina. What is already clear is that this horrific event lays bare longstanding and lethal contradictions in this country: Mentally deranged individuals have no trouble getting guns, and more than 150 years after the Union defeated the confederacy and freed its slaves, racism lives on. Can this tragedy galvanize the personal and political will needed to face these issues directly and make change across the country?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Raisin Outlaw 19 mins – “A farmer wanted to sell all his raisins, but the federal government said no. So he took it to the Supreme Court.” At the link find the title, “#478: The Raisin Outlaw,” right-click “Media files 20150624 blog pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russo-Japanese War 43 mins – “This week we look at the 1904-05 war between a young Japan and a massive Russia. I talk about some interesting Japanese history, Russia’s greatest defeats and I put on a fantastic Russian accent. Trust me. Thanks to all of you for your support, hope you enjoy this one. Be sure to let me know what you thought!” At the link find the title, “WDF 3: The Russo-Japanese War,” right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shortwave Report 30 mins – “A weekly 30 minute review of international news and opinion, recorded from a shortwave radio and the internet…. This week’s show features stories from NHK World Radio Japan, China Radio International, Radio Deutsche-Welle, Radio Havana Cuba, and Sputnik Radio. At the link right-click “Media files swr150626.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Silencers 57 mins – “Lane Douglas graduated from UT-Martin in 1975 with an Engineering degree. After a few years as an engineer, he began working in Industrial Sales. He retired in 2011, after 32 years in sales management, the last 12 as Regional Sales Operations Director for MSC Industrial Supply. He opened Southern Silencers, LLC in 2014, a NFA Class 3, silencer business, selling silencers in the State of Tennessee.  His company provides suppressors and nothing else.  They are 100% customer focused and will work hard to help their customers make the right choice for their needs.They also provide all the information you need to complete the necessary ATF paperwork for owning a suppressor and will even complete as much of the paper work for you as the law will allow, to help you make sure you get it done properly.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media and Pilots 79 mins – “Do you have a social media policy for your career? Welcome to the podcast where we inform, motivate, and give you an inside look at the many aviation careers. Some of our favorite co hosts join us. First , Eric Crump, Aerospace Director at Polk State College and a passionate aviation educator. We also have Tom Wachowski, Corporate Pilot and career advocate. Welcome to the show Eric and Tom!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sugar Concerns 19 mins – “ This installment explores the pleasures and perils of sugar, the viral vegetable kale, and whether kale devotees can have too much of a good thing. With a bonus yarn about a chia seed-induced emergency room visit.” At the link find the title, “Scary Food Stories,” right-click “Media files checkup15062201_ghit.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorist Creation 9 mins – “There’s an organization responsible for more terrorism plots in the United States than al-Qaeda, al-Shabaab and ISIS combined: The FBI. How? Why? In an eye-opening talk, investigative journalist Trevor Aaronson reveals a disturbing FBI practice that breeds terrorist plots by exploiting Muslim-Americans with mental health problems.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

The Super 60 mins – “#323: The Super – In 1980’s New York City, rent is rising: it seems out of control, and residents struggle to keep up. So Jack Hitt helps organize tenants, and threatens a rent strike. This does not go over so well with his building super, who, as it turns out, is a very dangerous man.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Two Gun Cohen 101 mins (2 parts) – “Today I wanted to introduce a sort of lovable rogue who haunted the hotel lobby’s of Shanghai, Guangzhou, Hong Kong, London and Edmonton.  Today’s subject was by no means a historic figure.  In fact, I don’t think you can even call him a bit player.  Nonetheless, Morris Abraham Cohen had a China story that deserves a telling.   Today’s episode will look at his early life, how he ended up in Canada and how he got hooked up with the local Chinese Canadians.  We’ll get as far as the death of Sun Yat-sen in early 1925.  We’ll finish up next time with Morris Cohen’s life after Dr. Sun.  I mainly used Daniel S. Levy’s superb biography: Two-Gun Cohen, A Biography.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2 here.

Water Management Breakdown 30 mins – “Abrahm Lustgarten of ProPublica discusses the panoply of unfortunate water management policies and practices in the West.” At the link find the title, “Abrahm Lustgarten: Water Management Breakdown,” right-click “Media files SC-2015-06-23.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Management in Lima 5 mins – “Lima taps ancient Andean canals to help fight its water shortage.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Science 26 mins – “Author and journalist Rachel Swaby discussed a few of the substantial contributions that women have made to science.” At the link find the title, “Girl Power — Groks Science Show 2015-06-17,” right-click “Media files groks061715.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One – Canada 275 mins (5 parts) – “Stories from those who lived to tell them. This series draws on the testimony of 200 Canadians who fought in WW1, recorded by CBC Radio in 1964. The men’s stories are supplemented by letters, war diaries, military reports and poetry.” At the link find the titles, The Bugle and the Passing Bell, Part1 [Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5], right-click beside “Media files…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WW II Female Agents 37 mins – “With us for this episode is writer Kathryn J. Atwood, arthor of Women Heroes of World War II and editor of Code Name Pauline: Memoirs of a World War II Special Agent and it is the later book we will be discussing. The protagonist, Pearl, Code Named Pauline, came from humble beginnings to do her part to as an SOE agent, behind enemies lines in Occupied France, to thwart the Nazi’s before and after D-Day. For all those looking for strong female role models, Mrs. Atwood’s books fit the bill beautifully.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic library of 6500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually (right-click “Podcast Encyclopedia” there to download the zip).  Over 240 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 189 – June 26, 2015: Addiction, Alzheimers and Food, Aung San Suu Kyi, Battle of Britain Vet, Biohacking, Books History, Carbon Giants Battle, Cardiologist, Career Selection, Cars and Chicken Tax, Clean Water Act, Coaching Ourselves, Comanches and Texas, Complex Television, Creativity, Damian Lewis, DARPA Program Manager, Dave Brubeck, David Attenborough, David Suchet, Dawn French, Dizzy Gillespie, Drug Research, Dustin Hoffman, Energy Futures, Ethics, Facial Recognition, Govt Job Applications, Grace Hopper, Grand Canyon Development, Hiring Interns, Hiring Overqualfieds, Hugh Laurie, Independent Power Producers, Interview Questions, Japanese Internment and Press, Lauren Bacall, Louis Armstrong, Magna Carta Impact, Malcom Gladwell, Multitasking Caution, Muscular Dystrophy Scientist, Native Americans in 1700s, Panama Canal Expansion, Patent Trolls, Pittsburgh Tech Council, Price Tags History, Prison State, Putin Background, Relativity, Shami Chakrabarti, Solitary Confinement, Standards, Stem Cells Background, Stephen Fry, Terry Gilliam, Timing Is Key, Tom Jones, Transplant Scarcity, Twitter History, Urinary Tract Dysfunction, Waters Fourth Phase, Whoopi Goldberg, Woman Aviator

The following audio files come from a larger group of 221 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 67 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Addiction 34 mins – “This week, Jesse talks about addiction with Dr. Jeremy MartinezCould a smart drug “habit” be a gateway to addiction?  What’s the difference between addiction and physical dependence?  What’s going on with the brain’s dopaminergic systems during addictive behavior?  Tune in to find out.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alice in Wonderland 47 mins – “For “Alice in Wonderland” and the rabbit-hole and his world of make-believe, author Lewis Carroll has been called the godfather of virtual reality. One-hundred and fifty years ago, he unleashed the Mad Hatter and the Queen of Hearts and the White Rabbit and the Cheshire Cat – and, above all, Alice. The young girl whose imagination was set free, and took the world’s with it. And then came Peter Pan, Middle Earth, Hogwarts, League of Legends. The back story? An uptight Oxford mathematician. A real girl – Alice.  And a different age. This hour On Point: the Victorian Age. Inside “Alice in Wonderland.‘” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimers and Food 87 mins – “…Dr. Dale Bredesen was the Buck Institute’s founding President and CEO and is an internationally recognized expert on Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Bredesen’s ground-breaking discoveries have led to a recent clinical trial as well as evidence for memory loss reversal associated with Alzheimer’s disease using lifestyle modifications… Dr. Bredesen says Dr. Perlmutter’s new book, Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain—for Life, explains how nurturing gut health can enhance brain function. “Thanks in large part to a dramatic new understanding of the brain-gut-microbiome connection, there’s new hope for the treatment of autism to Alzheimer’s to multiple sclerosis. David Perlmutter is a leader in this burgeoning field. His book is a landmark contribution.”At the link you can listen/watch, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is in the blog archive.

Aung San Suu Kyi 45 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is Aung San Suu Kyi. The programme was recorded on location in Naypyitaw, Burma in December 2012. Now Leader of Burma’s opposition party, she has dedicated her life to fighting for human rights and democracy in her homeland. A figure of world renown, she is known in Burma as simply “The Lady” and her integrity, determination and grace have provided a beacon of hope to a nation oppressed and exploited by decades of brutal military dictatorship. President Obama says she is an “icon of democracy” and Desmond Tutu calls her “a remarkable woman … ready to work for the healing of her motherland”. Her renown has come at significant personal sacrifice: she endured nearly 20 years of house arrest and persecution, exiled from her children and apart from her British husband who died from cancer in 1999. She says “It takes courage to feel the truth, to feel one’s conscience because once you do, you must engage your fundamental purpose for being alive. You can’t just expect to sit idly by and have freedom handed to you.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battle of Britain Vet 39 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway is the veteran RAF pilot Tony Iveson. Aged 21, he survived being shot down in his Spitfire over the North Sea during his first taste of combat in the Battle of Britain. Unusually for a fighter pilot, he then went on to join Bomber Command and the famous Dambusters squadron, sinking the German battleship The Tirpitz and winning a Distinguished Flying Cross. Aged 89 he returned to the skies, becoming the oldest man to fly a Lancaster bomber: “Well, I got out of that aeroplane and looked at it and it and thought how did we do it?” he says. “I know it was a long time ago and I was young and fit and a professional flier. But I thought about some of my friends who had been lost and it was an emotional experience.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biohacking 60 mins – “This week we’re talking about do-it-yourself biology, and the community labs that are changing the biotech landscape from the grassroots up. We’ll discuss open-source genetics and biohacking spaces with Will Canine of Brooklyn lab Genspace, and Tito Jankowski, co-founder of Silicon Valley’s BioCurious. And we’ll talk to transdisciplinary artist and educator Heather Dewey-Hagborg about her art projects exploring our relationship with genetics and privacy.” At the link find the title, “#322 Biohacking,” right-click “Media files Science for the People, 322 Biohacking.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Books History 19 mins – “…Democratization came to books and journals decisively in the 1980s, when desktop publishing began to replace physical plants and industrial machinery. Digital media master Richard Nash says the digital revolution took many by surprise in the book world because it was a change in disguise. At first blush, nothing seemed to have changed at all.Today, though, we see change in every direction. An open network has replaced a closed supply chain of warehouses and bookstores; the bond that writers share with their readers is now the paramount relationship; and everyone is a creator. As Nash tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally, printed books may have given birth to industrialism, yet digital publishing is returning society to a pre-modern phase. Today, though, we see change in every direction. An open network has replaced a closed supply chain of warehouses and bookstores; the bond that writers share with their readers is now the paramount relationship; and everyone is a creator….” At the link right-click “Download,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Giants Battle 60 mins – “…Welcome to Radio Ecoshock. This week we investigate attempts by the fossil fuel industry to capture otherwise green-thinking ports in the Pacific Northwest, of the United States and Canada, to export carbon to Asia. It’s a battle you hardly hear about. Citizens are lining up against huge corporations with huge money, to fight off giant coal ports, liquified natural gas ports, even propane ports. If we commit to that infrastructure, we commit to devastating climate change – not to mention the explosive, toxic and polluting impacts of these big projects on the Pacific coast….” At the link right-click the first reference to “Lo_Fi” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cardiologist 60 mins – “Q&A with Dr. Patrick O’Gara – Dr. Patrick O’Gara talked about advances in heart surgery, progress in understanding heart health and heart diseases, and the impact of the Affordable Care Act on doctors and patients. He also spoke about his family and career.” At the link you can listen, but a download costs $.99; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Career Selection P1 20 mins – “The most quoted speech in the realm of ‘follow your passion’ is Steve Job’s Stanford graduation commencement speech. He said: I’m convinced that the only thing that kept me going was that I loved what I did. You’ve got to find what you love. And that is as true for work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. And don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking. Don’t settle. What isn’t often quoted is another part of the same speech: It wasn’t all romantic. I didn’t have a dorm room, so I slept on the floor in friends’ rooms, I returned coke bottles for the $0.05 deposits to buy food with, and I would walk the 7 miles across town every Sunday night to get one good meal a week at the Hare Krishna temple.” Part 2 is here. (One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cars and Chicken Tax 16 mins “How the American auto industry is built on a trade dispute over frozen chicken parts.” At the link find the title, “#632: The Chicken Tax,” right-click “Media files 20150612_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clean Water Act 51 mins – “Major rivers — like the Mississippi — are protected under the clean water act of 1972. But it’s been unclear if smaller wetlands and streams that feed into major rivers and lakes are also safeguarded. The Obama administration is seeking to clear up that confusion. Last month, it announced a rule that would clarify the number of smaller waterways protected by federal law. The Environmental Protection Agency says this will ensure safe drinking water for a third of Americans. But farmers and developers say it violates their property rights. A look at the debate over how to best protect the nation’s lakes and rivers. [3 guests]” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Coaching Ourselves 38 mins – “Our guidance on how to coach yourself – Many people tell us that their boss doesn’t coach, or their company doesn’t provide training or a mentoring program and they don’t know how they can improve their skills. So in this guidance, we’re going to tell you can use our coaching model to help yourself.” (One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comanches and Texas 53 mins – “Sixty years ago John Ford travelled to Monument Valley to make his greatest Western, The Searchers. Based on Alan LeMay’s novel, it is still a powerful tale of race, violence and redemption as Ethan Edwards (John Wayne) searches for his niece Debbie, abducted by a Comanche raiding party on the Texas frontier. But, as Mark Burman discovers, The Searchers is a gateway to the real and powerful story of the forging of Texas statehood and the rise and fall of the Comanche empire.” At the link find the title, “In Search of The Real Searchers,” right-click “Media files p02tl312.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up media.

Complex Television 15 mins – “We’ve all heard the age old complaint: hundreds of shows, but nothing to watch. Author and Professor of Media Jason Mittell explains why that disgruntled channel-flipping is becoming a thing of the past — and how today’s television just keeps getting better.” At the link find the tite, “How IMBD and Amazon Are Making TV Better,” right-click “Media files 0620-Mittell-Webmix-Fix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity 49 mins – “Whether it’s work, school, the kids, or having a David Bowie/Queen collaboration stuck in our heads, we’re all under pressure. This week, we’ll examine how we get under pressure, and how we get out of it. Harvard’s Teresa Amabile will tell us about workplace creativity, and what types of tension can heighten it. Reporter Daniel Gross looks at the engineering and psychology behind one of the most aggravating experiences in human existence… traffic. James Bessen, an economist at BU, gives some insight and historical context into the fear of knowing that a robot might soon have your job. Finally, John Ioannidis talks about the stress scientists are under to come up with interesting research, and how that’s created a crisis in scientific literature. So give love one more chance, and listen to our show about pressure.” At the link find the title, “6.13.15 Pressure Pushing Down on Us,” right-click “Media files 0613-FullShow-WebMix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Damian Lewis 35 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is the actor, Damian Lewis. As part of the wave of British talent that’s crashed onto America’s shores in recent years his impact has made a deep impression on the creative landscape. His role as Sergeant Brodie in Homeland saw him win both an Emmy and Golden Globe and along with Band of Brothers, The Forsyte Saga and a long list of other credits, he now ranks as one of our most well recognised and highly regarded performers. Things didn’t always look so peachy: aged 11, and in the school production of Princess Ida, he forgot the entire third act and stood mute in front of a packed auditorium. Tellingly, rather than scuttling into the wings with shame he soldiered on and by 16 he knew performing was, more than anything, what he wanted to do. He says, “I am a person who is ambitious. I’m ambitious to get the very best from every moment and even if that’s just taking my children to the zoo … I want it to be the best it can be.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DARPA Program Manager 67 mins – “Dr. Justin Sanchez and DARPA – Hosted by Leo Laporte. DARPA program manager exploring neurotechnology, brain science and systems neurobiology. Hosts: Leo Laporte and Marc Pelletier. Dr. Justin Sanchez joined DARPA as a program manager in 2013 to explore neurotechnology, brain science and systems neurobiology.” At the link right-click “Download options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dave Brubeck 17 mins – “Roy Plomley’s castaway is jazz musician Dave Brubeck.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

David Attenburough 40 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway for the 70th anniversary edition of Desert Island Discs is Sir David Attenborough. He has seen more of the world than anyone else who has ever lived – he’s visited the north and south poles and witnessed most of the life in-between – from the birds in the canopies of tropical rainforests to giant earthworms in Australia. But despite his extraordinary travels, there is one part of the globe that’s eluded him. As a young man and a keen rock-climber, he yearned to conquer the highest peak in the world. “I won’t make it now – I won’t make it to base camp now – but as a teenager, I thought that the only thing a red-blooded Englishman really should do was to climb Everest.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

David Suchet 37 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is the actor David Suchet. He has won armfuls of awards for his work – most recently an Emmy for his portrayal of Robert Maxwell – but he is best known for the character he has been associated with for 20 years, Hercule Poirot. His approach to his work is meticulous and he says he has to inhabit each role he takes on. In this illuminating interview he recalls how, early in his career, a psychologist showed him how to shed his character at the end of each performance otherwise, he found, the edges between his own life and those of the person he was playing became blurred.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dawn French 35 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is Dawn French. Her career started back when dungarees were considered a legitimate fashion choice and she’s built her reputation on borderline surreal skits and glowingly warm characterisations. Brought up in a forces family she had to move schools a lot and found making people laugh helped to make them her friends. Since then it’s made her a household name and she may be moments away from becoming a ‘national treasure’. Double act partner, sit-com star, sketch show performer, writer, actor, Dawn has made us laugh for years. So does she ever feel overwhelmed by people’s expectations? She says “I tell myself that I’m the sort of person who can open a one-woman play in the West End, so I do …. I am the sort of person who writes a book – so I do”. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dizzy Gillespie 30 mins – “Roy Plomley’s castaway is jazz trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Research 26 mins – “Extracts of the Mexican poppy found in Mali can treat malaria. Dr Merlin Willcox, a clinical researcher from Oxford University, visited communities in Mali to see how healers are using local plants to treat disease. He found that the Mexican poppy has some active ingredients that can treat malaria in some ways as effectively as current medicines. He told Claudia Hammond about how he went about this process of reverse pharmacology. Iron Fish Fights Anaemia In Cambodia iron deficiency affects as many as half of all women and children, but supplements can be hard to get hold of and can have unpleasant side effects. Nick Wood reports on how some families are using a piece of iron, 8cm long and shaped like a fish, to improve their nutrition and prevent anaemia. They just drop it into their cooking pots. Professor Imelda Bates of Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine explains why anaemia is detrimental to health and how the iron fish idea could be adapted for other cultures. How Many Drugs are Fake? Research just published in PloS One and conducted by Dr Harparkash Kaur, a pharmacologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, has shown that in parts of Nigeria there are fewer fake drugs than was feared, but more sub standard ones, which bring their own risks. Dr Kaur tells Claudia how they carried out their research.” At the link find the title, “Plants to Treat Malaria,” right-click “Media files p02tyntf.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dustin Hoffman 36 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is Dustin Hoffman. In spite of his Aunt Pearl telling him he wasn’t good looking enough to be an actor for the past forty-five years he’s been crafting landmark movie performances. He is that rare and apparently contradictory thing – a character actor and a superstar. The Graduate, Midnight Cowboy, Lenny, All The President’s Men, Marathon Man, Kramer v Kramer, Tootsie, Rain Man, Wag The Dog, and Last Chance Harvey are just a handful of the movies that contribute to an unparalleled body of work: he is the only actor in history to have top billing in three films that won Best Picture Oscars. Now in his mid-70s he is making his directorial debut. He says “I’m always fighting to break through… I’m trying to show you the part of me that wants to love, wants to kill, that wants to find my way out, that feels there is no way out.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Futures P1 54mins – “This week we begin the first of a four-part series in which Carl Smith looks at Australia’s energy options beyond fossil fuels. Today, he investigates geothermal and nuclear power. The energy stored below Australia is immense. But it’s not just coal and gas. There’s also a huge amount of geothermal heat. Can this energy be harnessed to fuel the nation? And Australia has one-third of the world’s uranium. Carl Smith discovers the immense heat beneath our feet, and visits Australia’s only nuclear reactor to discover the potential of geothermal energy and nuclear power as replacements for coal as Australia’s major source of electricity. (A four minute brief about coughing starts the program.)” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethics 42 mins – “Our guidance on ethical behavior. Although this show was originally recorded as a Career Tools cast, we’ve included it for free for our Manager Tools listeners and Licensees given the underlying assumption of ethical behavior in all our recommendations. We started this cast with the intention of putting it in our new series for newcomers to the workforce: First Job Fundamentals. But it’s too important not to give everyone access to it. Ethical behavior underpins the Manager Tools and Career Tools philosophy. We’ve always taken it for granted that our listeners understand that. This cast makes clear our stance on ethics.” (One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facial Recognition 47 mins – “Facial recognition technology takes privacy and personal identification issues to a whole new level. With enough cameras around and enough data, you can identify almost anyone – everyone – anywhere, anytime. It’s as good as fingerprints but requires no contact. Just a watchful, electronic eye. ID-ing you, wherever you go. Facebook and Google and US law enforcement have lots at work already. The Obama administration has been trying to hammer out privacy restraints. Last week, the privacy advocates walked out. This hour On Point: facial recognition and the future of privacy in America.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Job Applications 21 mins – “Our guidance on the application process in government – We’ve been asked about how to get through the application process for government jobs – both local, state and federal. There are a lot of similarities, whether you look at any of the levels within the US, and in other countries in the world. This cast won’t be specific to any one system, but we will go over the basics.” (One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grace Hopper 4 mins – “…Rear Admiral Hopper finally retired from the Navy at the age of 80 as the oldest active duty officer in the US military. Hopper continued to consult and speak in the computing industry and on college campuses until her death in 1992. Grace Hopper was a pioneer of computer programming, sometimes remembered as the ‘Queen of Code.’….” (Photo of the first computer bug is also here.) At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grand Canyon Development 52mins – “The Grand Canyon is an awe-inspiring gorge of the Colorado River in Arizona. About 5 million sightseers, hikers and paddlers visit Grand Canyon National Park every year. As federal land it’s protected, but much of the land nearby is not. There’s a fierce battle going on in the region and nationally over two proposed development plans: One is a 1.4 mile tramway that would take visitors to new restaurants and an amphitheater at the bottom of the canyon. The other is a commercial development with more than 2,000 new homes, less than two miles from the park entrance. We look at the battle to balance private property rights and public land preservation. [5 guests]” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Hiring Interns 22 mins – “Our guidance on hiring internsHiring interns is often a task delegated to team members by managers to give them hiring experience.  There’s a thought there that because interns aren’t around long, getting a bad hire doesn’t mean much and there’s less risk if you get it wrong.
Of course, it’s not true.  A great intern can have a really positive effect in as little as a month. A bad intern just gives everyone more work to do.  So, how do you choose an intern?”
(One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hiring Overqualifieds 27 mins – “This guidance describes how – and why – to hire “overqualified” candidates. In 2013, there are overqualified candidates in the job market. And Manager Tools recommends you HIRE them. Stop complaining about how you have to help and train and push your directs all the time, and hire someone who can MORE than do the job. The benefits – to an effective, smart manager – FAR outweigh the risks. Maybe it’s not for the faint of heart, but come on boys, do you want to live forever? Hiring overqualified candidates is a clever competitive advantage for an effective Manager Tools manager.” (One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hugh Lourie 33 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway is the actor, Hugh Laurie. If life were straightforward he’d be marooned on the island because of his achievements as an Olympic rower. But his early promise on the water was scuppered by a bout of glandular fever – so he’s had to make do instead with life as a worldwide entertainment superstar. Very British comedy, very big budget movies, very successful syndicated TV drama – his 30 year career has taken him from A Little Bit of Fry & Laurie to a big bit of broadcasting history: his role in the U.S. show House ran for 8 series and had a global audience of 81 million. So why now does he feel the need to risk his stellar reputation by making music too? He says, “as soon as I acknowledge to myself that something is frightening and carries the risk of public humiliation I feel like I have to do it.”At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Independent Power Production 29 mins – “Todd Thorner, an entrepreneur who has started wind, solar and hydro-electric companies. discusses the role of independent power producers in the U.S. The post Todd Thorner on Independent Power Producers appeared first on Sea Change Radio.” At the link find the title, “Todd Thorner on Independent Power Producers,” right-click “Media files SC-2015-06-16.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interview Questions 22 mins – “Our guidance on answering the question ‘why do you want to work here?’This guidance is part of a series helping you answer common interview questions. ‘Why do you want to work here?’ is a dispositive question for many interviewers. An enthusiastic, well thought through answer will make up for poor answers elsewhere, and a stuttered half answer will detract from your whole interview. So what is the right way to answer?” (One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Japanese Internment and Press 64 mins – “University of Southern California lecturer Richard Reeves talks about the internment experiences of the Japanese on the U.S. West coast and how the press fueled hysteria over sabotage.” At the link find the title, “Discussion on the Press and Japanese Internment in World War II,” right-click “Media files program.377774.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lauren Bacall 28 mins – “Roy Plomley’s castaway is actress Lauren Bacall.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Louis Armstrong 25 mins – “Roy Plomley’s castaway is jazz trumpeter and singer Louis Armstrong.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Magna Carta Impact 110 mins (2 parts) – “It’s been hailed as the cornerstone of our justice system. From property rights to women’s rights, the rule of law, equality before the law and defined roles for judges: all roads seem to lead us back to Magna Carta Libertatum. But is this entirely true?” At the link find the title, “ Much Ado About Magna Carta, Part 1,” right-click “Media files ideas 20150615_66349.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2.

Malcolm Gladwell 37 mins – “The writer Malcolm Gladwell is interviewed by Kirsty Young for Desert Island Discs. Always concise, frequently counterintuitive and unexpectedly beguiling, his work orders the world in a way that gives fresh insights into human behaviour. He believes that a knowledge of people’s backgrounds is necessary to understanding their success; his own achievements may presumably then be attributed, not just to his keen mind and polished prose, but also to his parents – an English mathematician and a Jamaican psychotherapist. He says, “I am the bird attached to the top of a very large beast, pecking away and eating the gnats…. I am someone who draws inspiration from the brilliance of others and repackages it … I am a populariser, a simplifier and a synthesizer.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Multitasking 28 mins – “We’ve said often on air that multi-tasking is a lie. We don’t mince our words, and we totally mean it. Multi-tasking is impossible for humans. It’s not even possible for computers. In the early days they just switched between tasks so quickly that it seemed as if they were multi-tasking. Nowadays they have multiple chips, so it can be argued they are multi-tasking, but you still only have one brain, so the argument doesn’t help you. Yes, you can rub your belly and pat your head at the same time. How much concentration does that take though? If we do it, we can’t do anything else, because doing those two things simultaneously takes up our WHOLE brain. We sometimes show this video at our conferences: Test Your Awareness: Do The Test. In it, you’re asked to look out for the number of passes the basketball players make. Something else happens in the video, which if you haven’t seen it before, you won’t see. Why? BECAUSE YOU CAN’T MULTITASK! If you are counting basketball passes (a relatively simple task) you cannot see the other things that happen. And, it doesn’t matter if you’re male or female, old or young, computer savvy or technically barely literate. No-one can multi-task. It’s just not in our physiology. (Humans differ by .1% from each other, so we’re all a lot more the same that we are different). Those of you who are thinking, but this isn’t me… *I* can multi-task, you’re wrong, but apparently not being convinced. Please try and experiment with us. Try these techniques for just a week and see if your output improves. If it doesn’t, you can go back to multi-tasking with our blessing.” (One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muscular Dystrophy Scientist 45 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is the scientist Professor Kay Davies. She has dedicated much of her life to finding a cure for the severest form of muscular dystrophy. Before she was 40, she had helped to develop the antenatal test which is now used around the world, then she isolated the gene sequence which could be instrumental in treating the condition. After years spent working on that, human trials for a possible treatment are about to begin. It’s quite something for a woman who doesn’t have an O-level in biology. Although, even as a child she did possess that critical quality crucial to scientific pioneers: “I loved solving problems,” she says, “I was very tenacious and would sit in my room until I had finished the problem. I am a sticker.” [Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Native Americans in 1700s 70 mins – “Professor Paul Mapp talks about the interactions between the European colonial powers and Native American tribes on the Great Plains during the 1700s.” At the link find the title, “Discussion on the Colonial West,” right-click “Media files program.376832.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panama Canal Expansion P1 13 mins – “The expanded Panama Canal is scheduled to open in the winter of 2016, featuring a new, parallel set of locks and deeper channels, allowing the passage of Neo-Panamax container ships carrying as many as 13,000 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs), in contrast to 5000 TEU capacity of today’s Panamax ships, as well as larger bulk carriers and now LNG ships. Larger ships mean lower transportation costs, and the possibility of reducing consumer prices and making some US businesses more competitive in the global markets. But a key question for the U.S. is “Are our ports, harbor, and landside transportation systems ready for these larger ships?” Are channels deep enough, cranes sufficiently large and plentiful, and do rail, road, and storage facilities have the throughput capacity to move the bulk and containerized goods? Host Joseph Schofer discusses the national perspective on port readiness with Roger Bohnert, Deputy Associate Administrator-Office of Intermodal System Development, and Yvette Fields, Director, Office of Deepwater Ports and Offshore Activities, at the U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD). The Phase I report of MARAD’s Panama Canal impact study is hereAt the link right-click “Listen to this episode now,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patent Trolls 25 mins – “Communicators on Patent Reform – Representative Hank Johnson (D-GA), Austin Meyer, and Daniel Zadoff talked about patent legislation before Congress and other issues. They were each interviewed in the Rayburn House Office Building on unknown dates.” Done during a CES Technology Fair held in Washington, DC. At the link you can listen, but a download costs $.99; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Pittsburgh Tech Council 54 mins – “Joyce welcomes Audrey Russo, president and CEO of the Pittsburgh Technology Council. Discussed on the show will be the mission of this organization.” At the link find the title, “Mission of the Pittsburgh Technology Council,” right-click “Media files bender061615.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Price Tags History 17 mins – “The price tag is a fairly recent invention. And it’s already on its way out.” At the link find the title, “#633: The Birth And Death Of The Price Tag,” right-click “Media files 20150617_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison State 86 mins – “An intimate look at the cycle of mass incarceration in America.” At the link right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Putin Background 27 mins – “Vladimir Putin, then a KGB agent, was caught up in dramatic events as East Germany collapsed. He saw crowds take control as communist power collapsed, and had to defend his KGB office in Dresden as demonstrators tried to break in. Chris Bowlby explores how this experience shaped Putin’s career and behaviour today – his determination to restore Russian power, his fear of demonstrations, his sense of the power of nationalism.” At the link find the title, “The Moment that Made Putin,” right-click “Media files p02tssz5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Relativity 52 mins – “A century ago, Albert Einstein rewrote our understanding of physics with his Theory of General Relativity. Our intuitive ideas about space, time, mass, and gravity turned out to be wrong. Find out how this masterwork changed our understanding of how the universe works and why you can thank Einstein whenever you turn on your GPS. Also, high-profile experiments looking for gravitational waves and for black holes will put the theories of the German genius to the test – will they pass? And why the story of a box, a Geiger counter, and a zombie cat made Einstein and his friend Erwin Schrödinger uneasy about the quantum physics revolution.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shami Chakrabarti 37 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is the director of Liberty, Shami Chakrabarti. A pithy and incisive speaker, she is rarely out of the media spotlight and has been voted ‘one of our most inspiring political figures’. She joined Liberty the day before the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and, as the events unfolded on the television screens, it was, she says, impossible to predict just how much they would shape the civil rights debate in the years that followed. For her, it was not just a matter of philosophical or political principle – her son was born soon after the attacks and his birth, she says, influenced her own feelings: “I understood more what it is to be afraid, what it is to really worry about whether your family are going to be blown up on the underground.” [Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solitary Confinement 34 mins – “Special Podcast: FRONTLINE asks how corrections officials are changing the use of solitary confinement in the U.S.” At the link find the title, “Frontline Roundtable: Solitary Confinement,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Standards 4 mins – “We spend a good part of our lives measuring things — length, weight, time. But how do we know that a pound of coffee weighs the same in Miami as it does in Seattle? Or that a gallon of gas is the same in Houston as it is in New York? The need for uniform measures in the United States was recognized in the Constitution. It grants Congress the power to establish standards. George Washington understood the need for standards. In his 1790 State of the Union address, he proclaimed that “Uniformity in the currency, weights, and measures of the United States is an object of great importance, and will, I am persuaded, be duly attended to.” However, it wasn’t until 1901 that Congress established the organization we know today as the National Institute of Standards and Technology, or NIST for short….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stems Cells Background 126 mins – “Stem cells are an important part of today’s medical practice, and their importance will grow in the future based on research conducted today. One of the researchers in Derrick Rossi of Harvard and the Boston Children’s Hospital. In the episode we introduce the different kinds of stem cells and their role in the body and in medical treatments. We then discuss some clinical use cases as well as current research (in general and in Derrick’s group).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stephen Fry 39 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is Stephen Fry. Comedian, actor, writer, director, presenter & award-ceremony host – his list of accomplishments is long, varied and impressive. His younger years were troubled and with a propensity for stealing and lying, he was expelled from two schools and imprisoned for credit card fraud. The turning point came when he knuckled down and won a scholarship to Queens’ College, Cambridge, where he read English and joined the Cambridge Footlights, becoming lifelong friends with Emma Thompson and Hugh Laurie. His career highlights include the fruits of his collaborative work with Laurie – from A Bit of Fry and Laurie to Jeeves and Wooster, he played Lord Melchett in Blackadder and Oscar Wilde on the big screen. He is a best-selling author of fiction and three volumes of autobiography, is the voice of the Harry Potter audio books and presents BBC Two’s QI. He has also spoken of his experience of mental health issues and in 2006 he made a documentary exploring the effects of living with Bipolar – it won an Emmy Award.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terry gilliam 36 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway is the animator and director Terry Gilliam. He first planted his foot-print on our cultural landscape more than thirty years ago – back then, it was a huge, animated foot which squashed everything beneath it and became one of the defining images of Monty Python’s Flying Circus. In the years since, his film credits have included Brazil, Twelve Monkeys and The Imaginarium of Dr Parnassus. Now aged 70, he’s directing his first opera. He says: “I’ve always liked the extremes, the edges. I like to know where the cliff is, but you only find out by stepping off.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Timing Is Key 7 mins – “Bill Gross has founded a lot of startups, and incubated many others — and he got curious about why some succeeded and others failed. So he gathered data from hundreds of companies, his own and other people’s, and ranked each company on five key factors. He found one factor that stands out from the others — and surprised even him.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tom Jones 36 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway is the singer Sir Tom Jones. In a career spanning fifty years he’s sold 150 million albums and his hits have included It’s Not Unusual, What’s New Pussycat? and Delilah. As a child it was assumed he’d follow in his father’s footsteps and become a miner. But he developed TB when he was twelve and doctors warned his parents against sending their only son to the pit; they said his lungs were too weak. Now aged seventy, he has no plans to retire. “Singing’s like breathing to me”, he says, “my voice drives me, it tells me that I have to do it”. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transplant Scarcity 17 mins – “Do we know our bodies’ true value? Northeastern’s Kara Swanson says the massive gap between organ supply and demand makes it much higher than we might think.” At the link find the title, “Organ Marketplaces” of the Future, right-click “Media files Swanson-Webmix-0620.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Twitter History 29 mins – “…New York Times columnist & technology reporter Nick Bilton discusses his book, “Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal,” in which he traces the origins of Twitter from the perspectives of its four co-founders.” At the link find the title, “The Communicators with Nick Bilton,” right-click “Media files comm012514 podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urinary Tract Dysfunction 24 mins – “Jalesh Panicker discusses lower urinary tract dysfunction, a common problem in people with neurological disorders.” At the link find the title, “Lower urinary tract dysfunction: The Lancet Neurology: June 16, 2015,” right-click “download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water’s Fourth Phase 24 mins – “How On Earth reporter Kendra Krueger caught up with Gerald Pollack, Bioengineering professor from the University of Washington to talk about the physical chemistry of water.  The science of water has a sordid past of controversy and dispute which continues today in our current scientific and layman communities.  Why is that? What is so strange about the properties of water?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whoopi Goldberg 35 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is the comic and actress Whoopi Goldberg. As a child she used to practise the acceptance speeches she was sure she would one day make – little surprise then that she’s one of a handful of people to have won an Oscar, a Grammy, a Tony and Emmy awards.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Woman Aviator 4 mins – “Today, Hilda Hewlett — not a young daredevil. The University of Houston’s College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them. The stories of first-women-fliers reveal one adventure-seeking young lady after another. But, when we come to Hilda Hewlett — first British woman pilot — the script changes dramatically. Hilda Hewlett was born in 1864 while we were still fighting our Civil War. She was almost 40 when the Wright Brothers flew….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic library of 6500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 240 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 188 – June 19, 2015: Abortion Legislation, App for Parking, Autistic Adults, Bitcoins, Bond Funds, Carbon Bubble, Changing Minds rev, Corporate Responsibility, Dollar Democracy, Elon Musk Book, Faith Based Medicine, Habit Building, Hybrid Authors, Inequality in America, Infrastructure, Job Growth, Jobs and Robots, Lawmaggeddon, Legal Services, Liberia, Looted Antiquities, Monsanto Issues, North Korean Teacher, Putin’s Way, SEAL Team, Sexual Freedom, Solar Women, Spectrum Management, Superbugs, Torture and CIA, Viagra for Women, Virtual Reality, Work Improvement

The following audio files come from a larger group of 187 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 34 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Abortion Legislation 52 mins – “Two years ago, Texas passed a law requiring all clinics that offer abortions to meet the same standards as hospital surgical centers. On Tuesday, a federal court upheld the Texas law, saying it did not place an “undue burden” on women seeking abortions. And in Wisconsin this week, a bill that would ban all abortions after 20 weeks passed the state senate. Fourteen states now have a similar ban on the books. Supporters of these laws say they are needed to protect the health and safety of women. But critics say they are unconstitutional and simply make it harder for women to obtain abortions. Diane and guests discuss new state laws restricting abortion and how courts are responding.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

App for Parking 17 mins – “The story of a 24-year-old kid and the idea he thought would reduce congestion, cut greenhouse gasses and make urban life easier for everyone. Instead, it brought him nothing but trouble.” At the link find the title, “#630: Free Parking,” right-click “Media files 20150605_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Austic Adults 52 mins – “Over the last few weeks, high school seniors around the country have lined up to receive their diplomas. It’s an exciting time, but this transition into adulthood can also be challenging. It is especially difficult for those with an autism spectrum disorder. Members of the autism community refer to leaving high school as “falling off a cliff,” as it marks the end of most government support services. Unemployment for these young adults is high, as are rates of social isolation, even when compared to people with other disabilities. Now, as 50,000 individuals on the autism spectrum enter adulthood each year, calls to address their needs are growing louder. We look at new efforts to support adults with autism.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Bitcoins 68 mins – “Nathaniel Popper of the New York Times and the author of Digital Gold talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Bitcoin. Can Bitcoin make it? What went wrong with Mt. Gox? Why did Ross Ulbricht, the creator of Silk Road, just get sentenced to life in prison? Why are venture capital firms pouring millions of dollars into companies promising easier ways to use Bitcoin? Popper discusses these questions along with the technical side of Bitcoin to help listeners understand why so many investors are excited about the potential of Bitcoin.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bond Funds 46 mins – “What Do You Want To Know About Bond Funds? Paul [Merriman] answers the 14 most common questions about bond funds. He references the following article about bond risk: FINRA.org” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Bubble 60 mins – “With the Tar Sands and the crash in oil prices, Canada went from being a world petro-state to an economy in trouble. Our next guest says the carbon bubble is bursting in Canada, and that may not be a bad thing. Jeff Rubin is no ordinary critic of fossil fuels. He was the Chief Economist for CIBC World Markets, the investment arm of a Canadian mega-bank. Since then he’s written the books “The End of Growth” and “Your World is About to Get A Whole Lot Smaller”. Now Rubin has a new work out: “The Carbon Bubble: What Happens to Us When it Bursts.” The obvious question, which everyone asks: what is a carbon bubble?” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” above the playback image and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Changing Minds rev. 45 mins – (Begins for nine minutes talking about faulty data concerning the topic, “Changing Minds” and then discusses the topic of money in life.) “It’s peculiar, your inability to predict what will make you happy, and that inability leads you to do stupid things with your money. Once you get a decent job that allows you to buy new shoes on a whim, you start accumulating stuff, and the psychological research into happiness says that stuff is a crappy source of lasting joy. In this rebroadcast, listen as psychologist Elizabeth Dunn explains how to get more happiness out of your money…with science!” At the link find the title, “Media files 050_Happy_Money, Elizabeth_Dunn_rebroadcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corporate Responsibility 25 mins – “How responsible should companies be about their impact on the world? Christine Bader, author of The Evolution of a Corporate Idealist: When Girl Meets Oil, and Arvind Ganesan, director of the business and human rights division at Human Rights Watch, discuss corporate social responsibility. Hosted by Sarah Childress.” At the link find the title, “Frontline Roundtable: Corporate Social Responsibility,” right-click “Media files 177665035-frontlinepbs-frontline roundtable corporate social responsibility.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dollar Democracy 56 mins – “ Dan has talked in the past about funding drives to get reformers elected, but this show explores a more “if you can’t beat them, join them” approach to achieving public policy goals in a money-dominated system.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elon Musk Book 58 mins – “Ashlee Vance is the author of ‘Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future,’ which provides the first inside look into the extraordinary life and times of Silicon Valley’s most audacious entrepreneur, and he is the feature writer for Businessweek.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing blue arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Faith Based Medicine 58 mins – “…our guest is Dr. Paul Offit, whose new book examines the uneasy relationship between religion and medicine in America. Offit tells the stories of children who have died from treatable ailments because their parents put their faith in scripture over medical intervention. He says his message isn’t anti-religious, but that medical neglect is itself un-Christian. We’ll talk about the choices some parents make and why he says the legal system is failing our most vulnerable.”At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Habit Building 40 mins – “Part of the reason for this is that different people have different personalities and traits. For example, some people are wired to want to uphold all expectations – both external (set by others) and internal (set by themselves). Others are rebels – they don’t want to be told what to do at all. Gretchen Rubin, an author of multiple best-selling books, outlines many of these personality types and traits – and how you can use the knowledge of yours to build habits – in her new book Better Than Before: Mastering the Habits of Our Everyday Lives. In this episode, she and I talk about this subject; if you’re interesting in improving your habits, check it out!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hybrid Authors 41 mins – “The first wave of independent publishing in the digital age promised a golden age of reading and writing. Many caught up in the excitement were swift to proclaim the demise of traditional publishing models. What we see in 2015 is a world that has found room for both the upstarts and the established players. Authors frequently migrate from “indie” status to traditional houses and back again. Authors are making choices based on personal and professional “ROI” assessments – and not only about revenue potential but also considering their long-term career goals. Depending on the book and the trajectory of an author’s career, independent publishing is the right choice now, or a year from now. For the keynote panel opening this year’s uPublishU at BookExpo America, CCC’s Chris Kenneally spoke with a panel whose direct experience working in today’s “hybrid” environment covers editing, publishing and representing authors.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inequality in America 58 mins – “Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz talks about his book, [The Great Divide]. He is interviewed by Heather McGhee, president of Demos.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Joseph Stiglitz,” right-click “Media files program.400404.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save ink As” from the pop-up menu.

Infrastructure History 52 mins – “ As crash experts sort out why an Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia last month, killing eight passengers, Congress is still haggling over how to replenish the nation’s Highway Trust Fund before it goes dry. All the while, the safety of America’s roads and rails hangs in the balance. So on this show, Brian, Ed and Peter uncover the stuff of modern life that’s hidden in plain sight. How have Americans decided what infrastructure to invest in, how to maintain it, and who ultimately has to pay for it? Our stories take a look behind the scenes at the electric grid, the shipping industry and the origins of oil pipelines.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Growth 20 mins – “If you’re worried that a robot might take your job, well, you’ve come to the right place. Economist James Bessen explores why technology may NOT displace workers – and why 19th-Century textile workers have a lot in common with techies in Silicon Valley.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jobs and Robots 24 mins – “If you aren’t already worried about being replaced by a robot, maybe you should be. Today on the show, three races pit humans against machines.” At the link find the title, “#622: Humans vs. Robots,” right-click “Media files 20150508_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lawmageddon 31 mins – “In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Nathaniel Russell about his definition of Lawmageddon, what the legal profession needs to embrace these changes, and the consequences lawyers face if they fail the tests of Lawmageddon. In the second half of the podcast, Russell discusses what can happen if lawyers ignore the presence of social media as evidence and the ethical responsibility all lawyers have to their clients with regard to social media and due diligence.” At the link find the titel, “Lawmageddon and How to Prepare for Social Media in the Courtroom,” right-click “lawmaggeddon-social-media-courtroom.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Legal Services 29 mins – “In this episode of The Digital Edge, Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview Judy Perry Martinez, chair of the ABA Presidential Commission on the Future of Legal Services. Martinez discusses specific actions the commission is taking to find solutions, including grassroots meetings across the country, a national summit, public hearings, and lawyer education. She explains how discussions with lawyers, judges, technology innovators, law students, academics, and law librarians bring awareness to issues in the changing legal landscape and encourages solution ideas. These changes present challenges and opportunities for lawyers today, but those who do not jump on board will likely be left behind.” At the link find the title, “The ABA Commission on the Future of Legal Services,” right-click “Media files aba-commission-future-legal-services.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liberia 87 mins – “FRONTLINE and ProPublica investigate the secret history of Firestone in Liberia.” At the link find the title, “Firestone and the Warlord,” right-click “Media files 209423642 frontlinepbs firestone and the warlord.mp3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Looted Antiquities P1 55 mins – “When the Taliban and ISIS destroy ancient artifacts, the world responds with outrage. But where should that outrage lead: taking ancient art out of the country of origin? Or would that amount to cultural genocide? Just who owns ancient art?” At the link find the title, “Who Owns Ancient Art? Part 1,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150612_96342.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monsanto Issues 51 mins – “The world’s largest seed company, Monsanto, is hoping to expand its business in insecticides and other herbicides by acquiring Syngenta, a major player in the chemicals business based in Switzerland. So far, Syngenta has said no, but Monsanto is likely to raise its offer. If Syngenta ultimately agrees to the deal, some fear the possible takeover could mean higher seed and food prices. In addition, anti-trust regulators will be looking closely at Monsanto’s expanded power in global seed and pesticide markets.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

North Korean Teacher 13 mins – “For six months, Suki Kim worked as an English teacher at an elite school for North Korea’s future leaders — while writing a book on one of the world’s most repressive regimes. As she helped her students grapple with concepts like “truth” and “critical thinking,” she came to wonder: Was teaching these students to seek the truth putting them in peril?” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Putin’s Way 56 mins – “FRONTLINE investigates the accusations surrounding Vladimir Putin’s reign in Russia.” At the link find the title, “Putin’s Way,” right-click “Media files 209427949 frontlinepbs putins way.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

SEAL Team 6 47 mins – “A huge report out this weekend on SEAL Team 6 – the special operations forces that killed Osama bin Laden. The New York Times spent a year digging in to the most elite, most deadly, most secretive force in the US military. What they found was a lot of killing, and rescue, and intelligence-gathering. An evolution in US force projection from big military to fierce, focused out-of-nowhere attacks that can show up almost anywhere – and do. It’s a gripping story with big questions attached. Their reporting staff is with us. This hour On Point:  Deadly force, global reach, and SEAL Team 6.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Freedom 57 mins – “Rising star historian Faramerz Dabhoiwala came to the Intelligence Squared stage in February 2012 to describe how the permissive society arrived in Western Europe, not in the 1960s as we like to think, but between 1600 and 1800. It began in England and is now shaping and challenging patterns of sexual behaviour all over the world. For most of western history, all sex outside marriage was illegal, and the church, the state, and ordinary people all devoted huge efforts to suppressing and punishing it. This was a central feature of Christian civilization, one that had steadily grown in importance since the early middle ages. Three hundred years ago this entire world view was shattered by revolutionary new ideas – that sex is a private matter; that morality cannot be imposed by force; that men are more lustful than women. Henceforth, the private lives of both sexes were to be endlessly broadcast and debated, in a rapidly expanding universe of public media: newspapers, pamphlets, journals, novels, poems, and prints. In his account of this first sexual revolution, Dabhoiwala will argue that the creation of our modern culture of sex was a central part of the Enlightenment, intertwined with the era’s major social, political and intellectual trends. It helped create a new model of Western civilization, whose principles of privacy, equality, and freedom of the individual remain distinctive to this day.” At the link find the title, “Faramerz Dabhoiwala on the Origins of Sex,” right-click “Media files 209708542-intelligence2-origins-of-sex.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Women 6 mins – “Take a step back from Zanzibar’s white sand beaches and big hotels and you’re in a very different world. One where the island’s dusty, inland villages largely go dark once the sun sets. This is when the differences between people who have electricity and those who don’t are most pronounced….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spectrum Management 30 mins – “Karl Nebbia, who formerly led spectrum management operations for the federal government, talked about the spectrum used for cell phones, the Internet, and streaming content. He discussed issues with the growth of wireless devices in recent years and how the government was addressing regulations.” At the link you can listen, but downloads cost $.99; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Suberbugs at NIH 19 mins – “FRONTLINE’s exclusive interview with the family of a young man who died in a superbug outbreak that swept through a hospital at the National Institutes of Health.” At the link find the title, Outbreak at NIH,” right-click “Media files 209421489 frontlinepbs outbreak at nih.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Superbugs 40 mins – “FRONTLINE investigates the widespread use of antibiotics in food animals and whether it is fueling the growing crisis of antibiotic resistance in people.” At the link find the title, “The Trouble with Antibiotics,” right-click “Media files 209419838 frontlinepbs the trouble with antibiotics.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Torture and CIA 57 mins – “The secret history of the CIA’s controversial “enhanced interrogation” methods.” At the link find the title, “Secrets, Politics, and Torture,” right-click “Media files 209431399-frontlinepbs secrets politics and torture.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Viagra for Women 48 mins – “A little pink pill called flibanserin got a green light last week from advisers to the FDA. Its purpose: to enhance sexual desire in women. The headline writers could not resist calling it “Viagra for women.” The same pill had been rejected twice before. At hearings it was called a “mediocre aphrodisiac with scary side effects.” But a big lobbying push demanded gender equity on the sex pill front – and finally got the panel’s recommendation. For “Viagra for women.” This hour On Point:  the little pink pill. Women, sex, side-effects and the making of desire.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virtual Reality 54 mins – “On the show this week we talk all things virtual reality with Will Smith and Norman Chan from Tested.com. Did VR fail in the 90s?How many times does it have to fail to succeed? What’s it useful for besides video games and Lawnmower Men? If you’re confused by the recent VR comeback, Will and Norm have answers. (Starts after a 12 minute intro.) At the link find the title, “90 Will Smith & Norman Chan – Understanding Virtual Reality,” right-click “Media files 209977852 inquiringminds 90-Will-Smith-Norman-Chan on understanding virtual reality.mp3

Work Improvement 71 mins ‑ “Work sucks, but it doesn’t have to. In this episode we go inside Google in an interview with Lazlo Bock, head of People Operations. Bock has helped the company conduct experiments and introduce policies and procedures that have applied knowledge gained from psychology and neuroscience concerning biases, fallacies, and other weird human behavior quirks. The result has been a workplace where people are happier, more productive, and better able to pursue that which fulfills their ambitions. Learn all about Google’s approach as Lazlo describes his new book, Work Rules, a collection of insights from Google’s evidence-based, data-driven human relations.” (At the At the link find the title, “051 – Work – Lazlo Bock,” right-click “Media files 051, Work by Lazlo Bock.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

=======================================================================

ARCHIVE

An alphabetic library of 6500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 240 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment