Mining Digest 396 – Jun 21, 2019: Affordable Care Act Fight, Anti-Vaxx Agenda, Bitcoin Wallet Attack, Blockchain Discussion, Cashless Economy, China’s Digital Currency Experiment, Cyber Breaking and Entering, Disturbing Books, Electronic Discovery, Fake News and Facebook, Farm Bureau Activities, Female Rage, Fertility Research, Fighting Hate Speech, Frederick Douglass, Future of Work, Harm Reduction to Treat Addiction, Internet Poor Quality in U.S., Internet Threat to Children, Investment Decisions, Library Fire, Measles Comeback, Meritocracy Myths, Mobile Device Forensics, Obesity Paradox, Opioid Crisis, Placebo Effect Research, Powerful Woman, Programmer Gender Imbalance, RISC Creation, Self Driving Car Research, Single Payer Health Care, Spouse Death, Test Tube Babies, U.S. Imperialism, Universal Basic Income, Waste Water Treatment, White Power Movement

Exercise your ears: the 58 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 614 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,442) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Affordable Care Act Fight 48 mins – “The Trump administration moves to strike down the entire Affordable Care Act. We look at the implications of a full repeal.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI in Canada 22 mins – “What would you do with $125 million dollars and a mandate to advance artificial intelligence research and policy in Canada? If you’re Dr.Elissa Strome, the answer is A LOT. This episode of the Ask AI podcast features an interview with Dr. Elissa Strome, the head of CIFAR’s Pan-Canadian Artificial Intelligence Strategy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Anti-Vaxx Agenda 6 mins – “…lawmakers in Washington heard from an 18-year-old who, against all odds got his shots. Ethan Lindenberger, who fought with his own mother to get vaccinated, told senators, “for my mother, her love, affection, and care as a parent was used to push an agenda to create a false distress.” That “anti-vaxx” agenda, the dangerous legacy of a thoroughly debunked 1998 study in the British medical journal Lancet, was dealt yet another devastating — though not mortal — blow this week, courtesy of epidemiologists from Denmark’s Staten Serum Institute. Their new study, which included more than 650,000 children, found that the MMR vaccine did not raise the risk of developing autism. And yet, even in the face of study after study, and even as websites like Pinterest have moved to stamp out the spread of anti-vaxx materials on their websites, the debunked vaccine-autism link and its impact on public health live on. In this 2012 interview, Brooke spoke with Seth Mnookin, author of The Panic Virus: A True Story of Medicine, Science and Fear, about why these myths persist.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Betsy Ross 46 mins – “Betsy Ross is an American icon to many, the seamstress who sewed the first U.S. flag because of a personal commission from George Washington. But is it true? Sort of. Learn all about this fascinating story today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Bitcoin Wallet Attack 6 mins – “In this issue: New Attack Against Electrum Bitcoin Wallets; Machine Learning to Detect Software Vulnerabilities; Using a Fake Hand to Defeat Hand-Vein Biometrics.” At the link find the title, “Crypto-Gram January 15, 2019,” right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-01.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bits and Bytes 4 mins – “...If you’ve purchased a laptop lately, you’ve likely been deluged with an array of technical details, like “number of bits.” Thirty-two is passé. Sixty-four is all the rage. Why should we care?…” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 2863” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Discussion 34 mins – “In this issue: Evaluating the GCHQ Exceptional Access Proposal; Public-Interest Tech at the RSA Conference; Blockchain and Trust” AT the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-02.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cashless Economy 16 mins – “Can digital payments make physical currency a thing of the past? Cryptpocurrency pioneer Charlie Shrem, founder of Crypto.IQ, says it’s only a matter of time.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

China’s Digital Currency Experiment 14 mins – “Join the team from WSJ’s Heard on the Street for a look at China’s futuristic adoption of digital payments and cashless transactions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Chinese Internet Growth 13 mins – “The Chinese internet has grown at a staggering pace — it now has more users than the combined populations of the US, UK, Russia, Germany, France and Canada. Even with its imperfections, the lives of once-forgotten populations have been irrevocably elevated because of it, says South China Morning Post CEO Gary Liu. In a fascinating talk, Liu details how the tech industry in China has developed — from the innovative, like AI-optimized train travel, to the dystopian, like a social credit rating that both rewards and restricts citizens.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cowboys 50 mins – we’re talking about the Wright family of ranchers and rodeo cowboys in central Utah. They’re the subject of a new book that explores the challenges of keeping a foot in the West’s past while trying to navigate its new realities.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Breaking and Entering 27 mins – “What are the distinctions between penetration testing and vulnerability assessments? In this 100th episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek talk to Sherri Davidoff about her career as a penetration tester and what she has developed with the companies in the area of cybersecurity. They discuss why law firms should consider pen testing in order to illustrate areas of weakness in security and become better protectors of their information. They also get a sneak peek of Sherri’s upcoming sessions at ABA TECHSHOW 2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Disturbing Books 42 mins – “On this week’s show, thriller fan Alison Flood speaks to Alice Clark-Platts about her terrifying novel The Flower Girls, after finding herself struggling with its most shocking moment. Then Claire, Richard, Sian and Alison share the books they have found unsettling or disturbing, even to the point of being unable to finish them.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronic Discovery 28 mins – “The processes of eDiscovery and its regulation are constantly changing. The challenges that come with this continuous evolution require lawyers to be educated on best practices. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek talk to Doug Austin about the most prominent trends in eDiscovery. They talk about the new developments in data privacy laws from 2018 and discuss the most significant criminal and civil eDiscovery cases.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Facebook Privacy 12 mins – “Judging Facebook’s Privacy Shift” At the link find the title, “Crypto-Gram March 15, 2019,” right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-03.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Fake News and Facebook 45 mins – “What’s real? What’s fake? With more than 1 billion people using Facebook, the company’s artificial intelligence algorithms can’t answer these questions, so it hired outside firms to moderate content. These human “content moderators” decide what’s fake, real, satire, inappropriate and illegal. No surprise: It’s not working. In this Komando on Demand podcast, you’ll hear from Brooke Binkwoski, former Facebook fact-checker, about the real story. Find out how Facebook’s content moderators watch the seedy side of life all day, so you don’t have to.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Management 36 mins – “Dick Wittman is the Founder of Wittman Consulting, a company dedicated to training consultants who can help family farm businesses in transitional processes and agricultural finance. Dick is a former manager and the current board chair for a 20,000-acre family farm located in Idaho. He has an extensive farming and ranching background in crops, cattle, and timber. He holds a degree in Agricultural Economics from the University of Idaho and a Master’s degree from the University of Utah. Currently, he focuses on public speaking and running Train-the-Trainer workshops, expanding the international resource base of agricultural consultants for family-owned businesses. Dick joins me today to share why it’s important for family farm owners to adopt the “Farm CEO” mindset. He explains why family farm managers need to operate more like executives and how they can change their mindset to function at an executive level. He also shares the skills that are required today to better manage family farm businesses and the importance of being able to adapt your organization to market changes in order to to ensure future success.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar, then selec “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Female Freedom 15 mins – “Kakenya Ntaiya made a deal with her father: She would undergo a traditional Maasai rite of passage, female circumcision, if he would let her go to high school. Ntaiya tells the fearless story of continuing on to college, and of working with her village elders to build a school for girls in her community, changing the destiny of 125 young women.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Poets 54 mins – “Mary Oliver, the beloved American poet who died last month at the age of 83, was described by The New York Times as “far and away this country’s best-selling poet. It does not seem strange at all now that the most prominent of poets should be women, but until relatively recently, poetry was considered, however chauvinistically, as a robustly male preserve. The vast majority of towering figures in English-language poetry were men until around the middle of the 20th Century. But just as Mary Oliver has inspired countless women – and men – with her poetry, her predecessors from decades or a century and a half ago deeply influenced Oliver’s generation.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Female Rage 12 mins – “Anger is a powerful emotion — it warns us of threat, insult, indignity and harm. But across the world, girls and women are taught that their anger is better left unvoiced, says author Soraya Chemaly. Why is that, and what might we lose in this silence? In a provocative, thoughtful talk, Chemaly explores the dangerous lie that anger isn’t feminine, showing how women’s rage is justified, healthy and a potential catalyst for change.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fertility Research [3rd item] 32 mins – “Helen Macdonald and Carl Heneghan are back again talking about what’s happened in the world of evidence this month. They start by talking about how difficult a task it is to find evidence that’s definitely practice changing, what GPs can learn from Malawian children with nonsevere fast-breathing pneumonia, how radiation dosage varies substantially – and consultant radiologist Amy Davies what that means for patients. They also rail against add-on tests for fertility, and the lack of evidence underpinning their use – will the traffic light system suggested help patients make treatment choices. Carl’s rant this week is based on a new study by Steve Woloshin and Lisa Schwartz which documented 20 years of medical marketing in the USA.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Fighting Hate Speech 52 mins – “Nadine Strossen says we should protect hate speech. She’s former ACLU president, and she argues that censorship just doesn’t work. The way to resist hate speech, she says, is with more free speech. Nadine Strossen says we should protect hate speech. Strossen is a constitutional law professor and the former president of the ACLU, and she gets why people react so viscerally to racist, sexist, and other hateful language. She says she’s been a target of anti-Semitic and misogynist speech herself. The problem though, she argues in her latest book, is that censorship simply doesn’t work. Strossen joins us to explain why the best way to resist hate speech is with more free speech.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Research Lab 4 mins – “…Baron Justus von Liebig was born in Darmstadt in 1803. He took up chemistry when he was seventeen. When he was twenty, he went to Paris for a year to study with the famous French chemist Gay-Lussac. Gay-Lussac opened his eyes to the new idea that we’d need accurate experiments to make sense of chemistry. Liebig came back to a post at the University of Giessen in Germany. There he turned his young man’s enthusiasm on Gay-Lussac’s ideas. He worked single-mindedly to set up a chemical research laboratory. He had to spend his own salary on equipment. By 1827, Liebig had a twenty-man operation, the likes of which the world had never seen. Liebig is honored for his work in organic, pharmacological, and agricultural chemistry. But this laboratory was his greatest contribution. Other chemists had to copy it to keep up with him. It was the first systematic research laboratory, and it changed our thinking. Before Liebig, research was an amateur’s game. Now it was being put into the hands of a new breed of professionals….”At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 1652.and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fred Rogers 36 mins – “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood aired its final episode in 2001. Fred Rogers passed away two years later. But the legacy of Mister Rogers is stronger than ever. Last year’s film about Rogers, “Won’t You Be My Neighbor,” became the highest-grossing biographical documentary of all time. And, now, a recently published book tells Fred Rogers’ story from childhood to his status as American icon. It is called “The Good Neighbor: The Life and Work of Fred Rogers.” Diane talks to the book’s author, Maxwell King, about why both children, and adults, continue to turn to Mister Rogers for comfort and guidance.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Frederick Douglass 52 mins – “…we’re talking about Fredrick Douglass, escaped slave, educator, and orator. Historian David Blight says that words were his only weapon, and he used his voice to explain the human condition.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future of Work 54 mins – “Boston University professor Ellen Shell talks with Recode’s Kara Swisher about her new book, The Job: Work and Its Future in a Time of Radical Change. In this episode: Shell’s background in science and culture journalism; her earlier books, “The Hungry Gene” and “Cheap”; how writing about 1800s department store sales in “Cheap” led to writing “The Job”; what jobs will be automated and how we should prepare; how this transition compares to the Industrial Revolution; the ripple effects of one job being automated; the recent government shutdown; what does it even mean to be employed in the gig economy?; the “skills gap” myth and the opportunities of growing up rich; what should young people in the workforce do now?; will robots ever take all the jobs?” At the link left-click the box with three dots, then right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Harm Reduction to Treat Addiction 14 mins – “Why do we still think that drug use is a law-enforcement issue? Making drugs illegal does nothing to stop people from using them, says public health expert Mark Tyndall. So, what might work? Tyndall shares community-based research that shows how harm-reduction strategies, like safe-injection sites, are working to address the drug overdose crisis.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Needs 28 mins – “3D printed steaks, One cheap pill to treat most of aging by Ian Woolf, Nathan Waters examines Human Needs, now and into the future – part 1” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Poor Quality in U.S. 32 mins – “The United States prides itself on being a country of innovation. But in the land that built the internet, our ability to get access to high speed quality service is not on par with other countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard law professor Susan Crawford says as the country slips further behind, we jeopardize our place as a leader in the tech revolution. Susan Crawford’s new book is called “Fiber: The Coming Tech Revolution―And Why America Might Miss It.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Internet Threat to Children 17 mins – “Writer and artist James Bridle uncovers a dark, strange corner of the internet, where unknown people or groups on YouTube hack the brains of young children in return for advertising revenue. From “surprise egg” reveals and the “Finger Family Song” to algorithmically created mashups of familiar cartoon characters in violent situations, these videos exploit and terrify young minds — and they tell us something about where our increasingly data-driven world is headed. “We need to stop thinking about technology as a solution to all of our problems, but think of it as a guide to what those problems actually are, so we can start thinking about them properly and start to address them,” Bridle says.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Decisions 44 mins – “Are you missing out on millions of dollars for your retirement? After deciding to save and invest, the most important investment decision of your life, in Paul’s opinion, is what this podcast addresses. Of the Millennials investing in 401k plans, nearly 25% are refusing to take the risk of investing in stocks (equities) and are choosing only to invest in bonds (fixed income), which they see as “secure”. Secure as bonds may be, Paul is concerned that young investors are missing out on what could be millions of dollars difference in their retirement savings. He makes a strong case that the worst of equity returns are better than the best of fixed-income returns. In comparing the returns of four major U.S. equity asset classes with three fixed-income asset classes, it is clear that those — especially in their early years — who do not “take the risk” of investing in equities — will lose out on significant increases to their long-term retirement plan, based on historical evidence. The point is, if you’re going to bother saving and investing for your future, why not maximize your returns with little additional risk, especially when you have time on your side?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Len Deighton Novels 54 mins – “The great era of the spy novel was the 1970’s and ’80s, and the three masters of the genre were all British: John le Carré, Ian Fleming and Len Deighton. Fleming arguably was in a genre all by himself, writing tongue-in-cheek romance thrillers, wearing just the tuxedo jacket of the spy novel. But the other two were up to something different — the spy novel for them was a vehicle to explore ideas of class, of ideology and disillusionments in life.Where were the gains that the post-war era had promised? In the Cold War with the Soviets, it didn’t seem like we were winning much of anything…” At the link you can listen, bu tnot download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Library Fire 51 mins – “…we’re talking about libraries and their place in today’s digital world. Our guide is the writer Susan Orlean, whose latest book tells the story of a devastating fire that swallowed the Los Angeles Central Library in 1986.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linux Creation 4 mins – “….My computer-wise friends have all been at me to do a program about the computer operating system Linux. That might strike you as odd, but Linux has almost religious implications among computer people. It has become an emblem of the altruism to which so much of the computer underworld aspires. Linux is an operating system, like those used to run Windows or Macintosh machines. Linux, however, is available to anyone, free of charge….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 1669.” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Measles Comeback 27 mins – “Dr. Brian Goldman looks at the global spread of measles, what it means to Canadians, and how we went from believing the disease was cornered to a crisis point in less than 2 years. Brian speaks to Jayda Kelsall, an Ottawa cancer patient with up-to-date vaccines, who contracted the disease on a trip to the UK, and New York Times “plagues and pestilences” reporter, Donald G. McNeil Jr., who has traced the origins of the current outbreak in New York, and the resurgence of measles around the world.” At the link find the title, The measles comeback,” right-click ”Download The measles comeback” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meritocracy Myths 50 mins – “A college admissions scandal has highlighted what people refer to as “the myth of meritocracy.” But actually, meritocracy itself is a myth. This week, On the Media looks at the satirical origins of the word and what they tell us about why the US embraces it. Plus, the messaging for and against Medicare for All, as well as a historical look at why we don’t have universal healthcare. And economic historian and Tucker Carlson antagonist Rutger Bregman.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mobile Device Forensics 31 mins – “In our increasingly mobile world, lawyers face many new challenges in digital forensics for their practice. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek talk to Brett Burney about what lawyers need to know about digital forensics on mobile devices. They discuss Brett’s mobile data collection spectrum, which outlines methods of data collection and preservation for lawyers and their clients. Brett gives tips on what lawyers should consider in these processes to ensure the best results, including the importance of hiring digital forensics technologists when lawyers are uncomfortable with technology. Brett Burney is Principal of Burney Consultants LLC, and focuses the bulk of his time on bridging the chasm between the legal and technology frontiers of electronic discovery. He is also the author of the free download eDiscovery Buyers Guide at http://www.ediscoverybuyersguide.com.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Mountaintop Dynamo 4 mins – “Today, we install a dynamo on a mountaintop. The University of Houston’s College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them….” At the link right-clickClick here for audio of Episode 1656.and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Obesity Paradox [first item] 27 mins- “It is well known that being overweight or obese puts a person at a higher risk of stroke, heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and many other conditions. But new research suggests that if a person does have a stroke, they are more likely to survive it if they are overweight. This adds evidence to what is known as the obesity paradox; namely that obesity puts you at risk, but might protect you in certain circumstances. Claudia speaks to the study author Dr Zuolu Liu, Vascular Neurology Fellow at the University of California Los Angeles Medical Center. Algae, cacti and the horseradish tree – they may sound like parts of nature you would observe on a hike but, according to a new report, these are among the 50 so-called foods of the future we should all be eating. The report, compiled by the food manufacturers Knorr, WWF-UK and the Center of Public Health Nutrition at the University of Washington, is hoping to help find solutions to how we can reduce the impact our food has on the environment. And give us some health benefits as well. The BBC’s Katie Silver went along to taste some of the ingredients in Paris and New York. Have you ever been in such terrible pain that you cannot even find the words to describe it? Or cannot convince your doctor quite how bad it is? New research says this can often happen to women with endometriosis, who wait seven years on average to get a diagnosis. Dr Stella Bullo, a Senior Lecturer in Linguistics at Manchester Metropolitan University, and an endometriosis patient herself, studied the experiences of 150 women with endometriosis. She found that many of them found it hard to communicate the extent of their pain, and some resorted to metaphors to try and describe it. Her research has just been published in the journal Health: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Opioid Crisis 24 mins – “Purdue Pharma has settled a lawsuit with the state of Oklahoma for $270 million, a larger figure than two other cases the company has settled with other states. In doing so, the company also avoided a televised trial in May at a time when there’s been growing public pressure on Purdue and its owners, the Sackler family, amid allegations that they misled the public about the dangers of OxyContin. Back in 2017, Bob spoke with Barry Meier about how public discourse about chronic pain and treatment have been shaped by companies like Purdue with help from physicians, consultants, and the media. Meier is a former reporter for The New York Times and author of Pain Killer: A “Wonder” Drug’s Trail of Addiction and Death. Bob also interviewed journalist Anna Clark about her reporting for the Columbia Journalism Review on opioid-related death notices. Sites like Legacy.com, she explained, have often chronicled the crisis’ individual human toll.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Periodic Table Anniversary 54 mins – “The world, the universe, is a mess of molecules and muck. Within the chaos, though, a cosmic harmony plays the secret song of nature, and the music of matter. You just have to be able to read the music. Contributor Ian Wilkinson unravels the universal chords as the world honours the 150th anniversary of Dmitri Mendeleev’s creation of the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Placebo Effect Research 62 mins – “Author and psychotherapist Gary Greenberg talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the placebo effect. Is it real? How does the placebo effect influence drug testing? If it’s real, what is the underlying mechanism of why it works and how might it be harnessed to improve health care? The conversation concludes with a discussion of how knowledge of the placebo effect has influenced Greenberg’s psychotherapy practice.” At the link right-click Download: and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Powerful Woman 13 mins – “Everyone’s heard of Martin Luther King Jr. But do you know the woman Dr. King called “the architect of the civil rights movement,” Septima Clark? The teacher of some of the generation’s most legendary activists — like Rosa Parks, Diane Nash, Fannie Lou Hamer and thousands more — Clark laid out a blueprint for change-making that has stood the test of time. Now T. Morgan Dixon and Vanessa Garrison, the cofounders of GirlTrek, are taking a page from Clark’s playbook to launch a health revolution in the US — and get one million women walking for justice. (This ambitious idea is part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Programmer Gender Imbalance 48 mins – “Algorithms influence everything we do now. Who’s creating them? Understanding coders and why how they think is changing how we live. Clive Thompson and Vaidehi Joshi join Meghna Chakrabarti. Also, the Jussie Smollett case. Miles Bryan joins.” At the link right-click the circle with three dots, then left-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Rape Kits 53 mins – “Rape kits are simple forensic evidence collection kits used when someone is sexually assaulted. But the story is deeper than this. Learn all about rape kits, the sad backlog problem, and what you can do to help, in today’s episode.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

RISC Definition 4 mins – “…In the early 1980s academic research challenged the notion that more was better. Instead of introducing ever more complicated instructions, researchers advocated the opposite. If an instruction set had simpler instructions, but worked very efficiently with a processor, computers would get faster. The name given to this approach went by the acronym RISC, for Reduced Instruction Set Computing….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 2865” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Driving Car Research 67 mins – “Five years ago at the Code Conference, self-driving cars seemed as though they were just around the corner: Google unveiled the project that would later become Waymo, and Uber’s then-CEO Travis Kalanick stirred controversy when he talked about the benefits of replacing human drivers. But in 2019, autonomous vehicle prototypes are a rarity in most cities outside of San Francisco, and humans are still vital to companies like Uber and its first-to-IPO rival Lyft. That’s because self-driving is a really, really hard technological problem, Ford CTO Ken Washington said on the latest episode of Recode Decode with Kara Swisher. But, very slowly, beginning in 2021, you’re going to start seeing cars with no one in the driver’s seat….” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shipping Containers 4 mins – “Shipping containers didn’t exist in 1950. Today, roughly seventeen million travel the world on ships, trains, and trucks. Laid end to end, they’d stretch around the globe almost four-and-a-half times. Managing their movement is an engineering feat in its own right. It’s work enough transporting a full container to its destination. But then comes another question — what to do with the empty?..” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 2879” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Singe Payer Health Care 52 mins – “we’re beginning a series of conversations about health care in the country and the best way to get it to the most people. There are a lot of ideas, but we’re going to begin with the single-payer model. Joseph Jarvis is a doctor and a public health consultant who’s written a book about his experiences in the system. He’s also a self-described conservative, which is why he says single-payer makes sense. It’s fiscally responsible, it can be state-based, and health care is a moral issue. Dr. Joseph Jarvis is a physician and a consultant in public health and environmental medicine. His book is called The Purple World: Healing the Harm in American Health Care.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Socialism History 47 mins – “President Trump says the U.S. will never be a socialist country. Some Democrats embrace the “democratic socialist” label. But what does socialism really mean? What’s its history?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spiritual Partnerships 32 mins – “Spiritual pioneer, teacher and New York Times best-selling author Gary Zukav and his wife Linda Francis discuss spiritual partnerships. Gary and Linda share what they’ve identified as “phases of a deeply connected relationship.” The couple describes the unusual way they met, their perspective on lasting love and how spiritual partnerships can help you find greater joy and happiness in life. Gary and Linda are co-founders of The Seat of the Soul Institute. Gary also talks about the inspirations for his book “Spiritual Partnership: The Journey to Authentic Power.” More than six million copies of Gary’s books are in print and translations have been published in 32 languages.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Spouse Death 14 mins – “In her brutally honest, ironically funny and widely read meditation on death, “You May Want to Marry My Husband,” the late author and filmmaker Amy Krouse Rosenthal gave her husband Jason very public permission to move on and find happiness. A year after her death, Jason offers candid insights on the often excruciating process of moving through and with loss — as well as some quiet wisdom for anyone else experiencing life-changing grief.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Test Tube Babies 16 mins – “The world’s first test-tube baby turns 40 this year, but human reproduction is still one of medical science’s great mysteries. From artificial sperm to AI-powered analysis of embryos, a look at how science is changing the way we make babies.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

U.S. Imperialism 53 mins – “Recently, a member of the Trump administration called Puerto Rico “that country,” obscuring once more the relationship between the island colony and the American mainland. In a special hour this week, On the Media examines the history of US imperialism — and why the familiar US map hides the true story of our country. Brooke spends the hour with Northwestern University historian Daniel Immerwahr, author of How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States. This is Part 2 of our series, “On American Expansion. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universal Basic Income 15 mins – “There’s a record wealth gap in the U.S. today. Entrepreneur and Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes says it’s time to talk about providing at least $500 a month to every American worker making less than $50,000 a year.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Wastewater Treatment 4 mins – “…So what exactly do wastewater treatment plants do with the wastewater? The solid and liquid components are separated. The solids are sent to a digester, so-called because special bacteria are introduced to digest the sludge — that’s the technical term. The process kills potentially harmful bacteria and creates biogas as a byproduct. The gas can in turn be used to power the plant. What’s left of the solids is used for fertilizer or sent to a sanitary landfill. The vast majority of the waste that arrives at a wastewater treatment plant is liquid; and not just any liquid, but water — with trace amounts of other compounds. Small amounts of chlorine are used to kill whatever bacteria become suspended in the water, after which it’s discharged into rivers or oceans. So in the end, wastewater treatment is less about back lot dealings with the unmentionable than it is about simply reclaiming water….” At the link right-click Click here for audio of Episode 2894and select ‘save Link As from the pop-up menu.

White Power Movement 51 mins – “…we’re talking about the roots of the resurgent white power movement. In a new book, historian Kathleen Belew traces the movement’s consolidation back to the 1970s, when some soldiers returned from Vietnam feeling betrayed by their government.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 395 – Jun 14, 2019: African Immigrant, AI Impact on Life, Allen Ginsburg, Altruism Gold Coat Program, Benazir Bhutto Assassination, Blackface History, Blind Wearable Tech, Blockchain in Business, Brexit and Facebook, Brexit Discussion, Bullet Trains in U.S., Canadian Indians, Climate Change Child, Conduction Story, Controversial Actions, Crypto Currency Theft, Cryptocurrency Guide for Criminals, Dead Zones and Nitrogen, Dementia Village, Disease Detection from Breath, Emmett Till Ballad, Fascism versus Nationalism, Genocide in Rwanda, German-American Bund, GMO Trends, Guatemalan Refugee Crisis, Hope Hospital, Insects As Food, IRS Cuts Impact, Jack the Ripper Victims, Library in a Drug Zone, Marijuana Opposition, Mass Shooting Suicides, Measles Outbreak in NYC, Mueller Report Impact, Opioid Withdrawal Advice, Racism Confrontation, Refugee Mental Health Support, Refugee Motivation, Sharing Economy, Smart Cities, Stay at Home Dad, Suicides, Talking AI’s, Teen Interrogations, Trachoma Eradication, Transgender Dad, Twilight Zone, Warfare in Megacities, Weaponized Social Media, Whoopi Goldberg, Working Remotely

Exercise your ears: the 81 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 767 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,388) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

African Immigrant 8 mins – “Michael Rain is on a mission to tell the stories of first-generation immigrants, who have strong ties both to the countries they grew up in and their countries of origin. In a personal talk, he breaks down the mischaracterizations and limited narratives of immigrants and shares the stories of the worlds they belong to. “We’re walking melting pots of culture,” Rain says. “If something in that pot smells new or different to you, don’t turn up your nose. Ask us to share.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Assistants – “Thanks to advances in artificial intelligence and big data, voice assistants like Siri and Alexa touch more of our lives than ever before. But what happens when these relationships become personal? And could a smart speaker be used to outsmart us?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

AI Controls 21 mins – “Amy Webb calls herself a quantitative futurist. A professor at NYU’s Stern School of Business, she uses her knowledge of game theory, sociology, programming and economics to imagine what’s next. And she’s deeply concerned about the lack of controls around artificial intelligence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

AI Impact 11 mins – “Roy Bahat was worried. His company invests in new technology like AI to make businesses more efficient — but, he wondered, what was AI doing to the people whose jobs might change, go away or become less fulfilling? The question sent him on a two-year research odyssey to discover what motivates people, and why we work. In this conversation with curator Bryn Freedman, he shares what he learned, including some surprising insights that will shape the conversation about the future of our jobs.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Impact by Garry Kasparov 24 mins – “Twenty years after losing to Deep Blue, the former world chess champion says that intelligent machines will promote their human makers to management rather than replace them.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

AI Impact on Jobs 23 mins – “Artificial intelligence will change all of our jobs, according to IBM’s Chief Executive. But will the technology augment workers or replace them? Ms. Rometty spoke with WSJ Editor in Chief Matt Murray at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

AI Impact on Life 21 mins – “Ask a layman about artificial intelligence and they might point to sci-fi villains such as HAL from 2001: A Space Odyssey or the Terminator. But the co-founders of the AI Now Institute, Meredith Whittaker and Kate Crawford, want to change the conversation. Instead of talking about far-flung super-intelligent AI, they argued on the latest episode of Recode Decode, we should be talking about the ways AI is affecting people right now, in everything from education to policing to hiring. Rather than killer robots, you should be concerned about what happens to your résumé when it hits a program like the one Amazon tried to build. “They took two years to design, essentially, an AI automatic résumé scanner,” Crawford said. “And they found that it was so biased against any female applicant that if you even had the word ‘woman’ on your résumé that it went to the bottom of the pile.” That’s a classic example of what Crawford calls “dirty data.” Even though people think of algorithms as being fair and free of human bias, Whittaker explained, biased humans are the ones who create the data sets and the code that decides how that data should be evaluated; that doesn’t mean AI is useless, but she and Crawford said we need to be interrogating how it is being made and deployed in the real world. “The harms are not evenly distributed, but this is in our lives, right?” Whittaker asked. “There are license-plate profiling AIs that are sort of tracking people as they go over different bridges in New York. You have systems that are determining which school your child gets enrolled in. You have automated essay scoring systems that are determining whether it’s written well enough. Whose version of written English is that? And what is it rewarding or not? What kind of creativity can get through that?” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

AI in Daily Lives 21 mins – “Amy Webb calls herself a quantitative futurist. A professor at NYU’s Stern School of Business, she uses her knowledge of game theory, sociology, programming and economics to imagine what’s next. And she’s deeply concerned about the lack of controls around artificial intelligence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Algorithm Ethics 12 mins – “AI algorithms make important decisions about you all the time — like how much you should pay for car insurance or whether or not you get that job interview. But what happens when these machines are built with human bias coded into their systems? Technologist Kriti Sharma explores how the lack of diversity in tech is creeping into our AI, offering three ways we can start making more ethical algorithms.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Allen Ginsburg 54 mins – “Allen Ginsberg’s landmark poem “Howl” is one of the 20th Century’s most important poems, one that would jolt a society and awaken a generation. We encounter it and often wrestle with it in school. We hear lines of it quoted in speeches. We sometimes hear it recited on solemn or momentous occasions. Some of us might even read some from time to time just for pleasure. But for most of us, most of the time, poetry plays a marginal role in our lives. So marginal that it’s easy to forget that many of the oldest, most enduring and most influential cultural artifacts in the world are poetry: The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Iliad and The OdysseyThe Aeneid, Beowulf, the poetry of Rumi and on and on. Those are poems upon which entire cultures have substantially been built. But poetry has done much more than built national myths and defined cultures. It has the capacity to inspire and enthrall,  to befuddle and infuriate. It can electrify a society, make you see the world with fresh eyes, or simply leave you mystified.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Altruism Gold Coat Program 54 mins – “Helping others feels good, but why do some go farther than others? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas about altruism — what motivates us to be altruistic, what limits us and do we ever go too far.” At the link you can listen, but multiple downloads are required for the entire program; however, all of it is in one file in this blog archive.

Benazir Bhutto Assassination 52 mins – “It is one of the world’s great unsolved murders. Ten years ago, Pakistan’s most prominent politician, a woman people would form human chains to protect from assassins, died in a suicide blast. The intervening years have brought allegations, arrests and a UN inquiry – but not one murder conviction. The victim was Benazir Bhutto. The Bhuttos are to Pakistan what the Kennedys are to the US: a powerful political dynasty, a family that inspire love and hate; a name that carries glamour and intrigue – Benazir was just the latest in a long line of Bhuttos to be murdered. With exclusive inside access to the official investigation and a shelf load of leaked, secret documents, The Assassination looks at what happened and why; what we know and what we don’t. The story spans the globe, from Pakistan to the US, to the Gulf and the UK, and hears from the victim, her family and the accused. The series was first released as a podcast. It won gold at the 2018 British Podcast Awards. It made the iTunes charts in seven countries, reaching number one in the UK. Listeners have left hundreds of glowing online reviews: “brilliant” … “fascinating” … “gripping.” Through the mystery of this murder we reveal a little of how Pakistan works. The Assassination is a portrait of a woman and the country she would rule by a man who knows both as well as any British journalist, Owen Bennett Jones.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Blackface History 34 mins – “Nathan talks with historian Rhae Lynn Barnes about Virginia Governor Ralph Northam’s 1984 yearbook page and its link to a long and disturbing history of blackface minstrelsy. They discuss how white civic organizations used minstrel shows for fundraising, why the era known as Jim Crow is named after a minstrel character, and what must happen to prevent people from donning blackface going forward. THIS EPISODE CONTAINS SOME LANGUAGE THAT PEOPLE MIGHT FIND OFFENSIVE.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Wearable Tech 8 mins – “Keith Kirkland is developing wearable tech that communicates information using only the sense of touch. He’s trying to figure out: What gestures and vibration patterns could intuitively communicate ideas like “stop” or “go”? Check out his team’s first product, a navigation device for the blind and visually impaired, and learn more about the entirely new “haptic language” he’s creating to power it.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Book 16 mins – “What if the next big thing turned out to be the next everything? It would need to be a technology so powerful yet so pliable that it could find a place in every industry, any activity, and all manner of creativity. Blockchain is “The Next Everything” asserts Stephen P. Williams. His latest book offers an explanation in layman’s terms of how the technology works and even suggests reasons why so many people struggle to understand it. “What I find most exciting is that blockchain is a distributed technology, which is a new way of looking at the world,” Williams tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “We generally respond very well to top-down, hierarchical systems– president, father, mother, teacher, each telling us what to do,” he explains. “Blockchain technology allows for a distributed system where everyone who participates in the system has an equal say in how that system works. This presents huge potential for designing new ways of doing business, of creating, of communicating.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain in Business 11 mins – “From big banks to diamond dealers, companies are experimenting with blockchain, an open and distributed ledger, to make transactions more transparent and trustworthy. Could this technology mean the end of cooked books?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Brexit and Facebook 15 mins – “In an unmissable talk, journalist Carole Cadwalladr digs into one of the most perplexing events in recent times: the UK’s super-close 2016 vote to leave the European Union. Tracking the result to a barrage of misleading Facebook ads targeted at vulnerable Brexit swing voters — and linking the same players and tactics to the 2016 US presidential election — Cadwalladr calls out the “gods of Silicon Valley” for being on the wrong side of history and asks: Are free and fair elections a thing of the past?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Dilemma 28 mins – “Adrian Goldberg is a BBC reporter. His father was German and came to the UK on Kindertransport just before the start of the Second World War. For Adrian, Brexit has raised a dilemma: should he get a German passport?” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Discussion 39 mins – “On April 12th, Britain is scheduled to leave the European Union. But right now, there is no plan in place for the departure. Parliament has rejected Prime Minister Theresa May’s proposal – three times. And attempts to address Brexit with other options have also been shot down by lawmakers. How did Britain get to this place and why can’t the country can’t get out?” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Brexit Publishing Impact 39 mins – “If the nature and even timing of Brexit remain unclear, one may yet predict that Brexit will mean important changes for the UK’s scholarly publishing community. However, whenever, and possibly even if ever – those are questions confronting Parliament throughout this week as the United Kingdom moves ever closer to March 29, 2019, the scheduled date for Brexit, when the country will exit from membership in the European Union. At the London Book Fair on Tuesday, Copyright Clearance Center presented “Scholarly Publishing Through the Brexit Lens,” to explore the many possible directions Brexit may lead publishing in 2019 and after.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bullet Trains in U.S. 47 mins – “California’s governor spiked the state’s high-speed rail project. “Let’s get real,” he said, “it would cost too much and take too long.” Why can’t the U.S. get high-speed rail right?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Indians 55 mins – “On the CBC Massey Lectures tour, each lecture concluded in an audience discussion with Tanya Talaga — most of which was never broadcast. In the original broadcast of the Massey Lectures, we invited you — the radio audience — to send in your questions for Tanya Talaga. In this episode, Tanya Talaga talks with Greg Kelly about her experience of delivering the CBC Massey Lectures, and responds to some of the questions sent to her, plus some of the best of those audience discussions from the tour.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Climate Change Child 13 mins – “In this passionate call to action, 16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg explains why, in August 2018, she walked out of school and organized a strike to raise awareness of global warming, protesting outside the Swedish parliament and grabbing the world’s attention. “The climate crisis has already been solved. We already have all the facts and solutions,” Thunberg says. “All we have to do is to wake up and change.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Conduction Story 76 mins – “Ta-Nehisi Coates reads his story from the June 10 & 17, 2019, issue of the magazine. Coates is the author of the nonfiction books “The Beautiful Struggle,” “We Were Eight Years in Power,” and “Between the World and Me,” which won the National Book Award in 2015. His first novel, “The Water Dancer,” from which this story is adapted, will be published in September.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Controversial Actions 11 mins – “We get stronger, not weaker, by engaging with ideas and people we disagree with, says Zachary R. Wood. In an important talk about finding common ground, Wood makes the case that we can build empathy and gain understanding by engaging tactfully and thoughtfully with controversial ideas and unfamiliar perspectives. “Tuning out opposing viewpoints doesn’t make them go away,” Wood says. “To achieve progress in the face of adversity, we need a genuine commitment to gaining a deeper understanding of humanity.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crypto Currency Missing 36 mins – “Missing crypto-currency mystery deepens $137m worth of crypto-cash is missing, despite the efforts of auditors to find the virtual currency. The mysterious case of Gerald Cotton, founder of the QuadrigaCX exchange, who died in India last December, has taken a new turn as auditors have found his e-wallets empty. Media censorship in Thailand – In the run up to the country’s general election later this month, Thailand’s military-appointed parliament has been accused of clamping down on internet freedoms and even tv stations with a controversial cybersecurity law and a temporary ban of the opposition TC channel. Off grid fr5idges -Researchers have been evaluating off-grid fridges in Uganda to see what difference they’d make to business owners like shopkeepers in areas lacking reliable electricity supplies. The fridges can also be used to store medicines and vaccines that need to kept cool. Those behind the Global LEAP Off-Grid Refrigerator Competition reckon they’re the first to field test these solar powered appliances and have just released their findings. Women’s health apps – how safe and secure are they?. – In the past three years, 3 billion of investment has gone into women’s health technology and there has been a huge growth in health tracking apps. There have been major concerns surrounding the sharing of this intimate data when it comes to commercial menstrual apps for women. But could scientists use this data in research into diseases like endometriosis?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Crypto Currency Theft 26 mins – “You can’t take money with you when you die…. or can you? In this episode of Assignment the stranger than fiction story that’s the latest cryptocurrency scandal to leave tens of thousands of people out of pocket. The news about QuadrigaCX broke almost to the day that crypto-currencies celebrated a decade in existence. On this anniversary, we investigate the current state of the market and uncover how these sometimes tragic events have unfolded both here in the UK and across the world. With the UK government and other countries now considering attempting to regulate the market, we ask if these scandals could have been prevented and could now be avoided in the future.” At the link left-click “Download,” select file type, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cryptocurrency Guide for Criminals 16 mins – “Crime involving digital currencies has skyrocketed in lockstep with their valuations. From bitcoin stickups to global money laundering, tech-savvy criminals are becoming increasingly anonymous. And law enforcement is scrambling to keep up.” At he link you can listen, but can’t download; however a copy of the podcast is included in the bis blog archive.

Dead Zones and Nitrogen 12 mins – “Ocean expert Nancy Rabalais tracks the ominously named “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico — where there isn’t enough oxygen in the water to support life. The Gulf has the second largest dead zone in the world; on top of killing fish and crustaceans, it’s also killing fisheries in these waters. Rabalais tells us about what’s causing it — and how we can reverse its harmful effects and restore one of America’s natural treasures.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Village 11 mins – “How would you prefer to spend the last years of your life: in a sterile, hospital-like institution or in a village with a supermarket, pub, theater and park within easy walking distance? The answer seems obvious now, but when Yvonne van Amerongen helped develop the groundbreaking Hogeweyk dementia care center in Amsterdam 25 years ago, it was seen as a risky break from tradition. Journey with van Amerongen to Hogeweyk and get a glimpse at what a reimagined nursing home based on freedom, meaning and social life could look like.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy and Theater 13 mins – “Truth comes from the collision of different ideas, and theater plays an essential role in showing us that truth, says legendary artistic director Oskar Eustis. In this powerful talk, Eustis outlines his plan to reach (and listen to) people in places across the US where the theater, like many other institutions, has turned its back — like the deindustrialized Rust Belt. “Our job is to try to hold up a vision to America that shows not only who all of us are individually, but that welds us back into the commonality that we need to be,” Eustis says. “That’s what the theater is supposed to do.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disease Detection from Breath 14 mins – “There’s no better way to stop a disease than to catch and treat it early, before symptoms occur. That’s the whole point of medical screening techniques like radiography, MRIs and blood tests. But there’s one medium with overlooked potential for medical analysis: your breath. Technologist Julian Burschka shares the latest in the science of breath analysis — the screening of the volatile organic compounds in your exhaled breath — and how it could be used as a powerful tool to detect, predict and ultimately prevent disease.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emmett Till Ballad 53 mins – “Emmett Till, fourteen and black, was put on the train from Chicago by his mother Mamie in August 1955. She got his corpse back, mutilated and stinking. Emmett had been beaten, shot and dumped in the Tallahatchie River for supposedly whistling at a white woman. His killers would forever escape justice. What Mamie did next helped galvanise the Civil Rights Movement and make Emmett the sacrificial lamb of the movement. From the very first Till’s death was both a call to political action and the subject of songs, poetry and prose. Gwendolyn Brooks, Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell and many more have been drawn to tell his tale – his is the never ending ballad of the first black life that mattered. His disfigured image in the legendary photograph in Jet magazine is seared into the memories of generations of Black Americans. And now Till has returned to haunt America. Taken up by the mothers and fathers of the slain in the Black Lives Matter movement, the subject of new documentaries, a trio of forthcoming Hollywood films and a new FBI investigation as the search for justice continues. His coffin lies at the heart of the Washington’s new museum of African American history – a secular shrine and symbol of the enduring pain of American racism. Maria Margaronis travels through landscape and memory across Mississippi and Chicago to reveal the many layers of meaning and the many ways Emmett’s story has been told and retold. These are the Ballads of Emmett Till.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Fascism versus Nationalism 18 mins – “In a profound talk about technology and power, author and historian Yuval Noah Harari explains the important difference between fascism and nationalism — and what the consolidation of our data means for the future of democracy. Appearing as a hologram live from Tel Aviv, Harari warns that the greatest danger that now faces liberal democracy is that the revolution in information technology will make dictatorships more efficient and capable of control. “The enemies of liberal democracy hack our feelings of fear and hate and vanity, and then use these feelings to polarize and destroy,” Harari says. “It is the responsibility of all of us to get to know our weaknesses and make sure they don’t become weapons.” (Followed by a brief conversation with TED curator Chris Anderson)” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free File Tax Program 16 mins – “Tax Day is behind us, but the Taxpayer First Act is not. The bipartisan proposal passed the House last week and is now under consideration in the Senate — and one of the provisions is exactly what the for-profit tax preparation industry has been pushing for. Through an agreement with the IRS, companies like H&R Block and Intuit currently offer free tax filing services to taxpayers making less than $66,000 dollars a year. But only 1.6 percent of taxpayers actually use Free File, and critics say that the companies engage in aggressive up-selling through the portal. A provision in the Taxpayer First Act would bar the IRS from developing their own free system.  Dennis Ventry is a tax scholar at the University of California, Davis. He has written about the shortcomings of the Free File program, and explains to Bob why he thinks the IRS isn’t doing enough to protect taxpayers who try to use it. He wrote an opinion piece last year titled “Free File providers scam taxpayers; Congress shouldn’t be fooled” — which made him the target of a public records request from an industry group.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Freedom and Equality 47 mins – “Are freedom and equality always at odds? Philosopher Elizabeth Anderson makes the case that we’re thinking about this wrong, and lays out how to have more of both.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genocide in Rwanda 13 mins – “Clemantine Wamariya was six years old when the Rwandan Civil War forced her and her sister to flee their home in Kigali, leaving their parents and everything they knew behind. In this deeply personal talk, she tells the story of how she became a refugee, living in camps in seven countries over the next six years — and how she’s tried to make sense of what came after.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

German-American Bund 19 mins – “Founded in 1936, the German-American Bund had approximately 25,000 members and 70 chapters around the country. While the Nazis were building concentration camps, the Bund held pro-Hitler retreats and summer camps. February 20th marks the 80th anniversary of the Bund’s most notorious event when 20,000 of its members gathered at Madison Square Garden for a “Pro-American Rally” featuring speeches and performances, staged in front of a 30-foot-high portrait of George Washington. The rally is the subject of the Oscar-nominated documentary short “A Night at The Garden” by filmmaker Marshall Curry. In this On the Media podcast extra, Brooke talks with Curry about how the film’s themes resonate today and how a 30-second broadcast spot has had a media moment of its own.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Trends 14 mins – “Vegetables engineered with the gene-editing technology Crispr are moving closer to supermarket shelves. But will these genetically altered foods carry labels to alert consumers? Or is gene editing, as some scientists argue, just a way to speed up evolution?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Goal Achivement 12 mins – “Our leaders and institutions are failing us, but it’s not always because they’re bad or unethical, says venture capitalist John Doerr — often, it’s simply because they’re leading us toward the wrong objectives. In this practical talk, Doerr shows us how we can get back on track with “Objectives and Key Results,” or OKRs — a goal-setting system that’s been employed by the likes of Google, Intel and Bono to set and execute on audacious goals. Learn more about how setting the right goals can mean the difference between success and failure — and how we can use OKRs to hold our leaders and ourselves accountable.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guatemalan Refugee Crisis 48 mins – “The majority of undocumented migrants crossing the southwest border are now from Guatemala. We look at the root causes behind the mass exodus.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Costs 7 min – “In the US, the very same blood test can cost $19 at one clinic and $522 at another clinic just blocks away — and nobody knows the difference until they get a bill weeks later. Journalist Jeanne Pinder says it doesn’t have to be this way. She’s built a platform that crowdsources the true costs of medical procedures and makes the data public, revealing the secrets of health care pricing. Learn how knowing what stuff costs in advance could make us healthier, save us money — and help fix a broken system.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hope Hospital 7 mins – “Local humanitarians are beacons of light in the darkness of war, says humanitarian aid entrepreneur and TED Fellow Rola Hallam. She’s working to help responders on the ground in devastated communities like Syria, where the destruction of health care is being used as a weapon of war. One of her campaigns achieved a global first: a crowdfunded hospital. Since it opened in 2017, the aptly named Hope Hospital has treated thousands of children. “Local humanitarians have the courage to persist, to dust themselves off from the wreckage and to start again, risking their lives to save others,” Hallam says. “We can match their courage by not looking away or turning our backs.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Hospital Food 27 mins – “It’s not uncommon for people to complain about bland, unappetizing hospital food. But a growing number of hospitals in Canada are pushing back against this stereotype, overhauling menus to be locally sourced and delicious. Patients in hospital need to eat nutritious food to heal. Yet research suggests that 51 per cent of young children admitted to hospital in one study lost weight, as did nearly 45 per cent of adult patients. Some are too sick to eat. Many others leave the food tray untouched, leading to about 1.3 kilograms of food per bed to be thrown out each day. By one Canadian estimate, about half of the food placed at patients’ bedsides went At the link find the title, “Why bringing room service to hospitals helps patients convalesce ,” right-click “Download Why bringing room service to hospitals helps patients convalesce” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Housing Costs 47 mins – “Housing prices are through the roof across the country. We take up the affordable housing crisis in Part 1 of our series, “Where We Call Home.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Insects As Food 19 mins – “Billions of people around the world include protein-rich bugs in their diet. But are crickets really a sustainable alternative to chicken? This episode, we talk to the scientists and startup founders looking to put bugs in everything we eat.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Investment Performance 33 mins – “Whether you are saving for retirement or already retired, establishing a reasonable expectation for future returns is one of the most difficult planning decisions.  What can investors learn from the past?  Are the next 10 years likely to be similar to the last 10, 20, 50 or 80 years?  Can we count on the value and small-cap premiums of the past?  What can we count on and what should we plan for? This podcast includes important historical information about the returns of large cap, small cap, growth, value, U.S., international, emerging markets, REITs, commodities and inflation.  The goal of this podcast is to help investors build a financial plan that is based on reasonable expectations rather than on “hope.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IRS Cuts Impact 47 mins – “After years and years of budget cuts, the IRS is leaner and meaner. A ProPublica investigation reveals who wins and who loses when a feared but crucial agency is slashed to the bone.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jack the Ripper Victims 46 mins – “For hundreds of years, people have been fascinated by true crime and death, but the blurred line between real stories and entertainment can uncomfortably inflect our knowledge of the truth – and our empathy for people in the past. Two historians are doing their bit to make us reappraise what we know about such histories. Hallie Rubenhold is the author of The Five, tracing the lives of the five women killed by Jack the Ripper. And Lindsey Fitzharris’s The Butchering Art is a history of Victorian medicine and the life of pioneering surgeon Joseph Lister, which includes details of riveting medical cases and shows the reality behind the gory details.” At the link right-click”Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jack the Ripper Victims 52 mins – “…we’re talking about the five women brutally killed by Jack the Ripper. The historian Hallie Rubenhold says the women often come to us as empty shells, but in her new book, she’s fixing that. You know the name “Jack the Ripper,” but do you know who Polly Nichols was? Or Anne Eliza Chapman? Elizabeth Stride? What about Catherine Eddowes or Mary Jane Kelly? While the serial killer is the stuff of legend, historian Hallie Rubenhold says the women he murdered are “just corpses” to most people. Rubenhold is joining us to tell their stories, and they weren’t all prostitutes by the way. They were poor, desperate and had the cards stacked against them from the beginning.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kavanaugh Impact 50 mins – “The Kavanaugh-Ford hearings this week felt like a watershed moment — but it’s not yet clear what long-term impact they’ll have. This week, we examine some of the policies that could be affected by the Supreme Court if Kavanaugh is confirmed, including dark money disclosure and voting rights. Plus, a moment of zen during trying times.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Library in a Drug Zone 11 mins – “Public libraries have always been about more than just books — and their mission of community support has taken on new urgency during the current opioid epidemic. After witnessing overdoses at her library in Philadelphia, Chera Kowalski learned how to administer naloxone, a drug that reverses the effects of narcotics, and she’s put it to use to save patrons’ lives. In this personal talk, she shares the day-to-day reality of life on the frontline of the opioid crisis and advocates for each of us to find new ways to keep our communities safe and healthy.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Opposition 45 mins – “In a controversial new book, Alex Berenson aims to torpedo a lot of what we think we know about marijuana. He says it isn’t the panacea we’ve been led to believe it is, and that it causes psychosis, which leads to violence. Recreational marijuana is now legal in nine states. Medicinally, it’s legal in 33 states, including Utah. Advocates say cannabis can treat a host of ailments, and there’s some evidence to support their claims. But the writer Alex Berenson says not so fast. In a controversial new book, he aims to torpedo a lot of what we think we know about marijuana. He says it isn’t the panacea we’ve been led to believe it is, and that it causes psychosis, which leads to violence. He joins us Thursday to make his case.” At the link left-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Shooting Suicides 47 mins – “Deaths by suicide by Parkland and Newtown survivors are sparking a conversation about how to support people long-term after violent trauma. We’re listening.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Measles Outbreak in NYC 27 mins – “New research from Poland has found that women take longer than men to ask for help when they have had a heart attack, and ambulance staff are slower to suspect that women might have had a heart attack in the first place. Young women in particular were delayed in getting treatment. Dr Marek Gierlotka, head of the Cardiology Department at the University of Opole in Poland, was lead author of the research, which was presented this week at the Acute Cardiovascular Care 2019, a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) conference. New York City is experiencing the biggest measles outbreak it has had in decades. Fears about vaccine safety, has caused vaccination rates across the United States to drop; the city joins places like Washington State that are seeing measles rates surge. Since last October, 121 people, the vast majority of which are children under 18, have been infected with measles in NYC. Normally that number would be just five or six. The epicentre of the outbreak is in the Orthodox Jewish communities of Brooklyn. While most children are vaccinated by the time they go to school, there are much lower rates of vaccination among very young children, making them vulnerable to the virus and allowing measles to spread. To combat it, the city and the community are mobilising, as the BBC’s Kizzy Cox reports. New research has found that the number of press-ups a man can do is a better indicator of his risk of cardiovascular disease than a running test on a treadmill. But why should press ups be a good test of someone’s risk of developing heart disease? For his study Stefanos Kales, who is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts, tested more than a thousand male firefighters over a period of ten years, and the results were not quite what he expected. They have just been published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mueller Report Impact 50 mins – “With the Mueller investigation complete, talking heads have given the short public summary their usual spin. This week, On the Media looks at why the framing of the report produced so much misunderstanding. Plus, how historical amnesia and old ideas about limitless growth have influenced American psychology and foreign policy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Opioid Withdrawal Advice 14 mins – “The United States accounts for five percent of the world’s population but consumes almost 70 percent of the total global opioid supply, creating an epidemic that has resulted in tens of thousands of deaths each year. How did we get here, and what can we do about it? In this personal talk, Travis Rieder recounts the painful, often-hidden struggle of opioid withdrawal and reveals how doctors who are quick to prescribe (and overprescribe) opioids aren’t equipped with the tools to eventually get people off the meds.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politicians Randomly Selected 10 mins – “If you think democracy is broken, here’s an idea: let’s replace politicians with randomly selected people. Author and activist Brett Hennig presents a compelling case for sortition democracy, or random selection of government officials — a system with roots in ancient Athens that taps into the wisdom of the crowd and entrusts ordinary people with making balanced decisions for the greater good of everyone. Sound crazy? Learn more about how it could work to create a world free of partisan politics.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PTSD Treatment 24 mins – “Millions of people suffering from mental health issues are left untreated and undiagnosed. In this episode, we meet the psychologists and scientists studying how artificial intelligence can help.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Racial Literacy 12 mins – “Over the last year, Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo traveled to all 50 US states, collecting personal stories about race and intersectionality. Now they’re on a mission to equip every American with the tools to understand, navigate and improve a world structured by racial division. In a dynamic talk, Vulchi and Guo pair the personal stories they’ve collected with research and statistics to reveal two fundamental gaps in our racial literacy — and how we can overcome them.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism Confrontation 52 mins – “Racism isn’t always obvious, but it can be found almost everywhere. This hour, TED speakers explore the effects of everyday and systemic racism in America—and how we can work to defeat it.” At the link you can listen, but multiple downloads are required for the entire program; however, all of it is in one file in this blog archive.

Racism Question 46 mins – “On this week’s show, Richard sits down with academic Robin DiAngelo to discuss her book White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism. A bestseller in the US, DiAngelo explains why white people need to listen more and stop avoiding conversations about racism due to their own discomfort, and how living in a racist society insidiously affects unconscious thinking. And legendary publisher Margaret Busby joins Claire in the studio to discuss New Daughters of Africa, her follow-up anthology to her groundbreaking collection Daughters of Africa, which established many black female writers as names almost three decades ago.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism Symbols 7 mins – “Multidisciplinary artist and TED Fellow Paul Rucker is unstitching the legacy of systemic racism in the United States. A collector of artifacts connected to the history of slavery — from branding irons and shackles to postcards depicting lynchings — Rucker couldn’t find an undamaged Ku Klux Klan robe for his collection, so he began making his own. The result: striking garments in non-traditional fabrics like kente cloth, camouflage and silk that confront the normalization of systemic racism in the US. “If we as a people collectively look at these objects and realize that they are part of our history, we can find a way to where they have no more power over us,” Rucker says. (This talk contains graphic images.)” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Help 6 mins – “Every minute, 20 people are newly displaced by climate change, economic crisis and political instability, according to the UNHCR. How can we help them overcome the barriers to starting new lives? TED Resident Muhammed Idris is leading a team of technologists, researchers and refugees to develop Atar, the first-ever AI-powered virtual advocate that guides displaced people through resettlement, helping restore their rights and dignity. “Getting access to the right resources and information can be the difference between life and death,” Idris says.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Mental Health Support 5 mins – “The global refugee crisis is a mental health catastrophe, leaving millions in need of psychological support to overcome the traumas of dislocation and conflict. To undo the damage, child psychiatrist and TED Fellow Essam Daod has been working in camps, rescue boats and the shorelines of Greece and the Mediterranean Sea to help refugees (a quarter of which are children) reframe their experiences through short, powerful psychological interventions. “We can all do something to prevent this mental health catastrophe,” Daod says. “We need to acknowledge that first aid is not just needed for the body, but it has also to include the mind, the soul.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Motivation 6 mins – “In the ongoing debate over refugees, we hear from everyone — from politicians who pledge border controls to citizens who fear they’ll lose their jobs — everyone, that is, except migrants themselves. Why are they coming? Journalist and TED Fellow Yasin Kakande explains what compelled him and many others to flee their homelands, urging a more open discussion and a new perspective. Because humanity’s story, he reminds us, is a story of migration: “There are no restrictions that could ever be so rigorous to stop the wave of migration that has determined our human history,” he says.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu

Sharing Economy 9 mins – “From rides to homes and beyond, we’re sharing everything these days, with the help of digital tools. But as modern and high-tech as the sharing economy seems, it’s been alive in Africa for centuries, according to author Robert Neuwirth. He shares fascinating examples — like apprenticeships that work like locally generated venture capital and systems for allocating scarce water — and says that if we can propagate and scale these models, they could help communities thrive from the bottom up. ” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smart Cities 18 mins – “Urban areas around the world are increasingly equipped with sensors to track-and control-everything from traffic patterns to wastewater. But this increased connectivity and data collection opens us up to devastating hacks and unwanted surveillance.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Stay at Home Dad 11 mins – “Glen Henry got his superpowers through fatherhood. After leaving behind a job he hated and a manager he didn’t get along with, he went to work for an equally demanding boss: his kids. He shares how he went from thinking he knew it all about being a stay-at-home parent to realizing he knew nothing at all — and how he’s now documenting what he’s learned.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide Conversation 12 mins – “Is there someone in your life dealing with anxiety, depression or thoughts of suicide — but is too ashamed to talk about it? Jeremy Forbes saw this happening around him, and now he’s on a mission to teach people how to start a conversation about it. In this deeply personal talk, Forbes shares his approach to helping a group of traditionally silent men in his community open up about their struggles. “We can all be life preservers,” he says.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicides 50 mins – “Why we do we kill ourselves? It’s a tough question, but the science writer Jesse Bering says that if we can answer it, we stand a better chance of thwarting a tragic act.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Talking AI’s 27 mins – “The duo behind Alexa and Amazon’s in-home devices explain what’s coming in the next wave of voice technology and machine learning that will power connected homes, search and shopping.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Teen Interrogations 15 mins – “Why do juveniles falsely confess to crimes? What makes them more vulnerable than adults to this shocking, counterintuitive phenomenon? Through the lens of Brendan Dassey’s interrogation and confession (as featured in Netflix’s “Making a Murderer” documentary), developmental psychology professor and researcher Lindsay Malloy breaks down the science underlying false confessions and calls for change in the way kids are treated by a legal system designed for adults.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trachoma Eradication 10 mins – “Thousands of years ago, ancient Nubians drew pictures on tomb walls of a terrible disease that turns the eyelids inside out and causes blindness. This disease, trachoma, is still a scourge in many parts of the world today — but it’s also completely preventable, says Caroline Harper. Armed with data from a global mapping project, Harper’s organization Sightsavers has a plan: to focus on countries where funding gaps stand in the way of eliminating the disease and ramp up efforts where the need is most severe. Learn more about their goal of consigning trachoma to the history books — and how you can help. (This ambitious idea is part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender Dad 14 mins – “LB Hannahs candidly shares the experience of parenting as a genderqueer individual — and what it can teach us about authenticity and advocacy. “Authenticity doesn’t mean ‘comfortable.’ It means managing and negotiating the discomfort of everyday life,” Hannahs says.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Twilight Zone 10 mins – “What will we find in the twilight zone: the vast, mysterious, virtually unexplored realm hundreds of meters below the ocean’s surface? Heidi M. Sosik of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution wants to find out. In this wonder-filled talk, she shares her plan to investigate these uncharted waters, which may hold a million new species and 90 percent of the world’s fish biomass, using submersible technology. What we discover there won’t just astound us, Sosik says — it will help us be better stewards of the world’s oceans. (This ambitious idea is part of The Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Warfare in Megacities 20 mins – “The wars of the future will be fought in megacities around the world by soldiers connected – and possibly even augmented – by neural implants and AI. In this episode, we examine how military leaders are preparing for a radical shift in combat.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Washington Press Club Foundation Congressional Dinner 82 mins – “Representatives Cheri Bustos (D-IL) and Dan Crenshaw (R-TX) were among those who addressed a group of journalists gathered for the Washington Press Club Foundation’s 75th annual congressional dinner. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD) and House Minority Whip Steve Scalise (R-LA) also made remarks.” At the link you can purchase a podcast; however, a copy of it is included in the blog archive.

Weaponizd Social Media 52 mins – …”we’re talking about how the Russians tried to influence the 2016 presidential election. Researcher Renee DiResta joins us to explore the techniques of weaponizing social media and why we take the bait. Wednesday, we’re talking about how the Russians tried to influence the American presidential election in 2016. We’re going to focus on their attempts to amplify conspiracy theories, spread disinformation, and get Americans to fight and argue with each other. The researcher Renee DiResta is our guest. She and her team created one of the independent reports for the Senate Intelligence Committee. We’ll talk about the techniques of weaponizing social media and why we’re primed to take the bait. Renee DiResta is director of research for New Knowledge, a cybersecurity company. She’s also head of policy at the nonprofit Data for Democracy. New Knowledge produced the independent Disinformation Report for the Senate Select Committee on Inteligence.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Whoopi Goldberg 33 mins – “Emmy-, Grammy-, Oscar- and Tony-winning actress, TV host and stand-up comic Whoopi Goldberg talks candidly about her childhood in New York City, her most valuable life lessons and her defining screen roles. Whoopi explains how she landed her two most iconic roles: Celie in “The Color Purple” and Oda Mae Brown in “Ghost.” She shares how she learned to accept success and open up doors of opportunity in her life. Whoopi also describes the moment she made peace with her mother’s death.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Remotely 47 mins – “Part 2 of our special series “Where We Call Home.” Cities and states are offering up cash to attract would-be residents. That catch is you need to be employed full-time somewhere else.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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Mining Digest 394 – Jun 7, 2019: African Inventions, Alice Guy-Blache, Broadband Access Bills, CIA and Reporters, Climate Change Battle, Computer History, Ebola Virus, Emergency Doctor, Farming Future, Government Evolution, Gun Control, HIV-Aids, Hookworm, Housing in Utah, Infection Control, Intelligence Committees, Jeanne Baret, Lie Detection, Malaria Discussion, Medicare in Utah, Melanoma Update, Neurosurgeon, Nuclear War, Nuclear Waste, Parasitism Discussion, Poverty Avoidance, Press Freedom, Propaganda Rag by Carlson, Public Health Doctor, Rabies, Rheumatology, Scurvy, Self Driving Cars, Technology Giants, Tim Cook, Tuskegee Airmen, Vaccines, Video Games Future, War on Drugs, Waste Elimination, Zika Virus

Exercise your ears: the 64 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 700 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,200) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

African Elections 37 mins – “Demographic, technological, and geostrategic developments are disrupting the electoral landscape in sub-Saharan Africa. How do these shifts affect the political climate for democracy and participation across Africa? What have recent elections in Nigeria illustrated about these? And what about the clash between China and the United States in Africa? To explore these questions, David Priess spoke with Judd Devermont, director of the Africa program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, host of the Into Africa podcast, and former national intelligence officer for Africa from 2015 to 2018.” At the link find the title,“African Elections and U.S. Interests,” and select “Direct download: Episode_401.mp3from the pop-up menu.

African Inventions 9 mins – “What good is a sophisticated piece of medical equipment to people in Africa if it can’t handle the climate there? Biomedical engineer Tania Douglas shares stories of how we’re often blinded to real needs in our pursuit of technology — and how a deeper understanding of the context where it’s used can lead us to better solutions.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow, then “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alice Guy-Blaché 50 mins – “…we continue our series on documentary film with the story of Alice Guy-Blaché, the first female filmmaker.  She wrote, produced, or directed a thousand films, and yet today, even in Hollywood, she remains unknown. Friday, we continue our series on documentary film with the story of Alice Guy-Blaché, the first female filmmaker. Guy-Blaché was working as a secretary in Paris at the very moment that moving pictures emerged as a new technology. She was mesmerized and inspired. Over the course of her career she wrote, produced, or directed a thousand films, and yet today, even in Hollywood, she remains unknown. Director Pamela Green joins us to talk about Guy-Blaché, the woman who saw the future through a camera.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Access Bills 30 mins – “Interest in community broadband and broadband service from cooperatives has grown significantly within the past few years. This legislative session, lawmakers in states such as Vermont, North Carolina, and Arkansas, have decided that they’d like to start contributing to new ways to bring better Internet access to their constituents. This week, Christopher and Jess Del Fiacco, our Communications Specialist, sit down to review some of the most recent state bills that we find promising. Jess and Christopher talk about H 513 making it’s way through Vermont’s legislature. The bill contains policy changes and financial support designed to invigorate local broadband projects. H 513 was developed after state leaders examined the success of ECFiber, the regional network that brings gigabit connectivity to more than 20 communities in the central part of the state.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband FCC Support 39 mins – “Over the past few years, Partner Jonathan Chambers of Conexon has become our “go-to guy” for FCC conversations. This week, he joins us to talk about a recent issue that revolves around the Connect America Fund Phase II auction and one of the grant recipients, Viasat. With former experience working at the FCC in the Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis, Jonathan has insight we try to tap into every time a thorny issue arises. Satellite Internet access provider Viasat was one of the top winners of federal funding, winning more than $122 million. Questions remain, however, if they will be able to deliver services that meet the requirements and deliver what they promised. Apparently, Viasat is unsure if their chosen satellite technology will be able to meet the testing thresholds and have asked the FCC to retroactively adjust the requirements to ensure their services pass muster. The FCC has yet to decline this request, which raises direct and indirect issue with the CAF II program, the FCC’s administration of the program, and Viasat. In this interview, Jonathan and Christopher discuss the issue in more detail and use the matter as a springboard to more thoroughly talk about the role of federal, state, and local government in developing rural broadband. Jonathan and Christopher ponder ways for local residents to have more of a voice in how broadband is funded and deployed in their communities and how ways to improve the process.” At the link right-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA and Reporters 50 mins – “Back in February, we hosted Bill Harlow and Marie Harf, two former public affairs officers at the Central Intelligence Agency, to discuss how the CIA interacts with reporters on sensitive national security topics. For this episode, we thought it only fair to turn that around and also talk about how it’s seen on the other side. Mary Louise Kelly is a voice familiar to many as an anchor of All Things Considered on NPR. She previously spent a decade as national security and intelligence correspondent for NPR News after working for CNN and the BBC. Shane Harris, in addition to co-hosting the Rational Security podcast, now covers intelligence and national security for The Washington Post, after writing about the same for outlets like The Wall Street Journal, Daily Beast, and National Journal. David Priess recently sat down with Mary Louise and Shane to discuss the challenges of covering national security, to address myths about the intelligence beat, and, unsuccessfully, to uncover their sources.” At the link find the title, “2 April 2019, Mary Louise Kelly and Shane Harris on Covering the CIA ,” right-click “Direct download: Episode_405.mp3and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Agreement Politics 85 mins – “From 1989 to early 2017, Sue Biniaz was the lead climate lawyer and a climate negotiator at the State Department. She was also a key architect of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, a UN-negotiated agreement designed to mitigate global warming, which went into effect in November 2016. In June 2017, President Trump announced his intention to withdraw the United States from the agreement. Sue sat down with Lawfare’s Jack Goldsmith to talk about the early days of U.S. and international climate action, how the Paris Agreement came into force and the predecessor agreements that gave rise to it, how it was supposed to operate, and what impacts Trump’s actions have had on international climate policy.” At the link find the title, “27 March 2019, Sue Biniaz on the Trump Administration and International Climate Policy,” right-click “Direct download: Episode_403.mp3and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Battle 29 mins – “Environmentalists have been talking for a long time about the threat to the planet. Now, a prominent voice is directing our attention to a related threat: he says our very humanity is in peril. This week on Sea Change Radio, we welcome back author and environmental leader Bill McKibben. The founder of 350.org, McKibben most notably spearheaded the resistance to the Keystone Pipeline and launched the fast-growing fossil fuel divestment movement. His new book is Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out? While his thesis may seem grim, the book includes a call to action and engagement. In our conversation we discuss the new book, how climate change activism is disrupting right wing plans, and what people can and must do to advance and support a sustainable future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer History 90 mins– “Mark Richards is a photojournalist and photographer of “Core Memory: A Visual Survey of Vintage Computers.” He talks with Leo Laporte about his career including photographing combat in Afghanistan, chronicling his cancer treatment and preserving computer history.” At the link click “Download options.” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Virus 61 mins – “Let’s face it. This is the episode you’ve been waiting for. Are you ready for one of the most publicized epidemics of the century? Because we’re ready to tell you about it. Ebola has been in the scientific consciousness since 1976, but why did it take an outbreak of epic proportions for you, dear listeners, to hear about it? Well, listen closely for the answer. Special guests this episode include badass scientists Lauren Cowley, Nell Bond, and Sarah Paige, who will share their first-hand experiences with the 2014 Ebola epidemic.” At the link right-click “MP2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emergency Doctor 46 mins – “Dr Belinda Hibble is an emergency medicine physician currently working in Geelong. Her self-admitted short attention span and desire to experience a variety of encounters in a single day makes her perfectly suitable for her position. Based in a rural setting, one simply “makes it work” in an emergency department. We debate the advantages and disadvantages of not having subspecialties at hand to “siphon off” broad or complex patients, and how this has helped her learn to manage patients in a more pragmatic manner. Dr Hibble describes high burnout rates amongst ED physicians. To combat this, she suggests doctors involve themselves in other aspects of medicine, including administration, research and teaching, while working in multiple public and private hospitals and considering subspecialising. Work-life balance seems to be an aspect ED physicians struggle with. We discuss the importance of “learning how to say no”, and the seemingly impossible task of truly “switching off” with smartphones at hand 24/7….Belinda’s time with MUMUS has served her well not only in her career but in other aspects of her life. She has used her experience with policy to work with the ED college in changing their curriculum. This leadership has also translated over into her clinical work, as well as looking impressive on her CV. At the end of the day, Belinda encourages us to get out there, experience as much as we can and make an educated decision about a path we want to pursue.At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Future 45 mins – “As the human population continues to grow can ag-tech developments create a more sustainable and efficient way of farming that will increase yields to cope with demand for food? Click looks at what farms of the future could look like; from fitbits for cows and robotic milking and growing crops without a human setting foot in a field. Are we looking at a digital agricultural revolution with highly technically skilled farm labourers needed to manage some of these automated systems?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Government Evolution 92 mins – “Denise Howell is joined by Tom W. Bell, who is a professor at Chapman University, Fowler School of Law, and author of Your Next Government?: From the Nation State to Stateless Nations. They discuss off-the-shelf government and open-source legal systems like Ulex, big tech stepping into roles traditionally occupied by government, seasteading, the future of cryptocurrency, and more.” At the link click “Download options.” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Control Success P1 29 mins – “Almost nothing is more controversial than gun control in the United States. Yet while passions flare and legislators posture but do little, deaths from gun violence are all too common. Almost every proposal put forward to address gun violence eventually fails. Seemingly, the Second Amendment stops any attempt to control guns. Despite this, there have been commonsense approaches to reducing gun violence that have been very effective in some communities. How gun violence has been managed in these communities is reviewed in this podcast with JAMA author April M. Zeoli, PhD, MPH, from the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University, Lansing.” At the link right-click “Download MP3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Control Success P2 26 mins – “Almost nothing is more controversial than gun control in the United States. Yet while passions flare and legislators posture but do little, deaths from gun violence are all too common. Almost every proposal put forward to address gun violence eventually fails. Seemingly, the Second Amendment stops any attempt to control guns. Despite this, there have been commonsense approaches to reducing gun violence that have been very effective in some communities. How gun violence has been managed in these communities is reviewed in this podcast with JAMA author April M. Zeoli, PhD, MPH, from the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University, Lansing. Part 2 of 3.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Control Success P3 25 mins – “Congressman Mike Thompson chairs the US House Gun Violence Prevention Taskforce. He spoke with us about what the House has done to address gun violence and what you can do to help them see necessary legislation make it into law. We also talk with Joshua Sharfstein, MD, about strategies that can be undertaken by the physician community to reduce gun violence.” At the link right-click “Download MP3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV-Aids 90 mins – “This week we’re talking about HIV/AIDS, one of the biggest pandemics of modern times. We were fortunate enough to speak with three individuals who have had vastly different experiences with HIV/AIDS. Frank Iamelli, who took care of many of his friends throughout the epidemic, Hillel Wasserman, who has been living with HIV since 1987, and Brryan Jackson who was diagnosed with AIDS when he was only 5 years old. In this episode, you’ll get a glimpse into their stories and then we’ll fill you in on all of the biology, history, and present state of HIV in the world. Don’t forget to tune in next week for our special bonus episode where you will get to hear more of Frank, Hillel, and Brryan’s stories in depth. In the meantime, here are a couple of links to Brryan’s website and Being Alive LA which you’ll hear more about next week!” At the link right-click “MP2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hookworms 76 mins – “Today we’re taking a bite out of hookworm, our first macroparasite. We start, as all hookworm journeys must, from the dewy grass, where larvae burrow into your exposed flesh and make their long and winding way to your guts, where the eggs of a fortunate few will be immortalized in fossilized poop. It’s a tale of human migration, of failed eradication, and of overburdened populations. So pull up a chair, take off your shoes, and rest your feet in the cool dew-soaked grass. But watch out for the ground itch…Find more from Meramec Valley Girl at https://meramecvalleygirl.com/ and on instagram @meramecvalleygirl” At the link right-click “MP2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Housing in Utah 51 mins – “…we’re exploring the problem of housing affordability in Utah. With the state’s high birthrate and an influx of new workers moving to the state, it’s becoming harder and more expensive to find a place to live. So, people are moving in with roommates. The elderly are retrofitting their homes and “aging in place.” And as gentrification is transforming communities downtown, plans for dense-housing projects have riled up the suburbs. It’s a tough situation, and a panel of guests will join us to talk about it.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ice Age Civilization 51 mins – “The writer Craig Childs’ latest book is a strange kind of travelogue. It’s about his journeys across the country and back in time to the Ice Age to explore what life was like for North America’s first people. When humans arrived here more than 20,000 years ago, they found the place teeming with massive mammals that they hunted and were hunted by. In many ways, those people were no different from us today. But what they did have is a connection to the natural world we can hardly imagine.” At the link left-click the “Play” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infection Control 12 mins – “Bacteria “talk” to each other, sending chemical information to coordinate attacks. What if we could listen to what they were saying? Nanophysicist Fatima AlZahra’a Alatraktchi invented a tool to spy on bacterial chatter and translate their secret communication into human language. Her work could pave the way for early diagnosis of disease — before we even get sick.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow, then “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Committees 49 mins – “In this third episode of the special Culper Partners Rule of Law series, David Kris and Nate Jones speak with former Senator Saxby Chambliss, who served as a senator from Georgia from 2003–2015, and in the House of Representatives from 1995–2003. During his tenure in the Senate, he was a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, as well as the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, where he served as Vice Chairman from 2011–2014. His previous role as Chairman of the House Intelligence Subcommittee on Terrorism and Homeland Security made him one of the leading congressional experts on those issues. They talked about the history of the congressional intelligence committees, the significance of election interference, and the proper penalties for lying to Congress. Chambliss also described what it was like to serve on the Senate Intelligence Committee, even describing a particular situation that is apparently still classified and undisclosed, as well as revealing whom he considers to be the best legislator he ever knew.” At the link find the title, “22 March 2019, Culper Partners Rule of Law Series: Sen. Saxby Chamblissright-click “Direct download: Episode_402.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interpol Abuses 49 mins – “Bill Browder, human rights campaigner and foe of Vladimir Putin, seems to get arrested whenever he travels abroad as a result of red notices and diffusion orders issued by Putin through the Interpol police organization. These incidents have highlighted the abuse of Interpol by authoritarian governments, and they raise a really important question: Should we be participating in an international police organization with governments that use that organization to harass and arrest their enemies? On this episode of The Lawfare Podcast, Benjamin Wittes speaks with two people with somewhat different points of view, although a lot of common ground: Bill Browder himself, along with Jago Russell, the head of Fair Trials, which has worked to reform Interpol and make it less susceptible to abuse. Bill argues for kicking the bums out and having police cooperation only between countries that observe civilized norms of law enforcement. Jago makes the case for mending, not ending, an inclusive international police organization.” At the link find the title, “Bill Browder and Jago Russell Debate Interpol and Authoritarian Governments,” right-click “Direct download: Episode_400.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jeanne Baret 16 mins – “In 1767, a young French servant boarded a ship and sailed around the world, collecting plants previously unknown to Western science. The ship’s crew knew the servant as “Jean,” the scrappy aide to the expedition’s botanist. But “Jean” had a secret. She was actually Jeanne Baret, a woman disguised as a man—and she was about to make botanical history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Lie Detection 56 mins – “…Freedom of the press is supposedly a defining feature of western societies, and journalists are generally under the impression that their job is to give us the facts about what’s happening in the world. There’s a lot of lip service to this ideal, but in an era of fake news, post-truth and a 24-hour news cycle, what are journalists to hang onto? Where might you find the truth anyway, and who might tell it to you? And does your editor, your paper, your producer, have your back? And if these are the problems for journalists: what about the problems for you, the reader, listener, viewer? This episode features a discussion with journalists Susan Ormiston and Desmond Cole, and writer Linda McQuaig.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Malaria Discussion 92 mins – “The Tremendous Trio solve the case of the Woman With Steatorrhea, and reveal breakdown of the glycocalyx associated with severe and fatal malaria.” At the link right-click “Download TWiP #167 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicare in Utah 52 mins – “You’ve probably been hearing a lot about “Medicare for All” recently. Monday, we’ll talk about how much it would cost and what it would mean to end private insurers and build a single-payer health care system. Monday, we continue our series exploring the best way to get health care to the most people in America. You’ve probably been hearing a lot about “Medicare for All” recently. Earlier this month, Democratic presidential hopeful Senator Bernie Sanders introduced a proposal for a national health insurance program. We’ll talk about Sanders’ Medicare for All and how it compares to other Democratic plans. Will also ask how much it would cost and what it would mean to end private insurers.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Melanoma Update 50 mins – “Dr. Omid Hamid, who is at the forefront of this research, shares the latest news of how he and scientists are making incredible advancements in the treatment melanoma with a variety of groundbreaking therapies. This episode is sponsored by Hydralyte and Alliant University CSP.” At the link right-click, “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mueller Report Release 46 mins – “The Mueller report is out. Redacted by the Justice Department, shipped up to Congress and released to the public. We break it down in a special live evening broadcast.” At the link right-click the down-pointed arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurosurgeon 34 mins – “Dr Heidi McAlpine is a neurosurgery registrar at the Alfred Hospital in Melbourne. Today, she gives us fantastic insight into what it’s like being the only female registrar currently on the program! While occasionally being mistaken for another, more junior member of the team on ward rounds, Heidi thoroughly enjoys her work. She initially wanted to be a neurologist but loved surgery, eventually finding a field that combined her two passions…..From Dr McAlpine’s perspective, neurosurgery constitutes a significant time commitment, but not one that should get in the way of pursuing one’s own life outside of medicine, including starting a family. She encourages all female medical students (including you guys!) to enter the program to show that it’s doable, as doctors will change the system by “pushing those boundaries” and “highlighting and addressing” issues within the program. To everyone else, she urges us to “experience everything that we can”, especially “hands on” activities, “look after each other”, and do what we enjoy.At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear War 49 mins – “End-of-times narratives themselves are nothing new; only the means have changed. While once a few horsemen and a river of blood were enough to signal the dusk of man, apocalypse now requires the imaginations of entire atomic laboratories — or roving squads of special effects crews. This week we look through a few recent highlights from the genre: from a 1980’s made-for-TV spectacle, to a new piece of speculative fiction documenting a hypothetical nuclear conflict with North Korea. 1. Jeffrey Lewis [@ArmsControlWonk], author of “The 2020 Commission Report,” on what we might say to ourselves after a devastating war with North Korea. Listen. 2. Marsha Gordon [@MarshaGGordon], film studies professor at North Carolina State University, on the 1983 film “The Day After,” which imagines a massive nuclear strike in the Midwestern U.S. Listen. 3. Anne Washburn, playwright, on “Mr. Burns: A Post-Electric Play,” in which she imagines American cultural life after a devastating nuclear event. Listen. 4. Andrew Fitzgerald [@magicandrew], chief digital content officer at Hearst TV, on what journalists, seven years ago, thought about the prospect of covering the end of the world.” At the link find the title, “Fallout, Aug 2019,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Waste 31 mins – “There’s no such thing as throwing something away, says Andrew Dent — when you toss a used food container, broken toy or old pair of socks into the trash, those things inevitably end up in ever-growing landfills. But we can get smarter about the way we make, and remake, our products. Dent shares exciting examples of thrift — the idea of using and reusing what you need so you don’t have to purchase anything new — as well as advances in material science, like electronics made of nanocellulose and enzymes that can help make plastic infinitely recyclable.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow, then “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oncologist 44 mins – “Dr Ranjana Srivastava is a well-decorated oncologist that also holds numerous accolades, including the Westpac Women of Influence Award, recipient of the Medal of the Order of Australia for her service to medicine in the field of doctor-patient communication, and award-winning author for The Guardian. As a medical student, she enjoyed most fields, but ruled out obstetrics when she “almost dropped a baby”, and surgery when she fainted in theatre! It was a rural rotation in oncology where she saw the calming influence her consultants had on patients that she decided to pursue this field….Her typical week involves a mixture between clinical work and authoring. Listen in to discover how she deals with the emotional burden of discussing prognoses, terminal illnesses and chemotherapy on a daily basis to patients and families. While she finds it incredibly rewarding to help patients, managing their expectations and breaking harsh truths to them can be tough. Moreover, the specialty is “bounding along at an unprecendented pace”. This makes keeping up to date inrcredibly difficult, especially with patients consulting the internet for novel regiment. In future, she sees treatments being targeted to patients. There is no “magic solution” to maintaining a work-life balance, but Ranjana gives us some aspects we should prioritise. Increasingly, clinicians can choose their own hours and draw boundaries from an early age. She encourages students to spend extended periods of time following consultants to learn what each specialty is like. The initial “glitter and glamour” can fade away unless one truly enjoys what they are doing. At the end of the day, Ranjana stresses the importance of being “present” in each consultation, since we “may never see that patient again”.At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Crisis 17 mins – “This installment examines the drug companies’ role in the current opioids crisis. Led by the billionaire Sackler Family, Purdue Pharma used marketing, advertising and questionable tactics to encourage physicians to prescribe OxyContin whenever possible. The push to “eliminate pain completely” resulted in iatrogenic addiction. Beautiful Boy author, David Sheff, Dreamland author, Sam Quinones and Addiction Treatment Specialist, Shelley Sprague are this week’s contributors.At the link right-click, “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oppression Impact 56 mins – “Oppression takes many forms: it can be physical, the one-on-one power play of an abusive relationship. It can also be political and cultural, the oppression of one group by another in a society. All of these things have their long-lasting effects: the psychological trauma of individuals and of groups. Then there’s the legacy of inherited oppression: you yourself may not have been oppressed, but those in your group before you — parents, ancestors — suffered, and now here you are, carrying the weight of that inheritance. Oppression shapes us, who we are, both individually and as a group — and often not in any way we might wish. That impact’s one of the nasty lessons life offers…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive

Parasitism Discussion 75 mins – “Vincent and Dickson answer listener emails about Leishmania, dual infection of vectors, tapeworms, liver flukes, toxoplasmosis, and much more.” At the link right-click “Download TWiP #42” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pathologist 39 mins – “Dr Tarini Fernando is a senior pathology registrar currently completing her advanced training.  She decided quite early on to pursue this pathway after enjoying her elective rotation in forensic pathology in her final year of university. We discussed with her what sort of students might enjoy the “culture shock” that is pathology and how best to prepare oneself for the interviews. This includes the importance of research and experience in other wards in the hospital. Tarini provides us with an insight into the scope of fields and and range of tissues pathologists deal with within the lab, as well as the teams she interacts with outside it. She highlights the difference between public and private work, comparing the financial reward, time commitment and workload demands of both. Our discussion also touches on the level of knowledge required for both day-to-day tasks and the final exams, as well as how to balance the demands of simultaneously learning and teaching with personal pursuits, family and friends. Her advice also extends to the traits doctors should have to pursue a career in pathology and to deal with the challenges of failing exams and working extra hours.At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Popaganda Rag by Carlson 28 mins – “To suggest that Tucker Carlson has a tendency to hint at deeply discriminatory tropes would be cliché — but also dead-on. Just this week, thanks to newly unearthed audio released by Media Matters, the Fox News darling ditches his signature dog whistle in exchange for unmistakable and unapologetic hate speech. Who is Tucker Carlson, really? In this week’s pod extra, Bob delves into the origins of the now-notorious commentator with Lyz Lenz, a writer for Columbia Journalism Review who profiled Carlson in September.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty Avoidance 56 mins – “…Poverty has always been a defining issue in the quest to build a better world. Most political systems lay claim to the idea that they alone can create a better world. It’s a kind of litmus test: if our political systems can’t raise almost everyone out of relative poverty, then what exactly have we achieved? Why poverty exists at all in otherwise wealthy, prosperous democratic countries is a very incisive question, and it’s not enough to just shrug and say our system is still better than any other alternative. And those alternatives? Dictatorships take us into the abyss. Right-wing libertarianism has little to offer as solutions to poverty. Soviet-style Communism didn’t exactly work either, which leaves some version of western liberal democracy, either what we have now, or some variation that is still to emerge. So once we’ve got past that, and accepted that we’ve failed on the poverty file, how do we go about making things more equitable right now, making sure that wealth is distributed to those in need, and creating opportunity for the weak to become stronger?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Press Freedom 54 mins – “What do you have a right to say? Is it ever ok to say whatever you want? In some places, like the United States, freedom of speech basically means you have the right to say nearly anything, and the idea is that the bright light of debate will push untruths aside.  It’s a nice idea, but easier said than done. In most societies, there are restrictions on what it’s alright to say: criticising the president is ok in some places; in others, doing so can land you in prison, or hasten your execution. And of course in the wild and lawless  lands of the internet, anyone appears to be able to say anything — although you might find it safest to say nothing at all.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Public Health Doctor 32 mins – “Dr Alessandro Demaio is a doctor in the field of public health that works for the World Health Organisation. He has pioneered several global public health movements, including NCD free, the UN decade of action on nutrition, and Festival 21. Alessandro’s work has taken him all around the world, from assisting aid workers in Sri Lanka after the tsunami, Copenhagen – where he completed his PhD in public health – Harvard University, where he pursued a post doctorate fellowship, Geneva, for his work with the WHO, and even Mongolia!…A typical day lasts 11 hours and involves practically nothing of what we expect of your average doctor! Alessandro spends his time liaising with experts from around the world and working on large-scale projects. For those of us wanting to do our part, Alessandro encourages us to become involved in the WHO, medical school organisations, or other non-medical organisations. Indeed, he sees his best investment as the “time and risk” he put in to leaving the “safe” path of medicine, with a clear goal and the comfort of equifinality in mind (yep, we had to google that one too). He believes life “comes in stages”, and he is happy to sacrifice his work-life balance for the moment to make an impact on the world.At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rabies 67 mins – “After a long hiatus we are back with a much anticipated look at one of the most feared diseases of all time: rabies. We cover everything from its evolutionary history to its massive case fatality rate, from why it makes you slobber so much to how Pliny the Elder thought you should treat it (spoiler: don’t try it at home, folks).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rheumatology 38 mins – “Dr Michael Gingold is a rheumatology consultant working in Melbourne. Today, we unpack this oft forgotten specialty, in which Michael has an abundance of experience. His training has taken him all over the world, and he is yet to meet a rheumatology consultant that isn’t “happy”. He personally puts this down to the enduring relationships he forms with his long-term patients. The work Michael performs on a daily basis seems intriguing. As with most doctors, he splits his time between public and private practice, with most of this comprising outpatient work, as well as teaching and supervising the trainee program. However, a good chunk of his day is also dedicated towards answering questions from GPs, specialists and patients. Rheumatologists seem to be an accessible, easy-going bunch! He also gives his two cents on why the current “workforce review” might result in a large changeover of staff in the near future, and encourages all of us that are clinically inclined to be a part of this. Many novel and newly-generic medications will continue to change the pharmacological landscape in this time as well…At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. .

Rheumatology 48 min – “Prof Michelle Leech is a rheumatology consultant and deputy dean at Monash University’s Faculty of Medicine. It is hard to believe that she was once a self-described “shy” medical student that dreaded answering questions given her success as a doctor! Today, we walk to Prof Leech about how she evolved from timid medical student to academic pioneer and respected clinician….We talk at length about the “training bottleneck” troubling many specialties, its impact on rheumatology, and where the future of specialty training may lie (literally – and it’s not in hospitals!). Other ideas, such as dual training and flexible working hours, are explained to us by our wonderful mentor. Michelle also gives us fantastic insight into her pathway to being an academic professor and researcher, and how this has helped her clinical work.. Michelle’s advice to use students is to simply “have a rest!”. We debate the origin and future of the hypercompetitive state of medical school which she believes is up to us as a group to “dial up and down”. Her opinion is that work and life exist on a “continuum”, not as separate entities, and that we should pursue that which keeps us “energises, and causes [us] to energise others” rather than to fill out our CVs. Wise words! Work and life is a “continuum”. She also implored young doctors to admit their vulnerability and ignorance, to lean on those around them for support, and share our stories with colleagues, to foster a supportive community that will stay with us through our junior years (and beyond).At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scurvy 62 mins – “Arr, mateys, climb aboard for a swash-buckling tale of when the high seas were full of disease! Today we’re covering a non-infectious but no less terrifying scourge that has wrecked millions of lives and sent even the bravest of sailors quivering in their boots: Scurvy. From the open ocean to the California gold rush to modern times, scurvy has been causing collagen breakdown throughout human history, and we can blame it all on…evolution?” At the link right-click “MP2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Driving Cars 19 mins – “Driverless vehicles are being tested at the moment but at the Blind Veterans UK Centre in Ovingdean, Brighton, a six month trial for the use of visually impaired people has just got underway. Reporter Lucy Edwards went to find out what some of the blind veterans think of them. Roy Symons is turning 100 on Friday. His secret to a long life? Keep organised, keep your independence and have a tot of something strong each day. Peter White visits him in his home in Harrow to toast him on his birthday.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

SF Writer Anders 63 mins – “Charlie Jane Anders is the author of The City in the Middle of the Night. She talks with Megan Morrone about starting the sci-fi blog iO9, the difference between futurism and science fiction, and writing believable characters who screw up.” At the link click “Download options.” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Speech Freedom 56 mins – “What do you have a right to say? Is it ever ok to say whatever you want? In some places, like the United States, freedom of speech basically means you have the right to say nearly anything, and the idea is that the bright light of debate will push untruths aside.  It’s a nice idea, but easier said than done. In most societies, there are restrictions on what it’s alright to say: criticising the president is ok in some places; in others, doing so can land you in prison, or hasten your execution. And of course in the wild and lawless  lands of the internet, anyone appears to be able to say anything — although you might find it safest to say nothing at all….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive 

Technology Giants 66 mins – “Can we live without big tech? Is it even possible to avoid any influence when they dominate the internet today? Megan Morrone speaks with Gizmodo’s investigative reporter Kashmir Hill about her six weeks blocking Google, Amazon, Facebook, Microsoft, and Apple from monetizing her in any way whether through surveillance capitalism or using any of their products.” At the link click “Download options.” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Titans 62mins – “Amy Webb is the Author of The Big Nine: How the Tech Titans & Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity. She talks with Leo Laporte about the coming age of artificial intelligence and the nine companies that will control it.” At the link click “Download options.” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tim Cook 57 mins – “Megan Morrone speaks with Leander Kahney, the editor and publisher of CultofMac.com and author of Inside Steve’s BrainJony Ive: The Genius Behind Apple’s Greatest Products, and Cult of Mac, about his latest book, Tim Cook: The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level. They discuss Tim’s background and how he started at Apple, how Cook fixed Apple’s supply chain with just-in-time manufacturing, and the clash between Apple and the FBI over iPhone encryption, and more.” At the link click “Download options.” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tuskegee Airman 50 mins – “The Tuskegee Airmen braved racism and brutally tough training in order to secure their spot in American history as the first African-American military pilots. Listen in today to the story of their determination and heroism.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Ulysses S. Grant 60 mins – “John Marszalek, editor of an annotated edition of Ulysses S. Grant’s memoirs, discussed Grant’s process for writing, his relationship with Abraham Lincoln and why he focused on the Civil War and excluded his presidency. This program is from the annual Lincoln Forum symposium.” At the link you can listen, but must purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Vaccines P1 128 mins– “The wait is finally over: this week we are very excited to bring you the episode we’ve been teasing for weeks: vaccines! This week and next (you don’t have to wait a full two weeks for the next episode!), we are presenting a two-part series on vaccines. In today’s episode, we dive deep into the biology of vaccines, from how they stimulate your (amazing) immune system to protect you, to how they make you into an almost-superhero, shielding the innocents around you from deadly infections. We take you back hundreds, nay, thousands of years to when something akin to vaccination first began, and then we walk along the long road of vaccine development to see just how massive an impact vaccines have had on the modern world. The best part? We are joined by not one, but two experts from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Dr. Gail Rodgers and Dr. Padmini Srikantiah explain the process of vaccine development, highlight the challenges of vaccine deployment, and shine a hopeful light on the future of vaccines. And be sure to tune in next week for part 2 where we’ll focus on vaccine hesitancy and address common misconceptions surrounding vaccines in even more depth. For more information on the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation initiatives, visit: https://www.gatesfoundation.org/At the link right-click “MP2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccines P2 140 mins – “Were you stoked about the history and biology of vaccines we covered in part 1, but left with even more questions? Were you really hoping to hear us talk about anti-vaccine sentiment and address misconceptions about vaccines in detail? Did you want even more expert guest insight?! Well then do we have the episode for you! Today, we delve into the history of the “anti-vaccine movement” which, spoiler alert, is nothing new. With the help of Dr. Peter Hotez, Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and Co-director of the Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development we address some of the most common concerns and questions that arise about vaccines, their safety, and their efficacy. And finally, we hear from Bill Nye The Science Guy about dealing with the challenges of science communication in the modern world when diseases spread as fast as fake news headlines. Y’all. This is the episode you’ve been waiting for. You can follow Dr. Peter Hotez on twitter @PeterHotez and check out his book “Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel’s Autism” At the link right-click “MP2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Games Future 67 mins – “Jason Howell speaks with returning guest Blake Harris, author of the bestseller Console Wars, about his latest book, The History of the Future: Oculus, Facebook, and the Revolution That Swept Virtual Reality. They discuss Harris’ three-plus years chronicling the meteoric rise of Oculus, the VR company founded by Palmer Luckey in 2012 that was acquired for over $2 billion dollars only two years later; and how he, after being systematically lied to by Facebook executives, uncovered the true story that led to the controversial firing of Luckey.” At the link click “Download options.” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War on Drugs P1 46 mins – “It was the perfect political prop: drugs seized by government agents right across the street from the White House, just in time for a big presidential address. The reality was more complicated.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

War on Drugs P2 33 mins – “One day, early in the semester, Keith Jackson didn’t show up to class. He’d been arrested for selling crack, but for his classmates, that wasn’t the surprising part.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

War on Drugs P3 49 mins – “The drug bust and the trial were a “farce,” but the full force of the law still came down on Keith Jackson — and thousands of people like him. That didn’t end the crack epidemic, so what did? At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

War on Drugs P4 37 mins – “It’s the deadliest drug epidemic our country has ever faced. We go to ground zero, where “nothing changes except for the drug.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

War on Drugs P5 44 mins – “It’s not easy being an undercover cop in a county of just 40,000 people. But drugs were making it hard for Bucky Culbertson to run his business, so he made it his business to get rid of drugs.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

War on Drugs P6 50 mins – “Many people in Wise County agree that they can’t jail their way out of a drug epidemic, but there’s a lot less agreement on what to do instead. And we find out what happened to Joey Ballard.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Waste Elimination 11 mins – “There’s no such thing as throwing something away, says Andrew Dent — when you toss a used food container, broken toy or old pair of socks into the trash, those things inevitably end up in ever-growing landfills. But we can get smarter about the way we make, and remake, our products. Dent shares exciting examples of thrift — the idea of using and reusing what you need so you don’t have to purchase anything new — as well as advances in material science, like electronics made of nanocellulose and enzymes that can help make plastic infinitely recyclable.” At the link left-click “Share”, right-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus 68 mins – “Zika virus may not have as long and storied a history as many diseases we’ve covered, but in a short time it has managed to make a big impression. Today we’ll talk about how Zika wriggled its way out of obscurity and cover its journey from a mosquito’s mouth straight to our newspaper headlines. From the first discovery of the virus in a Ugandan jungle, to the heartbreaking effects only recently discovered, to the future of Zika research and vaccine development, we’ll fill you in on everything you want to know and then some.” At the link right-click “MP2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 393 – May 31, 2019: 3D Printing Nano and Prosthetic Hands, Ageism and Innovation, Black Political Activism, Body Parts Farm, Border Issues, Chemical Warfare, Child Care Costs, Climate Scientist, Deepak Chopra, Desert Survival, Digital Rights Law, Dinosaur Tracks, Disasters, Earthquake Protection in California, Ebola in Sierre Leone, Elizabeth Warren, Emotional Education, Eric Holder, Faster Than Light Drives, Fat Viruses, Fructose Impact, Gravity Wave Generators, Internet Defamation, Internet Regulation, Journalists Watch List, Lasers Research, Maya Angelou, MEMs Electronics, Military Balance Report, Money versus BitCoin, National Security in Congress, Nationalist Revival, Ocean Health, Offensive Cyber Operations, Patient Led Research, Presidential Investigation, Privacy Rights, Rat Eradication, South Africa Cyclone Deaths, Statistics Uses, Synthetic Labs in Homes, Terrorism Analysis, Transcranial Brain Stimulation, Trump Tactics, Trust Discussion, War Powers, Work Future Trends

Exercise your ears: the 68 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 770 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,200) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Printing Nano and Prosthetic Hands 29 mins – “Feeling hands, incriminating handshakes by Ian Woolf, Professor Martin Wegener talks about nano 3D Printing,” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ageism and Innovation 7 mins – “The average age of an employee at leading Silicon Valley companies like Facebook is 28 while Google is 30. My former employer, HP looks like a retirement home with the average age of its employees being 39. Some of the companies in the valley truly believe that because someone is older, they are less able to be creative — to be innovative. Hogwash. Creativity and innovation know no limits based on age….Someone judging a persons ability to be successful creatively based on age is nothing more than ageism which is a form of bias. Bias is when a person or organization unfairly show favoritism towards something or someone such as the bias to hire younger staff because a leader believes they are more creative — more innovative. Bias is one of those things that can crop up without us even be conscious of it. Reminds me of the story of young American at a banquet who found himself seated next to a Chinese diplomat. Not knowing what to say to a Chinese person, the young man pointed to the first course and asked, “Likee soupee?” The diplomat nodded and smiled. Later, the Chinese diplomat, Wellington Koo, was called on to speak and delivered an eloquent address in flawless English. As he sat down to the sound of applause, he turned to the young American and said, “Likee speecchee?” …I’m Phil McKinney … and thanks for listening.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Artificial Meat 28 mins – “Nova Meat- Barcelona researcher develops 3D printer that makes ‘steaks’ -A researcher has developed a plant-based meat substitute that’s made with a 3D printer – PRESSKIT 100% PLANT-BASED STEAK – Vivera Vegan Steak: Does It Taste Like The Real Thing? – Sampling Vegan Steaks – Vivera vegan steak: a review” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Savev Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ash Tree Threat 27 mins – “Adam Hart investigates yet another threat to the ash trees of Europe. In the last programme he found out about the latest research developments to save ash trees from ash dieback, a disease that has already devastated trees across Europe, but now it seems that another threat could be on its way from Russia – the emerald ash borer. This beetle already targets ash trees in the USA and kills 99% of the trees it infests. But, what is it, how great is the threat and is there any way to stopping it spreading to Europe?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronomy 24 mins – “Astrophysicist Jo Dunkley just published a book titled Our Universe: An Astronomer’s Guide. In it, she reveals the history of our universe, as well as some of the remarkable – and sometimes overlooked – contributions of pioneering female astronomers. Hannah Devlin talks to Dunkley about her career which has seen her join the team looking after Nasa’s Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, and head to Chile to work on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Political Activism 63 mins – “DeRay, Clint, Brittany and Sam discuss Georgetown’s reparations fund, the new Black Maternal Health Caucus, life-long prison sentences without the possibility of parole, and “proactive policing.” New York Times Magazine Staff Writer Emily Bazelon joins DeRay to talk about the power of prosecutors, transforming the American court system and ending mass incarceration.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain and Publishing 13 mins – “Imagine a digital ledger that is permanent and irreversible, and you will begin to understand why blockchain promises so much for the online world. With blockchain, transparency and certainty are guaranteed for every e-transaction. The platform that underlines bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, blockchain is already taking up a role in supply chain management, music licensing, and even health care record-keeping. Blockchain enthusiasts expect publishing will soon follow. Not only the future of the internet may come to rely on blockchain, but also the future of civilization. At least that’s the lofty dream of publisher and entrepreneur Rana DiOrio, co-founder and CEO of Creative Mint. Blockchain, she says, will bring visibility to the creative supply chain that will ensure fair treatment for authors, artists, and other creators. In fact, DiOrio believes blockchain will put in practice a digital version of the golden rule. “Rights transactions happen for creative works in myriad ways. You have your book deal, and then you have your video deal and you have your ed-tech licensing deal or your video game deal or your merchandising deal. All those deals can be committed to smart contracts that then reside in a blockchain for all to see, so there’s checks and balances built into the system,” DiOrio recently told CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “My background is a lawyer, and in my contracts class, our professor said sunlight is the best disinfectant,” she explained. “What we’re doing is we’re casting a light on the whole industry. Imagine – all of our partners are going to be able to see with great degree of granularity all of the numbers for a brand. A publishing partner is going to be able to see how the toy sales are going and how the ed-tech licensing deals are going and how the video game sales are going, and they can adjust their product offering because of that.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Body Parts Farm 18 mins – “Demand for donated organs far outstrips supply. But researchers are working to remedy the crisis using everything from gene-edited pigs to 3D-printed tissue.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a podcast copy is included in the blog archive.

Border Issues 50 mins – “Growing up in the American Southwest, the writer Francisco Cantu always had some idea of what happened along the US-Mexico border, but he wanted to know more. So, he joined the Border Patrol, hoping he could be a force for good. Growing up in the American Southwest, the writer Francisco Cantu always had some idea of what happened along the US-Mexico border, but he wanted to know more. So, he joined the Border Patrol, hoping he could be a force for good. Then he found himself tracking fellow humans through the desert. He recovered the bodies of dead migrants and hauled live ones in to detention. Along the way, he learned just how complicated the border is. He joins us to talk about what happens on both sides of the line. Francisco Cantu is a writer and translator. His book The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border was recently released in paperback” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the popup menu.

Britain Assessment from Egypt 27 mins – “Neil MacGregor visits different countries to talk to leading political, business and cultural figures to find out how they, as individuals and as members of their broader communities, see Britain. In Egypt, Neil hears from political historian Said Sadek; magazine publisher and editor Yasmine Shihata; and writer and activist Ahdaf Soueif.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Chemical Warfare P1 27 mins -”In the first of two programmes he looks back to the first attempts to ban the use of chemical weapons at the end of the 19th century. Heavily defeated in the Crimea, Russia succeeded in getting unanimous agreement at the 1899 Hague Convention that poison and poison weapons should be banned from warfare. But chemicals such as chlorine, phosgene and mustard gas were heavily used in the First World War by both sides. More substances were developed in the 1930s and 1940s but weren’t used in the battlefield in World War 2. Andrea Sella tells the stories of the chemists behind these developments.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Lower quality” from the pop-up menu.

Chemical Warfare P2 27 mins – “For more than 100 years chemical weapons have terrorised, maimed and killed soldiers and civilians alike. As a chemist, the part his profession has played in the development of these weapons has long concerned Andrea Sella, professor of chemistry at University College London. In this programme he examines the motivation of chemists like Dr Fritz Haber, who first encouraged the German military to deploy chlorine gas in World War One for the sake of “The Fatherland” and of Dr Gerhard Schrader, who, in his hunt for an effective pesticide, accidentally discovered a new class of lethal nerve agents for Nazi Germany. From chlorine, phosgene and the mustard gases, to tabun, sarin, soman, VX and the novichok agents used to target former Soviet agent Sergei Skipal in England, Andrea weaves archive with interviews with key figures in the ongoing campaign to control and ban the use of such weapons and he asks how science educators can prepare young chemists for the moral hazard posed by this particular class of weapon.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Lower quality” from the pop-up menu.

Child Care Costs 47 mins – “Some cities and states have tried implementing universal pre-K. But the idea’s struggled to find a nationwide platform. Could that be changing?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA Public Relations 52 mins – “The Central Intelligence Agency, by its very nature, is a secretive organization, yet it has a robust public affairs and media relations operation. How does the agency resolve this tension? How do its employees, from the director of the CIA to the officers needed to assist in this effort, deal with the difficult questions of how open to be? To find out, David Priess sat down with Bill Harlow and Marie Harf, two former CIA officers who were in the middle of it all.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_393.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Scientist 26 mins – “Professor Corinne Le Quéré of University of East Anglia talks to Jim Al-Khalili about tracing global carbon. Throughout the history of planet Earth, the element carbon has cycled between the atmosphere, the oceans and the biosphere. This natural cycle has maintained the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and has allowed life to exist for billions of years. Corinne Le Quéré is a climate scientist who keeps track of where the carbon comes from and where it goes – all on a truly global scale. Corinne Le Quéré is the founder of the Global Carbon Budget, which each year reports on where carbon dioxide is being emitted and where it is being absorbed around the world. More specifically, she studies the relationship between the carbon cycle and the earth’s climate, and how it is changing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Lower quality” from the pop-up menu.

Congestive Pricing 29 mins – “They say the squeaky wheel gets the grease. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to two brothers who are trying to make a little noise for the issues they care about through citizen journalism. Eric and Joshua Preven put out a weekly publication, The Preven Report, from their hometown of Los Angeles. We discuss the issue of congestion pricing, a proposal to reduce traffic currently being considered by local government there. Then, we dip into the Sea Change Radio archives and hear from Rahwa Ghirmatzion, the Executive Director of PUSH Buffalo, to learn about her organization’s efforts to make Buffalo, NY greener while also helping communities of color.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Containers for Survival Situations 92 mins – “Today Steven Harris and I answer your questions on Bug Out Trailers. This time we discuss storage options for all your gear while bugging out with a trailer or in any situation really. This is the tenth in a multi part series that began with Episode-2117- Steven Harris and Jack Spirko on Bug Out Trailers. As this is clearly going to become a multi episode series I have created the tag BOT Shows so that all of them can be found at one location. The response to the first in the series was overwhelming, Steve compiled and sent me 14 pages of questions, I printed it out and it feels like a small book, and these are just questions and a few notes here and there. So we are going to run about 1 hour and 15 minutes on the interview and break it into pieces parts over the next few months. Today we about every storage option out there for all your gear, food, supplies and more.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deepak Chopra 39 mins – “World-renowned spiritual thought leader Deepak Chopra welcomes Oprah to his homeland, India. Deepak discusses his groundbreaking work in the field of mind-body medicine, the life lessons he’s learned from his family, and the influence that India’s rich cultural traditions have had on his life’s work. Deepak explains how we can create harmony in our own lives. He says learning to move with the flow of life wherever you are is key to appreciating every moment. He also describes his life-changing experience as a Buddhist monk in Thailand.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Desert Survival 48 mins – “The chances are pretty low that you’ll find yourself lost in the desert, but on the off chance you do you’ll thank yourself that you listened to this episode, where we guide you to safety.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Digital Democracy in Kenya 58 min – “Kenya is the most digitally advanced country in sub-Saharan Africa, where Twitter, Facebook, WhatsApp, and other online platforms are part of everyday life. And, as in Western nations, the digital age has had dramatic effects on society and politics. Yet, while we hear about the #MeToo movement and the Russian bot scandal, there is little appreciation for the feminist movement #MyDressMyChoice and the subversion of state-run political propaganda by social media. Digital Democracy, Analogue Politics aims to change this by presenting a unique contribution to the debate on digital democracy. For traditionally marginalized groups, particularly women and the disabled, digital spaces have provided vital platforms that allow Kenyans to build new communities that transcend old ethnic and gender divisions. Covering attempts by political elites to prevent social movements from translating online visibility into meaningful offline gains, Digital Democracy, Analogue Politics explores the drastic efforts to contain online activism and new methods of feminist mobilization, as well as how “fake news,” Cambridge Analytica, and allegations of hacking contributed to tensions around the 2017 elections. Reframing digital democracy for the first time from the African perspective, Nanjala Nyabola’s groundbreaking work opens up new ways of understanding our current global online era.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Rights Law 91 mins – “After two decades of little direct legislation of the internet, national laws and related court decisions meant to govern cyberspace are rapidly proliferating worldwide. They are becoming building blocks in new legal frameworks that will shape the evolution of Internet governance and policymaking for years to come. In the Global South and particularly under repressive regimes, these frameworks can be imposed with little regard for human rights obligations and without a full understanding of the technologies and processes they regulate or their implications for the preservation of the core values of the internet: interoperability, universality, and free expression and the free flow of information. This panel brings together practitioners from five international organizations monitoring the development of legislation and case law related to cyberspace to discuss the implications for the future of human rights online.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dinosaur Tracks 27 mins – “In a dry creek bed in the middle of the Australian outback is a palaeontological prize like no other: 95-million-year-old footprints stamped in a sandstone slab by three species of dinosaur. One of the beasts was a massive, lumbering sauropod that measured 18 metres from nose to tail. But the precious trackway is in danger of being damaged by the next floods, so must be moved. In the final episode of the four-part series The Chase, science journalist Belinda Smith from the ABC in Australia discovers what footprints can tell us about the ancient beasts that once roamed this land, and follows a team racing against time and the elements to save this once-in-a-lifetime find. Because even though these tracks have lasted the best part of 100 million years, they may not survive another one.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Lower quality” from the pop-up menu.

Disasters 50 mins – “The anniversary of a disaster gives us a moment to reflect on whether we have learned the right lessons — or any at all. This week, we examine the narratives that have solidified ten years after the financial crisis, and one year after Hurricane Maria.  1. Political anthropologist Yarimar Bonilla [@yarimarbonilla] on how we can focus our attention on Puerto Rico’s structural challenges even as the president spouts falsities about the “unsung success” of the federal response to Hurricane Maria. Listen. 2. Dean Starkman [@deanstarkman], author of The Watchdog That Didn’t Bark: The Financial Crisis and the Disappearance of Investigative Journalism, on how the signs of the financial crisis had been visible leading up to it but many journalists were looking elsewhere. Listen. 3. Brown University professor Mark Blyth [@MkBlyth] takes on the most popular narratives of the financial crash. Listen. 4. Copenhagen Business School business historian Per Hansen on Hollywood’s depiction of the board room and Wall Street from 1928 to 2015. Listen.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Earthquake Protection in California 27 mins – “Los Angeles is a city of Angels, and of earthquakes. Deadly earthquakes in 1933, 1971 and 1994 have also made it a pioneer in earthquake protection – for example with tough engineering standards to save buildings. Since 2013, with the help of scientists at the US Geological Survey, the city has been developing a resilience plan which culminated in the release of an app that should give residents precious seconds of warning when an earthquake starts. Roland Pease meets the scientists, the Mayor and the officials making the system work.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Lower quality” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola in Sierre Leone 31 mins – “In 2014, Oliver Johnson was a 28 year old British doctor, working on health policy in Sierre Leone after finishing medical school. Also working in Freetown was Sinead Walsh, then the Irish Ambassador to the country. Then the biggest outbreak of Ebola on record happened in West Africa, starting in Guinea and quickly spreading to Liberia, Sierre Leone and Nigeria. Oliver and Sinead have co-authored a book about the change that wrought on their lives, how they stepped into roles coordinating the international response to the disease and running a treatment centre. They join us today to talk about their experiences there. For more information about Ebola, including the current outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo visit www.bmj.com/ebola. For Sinead and Oliver’s book – Getting to Zero: A Doctor and a Diplomat on the Ebola Frontline is available now.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Elizabeth Warren 43 mins – “Senator Elizabeth Warren sits down with Tommy to talk about Medicare for All, climate change, Venezuela, Israel, and more.” At the link right-click “Download” at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emotional Education 13 mins – “To get young kids to thrive in school, we need to do more than teach them how to read and write — we need to teach them how to manage their emotions, says educator Olympia Della Flora. In this practical talk, she shares creative tactics she used to help struggling, sometimes disruptive students — things like stopping for brain breaks, singing songs and even doing yoga poses — all with her existing budget and resources. “Small changes make huge differences, and it’s possible to start right now … You simply need smarter ways to think about using what you have, where you have it,” she says.” At th link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eric Holder 54 mins – “In this second episode of the special Culper Partners Rule of Law Series, David Kris and Nates Jones, the founders of the Culper Partners consulting firm, speak with Eric Holder, who served as the 82nd Attorney General of the United States from 2009 to 2015. Holder shares his perspective on the proper functioning of the Department of Justice, the balance between independence and political accountability, and a distinction between the role of the Attorney General as the chief prosecutor on the one hand and as legal advisor to the president, and sometimes to the National Security Council, on the other. He also remembers his own experience with congressional oversight and gives a frank assessment of how oversight is functioning today. He also critiques the two OLC opinions against indicting a sitting president, and he offers predictions about the Mueller report and his own upcoming decision on whether he will run for president.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_395.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

European Inventor 27 mins – “European Inventor of the Year, Chris Toumazou, reveals how his personal life and early research lie at the heart of his inventions. As chief scientist at the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at Imperial College London, Chris inspires engineers, doctors and other scientists to create medical devices for the 21st Century. Applying silicon chip technology, more commonly found inside mobile phones, he tackles seemingly insurmountable problems in medicine to create devices that bridge the electronic and biological worlds – from a digital plaster that monitors a patient’s vital signs to an artificial pancreas to treat diabetes. His latest creation, coined a ‘lab on a chip’, analyses a person’s DNA within minutes outside the laboratory. The hand-held device can identify genetic differences which dictate a person’s susceptibility to hereditary diseases and how they will react to a drug like warfarin, used to treat blood clots.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Faster Than Light Drives 28 mins – “High Frequency Gravitational Wave generator by Ian Woolf, Alcubierre warp drive, EM inertia-less drive and anti-gravity with Professor Geraint Lewis, The strange case of the disappearing anti-gravity researchers by Dr Tim Baynes,” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Faster Than Light Drives 28 mins – “Navy FTL space drive patent by Ian Woolf,” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fat Viruses 29 mins – “The virus that makes you fat but healthy – by Ian Woolf, Alex Kelly talks about a new model for the Biofoundry, and CRISPR kits in development.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Fructose Impact 30 mins – “If you believe the headlines fructose is “addictive as cocaine,” a “toxic additive” or a “metabolic danger”. So how has a simple sugar in fruit got such a bad name and is there any evidence behind the accusations that it has caused the obesity epidemic? Meanwhile, a new health claim approved by the European Union promoting the benefits of fructose containing foods or drinks, comes into force in the New Year. So where does the truth lie? Dr Mark Porter talks to leading world experts to sift through the evidence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Gravity Wave Generators 28mins – “High Frequency Gravitational Wave generator by Ian Woolf, Alcubierre warp drive, EM inertia-less drive and anti-gravity with Professor Geraint Lewis, The strange case of the disappearing anti-gravity researchers by Dr Tim Baynes,” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

House of Representatives Oversight 37 mins – “With the Democrats taking control of the House of Representatives, the 116th Congress is expected to be one of vigorous oversight of the executive branch, complete with requests for documents and for testimony from executive branch officials. But how does this actually work, and what happens when the executive branch refuses to comply? To hash it all out, Brookings Senior Fellow Molly Reynolds spoke with Stan Brand, who served as the general counsel to the U.S. House of Representatives from 1976 to 1983. They talked about the institutional role of the House general counsel, the ins and outs of congressional contempt and subpoena enforcement, and the various challenges that the House will have to confront over the next two years.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_387.mp3” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Defamation 26 mins – “What do lawyers need to look out for when handling a defamation case? In this edition of Digital Detectives, hosts John Simek and Sharon Nelson welcome Joe Meadows for a discussion about internet defamation. They outline what constitutes online defamation and talk about the key issues lawyers need to consider in this highly nuanced practice area. Joe discusses current trending cases and gives his take on the future of defamation case development. Joe Meadows is a former DOJ attorney and current partner with Bean, Kinney & Korman in Arlington, Virginia. He focuses on internet defamation, cyber-attacks, and business dispute litigation.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Internet Regulation 29 mins – “What, if anything, should be banned from online media? And who should review violent and explicit content, in order to decide if it’s okay for the public? Thousands of people around the world are working long, difficult hours as content moderators in support of sites like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. They are guided by complex and shifting guidelines, and their work can sometimes lead to psychological trauma. But the practice of content moderation also raises questions about censorship and free expression online. In this IRL episode, host Manoush Zomorodi talks with a forensic investigator who compares the work she does solving disturbing crimes with the work done by content moderators. We hear the stories of content moderators working in the Philippines, as told by the directors of a new documentary called The Cleaners. Ellen Silver from Facebook joins us to outline Facebook’s content moderation policies. Kalev Leetaru flags the risks that come from relying on artificial intelligence to clean the web. And Kat Lo explains why this work is impossible to get exactly right.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Regulation 67 mins – “Welcome to episode 130 of the EdTech Situation Room from April 10, 2019, where technology news meets educational analysis. This week Jason Neiffer (@techsavvyteach) and Wesley Fryer (@wfryer) discussed YouTube’s challenges moderating objectionable content, the human costs of that content moderation, and the incredibly hostile digital infrastructure which is now online amplifying that content for apparently malicious purposes. HUD’s new lawsuit against Facebook for illegally targeted housing advertisements, and privacy and security challenges posted by pre-installed apps on Android were also discussed. Exciting recent Google announcements were highlighted including native editing of MS Office documents via Google Docs, forthcoming 3rd party add-ons to GSuite, and improvements to Hangouts Chat now integrated with Gmail were also discussed. From Chromebook land, the exciting announcement of a new #MadeByGoogle Chromebook, and Apple’s expected “reinvention” of MagSafe power adapters for USB-C devices were explored. Microsoft’s announced closure of its eBook store, the futuristic and arguably dystopian U.S. Army version of Microsoft’s Hololens platform, an intriguing SxSW musical performance utilizing sensorware, and the “Share No Evil” Chrome extension created in response to the mass shooting in Christchurch, New Zealand were topics rounding out the show. Geeks of the week included resources for Wes’ upcoming ATLIS workshop “Filtering the ExoFlood,” the free eBook “Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers,” Gobo.social, and the 2019 Webby’s.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Journalist Watch List 50 mins – “Mexican officials and U.S. Customs and Border Protection are using a secret database to target journalists and advocates at the southern border. This week, On the Media speaks with a reporter on the list who was detained for questioning by Mexican authorities. Plus, what the Obama Library’s unique arrangement with the National Archives means for the future of presidential history. And, the grotesque origins of segregation.  1. Mari Payton [@MariNBCSD], reporter at NBC 7 in San Diego, and Kitra Cahana, freelance photojournalist, on the secret government database of immigration reporters and advocates. Listen. 2. Tim Naftali [@TimNaftali], historian at New York University and former director of the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, and Louise Bernard, director of the museum at the Obama Presidential Center, on the Obama Foundation’s decision to curate its own presidential museum. Listen. 3. Steve Luxenberg [@SLuxenberg], author of Separate, on the history of Plessy v. Ferguson. Listen.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lasers Research 27 mins – “Donna Strickland tells Jim Al-Khalili why she wanted to work with lasers and what it feels like to be the first woman to win a Nobel Prize for Physics in 55 years. When the first laser was built in 1960, it was an invention looking for an application. Science fiction found uses for these phenomenally powerful beams of light long before real world applications were developed. Think Star Wars light sabres and people being sliced in half. Today lasers are used for everything from hair removal to state of the art weapons. Working with her supervisor Gerard Mourou in the 1980s, the Canadian physicist, Donna Strickland found a way to make laser pulses that were thousands of times more powerful than anything that had been made before. These rapid bursts of intense light energy have revolutionised laser eye surgery and, it’s hoped, could open the doors to an exciting range of new applications from pushing old satellites out of earth’s orbit to treatments for deep brain tumours.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Lower quality” from the pop-up menu.

Lincoln Memorial Sculptor 60 mins – “The dedication of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., took place in 1922, almost 60 years after Abraham Lincoln’s death. Harold Holzer talked about his book, Monument Man: The Life and Art of Daniel Chester French, which examines the life of the sculptor best known for the statue of Lincoln that serves as the memorial’s centerpiece. This talk took place at the annual Lincoln Forum symposium.” At the link you can listen, but must purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Maya Angelou 34 mins – “The late poet, author, icon and activist Dr. Maya Angelou speaks about her creative process, the power of words and how she overcame a traumatic childhood. Dr. Angelou says that in order to be the best human being you can be, you must follow one simple directive: “Just do right.” She also discusses what it felt like to stand side-by-side with leaders of the civil rights movement. Dr. Angelou’s most notable work, “I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings,” in on TIME magazine’s list of the “100 Best Non-Fiction Books of All Time.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MEMs Electronics 27 mins – “Jim Al-Khalili talks to Ken Gabriel, the engineer responsible for popularising many of the micro devices found in smartphones and computers. Ken explains how he was inspired by what he could do with a stick and a piece of string. This led to an engineering adventure taking in spacecraft, military guidance systems and the micro-mechanical devices we use every day in our computers and smartphones. Ken Gabriel now heads up a large non-profit engineering company, Draper, which cut its teeth building the guidance systems for the Apollo space missions, and is now involved in developing both driverless cars and drug production systems for personalised medicine. Ken himself has a career in what he terms ‘disruptive engineering’. His research married digital electronics with acoustics – and produced the microphones in our phones and computers. He has also worked for Google, taking some of the military research methods into a civilian start up. This led to the development of a new type of modular mobile phone which has yet to go into production.

Military Balance Report 44 mins – “Each year, the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) in London publishes The Military Balance, an annual assessment of the military capabilities and defense economics of 171 countries around the world. Last week, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Bastian Giegerich, director of defense and military analysis for IISS, who leads the research and publication of The Military Balance, which has just come out for 2019. They discussed Chinese military modernization, global defense spending and how it’s changing around the world, Russia’s violations of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Agreement, NATO, and cyber.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_394.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Money versus BitCoin 49 mins – “Ten autumns ago came two watershed moments in the history of money. In September 2008, the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers triggered a financial meltdown from which the world has yet to fully recover. The following month, someone using the name Satoshi Nakamoto introduced BitCoin, the first cryptocurrency. Before our eyes, the very architecture of money was evolving — potentially changing the world in the process. In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Security in Congress 44 mins – “It’s hard to open a newspaper or turn on the television without hearing about the dysfunction and partisan polarization affecting members of Congress. But what about their staffs, and what does that mean for national security? This week, Margaret Taylor sat down with seemingly unlikely partners: Luke Murry, National Security Advisor to Republican House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, and Daniel Silverberg, National Security Advisor to Democratic House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer. They spoke about security issues facing this Congress, what staffers do on a day-to-day basis, and how the two of them actually work together.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_396.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nationalist Revival 45 mins – “Political trends in recent years have seen a rise of right-leaning nationalism and populism around the globe, including in the United States. What are the sources of nationalism, and what are its effects on modern politics? On this episode, Lawfare founding editor and Harvard law professor Jack Goldsmith sits down with John Judis, editor-at-large at Talking Points Memo and author of “The Nationalist Revival.” They discussed Judis’s book, including the necessity of nationalism in developed democracies, why right-wing nationalist and populist movements seem to be winning out over those on the left, and how Donald Trump successfully raised the profile of nationalist politics in the United States.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_397.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Health 28 mins – “Oceans cover about 70% of our planet, and represent over 95% of all of the earth’s water. The human impact on the ocean includes temperature rise, coral bleaching, ocean acidification, and changing chemical composition of the water – all of these things, of course, have an effect on the organisms that live in these vast ecosystems. This week on Sea Change Radio, we take a look back into the archives. First, we revisit our discussion with Jeff Boehm, the Executive Director of the Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito, CA as he talks about the work his organization does to protect seals up and down the Pacific coast. Then, we speak with Boston Globe reporter David Abel about the surprising resurgence of Atlantic cod.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Offensive Cyber Operations 36 mins – “Last week, as part of the Hoover Institution’s “Security by the Book” series, Jack Goldsmith spoke with Herb Lin and Amy Zegart, co-directors of the Stanford Cyber Policy Program. Lin and Zegart edited a recently-published volume on offensive cyber operations entitled: “Bytes, Bombs, and Spies: The Strategic Dimensions of Offensive Cyber Operations.” In the book, leading cybersecurity scholars and practitioners dissect the technical, political, psychological, and legal ramifications of offensive cyber operations. Goldsmith, Lin, and Zegart discussed the book’s inception, its contents, and what role offensive cyber operations have played and continue to play in U.S. strategy.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_388.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Anatomy 27 mins- “Scientists reveal why we feel pain and the consequences of life without pain. One way to understand the experience of pain is to look at unusual situations which give clues to our everyday agony. Phantom limb pain was described in ancient times but only after WWI did it gain acceptance in modern medicine. For those living with it, it can be a painful reminder of a lost limb. New studies are now unravelling why the brain generates this often unpleasant experience and how the messages can be used positively. Its only since the 1980s that doctors agreed that babies are able to feel pain but we still don’t know how the developing brain processes information and how premature babies can be protected from the many invasive tests they have to go through. New research aims to provide appropriate pain relief that could have long term consequences.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Lower quality” from the pop-up menu.

Patient Led Research 28 mins – “Patient power is on the rise. But is it rising too far? Frustrated by the time it takes to develop new drugs, the ethical barriers to obtaining clinical data or the indifference of the medical profession to obscure diseases, patients are setting up their own clinical trials and overturning the norms of clinical research. A DIY clinical trial sounds like a joke – and a dangerous one at that. But as Vivienne Parry discovers, it’s real and on the rise as greater access to medical data allows more patients to play research scientists and medics at their own game. Patients lie at the very heart of clinical research – without them there is none. Yet they come way down the food chain when it comes to transparency about their own health, blinded as they usually are to what pills they’re taking and whether they are actually doing them any good. Even after the trial is published they’re left with little understanding of whether the treatment could work for them and licensing is usually years away. So it’s perhaps hardly surprising that patient networks have sprung up to redress the balance. Much of this current patient led research now takes place through online communities, with activists and the articulate ill demanding more say in their treatment. Vivienne Parry looks at some examples of patient led research which have challenged the medical establishment. She also asks how far can this go: should patients be prevented from experimenting with procedures or drugs that might kill them?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Presidential Investigation 44 mins – “As the nation braces for the forthcoming end of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into President Trump and his associates, The Lawfare Podcast decided to take a look back at the complete history of special prosecutors. Benjamin Wittes sat down with Andrew Coan, a professor of law at the James E. Rogers College of Law at the University of Arizona. Coan recently published “Prosecuting the President,” which traces the history of how special prosecutors and counsels work to keep the executive branch accountable for its actions. Ben and Andrew discussed the book, the Teapot Dome Scandal, the Whiskey Ring, and what all of that might mean for the future of special counsels.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_399.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Privacy Rights 66 mins – “In this talk, Professor Woodrow Hartzog argues that the law should require software and hardware makers to respect privacy in the design of their products. Against the often self-serving optimism of Silicon Valley and the inertia of tech evangelism, privacy gains will come from better rules for products, not users. The current model of regulating use fosters exploitation. Hartzog speaks on the need to develop the theoretical underpinnings of a new kind of privacy law that is responsive to the way people actually perceive and use digital technologies. The law can demand encryption. It can prohibit malicious interfaces that deceive users and leave them vulnerable. It can require safeguards against abuses of biometric surveillance. It can, in short, make the technology itself worthy of our trust” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Toilets 54 mins – Public bathrooms are an amenity we all need. Yet few of us talk about them openly, and cities often get them wrong. So how should governments and businesses provide for this most basic bodily need – and what does it mean for citizens when they have no place to go? Contributor Lezlie Lowe flushes out the answers on a road trip, with many bathroom breaks, across North America.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Rat Eradication 27 mins – “The atoll of Tetiaro is a string of tiny islands in French Polynesia, about 60km away from Tahiti. The islands – known as ‘motus’ to local Polynesians – are unique ecosystems that are crucial nesting sites for native seabirds. But invasive species threaten to disrupt these fragile environments – a fate seen across many islands in the Pacific. Rats arrived with early human settlers and have driven bird species off some of the islands. Meanwhile introduced mosquitoes have thrived in the warm conditions, and now act as vectors for diseases such as the Zika virus. Rat eradication experts have travelled to one of the uninhabited islands in the atoll, called Reiono, to attempt an experimental eradication of thousands of rats with one mammoth poison bait drop. They’re also using this as an opportunity to better understand why eradication attempts have been less effective on tropical islands. At the same time, on another island in the chain called Onetahi, researchers are releasing swarms of sterilised male mosquitoes to try to rid this motu of the disease-carrying pest. Join Carl Smith from ABC Australia for the third episode of The Chase: a special four-part series about science on the run.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Lower quality” from the pop-up menu.

South African Cyclone Deaths 47 mins – “Cyclone Idai is one of the worst weather-related catastrophes in the history of Africa. We look at the forecast for a region under the threat of climate change.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Statistics Uses 24 min – “Prof Sir David Spiegelhalter has a love of statistics and has done ever since he was inspired by a teacher at university. Today, though, some are arguing that this type of number crunching is losing its power and its ability to depict reality. This, they say, has in part led to increasing levels of distrust in statistics. Nicola Davis and Ian Sample investigate how significant statistics are in today’s world with the author and Cambridge academic David Spiegelhalter. They discuss the golden days of the field and its importance to medical science, as well as the future of statistics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Synthetic Labs in Homes 29 mins – “Electric cars are the new NBN by Ian Woolf, JJ Hastings talks about creating art and science and her new authorised synthetic biology home lab” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taste Sense Discussion 23 mins – “Coffee is a drink adored the world over. But have you ever wondered why a fresh brew smells better than it tastes? This is one of the many questions Prof Barry Smith from the University of London has been trying to answer by studying the senses. It turns out there are a lot to choose from; we could have anywhere between 22 and 33 different senses. With a strong interest in wine, though, Smith has focused on how touch, taste and smell all work in tandem to produce flavour perception. Graihagh Jackson invited Smith into the studio to talk about taste, coffee and chocolate and how we can manipulate our brains into thinking something tastes sweeter than it is.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Analysis 27 mins – “Dr Hannah Fry investigates the hidden patterns behind terrorism and asks whether mathematics could be used to predict the next 9/11. When computer scientists decided to study the severity and frequency of 30,000 terrorist attacks worldwide, they found an distinctive pattern hiding in the data. Even though the events spanned 5,000 cities in 187 countries over 40 years, every single attack fitted neatly onto a curve, described by an equation known as a ‘power law’. Now this pattern is helping mathematicians and social scientists understand the mechanisms underlying global terrorism. Could these modelling techniques be used to predict if, and when, another attack the size of 9/11 will occur?”At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Therapeutic Writing 36 mins – “New York Times best-selling author Cynthia Bond discusses her first novel, “Ruby,” which is an Oprah’s Book Club choice. Cynthia says that as an adult she was flooded with painful memories of sexual abuse from her childhood. She found healing in a writing class and her work there eventually led to the idea for the novel that would take her 10 years to complete. “Ruby” was finally published in 2014. Cynthia says the message she wants to share in her book is about survival. “The lesson is that it is possible to not just survive anything, but it is possible to be a victor,” she says. “It is possible to be victorious over any obstacle. And that’s something I know in my marrow. I know in my bones.” Cynthia also talks about her years of teaching writing classes to the homeless and at-risk youth throughout the Los Angeles area.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Time Use Trends 63 mins – “Economist and author Daniel Hamermesh of Barnard College and the Institute for the Study of Labor talks about his latest book, Spending Time, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Hamermesh explores how we treat time relative to money, how much we work and how that has changed over time, and the ways economists look at time, work, and leisure.” At the link right-click “Download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transcranial Brain Stimulation 27 mins – “The God helmet by Ian Woolf, Peter Simson-Young talks about personalising transcranial direct current stimulation using 3D printing.” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Tactics 68 mins – “Trump botches the human act of calling grieving families and rejects a bipartisan deal to improve the Affordable Care Act. Then Jon and Dan talk to Virginia Democratic Party Chairwoman Susan Swecker about the race between Ralph Northam and Ed Gillespie, and Ana Marie Cox joins to talk about #MeToo and the Trump Administration’s legal push to force an undocumented immigrant to give birth.” At the link find the title, ““The strategic sense of a rabid raccoon.” 19 Oct 2017, right-click “MEDIA ENCLOSURE: https://traffic.megaphone.fm/DGT3095986984.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trust Discussion 25 mins – “In a live appearance at UCLA’s Royce Hall, research professor, social scientist, New York Times best-selling author and TED Talk sensation Dr. Brené Brown discusses the fundamentals of trust. Brené explains how she was moved to focus on the topic after watching her daughter struggle with a betrayal of trust. Brené says she eventually found a way to teach her daughter to build trust and identify the people in her life who deserve it. She also explains why gossip harms relationships more than we realize and creates an intimacy that isn’t real.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

War Powers 62 mins – “For the past year, Matt Waxman has been writing Lawfare vignettes about interesting—and usually overlooked—historical episodes of American constitutional war powers in action, and relating them to modern debates. These include the stories of St. Claire’s Defeat and the Whiskey Rebellion during the Washington administration, congressional war powers and the surprisingly late termination of World War I, the proposed Ludlow Amendment during the interwar years, and Eisenhower’s Taiwan force authorization. Ben Wittes invited Matt on the podcast to talk about them and how they fit together into a book broader project he’s embarking on. If you’re tired of hearing the usual war powers debates, listen in. And even if you think you know a lot about constitutional war powers, you’ll learn a lot.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_398.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the popup menu.

Work Future Trends P1 29 mins – “Alex Kelly talks about economics, automation, investment, and how to change things for a better society. Excerpt from “Machine: Master or Slave” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Work Future Trends P2 28 mins – “Will the Sun cool the Earth? by Ian Woolf, Nathan Waters looks to the future of work and housing needs- part 2,” At the link right-click MP3 download: and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 392 – May 24, 2019: AI Dangers, Black Lung, Broadband in Minnesota, Broadband Telemedicine, Broadband Wireless in North Carolina, California Education Issues, Chagas Disease, Childhood Obesity, Climate Action, Climate Change Emergency, Climate Change in Australia, Cohen Testimony, Comics in Classroom, Communications Issues, Communicator Workers Union President, Alcoholism Treatment, Democracy and Technology, Diabetes Insipidus, Diane Sawyer, FBI and Cybercrime, FIFO Worker Stress, HIV in U.S. Homeland Security Viewpoint, Industrial Problems and Solutions, Jonestown Survivor, Journalism Ethics, Medical AIs, Monopoly Concerns, NBA Discussion, Obesity Impact, Pearl of Lao Tsu, Pete Buttigieg, Public Policy and AI, Racial Division Healing, Radio Free Europe, Rep Joe Kennedy III, San Francisco Federal Reserve, Silicon Valley Problems, Susan Crawford on Fiberoptics, Sustainable Farming, Trump Investigation, Uganda’s Orphanage Closure, Walls Discussion

Exercise your ears: the 64 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 601 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,200) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Activism 54 mins – “What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, “craftivist” Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.” At the link find the title, “Changing The World, Apr 4, 2019,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Dangers 64 mins – “Some would say that the magic of artificial intelligence, or AI, is that its users are its primary source of power. As we navigate a Facebook page or ask Alexa a question, we provide data inputs at virtually no cost. Others, such as Amy Webb, would argue that this is AI’s most dangerous characteristic. This is because our data contributions are subject to such limited oversight.  Webb is the founder of the Future Today Institute, a leading foresight and strategy firm that advises Fortune 500 companies, international nongovernment organizations (NGOs) and government agencies. A clear lover of new experiences, reporting and data, today she is a self-described quantitative futurist. Since future trends are usually present on the fringe of society before they appear in the mainstream, Webb’s line of work uses data-driven models to report on the probabilities of the future. Her latest predictions, as laid out in her book The Big Nine: How Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity, give three scenarios for the future of artificial intelligence—optimistic, pragmatic and catastrophic. For each scenario, she provides practical measures that can be taken to address the most pressing issues…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Alcoholism Treatment 27 mins – “Scientists hope that a recreational drug could help to treat people with alcohol dependence. In the UK, MDMA – the active ingredient of the class-A drug ecstasy – has been given to a handful of alcoholics who have undergone a full detox, as part of psychotherapy sessions. The researchers hope it will help to make people more receptive to therapy, increasing their chances of recovery. City traders who can detect their own heartbeat may make better use of their instinct when making quick decisions based on the financial markets. Most people do not seem to have this skill –– but one expert believes that the heart can be a powerful source of information guiding our behaviour without us being consciously aware of it. Working on construction sites can lead to builders becoming locked into a cycle of fatigue, financial concerns and ill health. The industry’s macho culture makes it hard to talk about their worries – leaving them vulnerable to depression and even suicide. The British Mates in Mind initiative hopes to enable its predominantly male workforce to discuss their feelings. And – feeling anxious about the audience’s every move, the stand-up comedian Robin Ince explains why he lays bare his own personal worries to make people laugh.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

April Fools Day 53 mins – “Celebrate the lunch hour on April Fools’ Day by sitting at the feet of cosmic comic Swami Beyondananda, whose favorite yoga pose is tongue in cheek. Swami will help you laugh lovingly at our human foolishness till the sacred cows come home. And at least one lucky person in the audience will achieve “fool realization” as to why author Marianne Williamson has called Swami the Mark Twain of our times. Come in darkness (to get a good seat), but expect to be enlightened. And BYOF (bring your own friends), because when it comes to laughter, the more the merrier.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Astronomical Visualisation [2nd item] 28 mins – “Bitcoin encoded DNA by Ian Woolf, Kai Polsterer and Andre Schaaff talk about astronomical visualisation with Google cardboard at the Astronomical Data Analysis Software and Systems conference – ADASS, Better by Jonathan Coulton.” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Futures 71 mins – “The issues facing black communities are often complicated, nuanced and heavily weighted by centuries of historical injustice. Black Futures Lab, founded by Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza, works to make black people powerful in politics by transforming black communities into constituencies that build power in cities and states. The Black Futures Lab recently completed the largest survey of black people since Reconstruction, with nearly 40,000 respondents from diverse communities across the nation. The survey included questions regarding many defining characteristics, including gender, sexuality, age and other categories, and it dug into several key issues rooted in inequality and to understand better what black communities desire for their futures. Join Garza and other cultural leaders, scholars and experts for a conversation about the inaugural data results and how to use this data to create solutions with lasting impact.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Black Lung 54 mins- “Howard Berkes joins us to talk about his reporting of an epidemic of black lung disease that is suffocating and killing the country’s coal miners. Federal regulators and the mining industry have done little to help. NPR’s Howard Berkes has reported on mine safety and regulation for almost a decade. Lately, he has teamed up with reporters at PBS’s Frontline to document an epidemic of black lung disease that is suffocating and killing the country’s coal miners. They’ve shown how federal regulators and the industry have consistently failed to protect vulnerable mine workers, who are often forced to choose between their livelihoods and their lives. Berkes joins us to talk about his reporting and its impact.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Comedian 28 mins – “On a typical episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast, you’ll hear from a guest whose community may be in the process of deploying a publicly owned fiber network, or an elected official who has championed a broadband-friendly policy for their city or town. Sometimes we talk to local business leaders or cooperative board members who’ve led their communities toward better connectivity. For the first time ever, we have a comedian on the show this week — Ron Placone. What does this mean? Not that the issue of publicly owned networks is joke material, but that it’s something that people from all walks of life care about. Ron is host of the streaming show, “Get Your News on With Ron,” a show driven by its audience. He has a popular YouTube channel and is regularly on the Jimmy Door Show and The Young Turks, often discussing municipal networks and the importance of network neutrality….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Minnesota 36 mins – “Brent Christensen, Chief Operating Officer of Christensen Communications, came into our Minneapolis office to sit down and have a chat with Christopher this week for podcast 346. Their interview comes a short time after Christopher and several other Institute for Local Self-Reliance staff took a tour of the Christensen Communications facilities. Brent has an additional role as President and CEO of the Minnesota Telecom Alliance (MTA) a group that advances policies encouraging expansion of broadband connectivity. Brent describes some of the ways MTA has helped Minnesota and local leaders establish policies to help private sector telecom companies bring better connectivity to local communities, especially in rural areas. He and Christopher spend time discussing Minnesota’s Border to Border Broadband Program and why they think it’s been a success.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 22 mins – “While in North Carolina at the recent Let’s Connect! speaking tour, Christopher sat down with Greg Coltrain, Vice President of Business Development of RiverStreet Networks. Greg participated in panel discussions in all three communities where the community meetings occurred: Albemarle, Fuquay-Varina, and Jacksonville. RiverStreet Networks is the product of evolution of what began as Wilkes Communications. They’ve acquired several local providers in different areas across the state and are set on bringing high-quality Internet access to rural North Carolinians. In this interview, Greg shares some of the cooperative’s history, including information on how they’ve funded their deployments. Greg also discusses his experience on the practical side of cooperative life, such as comparative operating costs between fiber and copper, working with electric cooperatives, and the ins and outs of leasing assets from public entities. Christopher and Greg also talk about future plans that RiverStreet has to partner with North Carolina’s electric cooperatives across the state to bring connectivity to more people in rural areas.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Telemedicine 36 mins – “This week, we have another interview that Christopher recorded while he was at the 2019 Broadband Communities Summit in Austin, Texas. Dr. Robert Wack from Westminster, Maryland, where the town is partnering with Ting Internet, sat down for a conversation on telemedicine. As the United States’ healthcare system continues to degrade, hospitals, doctors, and other caregivers are looking for new and efficient ways to provide better care for their patients. Broadband is a tool that healthcare professionals are already using for preventative care, consultation, and treatment from a distance. Dr. Wack and Christopher discuss some of the innovations within the healthcare industry that use connectivity, data, and human engagement. These approaches reduce costs and help patients by reducing the stress that accompanies unnecessary trips to the emergency room or can identify when a patient requires medical intervention from the security of their home. Christopher and Dr. Wack also discuss some of the new challenges that accompany these innovations and strategies for bringing these programs to large groups of people, rather than focusing on small populations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Wireless in North Carolina 22 mins – “It’s cold in our Minneapolis office this week, but two of our staff — Christopher Mitchell and Katie Kienbaum — are off enjoying mild January weather in North Carolina. They’re conversing with the good folks in three different communities, where they also met up with this week’s podcast interviewee, Alan Fitzpatrick, CEO of Open Broadband. Alan and Christopher have a practical conversation about what it’s like to be in the fixed wireless Internet access business these days. As they discuss, the model for today’s WISPs isn’t like it was in the past, which is one of the reasons fixed wireless companies such as Open Broadband are able to provide service so much more advanced. In addition to talking about technology, Alan touches on the birth of the company, some of their hardest challenges and how they overcome them, and he gets a little nostalgic remembering their first gigabit customer.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Education Issues 67 mins – “Education Week magazine reported in 2017 that among all states, California’s K–12 public education ranked 41st in conditions that help children succeed, 39th in school finance and 30th in achievement. So what can we expect in 2019? In a major upset against his opponent Marshall Tuck, Tony Thurmond was elected California State Superintendent of Public Instruction this past November. He was the endorsed candidate of the California Democratic Party and all five 2018 California Teachers of the Year. He previously represented the 15th Assembly District, which encompasses the northern East Bay. Thurmond became the second African-American to hold the office and fourth African-American to win statewide office in California following Wilson Riles. Prior to being elected to the Assembly in 2014, he was a member of the Richmond City Council, a board member of the West Contra Costa Unified School District and social services administrator. Come hear his plans for improving California’s schools.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Chagas Disease 27 mins – “On this edition of Science Studio we meet two UTEP professors, Igor Almeida, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences, and Katja Michael, Ph.D., associate professor of chemistry.  They have received $6 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to improve treatment and develop new diagnostic tools to assess post-therapeutic outcomes for patients with Chagas disease.” At the link right-click the “Play” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chaos Agents 50 mins – “Family separation, a re-framed immigration debate and Trump’s misleading executive order: why news fatigue about the border isn’t an option. This week, we explore multiple sides of the asylum policy — including the view from Central America. Plus, a look back at US repatriation policy in the 1930’s, and six decades of American culture wars. 1. Dara Lind [@DLind] and Dahlia Lithwick [@Dahlialithwick] on how Trump’s family separation policy attempts to re-frame the immigration debate, and why news fatigue isn’t an option. Listen. 2. Carlos Dada [@CarlosDada] on the way the family separation and zero-tolerance asylum policy are changing the way Central Americans see the United States. Listen. 3. Francisco Balderrama on the mass expulsion of Mexican immigrants and their American-born children from the United States during the Great Depression. Listen. 4. Brian Lehrer [@BrianLehrer] on six decades of culture wars in the United States. Listen.” At the link right-click the download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood Obesity 15 mins – “Professor Louise Baur is Head of Child and Adolescent Health at the University of Sydney. She discusses the prevention and treatment of paediatric obesity in Australia. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Rhinosinusitis 36 mins – “Patients who experience chronic rhinosinusitis may way for a considerable period of time before presenting, because they believe the condition to be trivial. In this podcast, Alam Hannan, ENT Consultant at the Royal Throat Nose and Ear Hospital in London, explains why that belief is not founded, and describes which treatments can be effective at providing relief.” At the link find the title, “Chronic Rhinosinusitis, 8 Feb 2019,” right-click “Play” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Action 51 mins – “With the Green New Deal in the national spotlight, a vigorous debate is happening: How ambitiously and broadly must the United States act on climate? Are issues such as economic equity, job security and public health outside the frame of climate action—or are they fundamental to its success? Progressive Democrats contend a holistic solution would tackle all of the above. Critics such as former Representative Barney Frank (D–MA) argue that society can only handle so much change at once. How bold does action need to be to avoid the worst impacts of climate change—and at what cost to citizens? Are environmental justice and human health central to the success of the climate action, or are they just a nice bonus? How can policy and innovation work together to decarbonize the economy?Join us for a special recording of the Climate One podcast and radio show at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, featuring Harvard’s John Holdren and Gina McCarthy and hosted by Greg Dalton.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Climate Change Emergency 47 mins – “Climate change is a public health emergency and physicians are “morally bound to take a lead role” in confronting the challenges, says the doctor making the claim. She’s with us.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change in Australia 15 mins – “Associate Professor Paul Beggs is an environmental health scientist at Macquarie University, and a coauthor of the MJA-Lancet Countdown on climate change and health. He discusses Australia’s vulnerabilities, policies and progress. With MJA news and online editor Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coders Discussion 64 mins – “When we think of the people behind the most influential technological advances of our day, we usually imagine the leaders of the industry but forget the armies behind them: coders. Dedicated to the pursuit of higher efficiency, these lovers of logic and puzzles are able to withstand unbelievable amounts of frustration; they are arguably the most quietly influential people on the planet. In his new book, Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World, Clive Thompson argues just that. Through increasingly pervasive artificial intelligence, coders have a larger and larger role to play. Thompson analyzes how embedded this industry is in our lives, questioning the lack of geographic and demographic diversity in the sector while outlining his optimistic view on the opportunities that this age of code can unlock. Join us for a conversation about this frequently misunderstood industry culture and a refreshingly enthusiastic take on its future.  Thompson is a freelance journalist and one of the most prominent technology writers. He is a longtime contributor to The New York Times Magazine and a columnist for Wired.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

Cohen Testimony 62 mins – “On Wednesday, Michael Cohen—the former executive vice president of the Trump Organization, former deputy finance chairman of the Republican National Committee, and former personal lawyer to Donald Trump—paid a visit to the House Committee on Oversight and Reform. Cohen accused the president of campaign finance violations after taking office. He alleged that he was present when Roger Stone gave Trump advance notice of the WikiLeaks dump of the hacked DNC emails. And he claimed that the president’s statements in a meeting with Jay Sekulow led Cohen to conclude that the president wanted Cohen to make false statements to Congress. So we cut out all of the bickering, all of the procedural obstructions, and all the rest of the frivolity, to bring you just the one hour of testimony you need to hear.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Cohen_Bonus_Ep.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comics in Classroom 11 mins – “Comic books and graphic novels belong in every teacher’s toolkit, says cartoonist and educator Gene Luen Yang. Set against the backdrop of his own witty, colorful drawings, Yang explores the history of comics in American education — and reveals some unexpected insights about their potential for helping kids learn.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Technology P1 Issues 31 mins – “Representative Mike Doyle (D-PA), chairman of the House subcommittee overseeing technology and communications, talks about net neutrality, hate speech on the internet and social media, and mergers such as the proposed T-Mobile/Sprint deal.” At the link find the title, “Rep. Mike Doyle Mar 15, 2019,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Technology P2 33 mins – “C-SPAN interviews digital leaders and officials at the State of the Net conference. This week’s guests include, Rebecca Slaughter (D), a commissioner at the Federal Trade Commission, and Neil Chilson, a fellow at the Charles Koch Institute. At the link find the title, “State of the Net 2 Feb 9, 2019,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Technology P3 26 mins – “C-SPAN interviews digital leaders and officials at the State of the Net conference. This week’s guests discuss the debate over when speech needs to be removed from media platforms and European Union digital issues.” At the link find the title, “Online speech & EU digital issues Apr 12, 2019,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Communications Workers Union President 28 mins – “Christopher Shelton, president of the Communications Workers of America, talks about the union’s opposition to the T-Mobile/Sprint deal, Congress’s role on the issues, 5G and more.” At the link find the title, “Christopher Shelton, Communications Workers Feb 22, 2019,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diabetes Insipidus 44 mins – “Diabetes is synonymous with sugar, but diabetes insipidus, “water diabetes”, can’t be forgotten. Between 2009 and 2016, 4 people died in hospital in England, when lifesaving treatment for the condition was not given. In this podcast, we hear some practical tips for non-specialists to aid diagnosis, and how patients should be managed during hospital admission.” At the link find the title,”Diabetes Insipidus – the danger of misunderstanding diabetes, 01 Mar 2019,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online Speech 76 mins – “We’re never going to get a global set of norms for online speech, but do the platforms pick our global values and constitutionalize them? Something to tie them to the mast when hard issues arise? What would those values even be? Kate Klonick and Thomas Kadri along with panelists, Chinmayi Arun, Kendra Albert, and Jonathan Zittrain with moderation by Elettra Bietti, engage in this discussion.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy and Technology 50 mins – “On the latest episode of Recode Decode, Recode’s Kara Swisher spoke with Nuala O’Connor — the president and CEO of the Center for Democracy and Technology — about how the group is currently lobbying the government and tech companies. O’Connor said there’s a “holy war” going on among the tech companies that have unprecedented power in societies around the world. “Maybe it’s an inappropriate phrase,” she said. “I think you are going to see a race, hopefully to the top, on this is how we treat our customer, and data is part of the equation. It’s old-time customer trust. It’s old-time respect for the customer.” “Knowing your customer is fine, but are you using the information you have gleaned about them in a way that, yes, furthers your corporate interest, but furthers their needs, and not in a way that is adverse?” O’Connor asked. “This tech sector is not in a good place right now. It’s in an incredibly disregulated place, literally and figuratively. I am short-term, a little pessimistic, but long-term optimistic that there’ll be enough public pressure … and ultimately government action to constrain some of the worst uses.” At the link left-click “Share” at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diane Sawyer 27 mins – “Award-winning journalist and news anchor Diane Sawyer opens up about her career, her tireless curiosity and what fuels her passion. Diane talks about the biggest lesson her father taught her and what she learned from working in the Nixon White House during his resignation. She also shares an idea that she says can truly spark lasting change.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Technology in Medical Education 26 mins – “19 November 2018. Dr Helen Wozniak, from the Office of Medical Education at the University of Queensland, and Dr Peter de Jong from the Centre for Innovation in Medical Education at Leiden University in the Netherlands, discuss digital technologies’ role in medical education. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FBI and Cybercrime 79 mins – “On Thursday morning, Susan Hennessey spoke to former FBI director James Comey about encryption, China, Attorney General Bill Barr’s comments to the Senate about the opening of the Russia investigation, and more.” At the link right-click “Direct download: comey_verify_mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FCC O’Rielly 31 mins – “FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly (R) talks about how the internet will operate now that net neutrality rules have ended, children’s programming rules, and the impact of a federal court’s approval of the proposed AT&T and Time Warner merger.” At the link right-click “Michael O’Rielly, FCC June 22, 2018,” select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FCC Wheeler 29 mins – “Former FCC Chair Tom Wheeler (D), discusses the end of net neutrality, his signature achievement, on June 11. The current GOP-led FCC voted to replace open internet regulation with FTC regulation under Title 1. Privacy and mergers are also discussed.” At the link find the title, “Tom Wheeler June 9, 2018” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FIFO Worker Stress 27 mins – “Dr Jennifer Bowers is managing director of Rural and Remote Mental Health. She discusses the psychological distress experienced by fly-in, fly-out workers. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV in U.S. 11 mins – “President Donald Trump’s call to end the domestic HIV epidemic in his 2019 State of the Union address may have taken some listeners by surprise. Many Americans consider HIV to be a plague of the past — a problem now resolved. For others, the initiative seems at odds with the Trump administration’s other health policy priorities, which include efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, restrictions on access to reproductive health services, and opposition to harm reduction for people who inject drugs — approaches that have undermined both access to health care and the civil rights of people in many of the communities hit hardest by HIV. Yet the effort is welcome and the goal is achievable, assuming it is informed by the latest advances in science and public health, as well as by earlier bipartisan initiatives to tackle HIV on the global stage. The past three decades have seen enormous progress in confronting HIV, even in the absence of an effective vaccine or a cure. An ever-expanding array of antiretroviral drug combinations has transformed HIV infection from a “death sentence” to a chronic and manageable condition. Treatment has also been shown to eliminate the risk of HIV transmission to sexual partners, and new prevention methods, including needle-exchange programs and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with antiretroviral drugs, are highly effective.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” to get the podcast.

Homeland Security Viewpoint 66 mins – “The Department of Homeland Security seems to appear in the headlines and in the media more and more often. Covering everything from terrorism prevention, law enforcement, disaster recovery and public safety, the department’s goals can often seem self-contradictory and overly politicized, especially today. Few people understand this better than Janet Napolitano, who served as the Secretary of Homeland Security from 2009-2013. In her new book, How Safe Are We? Homeland Security Since 9/11, Napolitano unabashedly acknowledges the shortcomings and challenges facing the Department of Homeland Security today, especially the politicization of border security and our lagging cybersecurity sector. But she also makes a pragmatic and honest case for its successes and explains the ways in which Homeland Security does indeed make us safer. Join us for a discussion that chronicles the evolution of our national security and cuts through the political noise that too often dominates these conversations.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Industrial Problems and Solutions 77 mins – “Many Americans are horrified about the dysfunction and abysmal results from Washington, D.C., say Katherine Gehl and Michael Porter, and they argue that they have a realistic approach to changing this. They say our political problems are not due to a single cause but rather to a failure of the nature of the political competition that has been created—a systems problem. Come for a rare visit with two of America’s top business thinkers as they turn their focus to realigning America’s political system through the Gehl Porter politics industry theory. Katherine M. Gehl is a business leader, author and speaker. She was president and CEO of Gehl Foods, a $250 million high-tech food manufacturing company in Wisconsin, where she led a transformational growth strategy and received multiple awards before selling the company in 2015—in part to dedicate more time to political reform… Michael E. Porter is an economist, researcher, author, advisor, speaker and teacher…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Jonestown Survivor 62 mins – “Jackie Speier was 28 when she joined congressman Leo Ryan’s delegation to rescue defectors from cult leader Jim Jones’ Peoples Temple in Jonestown, Guyana. Ryan was killed on the airstrip tarmac, and Speier was shot five times at point-blank range. While recovering from what would become one of the most harrowing tragedies in recent history, Speier had to choose: Would she become a victim or a fighter? The choice to survive against unfathomable odds empowered her with a resolve to become a vocal proponent for human rights. From the formative nightmare that radically molded her perspective and instincts to the devastating personal and professional challenges that would follow, her memoir, Undaunted, reveals the perseverance of a determined force in American politics. Deeply rooted in Speier’s experiences as a widow, a mother, a congresswoman and a fighter, hers is a story of true resilience, one that will inspire other women to draw strength from adversity in order to do what is right—no matter the challenges ahead.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Journalism Ethics 49 mins – “The Lincoln Memorial debacle showed how vulnerable the press are to a myriad of social and political forces. This week, we examine how the outrage unfolded and what role MAGA hat symbolism might have played. And, a graphic photo in the New York Times spurs criticism. Plus, a reality show that attempts to bridge the gap between indigenous people and white Canadians. 1. Bob’s thoughts on where the Lincoln Memorial episode has left us. Listen. 2. Charlie Warzel [@cwarzel], tech writer, on the zig-zagging meta-narratives emerging from the Lincoln Memorial episode, and the role played by right-wing operatives. Listen. 3. Jeannine Bell [@jeanninelbell], professor at Indiana University’s Maurer School of Law, on MAGA hat symbology. Listen. 4. Kainaz Amaria [@kainazamaria], visuals editor at Vox, on the Times’ controversial decision to publish a bloody photo following the January 15 attack in Nairobi, Kenya. Listen. 5. Vanessa Loewen, executive producer of the Canadian documentary series First Contact and Jean La Rose, CEO of the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, on their televised effort to bridge the gap between indigenous and settler Canadians. ListenAt the link right-click the download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Korean Ambassadors 63 mins – “Following President Trump’s second summit with North Korea’s Kim Jong-un, what does the future hold for relations between South and North Korea as well as between both Koreas and the United States? Here is a chance for a rare visit with the U.S. and South Korean Ambassadors who are closely involved with these issues. They will discuss the economic and political relationship between the United States and South Korea and the outlook for diplomacy with North Korea and the entire region. On August 30, 2017, Cho Yoon-je was nominated as the Republic of Korea’s ambassador to the United States by President Moon Jae-in. Cho was part of the emeritus faculty at Sogang University’s Graduate School of International Studies. He completed both a master’s and doctorate in economics at Stanford University. Harry B. Harris Jr. was sworn in as U.S. ambassador to the Republic of Korea on June 29, 2018. Prior to his nomination, Harris was an admiral in the U.S. Navy, serving as commander. U.S. Pacific Commander Harris graduated from the Naval Academy and went on to receive an MPA from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and an MA from Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service. From January 2017 until April 2018, he was the U.S. Navy’s longest-serving Naval Academy graduate still on active duty.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Medical AIs 62 mins – “One of America’s top doctors reveals how artificial intelligence (AI) will empower physicians and revolutionize patient care. Medicine has become inhuman to disastrous effect. The doctor–patient relationship—the heart of medicine—is broken: Doctors are too distracted and overwhelmed to truly connect with their patients, and medical errors and misdiagnoses abound. In his latest book, Deep Medicine, Topol reveals how AI can help. AI has the potential to transform everything doctors do, from note-taking and medical scans to diagnosis and treatment, greatly cutting down the cost of medicine and reducing human mortality. By freeing physicians from the tasks that interfere with human connection, AI will create space for the real healing that takes place between a doctor who can listen and a patient who needs to be heard.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

Monopoly Concerns 29 mins – “Tim Wu discusses his book, [The Curse of Bigness.] He says today’s big technology companies are buying up small companies to prevent competition, and have impacts similar to Standard Oil and U.S. Steel, when they dominated the economy.” At the link find the title, “Tim Wu Apr 5, 2019,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

NBA Discussion 40 mins – “Rage at referees is all the rage in professional sports. Michael Lewis visits a replay center that’s trying to do the impossible: adjudicate fairness.” At the link find the title, “Ref, You Suck!, Apr 2019” right-click “Play” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obesity Impact 26 mins – “Discussion with Obesity commission co-authors Bill Dietz (George Washington University, USA) and Boyd Swinburn (University of Auckland, New Zealand), plus three personal testimonies about the impact of obesity relating to stigma, indigenous culture, and health.” At the link find the title, “Global action to confront the pandemics of obesity, undernutrition, and climate change,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pearl of Lao Tzu 51 mins – Legend says the Pearl of Lao Tzu was found in 1934 after a diver drowned trying to pry it from the mouth of a giant clam. The writer Michael LaPointe has traced the pearl’s unbelievable story through a tangled web of fact and fiction. Legend says the Pearl of Lao Tzu was found in 1934 after a diver drowned trying to pry it from the mouth of a giant clam. Once the world’s largest pearl, it has been valued between $100,000 and $100 million. According to the writer Michael LaPointe, the pearl’s true worth is in the myths that have grown on it, and in the stories of the characters who would give everything to acquire it. LaPointe joins us to spin the yarn of the pearl and talk about unweaving a beguiling web of fact and fiction.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pete Buttigieg 74 mins – “South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg joins Dan in the studio for a conversation about his presidential campaign, how Democrats can win back the Midwest and what he’s bringing to the table as the youngest candidate in the race.” At the link find the title, “2020: Pete Buttigieg on freedom and farting cows, 1 Mar 2019,” right-click “MEDIA ENCLOSURE: https://traffic.megaphone.fm/DGT9209523273.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pete Buttigieg 65 mins – “At 37 years old, Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg already has a few firsts under his belt. In 2011 and at the age of 29, he was elected mayor of South Bend, IN, making him the youngest mayor of a U.S. city with at least 100,000 residents, and the first openly gay municipal executive in Indiana. In December 2018, he announced his 2020 campaign for the presidency and is now the first millennial and the first openly gay presidential candidate. With fellow politicians like President Barack Obama touting him as the future of the Democratic Party, Buttigieg is seemingly in for an incredible year. Join INFORUM for a conversation with the presidential hopeful, moderated by Mother Jones Editor-in-Chief Clara Jeffery, as they discuss Buttigieg’s quickly rising star, the importance of representation in American politics, and his desire to be the “fresh start” he feels our country needs. At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archicw.

Public Policy and AI 64 mins – “Some would say that the magic of artificial intelligence, or AI, is that its users are its primary source of power. As we navigate a Facebook page or ask Alexa a question, we provide data inputs at virtually no cost. Others, such as Amy Webb, would argue that this is AI’s most dangerous characteristic. This is because our data contributions are subject to such limited oversight. Webb is the founder of the Future Today Institute, a leading foresight and strategy firm that advises Fortune 500 companies, international nongovernment organizations (NGOs) and government agencies. A clear lover of new experiences, reporting and data, today she is a self-described quantitative futurist. Since future trends are usually present on the fringe of society before they appear in the mainstream, Webb’s line of work uses data-driven models to report on the probabilities of the future. Her latest predictions, as laid out in her book The Big Nine: How Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity, give three scenarios for the future of artificial intelligence—optimistic, pragmatic and catastrophic. For each scenario, she provides practical measures that can be taken to address the most pressing issues. Her lesson in foresight is an important one as AI becomes more powerful and embedded within our everyday lives. Join us for a compelling discussion on the future of artificial intelligence—and what we can do about it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Racial Division Healing 20 mins – ““Where does it hurt?” It’s a question that activist and educator Ruby Sales has traveled the US asking, looking deeply at the country’s legacy of racism and searching for sources of healing. In this moving talk, she shares what she’s learned, reflecting on her time as a freedom fighter in the civil rights movement and offering new thinking on pathways to racial justice.” At the link left-click “Share,” left-click the down-pointing arrow, right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism Confrontation 56 mins – “Racism isn’t always obvious, but it can be found almost everywhere. This hour, TED speakers explore the effects of everyday and systemic racism in America—and how we can work to defeat it. Guests include authors Brittney Cooper and Monique Morris, journalism professor Pat Ferrucci, clinical psychologist Howard Stevenson, and anti-racism educator Travis Jones.” At the link find the title, “Confronting Racism, Mar 2019,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radio Free Europe 25 mins – “In the 1950s and 60s, the CIA secretly funded Radio Free Europe, which broadcast anti-Communist propaganda behind the Iron Curtain. Kenneth Osgood, author of Total Cold War, talked about the program’s U.S. operations, which sought funds and support from politicians, corporations, and American citizens. This interview was recorded at the American Historical Association’s annual meeting in Chicago.” At the link you can listen, but a download must by purchased; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Rep Joe Kennedy III 67 mins – “Representative Joe Kennedy III, at just 38, has already made a name for himself in Democratic politics. Elected in 2012 to his first term representing Massachusetts, he quickly rose to prominence as one of the younger voices in Congress. He gained new national recognition when he was chosen to give the Democratic response to the 2018 State of the Union and recently introduced Senator Elizabeth Warren (D–MA) when she made her public  announcement to run for president of the United States in the 2020 election. Since he took office, Kennedy has leveraged his role to champion economic and social issues locally and nationally, including American manufacturing, workforce development, a livable minimum wage, affordable health care, mental health and addiction care, civil rights, immigration, and energy costs, with a focus on bipartisan efforts. He is a member of the influential House Energy and Commerce Committee and chairs Congress’ Transgender Equality Task Force. Locally, Kennedy remains closely in touch with his constituents by committing to his ongoing Tour 34, an initiative where he holds constituent office hours in all 34 Fourth District municipalities. Join us for a wide-ranging conversation with a rising star of the Democratic Party about the future of a new generation of politicians and the key challenges facing the American people today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

San Francisco Federal Reserve 65 mins – “Ten years into a historic economic expansion, inflation remains surprisingly subdued. Is this a problem or a benefit? San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank President Mary Daly will talk about navigating this debate and finding clarity as a policymaker. Daly became president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco on October 1, 2018. In this role, she participates on the Federal Open Market Committee, bringing the 12th district’s perspective to monetary policy discussions in Washington, D.C. Daly is a widely respected expert on labor markets with an unusual breadth of personal experience. She dropped out of high school at the age of 15, working in a doughnut shop and at Target before a friend persuaded her to earn a general education diploma. She worked her way through college at the University of Missouri–Kansas City, then earned a doctorate from Syracuse University before joining the Fed in 1996. Prior to her appointment to president, Daly served as the bank’s executive vice president and director of research. Daly has become a strong voice for increasing diversity among the leadership ranks of the Federal Reserve System by building the pipeline of women and minorities entering the economics profession. Come hear a unique perspective from an official responsible for supporting a safe, sound and stable American financial system.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Silicon Valley Problems 69 mins – ““In Italian, there’s a beautiful word, basta, which is basically like your way of saying, ‘Enough!’” the Social Capital CEO said on the latest episode of Recode Decode. “And so I woke up one day and I was like, ‘Basta!’ Enough.” And over the next year, Palihapitiya’s declaration that he had had “enough” would ricochet around Silicon Valley, as his well-regarded, traditional venture capital firm lost several of its most prominent partners, angered its investors, and scaled back several of its most ambitious plans. Now, Palihapitiya is offering his explanation for how exactly Social Capital fell into such dramatic disarray: It was an “identity crisis” motivated by deep, personal failings that had to be dealt with. On this emotionally charged episode of Recode Decode, Palihapitiya told Recode’s Kara Swisher and Teddy Schleifer that he had the right to be happy and had discovered — despite being part of Silicon Valley’s rich and famous — that he wasn’t. So “basta” it was.” At the link right-click “Share” at the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

Susan Crawford on Fiberoptics 33 mins – “Harvard Professor, author, and broadband champion Susan Crawford has been incredibly busy ever since she released her latest book Fiber: The Coming Tech Revolution — And Why America Might Miss It. Fortunately for us and our listeners, she hasn’t been too busy to take some time for Community Broadband Bits listeners. She’s here this week to talk about the book, her experiences researching it, and discussing policy recommendations aimed at bringing better connectivity to rural and urban areas. The conversation between Christopher and Susan is one of our best podcasts. They touch on technology, competition, and how we’ve come to the point when local communities are leading the charge to bring high-quality Internet access to their residents and businesses. Susan shares some of the stories she encountered — both favorable and not so favorable — of places where local leaders are either working to hard to put broadband infrastructure in place or barely moving the dial on getting their communities better connected.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainable Farming 60 mins – “One of the best-kept secrets in combating the climate crisis and the loss of biodiversity and agricultural productivity is a return to an agriculture model that sustained people and the planet prior to the age of industrial agriculture. The answer to the future of farming is to look to the past. Beginning from the modern sustainable agricultural and slow food movement, California’s early pioneers in organic farming have redefined the meaning of sustainability. The new models for an earth-friendly, food-healthy system have drawn from the teachings of Rudolf Steiner—noted scientist, philosopher and founder of the Waldorf School. Interestingly, he was instrumental in helping European farmers combat the rapid decline in seed fertility, crop vitality and animal health on their farms. Join fourth-generation winemaker Paul Dolan, former chairman of the Wine Institute and former president of Fetzer Vineyards, who led a transformation that put the company at the forefront of organic viticulture and sustainable business. Today, besides growing and making biodynamic wines, Dolan is a leader in redefining the farming system, with a focus on regenerative agriculture and biodynamic farming. Joining Dolan is Roots of Change (ROC) president Michael Dimock, an organizer and thought leader on food and farming systems. ROC develops and campaigns for smart, incentive-based food and farm policies that position agriculture and food enterprises as solutions to critical challenges of the 21st century. He is the host of the new podcast “Flipping the Table,” featuring honest conversations about food, farms and the future. Dimock serves on the boards of the UCLA Law School’s Resnick food law and policy program, Farm to Pantry, the Wild Farm Alliance and Sonoma Academy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Trump Investigation 76 mins – “Trump lashes out as investigators close in, Democrats introduce a Green New Deal, and former Mayor Mitch Landrieu joins Jon, Jon, Tommy, Dan, and Brittany Packnett live on stage in New Orleans.” At the link find the title, ““Who dat obstructing justice?” (LIVE in New Orleans), 10 Feb 2019” right-click “MEDIA ENCLOSURE: https://traffic.megaphone.fm/DGT9442139477.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the popup menu.

UC Berkeley Chancellor 74 mins – “It is not news that UC Berkeley is under continual financial pressure due to a challenging mix of increased enrollment, insufficient state funding and a tuition freeze. But by July 2019 Berkeley is expected to return to a balanced budget and financial health, and Chancellor Carol Christ is already looking to the future. Hear her discuss a new vision for undergraduate education that goes beyond the completion of assignments to immersion in the discovery and the creation of knowledge.  Christ’s signature Initiatives include: translating UCB’s research into inventions, governmental policies and services that advance the greater good; emphasizing research initiatives like Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, which span the old dividing lines between disciplines, departments and even institutions; supporting the exploding interest in data science across the full range of academic disciplines; implementing a new free speech policy that sustains a commitment to the First Amendment while supporting the campus community’s values and protecting Berkeley’s actual operations from unnecessary disruption; and promoting diversity as an essential element for a campus that seeks to embody and represent California and that needs to prepare students to succeed in a multicultural world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Uganda Orphanage Closure 27 mins – “Uganda is a country that has seen massive growth in the number of ‘orphanages’ providing homes to children, despite the number of orphans there decreasing. It is believed 80% of children now living in orphanages have at least one living parent. The majority of the hundreds of orphanages operating in Uganda are illegal, unregistered and now are in a fight with the government trying to shut them down. Dozens on the government’s list for closure are funded by overseas charities and church groups, many of which are based in the UK. With widespread concerns about abuse, trafficking and exploitation of children growing up in orphanages, are funders doing enough to make sure their donations are not doing more harm than good?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is also included in the blog archive.

Walls Discussion 66 mins – “Even with just a two-word title, John Lanchester’s newest novel, The Wall, evokes the political divisiveness our time. In this dystopian future, current political issues are taken to their logical extremes: issues of mass immigration (and populist reactions against it) are cast as symptoms of the ultimate problem of climate change. Lanchester’s ability to merge reality with metaphor make the novel a poignant wake-up call in the context of global politics, which are often too shortsighted. Join us with moderator Michael Lewis, best-selling author of Moneyball and The Big Short, for a witty back-and-forth between two authors who both have a knack for understanding some of the largest political issues of our time—and, more important, know how to communicate them in an effective and engaging way.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Water In California 60 mins – “For most Americans, water will be the primary delivery system through which they personally experience the effects of climate changes: drought, floods, storm water and wastewater discharges. Horror stories abound about the massive infrastructure costs needed to address these potential catastrophic issues. But the reality is that we have solutions that are both environmentally sustainable and affordable. Our speaker will explore new options to finance and scale investments for localized consumer and neighborhood created strategies that ensure a resilient future for water flow. These options should be capable of providing safe, clean reliable water for everyone.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 391 – May 17, 2019: Aging Successfully, American Leadership Declines, Ancient Grain, Andrew McCabe Interview, Artificial Intelligence, Asian Ascendancy, Better Building Challenge, Blockchain and Honesty, Botswana, California Workforce, Calorie Death, Cancer Tests, Capital Punishment Technique, Carbon Neutral California, Climate Change Solutions, Climate Restoration, Climate Warming Questions, Decriminalizing Sex Work, Electronic Deleterious Effects, End of Life Care, End of the World, Facebook Catastrophe, Farming to Save Earth, Federal Reserve Politics, Female Bravery, Food Fitness, Food Shortages, Hearing Loss Impact, Heart Muscle Regeneration, Home Care, Homeless in San Francisco, Influenza Vaccines, Journalism Business Problems, Lead in NJ Water, Longevity Explorer, Lynching in Alabama, Marshall Plan Discussion, MASH Actors, Medicare Primer, Parkinson’s Treatment, Poaching, Productivity, Public Defender, Refugee Help, Rehabilitate Prisoners, Robot Homicide, Robots in Stores, Shanghai

Exercise your ears: the 86 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 801 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,200) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Aging Research 67 mins – “In How to Live Forever, Encore.org founder and CEO Marc Freedman tells the story of his thirty-year quest to answer some of contemporary life’s most urgent questions: With so many living so much longer, what is the meaning of the increasing years beyond 50? How can a society with more older people than younger ones thrive? How do we find happiness when we know life is long and time is short?  In his new book, Freedman finds insights by exploring purpose and generativity, digging into the drive for longevity and the perils of age segregation, and talking to social innovators across the globe bringing the generations together for mutual benefit. He finds wisdom in stories from young and old, featuring ordinary people and icons such as jazz great Clark Terry and basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.   But the answers also come from stories of Freedman’s own mentors—a sawmill worker turned surrogate grandparent, a university administrator who served as Einstein’s driver, a cabinet secretary who won the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and the gym teacher who was Freedman’s father. You can read more about Freedman views on the power of intergenerational relationships hereHow to Live Forever is a deeply personal call to find fulfillment and happiness in our longer lives by connecting with the next generation and forging a legacy of love that lives beyond us. Freedman will discuss his new book at the beautiful Buck Institute, an organization dedicated to helping people live better longer. It is a special event you won’t want to miss.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Aging Successfully 62 mins – “BS 154 is an interview with Dr. Alan Castel, author of Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging. In the past we have discussed how our brain changes as we age, but it turns out successful aging requires more than “good genes.” Our attitudes and our behaviors have a huge impact. More importantly, it is never too early to begin preparing for successful aging.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America Withdrawal from Leadership 70 mins – “The United States was once the hope of the world, a beacon of freedom and the defender of liberal democracy. Nations and peoples on all continents looked to America to stand up for the values that created the western world and to oppose autocracy and repression. Even when America did not live up to its ideals, it still recognized their importance at home and abroad. But as Bernard-Henri Lévy lays bare in his powerful and disturbing analysis of the world today, America is retreating from its traditional leadership role, and in its place have come five ambitious powers, former empires eager to assert their primacy and influence. Lévy shows how these five powers―Russia, China, Turkey, Iran and Sunni radical Islamism―are taking steps to undermine the liberal values that have been a hallmark of western civilization. Please join us for a special talk with Bernard-Henri Lévy, one of the world’s leading intellectuals.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

American Leadership Declines 61 mins – “Authors Julio Moreno and Thomas O’Keefe debate the current state of U.S. hegemony in Latin America and the Caribbean, a region where the United States first made its appearance as a world power in the late 19th century. In his new book, Bush II, Obama, and the Decline of U.S. Hegemony in the Western Hemisphere, O’Keefe assets that U.S. economic dominance and leadership in the Americas has been in noticeable decline since the start of the 21st century. In his recent co-authored book, Beyond the Eagle’s Shadow, Moreno posits that even at its height during the Cold War, U.S. power and influence in the Western Hemisphere was often contested and never complete.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Ancient Grain 58 mins – “Grain by Grain tells the story of Bob Quinn, an organic farmer from Big Sandy, Montana. Quinn was raised with traditional farming methods but learned that organic farming could create better, healthier food and bring economic opportunity to his small town. He is the founder of the international company Kamut International and the leader in reviving that ancient grain. Ultimately, Quinn’s story shows the way to a better future for American agriculture, proving that rural America can lead sustainability.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Andrew McCabe Interview 64 mins – “On March 16, 2018, just 26 hours before his scheduled retirement, FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe was fired by then Attorney General Jeff Sessions. President Donald Trump celebrated on Twitter, saying: “Andrew McCabe FIRED, a great day for the hard working men and women of the FBI – A great day for Democracy.” Now McCabe is telling his side of one of the most intriguing political episodes of 2018. In The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump, Andrew G. McCabe offers a dramatic and candid account of his career and an impassioned defense of the FBI’s agents and of the institution’s integrity and independence in protecting America and upholding our Constitution…” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Andrew Wheeler 52 mins – “Greg Dalton sits down for a rare interview with newly-confirmed U.S. EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler on cars, coal, and climate. Mary Nichols, Chair of the California Air Resources Board, responds to Wheeler’s position on vehicle standards, and discusses her agency’s role leading a group of states in contesting the Trump administration’s revised auto emissions rules. Also featuring Albert Cheung of Bloomberg New Energy Finance on the future of personal mobility, and Helen Clarkson of The Climate Group on getting some of the world’s biggest companies to commit to 100% renewable energy.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Artificial Intelligence 62 mins – “BS 155 is an interview with neuroscientist Paul Middlebrooks, host of the Brain-Inspired podcast. We explore the main theme of his show, which is the intersection between neuroscience and artificial intelligence (AI). We explore topics such as Deep Learning and the challenges of interdisciplinary science. Neural nets and other forms of AI may be inspired by real neurons, but they are actually very different. On the other hand the scientists working AI have developed techniques for dealing with large amounts of data. These techniques have potential for dealing with the large amounts of data now being generated in neuroscience. One large challenge is that both fields have their own jargon and it is not easy to be competent in both fields. That is why I appreciate Paul Middlebrooks effort to make Artificial Intelligence more accessible for those of us who are interested in neuroscience.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asian Ascendancy 67 mins – “Parag Khanna says there is no more important region of the world for us to better understand than Asia, and thus, we cannot afford to keep getting Asia so wrong. He says Asia’s complexity has led to common misdiagnoses, namely that western thinking on Asia conflates the entire region with China, predicts imminent World War III around every corner and regularly forecasts debt-driven collapse for the region’s major economies. Khanna says that, in reality, the region is experiencing a confident new wave of growth led by younger societies from India to the Philippines, that nationalist leaders have put aside territorial disputes in favor of integration, and today’s infrastructure investments are the platform for the next generation of digital innovation. Khanna asserts that in the 19th century, the world was Europeanized; in the 20th century, it was Americanized; and now, in the 21st century, the world is being Asianized. He says far greater than just China, the new Asian system taking shape is a multi-civilizational order spanning from Saudi Arabia to Japan, Russia to Australia, Turkey to Indonesia—linking five billion people through trade, finance, infrastructure and diplomatic networks that together represent 40 percent of global GDP. Khanna says Asia is rapidly returning to the centuries-old patterns of commerce, conflict and cultural exchange that thrived long before European colonialism and American dominance. He will detail his view that as Asia determines its own future, it will determine ours as well…” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Better Building Challenge 58 mins – “On March 26, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Better Buildings Challenge visited Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD)’s Showcase Project Santee Education Complex, to recognize LAUSD for the energy productivity advances made in its schools. Better Buildings Partner LAUSD opened the 338,000-square-foot Santee Education Complex in July 2005 as the first new four-year high school for the Los Angeles Unified School District in more than 35 years. Santee is on schedule to achieve 30% annual energy savings this year. As a result of these upgrades, the school expects to achieve a 23% annual cost savings, equal to more than $195,000 yearly. Tune in as we speak with Maria T. Vargas, Director of the Better Buildings Challenge at the Department of Energy, and Christos Chrysiliou, Director of Architectural & Engineering Services at LAUSD.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain and Honesty 12 mins – “From big banks to diamond dealers, companies are experimenting with blockchain, an open and distributed ledger, to make transactions more transparent and trustworthy. Could this technology mean the end of cooked books?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Botswana 62 mins – “From the Okavango Delta to the Central Kalahari Game Reserve, Botswana draws in wildlife and nature lovers from around the world. It also has one of Africa’s fastest-growing economies and a highly advanced banking system. It has had a democratic government for over 50 years. Charles Frankel and Graham Johansson discuss what draws people to Botswana and the factors that contribute to the country’s success relative to the rest of Africa.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

California Employment Issues 69 minsCalifornia’s powerhouse economy, the fifth largest in the world, relies on a skilled, healthy and available workforce. Yet employers say that job candidates often lack the skills they need—and they cannot grow as a result. Meanwhile, many workers make low wages that are stagnant, despite ever higher living costs. Often workers lack access to quality job training and are increasingly shut out of California’s middle class. As one of the state’s largest philanthropic funders, with $2.3 billion in assets and annual grantmaking of nearly $100 million, The James Irvine Foundation envisions a California where all low-income workers have the power to advance economically. The foundation recently commissioned a survey of California workers, finding that nearly half are struggling with poverty.  Join business and community leaders for a discussion of the California workforce and how to increase the skills, qualifications and well-being of employees in ways to benefit individuals, their families, their employers and the California economy—ultimately restoring the state’s vibrant middle class.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

California Workforce 69 mins – “California’s powerhouse economy, the fifth largest in the world, relies on a skilled, healthy and available workforce. Yet employers say that job candidates often lack the skills they need—and they cannot grow as a result. Meanwhile, many workers make low wages that are stagnant, despite ever higher living costs. Often workers lack access to quality job training and are increasingly shut out of California’s middle class. As one of the state’s largest philanthropic funders, with $2.3 billion in assets and annual grantmaking of nearly $100 million, The James Irvine Foundation envisions a California where all low-income workers have the power to advance economically. The foundation recently commissioned a survey of California workers, finding that nearly half are struggling with poverty.  Join business and community leaders for a discussion of the California workforce and how to increase the skills, qualifications and well-being of employees in ways to benefit individuals, their families, their employers and the California economy—ultimately restoring the state’s vibrant middle class.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

Calorie Death 47 mins – “Not all calories are the same, so why are we still using them as the measure for nutrition?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian View of Britain 28 mins – “Neil MacGregor visits different countries to talk to leading political, business and cultural figures to find out how they, as individuals and as members of their broader communities, see Britain. In Canada, Neil hears from French-Canadian film director, Denys Arcand; writer and Booker Prize nominee, Madeleine Thien; and Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs, Chrystia Freeland.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Cancer Tests 16 mins – “Associate Professor Judy Kirk is an oncologist and Head of the Familial Cancer Service at Westmead Hospital in Sydney. She discusses genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancers, and issues a caution for physicians ordering them.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capital Punishment Technique 20 mins – “After finding out about a distant forebear’s execution, J Robert Sneyd acted as an expert witness in a US court to try to prevent the use of a new drug for lethal injection, appalled that untrained government workers were using lifesaving drugs to kill ” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Carbon Neutral California 51 mins – “Just 10 years ago, an entire state running on 100 percent renewable electricity was considered fanciful. But this dreamy vision became reality when, with the backing of big utilities, California committed to 100 percent use of zero-carbon electricity by 2045. The stakes were raised even higher with a statewide pledge to go carbon neutral by 2045. What will it take for California to achieve such a feat? What are the impacts on the fuel and transportation industries? Will Governor Gavin Newsom embrace climate initiatives started by former Governor Jerry Brown? Join us for a discussion on California’s surprise gambit to take the world’s fifth largest economy to net zero with John Hofmeister, former president of Shell Oil; Bob Holycross, global director of Sustainability and Vehicle Environmental Matters at Ford Motor Company; and Mary Nichols, chair of the California Air Resources Board.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Climate Change 49 mins – “Join us in presenting Katharine Hayhoe with the eighth annual Stephen Schneider award. Established in honor of Stephen Henry Schneider, one of the founding fathers of climatology who died suddenly in 2010, the $15,000 award recognizes a natural or social scientist who has made extraordinary scientific contributions and communicated that knowledge to a broad public in a clear and compelling fashion. “For many years, Katharine Hayhoe has been a unique voice in the climate communication world. With her patience, her empathy and her abiding Christian faith, she has been able to reach audiences that other climate scientists have not been able to reach,” says juror Naomi Oreskes, professor of the history of science at Harvard University. Hayhoe will be joined by fellow scientist Noah Diffenbaugh, professor and senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford University. They will be in conversation on communicating climate change in a transparent, engaging and accessible manner.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Climate Change Solutions 50 mins – “When it comes to cutting emissions, there are many paths to success. Sweden, France, South Korea and Ontario have all taken steps to replace fossil fuels with nuclear, hydro and renewable energy. Norway has ambitions to swap its dependence on oil for clean energy in relatively short order. China is expanding electric car and battery production in an effort to stake out leadership in 21st century industries. But the absence of U.S. climate leadership is causing heads of state to ease off their goals. In France, violent protests against higher diesel taxes are casting a shadow over efforts to raise the price of fossil fuels to combat climate change. Join us for a discussion about who’s moving ahead and who’s moving backward in the transition to a clean energy economy.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Climate Philanthropy 49 mins -”Donor Power: The Influence of Climate Philanthropy” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Climate Restoration 49 mins – “Peter Fiekowsky founded Healthy Climate Alliance with the intention of restoring the climate to its preindustrial climate health. He hopes to accelerate an emerging array of innovations to reduce the level of carbon in the atmosphere and to preserve and rebuild Arctic ice. While reducing emissions is important, he promotes climate restoration as both possible and essential—a strategic business strategy. The Silicon Valley tech entrepreneur and physicist runs the Healthy Climate Alliance along with his daughter Erica Dodds, executive director. They will point to profit-making enterprises that are sequestering carbon into building materials and pragmatic other land- and ocean-based technologies for restoring our climate. They will highlight and share with the audience an understanding of how companies and individuals can take strides to implement change for a healthier climate, their mission to restore the climate by reducing atmospheric CO2 levels to 300 parts per million and, thus, “giving our children a healthy climate like our grandparents had.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Climate Warming Questions 49 mins – “The world is warming, so why is the Midwest suffering record cold temperatures? How is global warming impacting oceans? What’s the connection between wildfires and climate change? Climate science is complex, vast and often difficult to understand. We’ll explain the fundamental basics you’ll need to answer friends and family who ask about climate change—or question if it’s even happening. Join us for climate science 101 with climate communications guru David Fenton and science experts Ben Santer and Katharine Mach, who will debunk common myths that arise from distortions of accepted science.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Czechoslovakia 67 mins – “When Norman Eisen moved into the U.S. ambassador’s residence in Prague and returned to the land his mother had fled after the Holocaust, he was startled to discover swastikas hidden beneath the furniture in his new home. These symbols of Nazi Germany were remnants of the residence’s forgotten history, and evidence that we never live far from the past. Looking into the building’s history, Eisen discovered a remarkable story stretching back over 100 years. In his new book, The Last Palace, Eisen tells a captivating tale of the upheavals that transformed Europe over the past century and of four remarkable people who have called the ambassador’s residence home. Otto Petschek, an optimistic Jewish financial baron who built the palace, and Shirley Temple Black, famed child star and U.S. ambassador, both lived there. Eisen dives into the personal and political history that shaped both a country and a continent. Join us for a conversation about history, diplomacy and the triumph of liberal democracy in the face of tragedy and dictatorship.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Decriminalizing Sex Work 59 mins – “…James Burch is St. James Infirmary’s policy and advocacy officer. He began his work at the Southern Center for Human Rights where he investigated human rights conditions in Georgia and Alabama’s prisons, jails, and court systems. He studied civil rights law at the Georgetown University Law Center. Burch clerked briefly at the ACLU of Southern California before moving to the Bay Area. In the Bay, Burch organized with the Frisco 500 before joining APTP and assuming the role of policy coordinator. He joined St. James Infirmary in January of 2019. Toni Newman is the executive director of St. James Infirmary in San Francisco. St. James Infirmary is a peer-based occupational health and safety clinic located in San Francisco, CA, offering free, compassionate, and non-judgmental health care and social services for former and current sex industry workers. Newman is a 1985 graduate of Wake Forest University and current candidate for her Juris of Doctorate (JD). Additionally, she is a best selling author, noted for I Rise—The Transformation of Toni Newman, released in 2011…” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Electronics Deleterious Effects 51 mins – “What does it take to get people off their phones and into the outdoors? Research has shown the deleterious effects of electronics on weight, sleep and cognitive development in children, who in 2018 spent nearly four hours a day glued to their screens. Other barriers such as income and proximity to nature make access to the outdoors extremely challenging for some families. Meanwhile, doctors have started prescribing hikes over medications, and terms such as “forest schools” and “unstructured playtime” are new buzzwords. When it comes to climate, an understanding and appreciation of the natural world is vital to comprehending the dramatic changes happening to our planet. So how do we encourage outdoor curiosity and conservation in a generation raised on screen time? Can phones and video games help facilitate engagement with nature?” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Empathy 39 mins – “Perhaps you’ve had experiences at work or your community where, while helping someone in crisis, you found yourself overextended. Or maybe you’ve seen an opportunity to help someone in the past and held back because it felt to risky or dangerous. How do you typically engage in relationships? How does your engagement shift when you are in a professional role? How does a challenging situation or crisis impact how you engage? Sustaining empathy requires attention. Awareness of how you engage in challenging times can become your superpower. Come learn the empathy rising framework for showing up in challenging situations and leave with tips for sustaining yourself while on empathy adventures.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

End of Life Care 59 mins – “Growing up as an American-born daughter of immigrant parents, Dr. Sunita Puri always tried to live up to her parents’ expectations and the examples they set. While completing medical school at UCSF, a troubling issue seemed to arise. Between her mother’s experiences as an anesthesiologist and her own conversations with her family about their faith, the disconnect between the traditional medical objective of lengthening life at any cost and her family’s spiritual teachings became more and more apparent. It was this tension that ultimately drew her to palliative medicine, a practice that aims not to simply extend life, but to improve its quality, especially in patients living with fatal illnesses. In her new book, Dr. Puri recounts the most instructive—and often heart-wrenching—stories she has experienced in this line of medicine, intertwining them with the childhood memories of her family that have shaped who she is today. The lessons are not black and white but nuanced in ways that medicine often isn’t. When the only remaining treatment options have the possibility to extend life, but come with severe side effects, how does a physician have an honest conversation with the patient and their family about the “pros” and “cons” of their choices?…” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

End of the World 56 mins – “The End of the World, in collaboration with HowStuffWorks, was one of the best new podcasts of 2018! The podcast is hosted by Josh Clark, co-host of the award-winning podcast Stuff You Should Know, and presented by iHeartMedia. On the show, Josh discusses the existential risks humankind faces and how new technology seeks to address them. He is joined by a number of experts across the podcast’s ten episodes, from astrobiologists to philosophers to economists and transhumanists. All ten episodes are available on Audible, iTunes, Spotify, and more. Clark’s compelling and insatiable curiosity will guide listeners through a dark debate around the astoundingly odd and unique nature of human intelligence and how that might either destroy or save the species. Tune in as we talk with Josh about what he has learned and his hopes for the future!” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Catastrophe 66 mins – “If you had told Bay Area technology investor Roger McNamee even three years ago that he would soon be devoting himself to stopping Facebook from destroying our democracy, he would have howled with laughter. He had mentored many tech leaders in his illustrious career, but few things had made him prouder, or had been better for his own bottom line, than helping Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of the world’s largest social network. Still a large shareholder in Zuckerberg’s creation, McNamee had every good reason to stay on the sidelines as the dark side of Facebook came to light. But he couldn’t stay quiet. McNamee’s new book, Zucked, is about the outspoken investor’s efforts to come to terms with the serious damage Facebook was doing to our society. McNamee set out to try to change the massive social network and other tech companies that use design tools to addict and manipulate its users. With the election of Donald Trump, and the emergence of one horrific piece of news after another about the malign ends to which the Facebook platform has been put, McNamee has dedicated his energies to have people understand the threat of Facebook and other social networks. He will discuss what we can do to hold the companies responsible and to protect our public health and political order.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Fair Trade Certification 56 mins – “On December 21, 2018, we spoke with Dana Geffner, Executive Director of the Fair World Project, about Fair Trade issues for cocoa farmers. On today’s episode, we will focus on: what is happening in the fair trade movement today that is exciting; how fair trade is relevant in today’s current political climate and is connected directly to current issues such as immigration; and how to make educated purchasing decisions.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming to Save Earth 60 mins – “One of the best-kept secrets in combating the climate crisis and the loss of biodiversity and agricultural productivity is a return to an agriculture model that sustained people and the planet prior to the age of industrial agriculture. The answer to the future of farming is to look to the past. Beginning from the modern sustainable agricultural and slow food movement, California’s early pioneers in organic farming have redefined the meaning of sustainability. The new models for an earth-friendly, food-healthy system have drawn from the teachings of Rudolf Steiner—noted scientist, philosopher and founder of the Waldorf School. Interestingly, he was instrumental in helping European farmers combat the rapid decline in seed fertility, crop vitality and animal health on their farms. Join fourth-generation winemaker Paul Dolan, former chairman of the Wine Institute and former president of Fetzer Vineyards, who led a transformation that put the company at the forefront of organic viticulture and sustainable business. Today, besides growing and making biodynamic wines, Dolan is a leader in redefining the farming system, with a focus on regenerative agriculture and biodynamic farming.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Federal Reserve Board Politics 46 mins – “President Trump wants his allies Stephen Moore and Herman Cain to join the Federal Reserve. Are politics and monetary policy on a collision course?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Bravery 56 mins – “How many of us go crazy trying to do it all, and do it all perfectly? How many obsess over tiny errors and avoid taking on big opportunities or challenges for fear of failing or embarrassing ourselves? Why is failure, big or small, not seen as a viable option for so many of us? Girls Who Code CEO Reshma Saujani’s popular TED Talk called for the need to teach bravery, not perfection, especially for women constantly finding themselves under enormous amounts of pressure to perform. In her new book, Brave, Not Perfect, Saujani asks us to rethink what our goals are supposed to look like and instead live life boldly, assuring us that it is more powerful to find something unexpected in the mistakes than it is to play it safe. Join us as Saujani offers stories from other brave women, shares best practices for making bravery the new standard for women across the country and details her own journey in getting there.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Food Fitness 59 mins – “This discussion about how to eat “The When Way” will not only present the science behind the optimal ways of eating based on your daily rhythms and changing circumstances but also offer easy-to-remember guidelines for how to adjust your diet to maximize the 24-hour cycle of life. Our speakers will explain why nutrition timing matters as well as what’s on the plate. The result: better health, weight loss and the ability to use food to prevent disease.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Food Shortages 58 mins – “10 BILLION – WHAT’S ON YOUR PLATE?, a new film by Valentin Thurn, and Winner of the Social Justice Award for Documentary at the Santa Barbara Film Festival. In 2050, the population of the world is set to hit a staggering 10 billion. This is a huge increase on today’s figure of seven billion, and according to a range of experts and the food industry, it will contribute to serious food shortages. In his search for solutions to this acute problem, filmmaker, bestselling author and self-proclaimed “food fighter” Valentin Thurn travels the world in search of ecologically and economically responsible alternatives to the mass means by which most of our food is currently produced. Tune in as we talk with Valentin on this episode!” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hearing Loss Impact 14 mins – “…there is a lot of other evidence that the use of hearing aids, or hearing, does mitigate against dementia, falls, and depression. We found in some of our studies of our Medicare supplemental population that hearing loss was a larger impact on quality of life than diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, any of the other common clinical conditions. Helen Keller, who was both blind and deaf said, “Blindness separates people from things, but hearing loss separates people from people.” At the link right-click “Download” (bottom of page) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Muscle Regeneration 15 mins – “The heart is one of the least regenerative organs in the human body — a big factor in making heart failure the number one killer worldwide. What if we could help heart muscle regenerate after injury? Physician and scientist Chuck Murry shares his groundbreaking research into using stem cells to grow new heart cells — an exciting step towards realizing the awesome promise of stem cells as medicine.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Home Care 56 mins – “New technology is constantly being developed for home care. What solutions work best, and how can technology successfully enhance the very personal side of home care? We will explore how to find the right balance between using and not using technology with home care. This technology may allow your aging parents and loved ones to remain safely at home.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Homeless in San Francisco 56 mins – “Every night, more than 130,000 people go to sleep homeless in California. An estimated 25,000 of them are in the San Francisco Bay Area: sleeping on couches, in cars or sometimes in tents on the sidewalk. At this point, people from coast to coast know that the Bay Area is in the midst of a housing crisis. But what is the city doing to address the affordable housing and homelessness crisis? Come hear from some of the Bay Area’s leading experts on issues surrounding homelessness. From working on the service and legal sides to fighting for policy changes to having experienced homelessness themselves, our speakers will discuss the state of the crisis, how we got here and where we’re headed next.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Housing in San Francisco 51 mins – “For the average income earner, obtaining a comfortable place to live seems out of reach. Some people travel great distances to get to their jobs. Others live in a crowded household in order to afford the rent or mortgage. Building more housing seems to be the logical goal, but where and what type? Join the conversation with Kristy Wang from the San Francisco Bay Area Planning and Urban Research Association (SPUR) and Laura Foote from YIMBY (Yes In My Back Yard), with Shelly Sutherland, a realtor at Compass, who will moderate the discussion.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Influenza Vaccines 16 mins – “Professor Kristine Macartney is Director of the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance. She talks about the two enhanced influenza vaccines now available for Australians over the age of 65 years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jerry Brown Interview 68 mins – “Join us for the first joint public appearance by the former governor and first lady since leaving office. Here’s a rare opportunity to hear their views on issues impacting the state, the United States and the world, in addition to learning about their unique relationship. Come for an engaging, unabashed and lively conversation, and bring your questions. Edmund G. “Jerry” Brown Jr. served four terms as California’s governor in addition to being the state’s attorney general and mayor of Oakland. He graduated from UC Berkeley and attended Yale Law School. His achievements include: eliminating the state’s multibillion dollar budget deficit, cutting the state’s unemployment rate to a record low, adding nearly three million new jobs, expanding health coverage, and enacting sweeping reforms in the areas of public safety, immigration, workers’ compensation, water, pension, education, housing and economic development. Under Brown, California also established nation-leading targets to protect the environment and fight climate change. Anne Gust Brown married Governor Brown in 2005 and served as unpaid special counsel to the governor. Gust Brown grew up in Michigan and graduated from Stanford University and the University of Michigan Law School. She previously served as general counsel and chief administrative officer at Gap Inc. and helped run a number of Governor Brown’s successful campaigns.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Journalism Business Problems 66 mins – “The news media is facing unprecedented crises: plummeting public trust and unrelenting attacks from the president of the United States. How do the “merchants of truth” navigate this new world? Jill Abramson worked as executive editor for The New York Times and offers an unparalleled view into the story of the news business, fighting for survival through a series of crises—first the digital revolution and then the president’s unprecedented war on the press. Abramson’s new book, Merchants of Truth, profiles four powerful news organizations as they grapple with upheaval: Buzzfeed and Vice, upstarts that captivated young audiences, and The New York Times and The Washington Post, two legacy papers that were slow to adapt to digital changes. Each struggled with crises in business, technology, resources and credibility.Abramson’s book focuses on the digital revolution and disruption of the news business, but the last sections of the book focus on fight for facts during a presidency whose war against journalists as “enemies of the people” has fueled public distrust of news sources. While the industry changes, the vital question remains: Can an informed press stand its ground?” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Lead in NJ Water 56 mins – “The levels of lead in Newark, New Jersey’s drinking water are some of the highest recently recorded by a large water system in the United States. Experts agree that there is no safe level of lead exposure. Pregnant women and children are most at risk: Even low lead levels are associated with serious, irreversible damage to developing brains and nervous systems. For years, the city has had the greatest number of lead-poisoned children in New Jersey. This likely stems from a variety of exposures to lead, including from contaminated tap water and other sources. Indeed, 2016 tests revealed 30 public schools with elevated water lead levels. Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), together with the Newark Education Workers Caucus, is fighting in court to ensure that the residents of Newark have access to safe, clean drinking water every time they turn on the tap.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Longevity Explorer 54 mins – “Richard Caro will describe the Longevity Explorers’ most recent explorations. The explorers are a unique sharing, evaluation and ideation community made up of older adults (in their 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s) and their friends, families and caregivers. The presentation will include promising products the explorers have tried, ideas the explorers have been discussing related to improving the quality of life for older adults and some ideas for products we wish someone would develop. The Longevity Explorers program is an initiative enabled by Tech-enhanced Life.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Lynching in Alabama 56 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy investigates the painful reality that succeeding in business is not always an advantage in America. In fact, if you were black in the Jim Crow South, it could get you killed. Elmore Bolling, a successful entrepreneur, was lynched in Lowndes County, Alabama in 1947 when his youngest daughter, Josephine Bolling McCall, was five years old. Over 70 years later, Bolling is now honored in the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, which opened in Montgomery last year. In her book, The Penalty for Success, McCall tells the story of her father’s murder and the impact it had—and still has—on her family and her community. She offers a revealing narrative that challenges us to rethink the reality of life for both blacks and whites in the rural South during Jim Crow, where whites used lynching to destroy competition from black business owners as part of a pattern of racial violence that terrorized African-Americans for generations and has yet to be adequately addressed in America.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

M*A*S*H Actors 68 mins – “M*A*S*H is the most beloved and one of the most watched TV shows of all time. It set viewing records that have never been broken and is ranked as one of the top 25 shows of all time. In this exclusive podcast, actors from this legendary show gather together for an uproarious and totally candid conversation about how they learned to connect with one another to create their special brand of entertainment on the screen and lifelong friendships off-camera. Join Alan Alda (“Capt.Benjamin Franklin “Hawkeye” Pierce”),Loretta Swit (“Maj. Margaret “Hot Lips” Houlihan”),Jamie Farr (“Sgt. Maxwell Q. “Max” Klinger),Mike Farrell (Capt. B. J. Hunnicutt), and Gary Burghoff (Cpl. Walter “Radar” O’Reilly) for this intimate gathering of your M*A*S*H pals. The gang invites you to share in the memories and the laughter. Mostly the laughter — after all this is the 4077th. This episode is sponsored by the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University, please visit aldacenter.org/vivid for more details.” At the link find the title, “The Actors from M*A*S*H — On How M*A*S*H Changed Our Lives, 02/05/2019,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marshall Plan Discussion 61 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy features author Benn Steil, winner of the 2018 American Academy of Diplomacy Douglas Dillon Prize for best book. Steil will discuss the gripping history behind the Marshall Plan. In the wake of World War II, with Britain’s empire collapsing and Stalin’s on the rise, U.S. officials under new Secretary of State George C. Marshall set out to reconstruct Western Europe as a bulwark against Communist authoritarianism. Their massive, costly and ambitious undertaking would confront Europeans and Americans alike with a vision at odds with their history and self-conceptions. In the process, they would drive the creation of NATO, the European Union and a Western identity that continues to shape world events.  Focusing on the critical years 1947 to 1949, Steil’s account brings to life the Prague Coup, the Berlin Blockade, the division of Germany, and Stalin’s determination to crush the Marshall Plan and undermine American power in Europe. As Putin’s Russia is again rattling the world order, the tenuous balance of power and uncertain order of the late 1940s is as relevant as ever.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Medical AI 62 mins – “One of America’s top doctors reveals how artificial intelligence (AI) will empower physicians and revolutionize patient care. Medicine has become inhuman to disastrous effect. The doctor–patient relationship—the heart of medicine—is broken: Doctors are too distracted and overwhelmed to truly connect with their patients, and medical errors and misdiagnoses abound. In his latest book, Deep Medicine, Topol reveals how AI can help. AI has the potential to transform everything doctors do, from note-taking and medical scans to diagnosis and treatment, greatly cutting down the cost of medicine and reducing human mortality. By freeing physicians from the tasks that interfere with human connection, AI will create space for the real healing that takes place between a doctor who can listen and a patient who needs to be heard.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive. 

Medicare Primer 60 mins – “If you are approaching the Medicare qualifying age of 65 and Medicare seems like one big alphabetical maze to you, you are not alone. For most, a true understanding of how Medicare works, what options are best for you, and when or how to sign up is not clear at all. Learn the ABC and Ds of Medicare as well as the realities of what to expect and what not to expect. Here’s what every boomer needs to know before they turn 65.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Montreal Protocol 10 mins – “The Montreal Protocol proved that the world could come together and take action on climate change. Thirty years after the world’s most successful environmental treaty was signed, atmospheric scientist Sean Davis examines the world we avoided when we banned chlorofluorocarbons — and shares lessons we can carry forward to address the climate crisis in our time.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Operation Hope 67 mins – “John Hope Bryant is an entrepreneur, author, advisor and one of the nation’s most recognized empowerment leaders. He is the founder, chairman and CEO of Operation Hope and the Bryant Group Companies and The Promise Homes Company, the largest for-profit minority-controlled owners of institutional-quality, single-family residential rental homes in the U.S. He is also one of the top-selling African-American business authors in America. Along with Crown Prince Haakon of Norway and Professor Pekka Himanen of Finland, Bryant is also a co-founder of Global Dignity. Global Dignity is affiliated with the Forum of Young Global Leaders and the World Economic Forum. In his new book, The Memo, Bryant argues that true power in this world comes from economic independence, but too many people don’t have enough money left at the end of the month. His message is simple: The supermajority of people who live in poverty, whom Bryant calls the invisible class, as well as millions in the struggling middle class, haven’t gotten “the memo”—until now. Come for an engaging discussion on achieving financial literacy and approaching wealth with a completely new attitude … and about how the path to liberation is hiding in plain sight.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Parkinson’s Treatment 22 mins – “Simon Lewis is professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Sydney’s Brain and Mind Centre. He discusses new ways of approaching the treatment and management of Parkinson disease.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poaching 68 mins – “Catherine Semcer of the Property and Environment Research Center (PERC) talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the role of incentives in preserving wildlife in Africa. The conversation discusses how allowing limited hunting of big game such as elephants and using revenue from hunting licenses to reward local communities for habitat stewardship has improved both habitat and wildlife populations while reducing poaching. Semcer draws on her experience as former Chief Operating Officer of Humanitarian Operations Protecting Elephants and also discusses recent efforts to re-locate lions in Mozambique.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Issues 70 mins – “Join us as we discuss the biggest, most controversial and sometimes the surprising political issues with expert commentary by panelists who are smart, are civil and have a good sense of humor. Our panelists will provide informative and engaging commentary on political and other major news, and we’ll have audience discussion of the week’s events and our live news quiz!” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Productivity 66 mins – “Stressed at work but can’t find time to de-stress and meditate? Need to be creative but running into mind blocks? Sidetracked by trivia instead of getting work done? Stanford’s Leah Weiss, author of How We Work: Live Your Purpose, Reclaim Your Sanity, and Embrace the Daily Grind, will show us how to sidetrack anxiety and enter a creative state even if we’re not feeling like it. She will provide other practical examples as well.  During this interactive session, we will learn how to integrate useful tools derived from mindfulness into our actual workdays. Come learn what Stanford’s Graduate School of Business is teaching about how to incorporate evidence-based meditation and mindfulness practices directly into the workday, reaping the benefits of improved productivity, creativity and happiness without having to set aside a special time or place. Weiss’ class at Stanford usually has a long waitlist, so sign up for this session before it sells out!” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Public Defender 56 mins – “Join us as Michelle Meow brings her long-running daily radio show to The Commonwealth Club one day each week. Meet fascinating—and often controversial—people discussing important issues of interest to the LGBTQ community, and have your questions ready. This week’s guest is Manohar Raju. Raju is the newly appointed public defender for San Francisco. Before being chosen by Mayor London Breed to succeed the late Jeff Adachi, Raju worked in the public defender’s office for 11 years, some of which he spent as director of training and then as felony manager. Previously he worked at the Contra Costa Public Defender’s Office. Raju did his undergraduate studies at Columbia University and earned his Master’s in South Asian studies from the University of California Berkeley. He also attended UC Berkeley for law school. He is a founding member of Public Defenders for Racial Justice.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Refugee Help 61 mins -”The Middle East member-led forum presents a distinguished panel, including: Hassan El-Masri, a Palestinian who volunteers to help refugee artists throughout the world; Karaman Mamand, a Kurdish Iraqi educator and human rights activist; Karen Ferguson, executive director of the northern California branch of the International Rescue Committee, which provides comprehensive services for refugees whose lives are shattered by conflict and disaster; and Aisha Wahab, who was recently elected to the Hayward City Council and is one of the first Afghan-American officials elected in the United States. The panel will discuss how we can help refugees and welcome the stranger in the face of war, strife, indifference and travel bans.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Rehabilitated Prisoner 57 mins – “Chris Wilson offers a fresh perspective on our criminal justice system, on crucial issues of mass incarceration and on the importance of second chances. Growing up in Washington, D.C., Wilson was surrounded by violence and despair. He feared for his life as his family was shattered by trauma, his neighborhood was beset by drugs and his friends died one by one. One night when he was 17, Wilson was cornered by two men. He shot one of them, killing him. A year later, at 18, he was sentenced to life in prison with no hope of parole. Wilson writes, “I just got on this planet. I don’t even have a mustache yet. And my life is over. But his life wasn’t over. Behind bars, Wilson began reading, working out and learning languages. He even started a business. He wrote a list of things he intended to accomplish. He called it his master plan. He revised it regularly and followed it religiously. And, in his 30s, Wilson did the impossible: He convinced a judge to reduce his sentence. Six years later, he came out of jail determined to teach others about the selflessness, work ethic and professional skills that led to his second chance.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Robot Homicide 53 mins – “A couple of years ago a cute little robot was sent out to hitchhike, to prove how well humans and robots could get on. It was an exercise in trust, and it went very wrong. Hitchbot was found decapitated, slumped next to some bins in Philadelphia. The robot’s head has never been found. Neither has the “killer”. Robots are machines, they are tools to help humans. But we seem unable to stop anthropomorphising them, and manifesting the worst of ourselves onto these machines we make ourselves, and increasingly in our likeness. We explore robot torture, and whether there is an ethical issue with harming a machine, other than damage to property. Does it display a lack of empathy in a person? We also explore the flipside – robots designed to do our worst – in war. There is a rising chorus of governments wanting to ban automated weapons or robots from the battlefield and we hear from the campaign to stop killer robots which argues that killing must never be automated. That seems obvious but does putting humans in control actually raise questions of its own? We also meet Norman—a psychopathic robot—and hear about what happens if the brains behind machines (AI) go bad, thanks to human programming. We meet a robotics maker who specialises in entertainment robots, but has been repeatedly asked to make assassins, and he explains how worrying the human robot relationship could be. We also take a resurrected Hitchbot for lunch, and ask what the robot’s story says about us all.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Robots in Stores 46 mins – “There are robots roaming the aisles of Walmart and other grocery stores. Monitoring inventory, cleaning up spills and potentially replacing workers. Automation is coming to a supermarket near you.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

San Francisco Mayor 66 mins – “Celebrate Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day with an intimate conversation with San Francisco Mayor London Breed. Following her election in 2018, Mayor Breed is the city’s first African-American female mayor and just the second woman to ever hold the office, elected during a historic year for women’s representation in local and national politics. The mayor has lived a life of public service. Prior to her election as District 5 supervisor in 2012 and her service as Board president from 2015–2018, she served as executive director of the African American Art and Culture Complex in the Western Addition for 10 years. She also served as a San Francisco Redevelopment Agency commissioner for five years and in 2010 was appointed by the then Mayor Gavin Newsom to be a San Francisco fire commissioner. Join INFORUM as we hear from Mayor Breed on the priorities for her administration, with a lens of economic justice, on the biggest issues of our day, including housing, criminal justice reform, education and public safety.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Shanghai 66 mins – “On the eve of the People’s Republic of China’s 70th anniversary, journalist and author Helen Zia discusses the desperate exodus out of that country’s biggest and most sophisticated city—a port so notorious that its name was synonymous with evildoing. Her new nonfiction book, Last Boat out of Shanghai: The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Fled Mao’s Revolution, is the first English language account of this mass flight, an event that mirrors the Jews and other intellectuals fleeing Berlin as Hitler came to power and the frantic rush for evacuees to enter the American embassy as Saigon fell. This is the history of a generation of Chinese intellectuals dispersed throughout the world. The story remained untold, even in China, until Zia interviewed more than 100 survivors of this late 1940s and early 1950s exodus. Many endured great hardship and nativist hostility, including the McCarthy inquisition in the United States, as they tried to find safety for themselves and their families. Their offspring include Maya Lin, I.M. Pei, Amy Tan, Steven Chu, Elaine Chao, David Henry Hwang, Chang-lin Tien, Gish Jen and many other notables. Zia’s first book, Asian-American Dreams: The Emergence of an American People, was a groundbreaking history of Asian-Americans in the United States.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Silicon City 68 mins – “San Francisco is changing at warp speed. Famously home to artists and activists, and known as the birthplace of the Beats, the Black Panthers and the LGBTQ movement, in recent decades the Bay Area has been reshaped by Silicon Valley, the engine of the new American economy. The richer the region gets, the more unequal and less diverse it becomes, and cracks in the city’s facade―rapid gentrification, an epidemic of evictions, rising crime, atrophied public institutions―have started to show. Inspired by Studs Terkel’s classic works of oral history, writer and filmmaker Cary McClelland spent several years interviewing people at the epicenter of the recent change, including venture capitalists, coders, politicians, protesters as well as native sons and daughters to the city’s newest arrivals. The crisp and vivid stories of Silicon City’s diverse cast capture San Francisco as never before.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Silicon Valley Ethics 66 mins – “Is Silicon Valley at a breaking point? The power of technology has been called into question amid the growing number of data breaches, disinformation and lack of privacy. Kara Swisher reflects on what has brought Silicon Valley to this point, the ethical challenges facing tech companies and prognosis for the future.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Slave Trade Abolition in Britain 53 mins – “Michael Suarez is the director of the Rare Book School at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. A renowned historian, author and worldwide leader of rare book scholarship interests, he co-edited The Oxford Companion to the Book. Suarez will provide us with a compelling, richly illustrated description about how a group of printers were instrumental in making the antislavery movement happen in England. Their broadside engraving with an image diagramming human cargo on the Brookes, a slave ship, became a force for political change in the worldwide abolitionist movement.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Slavery in Canada 55 mins – “Why is it common knowledge that we saved runaway slaves from the United States, but few know that Africans and Indigenous peoples were bought, sold and exploited, right here? In the first of a two part series, contributor Kyle G. Brown asks how slavery was allowed to continue for some 200 years, and be one of the least talked-about aspects of our history. Part 1 of a 2-part series.” At the link find the title, “Canada’s slavery secret: The whitewashing of 200 years of enslavement,” right-click “Download Canada’s slavery secret: The whitewashing of 200 years of enslavementand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Lanterns 56 mins – “CleanChoice Energy, a renewable energy company that empowers people and businesses to cut emissions and live cleaner lives, has launched a new product to provide solar lanterns to families in need around the world. For every customer that makes the switch to clean energy through the Clean Lights Plan, CleanChoice Energy will send a solar lantern to families in need. An estimated 1.1 billion people – 14% of the global population – do not have access to electricity according to the International Energy Agency. Tune in as we talk with Kate Colarulli, VP, Retention Marketing and PR for CleanChoice Energy about this program and many more offered by the company.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainable Future 66 mins – “The free market, limited government development model has been an ecological and social disaster for the developing world. Sustainable and equitable development is possible only with the active involvement of a strong central state that can guide the economy, protect the environment and prioritize meeting its people’s basic needs. In his latest book, The Sustainable State, Chandran Nair shows that the market-dominated model followed by the industrialized West is simply not scalable. The United States alone, with less than 5 percent of the world’s population, consumes nearly a quarter of its resources. If countries in Asia, where 60 percent of the world’s population lives, try to follow the western lead, the results will be calamitous. Instead, Nair argues that development must be directed by a state that is willing and able to intervene in the economy. Corporations, which demand ever-expanding consumption, need to be directed toward meeting societal needs or otherwise restrained, not unleashed. Development needs to be oriented toward the greatest good—clean drinking water for the many has to take precedence over swimming pools for the few. Nair provides three compelling case studies demonstrating the benefits of such strong state governance and the failings of weak state governance…” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Sustainable Schools 56 mins – “Sustainable Jersey for Schools is a free program available to all public schools in the Garden State that want to “go green” and conserve natural resources. The program offers training, grants and certification opportunities. The program was launched in 2014 and encompasses three vital components of sustainability: people – contribute to a strong civil society that provides opportunity for all; prosperity – support local economies and wise use of community resources; and planet – practice responsible environmental management and conservation. Tune in as we talk with the Sustainable Jersey for Schools Program Director, Heather McCall; Dr. Michael Salvatore, Superintendent of Long Branch Public Schools; and four educators in the Long Branch School District. ” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainable Seafood 59 mins – “The challenges facing American fishermen, ranging from declining quotas to disputed science to fleet consolidation, are highlighted in a new Netflix documentary series. Rotten, “travels deep into the heart of the food supply chain to reveal unsavory truths and expose hidden forces that shape what we eat.” The series’ sixth and final episode, “Cod is Dead,” focuses on the domestic seafood industry, and the business and regulatory climate that has made it increasingly difficult for fishermen to make a living. The episode interviews fishermen, scientists, environmentalists, and other stakeholders, with special emphasis placed on industry members in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Tune in as we talk about the issues raised in ‘Cod is Dead’ with Bob Vanasse, Executive Director of Saving Seafood.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technologies Ethical Boundaries 38 mins – “After several years in the Silicon Valley “bubble,” Joe decided to step away.  Disconnect between life in the Valley and the world outside became his opportunity.  Joe Toscano formed a nonprofit called BEACON. BEACON stands for “Better Ethics and Consumer Outcomes Network.” It is a social innovation organization.  BEACON strives to connect the public to what is going on in the tech industry.  BEACON provides insights to policymakers in defining ethical boundaries of technology.   This tech insight equips them to address ethical concerns in a balanced way. BEACON works with technologists to create products that meet consumer demand and create positive social impact. Some tech leaders are content to leave it to regulators to define ethical boundaries of technology.  Through BEACON, Joe takes a holistic approach. Shaping ethical boundaries of technology has many factors to consider. The effect on the consumer, small business, local and global community as well as Big Tech must be in view.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, awlwxr “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Technology Impact on Kids 68 mins – “Everyone is looking down—but especially kids. There is something unnatural about a 15-month-old using an iPad to soothe him or herself. Many assume this is just the natural progression of our high-tech society. But what if this is causing us harm? And what if children are more vulnerable than adults? Numerous politicians are calling for reining in of the Internet. Is this necessary? Robert Lustig will answer five key questions: Is there such a thing as tech addiction? Is it similar to or different than drug addiction? Does technology lead to depression and suicide? Have our minds been hacked? Are children at more risk?  The answers to these questions will provide us with a blueprint to harnessing technology for good.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Technology Monopolies 67 mins – “What are the implications of a few massive firms controlling global industry? Tim Wu endeavors to answer this question by linking together big business, inequality and political extremism in his latest book, The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age. Wu argues the failure to curb excessive corporate power has led to greater tolerance of inequality and may even engender extreme populism, nationalism and fascism. Wu’s argument concludes that excessive corporate power poses a great threat to the health of American democracy, just as giant trusts did during the Gilded Age. Wu asserts that we must thus learn from the progressive policies of the past to overcome the consequences of extreme inequality today. Join us and learn from Wu as he discusses the problem of modern massive firms and what America can learn from its past.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Teen Vaping Ban 39 mins – “Illinois joins a growing list of states adopting “Tobacco 21” policies to combat teen vaping. Will it curb usage?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Think Resilience 56 mins – “Our guest today is Richard Heinberg, Senior Fellow-in-Residence at the Post Carbon Institute. We will discuss what our future climate might mean for us and how we can prepare for the coming changes. Richard is an American journalist and educator who has written extensively on energy, economic, and ecological issues, including oil depletion. He is the author of 13 books, and presently serves as the senior fellow at the Post Carbon Institute. Richard will draw on the extensive knowledge of the Institute and from his outstanding online video series, Think Resilience.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender Experience 57 mins – “Born in Hyderabad, India, blossomed in Toronto and living in Oakland, Rimi has been on the gender journey proudly with confidence and realness. She has performed at various South Asian queer events through dance forms and poetry, depicting the anguish and eventual liberation of her gender journey, transcending the paths of survival, rejection, isolation and stress. Rimi lives in Oakland, is working in a leadership role at Walmart.com, and leads PRIDE Associate Resource Group as well, driving inclusion for TGNC lives at workplace inclusion. While staying visible and present for TGNC, Rimi finds herself vulnerable and targeted at times. Rimi seeks to have the world to accept transgender identities as equals and as capable individuals for holding jobs, earning degrees, and having relationships and a dignified life.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Tuberculosis-Free World 28 mins – “A new Lancet Commission maps out priorities in diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and advocacy efforts to end tuberculosis by 2030. Detailed discussion with two of the Commissioners: Eric Goosby, UN Tuberculosis Special Envoy, and Paula Fujiwara from the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. The podcast is introduced by Liz Zuccala from The Lancet HIV.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Valerie Jarrett 46 mins – “Her road from Chicago to the White House — our conversation with Obama senior adviser Valerie Jarrett.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vegan Challenge City 56 mins – “Asheville, North Carolina declared the week of June 4-10 as the nation’s first “city-proclaimed” seven-day vegan challenge. Mayor Esther Manheimer signed a proclamation encouraging “all citizens, businesses and institutions to participate in the 7-Day Vegan Challenge to promote good health, Animal Justice, Social Justice, Environmental Justice and Climate Justice.” The challenge was organized by the City of Asheville, regional hospital, Mission Health, and no-kill shelter, Brother Wolf Animal Rescue. Tune in as we speak with Paul Berry, Executive Director for Brother Wolf about this unique event!” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water from Wilderness 61 mins – “A 100+ years ago, no one might have imagined putting a dam in a national park. But San Francisco did just that after the 1906 earthquake and fire. Building the O’Shaughnessy Dam was not easy. Some fought the process; others still want to see the dam dismantled. Yet, for more than a 100 years, the dam has been the water center for San Francisco and millions of Californians who rely on pure water and clean energy. But can our Hetch Hetchy water and energy systems survive a changing climate? Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Jim Yager will share his new documentary film, Water from the Wilderness, about the past, present and changing climates and times.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

World Politics 68 mins – “Retired Vice Admiral Charles W. Martoglio of the U.S. Navy will discuss America’s greatest security challenge of the 21st century, the increasingly competitive rivalry posed by China and Russia teaming against American interests at home and around the world. He’ll discuss the global security environment, how China and Russia are challenging America, internal challenges faced by Russia and China, and America’s way ahead to ensure its global position in this increasingly dynamic and competitive world.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

YMCA in Bay Area 66 mins – “Come for a gathering of San Francisco business leaders and philanthropists. They will discuss the importance of and need to give youth a voice, enabling them to make change happen in their own communities. The conversation will focus on the disparities that exist for our youth and families and how local entities are working to close the gap in health, education and access to the outdoors.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Young Activists 74 mins – “Gun violence. #BlackLivesMatter. Climate change. Voting rights. Despite a sense of alienation from civic engagement in today’s political atmosphere, young leaders continue to take up the charge across these and other critical issues, demanding a better future, wielding their votes and pushing the country forward to create change. In his book Generation Citizen: The Power of Youth in Our Politics, Scott Warren, co-founder and CEO of Generation Citizen, recounts his personal political awakening and the long and inspiring history of young people enacting significant political change in the United States, ranging from the civil rights movement to the Parkland students’ stance against gun violence. Since its founding in 2010 when Warren was a senior at Brown University, Generation Citizen has worked with more than 50,000 students across the country to engage them in politics as the next generation of future leaders through an innovative curriculum and hands-on opportunities to dig into the civic process, creating new channels for learning and capacity building to make a difference locally and nationally…” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 390 – May 10, 2019: Adoption Story, Affordable Care Act, Amazon Plane Crash, Antitrust Paradox, Assisted Dying, Barbara Walters, Basecamp CEO, Berry Gordy Jr, Bias and Perception, Big Data Balancing, Bill Browder, Black History Month, Blind Researcher, Blockchain Book, Blood Test for Cancer, Brain Stimulation, Bullet Journal Method, Caesarean Problem, Climate Exchange Impact, Conservation Killing, Depression and Cure, Disability Employment, Epilepsy Smart Watch, Evolutionary Biology, Exchange Traded Funds, Facebook and Cambridge Analytica, FBI Director McCabe, Forest Preservation and Waste Reduction, Guide Dog Attacks, HIV Upward Trend, Knee Replacement Rehabilitation, Lynchings, Measles and Anti-Vaccinations, Measles Outbreak Continues, Multitasking Slowly, National Security Overhaul, Nerve Blocks, Pharmaceutical Marketing, Positive News Stories, Rare Diseases, Safari Business, Sex Trafficking in U.S., Student-Centered Classrooms, Surveillance Capitalism, Teachers Graphic Novel, Terrorist Recruiting, Textile Waste, Twistronics, Vaping Age Limit, Venezuelan Crisis, White Nationalist Resurgence, Working Poor, Wounded Knee

Exercise your ears: the 83 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 751 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,200) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Adoption Story 46 mins – “When Nicole Chung looked in the mirror she saw a girl who didn’t look anything like her adoptive white parents. She tells the complicated story of transracial adoption in a new memoir.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Affordable Care Act 9 mins – “U.S. universal coverage can be achieved by expanding Medicaid in all states, increasing assistance for buying coverage in the marketplace, ensuring that people enroll in affordable coverage for which they’re eligible, and addressing coverage for undocumented immigrants. Interview with Dr. Matthew Fiedler on policies for extending coverage to the remaining uninsured populations in the United States.  Universal coverage can be achieved by expanding Medicaid in all states, increasing assistance for buying coverage in the marketplace, ensuring that people enroll in affordable coverage for which they’re eligible, and addressing coverage for” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Concerns 86 mins – “Futurist and author Amy Webb talks about her book, The Big Nine, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Webb observes that artificial intelligence is currently evolving in a handful of companies in the United States and China. She worries that innovation in the United States may lead to social changes that we may not ultimately like; in China, innovation may end up serving the geopolitical goals of the Chinese government with some uncomfortable foreign policy implications. Webb’s book is a reminder that artificial intelligence does not evolve in a vacuum–research and progress takes place in an institutional context. This is a wide-ranging conversation about the implications and possible futures of a world where artificial intelligence is increasingly part of our lives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcohol History 49 mins – “This week, we devote an entire hour to what one important scholar deemed “the cause of and solution to all of life’s problems.” From its earliest role as a source of nourishment to its depictions in ancient literature, we examine the roots of mankind’s everlasting drinking problems. Plus, how a bizarre 60 Minutes piece spread the idea that red wine has medicinal effects. Then, a look at how popular culture has incorrectly framed Alcoholics Anonymous as the best and only option for addiction recovery. And, a scientist cooks up a synthetic substitute for booze.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon Plane Crash 27 mins – “The dangers of flying in the great wilderness of the Brazilian rainforest. When a light aircraft carrying two families from a local Indian tribe disappeared over the Amazon in December, relatives scoured the rainforest for weeks until hunger and sickness forced them to give up. The Brazilian authorities ignored appeals for an official ground search – just as they’ve ignored appeals over many years to regulate local flights in the Amazon. Without air traffic control, pilots must fly clandestinely – making already-hazardous travel between the tiny landing strips even more dangerous. Now, Brazil has a new right-wing president, Jair Bolsonaro, who has spoken out against the communal rights of indigenous people – and, as Tim Whewell reports, tribal leaders fear the failure to find the missing plane may be a sign of growing official indifference to their needs. Producer in Brazil, Jessica Cruz.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Angela Davis 79 mins – “UCLA’s Black Alumni Association hosted a conversation with activist and author Angela Davis and rapper Common. They shared insights from their personal experiences in activism and standing up to injustices in society. Sports journalist Jemele Hill moderated the discussion in Los Angeles.” At the link you can listen and pay for a download; however, a copy of the podcast is also in the blog archive.  

Antitrust Paradox 24 mins – “This is the third episode in our series on antitrust law in America. Our first episodetold the story of Ida Tarbell and how her reporting on John D. Rockefeller and Standard Oil changed antitrust law in the early 1900s. Our second episode followed the turn that took place in the 1970s in response to Robert Bork’s Antitrust Paradox.For this episode, we’re looking at the present, and toward a future where markets may be dominated by tech giants like Facebook, Amazon, and Google. A new wave of antitrust thinkers is asking if the size and reach of these companies is a threat to competition, and ultimately to consumers. It’s the backlash to the backlash introduced by Robert Bork in the seventies, and a reassessment of the relationship between the government and business in the United States.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Assisted Dying 29 mins – “The Royal College of Physicians will survey all its members in February on this most controversial question. It says that it will move from opposition to neutrality on assisted dying unless 60% vote otherwise. The BMJ explores several conflicting views. From Canada, palliative care doctor Sandy Buchman explains why he sees medical aid in dying as a compassionate treatment that fully respects patient autonomy. The Canadian Medical Association is neutral on the issue, and Jeff Blackmer, its vice president for international health, shares how that stance enabled it to represent all its members, including doctors with conscientious objections. But many are unconvinced to say the least. Rob George, a UK palliative care doctor and professor at King’s College London, says assisted suicide has no place in medicine. Tony Baldwinson, from the UK campaign group Not Dead Yet, worries for disabled people were society to endorse doctors actively ending lives. And Zoe Fritz, a consultant physician in acute medicine at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, has a proposal that she says would protect the doctor-patient relationship. Read all our content at www.bmj.com/assisted-dying “Why I decided to provide assisted dying: it is truly patient centred care” by Sandy Buchman www.bmj.com/content/364/bmj.l412 “How the Canadian Medical Association found a third way to support all its members on assisted dying” by Jeff Blackmer www.bmj.com/content/364/bmj.l415 “Religious and non-religious people share objections to assisted suicide” by Mark Pickering blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2019/01/30/rel…-assisted-suicide/ “The courts should judge applications for assisted suicide, sparing the doctor-patient relationship” by Zoe Fritz blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2019/01/30/the…ient-relationship/At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Barbara Bush Book 49 mins – “The country knew Barbara Bush as the wife of one president, the mother of another. During her time as first lady, she became an unwavering advocate for literacy, and, for many years, was seen as the grand dame of the Republican Party. With her pearls and shock of white hair, she was dubbed “everyone’s grandmother,” and often kept silent on political issues, deferring publicly to her husband, George H.W. Bush. In a new book, Susan Page of USA Today peels back this public persona to reveal a complicated woman — and argues Barbara Bush’s influence on the country was far greater than anyone acknowledged. Diane talked to Susan about her book, “The Matriarch,” at a live event at Politics and Prose bookstore in Washington D.C.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however; a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Barbara Walters 32 mins – “Legendary journalist Barbara Walters is a 13-time Emmy award winner, an Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Hall of Famer and Lifetime Achievement Award recipient whose career is unrivaled. In this rare glimpse into Barbara’s personal journey, she details how she got her big break and describes her ascent, from being the first woman to co-anchor “The Today Show” to interviewing every president and first lady since Richard Nixon. She offers the most valuable lessons learned from her five decades in the business. Barbara also explains why she chose to step away from the Emmy-winning daytime show she created, “The View.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Basecamp CEO 61 mins – “Uncovering and explaining how our digital world is changing — and changing us. Some tech companies are worth billions of dollars. But the vast majority are not, and should stop raising money like they could be, says Basecamp CEO Jason Fried. “Raising a bunch of money, and raising way more than you need, it ends up stunting people’s actual growth as businesses. It destroys businesses,” Fried said on the latest episode of Recode Decode. “It’s like, look, you know, you plant a seed, it needs some water, but if you just pour a whole fucking bucket of water on it’s going to kill it.” Fried told Recode’s Kara Swisher that venture capital “kills more businesses than it helps” because the pressure to grow crazy-fast means companies keep raising money to keep their growth rate up. That, in turn, means they rarely have the opportunity to learn how to spend money in a disciplined, sustainable way. “If you have a bunch of money in the bank, you’re encouraged to spend it because no one ever … Well, I shouldn’t say no one, but hardly anyone ever goes for one round,” he said. “It’s round A, round B, it’s like, you’re going back to the drug dealer. “Lots of businesses could be great $10 million, $20 million businesses, but they’re not allowed to be,” he added. “[They’ve] got to be $200 million or $500 million or a billion … One of the reasons you get into entrepreneurship is to control your own destiny to some degree, to not have to go work for somebody else, to not have to collect a paycheck from somebody else. And so the thing is, when you go take money, you’re working for someone else again, instantly.” At the link left-click “Share” at the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Berry Gordy Jr 34 mins – “Berry Gordy Jr. forever changed the music scene with a new sound he called Motown Records. Under Berry’s guidance, the Motown record label pumped out #1 hits for The Jackson 5, The Temptations, Stevie Wonder, Diana Ross and the Supremes, the Four Tops and Smokey Robinson. Berry talks about his childhood growing up in Detroit, his love affair with Diana Ross and how he turned $800 and a small Detroit studio into Motown’s first headquarters.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beto O’Rourke 46 mins – “Oprah sits down with political hopeful Beto O’Rourke, who many say has emerged as a fresh voice for Americans who feel detached, divided and disillusioned in today’s political climate. Beto, who’s known for his successful grassroots political campaigns, became one of the youngest city council members to ever serve in El Paso, Texas. In 2012, he pulled off a political upset that landed him three terms in Congress. Then, Beto created big buzz on social media, galvanizing support across the country during his 2018 bid to unseat Texas Senator Ted Cruz. Although Beto narrowly lost that race, enthusiasm for him to run for President continues to swell. Beto says he’s weighing that decision with his wife, Amy, and their three children. “If we come to that same decision about this opportunity to serve and to run, then it will be on that we do together,” he says.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bias and Perception 52 mins – “How does bias distort our thinking, our listening, our beliefs… and even our search results? How can we fight it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas about the unconscious biases that shape us.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Data Balancing 37 mins – “Often cited as the “4th Industrial Revolution” big data has the potential to transform health and healthcare by drawing medical conclusions from new and exciting sources such as electronic health records, genomic databases, and even credit card activity. In this podcast you will hear from tech, healthcare, and regulatory experts on potential paths forward that balance privacy and consumer protections while fostering innovations that could benefit everyone in our society. This podcast was produced following a conference on this topic held in partnership between the NYU School of Medicine and the Academy. It was made possible with support from Johnson & Johnson.” At the link right-click “Download the Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bill Browder 69 mins – “Bill Browder talked about his experiences as one of the the largest foreign investors in Russia and his work to end worldwide human rights abuses. He was expelled in 2005 from Russia for exposing corruption, and President Putin has gone to Interpol numerous times in an effort to arrest him.” At the link you can listen/watch and pay for a download; however, a free copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Black History Month 21 mins – “This week, we’re celebrating Black History Month with special guest host R. Eric Thomas. We have two stories: Emily Richmond wrestles with a grade school survey; and Maxie Jones witnesses a historic night in Harlem, NY. R. Eric Thomas recorded this episode at the Sundance Film Festival with the help of the Sundance TV team in their pop-up podcast studio.” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Researcher 19 mins – “Dr Damion Corrigan wanted to be a medical doctor and when that seemed out of his reach, he took another route to working to improve medical testing. He says the field of science is opening up for prospective visually impaired scientists. Comedian Chris McCausland and actor Chloe Clarke debate whether it’s a realistic assertion that all visually impaired roles on TV, in film and on stage should be played by partially sighted actors.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bliss 54 mins – “Because moments of total, world-shaking bliss are not easy to come by. Maybe that’s what makes them feel so life-altering when they strike. And so worth chasing. This hour: stories of striving, grasping, tripping, and falling for happiness, perfection, and ideals.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Blockchain Book 15 mins – “What if the next big thing turned out to be the next everything? It would need to be a technology so powerful yet so pliable that it could find a place in every industry, any activity, and all manner of creativity. Blockchain is “The Next Everything” asserts Stephen P. Williams. His latest book offers an explanation in layman’s terms of how the technology works and even suggests reasons why so many people struggle to understand it. “What I find most exciting is that blockchain is a distributed technology, which is a new way of looking at the world,” Williams tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “We generally respond very well to top-down, hierarchical systems– president, father, mother, teacher, each telling us what to do,” he explains. “Blockchain technology allows for a distributed system where everyone who participates in the system has an equal say in how that system works. This presents huge potential for designing new ways of doing business, of creating, of communicating.”

Blood Test for Cancer 18 mins – “A blood test that could detect cancer earlier than current methods has long been a dream of oncologists. The hope is that these “liquid biopsies” could save countless lives by diagnosing cancer before symptoms show. They’re less invasive, quicker and easier than what is available now. However, this area of research has been plagued with hype. This happened most notably when a Silicon Valley startup – Theranos – allegedly duped investors out of hundreds of millions of pounds for the development of a blood test that would test a range of diseases, including cancer. Something that led to its founder being charged with criminal fraud. But Theranos is not the only product out there. And many others are showing real genuine promise. Nicola Davis explores the science of blood diagnostics with Prof Beverley Hunt, a haematologist working in central London and discusses how some “liquid biopsies” work with Prof Jacqui Shaw from the University of Leicester.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bloodlines 49 mins – “In using a genetic test to try to prove her Native ancestry, Senator Elizabeth Warren inadvertently stepped into a quagmire. This week, we examine the tensions around DNA and identity. Plus, after Jamal Khashoggi’s death, revisiting the trope of the so-called reformist Saudi royal. And, a look at what we can learn — and how we’ve tried to learn it — from twins, triplets and other multiple births.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bonds vs Stocks 42 mins – “1. If I need income from my investments, am I better off investing in stocks paying a good dividend rather than bonds? 2. Is a 60% stocks/40% bonds balanced fund better than a target date fund? 3. How does VBIAX (Vanguard Balanced Fund) compare to the 2 Funds for Life Strategy? 4. If I use M1, will the bid-ask spread cost of trading ETFs eat into my profits? 5. Will there be duplicate holdings if I use your ETF or mutual fund recommendations? 6. What is your favorite large-cap value ETF? 7. Why do you need so many ETF holdings in your best-in-class portfolio? 8. What are all the fees you have to pay if you use the M1 platform? 9. Where on your website do I find the symbols for all the ETFs you recommend in Portfolio #8? 10. How have listeners motivated young investors to learn the lessons from your website?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Border Walls 11 mins – “What is a border? It’s a line on a map, a place where cultures mix and merge in beautiful, sometimes violent and occasionally ridiculous ways. And a border wall? An overly simplistic response to that complexity, says architect Ronald Rael. In a moving, visual talk, Rael reimagines the physical barrier that divides the United States and Mexico — sharing satirical, serious works of art inspired by the borderlands and showing us the border we don’t see in the news. “There are not two sides defined by a wall. This is one landscape, divided,” Rael says.” At the link left-click “Share,” left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Download audio” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Stimulation 27 mins – The God helmet by Ian Woolf, Peter Simson-Young talks about personalising transcranial direct current stimulation using 3D printing. Produced and hosted by Ian Woolf” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Britain Assessment from Germany 27 mins – “Neil MacGregor visits different countries to talk to leading political, business and cultural figures to find out how they, as individuals and as members of their broader communities, see Britain. In Germany, Neil talks to Wolfgang Schäuble, the president of the Bundestag; TV host, writer and cultural commentator Thea Dorn; and Hartmut Dorgerloh, the new director of Berlin’s Humboldt Forum. As the UK prepares to place itself on the world stage as an independent power, he explores the relationship between Germany and Britain.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bullet Journal Method 44 mins – “Episode 64 of Books and Ideas is an interview with Ryder Carroll, author of The Bullet Journal Method: Track the Past, Order the Present, Design the Future. He describes how he developed this popular method that combines to-do lists and journaling. I have never featured a “self-help” like title before, but I decided to make an exception this month because I have found bullet journaling to be an effective method for organizing my complicated life.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Caesarean Problem 63 mins – “Obstetrician gynecologist Amy Tuteur and author of Push Back, talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Tuteur argues that natural parenting–the encouragement to women to give birth without epidurals or caesarians and to breastfeed–is bad for women’s health and has little or no benefit for their children.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Impact 12 mins – “Dr Liz Hanna is Honorary Senior Fellow at ANU’s Climate Change Institute. She talks about the evidence and impact of climate change in Australia. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Issues 54 mins – “Author Bill McKibben, the founder of 350.org, the first worldwide grassroots climate change organization, delivered the opening keynote address at a climate change conference at the University of California in Irvine.” At the link you can listen/watch and pay for a download; however, a free copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Conservation Killing 32 mins – “In Australia, conventional conservation wisdom has stated that in order to save the small indigenous mammals, it’s necessary to kill invasive predators. But is it?  Today on the show, we follow environmental writer Emma Marris as she explores the concept, and possible limits, of compassionate conservationism. Check out The Atlantic’s series, Life Up Close, where Emma Marris originally wrote about compassionate conservation.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included on the blog archive.

Construction Tips 14 mins – “As I go through my homebuilding process, I’ll be letting you know what I learn in my preconstruction and construction meetings and what tips I pick up on the job site from contractors. Last week I met with my architect and construction manager to clear up a few last details before sending plans off to more subcontractors for bids. Although my experience and my house will obviously be different from yours, I’m hoping what I learn through my process will help you with yours. So this week I have a short list of quick tips that I picked up in my meeting.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Copyright in Europe 45 mins – “The world of intellectual property law is no less divided than anywhere else we look. In 2019 – and in fact, since the dawn of the Digital Age – the Copyleft are constantly tilting at the forces of Copyright. Information wants to be free. Information wants to be expensive. Yet last summer, something remarkable happened. The European Parliament agreed – overwhelmingly, though after a very long period of lobbying and legislative horse-trading in Brussels and Strasbourg – to terms for the European Commission’s Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market. Nevertheless, Article 13 of the Directive – sometimes called the YouTube Tax – remains controversial, as it could require certain types of online services to take proactive steps to license copyrighted material or keep it off their services. It will take years to figure out what types of technologies or enforcement schemes for Article 13 may be acceptable or required in EU Member States. This week at the annual Copyright & Technology Conference in New York, a panel of European lawyers made a head start on predictions for the impact of Article 13 – in Europe and far beyond the EU. The law will apply of the country where I seek my protection,” Christiaan Alberdingk Thijm, an Amsterdam-based attorney told CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “So, if I am in the Netherlands and somebody in the US has uploaded my protected content on YouTube, but it violates my rights in the Netherlands, I can sue that person directly in the Netherlands for an act that is not, in itself, contrary to US copyright law.” At the link right-click Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Depression and Cure 49 mins – “Best-selling author, speaker and teacher Byron Katie shares how she believes we can end our own suffering forever. Katie, as she is known, guides us through her powerful process of inquiry she calls “The Work.” She says we can radically shift our stressful beliefs about our lives, other people and ourselves. Katie explains that all the problems in the world originate in our thinking and gives us the tools to open our minds and set ourselves free. Based on her own experience of how suffering is created and ended, Katie says her simple process is accessible to people of all ages and backgrounds and requires nothing more than a pen, paper and an open mind. Katie is the founder of “Byron Katie International,” an organization that includes The School for the Work and Turnaround House in Ojai, California. TIME magazine describes her as “a spiritual innovator for the 21st century.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disability Employment 52 mins – “Christine Griffin is a disability rights leader and search consultant at Bender Consulting Services, Inc.” At the link find the title, The Career of Disability Rights Leader Christine Griffin, 4/16/2019where you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Epilepsy Smart Watch 16 mins – “Every year worldwide, more than 50,000 otherwise healthy people with epilepsy suddenly die — a condition known as SUDEP. These deaths may be largely preventable, says AI researcher Rosalind Picard. Learn how Picard helped develop a cutting-edge smartwatch that can detect epileptic seizures as they occur and alert nearby loved ones in time to help.” At the link left-click “Share,” left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Download audio” from the pop-up menu.

Evolutionary Biology 59 mins – “Books and Ideas is back with an interview of Jonathan Losos, author of Improbable Destinies: Fate, Chance, and the Future of Evolution. This fascinating book reveals the surprising world of experimental evolutionary biology. We explore how experiments both in the laboratory and in the wild are answering long-standing questions about how evolution works.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exchange Traded Funds 58 mins – “In this special podcast Paul interviews Chris Pedersen about the 2019 changes to the Best-In-Class ETF Portfolio recommendations. This will be helpful to those who want to understand the details of how Chris made the decisions to select the best in each asset class, changing many from the previous year. The discussion includes comparing the long-term results of these recommendations  vs. Vanguard ETFs, as well as DFA mutual funds. To read the article and tables supporting Chris’ decision-making process, click here  His article also answers many of the most commonly asked questions regarding our Best-In-Class recommendations. • Click here to see the newly recommended ETF Portfolios. • To implement these portfolios using M1 Finance commission-free services, Click here.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook and Cambridge Analytica 53 mins – “Cambridge Analytica claims that, with the help of 50 million Facebook users’ data, it was able to target ads so specifically and so effectively that it helped swing the election for Donald Trump. The media have been more than happy to boost the claim, but many experts are skeptical. This week, a look at what exactly went on with Cambridge Analytica and whether we shouldn’t be focusing more on Facebook. Plus, how social media works to undermine free will and what the future might hold for Facebook.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-u menu.

FBI Direrctor McCabe 58 mins – “Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe discusses his career, the FBI, and his firing from the Bureau. He’s interviewed by [New York Times] reporter Adam Goldman.” At the link in the After Words section right click “Mar 2, 2019, Andrew McCabe, ‘The Threat’”, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forest Preservation and Waste Reduction 29 mins – “What can we do to be better citizens, better consumers and better advocates for the planet? Fighting waste and saving forests are a good place to start. This week on Sea Change Radio, we first talk to California Assembly member Ash Kalra about his new bill to save tropical forests. California may not have rainforests …” At the link find the title, “Ash Kalra + Stefan Kalb: Saving Food and Forests, 3/5/2019which can be heard but not downloaded; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Green New Deal 29 mins – “Back in the 1930s, when the US was in the midst of an economic crisis, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt enacted a set of policies to protect the people of the US from the worst ravages of poverty: it was called The New Deal. Our planet is currently in the midst of an environmental crisis. Some lawmakers in Washington D.C. are asserting that this crisis requires a set of policies no less deep or sweeping than FDR’s New Deal. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to political consultant Aaron Huertas to better understand the ins and outs of the initiative set forth by the progressive wing of the Democratic Party. We take a look at the history behind the idea, delve into some of the policy specifics, and consider how the two major political parties are responding to this Green New Deal.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guide Dog Attacks 19 mins – “In November of last year, Emily Brothers’ guide dog, Truffle, was attacked by two dogs in Sutton, South London. As a result of her injuries, Truffle was out of action for six weeks. Emily was unhappy with the support she received from Guide Dogs for the Blind Association. Reporter Dave Williams spoke to Emily at her home. John Carlin from GDBA responds. Also, we hear listeners’ feedback from the radio play, Blind School, which was broadcast on Radio 4 last Tuesday, and which we featured on In Touch on January 29. We also include your comments on the extended podcast from the same programme. And finally, also following feedback from a listener, we hear from Hugh Brasher on the London Marathon’s U-turn to award official medals to guide runners.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV Upward Trend 47 mins – “Southern states now make up the majority of new HIV diagnoses. We look at the political and structural reasons behind the increase, and at solutions.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ideology Extremist War 58 mins – “BKC Executive Director Urs Gasser speaks with Jason Farman, author of the book “Delayed Response: The Art of Waiting from the Ancient to the Instant World,” about how our communication media shape not only how we understand human intimacy and connection, but also how we learn and build knowledge about our world and the universe. For more info about this event visit: cyber.harvard.edu/events/2019-04-0…ion-jason-farmanAt the link right-click the three dots rectangle at the sound bar, right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet at 25 Years 21 mins – “March 12, marks the 30th anniversary of the World Wide Web. CERN, where in 1989, Tim Berners-Lee drafted his proposal for a way to link documents and data across the Internet, is celebrating the occasion, along with the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the World Wide Web Foundation. In 2014, when the Web turned 25, CCC’s Chris Kenneally spoke with journalist and author John Naughton about the ways that the Web has sparked an innovation revolution that has yet to run its course. “When people ask me, ‘What is the Internet?’ I say it’s a global machine for springing surprises. That’s really what it is,” says Naughton.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iranian Prisoner Story 59 mins – “The [Washington Post]’s Jason Rezaian discusses the 544 days he was held in an Iranian prison. He’s interviewed by Rep. Jared Huffman of California.” At the link in the After Words section right-click the title, “Jason Rezaian, “Prisoner” (Feb 23, 2019) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Island Territories 67 mins – “In 1903 the US Supreme Court refused to say that Isabel González was a citizen of the United States. Then again, they said, she wasn’t a exactly an immigrant either. And they said that the US territory of Puerto Rico, Isabel’s home, was “foreign to the United States in a domestic sense.” Since then, the US has cleared up at least some of the confusion about US territories and the status of people born in them. But, more than a hundred years later, there is still a US territory that has been left in limbo: American Samoa. It is the only place on earth that is US soil, but people who are born there are not automatically US citizens. When we visit American Samoa, we discover that there are some pretty surprising reasons why many American Samoans prefer it that way.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Knee Replacement Rehabilitation 12 mins – “Dr Chris Schilling is a health economist and associate director with KPMG Australia. He discusses the economics of inpatient rehabilitation following total knee replacement. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Kushner and Ivanka Trump Roles 58 mins – “Investigative reporter Vicky Ward reports on the careers of Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump and their roles in the Trump administration. She’s interviewed by former New York Observer Editor in Chief Elizabeth Spiers.” At the link in the After Words section right-click “After Words: Vicky Ward, “Kushner, Inc.,”‘ Apr 6, 2019 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lynchings 53 mins – “Nathan showcases some of BackStory’s best content about African American history in honor of Black History Month. In this episode, hear about one historian’s heartbreaking research into the human effects of lynching to the extraordinary story of Korla Pandit, the turban-wearing showman of California’s cocktail lounges. We’re also sharing a segment from “Scene On Radio” about the racial cleansing in Corbin, Kentucky that took place 100 years ago, but mostly remains hidden from the town’s official history. Note: This episode contains previously broadcast content. Historian Kidada Williams studies lynching. For years, she read accounts of lynching in newspapers and public documents. But how she thought about lynching victims changed when she discovered letters written by a man named Gainer Atkins. Atkins wrote the NAACP seeking justice for his son, Charlie, who was murdered by a mob in Davisboro, Georgia. Read some of the correspondence between Gainer Atkins and Walter White (provided by Kidada Williams).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Measles and Anti-Vaccinations 31 mins – “The U.S. declared measles eradicated in 2000 but refusal to vaccinate children among certain pockets of the population means the disease is resurging. Public health officials in this country say 10 states have reported cases in 2019 alone. Internationally, the World Health Organization recently named “vaccine hesitancy” as one of the top global threats of 2019. How do public health officials confront those opposed to vaccination? And why has the movement proved so resilient? Diane talks with Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blogs archive.

Measles Outbreak Continues 17 mins – “Measles cases mount in the Pacific Northwest, where vaccination rates are among the lowest in the nation. Now, lawmakers want to tighten some of those personal belief exemptions.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Power Trends 37 mins – “Change requires the application of power – the way in which individuals can accrue power has shifted in our digitally connected world. Traditional ways of influencing change in healthcare (getting the chief executive on side, having a quiet chat with the medical director) are not the only way to build a momentum. Henry Timms – author of “New Power” the internationally best selling book joins us to talk about about how much of his thinking on these power structures has come from healthcare.” At the link find the title, “Applying new power in medicine,” right-click “1 Apr 2019, Play Nowand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicinal Cannabis 24 mins – “Dr John Lawson is a paediatric neurologist at the Sydney Children’s Hospital. He discusses the evidence base for the use of cannabidiol as a treatment for paediatric epilepsy. With MJA news and online editor Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Mississippi Church Burning 54 mins – “Senator Doug Jones (D-AL) recounts his prosecution of two former KKK members involved in the 1963 Birmingham church bombing that killed four black girls. He’s interviewed by author and journalist Diane McWhorter.” At the link in the After Words section right-click “(Mar 9, 2019)Sen. Doug Jones, “Bending Toward Justice” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Multitasking Slowly 18 mins – “What can we learn from the world’s most enduringly creative people? They “slow-motion multitask,” actively juggling multiple projects and moving between topics as the mood strikes — without feeling hurried. Author Tim Harford shares how innovators like Einstein, Darwin, Twyla Tharp and Michael Crichton found their inspiration and productivity through cross-training their minds.” At the link right-click the three dots at the end of the sound bar, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Security Overhaul 57 mins – “Former Trump Administration strategist Sebastian Gorka offers his thoughts on how the U.S. can strengthen its national security. He’s interviewed by Amb. Paula Dobriansky, fmr. Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs in the Bush administration.” At the link in the After Words section find the title, “After Words: Sebastian Gorka, “Why We Fight”‘ (Jan 19, 2019) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nerve Blocks 19 mins – “This week, Jacob discusses all things TAP (Transversus Abdominus Plane) block with Arun Nagdev.  This block has previously been relegated mostly to post-surgical patients, but Arun explains to us why you should consider using this in your patients with certain types of abdominal pain, such as in patients with appendicitis.  Do not adjust your screens…This interview is pure audio! If you want to watch a video of the interview, check out our YouTube page.At the link right-click Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Access Issue 22 mins – “Among the global scholarly publishing community, open access is a well-established fact. A study appearing in February 2018 in the OA mega-journal PeerJ estimated that at least 28% of the scholarly literature is OA – some 19 million articles in total. The researchers also found that the OA proportion is rising, driven particularly by growth in Gold and Hybrid business models. The same study also corroborated the so-called “open-access citation advantage” – finding that OA articles receive 18% more citations than average, an effect driven primarily by Green and Hybrid OA. Mandates to authors and publishers from the Wellcome Trust as well as various governments have advanced the OA cause considerably – and raised many questions for all the key stakeholders in academia. Indeed, the evolving relationship of publishers and institutional libraries particularly faces critical challenges.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Palestine Occupation 82 mins – “Dr. Mamdouh Aker is a very big deal in Palestine, the kind of man everyone knows and respects, and it’s easy to see why.  He’s urology surgeon and the deputy chair of the Board of Trustees of Berzeit University in Palestine’s West Bank.  Among the founders of the Mandela Institute for Political Prisoners and the Independent Commission for Human Rights, Dr. Aker was also  a member of the Palestinian delegation to the Madrid Peace Conference and in the Palestinian-Israeli bilateral talks between 1991 and 1993. He’s also a member of several councils and committees focused on the health, education, and wellbeing of the Palestinian people.  During his visit to the Carver College of Medicine he spoke to our students and faculty about the state of Palestinian healthcare. He was generous with his time, as he also sat down with med students Shakoora Sabree, Ossama Habu-Halawa, Jordan Harbaugh-Williams, and Joelle Friezen to discuss the topic. Our discussion was near the anniversary of his 45-day ordeal in the custody of Israeli security forces in the early 1990s because of his outspoken views that his Palestinian patients were prevented from receiving adequate healthcare.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pharmaceutical Marketing 9 mins – “Though the Sackler family did not invent the practice of selling drugs to physicians, they were pioneers whose story illustrates the ways marketers developed, naturalized, and monetized the interface between the pharmaceutical industry and prescribing physicians. Interview with Dr. Scott Podolsky on the revolution in pharmaceutical marketing that set the stage for physician “education” about treating pain with opioids.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Positive News Stories 47 mins – “Does the 24/7 news cycle need a dose of positivity? We look at the push for coverage of good news.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rare Diseases 54 mins – “Each day in Canada, the government effectively puts a dollar value on people’s lives by deciding which medications to cover. The issues of coverage and cost are magnified exponentially when it comes to expensive drugs for rare diseases. On one side, we have the rights of sick people to access medicine; and on the other, companies saying they have a right to make profit. Can we resolve this challenge fairly without accepting the prospect that some Canadians are just too expensive to help?At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included on the blog archive.

Russian Foreign Policy 54 mins – “Georgetown University professor Angela Stent examines Russia’s foreign policy and international goals. She’s interviewed by Representative Dina Titus (D-NV), a member of the Foreign Affairs Committee.” At the link in the After Words section right-click “Angela Stent, “Putin’s World” (Mar 16, 2019) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Safari Business 22 mins – “This is an interview with my friend Jody Cole, founder of Wild African Rainbow Safaris. We explore how she built her business from the ground up based on her love of Sub-Saharan Africa. I think you will find her story inspiring.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Sex Trafficking in U.S. 48 mins – “Patriots owner Robert Kraft is one of dozens of people accused of soliciting prostitution from women allegedly held in “sexual servitude.” We look at human trafficking in the U.S.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student-Centered Classrooms 34 mins – “Brad Gustafson is a top educational leader. His new book, Reclaiming Our Calling: Hold on to the Heart, Mind, and Hope of Education, is causing waves in the educational community because of Brad’s passion for student-centered classrooms. This episode of the Bedley Bros is sponsored by Advancement Courses, 200+ graduate-level, self-paced, online professional development courses for teachers. Learn more at http://www.advancementcourses.com/bedley and use the special promo code BROS20 to receive a 20% discount.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Capitalism 64 mins – “Shoshana Zuboff, author of The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, talked about the growing business of collecting and selling consumer data. She was interviewed by Nilay Patel, editor-in-chief of The Verge.” At the link you can listen or purchase a download; however, an audio copy is also included in the blog archive.

Teachers Graphic Novel 29 mins – “Author, educator, innovator, and teacher of the year Josh Stumpenhorst has a new book out, Drawn to Teach. It’s a graphic novel for teachers! Scott and Tim talk to Josh about the book as well as other fun topics. This podcast is graciously sponsored by Advancement Courses, offeringover 200 online graduate-level PD courses in 19 different subject areas for K-12 teachers. Learn more at http://www.advancementcourses.com/bedley. Use coupon code BROS20 to receive 20% off. The Bedley Bros is also a huge fan of Empatico, connecting classrooms from around the world to build empathy. bit.ly/buildglobalempathy to sign your class up today! It’s all FREE!!” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teaching Simplified 31 mins – “One of education’s most popular authors and leaders, Angela Watson, shares ideas from her new book Fewer Things, Better: The Courage to Focus on What Matters Most. This episode of the Bedley Bros is sponsored by Advancement Courses, 200+ graduate-level, self-paced, online professional development courses for teachers. Learn more at http://www.advancementcourses.com/bedley and use the special promo code BROS20 to receive a 20% discount. Please write us a review to share your love of the Bedley Bros Podcast.” At the link rightD-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorist Recruiting 64 mins – “In her new book, How We Win, Farah Pandith, a world-leading expert and pioneer in countering violent extremism, lays out a comprehensive strategy for how we can defeat the growing extremist threat, once and for all. From technology companies and entrepreneurs to businesses in the private sector, she says, this is an all-encompassing global issue that we must address together. For more info about this event visit: cyber.harvard.edu/events/2019-03-2…on-farah-pandith” At the link right-click the three dots rectangle at the sound bar, right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Texas Politics 66 mins – “On the latest episode of Recode Decode, Backstage Capital founder Arlan Hamilton and Deeds Not Words founder Wendy Davis joined Recode’s Kara Swisher onstage to talk about being seen and heard in historically male-dominated fields; the current political climate in America; and how, sometimes at the urging of their own peers, women and people of color make apologies and accommodations for the people who discriminate against them. Hamilton recalled a story about a successful black woman in New York who she thought was going to invest in Backstage, but instead used a meeting to give her fashion counseling: She said, ‘First of all, I don’t need to see you in blue anymore. You’re never going to raise money if you don’t dress the part, if you don’t dress better, if you can’t wear what you’re wearing,’” Hamilton said. “And I do believe it was well-meaning because I feel like she felt she had to do the part … It just felt so wrong. And then about two blocks out I was like, ‘No way. That’s crazy.’ And it was literally two or three days later that Marc Andreessen invested in me for the first time.” Hamilton and Davis spoke with Swisher at South By Southwest earlier this month; last week, Hamilton stepped down as CEO of the incubator within her firm, Backstage Studio, to be replaced by general partner Christie Pitts. Davis previously appeared on Recode Decodeafter launching Deeds Not Words — a nonprofit working to get women “in the room” and/or elected to political office — and confirmed on this episode that she may run against Texas Sen. John Cornyn in 2020.” At the link left-click “Share” at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow on the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Textile Waste 34 mins – “When you’re a home sewer, you have the time to be economical about how you place and cut pattern pieces. But even so, you still end up with a lot of scraps. Zero waste design aims to make clothes that produce little to no waste. There’s no one way to do it. Some people like Timo Risannen try to design clothing that use a whole piece of fabric. If you’re used to making clothes from standard sewing patterns, these zero waste patterns can be a challenge to decipher.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included on the blog archive.

Trump Election Process 62 mins – “Victor Davis Hanson discusses the campaign, election, and presidency of Donald Trump. He’s interviewed by former Congressman Dave Brat (R-VA).” At the link in the After Words section right-click “After Words: Victor Davis Hanson, “The Case for Trump”‘ Mar23, 2019 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Twistronics 25 mins – “In this episode of Physics World Weekly we’re celebrating the Physics World 2018 Breakthrough of the Year. Announced today, the honour has gone to Pablo Jarillo-Herrero of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the US and colleagues for making the discovery that led to the development of “twistronics”. The researchers discovered Mott insulator behaviour in pristine bilayer graphene when the orientation of the two layers were twisted by a specific angle. Physics World journalists discuss the award-winning work, along with other 2018 research highlights across core physics, materials science, environment and energy research, as well as medical physics and biophysics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaping Age Limit 49 mins – “Illinois joins a growing list of states adopting “Tobacco 21” policies to combat teen vaping. Will it curb usage?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuelan Coup 69 mins – “Mike Prysner, from the Empire Files and the Eyes Left podcast, joins Breht to discuss the current coup attempt in Venezuela.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuelan Crisis 31 mins – “Opposition leaders hoped last weekend would loosen President Maduro’s grip on power. But international aid remains stuck at the border with the military preventing supplies from entering the country. U.S. Vice President Mike Pence traveled to Colombia this week to announce additional sanctions and to keep the pressure on the regime. In the meantime, the humanitarian crisis is dire and the way forward unclear.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

White Nationalism Resurgence 24 mins – “Most Americans are not familiar with the name Madison Grant. But in the early 20th century he was one of the most well-known members of an elite group of intellectuals and policy makers who promoted ideas of racial purity and white nationalism. He influenced restrictive immigration policy making in this country, and from his 1916 book “The Passing of the Great Race,” Grant’s views spread around the globe. In fact, Hitler considered the text as his “bible.” So who is Madison Grant and why don’t we know about him today? And what can this history teach us about the resurgence in white nationalism? Adam Serwer’s recent profile of Madison Grant looks into these questions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blogs archive.

Working Poor 55 mins – “Stephanie Land discusses her path from working as a maid to earning a journalism degree and later writing about the working poor. She is interviewed by Rachel Schneider, co-author of [The Financial Diaries].” At the link in the After Words section right-click “Stephanie Land, “Maid” (Jan 26, 2019) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wounded Knee 54 mins – “The massacre of over 150 Lakota at Wounded Knee in 1890 is often taken to be the “end” of Native American history — a notion unintentionally reinforced by Dee Brown’s groundbreaking 1970 book, I Buried My Heart at Wounded Knee. This idea of history as tragedy is something that Ojibwe writer David Treuer tries to undo in The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee. He argues that both before and after contact was made with colonizing Europeans, Indigenous peoples have always found ways to adapt, and that’s exactly what they’re doing now.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

WW II Manila Battle 64 mins – “Author James Scott described General Douglas MacArthur’s return to the Philippines during World War II, the Japanese resistance and the atrocities committed against the Filipino civilians. Mr. Scott is the author of “Rampage: MacArthur, Yamashita, and the Battle of Manila.” This talk was part of a three-day conference hosted by the National World War II Museum in New Orleans.” At the link you can listen, but have to pay to download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

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