Mining Digest 387 – Apr 19, 2019: Aging Research, Angry Women, Autism and Vaccines, Cambridge Analytica Defined, Canadian Cannabis Users at the Boarder, Carbon Tax Rebate, Citizens United Defined, Climate Change Problem, Climate Warming and Plant Stomata, Climate Warming Wildfires and Politics, Conspiracy Theory Discussion, Drought-related Stress, Electoral College Discussion, End of Life Care, Evolution, Fish Industry, Forensic DNA Database, Fresh Vegetables versus GMOs and Treated Plants, Fungi Overview, Gene-Edited Meat, Gerrymandering Defined, GMOs Defined, Handgun Ban in Canada, House and Senate Responsibilities, Jellyfish Immortality, Kidney Function Research, Mental Patient Story, Mercury Contamination, Middle Aged Mortality, Net Neutrality Defined, Ocean Research, Opiate Prescription Problem, Polio-like Illness, Prostate Surveillance, Real Estate Fraud Case, Sanctuary Cities Defined, Stroke Rehabilitation Problems, Tech Regulation in California, Textbook Wars, Wildfire Control, William Barr, Worst Year for Humanity, Wound Care Basics, Wounded Healers

Exercise your ears: the 67 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 399 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,729 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Aging Research 52 mins – “Science is showing that while chronological aging is inevitable, biological aging is malleable. There’s a part of it that you can fight, and we are getting closer and closer to winning that fight.” Join Dr. Eric Verdin live April 2 from the Buck Institute, as he shares his perspectives on the tremendous advancements in biological understanding achieved in the last 30 years. Dr. Verdin became President and CEO of The Buck in November, 2016. He was previously Associate Director and Senior Investigator at the Gladstone Institute for Virology and Immunology and has held faculty positions at the University of Brussels, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Picower Institute for Medical Research. Dr. Verdin is also a Professor of Medicine at UCSF. The Verdin lab focuses on how metabolism, diet and small molecules regulate a family of key proteins and thereby the aging process and its associated diseases. Dr. Verdin has published more than 210 scientific papers and holds more than 15 patents. A native of Belgium, he earned his MD from the University of Liege and completed additional training at Harvard Medical School.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Angry Women 17 mins – “Brett Kavanaugh was accused of sexual misconduct. He was also nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court. Days after she testified in front of the senate, Dr. Christine Blasey-Ford was publicly mocked by President Trump. And women grow angrier and angrier. As the outrage swells, so do the protests. And the rallies. Women are coming together en masse in response to injustice. But this isn’t the first time. In fact, it’s just one moment in the hundreds of years of organizing and protesting and screaming in the streets, demanding to be heard. Christina Vardanis is the Executive Editor of Chatelaine, and like most of us, she’s struggled with knowing where to place her anger. With the help of a new book called Good And Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Anger by Rebecca Traister, Christina came to realize that rage can, in fact, be catalytic.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apple Inc in Supreme Court 60 mins – “The Supreme Court heard oral argument in Apple Inc. v. Pepper, which concerns whether a group of iPhone app purchasers can sue the tech giant for antitrust damages over its app store and pricing scheme. The class action lawsuit alleges that Apple has created a monopoly environment with its app store, causing consumers to pay higher prices than if there were other competitors in the market.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Astro Geology 27 mins – “The audacious Japanese space mission has successfully landed two rovers (Minerva II 1a + b) on the surface of asteroid Ryugu. The asteroid is currently 4 years travel away from Earth, so much of the mission has been carried out autonomously. Killer of Killer Whales – Despite being banned in the 1980’s the organophosphate PCB is killing the world’s killer whales. As top predators, killer whales, or Orca, bioaccumulate the toxin in their fat reserves and then nursing mothers pass on the chemical to the young in their fat-rich milk. PCBs are endocrine disruptors and affects breeding success, so researchers are seeing fewer and fewer calves being born. And the worst part is that the chemicals, despite the 40 year ban, are still very persistent in the oceans. Ionosphere and World War 2 Bombs – The bombs used by Allied forces during the Second World War were big enough to weaken the Earth’s upper atmosphere. By calculating the energies of the Allied bombing raids over Europe between 1943 and 45 and referring back to ionospheric measurements made at the time over Slough in the South of England. The team at Reading University can calibrate the ionospheric wobbles and use this to work out how much energy is in natural events such as earthquakes and thunder storms which also perturb this atmospheric layer at the edge of space.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Autism and Vaccines 19 mins – “Vaccine scientist, pediatrician, and autism dad Peter Hotez talks about his new book, Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel’s Autism.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Back Pain Referrals 12 mins – “Dr John Moi is a rheumatologist and Head of the Back Pain Assessment Clinic at Royal Melbourne Hospital. He talks about improving referrals to back pain specialists to improve pathways to care. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Cambridge Analytica Defined 10 mins – “What is Cambridge Analytica? The recent word that 50 million Facebook users had their personal information collected during the 2016 presidential campaign by a data analytics firm has brought new and intense scrutiny on Facebook and social media. Posting privately to your friends, liking and disliking posts and pages may seem harmless enough, but that seemingly benign information can be mined, studied, analyzed, and transformed into political campaign ammunition. Everything Explained’s Brian Shields spoke with Prof. James Hendler, the Director for Data Exploration and applications at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy about the data giant.” At the link find the title, “What Is Cambridge Analytica?,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Cannabis Users at the Boarder 12 mins – A discussion of the problem of Canadians admitting to having used marijuana when they attempt to enter the U.S. The podcast is from The Big Story podcast, but no summary is available there. However, the podcast is in the blog archive.

Canadian Monuments 27 mins – “What do you have to do to get a statue in Canada? We put some of our most lauded historical figures on trial and deliberate their pros and cons. Who should be torn down and who should stay up? From the Famous Five to Terry Fox, we look at some of the best and worst.” At the link find the title, “The Secret Life of Statues,” right-click “Download S1: The Secret Life of Statues” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Tax Rebates 23 mins – “Did the federal carbon tax just drive up the price of gas in four provinces? It sure did, and lots of other things, too. But will you get that money back, and maybe more on top of it? Also yes. This is why you’re going to hear a lot of technically-not-lies on this issue over the next six months. Conservatives spent the weekend telling Canadians to horde gas against the looming expense. Liberals enlisted a celebrity guest to help reassure those same Canadians that really, it wouldn’t be so bad. No matter whom you choose the believe, there are plenty of facts out there to support your case. But instead we’re going to ask our Parliament Hill reporter to try to cut through the spin and explain how this works, what it means for you, and why the spin on this issue has been so dizzying.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Citizens United Defined 18 mins – “It’s 2010. The Supreme Court is hearing the infamous case that decided elections law in the United States… Citizens United v. Federal Elections Commission. You’ll often hear political candidates cite the case when talking about how campaigns are funded and thus sometimes unjustly balanced.” At the link find the title, “What Is Citizens United?” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 18mins – “A new approach to the defining story of our time might help us finally develop a framework to make a difference. Now that extreme weather is the new normal, individual efforts to fight climate change can feel pointless. What good is making sure you take transit when it’s -35 one day and 10 degrees the next? But defining climate change as inevitable is a marketing strategy used by those who profit off of our inertia. So you can change the story, but not by riding a bike or recycling. Research shows there is one thing we can do that’s both easy and effective—you have to tell people you care; not with depression or sadness but with concern and hope. That’s what moves the needle. But how do you start those conversations, and with whom? Also…can we still enjoy unseasonably warm days in the dead of winter without guilt? Asking for a friend who hosts a podcast.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change and Agriculture 24 mins – “Shifting weather patterns and rising temperatures are altering what crops farmers can plant. In the last of a three-part series on climate, we examine how advancements in AI and genetics could help farms battle drought and crop disease.” At the link find the title, “The Price of Climate: The Northern Farming Frontier,” where you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Climate Change Problem 27 mins – “The latest climate talks have heard that emissions this year and last have increased – they fell in the 3 years previously. Development of electric vehicles and energy generation with renewable technologies have helped reduce emissions, but it’s not enough according to the latest analysis. The growth of conventional energy generation using fossil fuels has dwarfed reduction from using cleaner technologies. Ammonia pollution is a serious issue for health globally. New satellite observations are able to pinpoint sources from factories to chicken farms worldwide. Ammonia pollution is a serious issue for health globally. New satellite observations are able to pinpoint sources from factories to chicken farms worldwide. Changes in laws in the Amazon designed to make the conservation of forests in private hands easier could have the opposite effect. In a strange statistical quirk, if a state is successful in its conservation efforts more private forestry could be made available for development. And the maths of Democracy, can analytical systems developed to help understand stem cell growth or the behaviour of social insects be used to help understand the function and dysfunction of political systems? Researchers suggest such analysis could even be used to predict a change in political direction, in the run up to elections for example.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Climate Warming and Plant Stomata 28 mins – “The rate the Greenland Ice Sheet is melting is possibly the highest in 8000 years. New work looking at layers of melt in ice cores, from the second biggest ice sheet in the world, has shown that in the past 20 years the rate of melting has increased by 250-575%. The resultant fresh water run off not only adds to sea level rise, but impacts important ocean currents in the Atlantic. When trying to understand how plants are reacting to increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, scientists count their stomata. Stomata are the tiny pores found on leaves which allow for carbon dioxide (plant food) uptake and oxygen release. They also are the route by which plants lose water. So there is always a trade-off. More stomata, more potential for CO2 uptake, but more chance of drying out due to water loss. This means that the number of pores in a leaf is carefully calibrated to the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. If you take a 200 million year old leaf from a gingko tree, it’s got a lot more stomata than a gingko leaf now. This is because levels of the greenhouse gas were much higher then. But how are modern gingkos and other plants adapting to increasing carbon now? Jodrell Bank Observatory, part of Manchester University, is famous for its telescopes and work on radio astronomy. But what’s not so well known is its work tracking communications from spacecraft, which came about completely by accident. Starting with the tracking of Sputnik 1 in the 1950s, scientists at Jodrell Bank tracked flights throughout the US Russian Space Race. Recently, Professor of Physics and Associate Director of the observatory, Tim O’Brien found a box of audio tapes, which turned out to be recordings of these communications, annotated by Sir Bernard Lovell himself. These tapes are a time capsule back to when the world was racing to get into space.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Climate Warming Wildfires and Politics 27 mins “In the US mid-term elections, the Democrats gained a majority in the lower house, this means they take control of key committees – including the House Science Committee. Over recent years, this once bipartisan committee has been used by Republicans to push a climate change-denying agenda. Now the Democrats will regain control and the chair elect says she will be reinforcing that climate change is real and doing more to encourage participation in science at a grassroots level particularly with minorities who are currently under represented. We ask what this and other changes to science administration mean for the future of science under Donald Trump’s presidency. Environmental policies and his generally anti-science attitude are likely to come under greater scrutiny. We’ll also look at the California fires, which seem to be increasing in frequency. Is this due to climate change or other human intervention or changes in natural processes? And new research into hurricanes suggests human activity is making them more severe than they would otherwise be. In this case the built environment has become part of the problem, with the density of buildings in cities contributing to increases in wind speeds and a reduction in drainage for floodwaters.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Conspiracy Theory Discussion 19 mins – “Stories of secret meetings, shadow governments and hidden knowledge are as old as we are—but you may have noticed them taking on a more active role in public discourse in the past few years. From Alex Jones to QAnon and Pizzagate to people who insist mass shootings are staged…there are some serious megaphones behind today’s conspiracies. But how different are they from the original conspiracies? And why do they seem so prevalent amongst the citizens of our neighbour to the south? Anna Merlan’s new book, Republic of Lies, dives into the history of America and conspiracies to examine their origins and their staying power. What’s the grandfather of all conspiracies? How do they gather such steam, so rapidly? What happens when they cross the line from Internet Content to real-life incidents? And are there any conspiracy theories out there worth believing?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constitutional Convention Defined 16 mins – “If you live in New York state, you’ve seen the signs. Vote to elect. Vote to re-elect. Vote YES. Vote NO on the Constitutional Convention. But what is … the Constitutional Convention?” At the link find the title, “What Is A Constitutional Convention?” right-cick the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DACA Defined 26 mins – “DACA – or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals – it’s a program set up during the Obama administration designed to protect the children of undocumented people who crossed the border into the United States. Today, Sarah Rogerson, Professor at Albany Law, helps us to break down the ins and outs of the program.” At the link find the title, “What Is DACA?” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dought-related Stress 19 mins – “Emma Austin is with the Centre for Climate, Water and Land at the University of Newcastle. Professor David Perkins is Director of UON’s Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health. They talk about drought-related stress with MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Driverless Cars 19mins – The global race for autonomous vehicles is on-but roadblocks lie ahead. Waymo CEO John Krafcik tells WSJ’s Jamie Heller about his company’s plans to launch a commercial self-driving car service in the coming months.” At the link find the title, ““WSJ Tech D.Live: Are We There Yet? The Future of Driverless Cars,11/14/2018” where you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Electoral College Discussion 28 mins – “For our third episode, we talk to Victoria Bassetti, fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University Law School about the electoral college.” At the link find the title, “What Is The Electoral College?” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. Electoral districts ebb and flow. The ever-changing population in different areas across the country creates the challenge of drawing the districts as close to accurately representative as possible. When drawing, the lines can get a little blurry, communities can become divided, and the way the edges of the districts are formed can determine the outcome of an election. At least, this is what legal teams across the country are trying to prove. The process of making the districts is called Gerrymandering. And today, we have an expert on the pod, to help us breakdown the fundamentals of the practice. https://wamcpodcasts.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/gerrymandering_ee.mp3 Ruth Greenwood, a senior counsel at the Campaign Legal Center, litigates a variety of redistricting cases. Along with co-counsel, she represents the plaintiffs in two high-profile partisan gerrymandering cases (Gill v. Whitford and LWVNC v. Rucho). On a federal level, not every state has to deal with this issue, some smaller states, like Vermont for example, only have one U.S. Rep. seat for the entire state. Which makes the issues more centered around medium to larger sized states, like Wisconsin, North Carolina, Texas, California, and New York. So Ruth, to start off the conversation on an broad note, what is gerrymandering?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

End of Life Care 26 mins – “Tristan Lederman was born hydrocephalic and had cerebral palsy. He could not see, walk or do anything for himself, relying on his parents and at-home caregivers for all his needs. But like a lot of other young adults with extraordinary medical needs, his health took a turn last year. He developed rashes and suffered seizures. He wasn’t eating and drinking. He slept more during the day and went to bed early in the evenings. “We knew something was seriously wrong with him,” his father Mark Lederman told White Coat, Black Art host Dr. Brian Goldman.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Evolution 6 mins – “Did humans evolve from monkeys or from fish? In this enlightening talk, ichthyologist and TED Fellow Prosanta Chakrabarty dispels some hardwired myths about evolution, encouraging us to remember that we’re a small part of a complex, four-billion-year process — and not the end of the line. “We’re not the goal of evolution,” Chakrabarty says. “Think of us all as young leaves on this ancient and gigantic tree of life — connected by invisible branches not just to each other, but to our extinct relatives and our evolutionary ancestors.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fish Industry 22 mins – “Demand for wild seafood is rising-but so is the cost of bringing it ashore. In the first of a three-part series on climate, we meet the fishermen and scientists grappling with warming waters, shifting currents and rapidly changing economics.” At the link find the title, “The Price of Climate: Is Commercial Fishing in Hot Water?,” which can be played but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Forensic DNA Database 22 mins – “First, we hear from science writer Joshua Sokol about his trip to the Cambrian—well not quite. He talks with host Megan Cantwell about his travels to a remote site in the mountains of British Columbia where some of Earth’s first animals—including a mysterious, alien-looking creature—are spilling out of Canadian rocks.  Also on this week’s show, host Sarah Crespi talks with James Hazel a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Genetic Privacy and Identity in Community Settings at Vanderbilt University in Nashville about a proposal for creating a universal forensic DNA database. He and his co-authors argue that current, invasive practices such as law enforcement subpoenaing medical records, commercial genetic profiles, and other sets of extremely detailed genetic information during criminal investigations, would be curtailed if a forensics-use-only universal database were created.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fresh Vegetables versus GMOs and Treated Plants 12 mins – A discussion of the pros and cons of fresh and treated vegetables. The podcast is from The Big Story podcast, but no summary is available there. However, the podcast is in the blog archive.

Fungi Overview 71 mins- “The TWiM team considers the state of the world’s fungi as revealed by a report from the Kew Royal Botanical Gardens, and how Salmonella loses motility to evade host defenses.” At the link “Right click to download TWiM#189” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gene-Edited Meat 18 mins – “Is the boutique burger scene ready for vegan patties that bleed like meat? What about chicken and beef grown in tanks? With the global population expected to exceed 9-billion by 2050, scientists and executives are looking for sustainable and delicious ways to replicate meat.” At the link find the title, “Are We Ready for Manufactured Meat?, 5/19/2017” which can be played, but not downloaded; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Gerrymandering Defined 18 mins – “Electoral districts ebb and flow. The ever-changing population in different areas across the country creates the challenge of drawing the districts as close to accurately representative as possible. When drawing, the lines can get a little blurry, communities can become divided, and the way the edges of the districts are formed can determine the outcome of an election. At least, this is what legal teams across the country are trying to prove. The process of making the districts is called Gerrymandering. And today, we have an expert on the pod, to help us breakdown the fundamentals of the practice. Ruth Greenwood, a senior counsel at the Campaign Legal Center, litigates a variety of redistricting cases. Along with co-counsel, she represents the plaintiffs in two high-profile partisan gerrymandering cases (Gill v. Whitford and LWVNC v. Rucho). On a federal level, not every state has to deal with this issue, some smaller states, like Vermont for example, only have one U.S. Rep. seat for the entire state. Which makes the issues more centered around medium to larger sized states, like Wisconsin, North Carolina, Texas, California, and New York. So Ruth, to start off the conversation on an broad note, what is gerrymandering? Credits: Everything Explained is produced by WAMC Northeast Public Radio with assistance from Kristin Gilbert and Ashleigh Kinsey. Also we’d like to give a special thanks to Ruth Greenwood…” At the link find the title, “What Is Gerrymandering?” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMOs Defined 15 mins – “Genetically Modified Organisms, or GMOs are controversial at their roots. But what exactly are they? Listen to WAMC’s Joe Donahue on the Roundtable talk with a journalist and author of a new book on the subject.” At the link find the title, “What Are GMOs?” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Handgun Ban in Canada 16 mins – “Toronto first proposed it after July’s mass shooting. And on Monday, Montreal city council unanimously voted to request a federal ban on handguns across Canada. The Liberal government could reopen bill C-71 and make it happen. And with shootings atop so much of the news this summer, it feels like a logical move. After all, who really needs a handgun, right?But how would the government go about implementing this? Would it actually make a difference? Or is this one of those measures that makes everyone feel better but doesn’t accomplish much? Manisha Krishnan of Vice takes us inside the world of gun control in Canada and what sort of data and policy might actually help stem the tide. Spoiler alert: Most Canadians don’t know nearly enough about the regulations already in place in their own country.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

High Fructose Corn Syrup Defined 9 mins – “Everything Explained is a podcast aimed at helping to decipher what we talk about in the news. We always start off with a basic question before the deeper dive into figuring out the gritty details in what something is. In our first episode, we talk to Dr. Marion Nestle, author of Food Politics and Paulette Goddard Professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University about high fructose corn syrup.” At the link find the title, “What Is High Fructose Corn Syrup?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

House and Senate Responsibilities 50 mins – “The US Congress has two houses – the House of Representatives and the Senate. But why? And what’s the difference? Also, Sam Evans-Brown tells us what are palm trees good for in an installment of “Ask Sam” from Outside/In. And finally, we get the lowdown on a Star Trek-related vanity plate.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hudson Bay Company History 38 mins – “The Bay Blanket. These blankets are as iconic as Mariah Carey’s lip-syncing, but some people believe they were used to spread smallpox and decimate entire Indigenous communities. We dive into the history of The Hudson’s Bay Company and unpack the very complicated story of the iconic striped blanket.” At the link find the titel, “S2: Bay Blanket” right-click “Download S2: Bay Blanket” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inuit Life 36 mins – “Nunavut has the largest landmass out of all the provinces and territories in Canada – and yet, it is an area that many of us know the least about. In this episode, we look at the forced relocation of the Inuit, the Eskimo Identification System, and the dog slaughter perpetuated by the Canadian government.” At the link find the title, “The Secret Life of the North,” right-click “Download S1: The Secret Life of the North” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Japanese Interment Camps 18 mins – “President Donald Trump’s promise of a border wall has divided many on both sides of the issue. This summer, the Trump administration’s zero tolerance policy brought about the removal of thousands of migrant children from their parents to child detention centers across the United States. The move sent shockwaves throughout the country, but for many, it’s deja vu.” At the link find the title, “What Were Internment Camps?,” to listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Jellyfish Immortality 38 mins – “T. dohrnii — This teeny tiny animal is one of the few known cases of a creature capable of reverting back to a sexually immature stage after reaching maturity, when t. dohrnii is caused physical or environmental distress, including natural aging, it will retract its tentacles and turn into a blob of transdifferentiated cells that will sink to the bottom of the ocean and grow into a polyp. The polyp buds into even more genetically identical jellyfish — thus t. dohrnii has both evaded death and managed to clone itself. This process could theoretically go on indefinitely, making the t. dohrnii effectively biologically immortal. [Three other stories are included about spotted hyena, the flying murder head (Quetzalcoatlus), and termite superorganism.]” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kidney Function Research 24 mins – “On this edition of Science Studio, Keith Pannell and Russ Chianelli speak with Dr. Rudy Ortiz from the University of California Merced. Professor Ortiz’s research focuses on the regulation of kidney function and metabolism in a variety of animal models, including seals and dolphins, with the intent that the data will have translative value to clinical medicine.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Klondike Gold Rush 33 mins – “There is no doubt that the Klondike Gold Rush was an iconic event. But what did the mining industry cost the original people of the territory? And what was left when all the gold was gone? And what is a sour toe cocktail?” At the link find the title, “S2: The Gold Rush,” right-click “Download S2: The Gold Rush” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Patient Story 27 mins – “At 22, Amy Willans was a driven nursing student with a part-time job and a spot on Canada’s national precision skating team. It was 1996, she was dating the varsity football quarterback and had her whole life planned out. “I was going to be traveling and competing and representing my country, which was so exciting,” Willans recalled. To outsiders, the young Edmonton woman was on an upward trajectory.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Mercury Contamination 27 mins – “A researcher in China claims to have modified the genes of two baby girls. His announcement at a genetics conference in Hong Kong caused outrage. Experts in the field were quick to point out the dangers of the technique he had used and questioned the ethics of doing such an experiment. Scientists in Cambridge have successfully grown human placental tissue. This is not for transplant into humans, but to provide a model to help understand problems in early pregnancy which can affect both mother and baby. Mercury in the Arctic is a toxic problem for people and wildlife. It’s not produced there, but comes from industrial processes around the world. Scientists have discovered about half the mercury transported to the Arctic each year comes from Russian rivers after it is released from melting permafrost.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Middle Aged Mortality 12 mins – “Professor John McNeil is the Head of the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Monash University. He talks about ageing Australian population and how to keep our elders healthy. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Net Neutrality Defined 18 mins – “Net Neutrality is a mess of divisive, confusing, and controversial opinion. And the clutter has only worsened over the last few months. After the Federal Communication Commission’s repeal of the Obama-era rules in December of 2017, chat forums, comment sections, and news articles about the repeal sprang up in every corner of the exact place that Net Neutrality was attempting to regulate – the Internet. Now, the beginning of the repeal process will start on April 23rd.” At the link find the title, “What Is Net Neutrality?” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Research 13 mins – “Our oceans are unexplored and undersampled — today, we still know more about other planets than our own. How can we get to a better understanding of this vast, important ecosystem? Explorer Sebastien de Halleux shares how a new fleet of wind- and solar-powered drones is collecting data at sea in unprecedented detail, revealing insights into things like global weather and the health of fish stocks. Learn more about what a better grasp of the ocean could mean for us back on land.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Research 8 mins – “Satellite imaging has revolutionized our knowledge of the Earth, with detailed images of nearly every street corner readily available online. But Planet Labs’ Will Marshall says we can do better and go faster — by getting smaller. He introduces his tiny satellites — no bigger than 10 by 10 by 30 centimeters — that, when launched in a cluster, provide high-res images of the entire planet, updated daily.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opiate Prescription Problem 9 mins – “Interview with Dr. Scott Podolsky on the revolution in pharmaceutical marketing that set the stage for physician “education” about treating pain with opioids.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Polio-like Illness 27 mins – “Rachelle Downton hoped her son Xavier, 4, would take a few steps with a walker for Christmas. That likely won’t happen, and doctors say his recovery from a frightening and mysterious ailment may take much longer. Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a rare illness that resembles polio. It mainly hits children. Why isn’t known. The spinal cord is affected, which can cause arms and legs to go limp with stunning speed.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Prostate Surveillance 12 mins – “A/Professor Sue Evans is director of the Clinical Registries Unit at Monash University and Ms Melanie Evans is coordinator of the Prostate Cancer Outcomes Registry Victoria. They discuss the low-risk prostate cancer patients slipping through the cracks. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Real Estate Fraud Case 30 mins – “It all started with a mansion in the most exclusive neighbourhood in Toronto. It ended up as $17 million worth of alleged real estate fraud, and the key witness to the scam living with stray cats in an expat heaven of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus. If this sounds wild, well yeah – that’s the point. Join us for this special long episode, a tale that spans cities, cultures and nations – but ultimately comes back to some all-too-human motivations: Greed, fear and vengeance.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sanctuary Cities Defined 32 mins – “What do San Francisco, Chicago, and Albany, NY have in common? They’re sanctuary cities – among hundreds of other U.S. cities, states, and counties that have declared their support for immigrant populations, often by limiting their cooperation with Immigration and Customs Enforcement – otherwise known as ICE. Safe havens to some, crime-infested danger zones to others – sanctuary cities have become the topic of heated partisan debate. Particularly since President Donald Trump took office, promising to strip them of funding….” At the link find the title, “What Are Sanctuary Cities?” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sankara of Africa 106 mins – “Comrade Slasher from Nigeria joins Breht to talk about the life, politics, and legacy of Marxist revolutionary and Pan-African leader of Burkina Faso, Thomas Sankara.” At the link find the title, “Thomas Sankara: “The Che of Africa” and Marxist Martyr Dec 16, 2018,” left-click the down-ponting, select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Sex Education for Kids 15 mins – What is the proper education for children in school. The podcast is from The Big Story podcast, but no summary is available. However, the podcast is in the blog archive.

Shirley Manson 47 mins – “Debbie talks to singer-songwriter Shirley Manson about her career, her music, and the long road that got her where she is today.” At the link left-click the download arrow, then right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Probe 27 mins – “Nasa is just a few days away from launching its next science mission, a spacecraft called the Parker Solar Probe that will eventually “touch the sun.” If all goes to plan, the probe will take off aboard a rocket on Saturday 11 August from Cape Canaveral in Florida. On its final close approach, in 2025, the Parker Solar Probe will get within six million kilometres of the Sun’s surface — so close that it will actually fly through the star’s incredibly hot atmosphere, called the corona. It is hoped the mission will provide answers to some of the Sun’s mysteries – why its atmosphere becomes hotter further away from the surface of the sun? How the solar wind of charged particles streaming out into space is born? And what causes the gigantic outbursts scientists call coronal mass ejections? One Hundred and Fifty Years Since the Discovery of Helium – Helium, the second most abundant element in the universe, was discovered on the Sun before it was found on the Earth. Pierre-Jules-César Janssen, a French astronomer, noticed a yellow line in the Sun’s spectrum while studying a total solar eclipse in 1868. Sir Norman Lockyer, an English astronomer, realised that this line, could not be produced by any element known at the time. It was hypothesised that a new element on the sun was responsible for this mysterious yellow emission. This unknown element was named helium by Lockyer. The Trouble with Doing Science- Marnie Chesterton takes an inside look at the hoops some scientists have to jump through to get their experiments running. In an experiment to look for dark matter, Polish scientist, Pawel Majewski, at Rutherford Appleton Lab has spent 5 years orchestrating the fabrication of a test chamber, a flask called a Cryostat. For the experiment to work the chamber has to be as radiation-free as possible. The trouble is the natural radiation from Earth during the manufacture and transport keep contaminating the metal. – New Horizons to Visit Ultima Thule Ultima Thule is the name given to an asteroid, or pair of asteroids, in the Kuiper Belt – a ring of rocky bodies at the edge of the Solar System. The New Horizons mission, which captured such amazing data on Pluto, got a mission extension to travel further out. This week the asteroid passed in front of a distant star, giving the team a chance to see more detail of the rocky body, which will be the furthest object visited by a man-made craft, when New Horizon’s gets there in November.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Stroke Rehabilitation Problems 26 mins – “It was dinner time when Linda Windross heard a thump. She ran upstairs to find Robert, her husband of 30 years, slumped on the floor. “He was talking, but he was really struggling and shaking,” Linda said, recalling the scene on Aug. 18 at their home in Castor, Alta., about 230 kilometres south of Edmonton….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Tech Regulation in California 32 mins – “California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (D) talks about California’s $385 billion tech industry, the state’s new data privacy law, net neutrality, antitrust investigations of tech platforms, and monitoring Silicon Valley tech companies.” At the link find the title in The Communicators section of C-Span, “Communicators with Xavier Becerra (Nov, 2018)” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Textbook Wars 58 mins- “In 1974, a fierce controversy erupted over some newly adopted school textbooks in Kanawha County, West Virginia. School buildings were hit by dynamite and Molotov cocktails, buses were riddled with bullets, journalists were beaten and surrounding coal mines were shut down by protesting miners. Textbook supporters thought they would introduce students to new ideas about literature and multi-culturalism. Opponents felt the books undermined traditional American values.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Toronto History 46 mins – “It’s our first live show! Recorded in front of an audience for the Hotdocs Podcast Festival, we try to answer the age-old question: why is Toronto the city Canada loves to hate? Featuring special guests Jane Luk, Kris Siddiqi, Brandon Hackett and music by Matt Reid.” At the link find the title, “Toronto vs. Everyone (Live!),” right-click “Download S2: Toronto vs. Everyone (Live!)” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Toronto Van Attack 15 mins – Podcast about the attack PTSD results. The podcast isn’t at the site, but is included in the blog archive.

Whole Earth Catalog 119 mins – “The evening program of The Whole Earth Catalog 50th Anniversary Celebration was held on October 13, 02018, and featured conversations between Whole Earth Catalog contributors and contemporary wave-makers as they discussed the legacy of the Catalog and what the next 50 years might hold. Speakers included Ryan Phelan, Danica Remy, Rusty Schweickart, Kevin Kelly, Simone Giertz, Howard Rheingold, Chip Conley, Stephanie Mills, Stephanie Feldstein, Stewart Brand and Sal Khan. The event was sponsored by the San Francisco Art Institute, WIRED, The Long Now Foundation, Ken and Maddy Dychtwald, Peter and Cathleen Schwartz, Stewart Brand and Ryan Phelan, Juan and Mary Enriquez, and Gerry Ohrstrom. Learn more about the Whole Earth Catalog 50th Anniversary Celebration. Watch Whole Earth Flashbacks, a documentary that profiles the creators of the Whole Earth Catalog and the community they inspired.” At the link you can listen/watch, but have to join to download; however, a copy of the podcast is incldued in the blog archive.

Wildfire Control 16 mins – “This year’s wildfire season in British Columbia is the second worst in the province’s history, behind only last year. More than 950,000 hectares of land has burned since April 1st. The situation has resulted in evacuation alerts and days of smoky skies in some areas. Is this the new summer norm? What, if anything, can be done to prevent wildfires on such a catastrophic scale? Lori Daniels, forestry professor at the University of British Columbia, explains the mistakes that have been made when dealing with forest fires, and the simple, yet crucial steps that should be taken by both homeowners and the government to keep communities safe.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

William Barr 43 mins – “Trump’s nominee for Attorney General, William Barr, is more qualified to do the job than Matt Whitaker–but so are thousands of others. His record, however, show’s he as bad as Jeff Sessions—if not worse.  David Cole, National Legal Director of the ACLU and The Nation’s legal affairs correspondent, explains. Also: a report on The Nation’s investigation of Massive Accounting Fraud at the Pentagon – Dave Lindorff found that $21 million cannot be accounted for.  For decades, he says, the Pentagon has been “deliberately cooking the books to mislead Congress.” Plus: the Armenian Revolution: “a small light of hope and progressive democratic change in a Europe increasingly shadowed by authoritarian and dictatorial forces, especially in most of the former soviet-bloc states of Eastern Europe.”  That’s what Marc Cooper says—he’s spent months in Yerevan, where elections on Sunday confirmed the victory of the revolutionaries.” At the link find the title, “William Barr: Another Jeff Sessions? David Cole….” left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Download” then “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Worst Year for Humanity 32 mins – “When was the worst year to be alive? Contributing Correspondent Ann Gibbons talks to host Sarah Crespi about a contender year that features a volcanic eruption, extended darkness, cold summer, and a plague. Also on this week’s show, host Meagan Cantwell talks with Andrea Di Francesco of the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Aging in Baltimore, Maryland, about his review of current wisdom on fasting and metabolism. Should we start fasting—if not to extend our lives maybe to at least to give ourselves a healthy old age?  In a special segment from our policy desk, Deputy Editor David Malakoff discusses the results of the recent U.S. election with Senior Correspondent Jeffrey Mervis and we learn what happened to the many scientist candidates that ran and some implications for science policy.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Wound Care Basics 44 mins – At the link find the title, “42: Wound Care Basics and Beyond,” right-click Direct download: Wound_care_Basics_and_Beyond.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wounded Healers 26 mins – “How peer support workers help people with mental health crises in the ER of the North Bay Regional Health” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Zika Virus Discussion 21 mins – “We’ve all heard plenty about the Zika virus by now, but it’s hard to know how worried to be. What are our chances of getting it? Should we postpone travel plans? Donald G. McNeil Jr. is a science writer for the New York Times, and he attempts to answer those questions and more in his new book Zika: The Emerging Epidemic. WAMC’s Ian Pickus spoke with the author about the virus.” At the link find the title, “What Is The Zika Virus?” which you can be hear, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

 

Advertisements
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mining Digest 386 – Apr 12, 2019: 3D Printing on the Moon, 5G Wireless, ACL Injury Prevention, Alzheimers Cure, Anemia App, Atrial Fibrillation, Back Pain Treatment, Bail System Criticism, Baker and Obama Discussion, Black Infant Mortality Rates, Blind Transitions, Cannabidiol for Epilepsy, China-U.S. Relations, Conflict Photographer, Constitutional Issues of 2018, Doris Kerns Godwin, Empathy Interview, Financial Journalism, Flying Taxis, Harvey Milk, John Bolton on Africa, Machine Learning in Medicine, Martha Mitchell, Medical Implant Registry, Metastatic Cancer Survivors, Monopoly Regulation, Multicultural Life, Netflix Co-founder, Politicon Republic Discussion, Predatory Journals, SAT Security Controversy, Sgt York Documentary, Special Counsel Independence and Integrity Act, Spinal Injury Repair, Transgender Journey, Trump-Russian Hacking, Video Games and History, Voiceover Artist, Warren Commission Report, Watergate Saturday Night Massacre, White House Press Access, Yellow Folks

Exercise your ears: the 64 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 516 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,729 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 499 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Printing on the Moon 8 mins – “3D printing moon dust could be the way to colonize the moon” At the link find the title, “Making it on the Moon – 3D printing useful stuff with moon dust,” right-click Download Making it on the Moon – 3D printing useful stuff with moon dust and select ‘Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

5G Wireless 28 mins – “Nicola Palmer talked about Verizon’s efforts to be the first U.S. company to implement 5G. 5G is the fifth generation of wireless technology that will make much faster speeds possible for downloading video to smartphones and allow cars to “talk” to each other and enable more of the” internet of things.” She described introducing 5G to four U.S. cities on October 1, 2018, and the race with China to be the 5G leader.” At the link the audio and/or video versions of the program can be purchased. A copy of the podcast is also available in this blog archive.

ACL Injury Prevention 18 mins – “Professor Christopher Vertullo is Director of Knee Research Australia, and is a knee surgeon based on the Gold Coast. He discusses the rapid increase in the number of ACL reconstructions being done in young Australians and what can be done to prevent the injury. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimers Cure 16 mins – “Why the prevailing theory for the cause of Alzheimer’s may be wrong” At the link find the title, “Have researchers been wrong about Alzheimer’s? A new theory challenges the old story,” right-click “Download Have researchers been wrong about Alzheimer’s? A new theory challenges the old storyand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America Divided 81 mins – “Former Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R-CA) hosted former presidential campaign advisers Steve Schmidt and David Axelrod in a discussion on reducing polarization and returning civility to politics. Politico reporter Carla Marinucci moderated.” At the link the audio and/or video versions of the program can be purchased. A copy of the podcast is also available in this blog archive.

Anemia App 8 mins -”Take a photo of your nails to find out if you’re anemic” At the link find the title, “Selfies for health – a smartphone app can detect anemia,” right-clickDownload Selfies for health – a smartphone app can detect anemiaand select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arctic Scandinavians 36 minsEveryone’s heard of Vikings – their daring North Atlantic voyages, their mysterious runes. But there’s another ancient culture in Arctic Scandinavia that’s much older, and just as fascinating – the Sámi. While the Vikings have been celebrated, Sámi music, language and traditions were forced underground. Why? Sámi Blood was released in 2016 and went on to win major awards at festivals around the world. It tells the story of Elle Marja, a young Sámi reindeer herder coming of age in the 1930s. Exposed to racism at her boarding school and struggling to connect to her family, she fights to find an authentic identity. The LA Times review is here. Sofia Jannok is one of many Sámi musicians who is reclaiming the tradition of joiking, using it to bring attention to Sámi issues and just to make Sámi people more visible in Sweden. You can hear some of her music here.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atrial Fibrillation 27 mins – “Professor David Brieger, from the University of Sydney, is a cardiologist at the Concord Repatriation General Hospital, and lead author on new Australian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of atrial fibrillation. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Back Pain Treatment 12 mins – “Professor Chris Maher, from the University of Sydney’s School of Public Health, discusses changes to the treatment and management of non-specific low back pain. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Bail System Criticism 14 mins – “On any given night, more than 450,000 people in the United States are locked up in jail simply because they don’t have enough money to pay bail. The sums in question are often around $500: easy for some to pay, impossible for others. This has real human consequences — people lose jobs, homes and lives, and it drives racial disparities in the legal system. Robin Steinberg has a bold idea to change this. In this powerful talk, she outlines the plan for The Bail Project — an unprecedented national revolving bail fund to fight mass incarceration. (This ambitious idea is part of The Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link right-click “Share,” left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Baker and Obama Discussion 57 mins – “Former President Barack Obama spoke with former Secretary of State James Baker at a discussion moderated by presidential historian Jon Meacham. Topics included their experiences in office, bipartisanship, and U.S. leadership abroad. President Obama talked about the need for American voters to return to a civic conversation based in common facts, and about the importance of the U.S. role in international diplomacy. The discussion was part of a celebration of 25 years of the Baker Institute for Public Policy at Rice University.At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Ben Franklin Son 57 mins – “Benjamin Franklin’s first son, William, was born around 1730. The identity of his mother is still unknown. But despite being an illegitimate child, Benjamin adopted William and the two became inseparable – that is, until the outbreak of the Revolutionary War. Joanne and Historian Sheila Skemp tell how the fight for America’s independence tore the Franklin family apart.” At the link right-click “Download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Infant Mortality Rates 29 mins – “Black babies are dying at rates much higher than those for American babies as a whole.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Transitions 21 mins – “Rakeb Max returns to the Blind Abilities studio to share what she has learned since entering her first year of college. On her previous podcast, Rakeb talked about her college transition plans and the steps she was taking to ensure she chose the right one. Rakeb did choose Providence college and talks about how the realities and expectations are not always the same and how she is adjusting to her new location. Rakeb wrote a letter to the editor about some of the questions she gets asked and basically broke it down for everyone to understand that she is just Rakeb, that girl with the long white cane. Join Rakeb Max in this brief and insightful interview and hear about what Rakeb is doing to make her presence known. Look out Providence College, Rakeb Max is on the campus.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Cannabidiol for Epilepsy 13 mins – “Dr Jeremy Freeman is a consultant neurologist at the Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne. He talks about cannabidiol’s use as a treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy in children. With MJA news and online editor Cate Swannell.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

China U.S. Relations 94 mins – “The Wilson Center hosted a discussion on U.S.-China relations over the past year and on whether to describe the relationship as a “Cold War.” Panelists rejected the Cold War comparison and offered analysis of a complex relationship between the U.S. and China. Former U.S. Ambassador to China J. Stapleton Roy said that measuring any kind of change in China would take decades, not months or years. Other topics discussed included reaction to Chinese President Xi’s recent remarks on development and global openness, China’s political and economic influence over the years, and common misunderstandings and perceptions that exist between the two countries.” At the link the audio and/or video versions of the program can be purchased. A copy of the podcast is also available in this blog archive.

Civil War Prequel 63 mins – “Military history Professor Harry Laver argued that the 1856 battles in Kansas between abolitionists and pro-slavery forces marked the true beginning of the American Civil War. Professor Laver also discussed the bloody 1856 caning of Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner by a pro-slavery South Carolina member of Congress on the U.S. Senate floor.” At the link the audio and/or video versions of the program can be purchased. A copy of the podcast is also available in this blog archive.

Closed Borders 56 mins – “National Review executive editor Reihan Salam argued the case against open borders. He was interviewed by Doris Meissner, former commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.At the link the audio and/or video versions of the program can be purchased. A copy of the podcast is also available in this blog archive.

Colonial American Religion 73 mins – “Baylor University professor Thomas Kidd taught a class on the first Great Awakening in the Americas, a period in mid-18th century of Christian revitalization that swept through the colonies. He explained how the Salem witch trials and the decline of Puritanism lead to an era of traveling preachers, such as George Whitefield, and an emphasis on evangelism.” At the link the audio and/or video versions of the program can be purchased. A copy of the podcast is also available in this blog archive.

Conflict Photographer 59 mins – “Conflict Photographer Lynsey Addario on Art, Love, and War – For two decades she’s traveled the world, photographing humans in crisis. Pulitzer and MacArthur winning photojournalist Lynsey Addario on what it’s all taught her.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constitutional Issues of 2018 64 mins – “This episode looks back at the biggest constitutional issues of 2018—from the recent ruling striking down Obamacare, to the Emoluments Clause lawsuits, the census case, the Mueller investigation, and more. Guests Emily Bazelon and Josh Blackman join host Jeffrey Rosen to give updates about where these constitutional questions stand and forecast where they’re headed next year.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corporate Hacking of American Minds 60 mins – “The distinction between pleasure and happiness might seem like a philosopher’s quibble. Fat Chance author Dr. Robert Lustig tells us why this difference is vitally important to our national wellbeing. Corporations are hacking the American mind because of our ignorance about the difference between them.The distinction between pleasure and happiness might seem like a philosopher’s quibble. Fat Chance author Dr. Robert Lustig tells us why this difference is vitally important to our national wellbeing. Corporations are hacking the American mind because of our ignorance about the difference between them.At the link click “Add to the cart” then “Checkout” from the pop-up menu to buy the podcast. A copy is also included in the blog archive.

Creek Nation 67 mins – “A very packed show. All the Mueller moves with Mimi Rocah, a former federal prosecutor in the Southern District of New York, now a Fellow in Criminal Justice at Pace Law School. Plus Dahlia Lithwick is joined by Riyaz Kanji, an attorney for the Creek Nation, to explore the fascinating questions and disgraceful history involved in Carpenter v. Murphy, a case argued by Kanji before the Supreme Court last week that started with a murder and now involves questions of sovereignty over 3 million acres in Oklahoma.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doris Kearns Goodwin Interview 76 mins- “Pulitzer-prize winning historian Doris Kearns Goodwin sits down with host Jeffrey Rosen at the National Constitution Center to discuss her new book, Leadership in Turbulent Times–a culmination of five decades of acclaimed study in presidential history. Goodwin compares the leadership styles of Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, and Lyndon Johnson, sharing fascinating anecdotes and lessons from these legendary presidents, and offering hopeful advice about how to apply these lessons to solve some of the toughest constitutional issues of today.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Empathy Interview 46 mins – “Helen Riess, M.D. – Empathy in the brain and the world – Empathy makes us human. Humans make structures that rob us of empathy when we need it most. Helen Riess is trying to reverse that trend.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Journalism 51 mins – “Slate Money on a new documentary about the financial crisis, the state of business and finance news, and a look at the duopoly.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flying Taxis 8 mins – “Flight is about to get a lot more personal, says aviation entrepreneur Rodin Lyasoff. In this visionary talk, he imagines a new golden age of air travel in which small, autonomous air taxis allow us to bypass traffic jams and fundamentally transform how we get around our cities and towns. “In the past century, flight connected our planet,” Lyasoff says. “In the next, it will reconnect our local communities.” At the link right-click “Share,” left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forgotten Presidents Book 60 mins – “University of North Carolina constitutional law professor Michael Gerhardt, author of The Forgotten Presidents, talked about the presidency of Jimmy Carter.” At the link the audio and/or video versions of the program can be purchased. A copy of the podcast is also available in this blog archive.

Harvey Milk 79 mins – “Today Harvey Milk is remembered as the first openly gay person to be elected to public office in the U.S. His legacy as a gay rights activist and politician helped open the door for future generations of LGBTQ people. But before he became a national icon, he ran a camera shop in San Francisco that became a meeting place for the city’s gay community. Brian talks with LGBTQ historian Lillian Faderman about Milk’s political rise and enduring message.” At the link right-click “Download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Huawei, etc 43 mins – “Slate Money on Huawei and the trade war, ride-share companies and IPOs, and Harvard stocking up on water.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

John Bolton on Africa 78 mins – “White House National Security Adviser John Bolton unveiled the Trump administration’s new Africa strategy. The core priorities of strategy include advancing economic ties in the region, combating terrorist threats, and ensuring that U.S. aid is used efficiently and effectively. In addition, the new strategy aims to counter the influence of China and Russia on the continent. Mr. Bolton said, “The predatory practices pursued by China and Russia stunt economic growth in Africa, threaten the financial independence of African nations, inhibit opportunities for U.S. investment, interfere with U.S. military operations and pose a significant threat to U.S. national security interests.At the link the audio and/or video versions of the program can be purchased. A copy of the podcast is also available in this blog archive.

Machine Learning in Medicine 16 mins – “In this view of the future of medicine, patient–provider interactions are informed and supported by massive amounts of data from interactions with similar patients. These data are collected and curated to provide the latest evidence-based assessment and recommendations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mars Insight Landing 88 mins – “NASA TV covered the landing of the space agency’s InSight lander and its arrival on the surface of Mars. The mutli-national space probe project launched May 5, 2018, and arrived on the “Red Planet” five months and three weeks later. In addition to showing the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) control room where scientists monitored and controlled the landing, video of the lander’s first images captured on the surface of Mars was broadcast.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Martha Mitchell 26 mins – “..Mitchell was the wife of Nixon’s first attorney general. In the days after the break-in, she was forcibly tranquilized and held prisoner in a California hotel room so that she wouldn’t tell reporters what she knew about Watergate. When I learned her story a few months ago, I couldn’t believe I’d never heard it before.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Math and Physics Questions 57 mins – “This episode features the hosts of “Ask a Mathematician, Ask a Physicist,” a blog that grew out of a Burning Man booth in which a good-natured mathematician (Spencer Greenberg) and physicist (Seth Cottrell) answer people’s questions about life, the universe, and everything. Spencer and Seth discuss the weirdest and most controversial questions they’ve answered, why math is fundamentally arbitrary, Seth’s preferred alternative to the Many Worlds Interpretation of quantum physics, how a weird group of parapsychologists changed the field of physics, and whether you could do a Double Slit Experiment with a Cat Cannon.” At the link right-click “Download Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Implant Registry 10 mins – “A joint investigation by the CBC and the Toronto Star has revealed story after story of Canadians whose lives have been forever changed by medical implants that didn’t work they way the should have. There is now a growing call for a national registry to track these devices, and the patients who use them.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Metastatic Cancer Survivors 20 mins – “Long-term survivors with metastatic cancer have not been well studied, but diagnoses of incurable cancer will have substantial effects on patients’ families, on workplaces, and on U.S. health care resources in the coming years.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monopoly Regulation 29 mins – “New York University Professor Scott Galloway talks about his book The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google. He discussed what he calls the four most powerful companies in the world and their impact on our lives.” At the link the audio and/or video versions of the program can be purchased. A copy of the podcast is also available in this blog archive.

Multiculture Life 10 mins – “Rebeca Hwang has spent a lifetime juggling identities — Korean heritage, Argentinian upbringing, education in the United States — and for a long time she had difficulty finding a place in the world to call home. Yet along with these challenges came a pivotal realization: that a diverse background is a distinct advantage in today’s globalized world. In this personal talk, Hwang reveals the endless benefits of embracing our complex identities — and shares her hopes for creating a world where identities aren’t used to alienate but to bring people together instead.” At the link left-click “Share,” left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Download audio” from the pop-up menu.

National Intelligence Under President Kennedy 64 mins – “Catholic University professor and former CIA historian Nicholas Dujmovic teaches a class about national intelligence during President Kennedy’s administration.” At the link in the section “Lectures in History,” and the subtitle, National Intelligence Under President Kennedy, right-click that subtitle, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Netflix Co-founder 21 mins – “Netflix changed the world of entertainment — first with DVD-by-mail, then with streaming media and then again with sensational original shows like “Orange Is the New Black” and “Stranger Things” — but not without taking its fair share of risks. In conversation with TED curator Chris Anderson, Netflix co-founder and CEO Reed Hastings discusses the company’s bold internal culture, the powerful algorithm that fuels their recommendations, the $8 billion worth of content they’re investing in this year and his philanthropic pursuits supporting innovative education, among much more.” At the link right-click “Share,” left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politicon Republican Discussion 56 mins – “At the fourth annual political gathering known as Politicon, liberal political commentator Sally Kohn moderated a panel discussion on the Republican Party. Speakers included former Republican National Committee chair Michael Steele, former Governor Chris Christie (R-NJ), and Trump presidential campaign adviser David Urban.” At the link the audio and/or video versions of the program can be purchased. A copy of the podcast is also available in this blog archive.

Predatory Journals 12 mins – “Professor Peter Munk is professor of Radiology, Orthopaedics and Palliative Care at the University of British Columbia, and he is the editor-in-chief of the Canadian Association of Radiologists’ Journal. He discusses predatory journals and how to combat them. With MJA news and online editor Cate Swannell.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

President VanBuren 59 mins – “Ted Widmer, former adviser to President Clinton and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, talked about his biography of President Martin Van Buren.” At the link the audio and/or video versions of the program can be purchased. A copy of the podcast is also available in this blog archive.

Presidential Power 57 mins – “On this Presidents’ Day edition of We the People, political historian Julian Zelizer of Princeton and constitutional law professor Eric Posner of the University of Chicago Law School join host Jeffrey Rosen to debate the question: Is the presidency too powerful? Starting with the Founding Fathers’ vision for the presidency, they trace the evolution of presidential power through the Progressive Era presidencies of Teddy Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson, the move to restrain presidential power in the 1970s during LBJ’s and Richard Nixon’s presidencies, and the uptick in exercises of unilateral presidential power by modern presidents like George W. Bush, Barack Obama, and Donald Trump. Finally, they share their thoughts on presidential emergency powers and President Trump’s recent declaration of a national emergency to fund construction of the border wall.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidents Book Interview 59 mins – “Peter Osnos, long-time editor and founder of PublicAffairs Books, talks about working with Presidents Donald Trump, Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, and other politicians.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Peter Osnos,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

SAT Security Controversy 30 mins – “The details of the admissions-fraud scheme revealed by federal prosecutors last month sound like something out of a heist movie. A private admissions counselor allegedly bribed a proctor of an SAT test, and in some cases paid someone to take the test for a student, or have someone change answers to improve a student’s score. The incident has raised questions about the fairness and validity of the admissions process as a whole, and specifically about whether the SAT is as secure as it should be.” At the link right-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sgt York Documentary 50 mins – :On October 8, 1918, Alvin York fought in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and single-handedly killed 25 men and helped to capture over 130. He received a Medal of Honor for his actions and was one of the most decorated soldiers of World War I. Twenty-three years later, Warner Brothers made a film starring Gary Cooper called “Sergeant York” about the man from Tennessee, his life and wartime actions. In this American History TV interview, Alvin York’s grandson, along with a filmmaker who produced a documentary about the “Sergeant York” film, talked about the man and the movie.” At the link the audio and/or video versions of the program can be purchased. A copy of the podcast is also available in this blog archive.

Special Counsel Appointment 54 mins – “This episode examines the constitutionality of the Special Counsel Independence and Integrity Act – bipartisan legislation that, if passed, would impose regulations on firing a Special Counsel (such as Robert Mueller). Although the bill is stalled for now, legal thinkers continue to offer a range of views on its constitutionality. Joining host Jeffrey Rosen to explore both sides of the debate is Josh Geltzer of Georgetown, arguing that the bill is not constitutional, and Eric Posner of University of Chicago, arguing that it is. BONUS: Hear Senator Chris Coons (D-DE) – one of the co-sponsors of the act – discuss it with Jeffrey Rosen on a special bonus episode, recorded the same day that Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) voted to stall the bill on the Senate floor.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Special Counsel Independence and Integrity Act 34 mins – “On this bonus episode, Senator Chris Coons (D-DE) breaks down the recent developments related to The Special Counsel Independence and Integrity Act, which he co-sponsored. (We explored the constitutionality of the act on this week’s episode of We the People.) Sen. Coons also shares his plans to make the Constitution a bigger part of the work of the Senate, and asks, what ever happened to Senate debates? He sits down with National Constitution Center President and CEO Jeffrey Rosen (his former Yale Law School classmate!).” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spinal Injury Repair 11 mins – “Spinal cord researchers make breakthrough” At the linnk find the title, Spinal injury patients take steps again thanks to spinal pacemaker,” right-click Download Spinal injury patients take steps again thanks to spinal pacemaker” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Story Sharing 59 mins – “Facts are essential for scientific understanding. Stories are critical for wisdom, understanding the arc and meaning of our lives. Dr. Rachel Naomi Remen, author of two wonderful books about stories, describes how some stories can diminish us and our view of ourselves. Others give us strength and hope. Stories can reveal deep meaning in our ordinary lives and relationships. How can we change a story that is not serving us well?” At the link click “Add to the cart” then “Checkout” from the pop-up menu to buy the podcast. A copy is also included in the blog archive.

Transgender Journey 43 mins – “A trans family in the holy land – Amit Tzuk and Ofir Trainin, the subject and director of an FAMILY IN TRANSITION, an Israeli documentary about a small town father of four who becomes a woman.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump-Russian Hacking 46 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to David Corn, Washington bureau chief for Mother Jones and co-author (with Michael Isikoff) of Russian Roulette: The Inside Story of Putin’s War on America and the Election of Donald Trump. They talk about lack of media attention on Trump-Russia ties around the election, the carnival cast of characters that come with political scandals, and of course, collusion.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Unpresidented Book 36 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Martha Brockenbrough, author of the YA book Unpresidented, about breaking down the story of Donald Trump, his bullying, and his ancestry. It includes forays into the letter Friedrich Trump wrote to the prince regent of Bavaria in 1905 to keep from being deported, the Trump family’s history with real estate, Woody Guthrie’s anti-Trump song, and the powerful influence of Roy Cohn.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Games and History 56 mins – “The Department of Defense developed the very first video game and “The Oregon Trail” taught a generation to live as a pioneer. “Red Dead Redemption 2” might be a major commercial success, but how historically accurate is it of the Old West? On this episode, Brian, Nathan and Ed explore the relationship between history and video games in America.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voiceover Artist 22 mins – “ROY SAMUELSON is one of Hollywood’s leading voiceover talents in film and television. Currently Roy is leading the way in the area of DESCRIPTIVE NARRATION / AUDIO DESCRIPTION, an aspect of television and filmmaking that allows Blind/Visually Impaired viewers to get audio description during a show without interruption and fills in the void as the action is not always obvious. Roy Samuelson is a professional Audio Describer for some of the latest Hollywood productions. Movies like First Man, Venom, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, Spiderman: Homecoming, Jason Bourne, The Magnificent Seven, Get Out, Skyscraper, Atomic Blonde and television shows like Lethal Weapon, NCIS, Blue Bloods and Criminal Minds. Roy stops by the studio to join Brian Fischler and Jeff Thompson for an in-depth look at Audio Description and where it is today.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Warren Commission Report 53 mins – “This CBS News series examined lingering controversies about the Warren Commission report on the assassination of President Kennedy. Originally broadcast over four successive nights in June of 1967 and anchored by Walter Cronkite, the program consists of field reports by several correspondents, interviews with key witnesses and experts, and investigative recreations. Interview subjects include Lee Harvey Oswald’s co-workers, Dealey Plaza eyewitnesses including Abraham Zapruder, an emergency room doctor, and in his first television interview, the chief autopsy surgeon. This is part one of four parts.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Watergate Investigation 32 mins – After the Watergate break-in, reporters competed to uncover new details of a possible government conspiracy. Democrats pushed the issue hard. Walter Cronkite devoted special segments of his CBS News show to it. Why didn’t anyone care? In the third episode of Slow Burn, Leon Neyfakh looks at the indifference with which the public responded to the Watergate affair during the 1972 election campaign.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Watergate Saturday Night Massacre 39 mins – “What did Richard Nixon do when he felt the walls closing in? How did the country respond? And what did it feel like when people finally got to hear those tapes? In the penultimate episode of Slow Burn, Leon Neyfakh describes a president’s desperate final moves.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White House Press Access 32 mins – “Dahlia Lithwick is joined by Ted Boutrous, who represented CNN and Jim Acosta in their case against the White House. Jim Acosta’s “hard pass,” or permanent press pass, was revoked by the Trump administration after Acosta clashed with the president at a Nov. 7 news conference. Dahlia Lithwick and Ted Boutrous examine questions of due process and free speech brought up by the case.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White House Press Facility 58 mins – “President Trump’s revocation of CNN White House correspondent Jim Acosta’s press pass and the ongoing lawsuit, CNN v. Trump, have brought issues relating to press freedom and due process under the Constitution back into the news. On this episode, David French, senior writer at National Review and Katie Fallow, senior attorney at the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University, break down the latest developments in the CNN case as well as broader First Amendment issues in the courts today – exploring public forum doctrine, the legal battle over the president blocking users on Twitter, Facebook’s proposal to create its own “Supreme Court” to decide how to regulate content, and the potential effects of WikiLeaks editor Julian Assange’s prosecution for publishing classified information.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yellow Folks 54 mins – “Wesley Yang – The Souls of Yellow Folk – What do the “seduction movement,” the Virginia Tech shooter, and the Asian-American experience have in common? Wesley Yang thinks and writes with devastating clarity about loneliness, invisibility, and the incoherence of American life. What if Asian American cultural “invisibility” is the key to saving America? Are liberalism and democracy too tame to survive identity politics? “One risks being a pariah…just by saying the things that need to be said.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mining Digest 385 – Apr 5, 2019: Accountable Capitalism, Amazon Worker Organization, American Blind Abilities Act, Brazilian Politics, Cancer and Exercise, Cancers with Low Survival, Cannabis Law, Chinese Chef, Civilization Decline, Climate Change, Congo Stories, Crisis Responses, Disaster Kitchens, Domestic Terrorism, Don MacLean, Driverless Cars, Electrical Therapies, First Amendment and the Press, Food Safety, Gravity Storage, Hate Control, Heart Failure, HIV Cure, Holy Apostle Soup Kitchen, Homeless Care, Huawei CFO Arrest, IRS Investigations Decline, Kavanaugh Confirmation Impact, Latino Voters, Marijuana Farmer, Parent-Child Separation, Parkinsons Pandemic, Parolees, Political Divides, Prochlorococcus Value, Rajneesh Documentary, School Shootings, Sepsis Treatment, Sexual Harassment, Suicide, Tick-induced Allergies, Top Canadian Stories, Toronto Van Killings, Transgender Child Care, Weaponization of Social Media, White House Press Corps, Yemini Children

Exercise your ears: the 67 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 516 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,729 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 499 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Accountable Capitalism 46 mins – “Accountable capitalism, Dollar General, and New TV on this week’s episode with Felix Salmon, Anna Szymanski, Emily Peck,  and Bloomberg Opinion’s Justin Fox.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon Worker Organization 45 mins – “On today’s show, hosts April Glaser and Will Oremus discuss the latest round of “Tech CEO Goes to Washington.” On Tuesday morning, that CEO was Google’s Sundar Pichai, who appeared before the House Judiciary Committee and was asked about data privacy, location tracking, Google’s plans in China, and of course, Republicans’ favorite tech topic: conservative bias. We’ll talk about what we learned from this hearing as well as what we wish Congress might’ve asked the Google CEO. Then April speaks with two people who have been working to organize workers in Amazon fulfilment centers in Minneapolis. One is a founder with the Awood Center, Nimo Omar. She’s been organizing with the primarily East African communities that work in the Amazon warehouses on a campaign to collectively advocate for better working conditions.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Blind Abilities Act 24 mins – “In partnership with State Services for the Blind of Minnesota we are proud to present, PACER Center – Champions for Children with Disabilities. Barb and Kate sit down with Jeff Thompson of Blind Abilities in the sixth of a series of podcasts in partnership with PACER Center and State Services for the Blind. You can find the entire PACER Center series here. Barb talks about her role as Co-Director of the National Parent Center on Transition and Employment and her experiences in advocacy that led her to PACER Center. Kate shares her experiences from her journey through her kids transition from youth into adulthood. What worked and where she found answers. Join Barb, Kate and Jeff in this informative podcast about how PACER Center, State Services for the Blind and others played a role in the success of not only their kids transition into college, the work place and independence, but how Barb and Kate too, made the transition themselves in part by letting them grow.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

American Disunited 60 mins – “Senator Ben Sasse (R-NE) argues that the country lacks unity and offers his thoughts on how to repair it. He’s interviewed by Arthur Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute.” At the link in After Words find the title, “[Them] (1 hr. – November 10, 2018),” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apache Helicopter 149 mins – “In mid-September I drove to Illesheim Army Airfield to meet with Caleb Marheine who flies the AH-64 Apache helicopter there. We talked about the helicopter’s systems, the cockpit, aspects of flying it as well as some of the missions.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 File directly” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazilian Politics 84 mins – “Diogo and Luiza, two professors from Brazil and members of “Professores Contra o Escola Sem Partido” (PCESP) join Breht to talk about the current state of Brazilian politics, the election of Bolsonaro, Fascism, Brazilian memory, the parallels between Brazil and the US, the importance of international solidarity, and what leftists abroad can do to assist our Brazilian comrades. It gets pretty emotional towards the end, but I hope you appreciate the love and value the discussion!” At the link left-click the download arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Cancer and Exercise 23 mins – “Vol 208, Issue 8: 7 May 2018. Associate Professor Prue Cormie is an exercise physiologist and Principal Research Fellow at the Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research. She discusses the crucial role of exercise in the care of cancer patients. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Cancer with Low Survival 20 mins – “Vol 209, Issue 8: 15 October 2018. Dr Adam Walczak is Youth Cancer Services and Clinical Trials Manager with CanTeen. He discusses how to improve outcomes for adolescents and young adults with low survival cancers. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Charlotte Pence Interview 57 mins – “Vice President Mike Pence’s daughter Charlotte Pence shares important lessons she’s learned from her father. She’s interviewed by Kate Brower, journalist and author of “First in Line: Presidents, Vice Presidents, and the Pursuit of Power.” At the link in After Words find the title, “After Words with Charlotte Pence (57 min. 33 sec. – November 3, 2018),” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Chef 22 mins – “At school, Nick was embarrassed by the smell of the Chinese food his parents packed him for lunch. When he decided to become a chef, he perfected French techniques under some of the top chefs in North America and Europe. Returning home, it was his grandmother’s dumplings that gave him a jolt of sensory memory that would define his current success.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Civilization Decline 63 mins – “Chris Hedges: Live at Politics and Prose – On this episode of Live at Politics and Prose, Chris Hedges discusses his book America: The Farewell Tour at Politics and Prose.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 54 mins – “On this week’s Slate Political Gabfest, Emily Bazelon, David Plotz, and John Dickerson discuss the dire new climate report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the aftermath of the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation, and Taylor Swift’s new engagement with politics.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Congo Stories 68 mins – “On this episode of Live at Politics and Prose, John Prendergast and Fidel Bafilemba discuss their book Congo Stories, with actor Ryan Gosling, who provided photography, and journalist Chouchou Namegabe.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Connecting Technology 30 mins – “Some people thought the laying of the trans-Atlantic cable might bring world peace, because connecting humans could only lead to better understanding and empathy. That wasn’t the outcome—and recent utopian ideas about communication (Facebook might bring us together and make us all friends!) have also met with a darker reality (Facebook might polarize us and spread false information!). Should we be scared of technology that promises to connect the world? Guests include: Robin Dunbar, inventor of Dunbar’s Number; Nancy Baym, Microsoft researcher.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crisis Responses 55 mins -”Between natural disasters, targeted attacks, and everyday run-of-the mill accidents, we hear about crises happening to other people on the news all the time. This week, Piya speaks with people who were there when crisis struck, to find out how they responded… and what their reaction says about them.” At the link find the title, “1101 #91: Crisis Reactors,” right-click Download #91: Crisis Reactorsand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Kitchens 75 mins – “On this episode of Live at Politics and Prose, José Andrés discusses his book We Fed An Island.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Domestic Terrorism 19 mins – “Daryl Johnson tried to warn Homeland Security about the growing momentum behind right-wing extremists. He was not well-received. On Friday’s show, how the actions of the Obama and Trump administrations fueled far-right violence. Plus, there’s election shadiness happening in Kansas. Slate’s Mark Joseph Stern explains.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Don McLean 12 mins – “It was late in 1971 when the singer-songwriter Don McLean released his song “American Pie.” Today, everybody still seems to know all the words … but nobody seems to know what those words really mean. Who is the “jester [who] sang for the king and queen/ In a coat he borrowed from James Dean?” And what was it that “touched [the singer] deep inside/ The day the music died”? Don McLean himself helps break down the song, along with author Raymond I. Schuck. Then, singer Garth Brooks talks about his love for the song and about performing it onstage with McLean. American Pie” was recently chosen by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Recording Registry.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Driverless Cars 33 mins – “The first pedestrian killed by a car in the Western Hemisphere was on New York’s Upper West Side in 1899. One newspaper warned that “the automobile has tasted blood.” Today, driverless cars present their own mix of technological promise and potential danger. Can the reaction to that 1899 pedestrian tragedy help us navigate current arguments about safety, blame, commerce, and public space?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electrical Therapies 35 mins – “We’ve used electricity to treat our brains for thousands of years, from placing electric fish on our heads to cure migraines to using electroconvulsive therapy to alleviate depression. But over time, our focus has shifted from restoring health to augmenting our abilities. Should we be wearing battery-powered caps to improve our concentration or implanting electricity-emitting devices to expand our thinking capacity? Guests include Bryan Johnson, CEO of Kernel.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Amendment and the Press 49 mins – “This week Dahlia Lithwick looks at freedom of the press through the lens of legal scholarship. Lithwick is joined by professor Lisa Sun of Brigham Young University’s J. Reuben Clark Law School and RonNell Andersen Jones, the Lee E. Teitelbaum chair and professor of law at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law. Their article “Enemy Construction and the Press” was published in the Arizona State Law Journal last year.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Safety P1 30 mins – “Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Deborah Blum talks about her book The Poison Squad: One Chemist’s Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the 20th Century, Part 1.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Safety P2 21 mins – “Pulitzer Priz​e–winning journalist Deborah Blum talks about her book The Poison Squad: One Chemist’s Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the 20th Century, Part 2.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fourteenth Amendment 12 mins – “There’s a clause in the 14th Amendment that people wanting to change it continue to come back to: “and subject to the jurisdiction thereof.” Professor Garrett Epps of the Atlantic joins us to explain why it’s absurd for Trump to think he can end birthright citizenship with an executive order —and also why it’s not absurd to talk about him wanting to change it.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking Industry 45 mins – “On this week’s episode, Emily Peck, Felix Salmon, Anna Szymanski, and Bethany McLean discuss: Looking Back, or Around, at the Crisis; Permian Oil Auction Gets Record $1 Billion as Bidding Soars; Saudi America by Bethany McLean; All The Devils Are Here by Bethany McLean and Joe Nocera; Shaky Ground: The Strange Saga of the U.S. Mortgage Giants by Bethany McLean; The Smartest Guys in the Room by Bethany McLeanAt the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geriatric Care for Orientals 54 mins – When we imagine old age, we tend to picture — and fear — mental decline, physical breakdown, and loss of independence. This week, Piya speaks with people facing additional challenges in the process of getting older… just because of who they are.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Google and Amazon Operations 44 mins – “On today’s show, host Will Oremus will talk about the employee uprising at Google and the changes that it and other tech companies have made to their sexual harassment policies in response. Joining him is Caroline O’Donovan, senior technology reporter for BuzzFeed News, who was there to cover the employee walkouts in person and has continued to report on the fallout. And then, a story that has been making headlines for months and finally reached its culmination this week with a big announcement. That would be Amazon’s HQ2 contest—or maybe now it’s HQ2.5, or HQ2 and 3, HQ2a and HQ2b. Whatever you call it, we’ll talk about the company’s decision to open not one but two new headquarters. One will be in Arlington, Virginia, just outside D.C. And the other in Long Island City, just across the East River from Manhattan. That, of course, prompted an outcry from critics around the country, not to mention all the cities that weren’t chosen. Here to help Will make sense of all this will be Tim Bartik, a senior economist at the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. He’s done some fascinating research on the incentives that cities offer to companies to try to get them to locate there—and whether it really pays off for their residents in the long run.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gravity Storage 100 mins – “With power generation in the grid becoming more diverse and decentralized, energy storage is becoming more and more important. Eduard Heindl‘s gravity storage is an approach to storing electrical energy as potential energy by lifting huge masses cut out of the ground. While this sounds crazy, there are lots of reasons why this makes sense. In the episode we discuss then need, the general approach, the construction process and some of the engineering challenges. We also look at the innovation process, the path from the idea to something that is ready to be built.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 File directly” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Control 55 mins – “From strident political divides, to protesting other people at rallies, to numerous stories of harassment and assault…it feels like hate is all around us today. This week, Piya speaks with haters and their targets, and asks: How do you cut through hate?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas 54 mins – “This week: grab a hot cocoa, cuddle up under a blanket and have a listen to these warm and cosy stories for the holidays. Featuring: Soul Music, The Allusionist, The Nod, Every Little Thing, Only Human and The Feast.” At the link find the title, Comforting Podcasts to Warm Up Your Holiday, right-click Download Comforting Podcasts to Warm Up Your Holiday” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Failure 21 mins – “Vol 209, Issue 3: 2 August 2018. Associate Professor John Atherton is Director of Cardiology at Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital. He discusses updated guidelines for the management of heart failure, with MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

HIV Cure 26 mins – “A man known as the “London Patient” has seemingly been “cured” after receiving a bone marrow transplant from a donor with an HIV-resistant genetic mutation. It’s only the second time in history a procedure like this has been executed successfully.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

HIV Trends 55 mins – “This week, Piya asks Canadians who have HIV what’s changed about life with the virus in the 30 years since the first World AIDS Day in 1988.” At the link find the title, “#93: World AIDS Day Turns 30,” right-click “Download #93: World AIDS Day Turns 30and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Holy Apostle Soup Kitchen 50 mins – “In this Thanksgiving bonus episode, Working takes a detour from MOMA to visit one of New York City’s biggest emergency food programs, Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen. Jordan talks to Michael Ottley, the director of operations of the program about tracking down turkeys for Thanksgiving, feeding 1,000 people a day, and how he had to convince Yelp to take down a rave review that was sending hordes of tourists to their kitchen for free meals.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless Care 14 mins – “Vol 209, Issue 5: 3 September 2018. Dr Andrew Davies is the founder and Medical Director of Homeless Healthcare, servicing the medical needs of Perth’s homeless population. He talks with MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Huawei Canadian Arrest Impact 22 mins – “The tone here is that this is an an innocent woman. So why would you treat her like a criminal? And the idea is, if you have handcuffed someone you have presumed their guilt,” says Nathan VanderKlippe, the Globe and Mail’s Asia correspondent. Tensions between Canada and China are high after the arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou and the subsequent detention of former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig. Today on Front Burner, Nathan explains China’s side of the diplomatic dispute and breaks down how this story is playing out in Beijing.” At the link find the title, How the Huawei arrest is playing out in China,” right-click “Download How the Huawei arrest is playing out in Chinaand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Huawei CFO Arrest 22 mins“It’s incredibly hard to overstate the significance of this arrest.” CBC’s economics reporter Peter Armstrong breaks down why Canada’s arrest of Huawei’s chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou for extradition to the U.S. is such a big deal.” At the link find the title, “Spying, industrial espionage and the arrest of Huawei’s CFO,” right-click “Download Spying, industrial espionage and the arrest of Huawei’s CFOand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infrastructure Funding 21 mins – “Both policy makers and investors are supporting the increased use of private funds to finance new and renewed public infrastructure. This sounds like a good idea, but is it realistic? How do these public private partnerships, called P3s, work? What are their advantages and risks? To teach us more about P3s, we talk with David Pennington, managing director at BMO Capital Markets, who guides both public agencies and private investors on the path to P3s for infrastructure.” At the link find the title, “Private Financing for Public Infrastructure,Posted November 26, 2018,” right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IRS Investigations Decline 18 mins – “Budget cuts have crippled the IRS, allowing tax cheats to run rampant. ProPublica’s Jesse Eisinger says the agency’s ability to pursue criminal cases is in collapse because of budget cuts and the fact that the agency still has the same number of auditors it had in 1953. So who benefits from this? And why does it matter?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kavanaugh Confirmation Impact 56 mins – “Dahlia Lithwick talks with Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon about the “deep wounds” in the Senate following Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation. And she’s joined by Vox’s Matthew Yglesias, who brings his nihilism about the institution of the Supreme Court to the show.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latino Voters 37 mins – “León Krauze talks with Roberto Suro, professor of public policy and journalism at the University of Southern California, about the much-buzzed-about Latino vote and the 2018 midterms. And John Di Domenico returns with more tweets.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Farmer 46 mins – “In this episode, Jordan goes back to Green Dragon in Denver to talk with Ryan Milligan, the company’s co-owner and head of cultivation. He quickly learns that the hardest part of farming marijuana definitely isn’t growing the plant.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Lawyer 46 mins – “Marshall Custer wasn’t planning on going into the marijuana industry after he graduated from law school. But as he tells host Jordan Weissmann in this episode, it’s turned out to be a booming business. You just have to be a little careful about knowing exactly who your clients are.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Liaison Officer 29 mins – “As it turns out, doing business in an industry that only recently became (semi)legal involves a lot of red tape—and messing up even a small bit of paperwork can be a disaster that might get a marijuana dispensary shut down or fined. That’s why compliance specialists like Katelin Edwards, of Terrapin Care Station, are some of the most important workers in the world of cannabis, even if you don’t hear much about them. Jordan talks to Katelin about the pressure of making sure the dispensary hews to every rule and regulation, as well as her less nerve-wracking duties as community liaison, supporting local charities and showing that yes, even a “weed company” can be a positive influence on the community.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Lobbyist 44 mins – “In the final episode of Working With Weed, Jordan talks to ​Peter Marcus, who is the communications director and head of political outreach for Terrapin Care Station in Boulder, Colorado. Like most positions in this newly legalized industry, lobbying for the interests of cannabis businesses means​ working without a roadmap. But for someone like Peter, that’s what makes things interesting. Whether he’s working to pass an unprecedented public cannabis consumption bill or unexpectedly explaining to a room full of anti-weed activists that no, everyone in the cannabis industry is ​not​ secretly in the mob, things are never run-of-the-mill for him.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Midterm Election Discussion 44 mins – “The 2018 midterm elections are the most important elections of our lifetimes … at least since the previous election. It’s a topic discussed in this week’s Political Gabfest podcast, which is hosted by Emily Bazelon, David Plotz, and John Dickerson. Special guest David Axelrod, former chief strategist for Barack Obama, dropped by to discuss the intersections of politics and violence and also Trump’s attempts to steer the election coverage leading up to the midterms.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Museum Stuff 69 mins – “This Thanksgiving week BackStory is all about stuffing and being stuffed. We’ll find out about the father of American natural history dioramas, talk to a man with a condor in his freezer, discover how a mischievous raven connects Edgar Allan Poe to Charles Dickens and unravel the extraordinary story of the man who proposed stuffing the Founding Fathers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Parent-Child Separation 55 mins -”North Americans were shocked when they discovered thousands of kids were divided from their families as part of the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy earlier this year. This week, Piya delves into different ways parent-child separation happens in the name of immigration enforcement here in Canada, with people who have directly experienced it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Parkinson Pandemic 61 mins – “The number of people with Parkinson’s in the world has doubled since 1990 and will double again by 2040, to nearly 13 million. “If you’re having an exponential rise in a condition throughout the world, that’s called a pandemic, and we haven’t addressed it as such,” says Ray Dorsey, MD, MBA, of the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, New York. In our latest podcast Dorsey speaks with MJFF Contributing Editor Dave Iverson about the rise in Parkinson’s and strategies to prevent its onset and address gaps in care. Dorsey looks to actions from the HIV/AIDS community in the 1980s that changed the trajectory of that disease. “What led that advance wasn’t great infectious disease doctors and it wasn’t great science, although those were all important. It was the community that drove change,” he says.” At the link right-click “Download Audio File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parolee Stories 54 mins – “Cliff Strong still wears his clothes to bed — a habit of having spent decades behind bars and never knowing who might be there when the cell doors open.  He’s been out on parole for nearly two years and currently lives at Haley House, a unique halfway house in Peterborough, Ont., run by the non-profit Peterborough Reintegration Services and funded mainly by Correctional Service Canada (CSC).  Haley House looks like your average bungalow, except its residents are mainly senior or palliative federal offenders on parole with housing conditions. Some are terminally ill and near the end of life, others have chronic diseases or trouble with mobility.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Political Divides 54 mins – “We have more ways than ever to communicate with each other. Yet even with all our discourse, it seems we’re more divided than ever too, entrenched in camps by our politics, identities, abilities and values. This week, meet people who stepped over the line as Piya asks: What can you learn from crossing divides?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Prochlorococcus Value 17 mins – “Oceanographer Penny Chisholm introduces us to an amazing little being: Prochlorococcus, the most abundant photosynthetic species on the planet. A marine microbe that has existed for millions of years, Prochlorococcus wasn’t discovered until the mid-1980s — but its ancient genetic code may hold clues to how we can reduce our dependence on fossil fuels.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School Shootings 15 mins – “After the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, we saw a group of students speed through the stages of grief and go directly to action. One year later, have they made any lasting changes to the gun control debate?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sepsis Treatment 45 mins – “You have probably treated someone with an infection and likely even with someone with SIRS criteria at some point in your career.  At what point does a simple infection become concerning to the point that you should call for a teleconsult? When does it become emergent or life threatening, demanding intervention and treatment? How can you prevent an infection from getting to that point? Once it becomes systemic how can you best manage a patient that meets SIRS criteria? When can you send a guy back to his room and when should you keep a close eye on him so that he doesn’t suddenly crash and die after discharge? At what point does sepsis turn into septic shock and become a life threatening emergency? In this episode Dennis moderates an interesting discussion on recognition and management of sepsis in Prolonged Field Care.  We have Doug and Jaybon from the ICU, Jay from the ER perspective along with Paul providing some questions and insight on prehospital and evacuation considerations.  This is a followup to Doc Jabon Ellis’ previous sepsis video podcast so if you want to “pre-read” listen to that first.  If you just want to listen to this one and still have some questions, go back and watch that one… a coupe times.  I feel like these 2 episodes will help make you a better medic who will be able to accurately place a patient on the SIRS/SEPSIS spectrum and apply appropriate treatments before we get to life threatening septic shock or death.” At the link right-click “Click here to download the episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment 54 mins – “It was one year ago this month that the hashtag #MeToo took off, motivating victims of sexual harassment and assault to go public about their experiences. This week, Piya speaks with people about how it has, or has not, changed their own lives.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Suicide P1 48 mins – “We are rejoined by Drew Pinsky to discuss philosophical, psychological, and sociological readings on suicide. Is suicide ever morally permissible? If it’s a symptom of mental illness rather than a chosen behavior, is it even appropriate to morally evaluate it? Last time Drew joined us, he helped us add clinical depth to an area that we’d already talked about philosophically. For suicide, while Drew has dealt with hundreds of suicidal patients, we only had one previous episode for him to bring his expertise to bear on: #4 on Camus’s “The Myth of Sisyphus” (1942). We reread this short version to reflect on the relationship between suicide and the meaning of life. For the rest, we tried to read widely from history:…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide P2 55 mins – “More on philosophical and psychological interpretations of and judgments about suicide with guest Drew Pinsky. Is suicide an epidemic or a choice? Could it be both? Socrates didn’t fear death and inspired Stoics and others to see suicide in some circumstances as brave. Or is it always cowardly? Does meaninglessness motivate suicide? If so, why should it? Listen to part one first or get the Citizen Edition, which will also get you access to the follow-up discussion, where Mark and Wes get more into Durkheim and talk about all the various types of explanation at work here: sociological, psychotherapeutic, experimental, evolutionary, etc.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tick-induced Allergies 26 mins – “Vol 208, Issue 7: 16 April 2018. Associate Professor Sheryl van Nunen is director of the Tick-induced Allergies Research and Awareness Centre in Sydney. She discusses tick anaphylaxis and mammalian meat allergy. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Top Canadian Stories of 2018 55 mins – “The media may move on… but for the people behind the headlines, the story continues. This week, Piya speaks with people affected by some of the year’s top news stories of 2018 to find out what their lives are like after trending.” At the link find the title,”1213 #95: See Ya, 2018,” right-click “Download #95: See Ya, 2018and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Toronto Van Killings 54 mins – “When a man in a van went barrelling into pedestrians in Toronto’s north end on April 23, people across the city and country were shocked. The attack left 10 people dead and injured 16 more. In the five months since this tragic event, Canadians have largely returned to the routine of daily life. But as those directly affected by the attack tell Out in the Open host Piya Chattopadhyay, their lives changed forever that day. A survivor, a witness and a victim’s family are now struggling to adapt to their unique new realities. Meanwhile, a former politician and a sitting mayor grapple with big decisions about how to act in tragedy’s aftermath, and how those choices could affect the future.” At the link you can listen to two parts, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Transgender Child Care 21 mins – “Vol 208, Issue 11: 18 June 2018. Associate Professor Michelle Telfer is Director of the Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne Gender Service. She talks about the new Australian standards of care for trans and gender diverse children and adolescents. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Weaponization of Social Media 42 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Peter Singer, co-author of the book “LikeWar: The Weaponization of Social Media,” about how Trump began using social media to rebrand himself into political life, Mike Flynn’s Twitter habits, conspiracy theorists, and why it’s tough to disconnect (even though we know better).” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White House Press Corps 30 mins – “On this week’s episode of my podcast, I Have to Ask, I spoke to Maggie Haberman, a White House correspondent for the New York Times and an analyst at CNN. She previously worked at the New York Post and Politico, has been at the Times since 2015, and this year was part of the team that won a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the Russia story. (Full disclosure: I have known Haberman for several years and occasionally discuss politics with her; we spoke once before on the podcast, last year.) Below is an edited excerpt from the show. In it, we talk about how covering Trump has changed over the past couple of years, why the White House is so scared of the Michael Cohen investigation, and the dangers of journalists spending too much time on Twitter.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yemeni Children 20 mins – “Eric Nagourney, an international desk editor for the New York Times, explains the paper’s decision to publish harrowing photographs of malnourished Yemeni children. And Fatima Alasrar, a Yemeni and a senior analyst for the Arabia Foundation, explains why she thinks assigning blame for Yemen’s famine is complicated.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mining Digest 384 – Mar 29, 2019: African Farm Growth, Autonomous Car Mishaps, California Fire Zones, Campus Unrest, Cannabis Law, Climate Politics, Computer Hacking History, Congo Stories, Disaster Kitchens, Economic Concepts, Fentanyl and Opiates, First Amendment in School, Gun Owning Doctor, Hate Speech, Information Explosion, International Elite, Jamal Khashoggi and the Hajj, Knee Replacement, Lung Health, Mental Privacy, Nitrate Hazard in Iowa Water, Occupational Lung Diseases, Online Jobs and Scams, Organ Donation, Pollinators, Prison Guard Reporter, Rajneesh Documentary, Skin cancer, Slate Editor, Strike Play, StubHub President, Swedish Political Changes, Trump Campaign and NRA, UK Christmas Music Hits, Virtual Colonoscopies

Exercise your ears: the 55 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 516 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,486 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 499 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Africa Farm Growth 11 mins – “Africa’s youth is coming of age rapidly, but job growth on the continent isn’t keeping up. The result: financial insecurity and, in some cases, a turn towards insurgent groups. In a passionate talk, agricultural entrepreneur Kola Masha details his plan to bring leadership and investment to small farmers in Africa — and employ a rising generation.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autonomous Car Mishaps 33 mins – “The first pedestrian killed by a car in the Western Hemisphere was on New York’s Upper West Side in 1899. One newspaper warned that “the automobile has tasted blood.” Today, driverless cars present their own mix of technological promise and potential danger. Can the reaction to that 1899 pedestrian tragedy help us navigate current arguments about safety, blame, commerce, and public space?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Discussion 61 mins – “The Brexit Special Edition -Slate Money talks everything Brexit—the ideological shift, the economic ramifications, and the greater effect on Europe.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Fire Zones 46 mins (7 min segment) – “The risks we face in California when it comes to wildfires has come into sharp focus in the last year and new analysis from the Los Angeles Times this morning only adds to it. More than 1.1 million structures, or roughly 1 in 10 buildings in California, are within what fire officials have identified as the HIGHEST-risk fire zones in the state and the majority are in the LA-area….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

California Wildfires 16 mins – “Steve Pyne has made fire his life’s work. He put them out for 15 summers and has thought about them ever since. Today on the show: the conversation we’re not having about wildfires and why despite the devastation in California this week, he remains hopeful that we can figure this out.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campus Unrest 34 mins – “Jonathan Haidt is a social psychologist whose new book is The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure. He sits down with Isaac Chotiner to discuss whether young people are losing faith in the First Amendment, why he thinks identity politics is polluting our political conversation, and the best way to understand the rise of Trump.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cannabis Law 46 mins – “Marshall Custer wasn’t planning on going into the marijuana industry after he graduated from law school. But as he tells host Jordan Weissmann in this episode, it’s turned out to be a booming business. You just have to be a little careful about knowing exactly who your clients are.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Politics 24 mins – “On this week’s Slate Political Gabfest, Emily Bazelon, David Plotz, and John Dickerson discuss the dire new climate report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change,…” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming 44 mins – “On this week’s episode of Slate Money, David Wallace-Wells joins Emily, Felix, and Anna to discuss his new book, The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming, and frankly, freak everyone out about global warming.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clinton-Lewinsky Scandal 46 mins – “This week, we hear more from Neyfakh’s interview with Ken Starr, the former independent counsel who investigated President Clinton. Plus, Neyfakh and Slate senior producer Mary Wilson discuss the making of Episode 6 and hear how a group of “former kids” remember the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Hacking History 29 mins – “The French telegraph system was hacked in 1834 by a pair of thieves who stole financial market information—effectively conducting the world’s first cyberattack. What does the incident teach us about network vulnerabilities, human weakness, and modern-day security? Guests include: Bruce Schneier, security expert.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Congo Stories 70 mins – “Congo Stories – John Prendergast and Fidel Bafilemba discuss their new book, with guests Ryan Gosling and Chouchou Namegabe.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consent Decrees 18 mins – “Late last week, Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a memo that put dread into the hearts of career attorneys throughout the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division. In it, Sessions called for a “review” of all 14 reform agreements—known as “consent decrees”—that the agency had struck with cities across the country during its Obama-era push for police reform. By way of justification, Sessions asserted that “local control and local accountability are necessary for effective local policing” and that “it is not the responsibility of the federal government to manage non-federal law enforcement agencies.” It was a straightforward articulation of a dearly held conservative idea: that federal big-footing of local authority is anti-democratic and should be avoided whenever possible. Police departments deserve the deference of the federal government, the memo suggested, and they shouldn’t be strong-armed into changing how they do business. Instead of forcing law enforcement agencies to abide by the dictates of federal bureaucrats and judges, the DOJ should “help promote officer safety, officer morale, and public respect for their work.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Decisions 32 mins – “Then, going with your gut isn’t always best (despite what President Donald Trump may tell you). Writer Steven Johnson says making better decisions can be as simple as considering multiple options instead of focusing on the “should I” or “shouldn’t I.” He’s also got anecdotes about Darwin’s marital deliberations, machine learning, and the call to storm the fortress in which Osama Bin Laden (“probably,” Americans figured) was ensconced. Johnson is the author of Farsighted: How We Make the Decisions That Matter the Most.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Kitchens 67 mins – “Four days after Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, José Andrés arrived on the island and started to cook. Andrés, whose 29 restaurants have earned him Michelin Stars and two James Beard “Outstanding Chef” awards, dropped everything to feed the people of Puerto Rico as they scrambled to rebuild their infrastructure and economy. Andrés cooked paella in parking lots and served sancocho at a friend’s destroyed restaurant, ultimately feeding hundreds of thousands of people. At the same time, he confronted the broken, wasteful crisis-management systems that made his cooking so necessary. We Fed an Island movingly describes his experiences in Puerto Rico, and introduces readers to the networks of community activists feeding the island to this day. A portion of the proceeds from the book will be donated to the Chef Relief Network of World Central Kitchen for efforts in Puerto Rico and beyond. Andrés is in conversation with Tim Carman, food reporter at The Washington Post.” t the link right-click the “MP3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Concepts 67 mins – “Economist and author Mariana Mazzucato talks about her book The Value of Everything with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mazzucato argues that economists have mismeasured value and have failed to appreciate the role of government as innovator. She argues for a more active role for government in the innovation process and for government to share in revenue proportional to its role in the creation of new technology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fentanyl and Opiates 19 mins – At the link find the title, “6: Opiate Analgesic Pain Control,Tue, 12 May 2015, right-click “Direct download: Morgans Opiate pain control.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Amendment in School 60 mins – “Student activism is back in America’s schools. Young people mobilizing around gun safety and social-justice issues are heading back to school. We talk to Mary Beth Tinker, who took her fight for the right to protest at school all the way to the Supreme Court back in 1969. And we hear from noted First Amendment scholar Geoffrey R. Stone of the University of Chicago Law School, who tells us what rights students have to raise their voices—or wear T-shirt slogans—in schools today.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender in Politics 82 mins – “On this episode of Live at Politics and Prose, Rebecca Traister discusses her book, Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Anger, at Sixth & I.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Owning Doctor 27 mins – “Today on the show we talk to Dr. Brendan Campbell, a pediatric surgeon at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center in Hartford. He has treated victims of gun violence for more than a decade. This week, he and his fellow colleagues released a new paper in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons recommending new ways to think about gun safety measures—not only as doctors who have seen the damage that a gun can do, but as gun owners themselves.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Speech 18 mins – “Does anyone know how to weed out the social media platforms that allow hate speech to bloom? Slate’s April Glaser explains the futility of expelling bigots from one social media platform, only to see them find safe harbor on another.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Howard Hughes Book 47 mins – “In the new book Seduction: Sex, Lies, and Stardom in Howard Hughes’s Hollywood, Karina Longworth explores the lives and careers of more than a dozen actresses who were involved, professionally and/or personally, with Howard Hughes. Inspired by the You Must Remember This episodes on “The Many Loves of Howard Hughes” produced in 2014–15, the book goes in depth, with much new research, into the stories of stars like Jean Harlow, Ginger Rogers, Ida Lupino, Jane Russell, and many more. In this short season of You Must Remember This, we’ll discuss some of the women who serve as peripheral characters in Seduction: four actresses who were briefly seduced by Hughes, either professionally or romantically, and one writer whose travails in Hollywood during the Hughes era speak to the conflicted female experience behind the camera in 20th century Hollywood. We begin the season by talking about the complicated, intermingled romantic and professional relationships of Rupert Hughes. Howard Hughes was not the first man in his family to find success in Hollywood, or to have a reputation built in part on multiple relationships with women. His uncle, Rupert Hughes, was a respected writer and director in the silent era, whose accomplishments included one of the first Hollywood meta-movies. He also married three times while making frequent public statements—and films—critiquing marriage and divorce laws. One of his marriages ended in a sensational divorce trial; the other two wives died by suicide.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Law 35 mins – “To listen to this episode of Amicus, use the player below: this week the high court is on its winter break, but the team here at Amicus wanted to talk about DACA, the travel ban, and issues around immigrants, refugees, and the law. We talk Americanism. Who is American and how? What do the courts have to say about who can be here and who cannot? What role do the courts play in figuring out who belongs here and who doesn’t? To tackle these thorny and sometimes superwonky questions, Dahlia Lithwick is joined by Stephen Vladeck who teaches law at the University of Texas. Vladeck’s teaching and research focus on federal jurisdiction, constitutional law, and national security law. He’s CNN’s Supreme Court analyst, co-editor in chief of the Just Security blog, and a senior contributor to the Lawfare blog.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Information Explosion 37 mins – “Our distant ancestors often felt overloaded by information. (“Have you read Cicero’s latest speech?” “I don’t have time!”) Throughout history we’ve invented shortcuts like tables of contents, indexes, book reviews, and encyclopedias. What technological solutions might help us cope with the information overload we experience today? Guests include: Stewart Butterfield, CEO of Slack, and Nathan Jurgenson, Snapchat sociologist.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

International Elite 48 mins – “On this week’s episode of my podcast, I Have to Ask, I spoke to Anand Giridharadas, the author of the new book Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World. It’s a book about his travels in the world of the international elite, and how he believes they have convinced themselves that they are changing the world via philanthropy and by pushing public policy they deem to be altruistic. But, he argues, in reality they’re merely helping entrench a system where elites gain more and more power, the poor have less and less power, and society is more and more reliant on the goodwill of several rich people. Giridharadas was formerly at The New York Times, where he reported extensively from India. In this edited excerpt from our conversation, we discuss whether the titans of Silicon Valley and Wall Street are really as well-meaning as they say they are, a surprising conversation Giridharadas once had with Bill Clinton, and why think tanks tend to only focus on certain kinds of solutions to political and social problems….At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jamal Khashoggi and the Hajj 22 mins – “Slate senior editor Josh Keating explains why Turkey has seized on the disappearance of a foreign journalist to stick it to Saudi Arabia. And Slate writer Aymann Ismail reconsiders going on hajj.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jules Feiffer 49 mins – “On this episode of Live at Politics and Prose, Jules Feiffer discusses his graphic novel, The Ghost Script, at Politics and Prose.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kickee Pants CEO 34 mins – Seth Stevenson talks to Kickee Pants CEO Aerin Nicole about her search for the perfect baby clothes material. In their conversation, Nicole talks about scouting for a bamboo-based textile, her line of gender-free baby clothes, and what it’s like when celebrities like Kim Kardashian post photos of their children wearing Kickee Pants.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Knee Replacement 13 mins – “Volume 207, Issue 6: 18 September, 2017. Associate Professor Justine Naylor is from the South Western Sydney Clinical School of the University of NSW. She discusses rehabilitation from total knee replacement. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Lung Health 19 mins – “Volume 207, Issue 10: 20 November, 2017. Professor Matthew Peters is head of Respiratory Medicine at Macquarie University and the Concord Repatriation General Hospital. He discusses climate change, novel therapies in lung diseases, e-cigarettes and more. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Melanomas 10 mins – “Volume 207, Issue 8: 9 October, 2017. Dr Victoria Mar is a consultant dermatologist with the Victorian Melanoma Institute and Monash University. She discusses new guidelines for diagnosing atypical melanomas. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Mental Privacy 12 mins – “Tech that can decode your brain activity and reveal what you’re thinking and feeling is on the horizon, says legal scholar and ethicist Nita Farahany. What will it mean for our already violated sense of privacy? In a cautionary talk, Farahany warns of a society where people are arrested for merely thinking about committing a crime (like in “Minority Report”) and private interests sell our brain data — and makes the case for a right to cognitive liberty that protects our freedom of thought and self-determination.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MP3 History 27 mins – “Vinyl records, cassettes, and CDs were once the staple for listening to music. Then, the invention of the MP3 player revolutionized the portable music industry and set the stage for the technology we have today. But when and where did the MP3 player get its start? In this episode of Komando on Demand, Kim looks at the history of music technology and how the MP3 player revolutionized how we listen to music, audiobooks, and so much more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nitrate Hazard in Iowa Water 30 mins – “In this episode of the Good Fight, Yascha Mounk talks to Tim Dixon, a co-founder of More in Common, about why the usual story on America’s deepening polarization is wrong, the views of America’s “exhausted majority,” how progressive activists differ from the rest of the country, and how Democrats can build a winning coalition by mobilizing “passive liberals” and by persuading moderates. [Also nitrates in Iowa water – Pulitzer Prize for Art Cullen]At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Occupational Lung Diseases 17 mins – “Volume 207, Issue 10: 13 November, 2017. Dr Ryan Hoy is a respiratory physician at Cabrini Medical Centre, and Monash University in Melbourne. He discusses occupational lung diseases. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Online Jobs and Scams 27 mins – “Ever been tight for cash and wished you had a side hustle that can provide you with that extra money you need without having to leave your house? Ever wondered what it might be like if you didn’t have to commute to your 9-to-5 job and instead just opened up your laptop to work from the comfort of your own couch, in your pajamas? There are sites out there that do legitimately cater to people who are confined to their homes or simply prefer to work remotely. And we’ll get to those. But a scary truth in this digital age is that some work-at-home gigs that promise big payouts are actually scams. Listen to this Komando on Demand podcast to learn how to avoid those scams and make money with legit jobs.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Organ Donation 20 mins – Volume 207, Issue 7: 25 September, 2017. Professor David Pilcher is deputy director at the Intensive Care and Hyperbaric Medicine Unit at the Alfred in Melbourne. Dr Helen Opdam is an intensivist and National Medical Director of DonateLife. Dr Sandeep Rakhra is an intensive care registrar at the Alfred. They discuss organ donation after circulatory death. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Philanthropy 34 mins – “…The book argues that we live in this extraordinary age in America … in which rich people and plutocrats are generous by every measure: [They] give a lot of money back, every elite young graduate wants to change the world, wants to do good, wants to help out. And yet we live in an era that has been absolutely punishing for perhaps the majority of Americans. Since 1979, the bottom half of Americans—about 117 million people—have seen their incomes rise from $16,000 to $16,200 over the last 39 years of innovation, growth, and transformation of the world order, whereas those in the top 1 percent and .01 percent and .001 percent have seen their incomes double, triple, multiply by however many X…” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pollinators 16 mins – “Keith Pannell and co-host Liz Walsh, Professor of Biological Sciences at UTEP, speak with Nigel Raine.  Raine is a Professor in the School of Environmental Sciences at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada whose research focuses on pollinator conservation and behaviour and monitoring of wild pollinator populations in Ontario.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Guard Reporter 32 mins “On this week’s episode of my podcast, I Have to Ask, I spoke to Shane Bauer, a senior reporter for Mother Jones whose new book is American Prison: A Reporter’s Undercover Journey Into the Business of Punishment. It’s the story of Bauer’s own experience, undercover, in a private Louisiana prison, and it is a harrowing look at one slice of our criminal justice system. Below is an edited excerpt from the show. In it, we discuss what being a prison guard did to Bauer’s psyche, why the system is explicitly designed to have guards dehumanize prisoners, and how his prior experience in solitary confinement shaped his thinking about being a guard.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prisoner Health 16 mins – “Volume 207, Issue 2: 17 July 2017. Stuart Kinner is honorary professor in the Centre for Mental Health Research at the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health. Megan Carroll is a PhD candidate. They discuss their research investigating the GP attendance habits of former prisoners. With MJA news and online editor Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Rajneesh Documentary 28 mins – “Wild Wild Country is one of the year’s best documentaries, but it pulls a few punches on the sinister cult it covers.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robert Bork Nomination P2 49 mins – “This episode of Whistlestop travels back to Sept. 15, 1987 and into the Kennedy Caucus Room where was Associate Justice nominee Robert Bork begins his five days of testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Whistlestop is Slate’s podcast about presidential history. Hosted by Political Gabfest panelist John Dickerson, each installment will revisit memorable moments from America’s presidential carnival.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment 63 mins – “On this week’s episode of the Waves, Hanna, Noreen, and June discuss female sexual harassers. How do the gender dynamics of these cases impact the way we interpret and respond to them, and what are the consequences of the do-no-wrong glorification of #MeToo leaders when the reality is more complicated? Next, Kellyanne Conway and her (supposedly) Trump-hating husband are back in the spotlight, thanks to a wild profile of their marriage in the Washington Post. Is George Conway sincere, or is the couple just hedging its bets? Finally, Democrats are nominating more women to run for Congress than ever before—while the GOP is telling its female candidates not to run this year. Are moderate Republican women really a “dying breed”—and what might it mean for both parties if so?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Skin Cancer 13 mins – “Volume 207, Issue 8: 16 October, 2017. Professor David Whiteman is senior scientist and leader of the Cancer Control Group at QIMR Berghofer. He discusses basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas with MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Slate Editor 42 mins – “What’s it like to be the woman who runs an online magazine and podcast network? On this episode of Women in Charge, we flip the mics and Slate’s executive editor, Allison Benedikt, interviews Julia Turner, Slate’s editor in chief. Turner talks about her career trajectory, discusses the concept of female mentorship, and reveals what excites her about her new move.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Director 42 mins – “Ellen Stofan: The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum consists of two different museums; our building on the National Mall, as well as another facility out near Dulles Airport called the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center. Both my museums are amazing. Out at Udvar-Hazy we have the space shuttle Discovery, we have an SR-71 Blackbird, and downtown at our National Mall building, which we’re about to do a major renovation project on, we hold, for example, a lot of the legacy of the Apollo program and then slightly historic artifacts from fairly historic objects like the 1903 Wright Flyer, the first airplane to ever fly, and the Spirit of St. Louis, which was, of course, where Charles Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic for a first time in an airplane.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Strike Play 12 mins – “Lynn Nottage’s play Sweat won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2017. It tells the story of a group of friends who work in a factory in Reading, Pennsylvania, and are reeling from layoffs and racial tension. The Public Theater’s Mobile Unit took the show to the road and visited 18 places in the Rust Belt. One of these unconventional venues was a public library in St. Cloud, Minnesota. Studio 360 was there to capture the moment.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

StubHub President 41 mins – “What’s it like to be a woman who’s worked at the helm of multiple internet-based companies? On this episode of Women in Charge, Julia Turner talks to Sukhinder Singh Cassidy—someone who worked her way from investment banking at Merrill Lynch, to heading up sectors at Amazon and Google, to finally taking on the role of president of StubHub. They speak about the need to surround yourself with people who will manage you, and about garnering insights from people across your organization. Cassidy also speaks about her work as the founder of TheBoardlist, an organization working to connect CEOs with qualified company-board candidates who are women.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Swedish Political Changes 54 mins – “In this episode of the Good Fight, Yascha Mounk talks to Peter Wolodarski, the editor of Dagens Nyheder, about the rapid rise of the Sweden Democrats, the reasons why far-right populists have found so much success in Scandinavia, and what Americans can learn from these changes.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Campaign and NRA 29 mins -”León Krauze talks to Mike Spies, a reporter for nonprofit news outlet the Trace, which covers the U.S. gun violence crisis. Spies broke a story about how the NRA and the Trump campaign coordinated their advertising strategies during the 2016 presidential campaign.
Also covered: The NRA’s $30 million contribution in support of Trump in 2016—which is an exceptional amount of money for the association—Maria Butina, and what it will take to turn around the U.S. gun crisis.”
At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Real Estate 50 mins – “Jacob Weisberg talks to Tom Burgis of the Financial Times about his story “Tower of Secrets: the Russian Money Behind a Donald Trump Skyscraper.” The two discuss a deal in Toronto, why people with illegitimate money look to Western real estate to “clean” that money, and what more this says about the rise of kleptocracy around the world. Note: Alex Shnaider has responded to Burgis’ story and can be read here in full:An Article Littered With ‘Ifs’ and ‘Possibilities’ ” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

UK Christmas Music Hits 71 mins – “In the U.K., the No. 1 song the week of Christmas is a big deal. The media breathlessly cover the contest, and there are even wagers placed on what song will reach the top of the charts as pop stars and record labels jockey for position. While there are patterns to the kinds of songs that tend to do well in this perennial sweepstakes, often the winner is a fluke: Everything from Queen to the Flying Pickets to Bob the Builder has taken the crown. It was even parodied in the smash British Christmas comedy film Love Actually—and one year in the late aughts, the British public rebelled en masse against a music-TV impresario, making a statement with the unlikeliest Christmas topper ever. But in an age when songs sell less than they stream, and hits tend to snowball, will the sun set on the fluky British Christmas No. 1 empire?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

University Operations 36 mins – “What is it like to be a woman who leads a university of 55,000 students? On this episode of Women in Charge, Julia Turner talks to Ana Mari Cauce, the president of the University of Washington, who progressed from assistant professor to president, all at the same institution. They speak about how a leader should never be the smartest person in the room, about Cauce being an unlikely candidate for administration, and about the Race and Equity initiative at University of Washington.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virtual Colonoscopy 10 mins – “Volume 207, Issue 4: 21 August 2017. Professor Tom Sutherland is a radiologist on the executive of the Abdominal Radiology Group of Australia and New Zealand. He discusses CT colonography and its underuse in Australia. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mining Digest 383 – Mar 22, 2019: Acne in Adults, American Disintegration, Anthroplogy and Business, Bias Impacts, Bill Clinton, Blind Instructor, Burnout Discussion, Camera Recovery Stories, Cannabidiol or CBD, Carbon Dioxide Removal, Child Predators, Climate Action, Climate Change Communication, Clinton-Lewinsky-Feminists, Computer Virus History, Congressional Violence, Democratic Freedom, Digital Culture Foundation, Economics 101, Encephalitis Lethargica, Environmental Failure, Fake News and Hoaxes, Fascism in U.S., Forensic DNA, Gen Nadja West, Hacking Young Minds Problem, Impeachment Guide, Indigenous Youth Suicides, Innovator’s DNA, Killiam Trust, Lies and Hoaxes, Linda Tripp, Mail Order Brides, Marijuana Farm in Colorado, Maxine Waters, Mind-Body Problems, Monica Lewinsky, Nonprofit Organizations, Organic Chemistry, Poor Laws in Europe, Populism Increases, Ruby Ridge, Sheldon Adelson Impact on Trump, Smart Device Impact, Sovereign Debt, Spanish Civil War, Success Academy Expectations, Success Academy, Television Inventor, Thanking People, THC Extraction, Venus, Victorian Virtual Reality Uses, Watergate Discussion, White Nationalist Conversion, Women Leaders, Wyatt Cenac

Exercise your ears: the 88 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 633 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,486 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 499 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Acne in Adults 53 mins – “Acne isn’t just a teenage rite of passage. Grown-up women with jobs and bank accounts struggle with chronic pimples as well. Cristen and Caroline examine why adult acne happens, how birth control affects it and other treatment options. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

African American Museum 46 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by Wanda Draper, who is the Executive Director at Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture to discuss her experience on the board of a museum and how museums can influence innovation. Wanda has over 40 years of experience in both broadcast and print journalism and has previously worked as Director of Programming at NBC-affiliated WBALTV, Director of Public Information for the Governor of Maryland, and as a reporter for The Baltimore Sun.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Disintegration 54 mins – “Christopher Hedges is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and the author of America: The Farewell Tour. He believes that America may well be in its last act. Addiction, income disparity and hollowed-out towns and cities are becoming the norm, he argues, while the political and financial sectors increasingly merge with each other to the exclusion of anyone else’s interests or needs. His vision is dark and sobering. America’s only salvation, he concludes in this illustrated conversation with guest host Rachel Giese, is mass resistance.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Anthropology and Business 45 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by author and journalist, Gillian Tett, to discuss the role anthropology plays in today’s business world. Gillian is the author of the award-winning book, Fool’s Gold, which analyses the origin of the 2008 financial crisis, and most recently, The Silo Effect, and is currently a columnist and US Managing Editor of The Financial Times.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artist Tom Thompson P1 59 mins – “Historian Gregory Klages describes the challenge of separating fact from fiction when it comes to the life and death of Tom Thomson. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Artist Tom Thompson P2 54 mins – “Many of us just can’t resist a good pilgrimage, whether it’s a religious one or not. The soul desires a deeper connection with whatever truly moves us. The late Canadian painter Tom Thomson has inspired many such pilgrimages. People often travel to where he’s thought to be buried, in the family plot at Leith, Ontario, or in a tiny cemetery beside Canoe Lake, in Algonquin Park, where he died under mysterious circumstances in 1917. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Asteroid Visitor 13 mins – “In October 2017, astrobiologist Karen J. Meech got the call every astronomer waits for: NASA had spotted the very first visitor from another star system. The interstellar comet — a half-mile-long object eventually named `Oumuamua, from the Hawaiian for “scout” or “messenger” — raised intriguing questions: Was it a chunk of rocky debris from a new star system, shredded material from a supernova explosion, evidence of alien technology or something else altogether? In this riveting talk, Meech tells the story of how her team raced against the clock to find answers about this unexpected gift from afar.At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bee Gees 91 mins – “Those falsettos, those white suits, those toothy smiles—you think you know the Bee Gees. But their story goes back much further than the ’70s, and it’s full of twists. From their roots as an eclectic harmony band in Australia and their first wave of Beatlesque fame, through their domination of the disco revolution and their years as a punchline, the Bee Gees stayed alive because of the Gibb brothers’ harmonies and especially their impeccable songs. This month, Hit Parade traces the influence of the Brothers Gibb on virtually every popular genre, from pop to R&B, rock to easy listening, country to … yes, even hip-hop.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Bias Impacts 12 mins – “What shapes our perceptions (and misperceptions) about science? In an eye-opening talk, meteorologist J. Marshall Shepherd explains how confirmation bias, the Dunning-Kruger effect and cognitive dissonance impact what we think we know — and shares ideas for how we can replace them with something much more powerful: knowledge.At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bill Clinton 40 mins – “Cliff Jackson insists that he never hated Bill Clinton. Here’s what he said about it when I interviewed him earlier this year: CLIFF JACKSON: With all my reservations about his character, I still thought that he had the potential to be one of the greatest presidents we’ve ever had. Jackson said pretty much the same thing back in 1994, when it was clear that he was doing everything he could to weaken Clinton’s presidency: CLIFF JACKSON: I am not an enemy of Bill Clinton. Enemy, to me, implies personal animus. Personal animosity. And I don’t have that. That’s not why I’m doing what I’m doing. You’ll hear about what Cliff Jackson was doing, and why, in just a second. First, I want to tell you the story of how he and Clinton met.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Blind Instructor 18 mins – “Please welcome Teen correspondent, Simon Bonenfant, as he steps into the interviewer role for Blind Abilities. While attending and presenting at the Pennsylvania NFB convention, Simon pulled out his recorder and went to work. Conducting 5 interviews from vendors and presenters. In this interview, Simon talks to Retired Teacher of the Visually Impaired/Orientation and Mobility Instructor Keith Ford. They talk about the importance of braille and how modern technology is changing the way teachers teach and Keith gives us some insight into the field of a Teacher of the Visually Impaired along with some tips for Transition age students. Join Simon and Keith in this brief look back at the journey Keith has gone through and his optimistic view of the future of technology and training.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Veterans 19 mins – “On the centenary of Armistice Day, over 100 blind veterans assembled at Horse Guards Parade in London. Some were blinded in action. However, most started to lose their sight well after their service had ended. Reporter Dave Williams went to talk to them as they assembled for this historic event – we hear just some of their stories. Also, Peter White visits 97-year-old blind veteran Peter Van Zeller. He is a resident at a Blind Veteran’s UK care home, and shares the story of when he first discovered a previously-unknown family connection to the home, and the charity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burnout Discussion 56 minsThe Story Over the last few months, we’ve been busy raising capital, hiring employees, launching shows, building a studio, and getting this business off the ground. But a few weeks ago, pretty much overnight, everything changed. During the holidays, while Alex was out of town, the workload became overwhelming, and Gimlet learned its first lessons about startup burnout. But it wouldn’t be a StartUp episode if that burnout wasn’t documented. While Alex is away, a new Gimlet employee picks up a recorder and captures the fallout on tape. Thanks to everyone who took our audience survey last week. To see the results, follow this link:  https://hearstartup.typeform.com/report/ofUGcO/wheUAt the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the soundbar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Camera Recovery Stories 22 mins – “If you’ve ever lost anything of sentimental value, you’ll relate to the stories in this podcast. This Komando on Demand episode shares surprising tales about lost cameras and valuable photos that were returned to their owners — sometimes years later — and how technology and social media reconnected them. Listen to these incredible stories, and you can’t help but smile.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cannabidiol or CBD 30 mins – “CBD mania is in full swing and people are using it for just about anything, but what is this chemical in cannabis? In this week’s episode, we tell you unlikely origin story of CBD and if the science backs up the hype. We speak to Paige Figi, neuroscientist Prof. Kent Hutchison, clinical researcher Dr. Mallory Loflin, and Josh and Joel Stanley.At the link you can listen, but not download however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

Carbon Dioxide Capture 14 mins – “Our planet has a carbon problem — if we don’t start removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, we’ll grow hotter, faster. Chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox previews some amazing technology to scrub carbon from the air, using chemical reactions that capture and reuse CO2 in much the same way trees do … but at a vast scale. This detailed talk reviews both the promise and the pitfalls.At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Predators 42 mins – “Kids run away in search of love only to be held captive by sex traffickers, hate groups, and terrorists. Every 40 seconds, a child goes missing in the United States. Learn how innocent-looking apps and recruiters are luring our kids in this can’t miss Komando on Demand episode. It might just save a life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Action 56 mins – “Environmental problems are well-known and have been for decades, but we still appear to be edging towards a global catastrophe. Why? Environmentalist Graham Saul believes that part of the problem is environmentalism itself. He believes it has a message problem — mainly because it doesn’t have a single, coherent, unified message that people can grasp. Graham Saul has been on the forefront of environmental thought and activism for over 25 years. In this lecture, he parses the problem and points towards a step with potential planet-saving implications. We are running out of time. According to the 2018 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, the overwhelming consensus in the scientific community is that we have just over a decade to turn things around to minimize the impact of global warming. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog

Climate Change and Having Children 54 mins – “Young couples face a complicated decision at a time when the dire consequences of climate change are becoming clearer, is it ethical to bring a child into the world? Science journalist Britt Wray talks with parents, prospective parents, ethicists, scientists, and children on this thorny question. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Climate Change Communication 17 mins – “How do you talk to someone who doesn’t believe in climate change? Not by rehashing the same data and facts we’ve been discussing for years, says climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe. In this inspiring, pragmatic talk, Hayhoe shows how the key to having a real discussion is to connect over shared values like family, community and religion — and to prompt people to realize that they already care about a changing climate. “We can’t give in to despair,” she says. “We have to go out and look for the hope we need to inspire us to act — and that hope begins with a conversation, today.,At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clinton-Lewinsky-Feminists 46 mins – “Today it’s conventional wisdom that all feminists hypocritically turned their backs on Monica Lewinsky. In fact, the scandal provoked an intense debate within the feminist movement about sex, power, and consent. For some, it was obvious that Clinton had victimized Lewinsky and needed to be thrown overboard. For others, it was just as obvious that the scandal was part of a political war in which Clinton was the good guy. In the seventh episode of our series on Clinton’s impeachment, Leon Neyfakh excavates the arguments and ideas that divided liberals—and feminists in particular—at the height of the scandal.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Computer Virus History 36 mins – “Before WikiLeaks, there was the Wank Worm. In this week’s episode, we tell you the story of how Australian hackers infiltrated NASA, just months after the country was hooked up to the internet in 1989. Joel Werner, host of Sum of All Parts, helps us tell this story, along with cybersecurity researcher Dr. Suelette Dreyfus.” At the link you can listen, but not download however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

Congressional Violence 56 mins – “On this episode of Live at Politics and Prose, Joanne B. Freeman discusses her book The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War at Politics and Prose.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Conservation Scientist 46 mins – “When you think about the types of jobs at an art museum, scientist probably doesn’t spring to mind. But as it turns out, science plays a big part in the art world. As a senior conservation scientist at MoMA, Chris McGlinchey uses the latest scientific techniques to conserve the collection and study the art. Chris tells Jordan about all the complex machines he uses, the extremely tiny scale conservators work on, and figuring out how to fill the museum with sugar cane that won’t rot. At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Democrat Surge and Demonstrations 41 mins – “Orange County, California, was the political starting point for Nixon, for the Barry Goldwater presidential campaign, and for Reagan—as Republican as any place in America. But starting in January, not a single Republican will represent Orange County in the House. It’s solid blue. Gustavo Arellano will explain how it happened—he’s a weekly columnist for the Los Angeles Times, and wrote the legendary column “Ask a Mexican.” Also: Mass demonstrations in America, from the 1963 March on Washington to the 2017 Women’s March. What protests do when they work, and why: L.A. Kauffman explains. Her new book is How to Read a Protest: The Art of Organizing and Resistance….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Democratic Freedom 54 mins – “What does it mean to be free? All societies place restrictions on what citizens can do, but some restrictions (speed limits) may be more important than others (limiting the right to vote). But one-size “freedom” doesn’t really fit all: democracy has many faces, and ideas of freedom are shaped over place and time. Many people in the West may find it difficult to look at more theocratic Middle Eastern countries where a priestly class has huge influence in politics, and consider them to be democratic, and their people to be “free”. For their part, these countries might look on our secular societies as profoundly morally corrupt and unfree. Similarly, we may look at a country with a single political party, such as China, and wonder how free anyone might feel in such a situation- even though many Chinese obviously do. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Dickens on Tour 29 mins- “This episode revisits the story of Charles Dickens on tour, featuring previous hosts Sarah and Deblina. Dickens is best known for chronicling life in London, but he also wrote about the United States – and not in a flattering light. When touring the U.S. and Canada with his wife, Dickens found many American customs repugnant. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Digital Culture Foundation 15 mins – “In the early days of digital culture, Jaron Lanier helped craft a vision for the internet as public commons where humanity could share its knowledge — but even then, this vision was haunted by the dark side of how it could turn out: with personal devices that control our lives, monitor our data and feed us stimuli. (Sound familiar?) In this visionary talk, Lanier reflects on a “globally tragic, astoundingly ridiculous mistake” companies like Google and Facebook made at the foundation of digital culture — and how we can undo it. “We cannot have a society in which, if two people wish to communicate, the only way that can happen is if it’s financed by a third person who wishes to manipulate them,” he says.At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics 101 38 mins – “On this week’s edition of Slate Money, host Felix Salmon of Fusion, Slate’s Jordan Weissmann, and Cathy O’Neil of Mathbabe devote the entire episode to a letter from Nathan Connelly, a teacher who emailed us to ask the following question: If you were to teach high school economics—comprised of mostly 16- to 18-year-olds—today, what would be the top three pieces of knowledge/insight/concepts each student should graduate taking with them for years after? To put it another way: What do you wish you would have learned in high school about the economic system?…Great question, but Slate Money always goes big. Instead of discussing a mere list of three, Felix, Jordan, and Cathy each came up with three, for a grand total of nine essential economic economics concepts for the high school crowd. In fact, Felix claims it’s really a list of 10: 1. Supply and demand 2. Sunk costs 3. Inflation 4. The “invisible hand” 5. The “tragedy of the commons” 6. Causality 7. Opportunity costs 8. Comparative advantage (video supplement) 9. Income inequality 10. Models versus reality Don’t see your favorite concept? Got a bone to pick with us? Send us an email at slatemoney@slate.com.”

Encephalitis Lethargica 33 mins – “From 1916 to about 1927, a strange epidemic spread around the world. It caused unusual symptoms, from drastic behavior changes to a deep, prolonged sleep that could last for months. Between 20 and 40 percent of people who caught the disease died. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Environmental Failure 48 mins – “Environmental problems are well-known and have been for decades, but we still appear to be edging towards a global catastrophe. Why? Environmentalist Graham Saul believes that part of the problem is environmentalism itself. He believes it has a message problem — mainly because it doesn’t have a single, coherent, unified message that people can grasp. Graham Saul has been on the forefront of environmental thought and activism for over 25 years. In this lecture, he parses the problem and points towards a step with potential planet-saving implications. We are running out of time. According to the 2018 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, the overwhelming consensus in the scientific community is that we have just over a decade to turn things around to minimize the impact of global warming. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog

Fake News and Hoaxes 22 mins – “Just after Kevin Young handed in the manuscript of his magnum opus on American hucksterism, Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News, his publisher had to send it back to him. Young—a noted poet, the newly appointed poetry editor of the New Yorker, and director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at the New York Public Library—has a theory that most hoaxes have a racial subtext (that is, when race isn’t the overt text). So when the Rachel Dolezal scandal broke, of course he had to weigh in on that, and back to the keyboard he went. Bunk conveys the sense that Young might have gone on writing it forever, frantically trying to keep up with the real world’s ever more screamingly on-the-nose illustrations of his theme. After Dolezal came Melania Trump’s speech on the first day of the Republican National Convention in July 2016, which may provide even better proof of Young’s point. Married to a man whose political fortunes depend on his promise to shore up white privilege and on his repudiation of the nation’s first black president, Melania plagiarized her speech from Michelle Obama. You can’t make this stuff up. At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Fascism in U.S. 54 mins – “We’ve heard it so much that it’s almost become a cliché: America is on the road to fascism. The debate over that claim continues, but renowned scholar Henry Giroux argues that “Donald Trump is not just some impulsive rich guy who marketed his way into politics through empty Kardashian-style consumer culture”. Trump needed followers. And he got them. Now what? At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog

Forensic DNA 32 mins – “Forensic DNA analysis has been used by law enforcement for years to help solve some of the biggest crimes. But with the rise of DNA analysis and forensic genealogy companies such as 23andMe, Ancestry, and Genomelink, some ethical questions must be answered. In this episode of Komando on Demand, Kim explores how law enforcement uses forensic DNA analysis to solve notorious criminal cases as well as the ethics and privacy issues of DNA data banks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gen Nadja West 33 mins – “What’s it like to be the woman who runs the United States Army Medical Command?* On this episode of Women in Charge, Julia Turner talks to Army Surgeon General Nadja West. West speaks about being born into a military family, choosing medicine, and discovering her place as a leader. She also talks about the increasing openness in the military and her personal view on the importance of kindness in positions of power.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Hacking Young Minds Problem 17 mins – “Writer and artist James Bridle uncovers a dark, strange corner of the internet, where unknown people or groups on YouTube hack the brains of young children in return for advertising revenue. From “surprise egg” reveals and the “Finger Family Song” to algorithmically created mashups of familiar cartoon characters in violent situations, these videos exploit and terrify young minds — and they tell us something about where our increasingly data-driven world is headed. “We need to stop thinking about technology as a solution to all of our problems, but think of it as a guide to what those problems actually are, so we can start thinking about them properly and start to address them,” Bridle says.At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Research 54 mins – “Although he’s not yet officially eligible to collect his pension, Dr. David Naylor is already President Emeritus of the University of Toronto — having occupied the office itself for eight turbulent years from 2005 – 2013. Before that, Naylor was Dean of Medicine at U of T, and Chair of the National Advisory Committee on SARS. Right now, he’s interim head of the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. And he was recently awarded the 2018 Henry G. Friesen Prize for Health Science Research. David Naylor talks with Paul Kennedy about his life and work, and about his recent Friesen Prize Lecture at the University of Ottawa. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Hotel Uses 54 mins – “A guest checks into a Las Vegas hotel suite, and makes it a fortress, staging a mass shooting on the city below. It’s a horrific act that seems to subvert the very ethos of hotels – places of hospitality and calm. Yet hotels contain multitudes. They are sites of fantasy and functionality, pleasure and trouble. Their spaces are public and private, workplace and bedroom. They exist to house us temporarily, in luxury or in squalor. IDEAS producer Lisa Godfrey explores hotels, both in reality and the imagination, with hotel workers, designers, and writers – to reveal how hotels reflect private desires and social truths. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Impeachment Discussion 44 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to CNN contributor and impeachment attorney Ross Garber about the recently unsealed Watergate “Road Map,” and what it could imply for any reports issued by Special Counsel Robert Mueller.Further Reading:The Watergate “Road Map” and the Coming Mueller ReportGrand jury report and recommendation to the House ” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment Guide 37 mins – “Jacob Weisberg talks to Harvard Law School’s Cass Sunstein about his new book, Impeachment: A Citizens Guide, and what it takes to remove a president from office.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous Youth Suicides 54 mins – “Prize-winning journalist Tanya Talaga (author of Seven Fallen Feathers) explores the legacy of cultural genocide against Indigenous peoples in her 2018 CBC Massey Lectures series, titled All Our Relations: Finding the Path Forward. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Innovator’s DNA 47 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by Hal Gregersen, author of The Innovator’s DNA, to discuss his latest book, Questions are the Answer. Hal is a Senior Lecturer in Leadership and Innovation and the Executive Director of the Leadership Center at MIT, and has previously taught at Dartmouth College, The World Economic Forum, and the London Business School. What was covered – Why Hal believes most CEOs have trouble asking questions and how to pivot from answer-centric to question-led leadership. How to be a better leader by asking the ‘different, better question’ and using the ‘power of the pause’. How Hal’s question-first process of reframing of challenges can help us discover the winning solution.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

James Comey 36 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to analyst Mieke Eoyang, vice president of Third Way’s national security program, about all things James Comey, including his testimony, takes on his role and righteousness, and what we would want to hear from him. Plus, Rex Tillerson, the new U.N. ambassador and how Trump elects women to his Cabinet, and more Trump-Russia.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Killam Trust 54 mins – “The Killam Trusts were established in 1965 after the death of Mrs. Dorothy J. Killam, the widow of Izaak Walton Killam, a Canadian financier, for a time the wealthiest man in Canada. He died intestate in 1955, but before his death he and his wife discussed in extensive detail the scholarship plan on which the Killam Trusts were founded. Approximately one half of his estate went to the government as inheritance tax. It was used to found the Canada Council, along with similar funds from the estate of Sir James Dunn, also from Nova Scotia). The rest of Mr. Killam’s estate was inherited by his widow, Dorothy J. Killam. In the ten years between his death and hers, she doubled the Killam fortune. Upon her death at Villa Leopolda, her estate in France, her lawyer Donald N. Byers, QC put into motion the plans the Killams had discussed during their lifetimes. Having no children of their own, the Killams decided to leave their fortune to further post-secondary education in Canada at the graduate studies level. The Killam benefactions went to five Canadian universities: University of British Columbia, University of Calgary, University of Alberta, Montreal Neurological Institute at McGill University and Dalhousie University. The Canada Council for the Arts also received Killam funds. The Council’s Killam Research Fellowships are open to professors from all Canadian universities. The Council’s $100,000 Killam Prizes in health sciences, natural sciences, engineering, social sciences and humanities, recognize lifetime contributions. The five Killam Prize Winners will travel to “Killam” universities each year to give a public lecture. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Kleptomania 33 mins – “Why are two-thirds of diagnosed kleptomaniacs women? Cristen and Caroline explore the 19th-century rise of retail consumerism, shoplifting and how kleptomania was invented to help keep wealthy women out of prison. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Language Impact 54 mins – “PhD graduate Laura Hare taught herself Biblical Hebrew so she could analyze male and female speech patterns in the original text of the Hebrew Bible (or Old Testament). She found the women characters consistently using language that shows deference to men. Some of these signs of deference exist in women’s speech today in North American English. The only female biblical character who fully speaks ‘like a man’ also became an archetype of evil — Queen Jezebel. Ideas from the Trenches producers Tom Howell and Nicola Luksic find out what Laura Hare’s discoveries mean for the present day. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Lies and Hoaxes 22 mins – “It may feel like disinformation is at an all-time high, but hoaxes, lies, and yellow journalism are age-old.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Linda Tripp 46 mins – “Aside from Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky, the most pivotal player in the Clinton-impeachment saga may have been Linda Tripp—an ordinary person who made extraordinary choices that precipitated the entire crisis. In perhaps the deepest and most intimate interview she’s ever given, Tripp talks to Leon Neyfakh about what she did, and why….” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Mail Order Brides 41 mins – “Six Impossible Episodes: Deja Vu in the U.S. and Canada, Dec 10, 2018 – Several times over the past few years, we’ve done an episode on something from U.S. history, and afterward we’ve gotten notes from listeners about the same thing happening in Canada – although this episode starts with one that’s the reverse. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Makeup History 33 mins– “We’re revisiting an episode from 2014 about makeup, which has a rich and lengthy history that spans the globe and crosses cultures. From 10,000 B.C.E. to the 20th century, people have been using cosmetics to enhance their looks — sometimes with unintended side effects. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Marijuana Farm in Colorado 50 mins – “In this episode, Jordan goes back to Green Dragon in Denver to talk with Ryan Milligan, the company’s co-owner and head of cultivation. He quickly learns that the hardest part of farming marijuana definitely isn’t growing the plant.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Maxine Waters 47 mins – “Slate Money talks about all the ramifications from this week’s midterms elections; Maxine Waters and big banks, Puerto Rico, the minimum wage, and cannabis on this week’s episode with Felix Salmon, Anna Szymanski, and Emily Peck.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mind-Body Problems 76 mins – “Science journalist and author John Horgan talks about his book, Mind-Body Problems, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Horgan interviewed an array of scientists, philosophers, and others who have worked on consciousness, free-will, and what it means to be human. Horgan argues that no single solution to the problems in these areas is likely to be established by science and that our perspective on these questions is inevitably colored by our personal experiences rather than by scientific evidence. Horgan concludes by making the case for personal and intellectual freedom and the need to embrace subjective interpretations of mind-body issues in ways that bring meaning to our lives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mirabal Sisters 30 mins – “There were four Mirabal sisters — Minerva, Patria, Maria Teresa, and Dede. The sisters are national heroes in the Dominican Republic, but they weren’t very well-known elsewhere until 20 or so years ago when they became the subject of the historical novel “In the Time of the Butterflies” by Julia Alvarez. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Monica Lewinsky 36 mins – “For 11 hours, Monica Lewinsky faced off against federal prosecutors who threatened her with decades in prison if she refused to help them take down the president.” At the link find the title, “EPISODE 1: DEAL OR NO DEAL, left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Nonprofit Organizations 64 mins – “The nonprofit sector is made up of 74 percent women, but men tend to fill organizations’ highest ranks. This classic episode looks at all the ins and outs of nonprofit’s not-so-generous gender dynamics and burnout-prone working conditions. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Organic Chemistry 16 mins – “Jakob Magolan is here to change your perception of organic chemistry. In an accessible talk packed with striking graphics, he teaches us the basics while breaking the stereotype that organic chemistry is something to be afraid of.At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poor Laws in Europe 50 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the 19th century legislation intended to discourage poor people from seeking relief instead of work, with handouts replaced by the workhouse.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Populism Increases 59 mins – “Once relegated to the political fringes, political populism has exploded across the world in recent years. Most of the populist leaders who have emerged so far — figures like Matteo Salvini and Marine Le Pen — have been defined, in part, by their xenophobic rhetoric. Some populist parties, like the Sweden Democrats, even have roots in Neo-Nazism. But what if ultra-nationalism and xenophobia aren’t necessarily a part of populism’s DNA? What if populism is actually a logical, if at times convoluted, response to decades of frustration with our democratic institutions? Political scientist Matthew Goodwin thinks it is. Contrary to the belief held by many “progressive” intellectuals, Goodwin argues populism is not simply an attempt by a generation of older, white men to cling to their social and political power. Instead, he argues that the rise of populism is the result of a citizenry who are thoroughly disenfranchised with traditional political ideologies, on both the left and the right. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Productive Disagreement 15 mins – “Some days, it feels like the only thing we can agree on is that we can’t agree — on anything. Drawing on her background as a world debate champion, Julia Dhar offers three techniques to reshape the way we talk to each other so we can start disagreeing productively and finding common ground — over family dinners, during work meetings and in our national conversations.At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reagan and Tip O’Neal 49 mins – “This episode of Whistlestop visits 1981, when Republican President Ronald Reagan, after surviving an assassination attempt, received a warm visit from the Democratic Speaker of the House, Tip O’Neill.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Robert Bork Nomination 50 mins – “This episode of Whistlestop travels back to Sept. 15, 1987 and into the Kennedy Caucus Room where was Associate Justice nominee Robert Bork begins his five days of testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Ruby Ridge 2 30 mins – “In this second episode of Standoff, our new narrative miniseries on the story of Ruby Ridge, host Ruth Graham breaks down what led to a shootout on the Weaver family property on Aug. 21, 1992, that left three people dead.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Ruby Ridge 3 30 mins – “In the third episode of Standoff, our narrative miniseries on the story of Ruby Ridge, host Ruth Graham describes what happens for the bulk of the 11-day siege on the Weaver family property. As the surviving Weavers stayed holed up inside their cabin, their story attracted droves of supporters and rabble-rousers to rural Idaho.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Ruby Ridge Discussion 44 mins – “…Graham talks to Slate’s Chau Tu about the making of the first episode and the history of white separatist groups in America. Then, we hear an interview with Idaho State University professor emeritus James Aho, author of The Politics of Righteousness, about the Order, a violent criminal group that formed out of the Church of Jesus Christ-Christians, Aryan Nations in the 1980s.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

San Francisco Cable Cars 38 mins – “Cable cars are an iconic part of San Francisco, and San Francisco’s cable cars are the last working system of their kind. The reason they haven’t been completely replaced by more modern modes of transportation is largely the advocacy of women, in particular, Friedel Klussmann, who was known as the Cable Car Lady. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Sheldon Adelson Impact on Trump 30 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Justin Elliott, a reporter at Pro Publica, about his new report on Sheldon Adelson, his donations to Donald Trump, and the influence he’s gained within the administration.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Silicon Valley History 46 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by writer and speaker, Adam Fisher, to discuss his latest book, Valley of Genius: The Uncensored History of Silicon Valley (As Told by the Hackers, Founders, and Freaks Who Made It Boom). Adam has previously worked as a freelance journalist for a variety of prestigious publications and as Features Editor of New York Magazine and Wired Magazine.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smart Device Impact 9 mins – “Once your smart devices can talk to you, who else are they talking to? Kashmir Hill and Surya Mattu wanted to find out — so they outfitted Hill’s apartment with 18 different internet-connected devices and built a special router to track how often they contacted their servers and see what they were reporting back. The results were surprising — and more than a little bit creepy. Learn more about what the data from your smart devices reveals about your sleep schedule, TV binges and even your tooth-brushing habits — and how tech companies could use it to target and profile you. (This talk contains mature language.)At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sovereign Debt 66 mins – “On this week’s episode, Felix Salmon, Anna Szymanski, Mitu Gulati, and Lee Buchheit nerd out about sovereign debt in the past (Ecuador, Argentina, Greece), present (Venezuela, Puerto Rico), and future (Italy).” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Spanish Civil War 39 mins – “We’re taking a look at Francisco Franco and the Spanish Civil War. We’ve talked about Spain’s parliament voting to exhume the remains of dictator Francisco Franco and relocate them to a state-funded mausoleum, and we’re giving that entire situation more context. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Success Academy 44 mins – “Eva Moskowitz wants to fix a really big problem. There are over a million kids in New York City’s public schools. Most can’t read or do math at grade level. Many won’t graduate on time. And it’s largely poor, black and brown kids who are stuck in the lowest performing schools. Eva’s the founder and CEO of Success Academy, the subject of this season of StartUp. And she’s actually making progress. Her school network is growing at lightning speed, and her students get among the highest standardized-test scores in the city, beating out schools in some of the wealthiest districts. And the education world is watching. But not everyone likes what they see. In this season, we ask how exactly Success is doing what it’s doing, and why does it have so many critics? Today, on the first of our six-part series about Success, we meet a mother, Sherisse, who desperately wants her son to get into Success, so that he can have opportunities she never had herself. And we go inside a Success classroom on the first day of school, to see what parents like Sherisse are clamoring for.” At the link you can listen, but not download however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Success Academy Expectation 59 mins It’s no mystery that Success Academy has high expectations — not just for its teachers, but also for its parents and students. Having a high bar is the foundation for Success’ amazing results. But the charter network’s expectations can make life hard for families and kids who don’t quite make the mark. In this episode, we will hear from two families who ran headlong into Success Academy’s high expectations.

Television Inventor 35 mins – “If you watch “Futurama” or “Warehouse 13,” you’ve probably heard the name “Farnsworth.” (And if you’re a “Warehouse 13” fan and an iPhone person, you may even have the old iOS app to turn your iPhone into a virtual Farnsworth device.) Philo T. Farnsworth essentially invented television in his head when he was still a teenager, and he started filing patent applications for his invention in 1927. But, in a story similar to the invention of the sewing machine, what came after involved legal land-grabs and some shady business. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Thanking People 41 mins – “Author AJ Jacobs embarked on a quest with a deceptively simple idea at its heart: to personally thank every person who helped make his morning cup of coffee. More than one thousand “thank yous” later, Jacobs reflects on the globe-trotting journey that ensued — and shares the life-altering wisdom he picked up along the way. “I discovered that my coffee would not be possible without hundreds of people I take for granted,” Jacobs says.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

THC Extraction 37 mins – “Our series on workers in Colorado’s legal cannabis industry keeps on burning. This week, Jordan talks with Max Platt, a cannabis-extraction technician at Denver’s Concentrated Love about the physically demanding art of making professional-grade hash for a living.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

The Little Prince 55 mins – “”And now here is my secret, a very simple secret: it is only with the heart that we see correctly; what is most important is invisible to the eye.” The Little Prince was first published in 1943. And since then, it’s sold 200 million copies, in 300 languages. And we’re still trying to figure out what it is: a children’s fable, or philosophical tale, or even an autobiography of its author, Antoine de Saint Exupe?ry? Danny Braun of Radio-Canada presents his documentary about the enduring magic of this deceptively simple classic. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Transgender 45 mins – “Recently we’ve been hearing a lot about transgender identity. That made us wonder… what makes us the gender that we are? And what should you do if your kid doesn’t fit the mold? To find out, we talked with endocrinologist Dr. Joshua Safer, psychologist Dr. Laura Edwards-Leeper, and psychologist Dr. Colt Keo-Meier.At the link you can listen, but not download however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

USO History 46 mins – “Fifty years ago this week, one of the Army’s most famous soldiers reported for duty. He turned up at Fort Hood, Texas, sporting a fresh GI buzz cut. The Army assigned him to a tank battalion, but he did his best-known work outside the tank. His name? Elvis Presley. Elvis, who rose to the rank of sergeant, still has fans among the troops. But today’s men and women in uniform also want other sounds, USO President and CEO Ned Powell tells NPR’s Liane Hansen. The heavy metal band Drowning Pool, for example, has made two USO-sponsored concert tours to Iraq. For 67 years, the United Service Organization has been putting on concerts and other events to boost the morale of American troops stationed around the globe. During World War II, Bob Hope was a favorite. Elvis didn’t perform at any USO events – though Powell thinks The King probably did take advantage of USO coffee and doughnuts. These days, the USO produces shows by bands, football players and comics – like Robin Williams, who performed at Camp Arifjan in Kuwait in December 2007. In the middle of Williams’ routine, a trumpet sounded and his entire audience turned their backs to him to salute a U.S. flag as it was lowered. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Venus 50 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Earth’s neighbouring planet, once thought very similar but now known to be extremely volcanic with a surface temperature of 450C.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Victorian VR 30 mins – “In the Victorian era, plaster casts became a way to preserve important artifacts in 3D. Now, virtual reality promises to preserve places and experiences. But who decides what gets preserved? And is the technology an accurate re-creation of the experience, or does it fool us into thinking we’ve encountered the real thing when we’ve done nothing of the sort? Guests include Jaron Lanier, VR pioneer; Nonny de la Peña, VR artist; and Tristram Hunt, director of the Victoria and Albert Museum.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Virtual Reality Uses 31 mins – “Though most commonly used for playing games, there are so many more productive aspects to virtual reality and augmented reality that you may not be aware of. From real estate to education, virtual reality technology is changing the world. Are we ready? In this episode of Komando on Demand, Kim looks at the technology behind virtual and augmented reality and how it is shaping the reality around us.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Watergate Discussion 53 mins – “Join us in NYC for a special Slow Burn live show. Host Leon Neyfakh leads a conversation with journalist Bob Woodward, whose groundbreaking investigation into Watergate for the Washington Post won the Pulitzer Prize in Public Service, Mary DeOreo and Marc Lackritz, who worked on the investigative staff of the Senate Watergate Committee as the hearings captivated the nation, award-winning author Gail Sheehy, and contributing editor at WIRED and cohost of Slate’s Trumpcast Virginia Heffernan.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

White Nationalist Conversion 28 mins – “On The Gist, the Kavanaugh hearing. By all accounts, Derek Black was supposed to become the next David Duke. He was the man’s godson, after all, and his father, Don Black, had founded Stormfront, the world’s first and biggest white nationalist website. But then Derek went to New College of Florida, where—as told by the Washington Post’s Eli Saslow—he was shunned by many of his peers for his racist views, and embraced by a few despite them. Saslow’s book is Rising Out of Hatred: The Awakening of a Former White Nationalist. In the Spiel, more on the Kavanaugh hearing, and Trump’s continuing belief that 52 percent of women voted for him.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Women Leaders 54 mins – “What makes a good leader — someone with the ability to get others to follow, sometimes into the unknown? Shakespeare had something to say about all that. Julius Caesar and Coriolanus, two fantastically successful military leaders, both stumble and fall catastrophically when it comes to political leadership. So, being a leader seems to depend somewhat on context. Or is leadership, then, perhaps more of an art? And what about men vs. women as leaders? Since the dawn of time, men have generally worn the pants — as CEO’s, world leaders. Power, authority and influence have not been distributed equally in society; gendered stereotypes and sexist attitudes have played a large role in the absence of women leaders. Many of the arguments in Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s book, Lean in: Women, Work and the Will to Lead, ring true. Women are considered bossy when they are aggressive while men are praised for the same behaviours. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog

Workplace Environments 24 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by Amy C. Edmondson to discuss her latest book, The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation, and Growth. Amy is the Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management at the Harvard Business School and is the world expert on psychological safety, a topic recently made famous by the findings of Google’s Project Aristotle, the quest to build the perfect team. What Was Covered – How leaders can create psychologically safe environments in the workplace, in service of innovation and profitable growth. The ‘fearless’ organization, and why fear-based leadership strategies are a recipe for failure. How leaders leverage approaches from indigenous cultures to deal with some of the worlds more pressing VUCA challenges.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wyatt Cenac 56 mins – “Wyatt Cenac on Mentor Colin Quinn, and Negin Farsad on Death Threats and Blackout Boning At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mining Digest 382 – Mar 15, 2019: Adaptability, Alpha Males, American and Chinese Agriculture, Astronaut Life, Black Ballerina, Boxing Injuries, Brexit Controversy, Canadian Auto Industry, Canadian Oil Reduction, Cancer Researcher, Carbon Tax, Climate Change in 11 Years, Climate Change Targets, Climate Solutions, Clothing Pollution, Dementia Victim, Democracy Upgrade, Digital Nomads, Entrapment, Evolutionary Ecology, Existential Hope, Facebook Issues, Federal Reserve Activity, Female Genital Mutilation, Fentanyl Crisis in Canada, Finite and Infinite Games, Fire Death Identification, Ground Sinking Problem, Gun Trauma Surgeons, Heart Transplants and Phages, Holocaust Music, Huawei and 5G, Indigenous Women Assaults, Journalism Evolution, Journalist of the Year, Listening and Understanding, Marijuana and Sex, Medical Device Failures, Migration Issues, Millennial Shopping Habits, Minimalist Living, Mosquito Control with Gene Drives, Pharmacy Primary Care, Racism in Canada, Rappers Beef, Refugees in Canada, Russian Hacking, School Bullying, Six Letter DNA, Social Media Deletion, Soil Building on Farms, Sterilized Indigenous Women, Syrian Refugee, Termite Mounds, Trans Oil Pipeline Discussion, US Constitution, Vancouver and China, Vaping by Teens, Venezuelan Politics, White Helmets in Syria, Yemen Starvation

Exercise your ears: the 100 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 701 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,486 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 499 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Adaptability 32 mins – “In this episode we talk about adaptability as one of the most important skills to have for the future. The current chaotic state of the world often leaves people feeling scared and helpless. We discuss how to move into a more resourceful mindset. We talk about mental flexibility, self-sovereignty, modern nomadism, minimalism, the need for retooling, and other options that can help us become more adaptive and transition more readily into the world of the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ai WeiWei Documentary 28 mins – “Chinese artist Ai Weiwei has turned his lens on the massive scale of the global refugee crisis in a powerful documentary, Human Flow. He says this crisis is not limited to refugees and represents the human condition.” At the link find the title, ‘Human crisis’: Ai Weiwei’s documentary showcases plight of refugees,” right-click “Download ‘Human crisis’: Ai Weiwei’s documentary showcases plight of refugeesand select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Alpha Males 16 mins – “In this fascinating look at the “alpha male,” primatologist Frans de Waal explores the privileges and costs of power while drawing surprising parallels between how humans and primates choose their leaders. His research reveals some of the unexpected capacities of alpha males — generosity, empathy, even peacekeeping — and sheds light on the power struggles of human politicians. “Someone who is big and strong and intimidates and insults everyone is not necessarily an alpha male,” de Waal says.” At the link left-click the “Share” button, right-click the “Download” button select “Save Page As“ from the pop-up menu.

American and Chinese Agriculture 35 mins – “Brady Sidwell is the owner of Sidwell Strategies, a commodity brokerage that provides a variety of risk management solutions that caters towards those in the agricultural industry. They help farmers manage price risks by trading futures and options on the commodity market. Before focusing on this type of business, Brady enjoyed traveling to 95 countries and working in a lot of them. The experiences he had on his many trips allowed him to form a better understanding of how the economy on agriculture works from a global perspective and apply that to his business. Brady joins me today to share his passion for helping farmers and how it led to the start of Sidwell Strategies. He shares his academic and career highlights, some of the countries he’s worked in and what he learned from them. He describes how China is trying to emulate how Americans look at farming as well as the difference between farmers from either country. He also discusses some of their projects for the coming months.” At the link and bottom of the page left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Astronaut Life 25 mins – “Have you got what it takes to be an astronaut? Major Tim Peake did. He beat 8,172 applicants for a spot on the European Space Agency’s astronaut training programme. He began his intensive training in 2009, which involved living in extreme environments such as semi-submerged caves and at sea. Six years later, Tim was launched into space and he began his stint on the International Space Station (ISS). In his 2,720 orbits of the Earth, he ran the London Marathon from the ISS treadmill, completed his first space walk and much more besides. Ian Sample sat down with Tim to discuss the selection process, the training involved in becoming an astronaut and whether he felt prepared for life in space.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Barn Preservation 57 mins – “Barns have an important historical significance in New Hampshire, and are a major part of our landscape. But as these barns age, how can we preserve and restore them for new uses today?” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Ballerina 26 mins – “Last month a U.K company announced it will now make ballet shoes in colours that reflect the diverse skin tones of dancers, but one woman dared to dance against prejudice long before this.” At the link find the title, “Meet Raven Wilkinson, the black ballerina who blazed a trail long before shoes came in brown and bronze,” right-click “Download Meet Raven Wilkinson, the black ballerina who blazed a trail long before shoes came in brown and bronzeand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boxing Injuries 24 mins – “Even though legendary Canadian boxer George Chuvalo is “now in cognitive decline,” he still perks up at the mention of his fights against Muhammad Ali, according to Chuvalo’s son Mitchell. “He has trouble now contextualizing things, knowing what day it is, knowing where he is, but that Ali reference always brings him back to some degree of being lucid,” Mitchell Chuvalo told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti. Mitchell Chuvalo told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Brexit Controversy 25 mins – “After British Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal was defeated in parliament Tuesday, what’s next for the troubled process? And what does it all mean for the people living in uncertainty?” At the link find the title, “‘Dark times ahead,’ but Brexit will be worth it in the long term, says financier,” right-click “Download ‘Dark times ahead,’ but Brexit will be worth it in the long term, says financierand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Discussion 15 mins – “Theresa May’s Brexit plan is one step closer to reality. But members of the British Prime Minister’s party are resigning and she could be removed from power. CBC London correspondent Nahlah Ayed explains how we got here and what it means for the future of the United Kingdom and the EU.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link AThe day after Stan Lee’s death, we look at the comic book legend’s impact on popular culture. And New York Magazine and Vulture staff writer Abraham Riesman explains why Stan Lee’s legacy is just a complicated as the superhero stories he helped create.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Auto Industry 27 mins – “In the wake of General Motors’ decision to close its facility in Oshawa, Ont., McMaster University professor and former Unifor economist Jim Stanford argues the company is more concerned about Wall Street shareholders than the Canadian workers it employs.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Canadian Indigenous Stories 24 mins – “Politicians may lie, but in a functional government they can be held to account by political opponents and the public, according to Senator Murray Sinclair. That option was not available to the Indigenous people in Canada who were lied about by politicians for generations, he told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti. “The people of Canada have been misled about who we are — not only as Indigenous people, but as Canadians — and we need to make sure that they all know the truth,” he said. The First Nations judge spoke to Tremonti as part ofThe Current’s special edition on truth, exploring who suffers most when it gets sidelined. Murray chaired Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which heard from some 6,200 former students of Canada’s Indian residential schools.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Canadian Oil Reduction 20 mins – “Alberta Premier Rachel Notley says the temporary cut in oil production may be a short-term stopgap for what she has called a “crisis” on oil prices, but she’s promising upgrades and more pipelines as long-term solution.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Canadian 1965 Plane Crash 39 mins – “Uncover: Bomb On Board – Episode 1. A bomb exploded on Canadian Pacific Flight 21 killing all 52 people on board. Chuck was on the ground. Didi’s dad was on the plane. Witnesses offer insight into what happened July 8, 1965 – and why no one has ever been held responsible.” At the link find the title, “S2 E1: The Crash,” right-click “Download S2 E1: The Crash” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Serial Killer 46 mins – “Ron Moffatt was wrongly convicted of murder in the 1950s, and kept his experience secret for many years. He’s now telling his story in a new book. In 1956, Ron Moffatt was taken into a small interrogation room by police in Toronto. “[They] stuck me up against the wall and they played good cop, bad cop,” Moffat told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti. “In them days it was quite normal for police to use physical violence against suspects. He threatened it; it never happened but he threatened it,” he said. Moffatt was 14 years old at the time. The “terrified” teenager had been picked up by police over the brutal murder of seven-year-old Wayne Mallette. You’ll say anything to get out of that room, and stop them from questioning you. – Ron Moffatt Moffatt was innocent — he had been miles away from the scene of the murder. But under pressure of interrogation, he confessed. The Boy on the Bicycle tells the story of Moffatt’s wrongful conviction of the murder of a 7-year-old boy in 1956. (Five Rivers Chapmanry Publishing)…” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Canadian-Chinese Human Rights Issues 21 mins – “If the diplomatic row with China is escalating, has Canada’s response has been too soft? MP Erin O’Toole thinks the prime minister should be doing more.” At the link find the title, Trudeau’s refusal to call Chinese president is ‘ridiculous,’ says MP Erin O’Toole,” right-click “Download Trudeau’s refusal to call Chinese president is ‘ridiculous,’ says MP Erin O’Tooleand select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Researcher 25 mins – “James Allison is an immunologist who rejected scientific orthodoxy early in his career, but has earned the Nobel Prize for Medicine for his revolutionary work on cancer treatment. Not all scientists who go rogue reap the rewards however, so where’s the line between confidence and stubbornness?” At the link find the title, “James Allison won a Nobel for defying scientific orthodoxy. What about the mavericks that don’t succeed?,” right-click Download James Allison won a Nobel for defying scientific orthodoxy. What about the mavericks that don’t succeed?and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Tax 16 mins – “As COP24 tries to set rules for how the world deals with environmental issues, we look at why the Canadian government has chosen carbon pricing as a key tool in addressing climate change. CBC reporter Nahlah Ayed gives us an overview of what’s happening at COP24, and energy economist and Simon Fraser University professor Mark Jaccard explains why carbon pricing is a costly political move.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Action 22 mins – “An activist is arguing that nations must mobilize to fight climate change in the same way that they did during the Second World War.  “We are too late in the game for gradualism … or for individualism — the idea that ‘I’ll take care of my emissions, you take care of your emissions,'” said Margaret Klein Salamon, a former clinical psychologist and the founder and director of The Climate Mobilization. Instead, Klein Salamon’s organization calls for an “immediate ban of all new fossil fuel infrastructure, and a 10-year timeline for retiring the fossil fuel infrastructure that we do have.” “What we envision is a rapid transition of our entire economy and society, with all hands on deck,” she told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Climate Change Consensus 15 mins – “British author and carbon pricing expert, George Marshall, explains the psychology of climate change communication and describes the work he’s done in Canada on this front – to bridge the political divides.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change in 11 Years 23 mins – “As part of The Current’s special edition on climate change, we talk to two experts about the level of commitment needed to tackle the problem – and why that action isn’t taking place.” At the link find the title, Activist urges WWII-level global effort to fight climate change, right-click “Download Activist urges WWII-level global effort to fight climate change and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Targets 20 mins – “As the UN talks on climate change are extended in Poland, Green Party leader Elizabeth May tells us that those expecting decisive action will be disappointed.” At the link find the title, ‘Do we want to survive or not?’: Elizabeth May says climate change talks too focused on technicalities,” right-click “Download ‘Do we want to survive or not?’: Elizabeth May says climate change talks too focused on technicalities and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Solutions 22 mins – “As industries change around plans to cut greenhouse emissions, will the “green jobs” that replace them match the pay and benefits of the fossil fuel sector?” At the link find the title, Some jobs in new energy industries come with a pay cut of $50K: coal miner,” right-click “Download Some jobs in new energy industries come with a pay cut of $50K: coal minerand select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Clothing Pollution 50 mins – “The clothing industry is a top polluter, but some companies are working to be kinder to the environment. The CEOs of Patagonia and Eileen Fisher talk about their shared value of social consciousness. Rose Marcario and Eileen Fisher delve into why a holistic approach, one that goes beyond a single company and its bottom line, is essential to doing business that’s good for everyone. They give tips on the clothing materials they prefer, the power of women-led initiatives, and why wearing clothes longer is key to helping the planet.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Death Definition 19 mins – ““In the vast majority of circumstances, families and care providers in the intensive care unit are on the same page,” says Dr. Brian Goldman on Taquisha McKitty’s case. The 27-year old woman has been declared brain dead by five doctors, but is breathing with the assistance of a ventilator at the request of her family. Their fight to keep her alive is now before the Ontario Court of Appeal. Dr. Goldman, emergency physician and host of CBC Radio’s White Coat Black Art, explains how the case sheds light on the complications of defining death.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Victim 28 mins – “There is no defined legal test to ascertain if someone is fit to enter into a marriage, which means that vulnerable adults, like those with dementia, are at risk of being exploited. We look at one such case, and hear from experts who say greater protections are needed for those who are at their frailest.” At the link find the title, “He married her in a ‘campaign’ to take her money: How a woman with dementia fell into a predatory marriage,” right-click “Download He married her in a ‘campaign’ to take her money: How a woman with dementia fell into a predatory marriage,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Upgrade 59 mins – “Our guest in this episode is Pia Mancini, a political scientist and activist from Argentina, who has spent most of her career researching and experimenting how we can upgrade democracy for the modern world. She is the co-founder of Open Collective, which supports groups to quickly set up a collective, raise funds and manage them transparently, and Democracy Earth, an open source and decentralized democratic governance protocol for any kind of organization. Today we talk about how democracy can function better in the age of internet, why we are seeing signs of the return of the city-state, how to build a self-sovereign identity, pros and cons of liquid democracy, and how to enable large scale cooperation in decision making.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diane Ladd 90 mins – “Oscar-nominated actress Diane Ladd pays a visit to the studio to talk about her favorite movie directors, her days as a “Copa Girl,” the importance of homegrown film production and the joys of collaborating with daughter Laura Dern and ex-husband Bruce Dern. Also, Barbara Stanwyck sends flowers, John Carradine opens doors, Robert Duvall turns on the charm and Diane drops by the set of “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.” PLUS: Making “Chinatown”! Celebrating Roger Corman! The genius of Tennessee Williams! Martin Scorsese encourages improvisation! And Diane indulges Gilbert’s obsession with “Carnosaur”!” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Nomads 45 mins – “In this episode, we talk about our experiences with the digital nomad lifestyle and how it has shifted our perspectives on the world over the past six years. This modern-day nomadism also relates to the tribal nomadic lifestyle that humans led for thousand of years before agriculture was invented. We discuss the benefits and downsides of this kind of life, and how our relationship to time, location, finances, education, future, different cultures, politics, and society have changed with the experience of being digital nomads.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

E. Coli on Romaine Lettuce 20 mins – “With more people going hungry as the world’s population increases, Haspel told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti that using valuable crop acreage to grow a vegetable like lettuce may not be the best idea.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

EL Chapo Arrest 19 mins “U.S. prosecutors say Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán is a brutal cartel kingpin that ran the largest drug trafficking organization in the world. As his criminal trial begins in Brooklyn, former DEA agent Andrew Hogan explains how El Chapo managed to evade the law for so many years.” At the link find the title, ”Inside the hunt for alleged Mexican drug lord El Chapo,” right-click “Download Inside the hunt for alleged Mexican drug lord El Chapoand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Entrapment 21 mins – “’From the justice system’s point of view, you also have these bigger questions about how to conduct terrorism investigations, and investigations into these elaborate societal issues where we have fears about the crimes that people might commit.’ Today on Front Burner, senior reporter for CBC Vancouver, Jason Proctor, explains why a B.C. couple accused of planning a bomb plot had their convictions stayed due to entrapment and abuse of process by the RCMP.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evolutionary Ecology 22 mins – “Could the fate of the world hang on the potency of beetle sperm? A new study suggests fertility in male beetles can be negatively impacted by heat waves, and its author argues that has implications for other species and the wider biosphere. “Beetles do all sorts of different things … they turn over nutrients, they’re important to things like soil fertility,” said Matt Gage, professor of evolutionary ecology and leader of the University of East Anglia research group that published the study.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Existential Hope 126 mins – “Humanity is at a turning point. For the first time in history, we have the technology to completely obliterate ourselves. But we’ve also created boundless possibilities for all life that could enable  just about any brilliant future we can imagine. Humanity could erase itself with a nuclear war or a poorly designed AI, or we could colonize space and expand life throughout the universe: As a species, our future has never been more open-ended. The potential for disaster is often more visible than the potential for triumph, so as we prepare for 2019, we want to talk about existential hope, and why we should actually be more excited than ever about the future. In this podcast, Ariel talks to six experts–Anthony Aguirre, Max Tegmark, Gaia Dempsey, Allison Duettmann, Josh Clark, and Anders Sandberg–about their views on the present, the future, and the path between them….” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Facebook Breakup 19 mins – “This week, lawmakers all over the world sat down to grill Facebook about privacy and fake news. Canada’s reps were especially harsh on the tech giant and one MP posed a tough question: Is Facebook just way too big? Breaking up a major American company isn’t common. But in the past – banks, telecom companies, and even an oil giant were broken up by the U.S. government. Could that happen with tech giants today? Tim Wu, professor at Columbia Law School and author of The Curse of Bigness, breaks it down.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Issues 25 mins – “Roger McNamee was an early adopter of Facebook, and an early believer. While he was once even an adviser to founder Mark Zuckerberg, today McNamee is one of the tech giant’s fiercest critics. He speaks to host Anna Maria Tremonti about his new book Zucked: Waking up to the Facebook Catastrophe.” At the link find the title, “Why a former Facebook advisor says the ‘like’ button was ‘beginning of the end’ of company’s good old days,” right-click “Download Why a former Facebook advisor says the ‘like’ button was ‘beginning of the end’ of company’s good old days,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Reserve Activity 21 mins – “U.S. President Donald Trump has lambasted the Federal Reserve for repeatedly hiking interest rates. But Stanley Fischer, the former vice-chair of the central bank, says it’s not doing much to help the president get what he wants.” At the link find the title, ‘Don’t do it’: Trump’s criticism of central bank could backfire, warns former vice-chair,”right-click “Download ‘Don’t do it’: Trump’s criticism of central bank could backfire, warns former vice-chairand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Genital Mutilation 26 mins – “Nice Nailantei Leng’ete narrowly escaped undergoing a female genital mutilation (FGM) when she was eight years old. She’s since been on a crusade to eliminate the practice, known as “the cut,” which still threatens millions of girls in Africa.” At the link find the title, “Meet the Kenyan woman urging village elders to abandon female genital mutilation,” right-click “Download Meet the Kenyan woman urging village elders to abandon female genital mutilationand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fentanyl Crisis in Canada 18 mins – ““If we were doing something killing thousands of Chinese, we would hear from them loud and clear,” says former Canadian ambassador to China, David Mulroney. He argues that Canada needs to pressure China to do more to stop the flow of fentanyl, and questions why PM Justin Trudeau didn’t apply more diplomatic pressure at the G20 this week.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Finite and Infinite Games 18 mins – “In this episode we are discussing the concepts from the book “Finite and Infinite Games” by James P. Carse. It’s a great book that explores game theory as a general framework for how to operate in life. It applies to every area: work, relationships, business, politics, how we treat nature etc. We talk about what finite and infinite games are, and how to recognize which game we are playing. We also go over examples and practical applications that can help with gaining perspective and making wiser choices.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fire Death Identification 21 mins – “As wildfires rage on in California, forensic workers face the grim task of identifying the remains of those who could not escape. In the past week, several fires in the state have destroyed nearly 9,000 homes and scorched more than 570 square kilometres. There are at least 300 people unaccounted for, while the death toll has now climbed to 56.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Fungi 57 mins – “We learn about the miracle of fungi, from mushrooms, to yeast, to mold on your shower curtain. Fungi are in a vast yet little-known kingdom of their own, closer to animals than plants, and one of the oldest and largest organisms on earth.  In addition to tasty mushrooms foraged in fall, we learn about the important role fungi plays in the ecosystem, their relationship to trees, and promising areas of research for the future.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Giraffologist 28 mins – “Canadian biologist Anne Dagg was denied tenure decades ago, despite her pioneering research on giraffes. She’s finally getting recognition in her field – and she wants to make sure young women scientists today don’t have to fight the way she did.” At the link find the title, “How a Canadian ‘giraffologist’ stuck her neck out to fight sexism in academia,” right-click “Download How a Canadian ‘giraffologist’ stuck her neck out to fight sexism in academia,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GM Plant Closure 20 mins – “Large factory closures, like the one announced by General Motors in Oshawa, Ont., carry with them a high human cost and potential political fallout, argues an historian. “I think there’s a deep sense of betrayal that runs across working-class communities right now,” Steven High, a professor at Concordia University’s centre for oral history and digital storytelling, told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Ground Sinking Problem 20 mins – “We hear from scientists who are saying we need to pay more attention to something called subsidence, or sinking ground, because they say is being exacerbated by climate change.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Guantanamo 22 mins – “When U.S. President Donald Trump signed the order to keep Guantanamo Bay open, he shut down the State Department office responsible for closing it and resettling released detainees. That office, called the Special Envoy for Guantanamo Closure, was also responsible for tracking inmates already released. Now several have gone missing. ..One of the missing is Abu Wa’el Dhiab, “a Syrian man, a hunger striker and thorn in the side to the prison here, who was resettled in Uruguay during the Obama administration,” said Carol Rosenberg, the journalist who uncovered the problem in a McClatchy investigation. She told The Current’s Michelle Shephard that Dhiab ran away and is “now in south central Turkey, going in and out of al-Nusra-controlled Syria, Idlib province.” …Responsibility for tracking the former inmates was moved to the office of U.S. Ambassador Nathan Sales, but the staff who had negotiated the resettlement deals were all deployed elsewhere, Rosenberg said. “They now have brand new staffers — Trump appointees — trying to catch up and manage these deals that went untended for at least a year.” The Current requested a comment from the U.S. State Department and from the Republican chairs of the House and Senate committees with responsibility for Guantanamo. They declined to comment or did not reply. …There is also a risk to the detainees themselves, Rosenberg said, explaining that two men who were resettled in Senegal have since been deported to their native Libya. The U.S. originally did not send them there, due to fears for their safety. “After two years in Senegal, something went wrong apparently with U.S.-Senegalese relations, and the Senegalese put those two men on a plane, one of them against his will … and sent him back to Libya, even though he said he’d be killed there,” Rosenberg said….” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Gun Trauma Surgeons 24 mins – “As part of One Bullet, The Current’s series on gun violence, we speak to two trauma surgeons who are faced with the reality of what bullets do to bodies.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Heart Transplants and Phages 24 mins – “This week, improving heart xenotransplants, and soil bacteria versus phages.” At the link find the title, “06 December 2018: Heart xenotransplants and phage fighting, 5 Dec 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hibernating Humans 20 mins – “A group of U.S. scientists are exploring whether the genes of the fat-tailed dwarf lemur of Madagascar could hold the key to human hibernation. “What the dwarf lemur does is basically suspend the metabolic regulation of body temperature,”  Peter Klopfer explained to The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti. “It becomes like a snake or a lizard — cold-blooded.” The dwarf lemur will go into torpor for six to seven months of the year, he added, noting it’s the only primate known to have this capability.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Hockey Player 24 mins – “Retired NHL goaltender ‘Cujo’ opens up about difficult childhood. Former goaltender Curtis Joseph spent 19 seasons in the NHL, playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs, Edmonton Oilers and Calgary Flames. From a young age, Curtis Joseph knew that he was adopted. But it wasn’t until he was a grown man playing in the NHL that the former goaltender — known as Cujo — finally met his biological mother. When he did, he knew exactly what he wanted to say: he thanked her for having him. “She wanted somebody to give me the life that she … felt that she couldn’t give me at 16 years old,” Joseph told The Current’s Michelle Shephard. Neglected as a child, Curtis Joseph was driven to succeed in NHL nets He remembers her being shy. And if she was anything like him, she may have also felt a bit of guilt, he said. Joseph, who grew up in an institution for mentally ill patients run by his adoptive parents, delves into how his childhood paved the way for his hockey career in his new autobiography Cujo: The Untold Story of My Life On and Off the Ice.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Holocaust Music 24 mins – “When music theory professor Patricia Hall played a recording during one of her lectures, the audience became visibly uncomfortable, their arms clenched around their bodies. Titled The Most Beautiful Time of Life, the recording was of an upbeat foxtrot. But it was originally arranged and performed by prisoners in the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Huawei and 5G 20 mins – “The arrest of a Chinese tech executive in Vancouver was followed by the detention of two Canadians in Beijing. We look at the geopolitical fallout surrounding Huawei, and whether Canada is stuck in the middle of a U.S.-China fight.” At the link find the title, “Conflict inevitable with Canada stuck in middle of U.S.-China row: expert,” right-click “Download Conflict inevitable with Canada stuck in middle of U.S.-China row: expertand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Huawei’s CFO Arrest 21 mins – “’It’s incredibly hard to overstate the significance of this arrest.’ CBC’s economics reporter Peter Armstrong breaks down why Canada’s arrest of Huawei’s chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou for extradition to the U.S. is such a big deal.” At the link find the title, “Spying, industrial espionage and the arrest of Huawei’s CFO,right-click “Download Spying, industrial espionage and the arrest of Huawei’s CFOand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous Women Assaults 22 mins – “An Anishinaabe criminal lawyer is concerned that a bill promoting harsher sentences for people who commit crimes against Indigenous women may actually end up hurting the group it’s trying to protect. Promise Holmes Skinner says she’s seen many cases in which assaults are committed by one Indigenous woman against another, and worries that if the bill passes, they’ll face more and longer jail time for minor offences.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Jewish WW II Refugee Rejects 16 mins – “Eva Wiener describes her voyage across the Atlantic and how she feels about Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s upcoming apology for Canada having turned her ship back. Also, CBC Ottawa Senior Reporter Catherine Cullen describes the politics of the apology.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism Evolution 24 mins – “Anna Maria Tremonti speaks to Alan Rusbridger, the former editor of the Guardian whose 20-year tenure involved explosive investigations and ushering the newspaper in the digital age.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Journalist Person of the Year 19 mins – “‘In the middle of a battle,’ journalist Maria Ressa, named among Time’s Person of the Year, won’t back down ‘I’m not about to render my entire life and career meaningless by not standing up when it matters,’ Ressa says Maria Ressa was honoured as one of Times Magazine’s People of the Year 2018 for her work as a ‘guardian’ of the truth. Criticism of the bloody drug war in the Philippines has been stymied by lies and aggression on social media, according to one of the journalists honoured among Time Magazine’s Person of the Year. Since his election in June 2016, President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs has reportedly resulted in the extrajudicial killings of 4,500 people, as police crack down on suspected drug dealers. ‘I’m not about to render my entire life and career meaningless by not standing up when it matters,’ Ressa says.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Listening and Understanding 27 mins – “In today’s world of either broadcasting or consuming information, people seem to have forgotten how to really listen. In this episode, we explore how we have arrived at this point where we can no longer listen to other people or our environment, and how to re-learn that crucial skill. We talk about different ways of listening, frameworks we can use to understand people better, as well as practical steps towards becoming better listeners.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mandela Supporter 14 mins – “Dikgang Moseneke was imprisoned on Robben Island when he was 15, where he befriended Nelson Mandela. After a lifetime fighting for justice, he says that Mandela’s lessons still hold true in today’s political climate.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Marie Colvin Death 24 mins – “War correspondent Marie Colvin reported the plight of the helpless from conflicts in the world’s most dangerous places, with a tenacity that eventually cost her her life. Lindsey Hilsum, her friend and fellow war correspondent, tells us about Colvin’s life – a life lived on the edge.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Marijuana and Sex 24 mins – “Carlen Costa, who is also a relationship psychotherapist, advises couples who may already use pot or who are now introducing cannabis in their intimate relationship, to take it slow and always talk. “Communication is the key to a really positive relationship,” Costa told The Current’s guest host Piya Chattopadhyay. “Talk about how it helps you, how it supports you and how it will help increase your desire, pleasure and arousability.” Stanford University School of Medicine researchers unveiled a link between marijuana and the frequency of sexual intercourse in a 2017 study, indicating frequent marijuana users have about 20 per cent more sex than those who don’t smoke pot. The study’s senior author, however, cautioned that it should not be misinterpreted as having proven a causal link.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Marijuana Legalization in Canada 19 mins – “’This really is the beginning of a cultural shift,’ says Solomon Israel, cannabis reporter for the Winnipeg Free Press. Nearly two months into cannabis legalization he breaks down the complaints – from low quality to short supplies – and the positives – including the benefits that legal weed provides for medical research.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Device Failures 30 mins – “A new investigation led by CBC/Radio-Canada, the Toronto Star and the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists found concerns in the way medical devices are approved and monitored in many countries, and patients who have suffered as a result.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Medical Implant Problems 24 mins -”After Amanda Dykeman gave birth to her third son, she had a medical device implanted to stop her from getting pregnant again. Almost right away, she felt something was wrong. “I bloated out to where I looked pregnant, I started experiencing migraines so severe they were debilitating, my regular periods then became irregular and full of clots,” she told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti. The implanted device was Essure, a small metal coil that is placed in the fallopian tube. …when her symptoms arose, she found groups on social media where hundreds of women were reporting the same issues. “I was shocked because, like I said, my physician had made it seem like such a cakewalk, and when all these women kept joining and joining with the same symptoms, you kinda gotta put two and two together and realize there’s something wrong with this device.” Health Canada warned of potential complications with Essure in 2016. The Current contacted Bayer, the company that makes Essure, and received the following statement: “We were very sorry to hear that a patient experienced difficulties. …”New investigation reveals implanted medical devices approved in Canada despite risks Bayer didn’t create Essure, but it bought the company that did, 11 years after the device was approved for use. Bayer voluntarily discontinued the sale of Essure in Canada for commercial reasons, but said its decision was driven by a decline in patient demand, and not a product recall. In July, the company announced in a press release that it will stop selling the product in the U.S. on Dec. 31, 2018…. A joint investigation by CBC/Radio-Canada and the Toronto Star, in collaboration International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, has found problems with approval and monitoring process for many medical devices, from pacemakers to breast implants.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Meyers-Briggs Personality Test 25 mins – “Using the Myers-Briggs personality test is a way to engineer a workforce while appearing to care about employees’ self fulfillment, says Merve Emre, the author of The Personality Brokers: The Strange History of Myers-Briggs and the Birth of Personality Testing.” At the link find the title “Myers-Briggs tests in the workplace help the employer, not the employee, says author,”right-click “Download Myers-Briggs tests in the workplace help the employer, not the employee, says authorand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Caravan in Mexico 18 mins – “A caravan of about 4,000 migrants is heading north through Mexico. Their journey has become heavily politicized. CBC’s senior correspondent Susan Ormiston describes what she’s seen during her travels with the migrants.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migration Issues 20 mins – “Dr. Joanne Liu was working in Central America when a father facing the threat of violence shared a story that stunned her. He told Liu, the international president of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), he could no longer live with the feeling that he might return home from work one day to find his child abducted. So, the family fled, Liu said. According to the United Nations, there were 258 million migrants worldwide in 2017. Some have left home willingly for work or family, but others — like the father in Central America — have been forced to run from violence and other threats. Roughly 68 million people around the world are forcibly displaced, and there are more than 25 million refugees, the UN says.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Millennial Shopping Habits 24 mins – “Vox’s Rebecca Jennings spent a week trying direct-to-consumer products marketed at young consumers. But her experience wasn’t as ideal as marketers claim.” At the link find the title, A millennial writer tested all the online products you can’t afford, and was seriously disappointed,” right-click “Download A millennial writer tested all the online products you can’t afford, and was seriouslydisappointedand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minimalist Living 25 mins – “In a world of stuff, there’s a movement that sells the idea of space as a path to happiness. But some critics see this lifestyle trend as self-centered, and say it includes its own kind of consumerism that only people with money can afford. “ At the link find the title, “Minimalism: Upper-class luxury or liberating lifestyle?,” right-click “Download Minimalism: Upper-class luxury or liberating lifestyle?and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Missionary Chau Death 19 mins -”A 26-year-old Christian missionary was killed last month when he snuck onto a remote island in the Indian Ocean. John Allen Chau hoped to preach to an uncontacted tribe, but he was killed. His death has sparked a debate: was he a martyr, or misguided?” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Mohawk Tannery Problem 6 mins- “Most of New Hampshire’s riverside mills and factories have closed. But they’ve left their mark – and in some cases, a lot of toxic waste. For decades, Nashua has struggled with what to do with waste from the Mohawk Tannery, a factory that produced leather for sixty years. Now, the city is considering a private-public partnership to clean it up, but the details are still up for debate.” At the link right-click “Play” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosquito Control with Gene Drives 27 mins – “Gene drive technology, which can introduce and spread a specific genetic trait through an entire species, is near the point where it leaves the lab and enters the real world. Some experts are calling for a global agreement on how the technology should be deployed, which could make for a showdown between scientists and policy makers at a UN meeting on biodiversity later this week.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Oyster Cage Freeze Problem 9 mins – “An early freeze is causing havoc for oyster farmers in P.E.I.[Prince Edward Island], where more than 1,000 people are employed in the industry. We spoke to one oyster grower about the challenges they’re facing.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Pharmacy Primary Care 25 mins – “With a number of Canadian provinces allowing pharmacists to take on new responsibilities – such as administering rapid strep tests or prescribing contraceptives – some experts say expanding pharmacists’ responsibilities could be good for patients and the health-care system.” At the link find the title, Could expanding the role of pharmacists alleviate pressure on the health-care system?” right-click “Download Could expanding the role of pharmacists alleviate pressure on the health-care system? and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in Canada 27 mins – “”When the agency that’s supposed to protect you is also an agency that you fear, there is really little place for you to find shelter,” says Jorge Barrera, a reporter with CBC’s Indigenous Unit, in relation to a disturbing new report about the Thunder Bay Police Service. Ontario’s police watchdog Gerry McNeilly says “systemic racism” exists at an institutional level inside the police force. And the consequences of this racism are so severe that he’s recommending nine cases involving the deaths of Indigenous people be re-opened and re-investigated. Today on Front Burner, we look at how Thunder Bay Police failed Indigenous people.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rappers Beef 19 mins – “On Tuesday, rapper Pusha T had a concert in Toronto interrupted by a brawl in the audience. Fans threw beer at him and tried to jump on stage. And now, a man is in life-threatening condition after being stabbed. Pusha T and Canadian rapper Drake have been in a public feud since last spring, and Pusha has accused Drake of paying members of the rowdy audience. Author and Drake biographer Dalton Higgins on how this beef developed.” At the link find the title, “Explaining Drake and Pusha T’s beef,” right-click “Download Explaining Drake and Pusha T’s beef,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in Canada 21 mins – “’Canada doesn’t have a refugee crisis. Canada has a crisis of will in terms of what we want to do,’ says refugee and immigration lawyer Zool Suleman about the influx of people crossing the American border to seek asylum in Canada. The country’s budget watchdog has now confirmed the federal cost of asylum seekers making irregular crossings and warned of a growing refugee claimant case backlog. But what does that really mean? Today on Front Burner, we shed some light on a confusing system and an issue that’s often clouded by rhetoric.” At the link find the title, “Asylum in Canada explained,” right-click “Download Asylum in Canada explained” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in Canada 24 mins – “Mohammad Amin Sadiqi is one of thousands of asylum seekers who have sought refuge in Canada by crossing the U.S. border illegally. He told The Current why he felt compelled to do it.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Hacking 22 mins – “There’s a lot of evidence to suggest that social media accounts tied to the Kremlin tried to meddle in the 2016 US presidential election, the Brexit vote, the last French election, and several elections across Europe. Turns out, they’ve been active in Canada too. Journalist Justin Ling tells us how Russian accounts have tried to spread misinformation and propaganda here, and how the Canadian government is responding, with the election one year away.” At the link find the title, “Is Canada ready for Russian election meddling?,” left-click the three dots, right-click “Download/Open” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School Bullying 24 mins – “Youth see bullying as ‘paying off for some people’ in today’s world, says expert Cruel behaviour can often lead to rewards for children, even if it harms the other children around them, according to an expert in mental health in schools. (Antonio Guillem/Shutterstock) Young people looking at today’s world could get the impression that being cruel brings rewards, according to a professor who studies anti-bullying strategies. “You only have to look south of the border to get a really good example of how somebody can be really mean but really popular at the same time,” said Tony Volk, professor in child and youth studies at Brock University in Ontario, referring to U.S. President Donald Trump. “It is not at all surprising that these youth who are growing up, who are intelligent, functional human beings, look around them and say: ‘Yeah this is really paying off for some people, maybe I should do the same thing,'” he told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti. If we can accept that people have a capacity for kindness, we should also accept that everybody has a capacity for cruelty. – Tracy  Vaillancourt Canada has recently seen its share of bullying and allegations of violence related to bullying.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

School Funding 34 mins – “All across the country, it seems like a given: Places with more expensive houses have nicer schools because they can raise more money. That’s just how education seems to work. Except in Vermont. Two decades ago, the state passed a radical law that aimed to equalize education funding. The law (and subsequent tweaks) made it much easier for towns with regular houses to raise money for their schools — almost as easy as it was for towns with expensive vacation homes. That’s because the Vermont funding model asks rich towns to pay higher taxes to subsidize the schools in less affluent places. On this episode of The Impact, we’ll tell you how this model came about. It’s the story of one woman named Carol Brigham, her young daughter Amanda, and their fight to save the tiny school that is the heart of their small Vermont town.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Six Letter DNA 14 mins – “Every cell that’s ever lived has been the result of the four-letter genetic alphabet: A, T, C and G — the basic units of DNA. But now that’s changed. In a visionary talk, synthetic biologist Floyd E. Romesberg introduces us to the first living organisms created with six-letter DNA — the four natural letters plus two new man-made ones, X and Y — and explores how this breakthrough could challenge our basic understanding of nature’s design.” At the link left-click the “Share” circle, then right-click the “Download” arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Deletion 25 mins – “He’s a Sillicon Valley pioneer and a scientist employed by Microsoft – but Jaron Lanier is calling on all of us to take back control and abandon social media for good. He says the catastrophic losses of personal dignity are not worth it.” At the link find the title, Can this tech pioneer convince you to delete your social media accounts?” right-click Download Can this tech pioneer convince you to delete your social media accounts? and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Soil Building on Farms 33 mins – “Joe Breker is the owner of the Coteau des Prairies, a getaway lodge that offers stunning views surrounded by prairie farms and fields. He has been farming for over 40 years and practices what the industry calls “No-till” farming, a method that prioritizes soil health. With his skills and knowledge, Joe managed to successfully operate his farm during the dry ‘80s and wet ‘90s, as well as each decade’s poor farm economy. Joe joins me today to describe how his conservative farming practices have improved their farm’s soil health. He shares how his father was a sustainable farmer and what he did to build on what his father started. He also describes what no-till farming is, how it helps to restore damaged soil and explains the science behind management practices and how it affects soil health for decades.” At the link and bottom of the page left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Stan Lee Dies 21 mins – “The day after Stan Lee’s death, we look at the comic book legend’s impact on popular culture. And New York Magazine and Vulture staff writer Abraham Riesman explains why Stan Lee’s legacy is just a complicated as the superhero stories he helped create.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sterilized Indigenous Women 20 mins – “As a senator calls for a nationwide review of the forced sterilization of Indigenous women, a lawyer representing a proposed class action detailed the women’s accounts of being sterilized without proper and informed consent. “In the throes of labour … they would be approached, harassed, coerced into signing these consent forms,” said Alisa Lombard, an associate with Maurice Law, the first Indigenous-owned national law firm in Canada.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Syrian Refugee 21 mins – “Hassan Al Kontar is now safe in Canada. But for seven long months, the Syrian refugee was stuck inside the transit area of Kuala Lumpur Airport, terrified of being deported back to Syria. Today, Hassan shares how he survived being stranded, the psychological toll of two months in detention in Malaysia, and how a group of Canadians changed this life by raising money to bring him to Whistler, B.C., as a privately-sponsored refugee.” At the link find the title, “After seven months trapped inside an airport, a refugee calls Canada home,” left-click the three dots, right-click “Download/Open” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Termite Mounds 24 min – “Researchers have discovered a network of 4,000-year-old termite mounds in Brazil that are so big, they can be seen from space. We hear all about the discovery, and how the much-maligned termite could teach humans a lot about biofuels and even robotics.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Trans Mountain Pipeline 19 mins – “Reconsideration hearings for the proposed expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline continue this week in B.C. This is the same pipeline that the federal government bought for $4.5-billion, only to have a Federal Court of Appeal delay construction because the review didn’t consider oil tanker traffic, or consult enough with Indigenous groups. UBC professor Kathryn Harrison lays out what it might take to get the proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion through, and what it could take to stop it.” At the link find the title, “What will it take to build Trans Mountain? What will it take to stop it?” right-click “Download What will it take to build Trans Mountain? What will it take to stop it?and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Oil Pipeline Discussion 18 mins – “A group of Indigenous leaders are meeting in Calgary this week with the oil industry to discuss options for purchasing the Trans Mountain pipeline. We hear from those on both sides of the debate.” At the link find the title, “Indigenous ownership won’t solve problems with Trans Mountain pipeline, says Squamish Nation councilor,” right-click Download Indigenous ownership won’t solve problems with Trans Mountain pipeline, says Squamish Nation councillorand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Truth and Beliefs 74 mins – “In a special edition, The Current looks at the state of truth in our world today: from why we believe what we believe; to who suffers most when the truth gets sidelined; and the groups and technologies being deployed on both sides of the war on reality.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

US Constitution 29 mins – “David talks to Gary Gerstle about the history of the United States Constitution and its current role in American political life.  Is it still fit for purpose in the twenty-first century and what could be done to change it?” At the link click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vancouver and China 16 mins – “Bloomberg’s Vancouver bureau chief Natalie Obiko Pearson helps us navigate the city’s complicated relationship with Chinese money. That relationship has ties to the city’s housing affordability crisis. Tackling affordability is job number one for Kennedy Stewart, who begins his work as Vancouver’s mayor today.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaping by Teens 27 mins – “David Hammond was picking out an Archie comic for his kids when he noticed a poster for vaping behind the corner store counter. Then, he spotted vaping products above the candy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Venezuela Politics 18 mins – “As a former diplomat, Ben Rowswell witnessed populist politics has taken hold in recent years, and the impact that had on countries like Venezuela. Now he’s urging citizens to organize and fight back against the threat – and he’s got an app for that.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Whaling Commercialization 20 mins – “Conservationist Paul Watson says that in three decades of a whaling moratorium, Japan has never stopped hunting under the guise of research. He argues that now, the country will at least be restricted to whaling in a much smaller area.” At the link find the title, Why one conservationist is lauding Japan’s return to commercial whaling,” right-click “Download Why one conservationist is lauding Japan’s return to commercial whalingand select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

White Helmets in Syria 20 mins – “Maysoon al-Masri, a former White Helmets volunteer, was one of 117 former members of the group to be resettled in Canada as part of an international evacuation of emergency volunteers and their from Syria in July. (Andrew Lee/CBC) After a harrowing escape, more than a hundred Syrian war zone first responders and their families are being resettled in Canada, as refugees. Hear the CBC’s Murray Brewster describe their journey and why they could still be in danger.” At the link find the title, “How Canada helped save the White Helmets,” left-click the three dots, right-click “Download/Open” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yellow Vest Protests 21 mins – ““If you look at the yellow vest movement in France, none of it has been about migration. It hasn’t been about cultural values.” Sophie Pedder, Paris correspondent for The Economist, says the ‘yellow vest’ protests in Canadian cities are in some ways different from the movement that inspired them in Paris. French protesters have been campaigning against everything from a fuel tax hike to the cost of living. While protests in Canada and Europe have copied their iconic uniform, the focus on immigration and the UN is different from what’s being campaigned against in France.” At the link find the title, “How and why the “yellow vest” protests spread, left-click the three dots, right-click “Download/Open” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yemen Starvation 23 mins – “With over 60 per cent of the population living on the brink of famine and an estimated 85,000 children dead from malnutrition, the war has propelled the country into a devastating humanitarian crisis.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Yemen War and Canada 25 mins – “Recent remarks from the prime minister have fuelled speculation about whether Canada will stop supplying Saudi Arabia with light armoured vehicles. We look to London, Ont., where those vehicles are made, and weigh up the ethical considerations against the livelihoods at stake.” At the link find the title, Ontario workers in ‘grey area’ as Canada considers scrapping sale of arms to Saudis,” right-click “Download Ontario workers in ‘grey area’ as Canada considers scrapping sale of arms to Saudisand select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mining Digest 381 – Mar 8, 2019: Ace of Cups Band, AI in Recruiting, Arctic Report Card, Bill Press Against Trump, Chagas Disease Research, Climate Cures, College Dropouts, Colored Women Politicians, Conflict Resolution, CRISPR Gene Editing, Drones and Journalism, Elephant Poaching, Environmental Poisons, Ethan Hawke, Facebook Criticism, Farsighted, Frederick Douglass, Free Press, Genome Editing, Geothermal Energy in Europe, Index Fund Power, Jaws Shrink, Morre’s Law Extended, Music Therapy, Myanmar Genocide, Native American Children Relocation, Paradise Fire Reconstruction Effort, Preservation Efforts in Britain, Rev Jesse Jackson, Self Driving Revolution, Sexually Transmitted Disease Increase, State Power Grabs, Suicide Rates, Supreme Court, The Hate U Give, Tom Hanks, Trachoma Disease Control, Traumatized Refugees, Tribes Book by Junger, Undocumented Citizen, Uninhabitable Earth, Violinist Micarelli, Wildfires, Women in Business, Yemen War

Exercise your ears: the 67 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 660 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,272 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 157GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 499 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Ace of Cups Band 62 mins – “The Ace of Cups was legendary from the beginning—five uniquely talented women writing fantastic songs, rocking as hard as any band at the time and harmonizing like psychedelic angels. The Ace of Cups performed with fellow artists such as The Band, Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead, Quicksilver Messenger Service; even Jimi Hendrix was an avowed fan. Despite eliciting music industry interest for their exceptional songs, sublime harmonies and exuberant live performances, the Ace of Cups never got a chance to make a record of their own. Until now … With the enthusiastic support of High Moon Records, and under the guidance of celebrated producer Dan Shea, four of the band’s original members holed up in San Rafael’s Laughing Tiger Studios to record gems from their back catalog and newly composed material that is as timely as it is timeless. Their self-titled debut album blends pure rock, folk, blues and gospel influences with a pop sensibility and a garage band rush—all tinted by an intoxicating psychedelic sheen. As news spread that the Cups were recording, old friends—including Bob Weir, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Taj Mahal, Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady—began to come by the studio to offer support and musical contributions. Thirty-six songs were recorded, and what started out as a chance to set the record straight has turned into a history-making second act. You can read more about the history here.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Adam Hochschield 60 mins – “Best-selling Bay Area author Adam Hochschild is back with a varied collection of essays on ideas and concerns that have spurred his career, with a particular focus on issues related to social justice and the people who have fought for it, the toll and aftereffects of colonialism, and the dangers of government surveillance. Hochschild was moved to collect and curate these essays (more than two dozen in all) by a sense that these issues matter more than ever in Trump’s America. The pieces in his new volume range from a day on the campaign trail with Nelson Mandela to walking through construction sites with an ecologically pioneering architect near the southern tip of India. Many of the pieces evince a personal angle: visits to Finnish prisons, exploration of former gulag areas in Siberia, his own dealings with the CIA when talking about new revelations of the agency’s control of ostensibly independent organizations in the ’50s and ’60s. As always, Hochschild’s journalistic skills, deep historical knowledge and activist leanings illuminate each essay. A longtime lecturer at the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley, Hochschild is the author of numerous books. His writings have appeared in The New YorkerHarper’s MagazineThe Atlantic, The New York Times MagazineThe Nation and other publications.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

AI in Recruiting 20 mins – “In this episode of AI In Industry, we interview Nick Possley, the CTO of a company called AllyO, based in the San Francisco Bay area. We speak with Nick about where artificial intelligence and machine learning are playing a role in recruiting today and how picking the right candidates from a pool is in some way being informed by artificial intelligence. Whether a business leader is hiring dozens and dozens of people or whether they ’re just interested in understanding how AI can engage with individuals on more of a one-to-one basis, this should be a fruitful episode. In addition, the fundamentals of what we discuss in this episode, in terms of taking in data from profiles and responding and engaging with applicants, could be applied to all sorts of cases, such as customer service and marketing.”  At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

American Ideals 46 mins – “American truths, not so self-evident. Historian Jill Lepore on why the tension between fact and fiction has been with us since the nation’s founding.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arctic Report Card 46 mins – “Warming in Arctic raises fears of a “rapid unraveling” of the region. Reindeer numbers crash by half. We’ll confront the climate emergency in the Arctic.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beatles White Album 47 mins – “The Beatles’ “White Album” turns 50. We’ll return to Abbey Road.“ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bill Press Against Trump 69 mins – “I’d give us an A.” ―President Donald Trump, on his first 100 days in office. Bill Press, a popular radio host and former California Democratic chair, argues the opposite: that every day that Trump stays in office, he diminishes the United States and its people. In his new book, Trump Must Go, Press offers 100 reasons why he believes Trump needs to be removed from office, whether by impeachment, the 25th Amendment or the ballot box. Ranging from banning federal employees’ use of the phrase “climate change” to making disparaging comments about African nations and countries such as Haiti and El Salvador, Press lists his reasons why he believes the president is unfit for office. Press says that Trump’s calendar is marked with extensive “executive time” so he can tweet, golf and watch TV. But, in a political climate where the world has learned to expect the unexpected, Press will also offer a twist: one reason not to ditch Donald Trump.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

California Fire Hazards 49 mins – “California’s endless fire season. Whether it’s climate change, development or forest management, we’ll look at the causes — all man made.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capital Definition and Purpose 76 mins – “How did we come to separate our understanding of economic/financial value from social/environmental value? How did we come to think of ourselves as being separate from our neighbors, community and planet? By crafting a new, holistic understanding of ourselves and our relationship to one another, we are able to approach a deeper, more significant understanding of the purpose of capital, which may then anchor our definition of the purpose of capital, how we understand the nature of returns (both financial and extra-financial) and a deeper understanding of the meaning of money. In a fireside chat, Donna Morton and Jed Emerson will explore these ideas—history and culture—connecting those within the current trend toward impact investing and sustainable finance as vehicles to generate financial returns with social and environmental impacts and the creation of a more just world for both human and nonhuman communities. The audience will come away with a new mindset for a future that is clean, just and regenerative for people and planet. Asking new questions—how can the people left out of the economy become our greatest assets—financial activism could unite Occupy and Wall Street, the 99 and the 1 percent. Movements such as Black Lives Matter, sanctuary cities, intersectional feminism and climate justice are the edges and opportunities for finance. Beyond divestment, the speakers will discuss moving finance from harm to healing.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Chagas Disease Research 27 mins – “On this edition of Science Studio we meet two UTEP professors, Igor Almeida, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences, and Katja Michael, Ph.D., associate professor of chemistry.  They have received $6 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to improve treatment and develop new diagnostic tools to assess post-therapeutic outcomes for patients with Chagas disease.” At the link left-click the play button and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change and Art 27 mins – “Climate change is hard to depict. Polar bears on melting ice caps are far away from everyday life and the data is often complex and confusing. So could art in its broadest sense help us to understand the implications of global warming and environmental degradation? Tom Heap takes a look at how the creative community is responding to what is arguably the biggest threat of our time and asks if art can succeed in eliciting a response where science has failed. Music and visual arts which make climate data sets tangible, clothing which make pollutants visible and artists who make their creative response a form of protest. These are just a few of the ways in which artists are responding to environmental issues but it remains to be seen if these visions can impact our collective beliefs and behaviours.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Cures 17 mins – “What if we took out more greenhouse gases than we put into the atmosphere? This hypothetical scenario, known as “drawdown,” is our only hope of averting climate disaster, says strategist Chad Frischmann. In a forward-thinking talk, he shares solutions to climate change that exist today — conventional tactics like the use of renewable energy and better land management as well as some lesser-known approaches, like changes to food production, better family planning and the education of girls. Learn more about how we can reverse global warming and create a world where regeneration, not destruction, is the rule.” At the link left-click the “Square” circle, right-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Dropouts 47 mins – “Your college student came home for Thanksgiving and didn’t go back to campus. We’ll look at when college students come home to stay.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Colored Women Politicians 75 mins – “Donna Brazile, Yolanda Caraway, Leah Daughtry and Minyon Moore have worked behind the scenes of some of the country’s most influential and historic presidential campaigns in history, all four beginning their careers with the Rev. Jesse Jackson and eventually working with the likes of Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Barack Obama and, most recently, Hillary Rodham Clinton. Together they form a political supergroup they like to call “The Colored Girls,” and, like many other women of color in politics, they are unsung heroes of public service who have dedicated their lives to demanding diversity in American politics. Brazile, Caraway, Daughtry and Moore paved the way for many women and people of color currently in the political arena, and they will visit The Commonwealth Club on the heels of an exciting midterm election where the topic of diversity was at the forefront. Join us as the four women discuss For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics, their new book, which chronicles their incredible stories, sheds light on their successes and offers insight on the many hurdles they faced in getting there.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conflict Resolution 47 mins -”Conflict resolution expert Priya Parker who works to resolve ethnic strife across the globe and corporate strife in boardrooms takes on the most fraught scenarios: holiday parties and family gatherings.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CRISPR Gene Editing 57 mins – “The gene-editing technology known as CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) is transforming everything, from pharmaceutical research to agriculture to the process of making yogurt (really). It is a disruptive technology that allows people to edit genomes, changing the genetic code of life. In some cases, it’s also raising complicated global questions about risk, regulation and even human values. So, should we be excited or afraid? Come discuss these questions and more with science writer Jennifer Kahn, who gave a 2016 TED talk on CRISPR.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Democratic Candidates 47 mins – “It’s looking like a lot of Democrats will be running for president in 2020. What will it take to win back the White House?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dorothy Kilgallen Death 78 mins – “Mark Shaw’s Denial of Justice adds the final chapter to The Reporter Who Knew Too Much, the bestselling murder mystery about “What’s My Line” TV star and investigative reporter Dorothy Kilgallen. The Reporter Who Knew Too Much detailed the life and times of Kilgallen who, according to Shaw, came too close to the truth about the JFK assassination. In his new book, Shaw presents incriminating evidence about the main suspect in Kilgallen’s death from the suspect’s family members, detailing the disturbing conduct by FBI agents on the day Kilgallen died. Shaw also includes government documents never published before that may change the way you perceive the JFK assassination. Readers can find out more at thedorothykilgallenstory.org.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Drones and Journalism 33 mins – “Ian is joined by Greg Agvent, the Senior Director of CNN’s Aerial Imagery and Reporting Unit—known as CNN Air. When evaluating drones for business, it’s easy to think of all the things they can replace. For aerial journalism and newsgathering, helicopters are the first thing that come to mind. But if you think national media organizations are going to fire the helicopters in place of drones… think again. Drones aren’t replacing traditional manned aircraft any time soon. The pair discuss how CNN is using drones in their Aerial Imagery and Reporting Unit; the types of hardware and software they use, when it’s best to use a drone (or a helicopter), and getting the first waiver allowing the team to perform flights above people in the U.S.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Drones in Construction and Mining 32 mins – “Join Kespry’s CEO, George Mathew, and host, Ian Smith, for a deep dive into Kespry’s enterprise drone hardware and software offerings and outlook on where the industrial use of drones is heading. And would you like to know what the CEO of one of Airware’s direct competitors thinks about them going out of business?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Economic Models 62 mins – “Maeve Cohen, Co-director of Rethinking Economics, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about her organization and its efforts to change economics education. Cohen, who co-founded the Post-Crash Economics Society, argues for a more human-centered approach to economics that would be less confident in its policy prescriptions and more honest about the significance of its underlying assumptions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elephant Poaching 15 mins – “The African elephant, the world’s largest land mammal, is threatened by poaching, human development, and climate change. As director of the Biodiversity and Ecosystems Services Branch of the UN Environmental Program, Max Gomera advocates for the elephant. Ensuring elephants and other animals thrive is important for the human species. In this episode, Gomera talks about improving the relationship between elephants and humans, and how our meat consumption is negatively impacting wildlife habitat. Gomera is an Aspen New Voices Fellow and spoke at Spotlight Health. Saturday, December 8, 2018”At the link find the title, “Off Stage 11: Saving the African Elephant” where you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog’s archive.

Environmental Poisons 63 mins – “E.G. Vallianatos will discuss his book Poison Spring, which documents in detail the EPA’s corruption and misuses of science and public trust. In its half century of existence, the EPA has repeatedly reinforced the chemical industrial complex by endorsing deadly chemicals, botching field investigations, turning a blind eye to toxic disasters and swallowing the claims of the industry. Come find out from an insider about how the EPA has allowed our lands and waters to be poisoned with more toxic chemicals than ever.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethn Hawke 48 mins – “Ethan Hawke on his new film about singer-songwriter Blaze Foley.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Criticism 47 mins – “Facebook in the hot seat — again. Lawmakers from around the world grill a top executive over its role in election meddling and spreading disinformation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Farsighted 82 mins – “Life is fraught with hard choices and decisions. How does one make them? Most of us are familiar with pros versus cons lists, which can be applied to everything from personal diet to public welfare. But that method only involves taking an existing understanding of the decision at hand, so it is limited by one’s imagination. The key to making a better decision is to see it with fresh eyes, to make imaginative leaps, and to discover new paths and potential outcomes. Over the past few decades, a field of research has emerged that will help us do just that. Spanning cognitive science, management theory and literary studies, its methods and procedures can help us make big decisions—and make them better. This science has been followed, explained and brought to life by best-selling author Steven Johnson in his 11th book, Farsighted: How We Make the Decisions That Matter the Most….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Frederick Douglass 46 mins – “Frederick Douglass was a fierce critic of America, a radical patriot and an abolitionist who was formerly enslaved. A new biography sheds light on the lesser-known corners of Douglass’ life.“ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Press 47 mins – “Freedom of the press. Reporters face jail, violence or worse — how can they be safe? And how can the truth get out? We’ll speak with journalists who have been in the arena.“ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gene Editing 10 mins – “The news that Chinese scientist He Jiankui had attempted to edit the CCR5 gene in the germline of two embryos led to a swift backlash in the scientific community. But the rogue experiment may inspire broader discussion about the fraught ethical issues involved. George Daley is dean of the Faculty of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Stephen Morrissey, the interviewer, is the Executive Managing Editor of the Journal.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genome Editing 13 mins – “Therapeutic editing of the human genome has long been a holy grail of genetic medicine. Different approaches are founded on a bedrock of basic laboratory discovery. This article describes the history, applications, and limitations of genome editing for clinical application. Matthew H. Porteus, the interviewee, is professor of pediatrics–stem cell transplantation at Stanford University. Stephen Morrissey, the interviewer, is the Executive Managing Editor of the Journal.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geothermal Energy in Europe 28 mins – “The heat contained in the top 3km of the Earth’s crust could power the planet thousands of times over. Despite that, less than 1% of the world’s electricity comes from geothermal energy. That may be about to change. Near Redruth in Cornwall a 3 mile deep hole is being dug- it will be the deepest in the UK. Cold water will be pumped down to the 200 degrees hot rocks below, the hot water returning will drive turbines to provide electricity for thousands of homes. Nearby, the Eden Project and the seawater lido in Penzance are building their own geothermal plants. But Cornwall is just the tip of the iceberg. Geothermal electricity was first produced in 1904 at Larderello in Tuscany. Today Enel Green Power supply a third of the region’s electricity from natural steam and they have plans to get much bigger, exploiting an extraordinary bit of chemistry. When water goes above 374 degrees centigrade and 221 bars of pressure it becomes a supercritical fluid. This contains five times as much energy as 200 degree water, transfers energy twice as efficiently and has a lower viscosity. Overall, you can theoretically get ten times more energy than from a similar conventional borehole. The new technology also promises more efficient geothermal energy in regions far away from geological hot spots like Iceland and Italy. The only fly in the ointment is that some techniques involve creating bigger fractures in the rocks. Experiments at Basel in Switzerland provoked an earthquake. So can the incredible potential of new-gen geothermal be exploited without provoking protests?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Giving 64 mins – “Is philanthropy, by its very nature, a threat to democracy? Though we may laud wealthy individuals who give away their money for society’s benefit, Rob Reich shows how such generosity not only isn’t the unassailable good we think it is, but it might also undermine democratic values. Big philanthropy is often a conversion of private assets into public influence—a form of power that is largely unaccountable and tax-advantaged. And small philanthropy, or ordinary charitable giving, can be problematic as well. These outcomes are shaped by the policies that define and structure philanthropy. Reich asks: What attitude and what policies should democracies have concerning individuals who give money away for public purposes? Differentiating between individual philanthropy and private foundations, Reich suggests that the goal of mass giving should be the decentralization of power in the production of public goods, such as the arts, education and science. For foundations, the goal should be long-term horizon innovations that enhance democratic experimentalism. Reich concludes that philanthropy, when properly structured, can play a crucial role in supporting a strong liberal democracy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Haitian Writers 52 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University African American Studies Program, and titled “Haiti’s Baron de Vastey and the Black Atlantic.”  Our speaker is Marlene Daut, Professor of African American Studies at University of Virginia.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Index Fund Power 47 mins – “Sounding the alarm on index funds. How their runaway success has reshaped power and accountability in boardrooms and on Wall Street.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infrastructure Maintenance 47 mins – “Deadly natural gas explosions in Massachusetts drew attention to the nation’s aging pipeline infrastructure. We’ll drill down.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jaws Shrink 58 mins – “There is a serious hidden epidemic just now being discovered by the public health community. It’s most obvious symptom is the growing frequency of children with crooked teeth wearing braces, but it includes children snoring, keeping their jaws hanging open, frequently afflicted with stuffy noses, children and adults with disturbed sleeping at night (sleep apnea) often unrecognized, attention and behavioral problems, and a general decline of physical appearance. Those symptoms indicate a building medical emergency that lies in the collection of serious diseases connected mouth breathing and disturbed sleep — a collection that includes heart disease, cancer, ADHD, depression, schizophrenia, suicide, asthma and perhaps Alzheimer’s disease. Disturbed sleep is an extremely serious stressor of the human mind and body; among other things, it tends to depress the immune system, making an individual much more vulnerable to a wide variety of diseases, and modifications of the brain that are manifest in many ways only partially understood. Add to this the large contributions of sleep deprivation to highway accidents, medical mistakes and poor performance at work and in school, and it’s easy to see how important this unrecognized public health emergency is. Come learn what causes this problem and many solutions. ‘Forwardontics’ will be discussed with clear explanations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jews in China P2 27 mins – “With the story of the Harbin Jews mostly out of the way, Laszlo moves on to the smaller and less known Jewish community of Tianjin.  Then as the 1930’s unfolds and after Hitler came to power, our story shifts to the European Jews. In this episode we’ll look at the events leading up to Kristallnacht November 1938. In Part 3 we’ll focus on 1938 and 1939.” At the link “Direct download: CHP-209-The History of_the Jewish Refugees in China Part 2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jews in China P3 28 mins – “This third episode in a series examining the history of the Jewish refugees who found sanctuary on the east coast of China, focuses on escalating events in Europe around 1938-1939. With the consolidation of Hitler’s rise, it didn’t bode well for many Jews. As the countdown to Kristallnacht gets closer the situation becomes more urgent and Shanghai as a destination becomes more popular. The great humanitarian He Fengshan (何凤山) will also be introduced.” At the link “Direct download: CHP-210-The History of the Jewish Refugees in China_Part 3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jews in China P4 26 mins – “Laszlo looks at Japanese attitudes towards the Jews and how it affected their treatment in Shanghai.  The focus will be on the year 1939, when the the greatest wave of Jewish refugees arrived in Shanghai. Then we will look at a little known tidbit from history concerning a plan championed by Sun Ke (son of Sun Yat-sen) to  rescue of Europe’s Jews.” At the link “Direct download: CHP-211-The History of the Jewish Refugees in China Part 4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mars InSight Lander 47 mins – “NASA’s InSight lander is settling in for the long assignment of exploring the geology of Mars. Will its findings one day rock our world?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Micromanaging 12 mins – “Think about the most tired you’ve ever been at work. It probably wasn’t when you stayed late or came home from a road trip — chances are it was when you had someone looking over your shoulder, watching your each and every move. “If we know that micromanagement isn’t really effective, why do we do it?” asks entrepreneur Chieh Huang. In a funny talk packed with wisdom and humility, Huang shares the cure for micromanagement madness — and how to foster innovation and happiness at work.” At the link left-click the “Square” circle, right-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moore’s Law Extended 29 mins – “How will technology shape our future? There is no doubt that automation will evolve and life will change. Technology will have a profound effect on what’s ahead in the coming years. We can barely keep up with the pace at which it is expanding. So what will our lives be like in the future? Listen to my free Komando on Demand podcast for a list of technologies that will mold our fate.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mouse at 50 37 mins – “Fifty years ago Doug Engelbart, engineer and inventor from the Augmentation Research Center Lab, gave what has become known as the “mother of all demos” – a demonstration of many computing concepts – such as the mouse, text links, and videoconferencing, that today we take for granted. Yet despite this landmark showcase it took another twenty years for the mouse to come into our homes and offices. Click looks back the development of the mouse and how interfaces may change in the future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Music Therapy 37 mins – “Dr. Concetta Tomaino is a pioneer in the field of music therapy and the executive director and co-founder of the Institute for Music and Neurologic Function. On the show this week we talk to Dr. Tomaino about her work treating individuals suffering the effects of brain trauma or neurological diseases as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.” At the link find the title, “Music as Medicine, 05 Dec 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Myanmar Genocide 63 mins -”This past August marked the 30th anniversary of Myanmar’s pro-democracy uprising in 1988. At the same moment, accusations of ethnic cleansing against the Rohingya Muslims and widespread human rights abuses across the Southeast Asian nation have prompted the United States to impose new sanctions, specifically on four military and police commanders and two army units. These recent actions by government forces taking place in Rohingya communities within Myanmar suggest that the promises of democracy have been betrayed. The responsibility, according to Azeem Ibrahim, rests on Nobel Peace Prize winner and de facto leader of the country, Aung San Suu Kyi, and her party as much as anyone else. Come hear this startling story. Ibrahim’s global analytical work has been praised by the likes of Secretary Madeleine Albright and former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown. Ibrahim received his doctorate from Cambridge University and has previously been appointed an International Security Fellow at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and a World Fellow at Yale University. Outside academia, Ibrahim has been a reservist in the 4th Battalion, Parachute Regiment (the U.K.’s elite airborne infantry reserve) and an award-winning entrepreneur. He was named a young global leader by the World Economic Forum.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Native American Children Relocation 42 mins – “For most of the 20th century, the U.S. government systematically forced Native American children from their homes and placed them with white families. Even as recently as the 1970s, one in four Native children nationwide was living in non-Native foster care, adoptive homes or boarding schools. Many of these children experienced devastating emotional and physical harm from adults who mistreated them and tried to erase their cultural identity. Dawnland, a feature-length documentary, follows the first government-sanctioned truth and reconciliation commission in the United States. The film tracks the commission’s journey across Maine, to gather testimony and bear witness to the devastating impact of the State’s child welfare practices on families in Maliseet, Micmac, Passamaquoddy and Penobscot tribal communities. Collectively, these tribes make up the Wabanaki people.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paradise Fire Reconstruction Efforts 49 mins – Back to Paradise. Three weeks after the devastating Camp Fire all but destroyed the town, children are back in school, but most everything else is in flux.“ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pod Save America Mailbag 83 mins – “Dan and Jon answer questions about the midterms, 2020, Never Trump Republicans, Iowa, the Senate, Fox News, the plutocracy, and our favorite Thanksgiving traditions. Then Doris Kearns Goodwin talks to Jon about her new book on presidential leadership.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Populism and Democracy 53 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, and the Center for the Study of Europe.  Our speaker is Sheri Berman, Professor of Political Science at Barnard College, Columbia University.  Professor Berman’s lecture is titled ‘Populism and the Future of Liberal Democracy in the West.’” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Preservation Efforts in Britain..28 mins – “2019 is the 70th anniversary of the legislation that created the first National Parks in the UK. At this crucial moment for the future of our countryside, Tom Heap asks how our best-loved landscapes can work better for people and wildlife. There are now 15 National Parks – all are protected areas because of their beautiful countryside, wildlife and cultural heritage. However, much has changed since the original legislation and many of these landscapes face significant challenges, including declining wildlife, a need for housing and poor public access. Tom visits two very different parks, the Cairngorms and the South Downs, to ask communities how they think National Parks should be improved to meet the needs of the 21st century. He considers some of the key issues; such as how to balance agriculture with enhancing and connecting habitats and how to deliver rural development and housing in protected landscapes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rev Jesse Jackson 70 mins – “The Rev. Jesse Jackson is one of America’s foremost civil rights, religious and political figures. For more than five decades, from working with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to his own two presidential campaigns and beyond, Jackson has played a pivotal role in virtually every movement for empowerment, peace, civil rights, gender equality, and economic and social justice. On August 9, 2000, President Bill Clinton awarded Jackson the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. As America grapples with polarization and increased threats of violence against social and political leaders, various ethnic groups, and the media, is it still possible for Americans to lessen the heated rhetoric and bridge divides? Come for a conversation with a man who has been called the “conscience of the nation.” Jackson will discuss the possibilities for America to be inclusive and to find common ground across lines of race, culture, class, gender and belief.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Self Driving Revolution 47 mins – “There’s now an app to hail a self-driving taxi. We’ll look behind the wheel at the technology and safety concerns.“ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexually Transmitted Disease Increase 53 mins – “This week, we speak with some experts dealing with the increase in sexually transmitted diseases and how to help the LGBTQ youth population. Dr. Derek Blechinger is a physician at Kaiser Permanente San Francisco who specializes in HIV and LGBT primary care. He completed residency in San Francisco in internal medicine and preventive medicine, during which he began his career in PrEP research and is now on the clinical faculty for the Bay Area, North and Central Coast AIDS Education Training Center (AETC) conducting “PrEP Bootcamps” throughout the greater Bay Area as well as a recent tour through states in the South… Sherilyn Adams is the executive director of Larkin Street Youth Services. For more than 30 years, Sherilyn Adams has dedicated her career to the nonprofit sector, focusing on issues of child abuse and neglect, family violence, mental health, substance abuse, and homelessness….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

State Power Grabs 47 mins – “The Wisconsin GOP’s lame-duck power grab — what the political slugfest means for democracy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide Rates 47 mins – “Americans are dying younger and death by suicide is a big reason why. We’ll look behind the rising numbers and talk about how to save lives. If you are in crisis, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting TALK to 741741.“ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court 69 mins – “David Kaplan takes us inside the secret world of the Supreme Court and shows us how nine justices have subverted the role of the other branches of government—and how we’ve come to accept this at our peril. The court is so crucial that some voters in 2016 selected a presidential candidate based on who that candidate would likely appoint. Donald Trump picked Neil Gorsuch and now Brett Kavanaugh, both potential swing votes on social policies such as abortion, same-sex marriage, gun control, campaign finance and voting rights. Kaplan asks: Is that really how democracy is supposed to work? Based on exclusive interviews with the justices and their law clerks, Kaplan will provide fresh details about life behind the scenes—Clarence Thomas’s simmering rage, Antonin Scalia’s death, Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s celebrity. Kaplan presents a sweeping narrative of the justices’ aggrandizement of power over the decades, and he demonstrates that the arrogance of the court isn’t partisan: Conservative and liberal justices alike are guilty of overreach.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

The Hate U Give 47 mins “A black teenager sees a friend killed by a white police officer. That’s the storyline of the new film “The Hate U Give.” The director and young activists tell their stories.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tom Hanks 47 mins – “We’ll talk with actor Tom Hanks on his career, his book and his love affair with the typewriter.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trachoma Disease Control 11 mins – “Thousands of years ago, ancient Nubians drew pictures on tomb walls of a terrible disease that turns the eyelids inside out and causes blindness. This disease, trachoma, is still a scourge in many parts of the world today — but it’s also completely preventable, says Caroline Harper. Armed with data from a global mapping project, Harper’s organization Sightsavers has a plan: to focus on countries where funding gaps stand in the way of eliminating the disease and ramp up efforts where the need is most severe. Learn more about their goal of consigning trachoma to the history books — and how you can help. (This ambitious plan is one of the first ideas of The Audacious Project, TED’s new initiative to inspire global change.)” At the link left-click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download” arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Traumatized Refugees 64 mins – “There are a greater number of forcibly displaced people in the world today than at any time since the end of World War II, and the Bay Area has welcomed many of these individuals. Hear from clinicians working directly with Bay Area refugees and asylum seekers about how they are restoring health and awakening hope in response to human rights abuses.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tribes Book by Junger – “Journalist and author Sebastian Junger talks about his book Tribe with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Junger explores the human need to be needed and the challenges facing many individuals in modern society who struggle to connect with others. His studies of communal connection include soldiers in a small combat unit and American Indian society in the nineteenth century.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uninhabitable Earth 50 mins – “…In between scientific reticence and science fiction is science itself. This article is the result of dozens of interviews and exchanges with climatologists and researchers in related fields and reflects hundreds of scientific papers on the subject of climate change. What follows is not a series of predictions of what will happen — that will be determined in large part by the much-less-certain science of human response. Instead, it is a portrait of our best understanding of where the planet is heading absent aggressive action. It is unlikely that all of these warming scenarios will be fully realized, largely because the devastation along the way will shake our complacency. But those scenarios, and not the present climate, are the baseline. In fact, they are our schedule….” At this link you can read the article. The audio version is at the link in this abstract’s title, but you can only listen, not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Violinist Micarelli 50 mins – “Violinist Lucia Micarelli defies the limits of what music can be played on a violin. She’s with us.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfires 71 mins – “Wildfires have always been part of life for the state of California. However, in the past year the state has seen 7 of its 20 most destructive wildfires ever, including the recent Camp Fire in Butte County, which directly impacted the Bay Area for days, and the Woolsey Fire in Malibu outside of Los Angeles. Combined, both fires cost hundreds of lives and caused billions of dollars in damage. Coming one year after last year’s Tubbs Fire in Santa Rosa, it is clear that the state has reached a new abnormal and is at a critical juncture in how it plans and prepares for the inevitability of future fires—ones that could be more destructive and costly than what we have already faced. But what is causing these fires? What can be done to improve preparation and fighting them, and who is responsible for doing it?  To address some of these critical and urgent questions, please join The Commonwealth Club for a special free town hall on California’s fires and what can be done in the short and long term to prepare for them. The Club has invited some of the region’s leading wildfire experts for an essential and honest discussion about the new abnormal and the pressing need to better prepare for the future. The town hall will also address how technology is shaping fire prevention and firefighting. Guests are invited to participate and share their experiences, thoughts and recommendations. Some of the state’s top fire experts will also be seated in the audience. ” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.    

Women in Business 74 mins – “Women, especially women of color, are underrepresented in business—from entry-level to the corner office, across corporate America—even as the number of women earning college degrees exceeds the number of men. As companies, leaders and those focused on diversity press ahead to make change, it’s become key to reflect on both data and stories to help define the problem and iterate on solutions. Women in the Workplace,” an annual report conducted by LeanIn.org and McKinsey on the state of women in corporate America, draws from more than 250 companies that together employ 13 million people. The report shares insights into the challenges women face across many industries and sectors and identifies concrete actions that companies can take to make lasting and significant change. Join co-author, Alexis Krivkovich, managing partner of McKinsey & Company’s Silicon Valley office and a leader in the Financial Services Practice, along with other corporate and cultural leaders, as they discuss the results of the report and how companies can evolve to reflect the times.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.   

Yemen War 60 mins – “Since 2015, a Saudi-led coalition, supported by Britain and the United States, has waged a devastating war on Yemen, resulting in a humanitarian disaster largely ignored by the world’s media. Isa Blumi, a noted historian, senior lecturer and associate professor at Stockholm University (specializing in Ottoman history, Albania and Yemen) will discuss his latest book, Destroying Yemen: What Chaos in Arabia Tells Us About the World, published by UC Press.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment