Media Mining Digest 241 – Jun 24, 2016: Africa Modernization, Alexander McCall Smith, Archive Value, Arctic Issues, Barbara Boxer, Bay of Fundy Power, Bhopal Disaster, Biofuel, Bird and Bees of Life, Body Part Fabrication, Bracero Program Lecture, Bronze Age Collapse, Bruce Bochy, Bullying Effects, Chronic Pain Management, Coroner History Lecture, Creative Paradigms, Drug Overdoses, Economic Competitiveness, Electric Rail History, European Disunion, Extinction Process, Facial Identification Database, Family Violence in Australia, Farm Equipment Auction, Fat and Sugar, Finance Industry Impact, Genetic Engineering, Gilded Age Lecture, Ginseng, GMO Trees, Gun Control Status, Hardware Hacker, Heart Overview, Higher Education, Historical Perspective, Information Overload, Intersex Issues, Investment Newsletters, Iran Sexual Issues, ISIS Kill Lists, Judicial Bias, Ketogenic Diets, Kids and Money, Life Extension Diet, Lithium Kidney Damage, Lynchings in the South, Male Empathy Training, Mass Incarcerations of 60s-70s, Mass Migrations of 1900s, Migration to Sweden, National Security Efforts, Nixon White House Recording System, Ocean Mapping, Performance Enhancing Drugs, Peter Bogdanovich, Police Reform History, Power Defined, Power Grid Defense, Power Trends-Australia, Productivity Mentor, Psych Ward Insights, Rat Control, Refugee Policy History, Relief Efforts by U.S., Sexual Health of Women, Sharing Economy, Stanford Sex Case, Startup Drug Business, Suicide Ethics, Supreme Court Role, Syria Murders, Syrian Hostages, Team Rubicon, Technology Trends, Terrorist Recruitment, Tiger Tracking, Torpedo Music, Wartime Families, Welfare Benefits, Welfare State, Women in the Workplace, World War One Myths

The best 83 podcasts from a larger group of 250 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Africa Modernization 62 mins – “Jake Bright, Writer; Author; Strategic Advisor Join us for a discussion of business, investment, technology and turnaround in Africa with Jake Bright, co-author of The Next Africa: An Emerging Continent Becomes a Global Powerhouse. The book won an Axiom Best Business Book award and was recently featured at TEDx. Bright, who also contributes on Africa for TechCrunch, will focus in particular on Sub-Saharan Africa’s emerging technology sector and its growing ties to Silicon Valley. Joining Bright for discussion and Q&A will be MallforAfrica.com CEO Chris Folayan, Uber’s Global Lead for International Relations Matt Devlin, and Toro Orero, managing partner for DraperDarkFlow, a Silicon Valley-based Africa focused venture capital firm.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alexander McCall Smith 51 mins – “Today on Word of Mouth it’s Writers on a New England Stage with Alexander McCall Smith, recorded live at The Music Hall in Portsmouth. Best known as the author of The No.1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series, McCall Smith made his living for many years as an esteemed lawyer, medical law professor, and international authority on medical ethics and bioethics. He was born in what is now Zimbabwe, and helped found a law school in neighboring Botswana. It is there that he set his first novel about Precious Ramotswe, who brought the innate curiosity and traditional wisdom honed as a child in the Kalahari desert to bear as Botswana’s first ever lady detective. Alexander McCall Smith joined us shortly after publication of The Woman Who Walked in Sunshine, the 16th novel in a series that’s sold more than 20 million books worldwide and been translated into 40 languages.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Archive Value 62 mins – “How will our memories be experienced by future generations? How much of our cultural memory is “owed” to them? And why on earth would the Library of Congress be interested in preserving years worth of tweets??? These were among the topics of conversations in this week’s episode in which EconTalk host Russ Roberts talked with archivist and historian Abby Smith Rumsey about how we experience memories of the past, and how we might preserve them for the future. This episode got me thinking a lot about what my grandchildren might make of EconTalk, among other memories and experiences I hold dear. Can I ensure that they will experience them? How do I know they will find any value in them? As always, we’d like to hear whay you took away from this week’s conversation. Let us know; we love to hear from you!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arctic Issues 56 mins – “Thank you for coming to the Council’s meeting on the Arctic. It’s really terrific, and a great honor, to have three of the country’s—our nation’s most important leaders on this subject: Admiral Papp, Ambassador Brzezinski, and Senator Murkowski. Their full bios are in your program, so I won’t repeat them for you here. Our plan, like most Council meetings, is to have a 30-minute conversation, and then we’ll open it up to the floor for members to ask questions….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Barbara Boxer 48 mins – “What’s at stake in the coming presidential election? “Everything,” says Senator Barbara Boxer. The lifelong democrat is retiring from the Senate after 34 years in Congress, but insists she won’t stop fighting for the causes she believes in, like environmental protection, women’s rights and healthcare. In a new memoir, Boxer chronicles her political career spanning four decades, and talks about honing what she calls “the art of tough.” She’ll share her views on the 2016 presidential race, give us a look inside her life as a senator and tell us what she thinks it takes to truly stand up for change at a critical time for our country.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Bay of Fundy Power 28 mins – “At the end point of Nova Scotia’s Bay of Fundy, in the Minas Basin, the tides can rise as high as 15 metres. Those hoping to harness that energy want to put giant turbines on the seabed but one very vocal lobster fisherman is already delaying the plan.” At the link find the title, “Bay of Fundy tidal turbines on hold over environmental concerns, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160615_61135.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bhopal Disaster 8 mins – “One December morning over thirty years ago, residents of the Indian city of Bhopal found themselves in the grip of what was to become the world’s worst industrial disaster, exposed to a cloud of toxic methyl isocyanate….” At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Methyl_isocyanate.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biofuel 28 mins – “Is the biofuel craze of a few years ago really dead? This week’s guest on Sea Change Radio, Pat Gruber, thinks not. While plummeting oil prices may have flattened the appeal of biofuel in the auto industry, the air travel industry’s interest appears to be just taking off. Gruber’s company, Gevo, provided the fuel for the first corn-powered commercial passenger flight in U.S. history this month. We discuss his company’s technology, the competitive bio jetfuel landscape, and what feedstocks are likely to be used to power future flights. Then we dig into the Sea Change Radio archives to hear from longtime airline industry analyst Bob McAdoo. He breaks down airline pricing models that often leave travelers flummoxed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bird and Bees of Life 62 mins – “Some information is so big and so complicated that it seems impossible to talk to kids about. This week, stories about the vague and not-so-vague ways to teach children about race, death and sex – including a story about colleges responding to sexual assault by trying to teach students how to ask for consent. Also, a story about how and when to teach kids about the horrors of slavery and oppression in America.” At the link you can listen online, but a download costs $.99; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Body Part Fabrication 7 mins – “TED Fellow Andrew Pelling is a biohacker, and nature is his hardware. His favorite materials are the simplest ones (and oftentimes he finds them in the garbage). Building on the cellulose structure that gives an apple its shape, he “grows” lifelike human ears, pioneering a process that might someday be used to repair body parts safely and cheaply. And he has some even wilder ideas to share … “What I’m really curious about is if one day it will be possible to repair, rebuild and augment our own bodies with stuff we make in the kitchen,” he says.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bracero Program Lecture 72 mins – “Mar, 2016,” University of Illinois professor Mireya Loza talks about Latino labor movements during the mid-20th century. She discusses the “bracero” program which brought thousands of Mexicans to the U.S. as guest workers.” At the link find the title, “Latino Labor Movements, Mar 2016,” right-click “Media files program.422471.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bronze Age Collapse 47 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss The Bronze Age Collapse, the name given by many historians to what appears to have been a sudden, uncontrolled destruction of dominant civilizations around 1200 BC in the Aegean, Eastern Mediterranean and Anatolia. Among other areas, there were great changes in Minoan Crete, Egypt, the Hittite Empire, Mycenaean Greece and Syria. The reasons for the changes, and the extent of those changes, are open to debate and include droughts, rebellions, the breakdown of trade as copper became less desirable, earthquakes, invasions, volcanoes and the mysterious Sea Peoples….” At the link find the title, “The Bronze Age Collapse, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03yhrs7.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bruce Bochy 64 mins – “San Francisco Giants CEO Larry Baer has stated that hiring Bruce Bochy was “probably the best move [Giants management] ever made.” Here’s a chance to get Bruce Bochy’s take on the Giants 2016 season and on his personal side as well. As a Major League manager, Bochy has one of the more stressful jobs imaginable. What does he do to relax? He goes for long walks as a way to clear his head, calm his soul and give his body a workout, all of which is the subject of his new book, A Book of Walks. Here’s a rare chance to meet Bruce Bochy off the field. Bring your questions.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bullying Effects 26 mins – “The Current has looked into bullying in schools and communities, even the effects of bullying on siblings. Now new research suggests the impact of bullying follows many into adulthood and creates what is being called Adult Post Bullying Syndrome.” At the link find the title, “Researcher says bullying ‘scars’ into adulthood should be classified as syndrome, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160613_19250.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Pain Management 59 mins – “Dr. Lawrence Poree looks at alternatives to opioid pain medication. Might technology hold the key to reducing opioid use? Recorded on 02/25/2016. (#30798) (Presents some advanced and proven approaches that are not well known.) At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coroner History Lecture 71 mins – “University of Georgia professor Stephen Berry teaches a class about coroners in the 19th century South. He discusses the role of a coroner as an agent of the state and talks about the records created from their inquests.” At the link find the title, “Coroners in the 19th Century South, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.440930.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creative Paradigms 37 mins – “Why do ideas discarded for centuries, like electric cars, return to the cutting edge of science and technology? Steven Poole’s new book Rethink shows what we can learn by considering obsolete ideas from a new perspective, drawing on examples from military strategy and psychotherapy to chess and morphic resonance. Ideas given a second chance include electric cars, panpsychism, and teleology.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Overdoses 32 mins – “Synthetic Opioids causing overdoses nationwide[5 – 15 min mark], and we’ll look at two high impact nurse leadership programs affecting patient outcomes for critical care patients. If that’s what you’re looking for, you found it. It’s the Nursing Show.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Competitiveness 60 mins – “In conversation with Mira Patel, Senior Advisor at U.S. Global Development Lab, U.S. Agency for International Development, John Engler, President of Business Roundtable, Steven L. Rattner, Chairman of Willett Advisors, LLC, and Jay C. Shambaugh, Member of the White House Council of Economic Advisors, discuss the role of the U.S. government in fortifying economic competitiveness in international markets. The experts consider the competitive challenges confronting U.S. manufacturing businesses, how trade policies influence global competitiveness, the need for change in federal spending priorities, and the potential impacts of corporate tax reform.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Rail History 49 mins – “Clemson University professor Roger Grant talks about the history of American transportation and the rise of interurban electric rail at the end of the 19th and early 20th century.” At the link find the title, “Interurban Electric Rail, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.443546.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

European Disunion 47 mins – “Recorded on January 25, 2016 Hoover Institution fellow Michael McFaul and John O’Sullivan discuss the many problems Europe is facing including an aggressive Russia, Brexit, NATO and the asylum crisis in Germany. McFaul and O’Sullivan give their analysis of these problems and what it means for the future of Europe.” At the link find the title, “European Disunion, Jan, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160613-mcfaul.mp3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Extinction Process 26 mins – “The Bramble Cay melomys lived on a small island in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, but their extinction is being looked at as a ‘canary in the coal mine’ moment.” At the link find the title, “First mammal extinction due to human-caused climate change, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160617_68473.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facial Identification Database 6 mins – “Audio interview by GAO staff with Diana Maurer, Director, Homeland Security and Justice” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Family Violence in Australia 56 mins – “Rosie Batty and Danny Blay speak at a family violence election forum at the National Press Club,Rosie Batty and Danny Blay speak at the National Press Club, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_BattyBlay_1506_512k.mp4” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Equipment Auction 50 mins – “Each month in a flat piece of English Fenland, a site the size of 40 football pitches, hosts the biggest second hand farm machinery auction in the world. It is both uniquely British and international – buyers from four continents arrive by truck, taxi, or hire car with their tractor shopping lists and hopes.” At the link find the title, “Follow That Tractor, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03y71yk.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fat and Sugar P1 54 mins – “Jill Eisen explores the complex, and sometimes contradictory, science of nutrition — and tries to find clarity amidst the thicket of studies and ambiguous research.” At the link find the title, “Fat and Sugar, Part 1, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160615_27588.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Finance Industry Impact 61 mins – “In conversation with Peter R. Fisher, Senior Fellow and Senior Lecturer at Tuck Business School, Dartmouth College, Rana A. Foroohaar, Managing Editor of Time Magazine, John P. Lipsky, Senior Fellow at Foreign Policy Institute, John Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, and Joseph E. Stiglitz, Professor at Columbia Business School, discuss the effects of the finance industry’s continued growth and assess whether it is helpful or hurtful to the U.S. economy overall. They consider how finance’s growth impacts business development, its effects on income inequality, and whether the financial regulations implemented after the Great Recession have been effective. The panel further reflects on the best ways to regulate and manage risk in the financial industry going forward.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Engineering 37 mins – “We talk to cancer physician and researcher Siddhartha Mukherjee about his latest book The Gene: An Intimate History.” At the link find the title, “136 Siddhartha Mukherjee – An Intimate History of the Gene,” right-click “Media files 93a65456-668a-4f87-a476-69a87c042b59.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gilded Age Lecture, 52 mins – “May, 2016 Robert Chiles of the University of Maryland talks about labor and social unrest during the Gilded Age, as well as the reforms that tried to combat this discontent.” At the link find the title, “Unrest and Reform in the Gilded Age, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.440170.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ginseng 37 mins – “Modern science is proving many traditional herbal medicines to be effective. In Episode 133, Dr. Andrew Scholey of the Swinburne Centre for Human Psychopharmacology is back to talk about the benefits of Ginseng (see our episode on Bacopa for another example of a traditional herb backed by science). Mood, Memory, and Mental Fatigue – Numerous studies have confirmed that Ginseng has cognition-enhancing properties, particularly when it comes to memory, mood, and mental fatigue…And Ginseng has benefits comparable to pharmaceutical heavy-hitters like Modafinil. In a study comparing the effects of Ginseng and Modafinil, the largest effect size (a measure of how much of an effect a compound has) for Modafinil was 0.77, while the largest for Ginseng was 0.86, meaning that Ginseng had more noticeable effects on certain measures of cognition than Modafinil. In the case of mental fatigue, Ginseng had double the effect of Modafinil!…”At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Trees 40 mins – “Dr. Steve Strauss is a Distinguished Professor of Forestry at Oregon State University. He has been at the forefront of forest biology and genetic engineering of trees, contributing greatly to the understanding of fundamental tree biology, as well as the development of techniques and tools to perform genetic engineering in tree species. We discuss the many opportunities in tree breeding, as well as the limitations and other challenges.” At the link find the title, “

Gun Control Status 20 mins – “As the U.S. once again debates gun control in the wake of the Orlando massacre, gun advocates are challenging the accepted wisdom the NRA is politically invincible. New research suggests the NRA is losing its grip to changing demographics.” At the link find the title, “NRA’s political influence on the wane, says gun control advocate, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160615_64931.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hardware Hacker 82 mins – “Dmitry Nedospasov is a full time hardware hacker and security researcher. He tells us about how to get into the silicon and learn all about what’s going on under the hood of devices….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Overview 64 mins – “This programme comes to you from the British Cardiovascular Society Conference in Manchester, where leaders in the field have been presenting their latest research on preventing heart disease: one of the leading causes of death. We explore the radioactive toothpaste that can help you predict heart attacks, listen in to a genuine heart transplant and ask whether running really keeps your heart healthy.” At the link right-click “Download as MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Higher Education 27 mins – “Dr. Bruce Johnstone is Professor Emeritus at the University of Buffalo and was named SUNY Chancellor Emeritus in 2014.  In this 2011 interview, we’ll hear Johnstone talk about the challenges facing higher education, including the increasing costs of a higher education and the job shortages facing college graduates. How can universities survive the current economy and state budget cuts?” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Historical Perspective 60 mins – “…We are living in a time of transition. Migration, religious fundamentalism and climate change leave many of us anxious about the future. So too does the rise of China, the re-emergence of Iran, the actions and posturing of Russia and a Middle East that seems fragile and volatile, where the dreams of the Arab Spring have turned to despair, as conflict rages across north Africa and the Middle East… how do we prepare for the new world that is emerging? [Peter Frankopan, the Oxford historian and author of the bestseller, ‘The Silk Roads’]…came to the Intelligence Squared stage to put these questions into an historical perspective. He was joined by the politician Kwasi Kwarteng, a rising star in Westminster, whose books on the history of empire and on finance have given him a rare perspective on global change and on the ways the West has engaged with other parts of the world, sometimes as he sees it with disastrous effect…. The globe has rotated towards the West for the last five hundred years. Now, as Frankopan will explain, it is turning east, towards the new Silk Roads, largely funded by China, that fan out in all directions across Asia. Is it closing time in the gardens of the west, as our old comfortable democratic assumptions – and our comfort – fall prey to a world order that is changing at terrifyingly quick pace?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Information Overload 39 mins – “This week we’re dredging the seas of memory, examining how identity is constructed out of what we choose to remember and what happens when we cannot use this faculty. According to the cultural historian Abby Smith Rumsey, the 21st century isn’t the first time human beings have found themselves drowning in data. She explains why it’s too easy to blame information overload on IT, how brains are designed to look for meaning instead of facts and where to build a library in a networked world. The artist Simon Bill joins us in the studio to tell us why he found himself putting down his brushes to write a novel, Artist in Residence. He explores how neuroscience challenges our basic preconceptions about originality and why artists struggle with the stuff of creation.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intersex Issues 24 mins – “What to do if your child is born with sexual anatomy that doesn’t fit the norm? For years, the answer has been gender assignment surgery, but The Current speaks to two intersex guests who want this to invasive practice to stop.” At the link find the title, “Stop medical intervention on the bodies of intersex children, says advocate, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160615_11079.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Newsletters 52 mins – “The Hulbert Financial Digest has been closed. HFD was to financial newsletters what Morningstar is to the mutual fund industry. HFD tracked the performance and risk of over 200 newsletter portfolios. Paul shares what he learned from subscribing to HFD for over 30 years. He discusses newsletters that recommend low-risk to very-high-risk PORTFOLIOS using individual stocks, mutual funds, market timing and buy and hold.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran Sexual Issues 27 mins – “In Iran, It is not just Ahmadinejad who slams homosexuals, many people also deny homosexuality or know very little about it. So how does one family cope when they realise their daughter is gay? This is the story of the collective struggle of a supportive and close-knit family, who are trying to find a solution for this “crisis”, each in their own way.” At the link find the title, “My Iranian Daughter, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03y72zv.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Kill List 20 mins – “Across the country, over a hundred Canadians are learning from police that they are on the ISIS ‘kill list’ — and most of them are women.” At the link find the title, “ISIS kill list targeting civilians is a game changer in terrorism, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160617_62060.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Judicial Bias 52 mins – “Dahlia sits down with Stanford Law School’s Deborah Rhode to discuss Donald Trump’s attack on the judge in the Trump University fraud lawsuits. And she talks with legal scholar Jeffrey Rosen about the astonishing legal mind of Justice Louis Brandeis.” At the link find the title, “What Would Brandeis Do? Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM9271746723.mp3” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ketogenic Diets 73 mins – “On this episode we have guest Luis Villasenor of KetoGains. We talk all about ketosis, ketogenic diets, building muscle, fueling in ketosis, weight and fat loss, electrolytes, and more.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kids and Money 28 mins – “In this episode, we handed the mic over to kids from 5 to 9 years old to discuss the role of money in their lives, and in their imaginations.” At the link find the title, “Get Schooled: Kids and Money, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files PNC5571652013.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Life Extension Diet 28 mins – “(Starts at 10 min mark) Solar panels reach world record high efficiency, but funding will be cut, Universe expanding faster than predicted by Ian Woolf, David LeCouteur talks about healthier ageing through a high carbohydrate diet.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lithium Kidney Damage 24 mins – “This week we’re revisiting the story of a woman making a very difficult decision. Jaime Lowe started taking lithium when she was 17, after a manic episode landed her in a psychiatric ward. She was diagnosed with bipolar disorder,and for more than 20 years, the drug has been her near-constant companion. She’s taken it for so long that she can’t say for sure where she ends and lithium begins. “It’s hard to know if lithium is actually — like, if it dampens my personality, or if it normalizes my personality, or if it allows me to just sort of be who I am,” she says. Jaime tried to go off of lithium only once, in her mid-20s, and the result was not good. She developed grand delusions. She would start an organization to defend the First Amendment. She would marry a friend she only recently met. She would change the world. She sent wild emails to would-be employers, adorned herself with glitter and stacks of necklaces, and barely slept. When she finally pulled herself back together again, Jaime made a resolution. She’d stick with lithium. And that worked — until she learned last year that her long-term lithium use has taken a physical toll. It’s damaged her kidneys. Now, she faces a choice that’s not much of choice at all: an eventual kidney transplant, or going off the drug that has kept her sane all these years.” At the link find the title, “Your Sanity or Your Kidneys, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files onlyhuman030116_cms579631_pod.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lynchings in the South 72 mins – “ University of Texas at Dallas professor Natalie Ring talks about the common practice of lynching black men as punishment for perceived crimes in the Jim Crow era South.” At the link find the title, “Punishment in the Jim Crow South, Mar, 2016,”right-click “Media files program.430202.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fromt ehpop-up menu.

Male Empathy Training 62 mins – “You probably don’t even notice them, but social norms determine so much of your behavior – how you dress, talk, eat and even what you allow yourself to feel. These norms are so entrenched we never imagine they can shift. But Alix Spiegel and new co-host, Hanna Rosin, examine two grand social experiments that attempt to do just that: teach McDonald’s employees in Russia to smile, and workers on an oil rig how to cry.” At the link find the title, “June 17, 2016, The New Norm,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Incarcerations of 60s–70s Lecture 72 mins – ”University of Washington, Bothell, history professor Dan Berger examines the rise of mass incarceration in the United States and the politics behind it.” At the link find the title, “Incarceration in the Late 20th Century, MY 2016,” right-click “Media files program.430012.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Migrations of 1900s Lecture 72 mins – ”Georgetown University professor Adam Rothman teaches a class on the impact of the advent of the Industrial Revolution on the flow of migrants from Europe to the Americas in the 19th century.” At the link find the title, “Mass Migration in the Industrial Atlantic, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436309.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migration to Sweden 82 mins – “More people than ever before are on the move, crossing international borders in search of safety, livelihoods, opportunity, or the chance to reunite their families. States are ill-prepared to deal with these mixed flows of refugees and other migrants, especially those who move without prior authorization from the countries they seek to enter. Much of the focus is on how best to address the immediate and urgent needs of refugees—and for good reason. But much less attention has been paid to protecting the human rights of other migrants, or to creating orderly processes and expanding opportunities for legal migration. Increased mobility is a fact of life in the 21st century, and cannot be continually dealt with as a crisis….” At the link right-click “Download(Loading)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Security Efforts 55 mins – “Amy Pope, U.S. deputy homeland security advisor and deputy assistant to the president at the White House National Security Council, joined CFR for a discussion on how the networks, talents, and perspectives of diverse populations help the United States to ensure the safety and security of its homeland against 21st century threats. Pope reflected on how women and civil society help to strengthen community resilience and combat radicalization, and what policies, strategies, and tactics the U.S. government can employ to best partner with them and address the risks that they face.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nixon White House Recording System and the White House Tapes, May, 2016,” 67 mins – “John Dean, former White House counsel to President Nixon and now Barry Goldwater Chair of American Institutions at Arizona State University, teaches a class on Watergate and the discovery of the Nixon White House taping system.”At the link find the title, “John Dean on Watergate and the White House Tapes, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.431129.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Mapping 26 mins – “We still know less than 95% of what the sea floor looks like. Even shallow coastal waters are poorly mapped… The weather system that creates the Indian monsoon is notoriously difficult to model, which leads to inaccurate forecasts of the start date and intensity that can lead to devastation for local residents and farmers. A team of oceanographers and scientists from the University of East Anglia are going to be out at sea during the monsoon and using underwater robots to map current flows and measure sea temperatures…- Gravitational Wave Detected Again The team at LIGO (The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) have done it again with a Christmas day detection of two black holes colliding…- Green Mining Wales in the UK has 1300 rivers with illegal levels of heavy metals. Toxic metals like lead, zinc and copper are a legacy left over from when the area was heavily mined. Natural Resources Wales and Innovate UK set a competition to look for technology that would clean up these rivers. One of the winners was Steve Skill from Swansea University, who has come up with some biotechnology that uses algae to suck the poison out of the rivers….” At the link find the title, “Mapping the Ocean Floor, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03yjjqs.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Performance Enhancing Drugs P1 42mins – “In this episode we talk to Chris Hoyte from RMPDC [Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center]about steroids, hormones, and other performance enhancing drugs. This is the first part of of a two part interview.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peter Bogdanovich 89 mins –Legendary director, critic and film historian Peter Bogdanovich joins Gilbert and Frank for a fascinating, in-depth conversation about “Citizen Kane,” John Ford, the influence of Howard Hawks, the B-movies of Roger Corman and the decline of the Hollywood studio system. Also, Peter befriends Cary Grant, Gilbert meets Richard Pryor, Jimmy Stewart recites a poem and Alfred Hitchcock orders a steak. PLUS: Samuel Fuller! Kenneth Mars! Orson Welles’ lost film! Peter remembers John Ritter! And the strange death of Thomas Ince!” At the link find the title, “#107: Peter Bogdanovich,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/3598900/6267b16d-9359-42aa-b65e-99c82bda6784.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Reform Historic 24 mins – “In 1968, the police department in Menlo Park, California hired a new police chief. His name was Victor Cizanckas and his main goal was to reform the department, which had a strained relationship with the community at the time. The 1960s had been a turbulent decade in Menlo Park, a small city with wide suburban streets and manicured lawns just south of San Francisco. There were big student-led, anti-war demonstrations at nearby Stanford University. Leaders in the African-American communities of Belle Haven and East Palo Alto were organizing to demand better treatment and services. After years of clashing with protesters, the police department didn’t have the best reputation. Cizanckas wanted to rebuild trust with the community — and he made a number of changes to improve the department’s image. One of the most ground-breaking and controversial was the new blazer-style uniform he implemented….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow just under the title, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power Defined 77 mins – “Dacher Keltner, Professor of Psychology, UC Berkeley; Co-Director, Greater Good Science Center; Author, The Power Paradox: How We Gain and Lose Influence Monday Night Philosophy investigates a revolutionary reconsideration of power. It is taken for granted that power corrupts. This is reinforced culturally by everything from Machiavelli to contemporary politics. But enduring power only comes from empathy and giving, because power is given to us by other people. This is the crux of the power paradox: by fundamentally misunderstanding the behaviors that helped us to gain power in the first place, we set ourselves up to fall from power. We can’t retain it because we’ve never understood it correctly. Dr. Keltner lays out exactly—in 20 original “Power Principles”—how to retain power, why power can be a demonstrably good thing, and the terrible consequences of letting those around us languish in powerlessness” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power Grid Defense 57 mins – “Ted Koppel’s new book, “Lights Out,” he asserts that a major cyberattack on America’s power grid is not only possible but likely, that it would be devastating, and that the United States is shockingly unprepared. Koppel warns that a well-designed attack on just one of the nation’s three electric power grids could cripple much of our infrastructure, and the federal government, while well prepared for natural disasters, has no plan for the aftermath of an attack on the power grid. On today’s episode of Go Green Radio, we’ll talk with Scott Aaronson, the Managing Director for Cyber and Physical Security for the Edison Electric Institute (EEI), and discuss what the electric power industry is doing to protect the nation’s power grid.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power Trends – Australia 54 mins – “There are big changes happening in the way we generate, buy and sell electricity. We’re seeing batteries, microgrids, and the possibility of self-sufficiency based on renewable energy, both for individual households, and in some cases, whole towns. In many places, the new options presented by technology and innovation are marching ahead of regulations, meaning some initiatives are being restrained by laws drafted for a different world. This discussion, recorded at WOMAD in March 2016 considers some of the new possibilities.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productivity Mentor 12 min – “We believe we should work hard in order to be happy, but could we be thinking about things backwards? In this fast-moving and very funny talk, psychologist Shawn Achor argues that, actually, happiness inspires us to be more productive.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psych Ward Insights 25 mins – “Kay Parley was a psychiatric patient turned psychiatric nurse. Now at the age of 93, she shares her reflections from both sides of the gurney from the then-called Weyburn Mental Institution and speaks to her experience with the therapeutic use of LSD.” At the link find the title, “93-year-old former psychiatric patient and nurse on lessons from LSD, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160614_43079.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rat Control 24 mins – “As a growing number of Canadian cities report increases in rat populations, The Current turns to a researcher and a rodentologist for their insight into the potential health risks to humans and how to get rid of rats. Yes, that’s right – a rodentologist.” At the link find the title, “Rising urban rat population pose health risks to humans, says researcher, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160614_40410.mp3 Rising urban rat population pose health risks to humans, says researcher” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Policy History 59 mins –” Cornell University professor Maria Cristina Garcia talks about the United States’ refugee policy since World War II.” At the link find the title, “U.S. Refugee Policy Since World War II, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.422219.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Relief Efforts by U.S. 59 mins – “Anne C. Richard, assistant secretary of state for population, refugees, and migration at the U.S. Department of State, discusses the scope of the global migration and refugee crisis, the humanitarian response, and policy options moving forward in this CFR National Program and Outreach Conference Call.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Health of Women 83 mins – “Dr. Tami Rowen discusses women’s sexual health as they age. Recorded on 03/23/2016. (#30692)” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharing Economy 54 mins – “Drawing on extensive research and numerous real-world examples — including Airbnb, Lyft, Uber, Etsy, TaskRabbit, France’s BlaBlaCar, China’s Didi Kuaidi, and India’s Ola, Arun explains the basics of what he’s coined “crowd-based capitalism” — a new way of organizing economic activity that will replace the traditional corporate-centered model. As peer-to-peer commercial exchange blurs the lines between the personal and the professional, The Sharing Economy: The End of Employment and the Rise of Crowd-Based Capitalism shows us how the economy, government regulation, employment, and our social fabric will change. Arun describes the intriguing mix of “gift” and “market” in its transactions, demystifies emerging blockchain technologies, and clearly defines the array of emerging on-demand platforms. Equally important, he puts forth policy choices and proposes possible new directions for self-regulatory organizations, labor law, and funding our social safety net.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stanford Sex Case 49 mins – “A California judge last week sentenced former Stanford university athlete Brock Turner to six months in jail for sexually assaulting an unconscious young woman on campus. The lenient sentence sparked widespread public outrage and efforts to recall the judge. Letters to the court by Turner and his father painting Turner as a victim of campus party culture fueled the outrage. The case has also called into question how colleges are addressing the growing number of allegations of sexual assault. We discuss the Brock Turner case, sexual assault on American campuses and the role of law enforcement and college administrators.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Startup Drug Business P2 42 mins – “A different kind of boom and bust.” Busted but very successful drug dealer starts a legitimate career after prison. At the link find the title, “From the Cell to the Sell (Season 3, Episode 8), Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT2039766347.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide Ethics 52 mins – “Questions surrounding suicide have been with us for at least as long as we’ve had written record, and the answers are as varied as the times and places where they were discussed. Friday, Doug sits down with philosophy scholar Margaret Battin. She’s spent her career collecting the works of religious and secular thinkers regarding suicide. It has been considered noble, immoral, heroic and cowardly, and we’ll talk about what all of those views teach us about end-of-life issues today. Margaret Battin is a Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and an Adjunct Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Utah. Her books include Ending Life: Ethics and the Way We Die and The Ethics of Suicide: Historical Sources At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Role 49 mins – “….the Court has shied away from the kinds of blockbuster decisions that marked the last term. Some celebrate this as newfound judicial restraint. Others say it is a sign of dysfunction. We take the long view with two Supreme Court scholars. Both have just released books that explain the historic role of the Court in society — and how that has changed over the years.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Syria Murders 25 mins – “In 1984, 20-year-old Emad Abdullah left his Beirut home to see friends and disappeared. It was the height of Lebanon’s civil war and Syria was known to be jailing Lebanese. Now many families are hoping those who disappeared might now come home.” At the link find the title, “Decades after Lebanon’s civil war thousands still unaccounted for, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160616_60525.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Hostages 50 mins – “Speaking together for the first time, four European hostages of so-called Islamic State talk to Lyse Doucet about their period of incarceration between March 2013 and June 2014. Aid worker Federico Motka, journalists Didier Francois and Daniel Rye, and blogger Pierre Torres were all held for between 10 and 14 months each.” At the link find the title, “Held Hostage in Syria, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03xy5qx.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Team Rubicon P1 32 mins – “This week on the Disaster Podcast, in part 1 of a two-part episode, we will be looking at one of the premier disaster response NGOs (non-governmental organizations) in the country and probably the world right now, Team Rubicon. Podcast co-hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and Sam Bradley are joined by long-time regular Dr. Joe Holley to chat with Dennis Clancy, Deputy Director of Response for Team Rubicon. Dennis is also a U.S. Army veteran. In this two-part episode, Dennis talks about the structure of Team Rubicon and how they work to respond to disasters. We also talk about the origins of the organization and what services they provide. Find out more about Team Rubicon at TeamRubiconUSA.org. Check out next week’s episode where we look at how the team training is effected and how deployments are arranged.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Trends 142 mins – “This Week in Tech 566…Hosted by Leo Laporte – Gawker bankruptcy, IoT job market, remote access trojans, cost of convenience, and more.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorist Recruitment 27 mins – “In the wake of the mass shooting in Orlando, we explore how groups such as the Islamic State explicitly try to capitalize on the grievances and individual frustrations of potential ‘recruits.’” At the link find the title “Encore of Episode 13: Terrorism, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160613_hiddenbrain_terrorism.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tiger Tracking 25 mins – “Wildlife Conservation Society researcher Ullas Karanth talks about his July, 2016, Scientific American article on state-of-the-art techniques for tracking tigers and estimating their populations and habitat health.” At the link find the title, “Tiger, Tiger, Being Tracked, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Torpedo Music 9 mins – “Who will sing the praises of the famous warrior who refused to fight.” At the link find the title, “Episode 21: The Coward of the Deep, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files The_Coward_of_the_Deep.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wartime Families 48 mins – “Philippe Sands is one of Britain’s most prominent human rights lawyers. He has been involved in high-profile cases against several dictators, including Chile’s Augusto Pinochet and Liberia’s Charles Taylor. Several years ago, Sands was asked to speak about human rights in Lviv, Ukraine. Sands was excited to go because the city was the birthplace of his Jewish grandfather. Sands had always wanted to know more about him and how he escaped from the Nazis. But when Sands researched his grandfather’s life, he uncovered family secrets and learned how his relatives were killed.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Welfare Benefits 60 mins – “…Right now there are some 4.5m people in the UK living in households where nobody has a job. Behind that figure lies a subsection of society mired in multi-generational unemployment. What was meant to be a safety net has become a poverty trap…. A 2012 survey showed that the unemployed in Britain are 3.6 times more likely than those with jobs to say they are seriously unhappy. If you want to help the poor, don’t just throw money at them. Incentivise and help them into work, and reform the system in which many people are actually better off not working at all than taking a job. Such an environment of worklessness simply makes it harder for the next generation to break out of the cycle. That’s the argument that was made by journalist James Bartholomew and social scientist Dr Adam Perkins, who has made a study of the adverse effect on personality of state benefits. Taking them on was Jess Phillips MP, dubbed Labour’s ‘future red queen’, and Matthew Taylor, chief executive of the RSA, who argued that benefits aren’t a handout but a hand-up….” At the link find the title, “The Benefits System Perpetuates Misery, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 268583003-intelligence2-the-benefits-system-perpetuates-misery.mp3 and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Welfare State 53 mins – “The Welfare State at Risk52:30 Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Center for the Study of Europe, and is titled “The Welfare State at Risk.” Our speaker is Patrick Sachweh, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Goethe University in Frankfort, Germany. At the link right-click the tiny cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Workplace 63 mins – “According to a new McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) report, advancing women’s equality could add $12 trillion to GDP by 2025. This seminal report, entitled “The Power of Parity,” is the product of research from ninety-five countries on the relationship between gender parity and economic growth. Kweilin Ellingrud, a lead researcher on the report, and Christopher Ruhm, whose research examines the economic effects of work/family policies, joined the Women and Foreign Policy program for a discussion about the economic imperative of promoting gender equality. This roundtable was generously sponsored by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One Myths, May, 2016, 84 mins –”Chapman University history professor Jennifer Keene looks at myths about America’s involvement in World War I.” At the link find the title, “Myths About America in World War I, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.438563.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 240 – Jun 17, 2016: Aircraft Careers, Airline Industry, Alcohol Blackouts, American Muslims, Antibiotic Crisis, Antonio Villaraigaso, Argentina Mass Executions, Arginine Patent Troll, Arms Control, Asteroid Threat, Audits by Publishers, Bataan Death March, Bathroom History, Being Human, Birch Trees, Bullying in School, California Water Regulation, Capitalism Declines, Cardboard Construction, Child Welfare Disparities, China and India, Climate Change, College Class Test Out, College Stresses, Computational Biology, Confidence Games, Corruption in Azerbaijan, Creativity Process, Decarbonization, Deobandis Islam, Diatoms, Dick Cavett, Digital Discrimination, Disaster Aftermaths, Do Gooders, E-book Decline, Educate Girls, Educational Electronics, Electric Vehicle Future, Federal Reserve, Food Safety Law, Freedom-embracing Humans, Geoengineering, Google at Work, Government Breakdowns, Gymnastics Training, Habit Losses, Hamilton, Hipcamp, Housing Price Bubble, India Book Podcast, Inequality in America, Iran-US Relations, Iran Arrests Canadian, IRS Commissioner Misconduct Hearing, James Meredith, Jordan, Justice Brandeis, Kevin Kelly-Futurist, Left-Hand Driving, Libertarian Convention Debate, Mattress Store Bubble, Medical Student Depression, Meditation, Military Medical Science, Muhammad Ali, New England Slavery, Pain Management, Patient Algorithm, Peak Oil-M. King Hubbert, Pelvic Floor Health, Penicillin History, Poverty, Precision Public Health, Privileged Communication Ethics, Productivity Hacks, Programmer Mitch Waite, Protest Music, Psychosis Detection, Queensland-Australia, Ransomware in Canada, Rape in Brazil, Rational Voters, Refugees in France, Roy Henry Vickers, Self-driving Car, Sharing Economy, Shikimic Acid, Social Awkwardness, Stanford Sex Assault, Startup Drug Business, Stereotypes, Student Job Training, Supreme Court Podcast, Sustainable Development, Syria, Terrorism, Think Tanks, Tobacco and Fuel Wars, Undocumented Employers, US Marine, Utopias, Venezuela Inflation, Water Issues, Whistleblowers, White Rage, Whitey Bulger, Wine and Paleo Diet, Wolf Control, Working Class Changes, Zika Virus by Virologists

The best 116 podcasts from a larger group of 244 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Aircraft Careers 58 mins – “Today we have a special guest who is transitioning from an Air Force loadmaster to professional pilot. Larry Unger is truly an inspiration. If you are considering transitioning from the military to a professional pilot you need to hear his story. Larry is an advocate for those considering serving their country through a career in the military. He explains how military service will enhanced your life and career. ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Airline Industry 43 mins – “Patrick Smith, the author of Cockpit Confidential, answers every question we can throw at him about what really happens up in the air. Just don’t get him started on pilotless planes — or whether the autopilot is actually doing the flying.” At the link left-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download File,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcohol Blackouts 48 mins – “Sarah Hepola once got so drunk that she gave a presentation to 300 people — and didn’t remember a thing the next day. She wrestles with her reasons for drinking in the memoir ‘Blackout,’ now out in paperback. Rock historian Ed Ward tells the story of Herman’s Hermits.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Muslims 47 mins – “It’s been a rough stretch for American Muslims. September 11th set the table. People tried to get back to normal. Working, living, studying, going for the American dream. But the headwinds in the headlines kept coming. The rise of ISIS cast a shadow. A trickle of radicalization got lots of attention. Then Donald Trump called for a ban on Muslim entry. San Bernardino took its terrible toll. Ramadan starts on Sunday. We want to hear from our fellow citizens. This hour On Point, American Muslims, 2016.” At the link find the title, “Muslim Americans At Ramadan, 2016, Jun,” right-click “Media files npr_480634831.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Antibiotic Crisis 47 mins – “A new superbug resistant to our antibiotic of last resort has shown up in the U.S. We look at the threat, and our dwindling antibiotic options. On Wednesday, May 26, 2016, U.S. military officials reported the first U.S. human case of bacteria resistant to an antibiotic used as a last resort drug. The 49-year-old woman has recovered from an infection of E. coli resistant to colistin. But officials fear that if the resistance spreads to other bacteria, the country may soon see germs impervious to all antibiotics. (Janice Carr/CDC via AP) We’ve heard for years that the effectiveness of antibiotics we use to fight everything from ear aches to urinary tract infections was at risk. Last week, bad news on that front. A new federal push to track down superbugs found one almost as soon as it started looking. In the United States. The first patient ever found here with a bacteria resistant to what is now our last line of antibiotic defense. This hour On Point, are we entering the post-antibiotic age? And what do we do about it?” (3 guests) At the link find the title, “Antibiotic Resistant Superbug Arrives In America, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_480159512.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antonio Villaraigaso 63 mins – “In 2013, Antonio Villaraigosa finished his two terms as mayor of Los Angeles, a city of nearly 4 million residents, after eight years of major strides in transportation, crime reduction, infrastructure, energy and resource sustainability, “right-sizing” government, business development and education reform. Before his time in the mayor’s office, he served as an L.A. city council member and speaker of the California Assembly. He has more than 20 years of leadership experience at the highest levels of state and municipal government, as well as in business, political, educational and nonprofit organizations.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Argentina Mass Executions P2 39 mins – “Valeria Perasso and Alejandro Millán travel to Colombia and witness the search for victims who vanished over the last decade in the country’s 50-year-long armed conflict, and hear the voices of families looking for missing young students in Mexico – all with the help of the Equipo Argentino de Antropología Forense, or EAAF as they are best known.” At the link find the title, “Listening to the Bones – Part Two, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03xhbst.mp3” and select “Save Link As” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arginine Patent Troll 21 mins – “Two bodybuilders go at it over a Stanford university patent. And we dive in to make sense of it.” At the link find the title, “#705: The Muscle Patents, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160610_pmoney podcast061016.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arms Control 14 mins – “In some parts of the world, it’s easier to get an automatic rifle than a glass of clean drinking water. Is this just the way it is? Samantha Nutt, doctor and founder of the international humanitarian organization War Child, explores the global arms trade — and suggests a bold, common sense solution for ending the cycle of violence. “War is ours,” she says. “We buy it, sell it, spread it and wage it. We are therefore not powerless to solve it.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asteroid Threat 24 mins – On June 2, 2016, NASA confirmed the bright burst of light over Arizona skies to be an asteroid exploding — a mere 90 kilometers above the earth. This came just a few days after another asteroid event in Mexico, where sonic booms and bright flashes marked an asteroid’s entry into the earth’s atmosphere. These recent close calls have brought attention to those scientific voices urging the world to pay more attention to asteroids, and the threat they pose. NASA aerospace engineer says we need to do more to stop killer asteroids There are 1700 “potentially hazardous” asteroids around Earth, says NASA aerospace engineer.” At the link find the title, “NASA aerospace engineer says we need to do more to stop killer asteroids,” right-click “Download NASA aerospace engineer says we need to do more to stop killer asteroids,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Audits by Publishers 59 mins – “If you’re a society publisher, have you ever heard yourself say?… “We need an increasing number of staff to keep the journal going.” “We have a new editor and his expectations are completely unreasonable.” “Our journal is losing money for us.” “I’m not sure if we are operating with industry best practice.” Then, it could be time for an audit.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bangladeshi Problems 27 mins – “Lipika Pelham travels to a remote part of south eastern Bangladesh to report on claims of human rights abuses against indigenous inhabitants of the area. The Chittagong Hill Tracts are home to thirteen indigenous groups with the Chakma, Marma, Chak and Mro mostly practicing Theravada Buddhism. Thousands were forced off their lands from the 1960s until the 1990s. An insurgency that started in the mid 1970s ended in a peace settlement in 1997 under which the army was supposed to withdraw but it continues to maintain a tight grip on the area. The resettlement of tens of thousands of Bengalis from other parts of the country has only added to tensions. Lipika is one of the few journalists from a foreign media organisation to report from there in recent years. She has returned with first-hand accounts of alleged rape and torture and hears claims that soldiers have been involved in evicting people from their homes. Her report carries details of attempts to forcibly convert young children to Islam as well as accusations of rape by Bengali settlers of girls as young as thirteen.” At the link find the title, “Bangladesh’s Hidden Shame, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03xq0fn.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Bataan Death March 52 mins – “In 1942 the Japanese army forced about 70,000 US and Philippine prisoners of war to march some 80 miles across the Bataan Peninsula on the way to a prison camp. More than 10,000 died or were summarily executed along the way. Among the survivors was Gene Jacobsen, who published a book about the ordeal. Jacobsen died in 2007 at the age of 85. Monday, we’re rebroadcasting his story of three and a half years as a prisoner of war…Gene Jacobsen died May 25, 2007 at the age of 85. Scroll to the bottom of this page in the University of Utah Alumni Association Newsletter to read more about his life. His book is called We Refused to Die‘” At the link right-click the play button beside Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bathroom History 51 mins – “In recent months, bathrooms have become a topic of heated debate. At issue is who should be allowed into which restroom. The Obama administration says public school students should be able to use facilities that correspond with their chosen gender identity. Opponents say they’re worried about the dangers of a gender free-for-all in the nation’s restrooms. Thursday, we’re talking about the clash over sex-segregated bathrooms. We’ll also ask how we came to have gendered lavatories in the first place.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Being Human 12 mins – “What are your dreams? Better yet, what are your broken dreams? Dan Pallotta dreams of a time when we are as excited, curious and scientific about the development of our humanity as we are about the development of our technology. “What we fear most is that we will be denied the opportunity to fulfill our true potential,” Pallotta says. “Imagine living in a world where we simply recognize that deep, existential fear in one another — and love one another boldly because we know that to be human is to live with that fear.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Birch Trees 4 mins – “…Birch is a hard wood, good for furniture and plywood. But it has to be well-cured or it warps. Hughes’ Spruce Goose was really made from a special plywood – layers of birch veneer. Hughes put teams of women to work ironing the veneer to stabilize it before they made it into plywood. You gaze up at that great gun-metal gray airplane and it’s hard to connect it with birch trees. But it is a true cousin of the Indian canoe. Same strength and buoyancy….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bullying in School 20 mins – “Experts say school anti-bullying programs can actually do more harm than good.” At the link find the title, “Teen suicides in Woodstock, Ont., spur discussion on effectiveness of bullying programs,” right-click “Download Teen suicides in Woodstock, Ont., spur discussion on effectiveness of bullying programs” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Water Regulation 59 mins – “Join Michael Carlin, COO of San Francisco PUC Water and Power, Patrick Koepele and Peter Drekmeier, executive director and policy director respectively of the Tuolumne River Trust, for an end-of-April 2016 report on what has happened with El Nino, the weather and the snow pack, as well as the continuing effects of the Yosemite Rim Fire to ease drought problems and bring water and growth cycles much needed in California at large and the Bay Area and the Central Valley specifically. Our speakers have extensive experience in the history and currency of California land, rivers, coastal areas and mountains as well as our urban areas, rivers and agriculture. What do we know from science, projected demands and expectations and forecasts for California water now and in the future?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capitalism Declines 65 mins – “Every 500 years or so, European civilization and now world civilization, has been rocked by fundamental shifts in its value regime, in which the rules of the game for acquiring wealth and livelihoods have dramatically changed. Following Benkler’s seminal Wealth of Networks, which first identifies peer production, the P2P Foundation has collated a vast amount of empirical evidence of newly emerging value practices, which exist in a uneasy relationship with the dominant political economy, and of which some authors claim, like Jeremy Rifkin and Paul Mason, that it augurs a fundamental shift. What would be the conditions for this new regime to become autonomous and even dominant, and what are the signs of it happening? As context, we will be using the Tribes, Institutions, Markets, Networks framework of David Ronfeldt, the Relational Grammar of Alan Page Fiske, and the evolution of modes of exchange as described by Kojin Karatini in The Structure of World History. We will argue that there is consistent evidence that the structural crises of the dominant political economy is leading to responses that are prefigurative of a new value regime, of which the seed forms can be clearly discerned.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cardboard Construction 54 mins – “Keeping Off The Rain With A Cardboard Roof, Arctic Fox Turns Stark Tundra Into Green Space, Squid and Octopus Thrive in Changing Oceans, The Antarctic Did Not Escape The Mass Extinction, Exercise Can Impair Your Eyesight, Moths Tell Bats They Taste Nasty.” At the link find the title, “Making A Cardboard House, plus, Squid and Octopus Get A Grip on Climate Change, Arctic Fox Are Good Gardeners, and more – 2016/06/04,” right-click “Media files quirksaio_20160604_68604.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Welfare Disparities 20 mins – “How does child welfare need to change to address the overrepresentation of black and Aboriginal children in care?” At the link find the title, “Ontario children’s aid will collect race data to address overrepresentation,” right-click “Download Ontario children’s aid will collect race data to address overrepresentation,”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China and India Contrasts 63 mins – “Anja Manuel, Co-founder and Partner, RiceHadleyGates LLC; Author, This Brave New World: India, China, and the United States; Twitter @AnjaManuel1 Lenny Mendonca, Director Emeritus, McKinsey & Company; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors—Moderator In the next decade and a half, China and India will become two of the world’s indispensable powers—whether they rise peacefully or not. During that time, Asia will surpass the combined strength of North America and Europe in economic might, population size, and military spending. India and China will have vetoes over many international decisions, from climate change to global trade, human rights, and business standards. From her front row view of this colossal shift, first at the State Department and now as an advisor to American business leaders, Anja Manuel will take us on an intimate tour of the corridors of power in Delhi and Beijing. We wring our hands about China, Manuel writes, while we underestimate India, which will be the most important country outside the West to shape China’s rise. Manuel shows us that a different path is possible: We can bring China and India along as partners rather than alienating one or both, and thus extend our own leadership in the world.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China Economic Growth 78 minsPanel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “China is Rattling the World’s Economy”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5114 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Climate Change Politics 79 minsPanel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “CLIMATE SERIES: Political Views on Climate Change: A Widening Gap”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5116 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Psychology 79 mins – “If climate change makes you feel anxious, depressed or powerless, psychologists say you’re not alone. Can talking it out help drive change? Joshua Freedman, CEO, Six Seconds; Author, Inside Change: Transforming Your Organization with Emotional Intelligence (Six Seconds, 2010); Renee Lertzman, Climate Engagement Strategist; Joan Blades, Co-founder, LivingRoomConversations.org” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Class Test Out 51 mins – “What do you do when you’re going into your 4th year of college – and then you school tells you the rest of your classes are unavailable? You test out of them, save thousands of dollars, and graduate a semester early – that’s what you do. Or, at least, that’s what my friend Jay Cross did. Jay found himself in this situation as he was readying to complete his senior year. His school had no idea when they’d offer the classes he needed again; they didn’t really make it seem like they cared either. Instead of waiting around, though, Jay started taking stock of his options – and found out about tons of opportunities for testing out of classes. By utilizing these opportunities, he finished his entire senior year in a single semester, and he saved thousands in the process. Now, Jay runs Do It Yourself Degree, a website that teaches other students how to do the same thing. So, if you’re looking to cut the time you spend in school, save money, and waste less hours sitting in class, give this episode a listen. Things mentioned in this episode: DSST Test; CLEP Exams; Jay’s Test Out of College: Graduate in 1 year with Degree-by-Examination article; Myth of the High-Paying Major….” At the link find the title, “How to Test out of College Courses (Ep. 49),” right-click “Media files 7235.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Stresses 109 mins – “…When I was high schooler trying to prepare for college, I basically equated “college-ready” to “becoming an adult.” As my senior year drew to a close, I spent a good amount of time trying to prepare myself for a life that would be largely independent from my parents and require a lot more responsibility. I made sure I was able to do my own taxes and generally manage my finances, set up time and task management systems, and created plans for getting involved and plugging into a community right as I entered college. In this episode, Martin and I try to give you a crash course on many of the things I tried to prepare for, in addition to many of the questions and uncertainties most students face….” At the link you can listen at up to 1.25x, or right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computational Biology 51 mins – Panel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Computational Biology: Using Biology & Computers to Model Artificial Life”. Sound is less than perfect. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5118 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Confidence Games 60 mins “This week we’re looking at the science — and art — of the con, from huge Ponzi schemes to small-time frauds. We speak to Maria Konnikova about her new book The Confidence Game: Why We Fall for It… Every Time” on the psychology of the con and why we keep falling for the same old tricks. This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pp-up menu.

Corruption in Azerbaijan 18 mins – “Released from jail, Azerbaijani investigative journalist shares her experience with power, corruption, sex tapes, blackmail and revenge.” At the link find the title, “Blackmailed and imprisoned by government, journalist tells her story, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160608_73449.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity Process 80 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Creativity: Breaking the Blocks & Keeping the Flow”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5314 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Decarbonization 59 mins – “Lord Nicholas Stern, Chair, Center for Climate Change Economics and Policy, London School of Economics Steve Westly, Founder and Managing Partner, The Westly Group Carbon pollution has recently dropped despite continued growth of the global economy. Supporters of clean energy cheered that news, and say it demonstrates that combatting climate change can be accomplished without massive economic pain. Was the decoupling of economic growth and carbon pollution just because of China’s slowing economy and temporary dip in coal use? What areas of the clean economy are most promising for investors and job-seekers? Lord Nicholas Stern is former chief economist of the World Bank and one of the foremost global experts on moving from fossil fuels to cleaner energy. When world leaders signed the historic Paris climate accord last year, Lord Stern was cheering in the front, row standing alongside Al Gore. Steve Westly leads a venture capital firm that made early investments in Tesla and the biofuel firm Anyris. It currently holds a position in Good Eggs, Planet Labs, Revolution Foods, RecycleBank, WaterSmart, and other companies pursuing more sustainable capitalism. Steve Westly was an early executive at eBay and is a former controller of the state of California.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deobandis Islam P2 27 mins – “The BBC’s former Pakistan correspondent Owen Bennett Jones continues his exploration of South Asia’s Deobandi Muslim movement. He heads across the border to Pakistan, where Deobandi ideology has provided spiritual guidance for both militant groups like the Taliban and a strictly non-violent missionary movement. So how can a single school of thought follow such different paths? Owen explores the role the Deobandi ideology has played in shaping Pakistan’s identity, and how the Pakistani state has tapped into the intolerant elements of Deobandi teachings to fuel state-sponsored jihad – be it fighting the Soviets in Afghanistan or the Indians in Kashmir. Empowered by a ready supply of cash and guns, a relatively small number of Deobandi militants have caused havoc across the country, in the form of sectarian violence, and anti-state violence, as violent groups turn their guns on their masters. Pakistan created a monster by endorsing Deobandi militancy – so how can it bring it under control?” At the link find the title, “The Deobandis: Pakistan, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03xlxwy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diatoms 28 mins – (Starts about the 8 min mark.)“Beth interviews Dr Sarah Spaulding, of the Institute for Arctic and Alpine Research here in Boulder. Sarah studies microscopic single celled algae, creatures that photosynthesize but aren’t plants. She discusses their ecological roles in numerous ecosystems as well as challenges in identifying them and her long term goals in studying these elusive but ubiquitous creatures. See more at https://westerndiatoms.colorado.edu/ “ At the link right-lick “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dick Cavett 76 mins – “Gilbert and Frank return to the NYC Podfest for a return engagement with their very first guest, legendary talk show host, comic and author Dick Cavett. In a lively (and LIVE) interview, Dick holds court on a host of topics, including World War II propaganda, John Cassavetes’ boozing, the lost “Tonight Show” episodes and the rapier wit of Pat McCormick. Also, Dick chats up Zeppo (and Gummo!), Groucho proposes to Truman Capote, Jack Benny gets the last word and a young Dick meets his idol, Bob Hope. PLUS: Robert Q. Lewis! Claude Rains trivia! Remembering Sig Ruman! Gilbert and Dick share a milkshake! And George Jessel weighs in on Uncle Miltie’s manhood!” At the link find the title, “#106: Dick Cavett LIVE @ 2016 NYC Podfest,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/3535111/e06bec69-051e-48a4-b939-125bf45235f2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” From the pop-up menu.

Digital Discrimination 27 mins – “Are we seeing digital discrimination in the sharing economy? A study from Harvard Business School in the US has found that the colour of your skin might affect the rents you can receive when you share your property on Airbnb. Benjamin Edelman, Associate Professor at Harvard Business School explains his findings. Airbnb told Click that they are dedicated to this topic, and they are carrying out a full review with experts to find out the best way to address these challenges….” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Aftermaths 39 mins – “Looking at triage mnemonic methods for disaster applications in this episode of the Disaster Podcast. Hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are joined again by Dr. Joe Holley to talk about the various triage methods that are used out there when you have multiple patients to managed in a disaster event. Whether it is START or SALT, all can show us some tricks to help us manage large numbers of patients….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Do Gooders 52 mins – “How far do you go to honor the Golden Rule, to “do unto others”? Chances are you don’t go nearly as far as the people profiled in journalist Larissa MacFarquhar’s new book. The donor who offers up his kidney to a complete stranger; the activist who abandons his normal life to care for lepers; the couple that gives most of their income to charity. These people truly live to help others. MacFarquhar joins us Tuesday to explore what extreme altruists can teach us about what it means to be human….Larissa MacFarquhar has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998. Previously she was a senior editor at Lingua Franca and an advisory editor at The Paris Review. Her new book is called Strangers Drowning: Grappling with Impossible Idealism, Drastic Choices, and the Overpowering Urge to HelpAt the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

E-book Decline 12 mins – “…The hope that books may stand where others have fallen lies in declining e-book sales; yet publishers are left pondering what is the underlying cause. This week, a respected industry analyst has put forth a theory that goes beyond the obvious suspects of pricing and access. According to Peter Hildick-Smith of the Codex Group, so-called “digital fatigue” is the hidden e-book killer. “Hildick-Smith’s conclusion is that e-book sales erosion is a combination of  ‘digital fatigue’ and the limitation of the reading device user experience,” reports Andrew Albanese, Publishers Weekly senior writer, on the curious diagnosis. “I’m tempted to say print is the vinyl of the book business—it is just a better experience. Moreover, Hildick-Smith believes that, based on the data he has seen, rather than rebounding anytime soon, e-books sales will likely continue to fall….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educate Girls 85 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Educate a Girl: Change the World”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5716 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Educational Electronics 107 mins – “Clint Cole, founder and president of Digilent, joins us to talk education, electronics, manufacturing, mobile test equipment, open source (or not) and how future engineers will learn.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Electric Vehicle Future 59 mins – “Today’s electric cars are more fun to drive than ever. And for many, they’re more affordable too. Will California reach its goal of a million EVs by 2020? Sherry Boschert, Co-founder, Plug In America; Author, Plug-in Hybrids: The Cars That Will Recharge America (New Society, 2006); Eileen Tutt, Executive Director, California Electric Transportation Coalition” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Reserve 66 mins – “Robert Heller, Former Governor of the Federal Reserve Board; Former President, VISA U.S.A.; Author, The Unlikely Governor This event is part of our Good Lit series, underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation. Robert Heller discusses policy issues facing the Federal Reserve: Should the Fed “normalize” monetary policy now? Was “quantitative easing” a success? Is the Fed’s chosen two-percent inflation target appropriate? What happens to the Fed as it pays ever more interest on bank reserves? These and many other important policy issues will be discussed by the author of The Unlikely Governor.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Safety Law 56 mins – “After many years of debate, the federal Food Safety Modernization Act is finally coming to local farms and producers. The goal is to reduce outbreaks of food-borne illnesses such as Salmonella or Listeria. We’ll find out how it aims to do that and what it might mean for farmers in New Hampshire.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freedom-embracing Humans 77 mins – “Continuing on Simone de Beauvoir’s The Ethics of Ambiguity (1947), parts I and II. We discuss all the various ways to fail to wholly will your own freedom, i.e., will it all the way to where you will the freedom of others. The first step is admitting that human consciousness is an ontological negative, i.e., it doesn’t have static being in the way a rock or tree or even an instinct-driven squirrel is, and some people just stop there, really willing nothing at all. These are the “sub-men.” Or maybe you sign on to some cause, some goal with all your being: you fill your negativity up with something external (like God, or wanting with all your heart to become an Olympic gymnast, or devotion to doing your job well) and thereby pretend to be determined just like a squirrel is. This is the “serious man,” and it’s a serious abrogation of your freedom! Or maybe you react against this seriousness and just deny that any such external thing has a hold on you, and actively will to have no values at all. This is nihilism, and it fails the existential test too. …And there are several more iterations before you’re really a fully freedom-embracing, authentic human being; in the process she ends up distinguishing herself from other existentialist atheists like Nietzsche (whom she thinks to be too solipsistic) and Camus (p. 129: “To declare that existence is absurd is to deny that it can ever be given a meaning; to say that it is ambiguous is to assert that its meaning is never fixed, that it must be constantly won.”).” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geoengineering 60 mins – “Geoengineering may sound like science fiction, but there are many who believe we can — and should — be taking drastic measures to cool our planet down. Oliver Morton, Briefings Editor, The Economist; Author, The Planet Remade: How Geoengineering Could Change the World (Princeton University Press, 2015); Kim Stanley Robinson, Author, 2312 (Orbit, 2012); Ken Caldeira, Climate Scientist, Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Global Ecology at Stanford University” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Google at Work 28 mins – “This week on Hidden Brain, Shankar talks to Google’s Laszlo Bock for insider tips and insights about what works — and what doesn’t work — in recruiting, motivating, and retaining a talented workforce.” At the link find the title, “Episode 34: Google at Work, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160603_hiddenbrain_google.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Breakdowns 53 mins – “On the next Reveal, we’re taking you to lawless lands. From Africa and the Middle East to places in Oregon and Texas, we explore what happens in the absence of government and find out who or what comes in to fill the void. Sometimes, it’s a strongman enforcing his will; other times, it’s just anarchy, and occasionally it’s something completely unexpected.” At the link find the title, “Lawless Lands, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files Lawless-Lands-1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gymnastic Training 69 mins – “It’s been a little while since we’ve done one of these, but we’re back with another “Best Of” episode of the podcast. Featuring guest Coach Christopher Sommer of Gymnastic Bodies. Hope everyone had a good time at PaleoFX!” At the link right-click “Download Episode Here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Habitat Losses 25 mins – “By documenting change over time in particular areas, Bernie Krause’s nature soundscapes offer insight into the effects of climate change, the California drought and other environmental problems.” At the link find the title, “Nature soundscapes reveal environmental devastation,” right-click “Download Nature soundscapes reveal environmental devastation” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hamilton 52 mins – “Alexander Hamilton is living large these days! Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hit musical about the Founding Father won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama and scored a record-breaking 16 Tony award nominations. In addition, Hamilton’s surge in popularity helped keep his face on the front of the $10 bill. Peter, Ed and Brian take apart the Hamilton phenomenon by considering who Alexander Hamilton was, his legacy (and how it was remade) and why a white migrant from the British West Indies appeals to so many Americans in 2016.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hipcamp 29 mins – “It’s summertime, time to make your camping reservations. Oops, should have done that three months ago! This week’s guest on Sea Change Radio, Alyssa Ravasio, noticed that there was a lot of private land that would be perfect for camping, while public campsites were consistently overbooked and too often unavailable. So she started something called Hipcamp which is sort of an Airbnb meets Expedia for campers. Ravasio tells us more about the company’s business model, how they hope to make it easier for more of us to appreciate nature and how her site can be a welcome new source of income for rural property owners.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Housing Price Bubble 47 mins – “The housing market is heating up. Home prices are reaching new highs across the country, even causing worries of a new housing bubble. Every region of the country has its own housing market, but stand back and you can see trends. The big trend: across the U.S., home prices are back near record highs. They were 30 percent down at the bottom, in 2012. Now, they’re high and higher. But it’s a split screen. A booming high end, where the money is. Tough for first-time buyers – to get the down payment, to get a mortgage. Gentrification, hot. And renters, paying big. This hour On Point, we dig in to the American housing market now.” (4 guests) At the link find the title, “American Housing Prices Going Big, Again, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_480458244.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Book Podcast 26 mins – “In this newscast, dated June 8, 2016; we talk about Four news stories related to Book Publishing in India, and also pricing of ebooks on Kobo India store. The news stories include: a. Children’s books in India and Tatas’ collaboration with Mumbai Lit Festival. b. Interview of Author Ashwin Sanghi, and Indian media’s fascination with comparing Indian icons with Icons of the west. c. SIze of the textbook printing market in the Southern Indian state of Telangana, and finally, d. Use of e-Textbooks by college students in India. In the analysis section, we talk about pricing of ebooks on the Kobo India store, and a dsicussion on the different genres that seem to be selling well.” At the link find the title, “NewsCast 8- How to Price Books on Kobo India, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 4668746-newscast-8-how-to-price-books-on-kobo-india.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inequality in America 35 mins – “Here’s what the 2016 election should be about: Winner-Take-All Politics — How Washington Made the Rich Richer and Turned Its Back on the Middle Class. It’s a groundbreaking account of how our political system was hijacked by the super rich and engineered to work for them at the expense of everyone else. Two of our top political scientists – Jacob Hacker and Paul Pierson – published it four years ago to wide acclaim. Robert Solow, winner of the Nobel Memorial Prize for Economics, said of it: “This book is a wake-up call. Read it and wake up.” Elizabeth Warren called it “must reading for anyone who wants to understand how Washington stopped working for the middle class.” I interviewed Hacker and Pierson at the time, and given how inequality has continued to grow and divide our country, what they wrote and said is more relevant than ever. Take a listen and let me know what you think can be done.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran – US Relations 79 mins – Panel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “US Policy Towards Iran”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5311 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Iran Arrests Canadian 10 mins – “Concordia professor Homa Hoodfar was arrested in Iran while researching the public role of women in that country. She has been moved to Evin prison, where another Canadian woman died in 2003.” At the link find the title, “Canadian professor detained in Iran prison, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160609_60045.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IRS Commissioner Misconduct 147 mins – “The House Judiciary hears testimony from Oversight Committee Chair Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) and Representative Ron DeSantis (R-FL) on the ongoing investigation into alleged targeting by the IRS of political groups seeking tax exempt status in 2014.” At the link find the title, “House Judiciary Committee Examines IRS Commissioner Misconduct, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.443691.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

James Meredith 55 mins – “On the 50th anniversary of the “March Against Fear,” Judy Meredith, wife of civil rights leader James Meredith, talks about the attempted assassination of her husband during the march. The panel discussion also features Sidna Brower Mitchell, who was editor-in-chief of the student newspaper The Daily Mississippian in 1962, and Henry Gallagher, the officer in charge of Meredith’s security detail in 1962 and author of “James Meredith and the Ole Miss Riot: A Soldier’s Story.” William Doyle, who co-authored James Meredith’s memoir “A Mission From God,” moderates.” At the link find the title, “James Meredith, the Integration of Ole Miss and the March Against Fear, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files IM_20160604.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jordan 63 mins – “Maher Kalaji, Ph.D.; Celia Menczel, Chair, Middle East Member-Led Forum -Jordan, a strong American ally, is one of the most historically and strategically important countries in the Middle East. It is also one of the most welcoming. However, tourists to Jordan were markedly fewer this March when Menczel toured Jordanian archeological sites, including Petra, one of the seven new wonders of the world. She will show images and discuss her enlightening and wonderful experience with Professor Kalaji, who was born and raised in Jordan.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Justice Brandeis 47 mins – “One hundred years ago, Brandeis became the first Jewish justice on the Supreme Court. Author Jeffrey Rosen says that Brandeis was also the most far-seeing progressive justice of the 20th century. His new book is ‘Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet.’ Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews ‘Homegoing’ by Yaa Gyasi.” At the link find the title, “Jun, 2016, The Legacy Of Justice Louis Brandeis, The ‘Jewish Jefferson’” left-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kevin Kelly – Futurist 106 mins – “Kevin Kelly (@kevin2kelly) is back again and, as I’ve said before, he might be the real-life “Most Interesting Man In The World.” Kevin is Senior Maverick at Wired Magazine, which he co-founded in 1993. He also co-founded the All Species Foundation, a non-profit aimed at cataloging and identifying every living species on earth. In his spare time, he writes bestselling books, co-founded the Rosetta Project, which is building an archive of all†documented human languages, and serves on the board of the Long Now Foundation. As part of the last, he’s investigating how to revive and restore endangered or extinct species, including the Wooly Mammoth. Kevin’s most recent project is The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future. The praise for the book is incredible, with Marc Andreessen saying it’s, “an automatic must-read.” In this conversation, we touch on all sorts of things, including: Stories about Jeff Bezos and his email management approach. Tech literacy. Why there are no “VR experts.” Artificial Intelligence (AI). Network effects. GMOs….” At the link find the title, “#166: Kevin Kelly – AI, Virtual Reality, and The Inevitable, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files The_Tim_Ferris_Show-Kevin_Kelly_and_The_Inevitable.mp3” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Left-Hand Driving 19 mins – “The Swedish Tourist Association recently announced a new service called The Swedish Number. People who dial +46 771 793 336 will be connected with a random participating Swede. We talked to about a dozen of those Swedes with one question in mind: What happened on September 3rd, 1967? Those who were alive and in-country during that time took little time to respond. That day was a national holiday of sorts: Dagen H (or “H-Day”), short for Högertrafikomläggningen (“the right-hand traffic diversion”). On that day, millions of Swedes switched from driving on the left side of the road to driving on the right. It was the most massive overhaul in driving infrastructure that the world had ever seen.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow title, “H-Day” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Libertarian Convention Debate 147 mins – “The Libertarian Party holds a presidential debate at its presidential nominating convention in Orlando, Florida.” At the link find the title, “Libertarian Party Holds Presidential Debate, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.443398.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mattress-Store Bubble 34 mins – “You’ve seen them — everywhere! — and often clustered together, as if central planners across America decided that what every city really needs is a Mattress District. There are now dozens of online rivals too. Why are there so many stores selling something we buy so rarely?” At the link left-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Student Depression 22 mins – “This is the second part of our series with NPR about mental health and generation gaps. When Giselle applied to medical school she decided to be completely open about her experience with mental health: depression, anxiety and a suicide attempt when she was 16 years old. She’s not alone—roughly 300 physicians in America commit suicide every year, and a higher percentage of doctors are depressed than the average person. But the intensity and prestige of the medical field doesn’t always lend itself to an open conversation about these issues. Giselle said hiding her mental health issues is not an option. The stakes are high for Giselle. Her mental health makes some people—from her school to future patients—uneasy. And sometimes her anxiety is so bad she can’t take her medical school exams. But as you’ll find out in the episode, these are not challenges that Giselle is about to shy away from. She says her challenges will make her a better doctor, and hopefully encourage other physicians find the help they need, too.” At the link find the title, “Part 2: Be the Doctor Your Mom Wanted You to Marry, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files onlyhuman053116 cms623495_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation 25 mins – “The Science of Meditation – can it really change you?
From infamous criminals, to powerful corporations, to some of the world’s most successful athletes, meditation has never been so popular. But can it really make you smarter, happier and healthier? New research shows that it can affect the body as well as the mind, slow down the aging process, and even alter the structure of the brain. Dr Graham Phillips embarks on an eight week meditation course and undergoes a raft of rigorous brain tests and scans, to find out if the ancient art lives up to the current hype.”
At the link right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Medical Science 48 mins – “Science writer Mary Roach explores the curious science of humans at war in her new book, ‘Grunt.’ She talks about traveler’s diarrhea, medical maggots, and stink bombs, and new scientific developments that help keep soldiers safe. Also, we hear an excerpt of our 1980 interview with G. Gordon Liddy, and jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews ‘Cuong Vu Trio Meets Pat Metheny.’” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muhammad Ali 48 mins – “Boxing legend Muhammad Ali dies at 74. We look back at the life and career of the whole Muhammad Ali.” At the link find the title, “Remembering Muhammad Ali, ‘The Greatest’, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_480977377.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muhammad Ali 49 mins – “(First 15 min segment) New Yorker editor David Remnick, who wrote a biography of Muhammad Ali, tells us how he became a champion boxer, a great showman, and how he took the country by surprise. He spoke to Terry Gross in 1998. Each year, Yellowstone attracts millions of visitors and provides a home to countless animal species. But National Geographic journalist David Quammen warns that balancing tourism and preservation can be tricky. Film critic David Edelstein reviews ‘Genius,’ about book editor Maxwell Perkins.” At the link find the title, “Jun, 2016, David Remnick On Muhammad Ali / Is Yellowstone In Trouble?” left click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New England Slavery 43 mins – “With its ‘lily-white’ reputation, the Granite State doesn’t often highlight the role that people of color have played throughout its history. A new documentary aims to reveal those hidden stories though, and their importance to the state’s history.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Management 78 mins – “People often think about chronic pain as only benefitting from medical treatment and interventions. Jessica Pullins focuses on an essential strategy for lowering pain-related distress: being “unsympathetic.” In this case, “unsympathetic” refers to the Sympathetic Nervous System, the part of the Autonomic Nervous System responsible for the Fight or Flight (or Freeze) Response. Recorded on 02/18/2016. (#30797)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patient Algorithm 38 mins – “Will Algorithms Replace Doctors? Dr Ravi Komatireddy On Software In Medicine. Dr Ravi Komatireddy is an Internal Medicine Physician and Digital Health Innovator with a deep knowledge of clinical decision support software and how technology will ultimately augment the clinical work flow. The issue of algorithms replacing physicians has become increasingly controversial but the question is not how to resist it, but rather embrace it so as to allow us to what we do best as physicians and augment our relationship with patients rather than take from it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peak Oil – M. King Hubbert 60 mins – “The man and the movement – is it dead? This week we’re going to look at a life that shaped energy expectations, a whole social movement, and American military policy in the Middle East. Finally, there is a biography of M. King Hubbert, the man who warned oil companies and the world about Peak Oil. We’ll ask author Mason Inman about the man, his legacy, and what it means now, in this brief time of oil glut. Then I’ll check in with Australian extreme weather specialist Lisa Alexander, to get her measure of the record-setting Indian heat wave now cooling to the monsoon rains.” At the link right-click “Ecoshock 160608 Lo-Fi” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pelvic Floor Health 79 mins – “Pelvic floor dysfunction refers to a wide range of conditions that can occur due to muscle weakness, hypertonicity or joint dysfunction and can be related to Incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse and pelvic pain. Recorded on 03/16/2016. (#30691)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Penicillin History 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss penicillin, discovered by Alexander Fleming in 1928. It is said he noticed some blue-green penicillium mould on an uncovered petri dish at his hospital laboratory, and that this mould had inhibited bacterial growth around it. After further work, Fleming filtered a broth of the mould and called that penicillin, hoping it would be useful as a disinfectant. Howard Florey and Ernst Chain later shared a Nobel Prize in Medicine with Fleming, for their role in developing a way of mass-producing the life-saving drug. Evolutionary theory predicted the risk of resistance from the start and, almost from the beginning of this ‘golden age’ of antibacterials, scientists have been looking for ways to extend the lifespan of antibiotics.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Poverty 80 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Tackling Global Poverty ”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5515 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Precision Public Health 14 mins – “Sue Desmond-Hellmann is using precision public health — an approach that incorporates big data, consumer monitoring, gene sequencing and other innovative tools — to solve the world’s most difficult medical problems. It’s already helped cut HIV transmission from mothers to babies by nearly half in sub-Saharan Africa, and now it’s being used to address alarming infant mortality rates all over the world. The goal: to save lives by bringing the right interventions to the right populations at the right time.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Privileged Communication Ethics 51 mins – “In 1973, a massive manhunt in New York’s Adirondack Mountains ended when police captured a man named Robert Garrow. And that’s when this story really gets started. This episode we consider a string of barbaric crimes by a hated man, and the attorney who, when called to defend him, also wound up defending a core principle of our legal system. When Frank Armani learned his client’s most gruesome secrets, he made a morally startling decision that stunned the world and goes to the heart of what it means to be a defense attorney – how far should lawyers go to provide the best defense to the worst people? NOTE: This episode contains graphic descriptions of sexual assault and violence.At the link right-click “Download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productivity Hacks 78 mins – “Mike Vardy of Productivityist is not a productivity guru. By his own definition, he’s a productivityist – a productivity enthusiast interested in trying and sharing new apps, strategies, and techniques for getting things done. He co-hosts Workflowing, a weekly discussion on how to live a better life, and do better work while avoiding pitfalls with playing around with your workflow. On his blog and podcasts, Mike shares how he structures his time and how it’s enabled him to spend more time with his family. “Your brain is meant to be a factory, not a warehouse.” -Mike Vardy In this episode, you’ll learn how to use contexts to keep your tasks manageable and to provide direction to be able to get things done. You’ll also learn how to use start dates alongside traditional due dates – with tasks in between – to boost the quality of the work you produce. Things mentioned in this episode:… Habit RPG & How To Use It To Build Strong Habits And Hack Your Motivation; Todoist; DashPlus; Haiku Deck; Freedom; FocalFilter; Coffeetivity.” At the link find the title, Productivity Hacks with My Friend Mike Vardy of Productivityist (Ep. 39,” right-click “Media files 5563.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Programmer Mitch Waite 86 mins – “Mitch Waite – Hosted by Leo Laporte : Mitch Waite is a former CEO, developer of iBird Explorer. He worked for a plethora of major tech companies writing various books on the up and coming programming languages of the time.” At the link left-click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protest Music 79 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Music for Social Change”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5714 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Psychosis Detection 12 mins – “Can the way you speak and write today predict your future mental state, even the onset of psychosis? In this fascinating talk, neuroscientist Mariano Sigman reflects on ancient Greece and the origins of introspection to investigate how our words hint at our inner lives and details a word-mapping algorithm that could predict the development of schizophrenia. “We may be seeing in the future a very different form of mental health,” Sigman says, “based on objective, quantitative and automated analysis of the words we write, of the words we say.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Queensland – Australia 63 mins – “Queensland is Australia’s second largest state and the third most populous, with more than 4.5 million inhabitants. The Hon. Annastacia Palaszczuk MP, premier of Queensland, is one of her country’s leading political figures. She will outline how her state is diversifying its economy from a traditional reliance on natural resources to innovation and ideas, and the potential that Queensland has as a launchpad for investment in the Asia-Pacific. She will also discuss the strategic importance of Australia to the world economy and international security.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ransomware in Canada 25 mins – “Often attacking through email, cyber thieves are racking millions of dollars with the rise of ransomware attacks.” At the link find the title, “Ransomware threat attacks hundreds of Canadians, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160609_91917.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rape in Brazil 11 mins – “A video revealing the rape of a Brazilian girl by 30 men leads to angry demonstrations across Brazil.Gang rape of 16-year-old Brazilian sparks protests, Jun, 2016,” “Media files current_20160609_99380.mp3

Rational Voters 79 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “The Myth of the Rational Voter ”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5512 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in France P2 55 mins – “Philip Coulter visits a refugee camp on the outskirts of Calais — city of dreams and lost hopes to ask the question: what do we owe our neighbour?” At the link find the title, “No Man’s Land, Part 2, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160609_56458.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roy Henry Vickers 25 mins – “The B.C. artist, carver, designer and storyteller, says he’s more keen than ever to create and share aboriginal stories.” At the link find the title, “Artist Roy Henry Vickers on making art, beating addiction and turning 70, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160609_61350.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self-driving Car 85 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Your Self-Driving Car Hit Mine!”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5315 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharing Economy 64 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “The Sharing Economy”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5513 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shikimic Acid 6 mins – “The Japanese star anise – Illicium anisatum, to give it its proper name, or shikimi as it’s known in Japan – is an elegant plant. Broad green leaves surround white many-petalled flowers, which in turn give rise to eight-pointed star-shaped seeds. It’s also the source of the chemical shikimic acid, first purified by Dutch chemist Johan Fredrik Eykman in 1885. Composed solely of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen, shikimic acid is an important starting ingredient in several multi-step biochemical manufacturing processes found in a wide range of lifeforms from bacteria and fungi to parasites and plants…Shikimic acid isn’t only an important ingredient feeding into the biological factories inside cells; it’s also used as a starting material by pharmaceutical factories making an anti-viral drug called oseltamivir – more commonly known by the brand name Tamiflu. It’s the world’s most widely-used antiviral drug for nasties such as swine flu, bird flu, and the regular (but still horrible) winter flu….” (Good photos of a star anise.) At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Shikimic_acid.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Awkwardness 80 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, ”Open Mouth, Remove Foot: Social Awkwardness & EQ”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5717 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Stanford Sex Assault 47 mins – “Outrage over the lenient sentence for a Stanford swimmer convicted of sexual assault. Feminist Jessica Valenti weighs in on the case and talks about her memoir, “Sex Object.” At the link find the title, “Jessica Valenti On The Stanford Sexual Assault Case And Feminism Now, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_481270987.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup Drug Business 39 mins – “A different kind of boom and bust.” Busted but very successful drug dealer starts a legitimate career after prison. At the link find the title, “Happy Ending (Season 3, Episode 7), Jun, 2016, right-click “Media files GLT5132895603.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stereotypes 80 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Moving Beyond StereotypesThe Age of Big Data”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5312 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Job Training 25 mins – “All post-secondary students should do internship or co-op, says employment and education group The Business Higher Education Round Table says too many students are entering the workforce without the practical skills that employers want, and believe mandatory workplace co-ops would assist all graduating students find the right job sooner.” At the link find the title, “All post-secondary students should do internship or co-op, says employment and education group,” right-click “Download All post-secondary students should do internship or co-op, says employment and education group,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Podcast 42 mins – “When Chief Justice Earl Warren was asked at the end of his career, “What was the most important case of your tenure?”, there were a lot of answers he could have given. After all, he had presided over some of the most important decisions in the court’s history — cases that dealt with segregation in schools, the right to an attorney, the right to remain silent, just to name a few. But his answer was a surprise: He said, “Baker v. Carr,” a 1962 redistricting case. On this episode of More Perfect, we talk about why this case was so important; important enough, in fact, that it pushed one Supreme Court justice to a nervous breakdown, brought a boiling feud to a head, put one justice in the hospital, and changed the course of the Supreme Court — and the nation — forever….” At the link left-click the circle with the dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainability Development 80 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Sustainable Development is Not a Pipe Dream”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5715 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Syria Journalism 48 mins – “Anne Barnard of The New York Times and Thanassis Cambanis from The Century Foundation fell in love when they were reporting on the war in Iraq. Now based in Beirut, they continue to cover the region. Also, Ken Tucker reviews Paul Simon’s new album, ‘Stranger to Stranger.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syria Warfare 25 mins “Ranging experiences of brutal torture, struggle and survival – di Giovanni’s new book “The Morning They Came for Us: Dispatches from Syria” chronicles everyday life of the Syrian war.” At the link find the title, “Journalist Janine di Giovanni on life in Syria,” right-click “Download Journalist Janine di Giovanni on life in Syria,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism 79 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Terrorism in America: The New Normal”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5511 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism War Cost 41 mins – “In our “Spotlight on Magazines” series, [Reason] contributor James Bovard discusses his piece on the war on terror, which he says has cost the U.S. $4 trillion since it began in 2001.” At the link find the title, “Washington Journal: James Bovard on the Cost of the War on Terror, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.442913.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Think Tanks 78 minsPanel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Think Tanks Can’t Think Straight”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5115 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Tobacco and Fuel Wars 59 mins – “Lowell Bergman, Investigative Journalist Stanton Glantz, Director, Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, University of California San Francisco Kenneth Kimmell, President, Union of Concerned Scientists Bill Reilly, Former Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Senior Advisor, TPG Capital Oil companies have long used a page from tobacco companies’ playbook by vigorously denying evidence that using their product as directed causes societal harm. Now the tobacco and oil narratives are getting closer following news that ExxonMobil executives for decades suppressed internal reports about the negative impacts of burning fossil fuels. A former U.S. Department of Justice lawyer who won a huge racketeering case against tobacco companies says the federal government should investigate whether oil companies colluded to bury evidence of human-caused climate disruption. It’s easy to blame energy suppliers and that may be the right thing to do. But don’t individuals also share responsibility for driving and flying around knowing that we are emitting climate-killing gases? Aren’t we also culpable? A conversation on how oil might be the new tobacco. A conversation on how oil might be the new tobacco.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undocumented Employers 62 minsPanel discussion with Jose Antonio Vargas at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “THE MOLLY IVINS MEMORIAL PLENARY: Race, Immigration, Identity and Citizenship in a Multicultural America ”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5700 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Marine 18 mins – “Before he fought in the galactic battles of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Adam Driver was a United States Marine with 1/1 Weapons Company. He tells the story of how and why he became a Marine, the complex transition from soldier to civilian — and Arts in the Armed Forces, his nonprofit that brings theater to the military. Because, as he says: “Self-expression is just as valuable a tool as a rifle on your shoulder.” Followed by a spirited performance of Marco Ramirez’s “I am not Batman” by Jesse J. Perez and Matt Johnson. (Adult language)” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Utopias 52 mins – “What should the future look like? That’s the question posed by ambitious, sometimes delusional Americans in the early 1800s who dedicated themselves to creating new ways of living. You had Mother Ann Lee’s Shakers; the Oneida community in New York; New Harmony, Indiana; intentional communities inspired by French socialist Charles Fourier; and the roots of a communist paradise in Texas. Friday, the writer Chris Jennings joins us to explore the idealism and the lasting impact of these five utopian movements. Chris Jennings is the author of the book Paradise Now: The Story of American Utopianism” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela Inflation 47 mins – “New York Times reporter Nicholas Casey talks about life in Venezuela, where the collapse in oil prices has caused shortages of everything, including water, electricity, medicine, and cash.” At the link find the title, “Jun, 2016, Bust Times In Oil-Rich Venezuela,” left-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water issues 79 mins – Panel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Water, Water … Not Everywhere”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5719 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Whistleblowers 5 mins – “In the US, the press has a right to publish secret information the public needs to know, protected by the First Amendment. Government surveillance has made it increasingly more dangerous for whistleblowers, the source of virtually every important story about national security since 9/11, to share information. In this concise, informative talk, Freedom of the Press Foundation co-founder and TED Fellow Trevor Timm traces the recent history of government action against individuals who expose crime and injustice and advocates for technology that can help them do it safely and anonymously.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White Rage 25 mins – “Carol Anderson explores U.S. racial past and present in her new book White Rage:The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide.” At the link find the title, “‘White rage’ causes racial unrest in U.S., says author, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160608_77886.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whitey Bulger 49 mins – “Boston Globe reporters Kevin Cullen and Shelley Murphy talk about their book “Whitey Bulger: America’s Most Wanted Gangster and the Manhunt That Brought Him to Justice.” Cullen and Murphy appeared at the Newseum nine days before Bulger’s federal trial began in Boston. He was apprehended in 2011 after a 16-year manhunt.” At the link find the title, “Whitey Bulger: America’s Most Wanted Gangster, Jun, 2013,” right-click “Media files IM_20130601.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wine and Paleo Diet 44 mins – “Today we have guest Todd White of Dry Farm Wines. Todd and I talk all about wine, and cover how it’s processed/made in the US, the wine industry, why drinking wine makes you feel bad, the difference in dry farming, sustainability, and how to get good wine that checks all the boxes. If you like wine at all, this is the episode for you.” At the link right-click “Download Episode Here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wolf Control 26 mins – “The rise of aggressive wolf attacks in Canadian parks due to visitors failing to respect boundaries.” At the link find the title,”Saving wolves by teaching fear: Parks Canada’s Bill Hunt explains shooting of wolf, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160610_40245.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Class Changes 58 mins – “Tamara Draut, vice president of policy and research at Demos, discusses America’s working class and the issue of income inequality. She is interviewed by Amy Goodman of Democracy Now!‘” At the link find the title, “After Words with Tamara Draut, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.433481.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus by Virologists 85 mins – “Host: Vincent Racaniello; Guests: Michael Diamond, Michaela Gack, Laura Kramer, and Charles RiceFour virologists discuss our current understanding of Zika virus biology, pathogenesis, transmission, and prevention, in this special live episode recorded at the American Society for Microbiology in Washington, DC.” At the link right-click “Download TWIV 392” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 238 – Jun 3, 2016: 3D Printing by US Navy, Addiction, Affordable Care Act, Anti Science Discussion, Authors Alliance, Big City Futures, Blogging Panel, Campaign Finance, Cancer Treatment, Cardiac Tests, Chocolate Effects, Civil Disobedience, Climate Warming Solutions, Cordite, Corruption in Brazil and Venezuela, Creative Conditions, Democracy, Disaster Business, Economic Growth, Embryo Research, Engineering Design, Eugenics in America, Frustrating Bureaucracy, Gene Editing, Generic Drug Names, Gettysburg Address, Government Reform, Hollywood Blacklist, Humanitarian Aid Panel, Innovation Concentrations, Intelligent Machines, Investment Expenses, ISIS History, LSD, Machiavelli, Machine Intelligence, Male Violence Reduction, Meditation, Music in Prison, Nigerian Business Lottery, Nutrition, Oliver Sacks, Pancreatic Cancer Treatment, Pandemics Discussion, Pentagon Papers, Research Reliability, Rooftop Solar Costs, Russian Regime, Satellite Images, Sebastian Junger, Sec Def Perry, Segregated Schools, Sex Worker Laws, Sexual Health, Shea Butter, Slavery Today, South Africa Politics, Soviet Internet, Spanish Civil War, STEM Education, Stunted Growth Impact, Technologic Transformation, Ten Thousand Hour rule, Terrorism, Tim Ferris Interview, Transdermal Image Detection, Transgender Bathrooms, Transgender Law in NC, Transgenders in School, Veterinary Medicine, Voltaire, Water Poverty, Wildfire Fighter Stories, Wildfires History, Wolbachia Bacteria, Women Leaders.

The best 88 podcasts from a larger group of 269 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 300 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

3D Printing by US Navy 1 min – “The Navy is employing 3D printing for just-in-time delivery of parts and products to ships at sea. CBS News Technology Consultant Larry Magid has today’s Tech Talk.” At the link find the title, “TECH TALK, 26 May 2016,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Addiction 78 minsPanel discussion with two guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Foreign Hackers Will pwn our Country”. At the link find and right-click the number 2468 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Affordable Care Act at 3 Years 50 mins – “Yesterday, the Supreme Court announced it would not rule on a major case on access to contraception under the Affordable Care Act. It was the latest in the legal battles over the health law. The goal of the ACA is to provide insurance to tens of millions of uninsured Americans through state and federal marketplaces. By some measures, the law succeeded. An estimated 20 million more people now have coverage. But the number of insurance companies participating in exchanges is dwindling, and their plans exclude many doctors and hospitals. Diane and a panel of guests look at the Affordable Care Act three years after it was enacted.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Affordable Care Act Repair 47 mins – “The controversial Affordable Care Act has insured millions of Americans, but left many patients frustrated. We’ll look at Obamacare’s growing pains.Donald Trump says he’ll scrap Obamacare and replace it with something really awesome. Bernie Sanders says forget it, just give Medicare to everybody. Hillary Clinton says she’ll fix what needs fixing in the Affordable Care Act. So, how is Obamacare actually doing? How’s it working? There’s a lot more coverage out there. Growing pains too. Premiums headed up. Out of pocket pain. This hour On Point: a clear-eyed check-up on Obamacare.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anti Science Discussion 79 minsPanel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “The Anti-Scientific Left Alex Berezow”. At the link find and right-click the number 3317 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Authors Alliance 57 mins – “I’m pleased to post…my interview with Prof. Pam Samuelson of UC Berkeley School of Law and School of Information, on the Authors Alliance. Pam needs little introduction to Hearsay Culture listeners given her position as one of the leading intellectual property law scholars of the last 30 years. In this interview, we focused on Pam’s work for the Authors Alliance, founded by Pam in 2014 to promote “authorship for the public good by supporting authors who write to be read.” Given the continued pitched battles around the contours of United States copyright law, the timing of our discussion could not have been better. In a candid and broad interview, we discussed the recent Google Book Search fair use decision, the Authors Alliance’s relationship with the Authors Guild, and the role for academics in policy debate, among other topics. I was thrilled to have Pam on the show, and look forward to her future return!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big City Futures 76 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, Urban Challenges: The Future of Big Cities”. At the link find and right-click the number 3314 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blogging Panel 69 minsPanel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Blogging: Putting the Me in Media”, At the link find and right-click the number 2468 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campaign Finance 52 minsPresentation by Timothy Wirth at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “PLENARY: Antidotes to the Poison of Campaign Finance ”. At the link find and right-click the number 3999 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Treatment 47 mins – “Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee says genetics play a significant role in identity, temperament, sexual orientation, and disease risk — but that environment also matters. His new book is ‘The Gene.’ John Powers reviews the film, ‘A Bigger Splash.’” At the link find the title, “May 2016, The Power of Genes,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cardiac Tests 30 mins – “Dr. Rita Redberg cautions that some screening test carry risks that far outweigh the benefits. In particular direct-to-consumer medical tests should have clear benefits and good dialog between patient and doctor. She advises that tests without clear evidence of benefit should be regarded with abundance of caution, if not skepticism Recorded on 02/16/2016. (#30670)” At the link download by right-clicking “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chocolate Effects 24 mins – “Most research on chocolate focuses on the acute effects of consumption. A typical study involves feeding subjects dark chocolate and then almost immediately testing their cognition. But Dr. Crichton was more interested in the long-term effects of regularly eating chocolate. Using data on 1,000 people from Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study, a 25-year study, Dr. Crichton and her fellow researchers looked at the effect of regular chocolate consumption on cognition. The results? People who eat a small amount of chocolate at least once a week perform better cognitively. Frequent chocolate consumption is associated with: Better working memory, so you can remember your grocery list; Better abstract reasoning; Better visual-spatial memory, Better multitasking, like being able to talk and drive at the same time” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil Disobedience 79 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Civil Disobedience for Change At the link find and right-click the number 3711 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming Solutions 76 mins – Panel discussion with six guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “CLIMATE SERIES: Risky Climate, Risky Solutions”. At the link find and right-click the number 3316 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cordite 6 mins – “‘There seems to be something wrong with our bloody ships today.’ These words, spoken by Admiral David Beatty, became the epitaph of the Battle of Jutland, fought 100 years ago on May 31 1916 in the middle of the North Sea. The largest naval battle of the first world war, 151 British ships – including 28 battleships – faced off against the German High Seas Fleet of 99 ships, including 16 battleships. It was the last pitched naval battle before aircraft became a dominant naval force, and historians have been arguing about which side won ever since. While the British ruled the waves at the end of the day, the Germans inflicted three times as many casualties. This tally included the battlecruisers Indefatigable and Queen Mary, both of which exploded after only a short time engaging the enemy. The reason for this twin calamity was cordite….” At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Cordite.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in Brazil and Venezuela 47 mins – “Two South American giants in crisis. Brazil and Venezuela. We’ll look at their ways ahead, from corruption to oppression to the Olympics. Two South American giants in serious trouble right now. Brazil’s in trouble. Economy gone from star to mess. Brazilians in the streets. Zika virus hitting. President sidelined last week. Claiming coup. Facing impeachment trial. And the Summer Olympics looming. Venezuela can look in free fall. A state of emergency declared on Friday. Shortages and violence all over. This hour On Point: we look at Brazil and Venezuela, South America’s two big players in trouble.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creative Conditions 4 mins – “…I recently had my curiosity piqued while attending a senior thesis presentation at a local high school. The topic was creativity, but of a very special kind: the creativity of the unconscious mind. And the young speaker made me aware of things I’d never really thought much about. We’ve all experienced the unconscious mind at work – a light bulb going off when we least expect it. But is it happenstance, or is there something more going on? Are there things that promote or hinder imaginative wanderings?…” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy 79 minsPanel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, Democracy is Winning the World – or Not.”. At the link find and right-click the number 3312 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Reform 55 mins – “For your Memorial Day weekend, I’m am amazed and humbled to post Hearsay Culture’s tenth anniversary show, # 254, recorded on April 26 and aired on KZSU on May 6, 2016, with Prof. Lawrence Lessig of Harvard University, reflecting on the past 10 years of Internet law and policy, and his current efforts to fix democracy….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Business 56 mins – “Who profits when disaster strikes? FRONTLINE and NPR investigate.” at the link find the title, “Media files 265851073-frontlinepbs-business-of-disaster.mp3 ,” right-click “Media files 265851073-frontlinepbs-business-of-disaster.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Response in Middle East 24 mins – “Sam Bradley got together with the Mad Dog Medic of social media fame while at EMS Today 2016 in Baltimore earlier this year. Mad Dog is a paramedic in the Middle East and he’s seen several large-scale Middle East disaster situations. Sam chats with him about how mass casualty incidents are handled in other countries with different customs and resources. Check it out.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Growth 60 mins – “…If the age of endless growth is over, how should we assess the implications? Does the developed world face decades of misery-inducing recession, or – given that the planet’s resources are finite – can we look forward to a more sustainable future where ever-increasing consumption does not count as the main good? Or are the economic doom-mongers wrong? Will capitalism, that engine of human ingenuity, continue to be the route to rising prosperity for all? If so, what are the mechanisms that will kick-start the global economy again?” At the link find the title, “Is the Party Over for Economic Growth? When economic stagnation becomes the new normal, May, 2016,” right-click “PM Media files 265083021-intelligence2-is-the-party-over-for-economic-growth-when-economic-stagnation-becomes-the-new-normal.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Embryo Research 36 mins – “Researchers in the US and UK recently broke the record for culturing human embryos in the lab, keeping them alive for up to 13 days – that’s beyond the point at which they would normally implant in a mother’s womb.This has prompted some to ask whether we should allow scientists to grow human embryos for longer? Or is the 14 day rule a line in the sand that should not be moved? Ian Sample is joined by embryologist Sue Avery, James Lawford Davies, a solicitor specialising in assisted reproduction, embryo and stem cell research and bioethicist and philosopher John Harris.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineering Design 75 mins – “Adam, Brian, Carmen and Jeff discuss theoretical and practical aspects of the design process, as well as the emotional states they experience when engaged in design activities.” At the link right-click “Download” and seelct”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eugenics in America 52 mins – “Journalist Adam Cohen has said if you want to learn about an institution, you look at where it’s gone wrong. For Cohen, Buck v Bell is a moment when the US Supreme Court went terribly wrong. Its 1927 decision upheld eugenics laws, and led to the forced sterilization of Carrie Buck and some 70,000 “undesirables” declared “feebleminded.” Tuesday, Cohen joins us to explain how Americans – and some of our most revered legal minds – succumbed to racism and classism in the name of “uplifting” the human race. Adam Cohen is a former member of the New York Times editorial board and was a senior writer for Time Magazine. His book is called Imbeciles: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Frustrating Bureaucracy 60 mins – “Nauru is a tiny island, population 12,000, a third of the size of Manhattan and far from anywhere: Yet at the center of several of the decade’s biggest global events. Contributing editor Jack Hitt tells the untold story of this dot in the middle of the Pacific and its involvement in the bankrupting of the Russian economy, global terrorism, North Korean defectors, the end of the world, and the late 1980s theatrical flop of a London musical based on the life of Leonardo da Vinci called Leonardo, A Portrait of Love. (30 minutes) [then] This American Life senior producer Julie Snyder found herself in a ten-month battle with her phone company, MCI Worldcom, which had overcharged her $946.36. She spent hours on hold in a bureaucratic nowhere. No one seemed able to fix her problem, and there was no way she could make the company pay her back for all her lost time and aggravation. Finally, she enlists the aid of the national media—specifically, This American Life host Ira Glass. (22 minutes)” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gene Editing 42 mins – “The African Swine Fever Virus is a devastating pathogen that leads to fatal disease in domesticated swine. Scientists at the Roslin Institute led by Prof. Bruce Whitelaw have made an important advance for domestic pig health and welfare. Wild African pigs like warthogs do not get the disease. Researchers at Roslin have studied the genes associated with viral infection, and found what is likely a critical difference between the wild and domestic pigs. Using new gene editing technology, the change in wild pigs has been created in domestic pigs, and they will be tested for resistance to the virus this year. This example is one of may that is coming in animal, plant, and fungal genetic improvement through gene editing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Generic Drug Names 7 mins – “It’s bad practice to prescribe a brand name drug when a cheaper, viable and approved generic is available. But, particularly in the US, this happens too much, at major cost to the health system. The team behind Michigan State University’s paediatric clinics set out to increase their prescribing of generics, and found that much of the problem was that whilst brand names lodged in staff and patient’s minds, generic names were easily forgotten.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gettysburg Address 50 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, ten sentences long, delivered at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery at Gettysburg after the Union forces had won an important battle with the Confederates. Opening with ” Four score and seven years ago,” it became one of the most influential statements of national purpose, asserting that America was “conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal” and “that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom-and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” Among those inspired were Martin Luther King Jr whose “I have a dream” speech, delivered at the Lincoln Memorial 100 years later, echoed Lincoln’s opening words. With Catherine Clinton Denman Chair of American History at the University of Texas and International Professor at Queen’s University, Belfast Susan-Mary Grant Professor of American History at Newcastle University And Tim Lockley Professor of American History at the University of Warwick Producer: Simon Tillotson.” At the link find the title, “The Gettysburg Address, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03w9xsq.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Reform 15 mins – “Haley Van Dyck is transforming the way America delivers critical services to everyday people. At the United States Digital Service, Van Dyck and her team are using lessons learned by Silicon Valley and the private sector to improve services for veterans, immigrants, the disabled and others, creating a more awesome government along the way. “We don’t care about politics,” she says. “We care about making government work better, because it’s the only one we’ve got.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hollywood Blacklist 59 mins -”In 1947, the House Un-American Activities Committee subpoenaed dozens of Hollywood workers to come to Washington and testify to the presence of Communists in the film industry. 19 of those who were subpoenaed announced that they wouldn’t co-operate with the Committee; of those 19, 10 “unfriendly” witnesses were called to the stand and refused to answer “The $64 Question”: “Are you now or have you ever been a Communist?” Those 10 men were subsequently denied employment, and imprisoned; afraid of collateral damage to the industry, the studio moguls were thus moved to design the Blacklist. This episode will explore the work and politics of the Hollywood Ten — and films on which they came together, such as Crossfire — and delve into the far-reaching consequences of their false assumption that the Constitution would protect them.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hollywood Blacklist – Bogart and Hepburn 50 mins – “In the late 1940s, as the country was moving to the right and there was pressure on Hollywood to do the same, Katharine Hepburn, Humphrey Bogart and John Huston all protested HUAC [House Unamerican Activities Committee] in ways that damaged their public personas and their ability to work in Hollywood. Hepburn’s outspokenness resulted in headlines branding her a “Red” and, allegedly, audiences stoning her films. Bogart and Huston were prominent members of the Committee For the First Amendment, a group of Hollywood stars who came to Washington to support the Hollywood Ten — and lived to regret it. With their career futures uncertain, the trio collaborated on the most difficult film any of them would ever make, The African Queen.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hollywood Blacklist – Charlie Chaplin P1 43 mins – “In 1922, Charlie Chaplin was one of the most beloved men in the world. In 1952, after over a decade of being publicly shamed, he was essentially manipulated into self-deportation. What happened in between? We’ll explain over two episodes, beginning with this flashback to an episode that originally ran in March 2015, detailing Chaplin’s politics, his fascination with Adolf Hitler, the making and release of The Great Dictator, and the sex scandal that gave J. Edgar Hoover an opening to persecute Chaplin.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hollywood Blacklist – Charlie Chaplin P2 41 mins – “Picking up where last week’s episode left off, we’ll catch up with Chaplin’s post-The Great Dictator activism, talk about Chaplin’s savage satirical follow-up, Monsieur Verdoux, and explain the witch hunt that ended with him forced to leave his adopted home, and Hollywood career, behind.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hollywood Blacklist – Lena Horne 43 mins – “Horne’s last years at MGM overlapped with the first HUAC [House Unamerican Activies Committee] hearings. Horne, an outspoken proponent of equal rights, who from the beginning of her career had associated with leftists and “agitators,” got caught up in the anti-communist insanity. One of those agitators was Paul Robeson, a singer, actor and political firebrand who was a mentor and friend to Horne. But once the red panic began to heat up, that friendship became problematic for Lena, and like so many others, she was forced to choose between her career and her friendships.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hollywood Blacklist – Reagan and the Blacklist 38 mins – “The post-war Communist witch hunt had a big impact on Ronald Reagan’s evolution from movie actor to politician, and from Democrat to Republican. And, Ronald Reagan had a major personal impact on the witch hunt’s manifestation in Hollywood, the Blacklist. This episode will trace the years in which Reagan was primarily known as a movie and TV star, and explore his two marriages to actresses, his testimony to HUAC, his behind-the-scenes work as an informer to the FBI, his late-career incarnation as bridge between Hollywood and corporate America, and more.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Humanitarian Aid Panelists 141 mins – “U2 lead singer and activist Bono, Deputy Secretary of State Antony Blinken, and U.N. and military officials testify at a Senate Appropriations subcommittee on the role of foreign assistance in combating violent extremism worldwide.” At the link find the title, “Bono’s Testimony on Foreign Aid and Combating Violent Extremism, April, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.438607.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Concentration 57 mins – “We examine several key indicators and their impact on the Granite state. One is rising inflation. Another is consumer debt: Americans are spending more, but we’re also borrowing — to the tune of nearly one trillion dollars. Also, a new report finds a worrisome trend: business formation in small towns and rural counties has dropped dramatically.” [3 guests] At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligent Machines 29 mins – “Back in the 1990s, Jeffrey Hawkins became both rich and famous when he invented the Palm Pilot-a device that in no small way ushered in a whole new era of mobile computing. These days, though, he’s on a far more ambitious mission. His goal: to build a machine that can think and reason on its own by mimicking the workings of the human brain. In this edition of Up Next, Hawkins opines on the both risks and rewards of artificial intelligence. (#29526) “ At the link download by right-clicking “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Expenses 20 mins – “Paul discusses the huge changes in expenses that are due in part to the debate between the “Fiduciary Standard’ that investment advisors work under, and the “Suitability Standard” that brokers apply to their recommendations. While a mutual fund’s expense ratio is the most commonly discussed variable, it turns out there are other factors that may be even more important. Paul lifts hood on a couple of big funds to discover what some of those forces are doing to investor returns.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS History 56 mins – “The inside story of the the radicals who became the leaders of ISIS, the many missed warning signs and the U.S. failures to stop the terror group’s brutal rise.”At the link find the title, “The Secret History of ISIS, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files 265116450-frontlinepbs-the-secret-history-of-isis.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

LSD 46 mins – “…LSD changes your brain not only during a trip, but in long-lasting ways. In studies on animals, researchers have seen markers of neuronal growth, including increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These effects are strongest in the cortex, the area of the brain responsible for cognition, suggesting that LSD can promote new, permanent connections in the brain. New research shows increased neuronal connections in humans, too….”

Machiavelli 4 mins – “…Machiavelli lived from 1469 to 1527. He was only a few years younger than Leonardo da Vinci and they both spent time working for the cruel Cesare Borgia. He and Leonardo had something else, even more important, in common. Both helped invent the new practice of empirical science. Leonardo observed the workings of nature. Machiavelli tried to make observational science of politics….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Machiavelli 52 mins – “Niccolò Machiavelli lived hundreds of years ago, and though he was a gifted political strategist, he knew nothing about democratic republics. So the scholar Maurizio Viroli recognizes that it’s a bit extravagant to consult a 15th-century Florentine for electoral advice in 21st-century America. But Machiavelli, Viroli says, remains the most competent, honest and disinterested political counselor we could ask for. Viroli joins us Wednesday to examine what Machiavelli can teach us about choosing leaders. Maurizio Viroli is professor emeritus of politics at Princeton University, professor of government at the University of Texas, Austin, and professor of political communication at the University of Italian Switzerland in Lugano. His many books include Niccolò’s Smile: A Biography of Machiavelli and Redeeming “The Prince”: The Meaning of Machiavelli’s Masterpiece. His new book is called How to Choose a Leader: Machiavelli’s Advice to Citizens” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up Menu.

Machine Intelligence 83 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Technological Singularity: When the Machines Take Over”. At the link find and right-click the number 3965 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Male Violence Reduction 89 minsPanel discussion with two guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Male Socialization: A Key to Reducing Violence”. At the link find and right-click the number 3315 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation 50 mins – “Transcendental Meditation is a practice that has its roots in Hinduism. Mindfulness traces back to Buddhist awareness techniques. Today in America, these forms of meditation seem to be everywhere from schools to businesses to the military. Whether it’s to treat a serious medical condition, help deal with depression, or simply find peace in the craziness of life, Americans are increasingly turning to meditation for answers. Diane and her panel of guests discuss how these practices work, their roots in Asian religion, and what science tells us about how they could impact our health.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Music in Prison 22 mins – “Sub Pop Records has signed some of the most famous and influential indie bands of the last 30 years, including Nirvana, Sleater-Kinney, The Postal Service, and Beach House. Over time, the stars and hits have changed and the formats have evolved as well, from vinyl to CDs to MP3s. In recent years, however, the label has started releasing new albums on a medium few thought would ever see a comeback: the cassette…But they and their customers certainly aren’t the only ones who still use cassettes. In fact, there’s one big user group that never entirely stopped using the old school technology. The United States prison system has the largest prison population in the world and many of its inmates listen to their music on tape. For this group, cassettes aren’t necessarily the cheapest or hippest way to listen to music; in some cases, it’s the only way….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nigerian Business Lottery 16 mins – ”One night, Lariat Alhassan heard an ad on the radio. It said the Nigerian government was offering millions of dollars to people with business ideas, practically no strings attached. She gave it a go.” At the link find the title, “#702: Nigeria, You Win! May, 2016 ,” right-click “Media files 20160520_pmoney_pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nutrition Labels 107 mins -”Richard Williams talks about his recent Politico op-ed on why the new nutrition labels won’t help people make healthier choices.” At the link right-click “Download the MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nutritional Health 108 mins – “A third of premature deaths in the US are attributable to poor nutrition and physical inactivity. Only 10% of Americans eat a healthy diet consistent with current nutrition recommendations. Dr. Robert Baron explains why you should care about what you eat and how to eat for healthfully. Recorded on 02/17/2016. (#30688)” At the link download by right-clicking “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oliver Sacks 54 mins – “Oliver Sacks, M.D. was a physician, a best-selling author, and a professor of neurology at the New York University School of Medicine. He is best known for his collections of neurological case histories, including The Man who Mistook his Wife for a Hat, Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain and An Anthropologist on Mars. Awakenings, his book about a group of patients who had survived the great encephalitis lethargica epidemic of the early twentieth century, inspired the 1990 Academy Award-nominated feature film Awakenings starring Robert De Niro and Robin Williams. Today we hear excerpts from Oliver Sacks’s public lectures in Australia during the 1990s and his conversation with Robyn Williams on The Science Show in 2008. (first broadcast 19th Sep 2015)” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pancreatic Cancer Treatment 6 mins – “Anyone who has lost a loved one to pancreatic cancer knows the devastating speed with which it can affect an otherwise healthy person. TED Fellow and biomedical entrepreneur Laura Indolfi is developing a revolutionary way to treat this complex and lethal disease: a drug delivery device that acts as a cage at the site of a tumor, preventing it from spreading and delivering medicine only where it’s needed. “We are hoping that one day we can make pancreatic cancer a curable disease,” she says.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pandemics Discussion 79 minsPanel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Fighting Global Pandemics from Avian Flu to Zika”. At the link find and right-click the number 3515 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pentagon Papers 53 mins – “In this episode of Reveal, we’re using the full hour to take a deep look at the leaking and publication of the Pentagon Papers. At the center of the episode are two guys who have a knack for being in the room when history gets made: Robert J. Rosenthal and Daniel Ellsberg. For Rosenthal, the Pentagon Papers came calling when he was at the beginning of his journalism career. When Ellsberg leaked the Pentagon Papers to the press in 1971, he was turning his back on a long career close to power, immersed in government secrets. His early career as a nuclear war strategist made him fear that a small conflict could erupt into a nuclear holocaust. In our second segment, when the Vietnam War flared, Ellsberg worried his worst fears would be realized. He wonders if leaking top-secret material he’s seeing at work could help stop the war. Soon, he was secretly copying the 7,000-page history that would come to be known as the Pentagon Papers and showing them to anyone he thought could help. In our last segment, President Richard Nixon wakes up to the biggest leak in American history. His first reaction is a little surprising: The Pentagon Papers might make trouble for the Democrats – this instinct starts a chain reaction that helps bring down his presidency.” At the link find the title, “The Pentagon Papers: Secrets, lies and leaks, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files The-Pentagon-Papers_-Secrets-lies-and-leaks_podcast-v2.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Research Reliability 29 mins – “Lots of psychology studies fail to produce the same results when they are repeated. How do scientists know what’s true?” At the link find the title, “Episode 32: The Scientific Process, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160523_hiddenbrain_32scipro.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rooftop Solar Costs 25 mins – “We investigate the sneaky “soft costs” driving up the price of rooftop solar, delve into the archives for a look at the turbulent times around the Energy Department’s creation, and contemplate some alternatives to the name “Direct Current.” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Regime 79 minsPanel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Is Putin Willing to Risk WWIII? At the link find and right-click the number 3512 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Satellite Images 47 mins – “The Fort McMurray wildfire in Canada’s Alberta province is not yet under control and the job of estimating damage is just beginning. In both of these efforts satellite images will be valuable. They provide detailed views on conditions across the charred expanse of more than 700,000 acres. Not long ago, pictures from satellites were the province of cold war spy masters. But now, clear pictures of the entire earth in almost real time are widely available, offering critical insights on regional water shortages, real estate development, refugee crises, agricultural productivity and much more. We ask: What are pictures from above teaching us about life on earth?” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Sebastian Junger 150 mins – “If you want a better understanding of warriors, tribal societies, human nature, and what we can learn from it all, this is for you. My podcast guest is Sebastian Junger (@sebastianjunger), the #1 New York Times best-selling author of The Perfect Storm, Fire, A Death in Belmont, War, and Tribe. As an award-winning journalist, a contributing editor to Vanity Fair, and a special correspondent at ABC News, he has covered major international news stories around the world and has received both a National Magazine Award and a Peabody Award. Junger is also a documentary filmmaker whose debut film “Restrepo,” a feature-length documentary (co-directed with Tim Hetherington), was nominated for an Academy Award and won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance.”Restrepo,” which chronicled the deployment of a platoon of U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley, is widely considered to have broken new ground in war reporting. Junger has since produced and directed three additional documentaries about war and its aftermath. In this episode, we cover rites of passage (and their importance), warfare, the art of great non-fiction writing, PTSD, evolutionary biology, and much more. Some of the topics will no doubt offend many of you, and this is a good thing. I urge you to bite your lip, if need be, and listen to the entire episode. There are gems within, including hilarious stories, surprising statistics, and tear-jerking epiphanies.” At the link find the title, “Lessons from War, Tribal Societies, and a Non-Fiction Life (Sebastian Junger), May, 2016,” right-click “Media files Tim_Ferriss_Show-Sebastian_Junger.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sec Def Perry 62 mins – “Former U.S. Secretary of Defense William Perry recalls major chapters from his illustrious career with entrepreneurship educator Steve Blank in a discussion that spans Silicon Valley’s evolution, digital technology’s emergence and its adoption by the military, to Perry’s time in Washington and his deep expertise in world affairs.” At the link find the title, “Dedication to Innovation and Nation, William Perry, Stanford University,” right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Segregated Schools 49 mins – “New federal data this week appear to show resegregation of U.S. schools is on the rise. A report from the Government Accountability Office says the number of schools serving mostly poor African-American and Hispanic students has more than doubled in the last decade and a half. The report comes 62 years to the day after the Brown v. Board of Education decision that found segregated schools unconstitutional. Many say this new data point to the work still needed after all this time; just days ago, a federal judge ordered a Mississippi school district to desegregate, following a five-decade-long legal battle. Sixty-two years after Brown v. Board of Education, a look at how the country is addressing segregation of U.S. schools.” 4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Sex Worker Laws 18 mins – “Everyone has an opinion about how to legislate sex work (whether to legalize it, ban it or even tax it) … but what do workers themselves think would work best? Activist Toni Mac explains four legal models that are being used around the world and shows us the model that she believes will work best to keep sex workers safe and offer greater self-determination. “If you care about gender equality or poverty or migration or public health, then sex worker rights matter to you,” she says. “Make space for us in your movements.” (Adult themes)” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Health 87 mins – “Sexual health is, for many, a fundamental element of life-quality. Dr. Maurice Garcia, Assistant Clinical Professor in Residence, Genital Reconstruction, Neurourology and Sexual Medicine, Department of Urology at UCSF, explores how to maintain sexual function and activity in older age and after cancer. He also talks about transgender and gender-non binary people. Recorded on 02/10/2016. (#30687)” At the link download by right-clicking “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shea Butter 27 mins – “Journalist and BBC presenter Akwasi Sarpong heads to Ghana to hear the stories of rural women at the bottom of the pyramid of a multi-million dollar confectionery, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics industry relying on shea butter from Africa.” At the link find the title, “Shea Gold,May, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03w1rd5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery Today 30 mins – “Human slavery. Many of us think of it as a terrible chapter of US history that ended in the 19th century. But, according to the United Nations, slavery is a modern reality for roughly 27 to 30 million human beings living, right now. Our guest today on Sea Change Radio is Associated Press reporter, Robin McDowell, who, along with three colleagues, recently won a Pulitzer Prize, for her team’s exposé of slavery practices in the Southeast Asian seafood industry….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Africa Politics 27 mins – “South Africa’s President Zuma is in deep trouble. Accusations of corruption and unexplained ministerial appointments have fuelled widespread suspicions that the South African state has been “captured”. At the heart of this accusation are the Gupta brothers – a secretive family of Indian-born entrepreneurs. From modest beginnings in the 1990s, the Guptas’ South African business empire grew dramatically. Boosted, it is said, by their alleged influence over state contracts, political appointments and President Zuma himself. In this edition of Assignment, Michael Robinson tells the story of “Guptagate” – how one of the fiercest political storms since the ending of apartheid has swept South Africa and its increasingly embattled President.” At the link find the title, “Capturing South Africa, May, 2016, right-click “Media files p03w82hm.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soviet Internet 60 mins – “I’m pleased to post…the first of the Spring 2016 shows.with Prof. Ben Peters of the University of Tulsa, author of How Not to Network a Nation: The Uneasy History of the Soviet Internet.Ben has written a fascinating, exquisitely written and thoroughly researched and contextualized history of the repeated failures over 30+ years to create a Soviet Internet. Not merely a history, Ben’s analysis and writing shines when he places the ebbs and tides of its development in the broader socio-political environment in which a few brave pioneers were operating. That the Soviet Internet never developed reveals far more about the nature of a closed but competitive administrative state than it does about the genius underlying failed efforts. In our interview, we discussed both the intuitive and counter-intuitive modern insights borne from Ben’s meticulous writing and research.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spanish Civil War 59 mins – “Author Adam Hochschild discusses his book [Spain In Our Hearts: Americans in the Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939].” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Adam Hochschild, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436973.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

STEM Education 49 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “STEM Education: Why Should We Care?”. At the link find and right-click the number 3514 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stunted Growth Impact 49 mins – “The most critical period of a child’s development is from conception through age two. Lack of proper nutrition during this time can cause developmental issues that last a lifetime: cognitive delays, slow physical growth and a compromised immune system, to name a few. The World Health Organization estimates one in four children experiences this type of stunting. Economists say this can cost countries up to 16 percent of their GDP in lost productivity and future health care expenses. These numbers have caught the attention of world leaders and inspired a movement to address maternal and child nutrition. A new book by a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist tells the story of these efforts.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Technological Transformation 64 mins – “Are workers being left behind when the economy grows? Is technology making the human workforce obsolete? James Bessen, author of Learning by Doing, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the role of learning on the job in the past and in the present. Bessen argues that during times of technological innovation, it often takes years before workers see higher wages from productivity increases. Bessen stresses the importance of the standardization of education on the job as workers adapt to new technology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ten Thousand Hour Rule 58 mins – “Does it take 10,000 hours to become an expert at something? Probably not, says our guest this week—who happens to be the author of the paper which was the basis for Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 hour rule in the first place. We talk to psychologist Anders Ericsson about his new book Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise.” At the link find the title, “134 Anders Ericsson – How to Do Everything Better, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files 272052df-f6f0-4e28-9595-d6e5e27f2137.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism 79 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Terrorism & the Role of Media”. At the link find and right-click the number 3111 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tim Ferris Interview 41 mins – “Our Self-Improvement Month concludes with a man whose entire life and career are one big pile of self-improvement. Nutrition? Check. Bizarre physical activities? Check. Working less and earning more? Check. Tim Ferriss, creator of the Four-Hour universe, may at first glance look like a charlatan, but it seems more likely that he’s a wizard — and the kind of self-improvement ally we all want on our side.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transdermal Image Detection 14 mins – “Are children poor liars? Do you think you can easily detect their lies? Developmental researcher Kang Lee studies what happens physiologically to children when they lie. They do it a lot, starting as young as two years old, and they’re actually really good at it. Lee explains why we should celebrate when kids start to lie and presents new lie-detection technology that could someday reveal our hidden emotions.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender Bathrooms 50 mins – “President Obama told public schools they must permit transgender students to use the bathroom of their choice. Advocates for transgender students view the president’s directive as a civil rights victory. Many school principals say they’re pleased to have guidance on an issue they’ve grappled with for years, particularly at large urban high schools. But opponents sharply criticized the move. They see it as executive overreach and an infringement on the privacy rights of non-transgender students. Schools that refuse to comply face the possible loss of federal funds. Diane and her guest discuss the controversy over transgender rights at the nation’s public schools.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Transgender Law in NC 24 mins – “Attorney General Lynch speaks to reporters about North Carolina’s decision to sue the federal government over its HB 2 law, which requires transgender people to use the bathroom that corresponds with the sex on their birth certificate.” At the link find the title, “Attorney General Loretta Lynch Responds to North Carolina Lawsuit, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.442330.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transgenders in School 46 mins – “The Obama administration says public schools must let transgender students use the bathroom of their choice. How will this work? “Significant guidance,” they called it Friday, when the federal justice and education departments laid down, in effect, new rules for how all publicly funded schools in the United States – Kindergarten through college – accommodate transgender students. Guidance to say transgender students should have access to the bathrooms, sports teams, locker rooms and more of their choice. The country is absorbing this. Some resisting this. This hour On Point: the new rules on transgender access and how they will work.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Veterinary Medicine 90 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier,vand Daniel Griffin [with] Guest: Paul Calle The TWiP trio visit the Bronx Zoo where Paul solves the case of the Four Year Old with Pulmonary Edema, and talks about his career as the Chief Veterinarian and Director of the Zoological Health program for the Wildlife Conservation Society.” At the link right-click “Download TWIP #110” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voltaire..4 mins – “…Voltaire understood how Newton departed from pure rationalism and wrote a science to fit the observed world. Voltaire understood that human equality must follow empirical knowledge. You can’t just theorize about the human lot; you have to observe it as well. He saw how the English industrial revolution was using rationalism aided by practical science. Knowing how real machines work in a real world would be the English key to individual freedom. Voltaire took those ideas back to France. In Candide, he used a tactic called travel satire. Put a traveler in an alien culture whose logic exposes the folly of a familiar world. Voltaire went to London the same year Swift published Gulliver’s Travels. Swift’s mythical lands ridiculed English culture and demanded change. Armed with Newton’s use of empiricism, Voltaire did the same thing, even more bitingly, in Candide. He told us that if we looked with clear-eyed detachment at our own folly, we’d see that we do not live in the best of all possible worlds after all. Rather, we live in a world that can actually be improved….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Poverty 5 mins – “On the windswept Navajo Nation in northern Arizona, water often comes from unexpected places miles from people’s homes. Outside the community of Bird Springs, for instance, that place is a big pipe that looks like a giant hook sticking out of the red dirt. It’s where Sterling Begay comes to fill up big plastic barrels on the back of his truck. But even this water isn’t clean enough for people to drink. Sterling and Brennan Begay fill up water barrels for their livestock at a watering station in Bird Springs, Arizona. They have to travel even farther from their homes to get potable water for people. 40 percent of the residents of the Navajo Nation lack running water, in part because of uranium contamination from cold war mining. “Livestock and plants” is all it’s good for, Begay says. To get clean drinking water, many residents have to drive even farther, because much of the water in Navajo Nation is contaminated. From the 1940s to the 1980s, mining companies blasted nearly 4 million tons of uranium ore from Navajo land to make atomic weapons. Toward the end of the Cold War, the companies left, abandoning more than 500 mines. And over the decades, uranium from tailings piles leached into the groundwater near the mines, leaving 40 percent of Navajos in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah without access to water. LaTanya Dickson is among them. She and her family have to lug refillable three gallon jugs into the nearest town, 20 miles from her home across the region’s remote high desert, and pay 35 cents a gallon to fill them up. It’s an expensive and time-consuming trek that leaves Dickson very frustrated. “I think people should have clean water to their home no matter what,” she says. Five hundred miles away in Los Angeles, George McGraw thinks so too. He’s the founder and executive director of the nonprofit DIGDEEP….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Fighter Stories 27 mins – “Battling the “beast.” Firefighters tell their stories of what it’s like facing the flames in Fort McMurray.” At the link find the titl,e “Fort McMurray fire: Firefighters share stories from the frontlines, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160523_66506.mp3” and select “Sve Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfires History 48 mins – “Adrienne Lamb explores the factors altering how we have to live with wildfire. New technology and new ways to think about fire and its behaviour could save lives.” At the link find the title, “World On Fire, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160516_62377.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wolbachia Bacteria 12 mins – “Dengue is one of the world’s most devastating infectious diseases. Around half of the entire planet’s population is at risk from dengue infection, which can lead to excruciating joint pain, haemorrhaging and, eventually, death. There is no vaccine for dengue, so current efforts to stop its spread involve trying to control the mosquito that transmits it, Aedes aegypti. But this is by no means easy – Aedes aeygpti is notoriously resilient and extremely well adapted to urban environments. Which is why scientists in Australia are currently testing a new method of preventing dengue that could be revolutionary – using a strange group of bacteria called Wolbachia. We spoke to Professor Scott O’Neill, leader of the Eliminate Dengue programme, to find out more.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women Leaders 79 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “ROUNDTABLE: High-Powered Women Share Their Secrets”. At the link find and right-click the number 3712 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 237 – May 27, 2016: Abortion Laws, Adaptive Learning, Air Pollution from Farming, Animals Think, Benedict Arnold, Beyonce’s Lemonade, Bitcoin in China, Brown People, Cancer Patient, Carbon Footprint Controversies, Changing Minds, Chinese Food Safety, Citrus Concerns, Climate Activists, Climate Education, Climate Equity, Computers with People, Constitution Reconstruction, Corruption Control, Crowdsourcing Solutions, Cuban Internet, Cyber Threats, D. Watkins Author, Disabilities, Disaster Response Lessons, Distracted Driving, Drone Kills American, Drones in Medicine, Drug Prices, Experiment Quality, Fargo Stash Death, Food Security Dangers, Founding Fathers Concepts, Gap Year Trend, Ghana Gold Mining, GMO Science Panel, Hands and Fists, Human Genome, Immigrant Stories, Income Inequality, International Cooperation Benchmark, Investment Introduction, Irrational Behavior, Israel and Palestine, Journalists at the Front, Labels Impact, Learned Helplessness, LGBT, Life Expectations, Linux for Blind People, Lyme Disease, Making Money, Mentors, Monte Carlo Simulation, Motivation Explained, MtBE Additive Lawsuit, Native American Health, Night Vale Things Fall Apart, North Korea, Nuclear Power, Oil Curse, Oil Exploration, Orson Bean, Pit Bulls, Placebo Effect, Play Station VR, Police Shootings, Police Work, Political Demographics, Political Dissent, Racial Inequality, Recycling in Taiwan, Refugee Stories, Satellites, Science Communication, SEAL Team Work, Secret Service Agent, Sex Worker Laws, Shrimp Noise, Sleep, Social Justice, Solar Energy Opposition, STEMed, Supreme Court Discussion, Surveillance Impact, Sustainability Organization, Syria Higher Education, Teaching with Games, TED Founder, The Envoy Book, Trevor Noah, Uber Pricing, Unconscious Thinking, Voting Rights for Felons, Wildlife Photographer, WOOP Method, Work Rules, Writing Process

The best 104 podcasts from a larger group of 312 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 300 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Abortion Laws 52 mins – “Abortion may be legal in America, but conservative legislatures have been working for years to pass laws that restrict women’s access to it. Hundreds of those laws have been enacted this decade, and they’ve forced many abortion clinics to close their doors. In a new documentary, filmmaker Dawn Porter tells the stories of clinic workers and lawyers fighting the restrictions designed to regulate abortion out of existence. Porter’s film is called Trapped, and she joins us Tuesday to talk about it.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Adaptive Learning 49 mins – “Can new computer programs rid us of the cognitive errors that lead to learned helplessness in the classroom? In this episode Ulrik Christensen, senior fellow of digital learning at McGraw-Hill Education, explains how adaptive learning tools are changing the way teachers approach students, empowering educators to provide the kind of attention required to pass along mastery in areas where traditional approaches don’t seem to work.” At the link find the title, “053-Adaptive Learning – Ulrik Christensen,” right-click “Media files 053-Adaptive_Learning-Ulrik_Christensen.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Air Pollution from Farming 27 mins – “In some parts of the world, the worst types of particulate air pollution, the sort of thing that causes around 7 million deaths a year, are due not just to belching engines and factories, but to agriculture. And in certain parts of the world, agriculture causes more pollution than all other anthropogenic sources. This is suggested by a Susanne Bauer from the Earth Institute of Columbia University New York and colleagues in a paper this week published in Geophysical Research letters….” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animals Think 50 mins – “We humans have long thought of ourselves as superior to animals. We design tools. We have a sense of self. We understand past and future. It turns out, so do other species. A crow in England bent a straight wire to create a hook to extract food from a tube. A study of Asian elephants showed they can recognize themselves in a mirror. And chimps at a Dutch zoo correctly inferred from an empty box that a grapefruit treat was in their future. A new book by the prominent primatologist Frans de Waal challenges our notions of animal intelligence. Join guest host Susan Page for a discussion on how animals are much smarter than we think.” At the link you can listen, but not download however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Benedict Arnold 42 mins – “One of the most well-known stories in the American Revolution is the tale of Benedict Arnold and his infamous treason. Less well-known, however, is the close relationship he had with George Washington, and his heroism as an American general, leading the troops to victory at Saratoga. In a new book, historian Nathaniel Philbrick delves deep into the American Revolution, beginning just after the signing of the Declaration of Independence. He explores the motives of Benedict Arnold, his tragic relationship with George Washington and how America’s most famous traitor actually helped unite a young nation.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Benedict Arnold 52 mins – “…writer Nathaniel Philbrick joins us to talk about George Washington and his buddy Benedict Arnold. Arnold has long been regarded as the archetypal American traitor. But before he betrayed his country, he was actually one of Washington’s favorite and most trusted generals. In a new book, Philbrick examines the complicated relationship between the two men. Ultimately, he says, it’s about their different reactions to a dysfunctional Congress that was driven by self-righteous opportunism. Nathaniel Philbrick is the author numerous books, including In the Heart of the Sea, Why Read Moby Dick? and Mayflower. His new book is called Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beyonce’s Lemonade 18 mins – “Feminism, infidelity, alt rock, country music, and the gliteratti rumor mill all peek from the corners of Beyoncé’s new visual album, “Lemonade.” Host Dr. James Peterson discusses the music and imagery with film critic Miriam Bale. Bale wrote about the album for the Hollywood Reporter.” At the link find the title, “Beyoncé’s visual album ‘Lemonade’ proves that sisterhood is powerful, May, 2016, right-click “Media files lemonade-web.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin in China 58 mins – “Bobby Lee, the co-founder and CEO of leading Bitcoin financial platform BTCC, answers some of the most common questions about the cryptocurrency, explains how its value is set and why it is the perfect monetary system for the digital age. Lee also shares familiar lessons for entrepreneurs that he learned launching his first startup in China.” At the link find the title, “Why Bitcoin Makes Sense – Bobby Lee (BTCC), May, 2016,” right-click “Media files lee160511.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brown People 25 mins – “Author Kamal Al-Solaylee travelled to 10 countries to capture the experience of being brown. He concluded that a brown racial identity has been shaped by the cheap labour movement. His new book explores what being brown in today’s world means to everyone.” At the link find the title, “Author Kamal Al-Solaylee on how cheap labour shapes brown racial identity, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160517_52199.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Patient 40mins – “Dr Liz O’Riordan is a Consultant Oncoplastic Breast Surgeon in the UK. In 2015 she was diagnosed with the very illness she has spent her life treating and has chosen to chronicle her experiences in her truly wonderful blog liz.oriordan.co.uk . This episode is a truly special one as it touches on so many of the issues that we fear as physicians; seeing yourself as a patient with the disease you know so much about to the challenges of choosing your own doctor, when almost all of them are your friends of colleagues.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Research 52 mins – “Prostate Cancer (PC) is the most common male-specific form of cancer and the third most common form of cancer in the UK. Although cancer treatments are initially effective they become less effective and have significant disadvantages. Against this, there is an urgent need for better treatments. In this lecture, Dr Matthew Lloyd describes a number of different strategies to identify small molecules (‘drugs’) that can be used to stop the protein AMACR from working and therefore potentially be used to treat prostate cancer.” At the link find the title, “How new cancer treatments are developed, October, 2015”right-click “Media files 264387146-uniofbath-how-new-cancer-treatments-are-developed.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Footprint Controversies 59 mins – “Kip Andersen, Filmmaker, Cowspiracy and What the Health Nicolette Hahn Niman, Author, Defending Beef Jonathan Kaplan, Director, Food and Agriculture Program, National Resources Defense Council Are environmentalists afraid of stepping in cow dung? The documentary film Cowspiracy contends that large environmental groups are turning a blind eye to the harmful effects cattle have on ecosystems and human health. Environmentalists bristle at the charge and point to work promoting vegan and vegetarian diets and campaigns against factory farms and other aspects of the animal agriculture industry. The film, which was backed by Leonardo DiCaprio, presents “a sensationalist conspiracy where none exists,” according to Greenpeace executive Robin Oakley. However a growing number of environmentalists are praising cows and claim they can be climate healers rather than the villains they are often made out to be. They contend that a cow’s methane-rich burps can be offset if cattle grazing patterns are carefully managed. The result, they say, can be pretty landscapes and healthy soil that stores both carbon and water. Is that just spin from cattle ranchers? Does Cowspiracy use green groups as a foil to make a sensational film to generate buzz? A conversation about the future of an American icon in the age of climate disruption.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Changing Minds 71 mins – “Can you change a person’s mind on a divisive social issue? The latest science says…yes. But it will require two things: contact and disclosure. In this episode you’ll travel to Mississippi to see how professional mind changers are working to shift attitudes on LGBT rights, and you’ll learn how a man in Los Angeles conducted 12,000 conversations until he was able to perfect the most powerful version of contact possible. In one 22-minute chat, Dave Fleischer can change people’s minds on issues they’ve felt strongly about for decades, and change them forever.” At the link find the title, “048 – Contact, April, 2015 6:41,” right-click “Media files 048_Contact.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Food Safety 117 mins – “China’s food safety challenges are well known. Exposés of unsafe foods have become all too common, especially after the 2008 scandal over melamine-tainted milk. From gutter oil to fake eggs to contaminated strawberries, the long list of food safety incidents in China has alarmed domestic and international consumers alike. In October 2015, China enacted its revised Food Safety Law, which aims to strengthen the regulation of food companies and enhance oversight along the supply chain. As with other issues, the key challenge rests not in setting regulations, but rather in enforcing them. Addressing China’s food safety woes is essential for maintaining the health and confidence of a steadily urbanizing population, increasing the competitiveness of the country’s agricultural sector, and meeting the needs of all food companies doing business in or with China….” At the link right-click “Download(Help)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Citrus Concerns 48 mins – “’Citrus is a term applied to a variety of popular and nutritious fruits, including oranges, grapefruit, lemons and limes. Citrus breeders are tasked with improving the varieties, which takes decades. Still, great progress has been made in fruit improvement. However, over the last twenty years a disease called Huanglongbing, or “HLB” (also known as “citrus greening”) has emerged in the USA and threatens the citrus industry. Today the focus is how to grow improved citrus varieties that can survive this insidious disease. Dr. Fred Gmitter is a seasoned citrus breeder that has produced improved fruit varieties, but also is working to identify new varieties to combat HLB.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Activists 59 mins – “Radical protesters Tim DeChristopher and Georgia Hirsty put the “active” in “activism.” But is civil disobedience the best way to effect real change?” (3 guests) At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change in California 59 mins – “Sam Liccardo, Mayor, San Jose Libby Schaaf, Mayor, Oakland Phil Ting, California State Assemblymember (D-19) Three political heavyweights from the Bay Area will discuss what needs to be done to protect the region from rising tides and temperatures. The June ballot in all nine counties includes Measure AA, which would charge property owners $12 apiece to restore wetlands safeguarding Silicon Valley and beyond. The Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association says the measure is unnecessary. The Silicon Valley Leadership Group and elected officials say it is insurance against rising tides that threaten tech campuses near the Bay. What else are cities and counties doing to prepare for floods, droughts and other severe weather happening in the Bay Area with increasing intensity and frequency? Be part of the conversation with a chance to ask your own questions of these Bay Area leaders.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Issues 73 mins – Panel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “CLIMATE SERIES:Theories & Myths of Climate Change” At the link find and right-click the number 2466 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Education 59 mins – “Increasingly, we understand how the issue of climate change is actually a youth issue. It is they who will inherit the changed planet, and it is they will be tasked with cleaning it up. On the weekend of Earth Day, Climate One will host an exciting, multi-part event exploring how this is changing the landscape for young adults. At “Learning Green and Earning Green,” we will discuss careers available to young professionals looking to have an impact and how education is changing to support that….Part I: Learning Green Giana Amador, Research Analyst, Center for Carbon Removal Minda Berbeco, Programs and Policy Director, National Center for Science Education Ryan Condesa, Action Fellow, Alliance for Climate Education Luis Martinez, Student Activist, TEEM Alex Zwissler, Principal, Einstellung Labs; Board Member, Cool the Earth In our first conversation, we will discuss how doctors, teachers and parents are framing climate change as a children’s issue. The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement saying children’s health will be disproportionately affected by climate. The California Parent-Teacher Association is raising its voice about carbon risk and the Boy Scouts are teaching kids about sustainability. We’ll explore how educators and students are increasingly making climate a youth issue. Students on Ice Climate Scholarship…..” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Equity 59 mins – “Communities of color are most affected by pollution, yet they’ve been overlooked by the green movement. How can we ensure environmental justice for all?” (3 guests) At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Impact 59 mins – “Rachel Morello, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy and Management, UC Berkeley School of Public Health Linda Rudolph, Director, Center for Climate Change and Health, Public Health Institute The reframing of cigarette smoke as a public health issue was a turning point in the tobacco wars. Can the same happen with climate change? Rising temperatures are implicated in recent health risks from the Zika virus to the algae blooms creating toxic soup in the Great Lakes and Pacific Ocean. Outdoor workers and poor people are especially at risk from severe heat, mosquitoes and illnesses that thrive in warmer conditions. Already, the atmosphere has warmed about one degree celsius from pre-industrial times. That doesn’t sound like much, but one degree can have a big impact on the planet and people. And we are on a path to temperature increases of at least two degrees. A study on the Climate Gap co-authored by Rachel Morello found that climate disruption is already hurting the health of Californians living in low-income communities. What is the outlook for public health in a warming world? Is California and the Bay Area prepared to deal with the medical impacts of a hot and crowded world? Join us for a conversation about how burning fossil fuels could impact your personal well-being and what you can do to protect yourself.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computers with People 46 mins – “Frankly, the answer is probably. Nearly half of all working Americans could risk losing their jobs because of technology. It’s not only blue-collar jobs at stake. Millions of educated knowledge workers—writers, paralegals, assistants, medical technicians—are threatened by accelerating advances in artificial intelligence. mart computers are demonstrating they are capable of making better decisions than humans. Brilliant technologies can now decide, learn, predict, and even comprehend much faster and more accurately than the human brain, and their progress is accelerating. Where will this leave lawyers, nurses, teachers, and editors? This week we speak with Tom Davenport as we discuss these issues and his new book, Only Humans Need Apply: Winners and Losers in the Age of Smart Machines. You will hearvhow Tom actually reframes vthe conversation about automation, arguing that the future of increased productivity and business success isn’t either human or machine. It’s both. The key is augmentation, utilizing technology to help humans work better, smarter, and faster. Instead of viewing these machines as competitive interlopers, we can see them as partners and collaborators in creative problem solving as we move into the next era. The choice is ours.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constitution Reconstruction 42 mins – “Each branch of the federal government has strayed from its original purpose and no candidate for president will be able to fix the underlying issues that plague it. Governor Abbott makes his case for proposing a Convention of States to make amendments to restore constitutional order.” At the link find the title, “The Texas Plan with Governor Greg Abbott, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files UK-Abbott-20160502.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption Control 20 mins – “Government corruption costs the global economy a staggering $1 trillion. Given the number of corrupt governments stealing from their own people, should there be an international anti-corruption court?” At the link find the title, “Can an international court stamp out government corruption? May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160516_62844.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crowdsourcing Solutions 4 mins – “In 2006, Netflix had both a solution and a problem. At issue was the question of video ratings. Based on a person’s ratings of past videos, what would be her rating for, say, The Sound of Music or The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy? The better the predictions, the better the recommendations Netflix could make. The solution came in the form of Cinematch, an algorithm developed by a team at Netflix. The problem was that they weren’t sure if there was a better algorithm. After all, there were limitless ways to predict rankings. Had the team chosen the best? So Netflix took an innovative step. The company posted an online challenge asking the world if someone could better the Cinematch predictions by ten percent. A prize of one million dollars would go to the first team, if any, that could achieve this goal. The company posted historical data online and waited for responses. Netflix had struck a chord. The idea of posting a challenge was so creative it quickly caught on, with other companies posting their own challenges. Soon, websites emerged for the sole purpose of hosting these challenges….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Internet 65 mins – “What is it like to use the Internet in fits and starts? How do communities with limited access to the global Internet use digital tools? Beyond sensational media narratives about Havana’s WiFi hotspots and the paquete semanal, there is a complex landscape of Internet access, digital media use and open source software development in Cuba. In this talk Ellery Biddle — Advocacy Director for Global Voices and Berkman Fellow — offers a primer on Cuba’s digital culture and critique of Western political narratives surrounding technology, freedom and empowerment as they apply in the Cuban context.” At the link right-click “Download the MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Threats 74 minsPanel discussion with two guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Foreign Hackers Will pwnour Country”” At the link find and right-click the number 2468 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

D. Watkins, Author 47 mins – “Baltimore Author On ‘Living (And Dying) While Black’ – Author D. Watkins says that crack destroyed his East Baltimore neighborhood, and he explains how the real day-to-day of selling drugs is nothing like the movies. David Edelstein reviews ‘Love & Friendship,’ adapted from a Jane Austen novel. We remember poet Michael S. Harper.” At the link click the circle with there dots, then right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabilities 80 mins – Panel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Disability or Ability?” At the link find and right-click the number 2768 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Response Lessons 79 mins – Panel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled,International Disaster Response” At the link find and right-click the number 2318 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Distracted Driving 47 mins – “Distracted driving is a huge, dangerous, and growing problem. We text, we eat, we crash. We look for new solutions to get drivers to keep their eyes on the road.Look around on the road these days and sometimes you’re the only one with your head up. Everybody’s nose buried in a smartphone. Texting. Dialing. We get it. Humans love to communicate. But distracted driving is becoming an epidemic problem. Vehicle fatalities have seen their largest spike in 50 years. What’s to be done while we wait for self-driving cars and even automakers embrace connectivity? Screens on board. This hour On Point: We text, we crash. What do we do about it?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Kills American 48 mins – “Paul Kennedy in conversation with author and New York Times journalist Scott Shane about his Gelber Prize winning book “Objective Troy: A Terrorist, A President, and the Rise of the Drone” At the link find the title, “Objective Troy – Scott Shane, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160511_61250.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drones in Medicine 25 mins – “Can drones save lives? That’s the latest question as innovators design flying robots to deliver medicine to remote parts of Canada and the world. But new technology brings with it new risks and new ethical questions.” At the link find the title, “Drones deliver possibility of better health care to remote parts of Canada, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160520_47553.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Prices 57 mins – “As health care costs overall have continued to rise, medicines are driving a good share of that trend. We’ll look at some of the factors at play, including advertising, patents, and government programs and regulations — also, plans underway on Capitol Hill to address the issue.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Experiment Quality 74 mins – Panel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Irreproducible Scientific Results” At the link find and right-click the number 2616 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fargo Stash Death 19 mins – “Documentarian Paul Berczeller examines the case of Takako Konishi, who died in a frozen forest on the North Dakota/Minnesota border looking for the fictional treasure from the Coen Brother’s film Fargo. Be sure to check out Paul’s documentary about Takako’s journey, This is A True Story. Also, be sure to check out the new feature film by the David and Nathan Zellner inspired by Takako’s story, Kumiko: The Treasure Hunter.At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Security Dangers 76 mins – Panel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled,Food Security & the Transformation of Rural America” At the link find and right-click the number 2313 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Founding Fathers Concepts 62 mins – Panel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled,What Would the Founding Fathers Do?” At the link find and right-click the number 2463 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gap Year Trend 46 mins – “Malia Obama will take a gap year before college. Did you? Should you? What it takes to have a good gap year. Plus, why millennials aren’t giving up dorm livin`tg after graduation.So, Malia Obama is taking a gap year before she heads off to college in 2017. Good for her. After all those years in the White House, she may need to get out and about. A lot of American high school grads and their families apparently now feel the same. The numbers taking a gap year are headed up and up. Time to see, explore, work, mature. Is it just a treat for the well-off? Is it the experience that makes everything else better? This hour On Point: What makes a good gap year? At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ghana Gold Mining 27 mins – “Illegal miners have invaded three Ghanaian gold mines in recent months. We visit the largest where some locals are claiming that the land is rightfully theirs. The multinational owners disagree, and are demanding the military force them off their concession. For its part, the government has remained largely silent, until now. Ed Butler visits the mine and speaks to all sides in a dispute that could have big implications for Ghana’s economy and security.” At the link find the title, “Ghana: The Obuasi Stand-Off, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03vjvlv.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Science Panel 77 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “What Science Says About GMOs” At the link find and right-click the number 2762 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hands and Fists 52 mins – “For biologist David Carrier, the study of human evolution is both a question of science and of philosophy. For centuries, thinkers have debated whether humans are innately good or if their good behavior can be chalked up to good governance. Carrier’s research suggests the latter is true. Evolution, he says, has armed us with tools of extreme violence. It’s also provided us the capacity for profound empathy and cooperation. Carrier joins us Wednesday to discuss his work and its implications. David Carrier is a professor of biology at the University of Utah, where his research is focused on better understanding how biomechanics has influenced the vertebrate evolution.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Stories 74 mins – Panel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled,Door Open/Door Closed: The Immigrant Experience in America” At the link find and right-click the number 2315 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Income Inequality 58 mins – “Don Watkins discusses income inequality and argues that a minimum wage is harmful to the individuals it proposes to help. He is interviewed by Diana Furchtgott-Roth of the Manhattan Institute.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Don Watkins, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436925.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

International Cooperation Benchmark 65 mins – “Experts discuss the mounting challenges to international cooperation today, and the launch of the Council of Councils (CoC) Report Card on International Cooperation, which evaluates multilateral efforts to address pressing global dilemmas, including nuclear proliferation, transnational terrorism, climate change, pandemic disease, mass migration, financial volatility, and cybercrime. This Report Card surveyed the Council of Councils, a CFR initiative connecting leading foreign policy institutes from twenty-six countries around the world, to provide a benchmark measure of international cooperation year after year, and to help policymakers prioritize among today’s critical issues. The event will present the findings of the 2016 Report Card and discuss implications for global cooperation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Introduction 41 mins – “Learn what you can do to increase your investment returns and peace of mind, as Paul presents, “Habits and Attitudes of Successful Investors,” from the 2016 RetireMeet Conference in Bellevue, WA. Also available as video on homepage.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Irrational Behavior 70 mins – “How far back can we trace our irrational behaviors and cognitive biases? Evolutionarily speaking, why do we even do these things? Can we blame our faulty logic on our cultures and institutions, or should we blame it on our biology and our genetic inheritance? Our guest on this episode is psychologist Laurie Santos who has created a novel approach to solving these questions – a marketplace where monkeys learn how to use money just like humans, and where they also tend to make the same kind of mistakes we do.” At the link find the title, “040 – Monkey Marketplace – Laurie Santos, January, 2015,” right-click “Media files 040 – Monkey Marketplace – Laurie Santos” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Israel and Palestine 74 mins – Panel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled,” Our Relationships with Israel & Palestine” At the link find and right-click the number 2614 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalists at the Front 52 mins – “It has been five years since civil war erupted in Syria. Hundreds of thousands have been killed. More than four million refugees have fled into neighboring countries — creating a crisis that has engulfed Europe. Janine di Giovanni, the Middle East editor for Newsweek, was embedded with the Syrian army. She says reporting on the war in Syria is unlike any other conflict she’s ever covered. And she has reported from dozens of war zones, including Bosnia, Iraq, and Somalia. Guest host Susan Page talks with di Giovanni about the brutal reality of the daily lives of Syrians.” At the link you can listen, but not download however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Labels Impact 48 mins – “What are the subconscious, invisible, involuntary ways that labels affect the way we think, feel, and behave? Listen as Adam Alter, author of Drunk Tank Pink, explains how labels affect every way in which we interact as human beings.” At the link find the title, “029 – Labels – Adam Alter,” right-click “Media files 029-Labels-Adam_Alter_1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Learned Helplessness 48 mins – “Stuck in a bad situation, even when the prison doors are left wide open, we sometimes refuse to attempt escape. Why is that? In this episode learn all about the strange phenomenon of learned helplessness and how it keeps people in bad jobs, poor health, terrible relationships, and awful circumstances despite how easy it might be to escape any one of those scenarios with just one more effort. In the episode, you’ll learn how to defeat this psychological trap with advice from psychologists Jennifer Welbourne, who studies attributional styles in the workplace, and Kym Bennett who studies the effects of pessimism on health.” At the link find the title, “052 – Learned Helplessness,” right-click “Media files 052-Learned_Helplessness.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

LGBT 75 mins – Panel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “ABCs of LGBTQ” At the link find and right-click the number 2769 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Life Expectations 47 mins- “How long are you likely to live in America? And why? We’ll look at race, gender, money- and American lifespans now. If time on Earth matters, life span matters. And American life expectancy is in motion. Overall, an American newborn’s life expectancy is 79.7 years. But there is a lot of variation. Rich now living much longer than poor. Blacks narrowing the life expectancy gap with whites. Middle class whites in trouble. This hour On Point: We’re looking at who lives how long, and why.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linux for Blind People 90 mins – “Ever wonder what it’s like to work on a Linux distribution? We discuss that, and much, much more in our interview with Kendell Clark, one of the three developers of Sonar/GNU Linux. Sonar is a Linux distribution focused on assistive technology trying to give the best experience for everyone that depends on accessible software….” At the link find the title, “Going Linux 299 · Assistive Technology,” right-click “Media files glp299.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lyme Disease 57 mins – “With the lilacs every spring comes an unwelcome harbinger of the season: black-legged ticks. And with New Hampshire near the top of the list of states with the highest incidence of Lyme disease, Granite Staters take this tiny arachnid seriously. We’ll find out what’s new this season in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention when it comes to this tick-borne illness. Lyme disease is the most commonly reported tickborne disease, with over 1,000 cases reported each year in N.H. The annual incidence of Lyme disease is highest among the 5-14 year age group.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Making Money 34 mins – “…It’s okay to talk about money. At least it is on this show. SuChin Pak searches for answers about why money is so universally thrilling, confusing, powerful, and stressful — no matter how much, or how little, you have. Created in partnership with Umpqua Bank, the West Coast’s largest, and most unconventional, community bank. – SuChin Pak talks with Lena Waithe & Ravi Patel about first paychecks, the art of negotiating, personal branding and what matters way more than money.” At the link find the title, “Will Work For Work : Ravi Patel & Lena Waithe, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files PNC4024470635.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Facilities Abuse 53 mins – “Find out what’s happened since we first told you about 40 years of alleged abuse and neglect of people with disabilities at specialty rehab centers across the U.S. We teamed up with New Hampshire Public Radio health and science reporter Jack Rodolico to unveil how these for-profit facilities thrived on public dollars with little oversight.” At the link find the title, “Update: A mountain of misconduct, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files Update-A-mountain-of-misconduct_podcast-master.mp3” nd select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mentors 76 mins – Panel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled,”Corporations have Mentors, Startups have Heroes At the link find and right-click the number 2166 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monte Carlo Simulation 56 mins – “In this inaugural lecture, Professor Nigel Wilding explores the computer simulation of changes of state in models for atoms and complex molecules. Predicting the phase behaviour of a material is a central goal of condensed matter science, and a pre-requisite for designing new materials with tailored or novel phase behaviour. Professor Wilding’s lecture outlined how computer simulation of phase behaviour now stands shoulder-to-shoulder with traditional approaches of experimental and analytical theory. He talk focuses on one particularly powerful and flexible computational technique called ‘Monte Carlo simulation’.” At the link find the title, “Professor Nigel Wilding inaugural lecture: Monte Carlo or bust: smart simulation for serious science, May, 2016” right-click “Media files 264392138-uniofbath-professor-nigel-wilding-inaugural-lecture-monte-carlo-or-bust-smart-simulation-for-serious-science.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Motivation Explained 73 mins – “What motivates you to keep going, to reach for your dreams, to persist and endure? Psychology has, over the last 40 years, learned a great deal about human motivation and drive. In this episode we ask Daniel Pink, author of Drive, how we can better put that knowledge to use in our lives and in our workplaces and institutions.” At the link find the title, “037 – Motivation – Daniel Pink,” right-click “Media files 037-Motivation_-_Daniel_Pink.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MtBE Additive Lawsuit 5 mins – “The United States Supreme Court has rejected ExxonMobil’s appeal of a $236 million verdict in a case brought against the oil company by the state of New Hampshire. The legal battle began more than a decade ago when the state Attorney General sued 22 oil companies for using a chemical called MtBE, which can contaminate soil and drinking water….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Native American Health Care 25 mins – “Native Americans have some of the highest rates of suicide, alcoholism, diabetes and maternal mortality in the country. And while the federal government passed the Indian Healthcare Improvement Act back in 1976 to make their care a priority, it spends just $3,000 a year caring for each Native patient. (We spend twice that on health care for every prisoner.) Dr. Adrienne Laverdure and Dr. Ken Bernard, two Native American doctors, know this first hand. The mother and son are both Chippewa Indians from North Dakota, and they’re part of the Indian Health Service (IHS), the federal agency that provides health care to all Native people in the U.S….” At the link click the three dots in a circle, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Night Vale 27 mins – “Things fall apart. Weather: “Palestine” by Sam Baker, featuring Carrie Elkin (sambakermusic.com) The voices of the automated phone tree were Erica Livingston & Christopher Loar. The voice of Carlos was Dylan Marron. The voice of Sheriff Sam was Emma Frankland. The voice of Michelle Nguyen was Kate Jones. The voice of Intern Maureen was Maureen Johnson. New Books: Night Vale Podcast Episodes, Volumes 1 & 2 now available for pre-order Plus…Welcome to Night Vale: The Novel. welcometonightvale.com… Written by Joseph Fink & Jeffrey Cranor. Narrated by Cecil Baldwin. More Info: welcometonightvale.com, and follow @NightValeRadio on Twitter or Facebook.” At the link find the title, “88 – Things Fall Apart, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files 8820-20Things20Fall20Apart.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Arrest 25 mins – “American pastor speaks about his experience of 735 days in captivity.” At the link find the title, “Kenneth Bae on life in North Korean labour camp, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160519_80343.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Politics 47 mins – “For the first time in 36 years, North Korea’s ruling political elite gather in Pyongyang for the Workers’ Party Congress. We’ll take you there. North Korea does not open its doors often. And when it does, it does not open them very far. But right now, there is a big crew of foreign reporters in North Korea for a big, rare Communist Party congress. More reporting power focused on the country than we’ve seen in a long time. What do they see? We’ll get the latest from Pyongyang this hour. On the secretive, bellicose, nuclear-armed country that keeps firing its missiles further and further.” At the link right-click “Donwload this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Power 59 mins – “With many of America’s first nuclear power plants nearing the end of their expected lifespan, should they be shut down or given a new lease on life? In recent years the licenses have been extended on many nuclear plants while a few have shut down. There is a lively debate over whether California should shutter the Diablo Canyon nuclear plant. If it does close, would its electricity be replaced by clean or fossil fuels? A new generation of nuclear entrepreneurs are striving to write a new atomic chapter. Startups in the Bay Area and elsewhere aim to address the three vulnerabilities of nuclear power: high costs, radioactive waste and nuclear proliferation. One concept getting a lot of attention is small nuclear reactors that would be manufactured like other industrial equipment rather than custom-built. Oklo aims to build nuclear batteries about the size of a cargo container for use in remote locations. Can these young companies bring innovation to an industry known more for cost overruns and lumbering giants? Are investors crazy for betting against the power and falling costs of the sun?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Curse 65 mins – “Should the United States allow its citizens to buy oil from countries run by bad men? Is this a case where morality trumps the usual case for free trade? Leif Wenar, professor of philosophy at King’s College, London and author of Blood Oil, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the morality of buying resources from countries that use the resulting revenue to oppress their citizens. Based on the ideas in his book, Wenar argues that in many cases, importing oil is equivalent to buying stolen goods where the low prices cannot justify the purchase. The conversation discusses the possible outcomes from banning foreign oil from tyrannical regimes along with the resource curse and the case for fair trade.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Exploration 27 mins – “Dave Steele spent 30 years as an employee of Shell Oil, having spent many years searching for hydrocarbon sources across the globe. He talks to us about the conventional ways of drilling for oil and the unconventional methods, which include hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking.” Is there an advantage or disadvantage to each method? Plus, he explains why the price of oil is mostly driven by global politics, not by supply & demand.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Orson Bean 67 mins – “Actor, comedian and raconteur Orson Bean is perhaps best known as a longtime game show fixture and frequent guest on talk shows, but he also appeared on Broadway and in popular films such as “Anatomy of a Murder” and “Being John Malkovich,” working alongside icons like Boris Karloff, Helen Hayes, Jimmy Stewart, Phil Silvers and Dustin Hoffman. Gilbert and Frank also talk to Orson about his years on the Hollywood blacklist, his friendship with Stan Laurel, his fondness for Ed Sullivan and his personal correspondence with Groucho Marx. PLUS: John McGiver returns! Jack Paar takes a powder! Will Jordan does Sabu! Jack Klugman nails Willy Loman! And Jayne Mansfield upstages Walter Matthau!” At the link find the title, “#103: Orson Bean, May, 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/3346778/e752c087-c08a-40b5-855a-b750ec31c227.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pit Bulls 30 mins – “Author Bronwen Dickey says the idea of pit bulls as predators is based on myth and misinformation. In the early Hollywood era, Dickey says, the dogs were often chosen to appear in comedies.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Placebo Effect 67 mins – “In this episode we learn about the placebo effect and how research continues to unravel the mysteries behind it and how it affects our behaviors. Our guest is Kristi Erdal whose latest research discovered a new psychological phenomeon now known as placebo sleep. After the interview, I eat a white chocolate Oreo cookie and discuss a new study into how the eccentricity of artists affects our perceptions of their art.” At the link find the title, “019 – The Placebo Effect – Kristi Erdal,” right-click “Media files 019-The_Placebo_Effect-Kristi_Erdal.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Play Station VR 54 mins – “Richard Marks is the senior research engineer at PlayStation. Richard has always worked at Sony specifically on the human interaction and control for the PlayStation. He heads the PlayStation Magic Lab to create new experiences for user. Richard gives Leo a behind the scene in the development of Sony’s latest VR hardware.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click”audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Shootings 69 mins – Panel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled,Police Shootings: When the “Perfect Storm” is the Perfect Police Cop-Out” At the link find and right-click the number 2462 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Work 48 mins – “Former NYC Cop On ‘The Job – Retired New York City police officer Steve Osborne shares stories including chasing a robber into a train tunnel and breaking up a knife fight. “Your heart is pounding; your adrenaline is shooting out of your ears,” he says. “And you got one second to get it right.” Over his 20 years of duty he never fired his gun. His memoir, ‘The Job,’ is now out in paperback. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews ‘Perfection’ from power trio David Murray, Gerri Allen, and Terri Lyne Carrington. Film critic David Edelstein reviews ‘Captain America: Civil War.’” At the link click the circle with there dots, then right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Demographics 67 mins – “The U.S. population has fundamentally changed, says Steve Phillips, and a new American voting majority has been created by progressive people of color along with progressive white voters. Philips says these two groups make up 51 percent of all eligible voters in America, and that majority is growing larger every day. By failing to properly appreciate this reality, progressives are at risk of missing this moment in history—and losing. Phillips’ new book is a searing indictment of the Democratic Party’s practice of courting white swing voters and a discussion of how America’s changed demographics have revolutionary implications for U.S. politics in 2016 and beyond. A leader in national politics for 30 years, Steve Phillips has had a front-row seat to these extraordinary political changes. He grew up in Cleveland, Ohio, and attended Stanford University, where he was a leader in the anti-apartheid and multicultural education movements. He was elected to the San Francisco Board of Education at age 28, becoming the youngest elected official in the history of San Francisco, and serving on the board for eight years, including one year as its president. He is the founder and chairman of PowerPAC+, a social justice political network that was the first national group to back Senator Cory Booker and California Attorney General Kamala Harris.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Dissent 46 mins – “The raucous politics at the very beginning of the American Republic, and what we have now. Stephen Solomon, author of the new book Revolutionary Dissent joins us. You look at the campaign in 2016 and sometimes the craziness on the campaign trail seems like it could not be any worse. The taunts, the slurs, the body parts. Big hands, little hands, little whatevers. But look back, says my guest today, historian Stephen Solomon. Back to the origins of the country. To Revolutionary War days and before. American political discourse and dissent in the time of the founders was wicked, rugged, wild. This hour On Point: rough politics at the birth of America.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racial Inequality 79 mins – Panel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, ”Who is Not at the Power Table?” At the link find and right-click the number 2167 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recycling in Taiwan 19 mins – “’Für Elise is one of the world’s most widely-recognized pieces of music. The Beethoven melody has been played by pianists the world over, and its near-universal recognition has been used to attract customers for companies as big as McDonald’s and as small as your local ice-cream truck. But if you hear the song playing on the streets of Taiwan, accompanied by the low grumble of an engine, the only ice-cream you’ll find if you follow the tune will be the soupy remains of a neighbor’s Häagen-Dazs. In Taiwan, “Für Elise” means it is time to take out your trash. Directly out to the truck. Yourself.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Stories 48 mins – “As the political atmosphere grows more hostile to the refugees who Angela Merkel famously welcomed in autumn 2015, five families continue with their attempts to settle in Berlin. Presenter Amy Zayed, follows their struggles with German bureaucracy.” At the link find the title,”Die Klassen – Health and Family, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03v22vp.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Satellites 83 mins – “Planet Labs is building small, inexpensive satellites, mostly from consumer-style components, for large-scale, continuous earth observation purposes. As a silicon valley startup, they pride themselves in doing things differently than then “big aerospace companies”. In this episode, I am talking with Ignacio Zuleta and Creon Levit about small satellites, satellite constellations, phones, optics and earth observation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Communication 58 mins – “I recently collaborated with Joe Hanson of the YouTube channel It’s Okay to be Smart and helped him write an episode about pattern recognition. I thought it would be great to bring him on the show and interview him in an episode all about the new science communicators. We learn what it is like to be part of the new wave of science communication, talk about science literacy, and discuss the ramifications of rubbing a beard with an infected chicken before conducting lab work. After the interview, I discuss a study about the difference between dogma and belief superiority, and how it helps explain why some politicians will never compromise.” At the link find the title, “027 – Science Communication – Joe Hanson,” right-click “Media files 027-Science_Communication-Joe_Hanson.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

SEAL Team Work 24 mins – “In March 2013, the man who shot and killed Osama bin Laden came forward to tell his story for the first time in “The Shooter,” by Phil Bronstein. It is a report of the celebrated mission by turns captivating, astonishing, and visceral, but also heart-breaking: The shooter decided to break his silence because, now a civilian, he feared for the safety of his family, was concerned about a life without a safety net, and he wanted to shine a light on a little-known and worrisome aspect of Special Forces service. Bronstein, the executive chair of the Center for Investigative Reporting, joins host David Brancaccio to discuss why the shooter decided to finally emerge and what he’s doing now.” At the link find the title, “The Shooter, by Phil Bronstein, May, 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13153/3349205/The-Shooter-by-Phil-Bronstein.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Secret Service Agent 58 mins – “Former Secret Service agent Clint Hill talks about his new memoir, “Five Presidents: My Extraordinary Journey with Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, and Ford,” which chronicles an eventful career that witnessed history up close.” At the link find the title, “Protecting the President, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files IM_20160507.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Worker Laws 56 mins – “When Amnesty International last year called for the decriminalization of the global sex trade, reaction from all sides was swift and passionate. Those in agreement argued this kind of policy serves to protect sex workers the world over. On the other side: the voices of those who called it a monumental mistake, allowing criminal and exploitative practices against women who may have no way out of the sex trade. As the debate has grown, new reporting is underscoring the deep ideological divide that has emerged between feminists on either side of this issue. We look at the debate over decriminalizing prostitution.” (5 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Shrimp Noise 38 mins – “Today’s story is a mystery, shockingly hot, and vanishingly tiny. It starts with a sound, rising like a mist from the marsh, around a dock in South Carolina. But where it goes next – from submarines to superheroes (and yes, Keanu Reeves!); from the surface of the sun to the middle of the brain – is far from expected. Producer Molly Webster brings her family along for the ride. Enjoy the adventure, before it…implodes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep 67 mins – “Why do we sleep and why do we dream? Despite the fact that every human being spends roughly 1/3 of his or her life asleep, science has yet to crack the mystery of the phenomenon. Why do we sleep and dream? The answer for now is…we don’t know. To learn more, we interview psychologist Richard Wiseman who has written a new book on sleep and dreaming that promises to help you get the most out of both based on what science has learned so far.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Sleep.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Justice 26 mins – “Longtime social worker, Deena Mandell says working outside the legal system is necessary for social justice. She argues until oppressive systems change, subversion and extra-legal action may be the only way to help people who are vulnerable.” At the link find the title, “Social workers have a duty to skirt edge of the law, says author, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160518_68989.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Energy Opposition 60 mins – “Who is trying to kill solar power in America? As energy activist Nancy LaPlaca reveals, state-by-state fossil fuels companies are trying to stop competition from safe renewable power. Then we look at developing court evidence in Canada – that fracking for gas and oil IS polluting drinking water. Veteran Canadian investigative journalist Andrew Nikiforuk fills in this key part of the shadows of fracking. We’ll wind up with part of my on-going conversation with permaculture guru Albert Bates: why is the worst news more popular than the best solutions? Radio “ At the link right-click the down-pointing-arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

STEM Education Future 92 mins – “On May 9, the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence (21CSI) at Brookings hosted NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and Dean Kamen, founder of FIRST, for a discussion of the future of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education in America. With increasingly complex problems emerging throughout government and with economic competitiveness at the fore of so many public debates, STEM education has the potential to deliver mission success and continued prosperity. But questions remain about how STEM programs should be implemented and which skills should be promoted and where. As leaders in areas of the public and private sectors that rely heavily on STEM-related skills and knowledge, Bolden and Kamen spoke to the state of STEM education across the country, why making it a national priority is critical, and how educators and policymakers can better promote STEM in the nation’s future workforce. John Allen, senior fellow and co-director of 21CSI, moderated discussion.” At the link right-click “Download(Help)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Discussion 73 mins – Panel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Full Court Press: 2016 Supreme Court Docket” At the link find and right-click the number 2765 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Impact 12 mins – “The effects of surveillance on human behavior have long been discussed and documented in the real world. That nervous feeling you get when you notice a police officer or a security camera? The one that forces you to straighten up and be on your best behavior, even if you’re doing nothing wrong? It’s quite common. The sense of being monitored can cause you to quit engaging in activities that are perfectly legal, even desirable, too. It’s a kind of “chilling effect.” And it turns out it even happens online. Researcher Jon Penney wanted to know how the feeling of being watched or judged online might affect Internet users’ behavior. Does knowledge of the NSA’s surveillance programs affect whether people feel comfortable looking at articles on terrorism? Do threats of copyright law retaliation make people less likely to publish blog posts? Penney’s research showed that, yes, the chilling effect has hit the web. On today’s podcast we talk about how he did his research, and why chilling effects are problematic for free speech and civil society.” At the link right-click “…or download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainability Organization 79 mins – Panel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled,Rethinking Attitudes toward Sustainability” At the link find and right-click the number 2314 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syria Higher Education 84 mins – “The war in Syria has generated the 21st century’s worst humanitarian crisis, with as many as 300,000 Syrians killed and half the population displaced. This violence and insecurity has also had a devastating impact on professors, university students, and the country’s education sector, exemplifying the consequences when scholars are targeted. Before the conflict, Syria boasted one of the Middle East’s largest and most well-established higher education systems. War, however, has decimated the university system inside the country, and amongst the refugees are an estimated 2,000 university professionals and a minimum of 100,000 university-qualified students. On May 17, the Center for Universal Education at Brookings hosted a panel discussion to explore the frequently overlooked impact of the Syrian crisis, and the broader political and security implications on higher education in conflict settings. The panel also highlighted the Institute for International Education’s Scholar Rescue Fund, which supports visiting appointments for threatened scholars worldwide, as well as perspectives from a Syrian beneficiary of the fund.” At the link right-click “Download(Help)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teaching with Games 80 mins – Panel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled,Gamification & Innovative Teaching” At the link find and right-click the number 2169 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

TED Founder 65 mins – “Chris Anderson, TED Curator; Author, TED Talks: The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking Jenny Dearborn, Chief Learning Officer, SAP—Moderator What makes a great speech? Anderson shares his unique public speaking philosophy about creating carefully crafted talks. Learn more helpful dos and don’ts from the man who has worked with everyone, including Bill Gates, Arianna Huffington, social activists, and Nobel Prize Winners.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

The Envoy Book 60 mins – “Zalmay Khalilzad, former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan, Iraq, and the United Nations, discusses his memoir, [The Envoy: From Kabul to the White House, My Journey Through a Turbulent World].” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Zalmay Khalilzad, May , 2016,” right-click “Media files program.437783.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trevor Noah 46 mins – “The Daily Show’s Trevor Noah is with us talking pointed comedy and the challenges of taking over from Jon Stewart.Seven months ago, multiracial South African comedian Trevor Noah took over the Daily Show. Jon Stewart said his goodbyes, grew a beard and took off. This week, Jon Stewart is back in the news, calling Donald Trump a “man-baby.” And Trevor Noah is with us, talking about moving into one of the biggest seats in American politics. The kid from Soweto, in the thick of it. This hour On Point: a conversation with Daily Show host Trevor Noah.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uber Pricing 30 mins – “Uber is built on the scourge of surge. When demand is high, the company charges two, three, even NINE-POINT-NINE times as much as normal for a ride. Riders hate it . . . but not so much that they stop riding. Yep, “dynamic pricing” has helped the company to grow into one of the largest taxi services in the world. What’s the psychology behind it? Shankar sits down with Uber’s Head of Economic Research Keith Chen to talk about when we’re most likely pay for surge, when we hate it the most, and why monkeys would probably act and feel the same way. That’s right. Monkeys.” At the link find the title, “Episode 31: Your Brain on Uber, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160516_hiddenbrain_uber.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Unconscious Thinking 68 mins – “Is it possible to for different parts of your mind to learn how the world works at different rates? Is it possible that the unconscious part of you can know something long before the conscious you realizes it? Learn more about the weirdness of the unconscious mind as we interview Ryan Scott, a cognitive psychologist who has discovered a new phenomenon that suggests you can have unconscious knowledge about something and fail to realize it until it is too late – something he calls blind insight.” At the link find the title, “039 – Blind Insight – Ryan Scott” right-click “Media files 039-Blind_Insight-Ryan_Scott.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Rights for Felons 50 mins – “Last month the governor of Virginia restored voting rights to more than 200,000 ex-felons. This is a dramatic development in a state whose felony disenfranchisement laws had been among the most restrictive in the nation. But Virginia isn’t the only state rethinking if and when those convicted of a felony should be allowed to vote. The Maryland legislature recently passed a bill automatically restoring voting rights to those who completed their sentence. While last year in Kentucky, one governor eased the state’s lifetime voting ban before his successor quickly reinstated it. Our [4 guest]panel discusses the debate over restoring voting rights to ex-felons.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Wildlife Photographer 24 mins – “John Aitchison, an elite wildlife cinematographer, has made his living watching predators stalk their prey. He joins The Current to talk about the beauty, brutality and inevitability of nature and shares what he’s learned watching for the perfect shot.” At the link find the title, “Filmmaker documents wildlife to win people over to the side of nature, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160518_73239.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from t the pop-up menu.

WOOP Method 21 mins – “Many of us have heard that we should think positive… Visualize ourselves achieving our goals. But researcher Gabriele Oettingen finds, this isn’t actually the best advice. Instead, we should use her strategy — which she calls WOOP.” At the link find the title,”Episode 30: WOOP, There It Is, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160506_hiddenbrain_oettingen.mp3

Work Rules 71 mins – “Work sucks, but it doesn’t have to. In this episode we go inside Google in an interview with Lazlo Bock, head of People Operations. Bock has helped the company conduct experiments and introduce policies and procedures that have applied knowledge gained from psychology and neuroscience concerning biases, fallacies, and other weird human behavior quirks. The result has been a workplace where people are happier, more productive, and better able to pursue that which fulfills their ambitions. Learn all about Google’s approach as Lazlo describes his new book, Work Rules, a collection of insights from Google’s evidence-based, data-driven human relations.” At the link find the title, “51 – Work – Lazlo Bock,” right-click “Media files 051-Work-Lazlo_Bock.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Writing Process 79 mins – Panel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Tough Love for Aspiring Writers” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find and right-click the number 2165 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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Media Mining Digest 236 – May 20, 2016: 3D Plastic Body Parts, AAC Institute, Ada Lovelace, Addiction Movie, ADHD, Aging Debate, Apple Pay, Apps that Track, Arab Youth, Assisted Suicides, Bangalore Rises, Blood Transfusion History, Brain-Computer Interface, Brazilian corruption, Cancer and Exercise, Carbon Tax Concept, Charles Koch, City Failure, Communism Issues, Copy Editor, Coral Loss, Death Cafes, Deliberate Practice, Democracy Now, DNA Background, Drone Assassinations, End of Life Issues, European Union Issues, First Nation Suicides, Food Addiction, Fraud and Forgery, Funding Ventures, Gender Issues, Gentrification, Girl Geeks, Global Citizenship, Gorilla Extinction, Grooveshark Startup Story, Gun Rights, Gymnastic Strength Training, Health Exam Issues, Human Rights, Income Inequality, Independent Media, Islam, Jingles, Luis W Alvarez, Machine Learning, Mao’s Great Leap, Medical Errors, Menstruation, Mexico City Air Pollution, Migration Issues, Ocean Rise, Ozone Hole History, Pakistani Sports Woman, Perceptions, Peter Marshall, Pinkerton, Polygraph, Power Grid Protection, Primary Politics and kidnapped Students, Privacy vs Security, Productivity Ideas, Protein from Bugs, Public-Private Partnerships, Republican Issues, Roman Water Wheels, Rosalind Franklin and DNA, Scalia, Segregation History, Sex Assaults on Campus, Sound Research Issues, Spain’s Civil War, Spam Empire, State Powers, Technology Fixation, Third Wave, Tyrannosaurus Rex, US Federal Reserve Dissection, Vampire Power Sources, Visual Intelligence, Wildfire in Canada, Wireless Sensors, Women and Housework, Wrongful Conviction, Zika Virus

The best 104 podcasts from a larger group of 288 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 300 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

3D Plastic Body Parts 50 mins – “In this episode we talk with Professor Paul McMenamin of Monash University, you know the school down under about his rather unique collection of body parts. You see there made of out plastic and colored with ink jet ink to look like actual cadaver body parts. Join us as we find out how his team at Monash accomplished this and who may benefit.This episode was recorded on the 29th of July, 2014. And if you aren’t squeamish, come check out the video of this interview out on our YouTube channel. “All Things 3D”… If you dare?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AAC Institute 48 mins – “Mission of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Institute – Joyce welcomes Katya Hill, director of the AAC Institute. Established in 2000, the AAC Institute is a resource for all who are interested in enhancing the communication of people who rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Organized as a 501(c)3 not-for-profit charitable organization, the AAC Institute offers information and provides services worldwide. The AAC Institute promotes the goals of AAC, the AAC Rules of Commitment, and evidence-based AAC clinical practice. This mission is accomplished through service delivery, research, activity organization, information dissemination, and education. Ms. Hill will discuss the mission of this charitable organization.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ada Lovelace 21 mins – “The first computer programmer was a woman named Ada Lovelace. Learn how the daughter of Lord Byron — one of the most famous poets in the Western world — moved out of her father’s shadow and became a herald of the electronic age in this episode.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Addiction Movie 46 mins – “Filmmaker, actor Rob Reiner and his son, Nick, get personal in their new film “Being Charlie,” which takes on drug addiction.Rob Reiner directed some of the greatest comedies of the late 20th century. When Harry Met Sally, The Princess Bride. And dramas: Stand By Me, A Few Good Men. But at home, and recently, his own family was joining the American story of drug abuse, addiction, and opioids. Reiner’s son, Nick – 17 times in rehab. Now father and son have joined forces on a movie about the drama of confronting addiction and its roots. This hour: Rob Reiner and Nick Reiner get personal about taking on addiction.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ADHD 57 mins – “With the number of diagnoses and prescriptions on a twenty-year rise, these days, having a kid with ADHD is no longer outside the norm. Still: there’s plenty of disagreement over the nature of the diagnosis itself, when medication can help kids, and when other approaches might be better.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Debate P1 45 mins – “Why face the ravages of time if you can stave off the effects of aging? We look at ways to cheat the clock!” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Debate P2 48 mins – “There’s no scientific consensus on the causes of aging and that has led to some spirited debates. We explore the arguments and learn a little something about ourselves in the process.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apple Pay 24 mins – “Apple is bringing mobile payment systems to the mainstream – making it easy for people to pay with their smartphones. The Current explores why the beginning of the end of cold hard cash is a problem for many privacy and security experts.” At the link find the title, “Apple Pay moves Canada towards a cashless society,” right-click “Download Apple Pay moves Canada towards a cashless society” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apps that Track 6 mins – “Smartphone Tracking Apps, May 9, 2016 – Audio interview by GAO staff with Mark Goldstein, Director, Physical Infrastructure” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arab Youth 60 mins – “Donald A. Baer, chief executive officer of Burson-Marsteller, and CFR’s Steven A. Cook join NPR’s Deborah Amos to discuss public opinion trends among Arab youth, including perceptions of economic opportunities, religion, and the self-proclaimed Islamic State. The panelists focus on a recent study of public opinion among 3,500 Arab youth and discuss the findings in terms of the broader political and economic context of the modern Middle East.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Assisted Suicides 60 mins – “The law allows me to kill myself, but what if I have a progressive illness and reach a stage when I long to end my life but cannot do so unaided. Isn’t it needlessly cruel and illogical that as the law stands, no friend or family member or doctor can then help me die without risking prosecution and a possible jail sentence? No it isn’t, say those who oppose legalising assisted suicide. Think of the pressures that would build once it became a legally sanctioned option – not least the pressure to extend the category of those whom it is permissible to help kill beyond the terminally ill to the old, the frail and even the mildly depressed ….We were joined by a panel of experts in 2011 to debate the motion “Assisted suicide should be legalised”. Arguing in favour of the motion were Emily Jackson, Professor of Law at the London School of Economics; Mary Warnock, moral philosopher, life peer and former Member of House of Lords Select Committee on Euthanasia; and the late Debbie Purdy, a right-to-die campaigner who in 2009 won a landmark ruling to clarify the law on assisted suicide. Arguing against the motion were Lord Carlile QC, barrister, Liberal Democrat peer and chairman of Care not Killing; Baroness Finlay, Professor of Palliative Medicine at Cardiff University; and Richard Harries, former Bishop of Oxford and author of ‘Questions of Life and Death: Christian Faith and Medical Intervention’. The debate was chaired by journalist and broadcaster Sue Lawley.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bangalore Rises 40 mins “Ask natives of Asia’s two giants, China and India, what they think of the other, and not infrequently, the jokes and stereotypes fly. At least some people in each country seem to enjoy secretly — or not so secretly — looking down on the other. So when an Indian official took the stage at a Chinese-sponsored high-tech conference in San Francisco last fall, made a joke about Chinese having to check with the teachings of Chairman Mao before they could answer a simple question, and then made the case for “why India Rocks, Bangalore roars, and Silicon Valley will soon be Bangalored,” some of the Chinese members of the audience were practically sputtering….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blood Transfusion History P1 30 mins – “In part one of a special author interview, Dr. Holly Tucker talks about her new book, “Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution.” Tune in to learn more about the startling history of blood transfusion.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blood Transfusion History P2 30 mins – “In part two of this interview series, Dr. Holly Tucker discusses the research methods behind her new book, “Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution.” Listen in to learn more about the controversial history of transfusions.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain-Computer Interface 60 mins – “Could the future of electronics be the human body? We explore efforts to turn your body into a technological interface.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazilian Corruption 49 mins – “Last month in Brazil, the lower house of the country’s National Congress voted to impeach the president, Dilma Rousseff. There are the legal grounds for the move — alleged cooking of the government books. And then there are the political motives, which as many observers have pointed out, are what’s really driving the impeachment. Those have to do with a massive corruption scandal at Petrobras, the state owned oil company. Add to that a severe recession, and many Brazilians are not happy with how their country is being run. Guest host Lisa Desjardins gets an update on the political crisis in Brazil from our panel of guests.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Cancer and Exercise 26 mins – “How targeted exercise can help fight cancer. By the time you hit midlife, odds are you or someone close to you will be touched by cancer. Cancer remains a potentially lethal lottery and everyone’s experience is different. But appropriate exercise under professional supervision – before, during, or after treatment – seems to substantially improve your odds. Catalyst meets a group of cancer patients that is experiencing extraordinary benefits from prescribed targeted exercise programs “ At the link right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Tax Concept 63 mins Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “HOWARD HIGMAN MEMORIAL PLENARY: How Free Enterprise Can Solve Climate Change” with Robert Inglis and a moderator. At the link find and right-click the number 1400 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charles Koch (2 parts) 92 mins – Charles Koch discusses his journey, from engaging in manual labor as a youth to attending MIT and working as a consultant. Having learned the principles of classical liberalism through his education and work, he now applies those principles to building and managing Koch Industries. He attributes much of his success to creating value for others and operating with integrity. …In Part II of our interview with Charles Koch, he covers politics and the role of corporations in our society. Koch, making the case to end corporate welfare, tells us what he admires about Bernie Sanders and why he is less sanguine about President George W. Bush. He also believes technology can be used to promote free market ideals over democratic socialism, especially for the younger generation.” At the link find the titles, “Good Profit Part I” and “…Part II,” then right-click “Media files 20160318-2.mp3” and “Media files 20160318.mp3” and select “Save Links As” from the pop-up menus.

City Failure 47 mins – “Fixing Michigan- from Flint’s water crisis to failing schools in Detroit. Are state takeovers the answers or the problem? The president was in Michigan yesterday, in Flint, telling that beleaguered city “I’ve got your back,” after all the water woes we’ve heard about there. Meanwhile in Detroit, teachers walking off the job this week in almost all the city’s schools, complaining about mold and rats and afraid they won’t be paid. When cities and school districts get in trouble, it’s hard to get out. Michigan’s cities tell that story. This hour On Point: Detroit, Flint, and lessons from the troubles in Michigan.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communism Issues 76 mins Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Communism Won Some Battles but Lost the War,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find and right-click the number 1514 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Copy Editor 10 mins – “’Copy editing for The New Yorker is like playing shortstop for a Major League Baseball team — every little movement gets picked over by the critics,” says Mary Norris, who has played the position for more than thirty years. In that time, she’s gotten a reputation for sternness and for being a “comma maniac,” but this is unfounded, she says. Above all, her work is aimed at one thing: making authors look good. Explore The New Yorker’s distinctive style with the person who knows it best in this charming talk.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coral Loss 44 mins – “Coral reefs are crucial to ocean ecosystems — providing food and shelter to a quarter of all marine life. They also support food stocks that feed more than a billion people. This year, reefs around the world are threatened like never before: At Christmas Island near Australia, scientists estimate more than 80 percent of all the coral is now dead. And at the Great Barrier Reef, a similar story is unfolding: More than half of the reef’s coral has died. Scientists point to warming ocean temperatures and successive El Nino events as causes. For this month’s Environmental Outlook, the threat to coral reefs worldwide and what it will take to save them.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy included in the blog archive.

Death Cafes 25 mins – “A Death Cafe is a place for lively conversations that confront fears of dying. What began in a basement in the UK is now an international movement in 35 countries, with meetings across Canada. The Current explores the slightly darker take on cafe culture.” At the link find the title, “Death Cafes spark international conversation on fear of dying,” right-click “Download Death Cafes spark international conversation on fear of dying” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deliberate Practice 42 mins – “We’ve all heard of the 10,000 Hour Rule (popularized in Malcolm Gladwell’s book Outliers — that it takes 10,000 hours of practice to master a skill and become an expert. Turns out 10,000 is not a magic number, it’s just a big number. In Episode 128, Jesse talks to an expert on becoming an expert, Dr. Karl Anders Ericsson, Conradi Eminent Scholar and Professor of Psychology at Florida State University, and author of the new book Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise.  Although Gladwell drew on Dr. Ericsson’s research, they never spoke before Outliers was published. Dr. Ericsson believes the most important element of mastering a skill was lost in translation: deliberate practice….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Now 53 mins – “Amy Goodman, host of [Democracy Now!], discusses the influence of corporate media outlets on journalism and American politics.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Amy Goodman, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436394.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Background P1 36 mins – “What is DNA and where did it come from? We’ll take a look at what we know about the building blocks for life as we know it.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Background P2 36 mins – “Now that we know all about DNA, let’s talk about how we can use it in technology. From diodes to computer storage, we explore the uses of DNA.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Assassinations 60 mins – “Jeremy Scahill, Investigative Reporter; Co-founder, The Intercept; Author, The Assassination Complex: Inside the Government’s Secret Drone Warfare Program; Twitter @jeremyscahill…Bestselling author Jeremy Scahill and his colleagues at the investigative website The Intercept reveal what they call stunning new details about America’s secret assassination policy. When the U.S. government discusses drone strikes publicly, the implicit message from the Obama administration has been characterized as “trust, but don’t verify.” The Intercept called this into question when it obtained a cache of secret slides that provide a window into the inner workings of the U.S. military’s kill/capture operations in Afghanistan, Yemen and Somalia. These documents raise serious questions about the central role that assassination plays in counterterrorism policy.” At th elink right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

End of Life Issues 72 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Navigating End of Life Choice in America,with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1816, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

European Union Issues 75 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs title, “EU Sings “Breaking Up is Hard to Do,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1715, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Nation Suicides 9 mins – “It’s been a month since a suicide crisis in Attawapiskat was declared. The community has yet to receive permanent mental health workers to manage the crisis. NDP critic Charlie Angus is calling for a permanent solution to solve this emergency.” At the link find the title, “Charlie Angus calls for permanent solution to address Attawapiskat suicide crisis,” right-click “Download Charlie Angus calls for permanent solution to address Attawapiskat suicide crisis” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Addiction (2 parts) 156 mins – “Michael Prager, Author, Fat Boy Thin Man Nicole Avena, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Florida Robert H. Lustig, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Endocrinology, UCSF Eric Stice, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist, Oregon Research Institute Vera Ingrid Tarman, MD., MSc., FCEP, CASAM, Medical Director, Renascent Elissa Epel, Ph.D., Associate Professor, UCSF Department of Psychiatry Ashley Gearhardt, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Michigan This program is an update from our previous Food Addiction program; all panelists will offer updated information. Addiction is about brains, not just about behaviors. We all have the brain reward circuitry that makes food rewarding; it’s a survival mechanism. In a healthy brain, these rewards have feedback mechanisms for satiety or “enough.” For some, the circuitry becomes dysfunctional such that the message becomes “more.” Michael Prager, author of Fat Boy Thin Man, will begin the discussion telling his very personal story of recognizing and then seeking treatment for his food addiction. Leading researchers and clinicians will discuss many aspects of this important topic.” At the link for Part 1 (64m) right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same here for Part 2 (92m).

Fraud and Forgery 60 mins – “This week we’re taking a look at two very different types of white collar crime — financial fraud and painting forgery — and how we use investigation and science to detect them. We’ll speak to Jennifer Fiddian-Green, a partner at Grant Thornton and lead of their National Forensic and Dispute Resolution Advisory practice, about forensic accounting and the ways we try to discover fraud. And we’ll talk with Dr. Jehane Ragai, Emeritus Professor of Chemistry with the American University in Cairo, about her book “The Scientist and the Forger: Insights into the Scientific Detection of Forgery in Paintings”.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Funding Ventures 78 minsPanel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “How to Raise Money for Your Brilliant Idea,”with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1113, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Issues 74 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs title, “Gender Fluidity,” with three panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1866, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gentrification 19 mins – “Neighborhoods are constantly changing, but it tends to be the people with money and power who get to decide the shape of things to come. New York City has an especially long history with change driven by landlords and real estate investors. Today, change is taking the form of gentrification, but in the 1960s, the neighborhood of East New York became a nexus of what has since become known as white flight. The first developer to set his sights on East New York was John Pitkin back in 1835. Pitkin would lose his fortune in a cotton market crash, but not before launching this neighborhood into existence with housing and industry. The Long Island Railroad came a year later, and with it factories to process foods from Long Island’s farms. The distinctive low-rise residential architecture that defines the area followed, then more rail lines connecting the area to Manhattan and the rest of Brooklyn. East New York became a thriving middle-class hub for the European immigrants working in local factories. It was, in many ways, a conventional white suburb, at least for a time….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title, “Turf Wars of East New York,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Girl Geeks 77 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs, titled “Girl Geeks Unite!” with four guests and a moderator. At the link right-click 1714, right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Citizenship 75 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs, titled “Educating Students to be Global Citizens,” with four guests and a moderator. At the link right-click 1718, right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gorilla Extinction 47 mins – “An award-winning new documentary takes us inside the deadly, high-stakes struggle to save the home of the last mountain gorillas.“Virunga” is an astonishing new documentary about corruption, compassion, and the imperiled gorillas and people of the Congo . The film is named after a national park in the Congo, where some of the world’s last mountain gorillas live. It’s the story of an oil company and local rebels trying to control their land and fearless Congolese park rangers, an intrepid investigative journalist and soft-spoken Belgian warden fighting to protect it. This hour on point, “Virunga” and the gorillas of the Congo.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grooveshark Startup Story 54 mins – “When a group of college kids in Florida set out to change the music industry, they did not anticipate quite how disruptive they would be. Their mission was a noble one: bring an end to online piracy by offering cheap, convenient, and legal access to music. Their execution, however, was less than thorough. And when you’re dealing with protective music labels, forgetting to dot an “i” or cross a “t” can mean being one lawsuit away from the swift and unceremonious death of your company. This is the story of Grooveshark, the people who built it, and the relationships that were tested during its rocky road to growth—and eventual demise.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Rights 78 minsPanel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “The 27 Words in the Second Amendment” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1312, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gymnastic Strength Training 192 mins – “…My guest this episode isChristopher Sommer (GymnasticBodies on Instagram/Facebook), former US national team gymnastics coach. He is also the founder of GymnasticBodies, a training system that I’m currently testing (and have no affiliation with). As a world-renowned Olympic coach, Sommer is known for building his students into some of the strongest, most powerful athletes in the world. During his extensive 40-year coaching career, Coach Sommer took meticulous notes on his training techniques—his wins and failures—so that he could translate the best elements into a superior exercise system for both high-level and beginner athletes. His four decades of careful observation led to the birth of Gymnastics Strength Training™ (or GST). In this episode, we cover A TON, including: The 3-5 exercises everyone should be doing (you’ve never heard of some of them); His opinions of kipping exercises, such as the kipping pull-ups common in CrossFit; What bodyweight goals non-gymnasts should target; Which exercises to remove from the gym entirely, at least in the first 6-12 months of training; How to optimize biceps strength and mass with straight-arm work….” At the link find the title, “The Secrets of Gymnastic Strength Training, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files Tim_Ferriss_Show, Coach_Sommer.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Exam Issues 40 mins – “Do we need periodic general health checks? It is the single most common reason US patients seek care and accounts for 10% of all primary care visits with a cost of about $10 billion per year. Dr. Deborah Grady explores when adults need asymptomatic checkups and why periodic exams may not be the best use of resources or time. Recorded on 03/01/2016. (#30674)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Rights 27 mins – “Human rights may aspire to be universal – they should belong to everyone, everywhere – but there has been resistance to them on philosophical or theological grounds by powerful states and world religions. Lawyer Helena Kennedy looks at these issues and the rise of the human rights movement since 1948.” At the link find the title, “Are Human Rights Really Universal? May, 2016,” right-click “Media filesp03tmylk.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Income Inequality 78 minsPanel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “US Income Inequality & the American Dream,” with three panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1516, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Independent Media 44 mins – “Last Saturday night Jason Rezaian, the former Iran bureau chief for the Washington Post, appeared at a correspondents’ dinner and joked that the audience there sure beat solitary confinement. It was a light-hearted moment underscoring a serious, growing issue. In July of 2014 Rezaian was arrested in Tehran and imprisoned until January of this year. His plight became a symbol of the many risks journalists face around the world. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, 72 reporters were killed for doing their jobs. Nearly 200 are unjustly jailed. Today, we look at the dangers of journalism and the reality of censorship.” (4 guests) At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islam 73 minsPanel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Views and Voices of Islam,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1512, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jingles 34 mins – “Jingles are traditionally defined as short songs about a product that are written for TV or radio, but—with songs like Poo-Pourri’s “Imagine Where You Can Go” being released on the internet—does the traditional definition need to be expanded? Listen as Tim Taylor, author of “The Sounds of Capitalism” and Helen Zaltzman, the host of The Allusionist, take us through the century long history of ad music, and examine what jingles sound like in the internet age.” At the link find the title, “10: Jingle Brains, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Luis W Alvarez P1 30 mins – “Luis Alvarez was a physicist whose broad interests connected him to some of the 20th century’s most influential moments, including the bombing of Hiroshima and the assassination of JFK. His diverse work led to the nickname “the wild idea man of physics.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Luis W. Alvarez P2 30 mins – “The second part of the Luis Alvarez episode covers his time as part of the Manhattan Project designing detonators for atomic bombs. Beyond his controversial work, Alvarez also contributed to particle physics, mystery solving and paleontology.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Machine Learning 66 mins – “What is machine learning? How is it transforming our lives and workplaces? What might the future hold? Pedro Domingos of the University of Washington and author of The Master Algorithm talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the present and future of machine learning. Domingos stresses the iterative and ever-improving nature of machine learning. He is fundamentally an optimist about the potential of machine learning with ever-larger amounts of data to transform the human experience.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mao’s Great Leap 36 mins – “When scuffles broke out at a Donald Trump rally in March, it made national headlines. Imagine what it would be like to see political factions of tens of thousands battling each other in cities across the country, inflicting serious injuries and death. That’s what happened in the late 1960s in China when Mao Zedong, the leader of the Communist Party, urged students and later workers to take to the streets to denounce and root out those who had strayed from the Socialist path. The movement, known as the Cultural Revolution, lasted for years and led to escalating violence, but it was little understood at the time since China was largely closed to Western observers. Our guest, historian Frank Dikotter, has plumbed newly-opened Chinese archives to get a deeper understanding of the Cultural Revolution – the motives of its leaders, the scale of the violence and its lasting effects on the country. Dikotter argues in his new book that the turmoil destroyed the credibility of the Communist Party and laid the basis for economic reforms that transformed the country. Dikotter is chair of humanities at the University of Hong Kong. One of his 10 books on China won the BBC Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction. FRESH AIR contributor Dave Davies spoke to him about his new book, “The Cultural Revolution: A People’s History.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Medical Errors 44 mins – “More than 250,000 Americans a year die from medical errors, including misdiagnoses, communications breakdowns, medication mistakes and botched surgeries. That’s according to a new study by a Johns Hopkins University surgeon and researcher who says that if medical errors were a disease, it would be the third leading cause of death in America. We discuss the scope of the problem and what can be done to improve patient safety.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Menstruation 11 mins – “It’s true: talking about menstruation makes many people uncomfortable. And that taboo has consequences: in India, three out of every 10 girls don’t even know what menstruation is at the time of their first period, and restrictive customs related to periods inflict psychological damage on young girls. Growing up with this taboo herself, Aditi Gupta knew she wanted to help girls, parents and teachers talk about periods comfortably and without shame. She shares how she did it.” At the link click “Downloads,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexico City Air Pollution 5 mins – “On a bad day, you cannot see forever in Mexico City. That’s how it has been lately, ever since the city government rang the alarm bells over its air pollution, as it surpassed the recommended ozone limits set by the World Health Organization. It was the first time such alarms went off in more than a decade. …What’s happening? Air quality has generally improved in Mexico’s capital over the last 20 years or so. Back then, locals used to say that living here was like smoking two packs of cigarettes a day. Memories are also fresh from the 1980s, when the air was particularly bad. “We saw birds that suddenly fell down. They fell out of the sky and they were dead,” says Gabriela Alarcón, who researches pollution at the Mexican Institute for Competitiveness, a think-tank in Mexico City. Since then, officials have pushed out big refineries, banned leaded gas, and built more public transportation. It all made a difference, for a while. But now things seem to be backsliding. By this time last year, 75 percent of the days had been considered bad air days. So far this year, it’s more than 80 percent….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migration Issues 78 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “International Migration,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1116, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Rise 78 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “CLIMATE SERIES: When the Oceans Rise,” with three panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1518, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ozone Hole History 16 mins – “Jonathan Shanklin was sifting through a backlog of data when he made the startling discovery of a hole in the ozone layer above Antarctica. In this podcast, he and others recall events in the mid-1980s and discuss how the ‘ozone hole’ became the poster child for environmentalism. Originally aired 17/05/2013.” At the link find the title, “REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast – May 1985, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pakistani Sports Woman 27 mins – “…When our guest was a girl growing up in the tribal area of Pakistan, she dressed like a boy to be able to live with some sense of freedom. To become a weightlifter and enter competitions in Pakistan, she entered as a boy. And instead of using her name – Maria Toorpakai – she used the name Genghis Khan. Her parents support women’s rights and have taken great risks to teach in the tribal areas, in spite of the Taliban bombing their schools. As for Maria, when she became a teenager, she gave up weightlifting for squash and gave up pretending she was a boy. She became the first tribal Pakistani girl to represent the country in international squash tournaments and came in third in the world junior women’s championship. But because the Taliban forbids sports and being a woman athlete is an even greater transgression, she basically went into hiding until she was accepted at a new squash academy in Canada founded by a former world squash champion. She’s now 25 years old and is the only female in international competition ranked in the top 50. She’s written a new memoir called “A Different Kind Of Daughter.” Terry spoke to her last week….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Perceptions 30 mins – “Caltech theoretical physicist Sean M. Carroll talks about his new book The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself. (Dutton, 2016)” At the link find the title, “Sean M. Carroll Looks at The Big Picture, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peter Marshall 87 mins – “Gilbert and Frank are joined by actor, singer and former “Hollywood Squares” host Peter Marshall, who shares irresistible stories about Redd Foxx, the mob, Glenn Ford, Uncle Miltie’s “apparatus” and Charlie Weaver’s (and Vincent Price’s!) sexual proclivities. Also, Peter croons with Bing, tours with Bob Hope, gets roasted by Orson Welles and runs afoul of John Wayne. PLUS: Al Jolson schmoozes! Phil Silvers does “Who’s on First”! Gilbert ticks off Marlon Brando! Peter and Nanette Fabray hit a nudie bar! And the definitive version of the Paul Lynde/Golddiggers story!” At the link find the title, “#102: Peter Marshall,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/3279488/ece0e824-31d3-4b2e-87fa-7189f714da2b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pinkerton 21 mins – “Allan Pinkerton fell into detective work when he discovered a gang of counterfeiters in Illinois. In 1861, he helped thwart a plot to assassinate Abraham Lincoln, which may have led Lincoln to later tap Pinkerton to organize the first Union espionage.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Polygraph 6 mins – “For years, New Hampshire has been unable to recruit enough prison officers. Despite spending thousands of dollars on recruitment and advertising, prisons here operate with 70 fewer officers than they need to meet “critical staffing” levels. While correctional facilities across New England face the same shortage, New Hampshire is the only state in the region that requires candidates to pass a polygraph test: a practice Congress banned among private employers 30 years ago. The New Hampshire Department of Corrections says the test is essential for preventing abuse and coercion behind bars. But recruitment staff say that test also eliminates many applicants who are otherwise qualified.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Power Grid Protection 54 mins – “Ted Koppel’s new book, “Lights Out,” he asserts that a major cyberattack on America’s power grid is not only possible but likely, that it would be devastating, and that the United States is shockingly unprepared. Koppel warns that a well-designed attack on just one of the nation’s three electric power grids could cripple much of our infrastructure, and the federal government, while well prepared for natural disasters, has no plan for the aftermath of an attack on the power grid. On today’s episode of Go Green Radio, we’ll talk with Scott Aaronson, the Managing Director for Cyber and Physical Security for the Edison Electric Institute (EEI), and discuss what the electric power industry is doing to protect the nation’s power grid.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Primary Politics and Kidnapped Students 46 mins – “The alliance between Ted Cruz and John Kasich to stop Trump was over before it began, but it’s just the latest in a long history of political plots. We examine the shadowy history of election scheming, and trace the origins of the notion that the people, not politicians, should get to pick the president. Plus, how the haunting disappearance of 43 students in Mexico may finally prompt a reckoning with institutionalized violence and corruption. Also, disturbing collusion between super PACs and presidential campaigns, and drawing meaning from the deep, dark world of the comments section.” At the link find the title, “In The Shadows, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files otm042916pod.mp3′ AND SELECT “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Privacy vs Security 61 mins – “Michael Chertoff, executive chairman and cofounder of the Chertoff Group; Adam Segal, director of CFR’s digital and cyberspace policy program; and Cyrus R. Vance, Jr., New York’s district attorney, join L. Gordon Crovitz, partner at NextNews Ventures, to discuss the trade off between privacy and security in the debate over government access to encrypted data, and the implications for business, counterterrorism, and user security. The panelists consider the recent legal case between Apple and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productivity Ideas 64 mins – “In his new book Smarter, Faster, Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter Charles Duhigg presents eight key points that illustrate the reasons that some people and some companies are more productive than others. Coupling statistics from neuroscience and psychology coupled with real-world stories from CEOs, FBI agents and airplane pilots, Duhigg explains how the most productive people and organizations view the world and their choices differently and how this ultimately influences their heightened levels of productivity. Join Inforum for a thought-provoking discussion with Duhigg about the science of productivity and learn how you can be more productive and successful in your personal and professional lives.

Protein from Bugs 44 mins – “Some say eating insects could save the planet, as we face the potential for global food and protein shortages. It’s a common practice in many parts of the world, but what would it take to make bugs more appetizing to the masses here in the U.S.? Does it even make sense to try? Many young companies are betting on the potential of crickets; You can now find flour, pasta, cookies, and even cocktail bitters made from them. A panel of experts tackles the arguments for and against eating insects — the practice known as entomophagy — and the cultural and environmental issues involved.” (Three guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy included in the blog archive.

Public–Private Partnerships 65 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Business & Government Can Work Together,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1716, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Republican Issues 62 mins – “Sara Robinson is a Seattle-based futurist and veteran blogger on culture, politics, and religion. She’s a consulting futurist and on the national board of NARAL. Find her recently launched blog — Future Imperfect — at sararobinson.net Culture of Truth is a political satirist, posting his weekly Bobblespeak Translations for those who have missed the Sunday Morning Talk Shows. @bobblespeak Moonshinepatriot.blogspot.com Tonight is Trump Night at VSS.” Sara Robinson and Culture of Truth Virtually Speaking Sundays,, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files sara-robinson-and-culture-of-truth-virtually-speaking-sundays.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roman Water Wheels 4 mins – “Today, we try to make sense of an old Roman power plant. The University of Houston’s College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them. Anyone who’s ever studied the history of technology has seen a drawing of 16 Roman water wheels, two abreast, arranged in stair-steps down a hillside. Historians have isolated that one mill like a sore. The common wisdom says that the Romans, who kept slaves, had no need of water power. This must be a lone oddity….” At the link right-click Click here for…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rosalind Franklin 27 mins – “The men who are usually credited with discerning DNA’s structure won the Nobel Prize in 1962, but they used Rosalind Franklin’s research. In 1952, she captured the best DNA image available at the time, and the Nobel winners used it without her knowledge.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scalia 78 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado ConferenceConference on World Affairs titled, “Scalia,” with three panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1565, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Segregation History 42 mins – “Foundational Violence: U.S. Settler Colonial Articulation of Racialized and Gendered Citizenship – Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Department of Sociology, and titled “Foundational Violence: U.S. Settler Colonial Articulation of Racialized and Gendered Citizenship.” Our speaker is Evelyn Nakano Glenn, Graduate School Professor and founding Director of the Center for Race and Gender at the University of California, Berkeley.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Sex Assaults on Campus 74 minsPanel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled,ROUNDTABLE: “Til it Happens to You Ending Sexual Assault on College Campuses,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1119, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sound Research Issues 57 mins – “I’m honored to post Show # 250 (!), March 4, my interview with Sam Brylawski of the Library of Congress’ National Sound Preservation Board, co-author of the ARSC Guide to Audio Preservation. Sam is one of the pioneers of audio sound preservation, and one of its foremost experts, having been the President of the Association of Recorded Sound Collections (ARSC) and editor of the Encyclopedic Discography of Victor Recordings. Sam’s work focusing on preserving our collective sound history is extraordinarily important, as this history is at persistent risk of disappearing through degradation of obsolete sound preservation formats, like wax cylinders and metal plates. In our discussion, we focused on the challenges facing our world’s sound history, from funding to copyright law. I’ve known Sam for over 10 years, and this show was long overdue. I hope that you enjoy the show!” At the link right-click “Download”and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spains Civil War 75 mins – “Adam Hochschild, Author, Spain in Our Hearts -Monday Night Philosophy follows award-winning author Adam Hochschild deep into the three crucial years in the 1930s when the Spanish Civil War dominated headlines in America and around the world. Volunteers rushed to help Spain’s democratically elected government fight off an uprising by right-wing army officers heavily backed by Hitler and Mussolini. Adam Hochschild brings alive a group of men and women who lived through this painful and dramatic period: a few are familiar figures like Hemingway and Orwell; others, until now, have been completely unknown.

Spam Empire 15 mins – “Chances are you’ve received an email with a subject line like this “The hottest method to please your beloved one” or this “Want to get good health for low prices?” Emails offering “low cost med pills!” You’ve probably wondered — who is sending these emails? Does anyone actually click on these links? What happens when they do? On today’s show — we go deep inside the world of spam to answer these questions with the help of cyber-security reporter Brian Krebs and researcher Stefan Savage.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

State Powers 79 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs title, “States: Underappreciated Laboratories of Democracy,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1912, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Fixation 77 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Technology is a Fetish,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1114, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Third Wave 60 mins – “America Online Co-founder Steve Case looks at what’s next for the Internet in his book, [The Third Wave: An Entrepreneur’s Vision of the Future]. Mr. Case is interviewed by Representative John Delaney (D-MD).” At the link find the title, “After Words with Steve Case, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.437190.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tyrannosaurus Rex 41 mins – “Why does the tyrannosaurus continue to fascinate us? Joining Ian Sample in the studio this week is David Hone, a palaeontologist at Queen Mary University of London, and the author of The Tyrannosaur Chronicles.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Federal Reserve Dissection 60 mins – “Lawrence R. Jacobs is Walter F. and Joan Mondale Chair for Political Studies at the Humphrey School for Public Affairs, the University of Minnesota, and co-author of both Health Care Reform and American Politics (Oxford) and Class War? (Chicago). The US Federal Reserve is one of the most powerful institutions in the world, unfettered by institutional or political checks. Captive to the finance industry, it has become a source of inequality and financial uncertainty. Professor Jacobs describe how this came to be and how a true central bank could be organized and regulated, as presented in Fed Power: How Finance Wins, a book he co-authored with Desmond King.” At the link find the title, “Fed Power: How Finance Wins, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files fed-power-how-finance-wins.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vampire Power Sources 41 mins – “Since a quarter of residential energy use is consumed by gadgets that are “off”, Kevin and I discuss how to measure and cut back on that power consumption with a few connected devices. We also talk about Apple’s rumored Home app for HomeKit, the launch of OpenThread, the open source version of Nest’s Thread protocol and the new Almond router from Securifi. We also touch on HP Enterprises‘ hop into the internet of things and Hitachi’s new formal IoT group. Then we go to Rich Brown, who is the executive editor of CNET’s smart home and appliance coverage, to discuss how the news site set up a smart house in Louisville, Kentucky, the site’s favorite gadgets and how the Amazon Echo has democratized access to the smart home. The big theme of our conversation was compromise, as in, if you want a smart home you are going to have to make compromises.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Visual Intelligence 51 mins – “How observant are you? What things are you missing out on that could have a huge impact on your life. In this episode we speak with Amy Herman about her new book, Visual Intelligence: Sharpen Your Perception, Change Your Life. In this episode you will learn how to create your own luck by becoming a better observer. You will also learn how to identify your “blind spots” and turn them in to opportunities. This information comes directly from Amy’s groundbreaking “The Art of Perception” course which teaches doctors to observe patients instead of their charts, helps police officers separate facts from opinions when investigating crimes, and trains professional from the FBI, State Department, Fortune 500 companies, and the military to recognize the most pertinent and useful information. If you would like to learn more, visit Amy at ArtfulPerception.com.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Aftermath 21 mins – “The people of Fort McMurray are determined to rebuild and come back. But it’s a daunting challenge. Hard to even think about as the wildfire still burns. The Current hears from others who have rebuilt in Slave Lake, Alta. and Kelowna, B.C.” At the link find the title, “’Be patient’: Advice for rebuilding Fort McMurray from wildfire survivors, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160506_42755.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Aftermath 7 mins – “Several officials toured Fort McMurray neighbourhoods to survey the aftermath of the wildfire first hand. Wood Buffalo Fire Chief Darby Allen said 85 per cent of Fort McMurray is still intact. CBC’s Briar Stewart was on that tour and shares her insight.” At the link find the title, “‘Couldn’t have done any more’: Fire chief gives tour of Fort McMurray fire damage,” right-click “Download ‘Couldn’t have done any more’: Fire chief gives tour of Fort McMurray fire damage,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Car Retrieval 11 minsHuman kindness is overflowing in Fort McMurray with people helping those in need any way they can. Eldon Hankins from Edmonton is trying to do his part, putting long hours on the road to reunite people with their cars.” At the link find the title, “Driven to help: Eldon Hankins reunites Fort McMurray’s abandoned cars with owners,” right-click “Download Driven to help: Eldon Hankins reunites Fort McMurray’s abandoned cars with owners,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Evacuation 46 mins – “After another challenging day for firefighters and other first responders, evacuees face another overwhelming day to escape the ravenous flames. But questions arise over the pace of evacuation and the paucity of routes available to get out of the city.” At the link find the title, “Fort McMurray evacuee says people felt like ‘sitting ducks’ as fire approached, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160505_99858.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Fighting 34 mins – “Within a day of orders that all residents had to leave Fort McMurray, three firefighters from St. Albert near Edmonton, joined hundreds of others to help extinguish a city on fire. They share their experience with The Current.” At the link find the title, “‘A lifetime of firefighting in an hour:’ Firefighters recall tackling Fort McMurray fire,”right-click “Download ‘A lifetime of firefighting in an hour:’ Firefighters recall tackling Fort McMurray fire” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Fire Fighting 21 mins – “Firefighters are always needed in Alberta. It’s estimated there are 40 fires across the province right now. As veteran firefighters, to new recruits, to water bomber crews continue to fight the Fort McMurray fire, we look at the toll this fire has taken.” At the link find the title, “‘Fire shooting sparks and debris’: Meet frontline firefighters in Fort McMurray,” right-click “Download ‘Fire shooting sparks and debris’: Meet frontline firefighters in Fort McMurray,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Hospital Evacuation 10 mins – “David Matear oversaw the medevac of Fort McMurray’s hospital – from newborns, to critical care, to long-term care patients – in one-and-a-half-hours. Hospital staff moved more than 100 patients to safety, with the raging fire in view of the ER doors.” At the link find the title, “Fort Mac hospital evacuation was ‘calm’ as flames raged close,” right-click “Download Fort Mac hospital evacuation was ‘calm’ as flames raged close,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Reconstruction 22 mins – “In the wake of devastation, it’s only human to vow to rebuild. But how to rebuild once the flames in Fort McMurray are gone is a complicated question. The Current ask what can be learned from other cities that rebuild after disaster strikes.” At the link find the title, ‘Don’t give up’: Lessons for Fort McMurray’s long road ahead to rebuilding,” right-click “Download ‘Don’t give up’: Lessons for Fort McMurray’s long road ahead to rebuilding,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Sandwiches 10 mins – “For some, amidst the damage and desolation of the Fort McMurray wildfire was a chance to step up and help others. Meet “Belt Drive Betty” and how her sandwiches and sensitivity saved the day for famished firefighters on the frontlines.” At the link find the title, “Fort McMurray sandwiches: ‘Belt Drive Betty’ feeds over 2,000 first responders” right-click Download Fort McMurray sandwiches: ‘Belt Drive Betty’ feeds over 2,000 first responders” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire School Evacuation 23 mins – “Principal Lisa Hilsenteger made a quick decision that saved the lives of fifteen stranded students at her Fort McMurray school. As the school bus headed towards a closed road, she made a decision to head back into the belly of the beast to get out.” At the link find the title, “Fort McMurray school principal-turn-hero evacuates 15 stranded students to safety,” right-click “Download Fort McMurray school principal-turn-hero evacuates 15 stranded students to safety” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Toxic Effects 11 mins – “Not much is known about the effects of sustained exposure to ash and debris on frontline firefighters. But what is known is there are health risks. The Current speaks to a researcher concerned for Fort McMurray residents returning to burnt homes.” At the link find the title, “Fire safety researcher concerned of toxicity risks in Fort McMurray,” right-click “Download Fire safety researcher concerned of toxicity risks in Fort McMurray” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wireless Sensors 8 mins – “As a former biology teacher and now product manager at PASCO Scientific, Mike Blasberg has witnessed a transformation in how students collect data in the science classroom. Mike joins us to talk about the evolution of sensors, how we can use a smartphone to collect and analyze data, and discusses the capabilities and features of the new wireless sensors available from PASCO scientific.” At the link right-click “download” on top of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women and Housework 15 mins – “Melinda Gates stayed mostly silent for years as her husband, Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, became the richest man in the world. Now, as co-founder of the foundation, Ms. Gates is a woman of influence empowering women and girls in the developing world.” At the link find the title, “Melinda Gates on the ‘ingenuity’ of women in the developing world,” right-click “Download Melinda Gates on the ‘ingenuity’ of women in the developing world,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wrongful Convictions 49 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled,Justice: Shining a Light on Wrongful Convictions,” with four panelists. At the link find 1115, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika in Rio 23 mins – “The Zika virus is a serious cause for concern in Rio weeks before the Summer Games kick off. So serious, it has many wondering if Olympic glory is worth the risk, calling to cancel or move the Games — for the sake of athletes and to prevent Zika`s spread.” At the link find the title, “Zika concerns prompt call to cancel Rio Olympic Games,” right-click “Download Zika concerns prompt call to cancel Rio Olympic Games,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Mosquito Control 57 mins – “Zika virus, a pathogen transmitted by mosquitoes, has seemingly established itself in South America and the Caribbean and is now threatening the U.S. Cases have been reported in Florida, Illinois, Texas and Hawaii in patients having traveled to Central and South America, where they acquired the virus through mosquito bites. Our guest today, Joseph Conlon, technical advisor for the American Mosquito Control Association, will discuss how the virus could spread and what we can do to minimize our risks. We’ll also discuss what effect, if any, climate change has on mosquito-borne illnesses.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 235 – May 13, 2016: Afghani Family in Canada, Alzheimer’s Life, Animal Treatment, Astrophysics Research, BC Land Management, Bugout Property, Cancer Screenings Value, China’s One Child Policy, Chip Designer, College Access, Columbine Shooter Mother, Computer Coder Stories, Confidence People, Copyright and Creativity, Data Dilemma, Dirty Jobs, Distracted Drivers, Divorce Fiances, Economic Fallacies, Forensic Science, Fusion Power, Gambling in America, General Custer, Grit, Guerrilla Marketing, Gun Industry, Hamilton Play, Indian act of Canada, ISIS Issues, Legionnaires Disease, Malaysia Flight 370, MCAT Myths for Premeds, Moral Limits of Markets, Muslim Issue, Open University, Pakistan-India-China, Panama Vice President, Parksinson Life, Peacemaker, Political Analysis, Presidential Politics, Press Freedom, Protein Complexity, Recycling Myths, Refugee Crises, Robots in Movies, Seal Hunters, Sex Assaults on Campus, Suicides in America, Tampon tax, Taxing the Rich, Tortillas Value, Tudor Life. U.S. Currency History, Vaxxed Movie, Vitamins and Supplements, Voice Structure, Water, Weight Loss Battle, Wine Fraud, Winter Fortress

The best 64 podcasts from a larger group of 221 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 300 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Afghani Family in Canada 13 mins – “Back in 2012, The Current brought you the story of “Froggy,” the Afghan translator who worked with the Canadian military for years, He eventually emigrated to Canada with his family and now we have an update to announce his new Canadian citizenship.” At the link find the title, “Update: Afghan interpreter ‘Froggy’ and family officially Canadian citizens, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160505_11873.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’s Life 46 mins – We look at how one women prepares for the full onset of Alzheimer’s disease.It’s alarming. You forget which key opens the car door. Leave the stove on. Get lost taking a walk around the block. Alzheimer’s Disease can turn basic tasks into daunting ones. The New York Times’ N.R. Kleinfield spent 20 months with one woman in the early stages of the disease as she tried to make sense of it all and live her best life. This hour On Point: A journey inside Alzheimer’s Disease.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Treatment 49 mins – “The animal rights movement has seen some major victories over the last year. Ringling Brothers abandoned its use of circus elephants, Sea World vowed to end its orca breeding program and Walmart announced it will sell only cage free eggs by 2025. The head of the Humane Society of the United States says this is no coincidence. In a new book he argues that technological innovation, combined with heightened consumer awareness, is ushering in a new era of animal protection, one driven by market forces. A look at the future of the “Humane Economy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy if included in the blog archive.

Astrophysics Research 60 mins – “This week we’re looking at astrophysics, zooming out to get a better idea of how universe works and what it might look like. Astrophysicist Ethan Siegel returns to talk about his new — and first — book “Beyond the Galaxy: How Humanity Looked Beyond Our Milky Way and Discovered the Entire Universe”. And we’ll speak with astrophysicist Katie Mack about the discovery of gravity waves, first predicted by Einstein. This episode is partially hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News. If you’re looking for more on gravity waves, check out this great explainer article and video on Science News.”At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

BC Land Management 26 mins – “Canadian filmmaker Nettie Wild is known for taking on politically charged topics. Now, she trains her camera on the beauty of Northwestern B.C. and the tense coexistence of First Nations, nature, and the Red Chris Mine in “Koneline: Our Land Beautiful.” At the link find the title, “Filmmaker Nettie Wild finds cinematic poetry in ‘polarized’ mining debate, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160506_88094.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bugout Property 94 mins – What should you consider when seeking and using a piece of property and structure for use as a bugout location. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Screenings Value 59 mins – “Cancer screenings sometimes sound better than they are. Dr. George Sawaya explores the major goals of these screenings – balancing benefits, harms and costs. See which cancer screening are currently discouraged and which are recommended. Recorded on 03/15/2016.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China’s One Child Policy 27 mins – “Now that China has ended its One Child policy, one group of state employees may soon be out of a job – the country’s hated population police. Hundreds of thousands of officers used to hunt down families suspected of violating the country’s draconian rules on child bearing, handing out crippling fines, confiscating property and sometimes forcing women to have abortions. But with an eye on improving child welfare in the countryside, there is a plan to redeploy many of these officers as child development specialists. Lucy Ash visits a pilot project in Shaanxi Province training former enforcers to offer advice and support to rural grandparents who are left rearing children while the parents migrate to jobs in the big cities. If successful, the scheme could be rolled out nationwide to redeploy an army of family planning workers and transform the life prospects of millions of rural children.” At the link find the title, “China’s Family Planning Army, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03t2mzt.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chip Designer 65 mins – “Jake Baker is a chip designer and educator at UNLV. He tells us all about DRAM, Flash, ReRAM, low level design and lots more silicon goodness! Jake is currently a professor at UNLV and teach mixed signal chip design. Reticles/Mask sets are $10M+, so big companies are risk averse. Jake has a total of 142 patents, about 50 of which were non-lawyer changes. He also regularly acts as an expert witness for cases. Chris asked about the RamBus RDRAM, because it was so expensive for his old computer. One of Jake’s early job was working on projects funded by Reagan’s StarWars program…. You can find Jake on his homepage and get in contact with him there. Definitely dive down into all the great content he has made for his students and the world! Thanks to Jake for being on the show.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Access 53 mins – “The U.S. Supreme Court is about to make a decision that could affect college admissions across the country. And Texas’ Top 10 Percent Rule plays a starring role. On this episode of Reveal, reporter Neena Satija, of our partner The Texas Tribune, tells us how an attempt to boost diversity in Texas colleges could, paradoxically, end affirmative action. She also takes a long look at the Top 10 Percent Rule and whether it allows students from economically diverse backgrounds to attend the state’s top public universities. We’ll hear from two high-achieving young Texans: Genesis Morales and Grayson Rutherford. They’re college-bound students who attend high schools only 10 miles from one another but whose experiences are worlds apart. We’ll also take you to Berkeley, California, and look at that school district’s integration plan. Over five decades, that plan has worked, for the most part – Berkeley’s kindergarten through eighth grade system is a model for the rest of the country on how to integrate schools. But the city’s single high school faces unexpected challenges.” At the link find the title, “The price of admission, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files The-price-of-admission.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Columbine Shooter Mother 57 mins – “Sue Klebold, whose son Dylan was one of the Columbine shooters, talks about the junction between violence and mental illness. She’s interviewed by Mary Giliberti, executive director of the National Alliance on Mental Illness.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Sue Klebold, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436574.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Coder Stories 76 mins – “So you want to learn how to code, eh? This episode’s for you. I started coding at the age of twelve, when I started learning HTML and CSS so I could customize a website I built for a band I’d never listened to. Yes, I know that sounds stupid. I can explain (the story’s in the episode). When high school ended, I picked web development back up and built a freelance web design company with a friend. During the summer before college, we built a website for a local client and made money hand over fist. And by that, I mean we made $350 for around 100 hours of work. Woot, $3.50 an hour! Despite our incredibly low-balled quote, the project was a great learning experience, and I used what I learned to take on bigger projects when I was in college. For my final freelance project, I was able to charge over $2,500! Not bad for a college student….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow for Ep 106 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Confidence People 50 mins – “Maria Konnikova is a writer and journalist who focuses on psychology. She studied psychology and creative writing at Harvard University and graduated magna cum laude. Maria is the author of The Confidence Game, which reveals how con artist, mastermind, and manipulation prey on our trust.” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Copyright and Creativity 13 mins“George Lucas built a whole new industry with Star Wars.” says Peter S. Menell, devoted science fiction fan and a professor at the UC Berkeley School of Law, who studies copyright and intellectual property law. “But what funds that remarkable company is their ways of using copyright.” And he’s right. A third of the profits LucasFilm pulls in from Star Wars has come from merchandising alone. Not ticket sales, not DVDs, not video games or books. Toys, clothes, and weird tie-ins like tauntaun sleeping bags and wookie hair conditioner. But fans of Star Wars, and other stratospherically profitable creative universes, increasingly like to become creators within those universes. They write books, they make costumes, they direct spinoffs and upload them to YouTube. And sometimes they make money. How does law come into play when fans start to reinterpret intellectual property? We sat down with Menell to see where the tensions lie between the law, the courts, and the George Lucases of the world.” At the link right-click “download” near “Listen:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Dilemma 12 mins – “At last month’s London Book Fair special presentation on “The Data Dilemma,” Sybil Wong, Ph.D., Head of Marketing and Communications for Sparrho, called attention to the “irrelevance crisis” facing researchers in the lab and on campus. “208,000 new articles are published every month, though a typical researcher only reads about 22 articles per month – just over 0.0001% of new publications,” said Wong. In such a dark ocean of information, discoveries important to the researcher’s own work are easily overlooked. Machine curation, including text mining, may address the problem, though only up to a point. What a machine finds must be relevant or the human reader will dismiss it. Sparrho tackles the irrelevance crisis with an innovative personal recommendation platform for scientific content and opportunities. “Machines can more easily make stringent decisions on large volumes of entries and help find ‘unexpected’ results from sources that humans may be biased against or not know about, such as smaller journals,” she explained.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dirty Jobs 141 mins – “Mike Rowe (@mikeroweworks) is perhaps the best storyteller and pitchman I’ve ever had on the show. You might know Mike from his eight seasons of Dirty Jobs, but that’s just a tiny piece of the story. His performing career began in 1984 when he faked his way into the Baltimore Opera to get his union card and meet girls, both of which he accomplished during a performance of Rigoletto. His transition to television occurred in 1990 when — to settle a bet — he auditioned for the QVC Shopping Channel and was promptly hired after talking about a pencil for nearly eight minutes. There, he worked the graveyard shift for three years, until he was ultimately fired for making fun of products and belittling viewers. Now, he is a massively successful TV host, writer, narrator, producer, actor, and spokesman….” At the link find the title, “The Importance of Being Dirty: Lessons from Mike Rowe,” right-click “Media files Tim_Ferriss_Show_Mike_Rowe.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Distracted Drivers 36 mins – “Texting while behind the wheel is illegal in most states. Warnings abound about the risks of distracted driving; Texting alone can make you twenty-three times more likely to crash. And yet drivers are still doing it. A lot. New numbers say 70% of crashes could be due to distracted driving. And it’s not just teens. Meanwhile, traffic fatalities overall are rising sharply. Many experts now say the problem has reached crisis levels, and requires radical new thinking. One proposed solution: a device that lets police officers view cell phone activity after a crash, the way a breathalyzer checks for alcohol levels. What it will take to meaningfully reduce distracted driving.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy if included in the blog archive.

Distracted Driving 23 mins – “The “textalyzer” is a roadside test for your phone to see if you’ve been texting while driving. The device is a proposal in New York state but has people across North America talking. Privacy advocates say the “textalyzer” is invasive and unnecessary.” At the link find the title, “’Textalyzer’ device to catch texting and driving prompts privacy concerns, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160506_42946.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Divorce Finances 32 mins – “Married young with two kids, Margaret and Leif Jacobsen navigated different class backgrounds and a mixed-race relationship in the pursuit of a life together. When they decided to divorce, a true friendship emerged from the ashes.” At the link find the title, “Independence Day : Divorce, Finance & Friendship, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files PNC5057184055.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Fallacies 67 mins – “Arnold Kling, economist and author, speaks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his latest book, Specialization and Trade: A Reintroduction to Economics. Kling argues that macroeconomics ignores the challenges of buyers and sellers working together in the real world of specialization and trade. Instead, most macroeconomic theories struggle to incorporate the differences across workers and products. Kling points the listener toward a different perspective on macroeconomics and the business cycle that focuses on those differences. Kling also lays out related insights on political economy as well as his take on G.A. Cohen’s parable of the camping trip.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Science 49 mins – “This week on the Naked Scientists, we’ve got science on trial! We look at real case studies, finding out how forensics can both help and hinder criminal investigations, including the insects who are first on the scene, how your phone can tell tales, and why DNA can lead you on a wild goose chase.” AT the link right-click “Download as mp3” and elect “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fusion Power 22 mins – “They said it couldn’t be done: Nuclear fusion. We visit scientists building a clean power plant that’s hotter than the sun — but can they ever deliver? Then: the strange world of cold fusion, the people who hate it and the billionaires betting on it.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound file and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gambling in America 52 mins – “…On this episode of BackStory, the Guys explore the history of Gambling in America. We look at how speculators bet on land–America’s most plentiful commodity–and created the “first” stock market. The Guys also uncover how gambling, once outlawed throughout much of the U.S., has become a major source of revenue for cash-strapped communities. From Native American gaming to the rise of Las Vegas, this episode unpacks how some Americans found opportunity in gambling, while others lost big.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

General Custer 52mins – “Even in his lifetime, George Armstrong Custer was controversial. He was ambitious and flamboyant as well as courageous and talented. Though largely remembered for his death at the Little Bighorn, T.J. Stiles’ paints a fuller picture of Custer’s colorful and complicated life. Stiles says Custer lived at a “frontier in time.” He helped usher in the modern American era, but couldn’t quite adapt to the modernity he helped create. Stiles joins us Thursday to talk about his new book “Custer’s Trials.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grit 46 mins – “Grit is the new buzzword for success: At work, in school, in the gym. The research shows that grit really does matter after all. More than intelligence. More than talent. Even more than hard work. It’s a combination of unshakable motivation, persistence, and determination. And the belief that improvement is always possible. Maybe, it’s grit that can set you apart. Up next On Point: True grit.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guerrilla Marketing 54 mins – “Imagine your business making a big impact solving problems like hunger, poverty, war, violence, and catastrophic climate change while making a healthy profit. A new book by Shel Horowitz and Jay Conrad Levinson, “Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World”, shows dozens of practical examples of successful companies doing well by doing good—from solopreneurs to Fortune 100 global corporations. Learn how to: create projects (and products) that accomplish social change, profitability, and cost reduction all at once; green your company in ways that save money and make money; gain enormous positive reputation as a visionary company worth supporting; expand successfully into totally new markets through strategic thinking, powerful partnerships, and commitment to core principles; turn marketing from a cost to a revenue stream; and embrace abundance and transformation—and stop worrying about market share.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Industry 49 mins – “From Revolutionary War militias to cowboys of the Wild West, guns are often associated with American history and identity. But a new examination of gun industry archives reveals that marketing strategies helped promote these narratives. Gun sales dwindled after the civil war. In an effort to increase sales, the Winchester Repeating Arms Company and other businesses helped promote a widespread love of guns through advertisements. And salesmen marketed firearms as essential to self-reliant Americans. Guest host Ray Suarez speaks with historian Pamela Haag about her new book on the history of U.S. gun culture.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy if included in the blog archive.

Hamilton Play 58 mins – “Author Ron Chernow discusses his 2004 book, [Alexander Hamilton], which has been adapted into the Broadway musical, “Hamilton.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Ron Chernow, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436397.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Act of Canada 55 mins – “Some prominent Indigenous Canadians discuss the wounds still afflicting First Nations people, the ways they need the government and Canadians at large to make amends, and the hopes they have for the future.” At the link find the title, “The Enright FilesThe Enright Files on Reconciliation, Redress & Restitution for Canada’s First Nations, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160502_45237.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Issues 49 mins – “Yesterday President Obama announced the US will send 250 military personnel to help in the struggle against ISIS in Syria. As with the 50 already there these forces, he said, will not be ‘leading the fight on the ground’, but will be working to cement recent gains by providing critical assistance to local troops. President Obama remains opposed to any large scale US troop involvement, but is pressing our European allies and NATO to do more. Join us for an update on the battle against ISIS and new efforts to undermine its power and influence in the region and beyond.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy if included in the blog archive.

Legionnaires Disease 22 mins – “The Bellevue-Stratford opened in 1904 and quickly became one of the most luxurious hotels of its time, rivaling the Waldorf Astoria in New York. The building was an incredible work of French Renaissance architecture. It was 19 stories high, had over a thousand guest rooms, light fixtures designed by Thomas Edison, and what was said to be the most lavish and magnificent ballroom in the United States. It hosted guests from around the world, including royalty, world leaders, and the magnificently wealthy. The hotel came to be known as “The Grand Dame of Broad Street.” The hotel went through some hard times during the Great Depression and then again in the 1950s and 60s, losing some of its luster from the early days. But it was always considered one of the nicest places to stay in Philadelphia. That is, until 1976, when the Bellevue-Stratford found itself at the epicenter of a series of mysterious deaths that terrified the country and stumped everyone trying to find answers.”  At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malaysia Flight 370 26 mins – “The question is astonishingly simple: In the year 2015, with GPS and satellites and global surveillance everywhere all the time, how does a massive airplane simply go missing? To find the answer, writer Bucky McMahon boarded one of the vessels searching for Malaysia Air 370 in one of the most isolated and treacherous stretches of ocean on the planet. In telling the story of the search crew and the massive amounts of technology, money, and human capital being spent trying to find this airplane, McMahon tells a story of our time—of a world completely dependent on nets of redundant technology, yet completely lost and broken when those nets suddenly break. McMahon joins host David Brancaccio to discuss his October 2015 story, “The Plane at the Bottom of the Ocean.” At the link find the title, “The Plane at the Bottom of the Ocean, by Bucky McMahon, May , 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13153/3221565/The-Plane-on-the-Bottom-of-the-Ocean-by-Bucky-McMahon.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop- up menu.

MCAT Myths for Premeds 62 mins – “In today’s episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Brett Ferdinand who has turned into one of the biggest prep gurus. He is the man behind the Gold Standard and MCAT-Prep.com. Today, they cover a countdown of the Ten Myths of the new MCAT. Brett has a vast experience in the MCAT space including the creation of the MCAT online video library even before YouTube existed. They have also developed their online practice tests even before the AAMC made the MCAT a computer-based test. Today, they offer 7 full-length tests and one free abbreviated test that you can practice with. With over 6,000 practice questions, students will get a balance between knowledge-based questions, application questions, and full-length exams. It’s not just about performing better for the MCAT but about making yourself a better doctor one day.” At the link find the title, “180 : 10 Common MCAT Myths,” right-click “Media files PMY180.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moral Limits of Markets 60 mins – “Michael Sandel is one of the world’s most acclaimed and popular political philosophers. He has given the Reith lectures, been called “the most influential foreign figure of the year” by China Newsweek, and his online video lectures for Harvard University attract millions of viewers. His book ‘Justice’ was an international bestseller. Now he turns his attention to the markets. In this special Intelligence Squared event from 2013 he discussed his provocative new book, ‘What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets’. Should we pay children to get good grades? Is it ethical to pay people to test risky new drugs or to donate their organs? What about hiring mercenaries to fight our wars, or selling citizenship to immigrants willing to pay? Isn’t there something wrong with a world in which everything is for sale? Sandel argued that market values have crowded out nonmarket norms in almost every aspect of life – medicine, education, government, law, art, sports, even family life and personal relations. So what is the proper role of markets in a democratic society, and how can we protect the moral and civic goods that markets do not honour and money cannot buy?” At the link click “Download” and select “Save File” and”OK” from the pop-up menu.

Muslim Issue 56 mins – “While these two Muslim groups have often co-existed peacefully over the course of history, in our time, sectarian differences have risen and boiled over, resulting in conflicts across the Middle East. Our guest is a longtime Middle East scholar who examines the religious, economic, and political factors involved. Geneive Abdo, fellow at The Atlantic Council researching Iran and political Islam. She was formerly the liaison officer for the Alliance of Civilizations, a United Nations initiative aiming to improve relations between Islamic and Western societies. Before joining the U.N., Abdo was a foreign correspondent for twenty years, focusing on the Middle East and the Muslim world. She is the author of three books on the subject, and is here in New Hampshire speaking at the World Affairs Council’s spring ‘Global Tipping Points’ program.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open University 27 mins – “Alan Bassindale is the retired Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Learning and Teaching, at Open University, a distance & learning university based in Milton Keynes, England. With a current enrollment of over 200,000, this experiment in open enrollment has expanded opportunities of higher education to a world-wide community. Bassindale talks about the advantages and challenges to this educational institution which was modeled on American universities.At the link right-click the play button beside “listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pakistan – India – China 57 mins – “Experts discuss U.S. relations with India, China, and Pakistan and will discuss the challenges and opportunities for the United States in light of changing regional geopolitics. This symposium is made possible through the generous support of the MacArthur Foundation.” Right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panama Vice President 64 mins – “Isabel de Saint Malo de Alvarado discusses the political, economic, and foreign policy issues facing Panama and the region, including the impact of the Panama Papers, the ongoing reform efforts of the Varela administration, and the economic benefits from the anticipated expansion of the Panama Canal, to be launched this summer.” Right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parkinson Life 49 mins – “More than 20 years ago, journalist Michael Kinsley, founder of Slate and contributor to Vanity Fair and The New Yorker, was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. For several years, he kept the diagnosis private, preferring to avoid what he calls “aggressive victimhood.” Eight years later, though, he went public in a TIME magazine piece titled, “In Defense of Denial.” Now in his sixties, he calls himself “a scout for his generation,” experiencing in his fifties what fellow baby boomers won’t experience until decades later. He says the competition among his peers shouldn’t be about longevity but instead about cognition. A conversation with journalist Michael Kinsley on lessons learned from his early journey into old age. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy if included in the blog archive.

Peacemaker 24 mins – “Padraig O’Malley, the behind-the-scenes “peacemaker”, has a gift for bringing together people in conflict – from Northern Ireland, to South Africa and Iraq. His own struggle with alcoholism offered lessons to learn how to reconcile big differences.” At the link find the title, “’Peacemaker’ Padraig O’Malley uses addiction treatment to help bitter enemies, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160503_20284.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Analysis 57mins – “Gaius Publius — Professional writer of stories, poems, and books on education & technology. Currently writes for Digby’s Hullaballoo, Down with Tyranny, Crooks and Liars and Naked Capitalism Follow @Gaius_Publius and his tumblr page, GaiusPublius See A Look Ahead: Coming to the Philadelphia Crossroads and The Rebellion Won’t Go Away” At the link find the title, “Gaius Publius Virtually Speaking Sundays, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files avedon-carol-and-gaius-publius-virtually-speaking-sundays.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Politics 57 mins – “In this tumultuous election, delegate math has a source of contention, with some calling the process rigged and many Americans scratching their heads about how much their votes matter. And while the Indiana primary may have quelled some uncertainty for the GOP, questions remain. Meanwhile, on the Democratic side, the delegate hunt continues. [with] Chris Galdieri, assistant professor of politics at Saint Anselm College, specializing in presidential politics. Ben Kamisar, campaign reporter for the Hill. Josh Putnam, lecturer in the Department of Political Science at the University of Georgia who runs FrontloadingHQ, a blog about the delegate system that tracks the presidential primary calendar.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Press Freedom 57mins – “Following the unveiling of the Newseum’s updated press freedom map, reflecting changes in the state of world press freedom in 2015, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Dana Priest moderated a program examining press freedom throughout the world. Panelists included ProPublica president Richard Tofel, award-winning independent journalist Anna Therese Day, Freedom House vice president for analysis Vanessa Tucker and International Consortium of Investigative Journalists reporter Will Fitzgibbon.” At the link find the title, “Spotlight on Freedom, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files IM_20160427.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protein Complexity 12 mins – “…For a long time, one thing seemed fairly solid in biologists’ minds: Each gene in the genome made one protein. The gene’s code was the recipe for one molecule that would go forth into the cell and do the work that needed doing, whether that was generating energy, disposing of waste, or any other necessary task. The idea, which dates to a 1941 paper by two geneticists who later won the Nobel Prize in medicine for their work, even has a pithy name: “one gene, one protein.” Over the years, biologists realized that the rules weren’t quite that simple. Some genes, it turned out, were being used to make multiple products. In the process of going from gene to protein, the recipe was not always interpreted the same way. Some of the resulting proteins looked a little different from others. And sometimes those changes mattered a great deal. There is one gene, famous in certain biologists’ circles, whose two proteins do completely opposite things. One will force a cell to commit suicide, while the other will stop the process. And in one of the most extreme examples known to science, a single fruit fly gene provides the recipe for more than 38,000 different proteins….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recycling Myths 60 mins – “The truth can be difficult to hear. It’s even harder when somebody kicks a sacred green cow like recycling. When John Buffington wrote to me about his new book saying recycling is a myth standing in the way to a greener world, I got defensive. When he told me he was a corporate exec for a major American beer company, I told him “no”. But Jack, as he’s called, is also a post doctoral researcher at one of the premier universities in Sweden, the country with the lowest landfill rate in the world. Add that to my own doubts that what I “recycle” is actually heading anywhere useful, and here we go, with the new book “The Recycling Myth: Disruptive Innovation to Improve the Environment”.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” towards the top of the page and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Crises 46 mins – “The European Union was supposed to unite the continent so closely that it could not be divided by war or tribalism. But Europe is looking awfully divided these days. Politicians and people from England to Hungary are taking extreme nationalist political views toward refugees. My guest today says the US has a deep stake in a united Europe, and needs to help Europe help the refugees. This hour On Point: America and the crisis in Europe.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robots in Movies 20 mins – “Each week, comedian Gilbert Gottfried and comedy writer Frank Santopadre share their appreciation of lesser-known films, underrated TV shows and hopelessly obscure character actors — discussing, dissecting and (occasionally) defending their handpicked guilty pleasures and buried treasures. This week: “Klaatu barada nikto!” Charlie Callas cashes a check! And Jeff Ross roasts the Caped Crusader!” At the link find the title, “Mini-Ep #58: Robots Redux and Legends of the Superheroes,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/3247429/c2870493-2ae5-48bb-bb1d-fa5c06580547.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seal Hunters 27 mins – “If the Inuit want to keep their indigenous culture, does that mean they can’t make money at the same time? Alethea Arniquq-Baril turns her lens on the fight over the sealing industry arguing the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic are collateral damage.” At the link find the title, “’Angry Inuk’ argues anti-seal hunt campaign hurts Canadian Inuit life, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160504_18314.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Assaults on Campus 53 mins – “This month, The Salt Lake Tribune has been following the story of BYU students who say they’ve been punished under the school’s honor code because they reported sexual assaults. Some of the questions these women are facing have been experienced around the country: will they be believed, shamed or blamed for being a victim? Tuesday, we’re asking how LDS culture and theology of chastity complicates this, and if there are lessons from the Mormon experience that might help challenge assumptions about rape in America.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicides in America 49 mins – “The suicide rate in the U.S. is at its highest level in nearly 30 years. In the 1980s and 1990s the suicide rate declined. But a new report from the Centers for Disease Control shows suicides rose by 24 percent between 1999 and 2014. The sharpest increases were among middle-aged Americans and young girls, though the number of suicides in the latter group remains small. Experts say suicide involves a complex set of factors, and rarely does a single life event cause someone to take his or her life. Join guest host Ray Suarez and a panel of [4] suicide experts to explain what’s behind the rise and to talk about prevention.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy if included in the blog archive.

Tampon Tax 54 mins – “Today, we catch up with the growing movement to get over the shame and secrecy and acknowledge that women menstruate…including a look into why tampons and pads are taxed as luxury goods in 40 states. Plus, working out while pregnant. Even though the science says elite female athletes can train pretty hard, even in the third trimester, society doesn’t always agree. Listen to the full show.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taxing the Rich 39 mins – “An audience with David Stasavage – a unique opportunity to hear him discuss his latest book: Taxing the Rich: A History of Fiscal Fairness in the United States and Europe. Taxing the Rich draws on unparalleled evidence from twenty countries over the last two centuries to provide the broadest and most in-depth history of progressive taxation available.” At the link find the title, “Taxing the rich: A history of fiscal fairness in the United States and Europe, May, 2016” right-click “Media files 262433469-uniofbath-taxing-the-rich-a-history-of-fiscal-fairness-in-the-united-states-and-europe.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tortillas Value 16 mins – “anything else involving a traditionally made corn tortilla, your taste buds get to experience the results of an ancient chemical process called nixtamalization. The technique dates to around 1500 BCE and involves cooking corn kernels with an alkaline substance, like lime or wood ash, which makes the dough softer, tastier, and much more nutritious. Only in the 20th century did scientists figure out the secret of nixtamalization—the process releases niacin, one of the essential B vitamins. Our guest, archaeologist and nixtamalization expert Rachel Briggs, says that the historical chemical process transformed corn from a regular food into a viable dietary staple, one that cultures around the world continue to rely on for many of their calories. Without nixtamalization Mesoamerican civilizations like the Maya and the Aztec would not have survived, let alone flourished….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tudor Life 52 mins – “To understand how our forebears lived, of course you’ll read period records, diaries and literature. There would still be things you wouldn’t fully grasp though, like how they smelled. So when historian Ruth Goodman wanted to understand 16th century English life, she “tudored.” She skipped bathing, brushed her teeth with soot, and slept on rushes. The result of her adventure is a new book called How to Be a Tudor, and Wednesday she joins Doug for a dawn-to-dusk guide to Tudor life….Ruth Goodman is an historian of British social and domestic life. She has presented a number of BBC television series, including Tudor Monastery Farm. She’s the author of How to Be a Victorian…and her new book How to Be a Tudor….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

U.S. Currency History 51 mins – “the U.S. Treasury announced that Harriet Tubman would replace Andrew Jackson on the front of the $20 bill. Originally, the Treasury was considering giving Alexander Hamilton the boot from the $10, but it seems the runaway Broadway hit about his life helped to secure his spot. In this episode, we evaluate America’s relationship with money, exploring the transformations of currency over the centuries. The Guys and their guests discuss the profusion of currencies in the past, and consider how Americans decided which ones to trust.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaxxed Movie 96 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, and Kathy Spindler Guest: Nina MartinNina Martin joins the TWiV team to talk about the movie Vaxxed, her bout with dengue fever, and the latest research on Zika virus.”

Vitamins and Supplements 78 mins – “More than half of Americans use vitamins or supplements, spending over $9.4 billion a year. Dr. Jeffrey Tice takes a look at which are encouraged, which are discouraged and which have no benefit. He covers antioxidants, folic acid, vitamin D and Calcium and Omega 3. Recorded on 03/08/2016.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voice Structure 39 mins – “What makes our speaking voices so distinctive and so recognisable? How can we transform the way we use our voice? Coinciding with a new exhibition at the Wellcome Collection, This Is A Voice is a book by Jeremy Fisher and Gillyanne Kayes offering 99 exercises to train, project and harness the power of your voice.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Desalination 20 mins – “’Water, water, everywhere, nor any drop to drink.’ So lamented Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s ancient mariner 210 years ago. Today’s scientific advances in water desalination promise to edit that script into “and every drop to drink,” dramatically increasing our ability to transform sea water into fresh water and quench the thirst of 1.2 billion people facing shortages of water….” At the link right-click “Listen to podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Issues 20mins – “From San Diego to Santiago to Seville to Sydney, billions of people are facing shortages of clean water. More than one billion people have no access to clean drinking water. And things are getting worse.” At the link right-click “Listen to podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Solutions 20 mins – “As wagon trains of pioneers headed West to settle the American frontier, they encountered oceans of grass swaying in the wind in the prairies. This grass grew 7-10 feet high — almost to the second story windows on a modern house. Much of that green ocean consisted of switch grass. Today switch grass is looking greener than ever to new generations of pioneers. Those pioneers are chemists, chemical engineers, and other scientists who are searching for solutions to the challenges of global warming.” At the link right-click “Listen to podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Weight Loss Battle 47 mins – “It takes a lot of courage to step on the scale on The Biggest Loser TV show. Sean Algier dropped 155 pounds after grueling training regimen. And then, gained it all back and a little more. Don’t blame donuts. It’s his metabolism that’s done him in. We’ll unpack the physiology and psychology of weight loss. Later in the hour, we’ll take a deep dive into American food culture with the author of Devoured. This hour On Point: Weighing weight loss.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wine Fraud 24 mins – “The biggest wine fraud in history is the subject of a new documentary, called “Sour Grapes.” It’s a story about the astronomically wealthy, an obsession with fine wines worth tens-of-thousands of dollars and the con man who duped them all.” At the link find the title, “Sour Grapes documentary uncorks high-end world of fine wine fraud, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160505_36658.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Winter Fortress 66 mins – “In early 1942, the U.S. and Great Britain work together to develop the Atomic Bomb, but London needs to make sure Nazi Germany doesn’t get there first. Today’s guest is author Neal Bascomb. We discuss his new book, out today, The Winter Fortress: The Epic Mission to Sabotage Hitler’s Atomic Bomb.” At the link find the title, “Episode 162-The Winter Fortress Interview with Neal Bascomb,” right-click “Media files Bascomb_Interview_5316” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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