Media Mining Digest 180 – Apr 24, 2015: Adam Smith Background, Aging Disease, Aid Worker Targets, America Unbalanced, American Indian Ruins, Angelou by Smiley, Annual Physicals, Bouncing Bombs, Brain trauma, Burgundy vs Bordeaux, China Pollution Issues, Civil War Women, Computer Vision, Constitution Interpretations, Copy Editor, Drought in California, Economics Lecture, Egg Unboiling, Energy Management, Energy Storage, Female Leader, First Nations Female Homicides, GABA, Genetic Medicine Startup, Government Secrecy, Health Care Business, Hydrogen Power, Italian Cooking, Job Growth, Kid Camp and Islamic Marriage, Large Hadron Collider, Lead Ammunition, Lincoln Assassination, Martin Luther King Jr, Muslim Relations, National Security Issues, Nature of Things, Nature-Deficit Disorder, Navigation on Land, Negro Justice, Neighborhood Revival, Neurology and Behavior, Newspaper Future, Nietzsche, Nora Ephron, North Korea, Nuclear Threat, Nutrition and Longevity, Occupy Movement, Ocean Ecology, Oklahoma Earthquakes, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Opportunity Makers, Oxytocin, Pavlov, Peripheral Artery Disease, Plant Directed Behavior, Plato on Knowledge, Play Is Important, PMS Controversy, Power Choice, Predator Nation, Prison Entrepreneur, Productivity, Psychopath Identification, Public Broadcasting, Future, Public Shaming, Public Speaking, Rachel Maddow, Residential Solar, Right to Work Laws, Rosalyn Carter, Rwanda IT, Salmon Future, Salmon in the Trees, Samurai Spirit, San Antonio Mayor, Sandra Day O’Connor, Saudi Arabia, Science Talk, Seed Libraries, Self Publishing, Shari’ah Law, Sharing Economy, Stockmarket Future, Target Date Funds, Trade and Commerce, Vanguard Funds, Video Game Gender, Volcanoes

The following audio files come from a larger group of 205 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 93 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Adam Smith Background 64 mins – “Vernon Smith and James Otteson talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Adam Smith in front of a live audience at Ball State University. Topics discussed include Smith’s view of human nature, the relevance of Smith for philosophy and economics today, and the connection between Smith’s two books, The Theory of Moral Sentiments and The Wealth of Nations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Aging Disease 52 mins – “We all try to fight it: the inexorable march of time. The fountain of youth doesn’t exist, and all those wrinkle creams can’t help. But modern science is giving us new weapons in the fight against aging. So how far are we willing to go? Hear when aging begins, a summary of the latest biotech research, and how a lab full of youthful worms might help humans stay healthy. Also, a geneticist who takes a radical approach: collect the DNA that codes for longevity and restructure our genome. He finds inspiration – and perhaps genes as well – in the bi-centenarian bowhead whale. But what if age really is mind over matter? A psychologist’s extraordinary thought experiment with septuagenarian men turns back the clock 20 years. Will it work on diseases such as cancer as well?” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aid Worker Targets 20 mins – “Vincent Cochetel was held hostage for 317 days in 1998, while working for the UN High Commissioner on Refugees in Chechnya. For the first time, he recounts the experience — from what it was like to live in a dark, underground chamber, chained to his bed, to the unexpected conversations he had with his captors. With lyricism and power, he explains why he continues his work today. Since 2000, attacks on humanitarian aid workers have tripled — and he wonders what that rise may signal to the world.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America Unbalanced 19 mins – “Ten days after 9/11, a shocking attack at a Texas mini-mart shattered the lives of two men: the victim and the attacker. In this stunning talk, Anand Giridharadas, author of “The True American,” tells the story of what happened next. It’s a parable about the two paths an American life can take, and a powerful call for reconciliation.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Indian Ruins 52 mins – “The Lost World of the Old Ones Thursday, Doug’s guest is author and mountaineer David Roberts. Roberts first wrote about the prehistoric people of the American Southwest 20 years ago. He says that when he finishes a book, he generally leaves the topic for the next project. But he could never get the “Old Ones” out of his head. So he continued to explore remote canyons and precarious cliffs to find the remains of their lives. Roberts’ new book chronicles his journeys and what he’s learned about “The Lost World of the Old Ones.’” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Angelou By Smiley 35 mins – “Author and broadcaster Tavis Smiley shares the story of his 28-year friendship with renowned author, poet and activist Maya Angelou, the subject of his new book, “My Journey With Maya.’” At the link find the title, ”Tavis Smiley: My Journey With Maya,” right-click “Media files IM_20150411.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Annual Physicals 51 mins – “According to a recent Kaiser Family Foundation poll, 92 percent of Americans believe it’s important to see their doctor at least once a year for a head-to-toe physical examination. About 45 million Americans do just that. Conventional wisdom deems the annual physical to be valuable for early detection of disease and general well-being. But many doctors and medical researchers have begun to question the efficacy of an annual physical. They say it’s too costly for the U.S. health care system. And some go so far as to say it’s worthless for the patient. We look at rethinking the annual physical exam.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Bouncing Bombs 4 mins – “Today, archivist Robert Marlin tells us about bouncing bombs. The University of Houston’s College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them. It’s nighttime, May 16, 1943: British pilots fly 19 modified Lancaster bombers into German territory. Their raid was meant to degrade Germany’s industrial capacity. And it quickly became legendary. And for good reason: they’d just launched the first “bouncing bombs” into German dams.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. (See the blog topic, “Duxford War Museum,” for more story.)

Brain Trauma 24 mins – “In this episode, we discuss what is known about chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), an increasingly discussed issue due to its effects on current and former football players. We discuss who else CTE affects, what is happening in the brain of affected individuals, and how more research is needed to solve this serious problem.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Burgundy vs Bordeaux 60 mins – “On March 23rd Intelligence Squared brought together Britain’s two giants of wine writing, Hugh Johnson and Jancis Robinson, to go head to head in a debate on the world’s two greatest wines. Every audience member will be given a glass of each wine to help them decide which of the two should win the crown.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

China Pollution Issues 56 mins – “What do major fashion retailers and designers like HM, Target, Gap and Levi have in common? They are all working with the Natural Resources Defense Council NRDC to create clothing that uses less water and energy to produce, transport, and care for. Through implementation of the NRDC’s Clean By Design program, these corporate partners utilize their tremendous buying power as a lever to reduce the environmental impacts of their suppliers abroad. Clean by Design focuses on improving process efficiency to reduce waste and emissions and improve the environment. Tune in to hear Dr. Linda Greer discuss the program in detail, and learn how consumers can influence the growing sustainable apparel movement.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil War Women 52 mins – “American women in the Civil War era could not own property. In fact, if they were married, they were property – the property of their husbands. They also could not vote and certainly could not run for office. But they made a mark on the nation’s history nonetheless. Some became journalists, nurses or activists. Others wielded influence behind the scenes as political spouses – women who had the ears of powerful men. In a new book, NPR’s Cokie Roberts delves into the lives of these Washington women and shows how their passion and intelligence influenced the times. Join Diane and Cokie for a discussion of 19th-century wives of presidents and congressmen.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Computer Vision 18 mins – “When a very young child looks at a picture, she can identify simple elements: “cat,” “book,” “chair.” Now, computers are getting smart enough to do that too. What’s next? In a thrilling talk, computer vision expert Fei-Fei Li describes the state of the art — including the database of 15 million photos her team built to “teach” a computer to understand pictures — and the key insights yet to come.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constitution Interpretations 52 mins – “It’s the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. As the country reflects on his death and legacy, the author of a new book says one basic fact of Lincoln’s life cannot be overlooked: where he is from. Legal scholar Akhil Reed Amar argues that Lincoln’s home in Illinois was key to his views on slavery and secession, making geography central to Lincoln’s contributions to the U.S. Constitution. It’s just one example of how America’s distinct regional differences shape the law of the land. We take a Constitutional road trip with Akhil Reed Amar.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Copy Editor 47 mins – “Subject. Verb. Object. What’s so hard about that? But the English language, our grammar rules, our punctuation, the endless guidelines and exceptions have been giving school children nightmares since the first edition of the Merriam Webster dictionary was published in 1828. “That” vs. “Which”. “Me” vs. “I”. Luckily, Mary Norris, a top level copy editor at the New Yorker, has spent her life worrying about dangling participles, the Oxford comma, and what’s next in the dangerous days of texting and twitter. This hour, On Point: the New Yorker’s Comma Queen on life and grammar.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought in California 51 mins – “The drought in California is considered to be the worst since temperature and rainfall records were first kept in the late 1800s. With a population of almost 39 million and an important agricultural sector, the effects in California are widespread. Climate scientists point out the current drought is not limited to California. And although unprecedented in modern times, research suggests that in past centuries the region experienced droughts lasting for decades. We look at the drought in the West and what we can learn from ancient weather patterns.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Economics Lecture 92 mins – “Tyler Cowen and Jeffrey Sachs discuss the resource curse, why Russia failed and Poland succeeded, charter cities, Sach’s China optimism, JFK, Paul Rosenstein-Rodan, whether Africa will be able to overcome the middle income trap, Paul Krugman, Sach’s favorite novel, premature deindustrialization, and how to reform graduate economics education.” At the link click “Download” and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Egg Unboiling 6 mins – “The familiar change that takes place when we boil an egg – the runny egg white goes rubbery and becomes opaque- occurs because heat causes the proteins that make up the egg white to change their shape – or denature. Now, University of California, Irvine, scientist Greg Weiss has found a way to reverse the process or “unboil” an egg. And this could be a very useful technique for mass-producing proteins that we need to study, or for medical use, as he explained to Chris Smith…” At the link right-click “Download as MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Management  7 mins – “Too much solar and wind power. Really? Is that possible? It’s a good problem to have, because if we’re going to beat climate change, we’re going to need way more low-carbon energy than we get now. But it’s still a problem for Germany. Germany has brought on record amounts of wind and solar generating capacity in the last few years, helping it now meet more than a quarter of its electricity demand with renewable sources, and building toward its goal of 80 percent by 2050. But that also means it’s having to deal with problems that the rest of us who are farther behind can barely even see coming. Like, occasionally, too much intermittent wind and solar power for the electricity grid to handle without a lot of juggling.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Storage 8 mins – “Wolfram Walter is a man obsessed with things electric. …His home is his development lab, and when he’s not wiring up his vehicles, he’s working on the latest iteration of an invention that he thinks will help solve what might be the biggest problem in Germany’s energiewende — its historic transition from fossil fuels and nuclear power to mostly solar and wind power. Just a few years in, the country already gets more than a quarter of its electricity from renewables. But those sources aren’t always available, which limits their effectiveness. Wolfram Walter with his first home solar storage system, which he built when he was unhappy with any of the others he could find on the market. Barely a year after he started testing it out in his own house the Sonnenspeicher/Sun Storage system won an award for innovative renewable product of the year in Germany. …It’s a metal box about the size of a small refrigerator. Hook it up to solar panels on your roof, Walter says, and “you have a power plant working 24 hours day, 365 days a year.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Leader 14 mins – “Dame Stephanie Shirley is the most successful tech entrepreneur you never heard of. In the 1960s, she founded a pioneering all-woman software company in the UK, which was ultimately valued at $3 billion, making millionaires of 70 of her team members. In this frank and often hilarious talk, she explains why she went by “Steve,” how she upended the expectations of the time, and shares some sure-fire ways to identify ambitious women…” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Nations Female Homicides 24 mins – “More women and girls from Canada’s Aboriginal population go missing or are murdered than any other section of society. Joanna Jolly reports from the city of Winnipeg. At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Canada’s Red River Murders – 8 Apr 2015,” right-click “docarchive_20150409-0430b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GABA 25 mins – “This week we kick off the first episode in our “Know Your Neurotransmitters” series.   Jesse is joined by Dr. Matthew Broome – Senior Clinical Research Fellow in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Oxford – to talk about the neurotransmitter GABA.  Dr. Broome explains how GABA (or gamma-Aminobutyric acid for those who love a good tongue-twister) works, where it comes from, and how it affects our brains and bodies. We’ll also learn about the dangers of alcohol withdrawal, how trying to remember things could actually make us more forgetful, and the strange-but-true symptoms of Alice in Wonderland Syndrome.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Medicine Startup 56 mins – “Sean George, president and chief operating officer of genetics-information company Invitae, explains how the rewards of entrepreneurship come from facing the major challenges along the way. In this insightful talk, the serial entrepreneur also underscores the necessity of a team’s focus on mission to see a venture through adversity.” At the link hover over “Podcast,” then right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Target As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Secrecy 52 mins – “Since the dawn of time, leaders have tried to control access to information. Even in the early days of the democratic United States, the founding fathers struggled to define how open a society the new country should be. In this debate, Thomas Jefferson won the day and the American government, by and large, favored openness over secrecy. But Frederick A.O. Schwarz Jr., the author of the new book “Democracy In The Dark” says the U.S. government has shifted far from this founding principle and that we are currently living in a “secrecy era” in which a lack of transparency threatens to undermine democracy. He joins Diane in studio to talk about the culture of secrecy in American government.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Health Care Business 54 mins – “The practice of medicine has been subsumed by the business of medicine. This is great news for healthcare shareholders — and bad news for pretty much everyone else.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hydrogen Power 7 mins – “People have been fantasizing about hydrogen cars forever. It was the car of the future before the Prius and the Tesla were the car of the future. And it still is. …my companions and I are talking about the reason we’re here, Germany’s energiewende, perhaps the most radical energy transition ever undertaken. By the middle of this century, Germany plans to nearly eliminate fossil and nuclear power and get 80% of its electricity from renewable sources, including wind, solar, hydropower and biomass. It’s a response to the dangers of climate change, nuclear accidents and reliance on foreign sources of energy. Already, just a few years in, the country gets more than a quarter of its electricity from renewables. And by many measures, the energiewende has been a remarkable success. But I’m also getting a reality check on it. “We’re still right at the very beginning of a new energy system in Germany,” Weise tells me. And there are huge challenges ahead.”At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Italian Cooking 48 mins – “When Jody Scaravella’s mother and grandmother passed, he missed their cooking. Italian. Old country. The real deal. Nothing watered down or homogenized, but cooking that brimmed with the original flavors and culture of his Italian ancestry. The cooking of a grandmother or, in Italian, the “nonna.” So Scaravella opened his own restaurant, on Staten Island, and put the word out to all of New York that he wanted real Italian grandmothers – nonnas – to come and do the cooking.  And they did. Now they’re with us. This hour On Point:  Italian cooking, nonna-style.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Growth 46 mins – “It’s been a big string of strong months for job creation in the USA. Most everybody expected more of the same when the new jobs numbers for March came out on Friday. A quarter million new jobs created was the confident ballpark. More good news. Instead, the actual number posted by the Labor Department Friday was half that. Just 126,000 new jobs.  That’s a big pothole in the economic recovery story. What’s going on?  A lot depends on this. This hour On Point: the jobs pothole, and what’s really going on with work, wages and the US economy.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kid Camp and Islamic Marriage 55 mins – Two stories, the first about life in a camp for kids with difficult diseases. The second about complications during the arrangement of an Islamic marriage. At the link find the title, “Snap #609 – Eye Of The Beholder,” right-click “Media files npr_398701555.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Large Hadron Collider 51 mins – “Two years ago the team at Cern operating the Large Hadron Collider astounded the world with the discovery of the Higgs boson. Now, after a refit and upgrade almost doubling its power, they have their sights set on capturing dark matter, and making scientific history for a second time. But what will they find? The Guardian’s Ian Sample and Nicola Davis are joined by Mike Lamont, operations group leader at CERN; Jon Butterworth, professor of physics at University College London; and Daniela Bortoletto, professor of physics at the University of Oxford.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lead Ammunition 30 mins – “…We have known for a long time that lead is a neurotoxin that poses health and safety risks, and we have seen over the past several decades corresponding efforts to remove it from toys, paint, gasoline, and other household items. But lead is still quite commonly found in the ammunition used in hunting, and as a result lead enters into the food chain for animals like the highly endangered California Condor. So why hasn’t lead been removed from ammunition?….” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lincoln Assassination 47 mins – “To mark the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, author and historian James Swanson looks back at the event that shocked the nation.” At the link find the title, “James Swanson on the Lincoln Assassination,” right-click “Media files IM_20150412.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martin Luther King, Jr  58 mins -”Cornel West, editor of The Radical King, talked about Martin Luther King, Jr.’s, radical political thinking, a side of the late civil rights leader that the author argues has been diminished and sanitized. Mr. West spoke with Khalil Gibran Muhammad, dire ctor of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.” At the link find the title, “After Words: Cornel West,” right-click “Media files program.392229.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muslim Relations 64 mins – “Former State Department advisor for Afghanistan and Pakistan and best-selling author Nasr delivers a sharp indictment of America’s flawed foreign policy and outlines a new relationship with the Muslim world. Drawing on his in-depth knowledge of the Middle East and firsthand experience in diplomacy, Nasr offers a powerful reassessment of American foreign policy that directs the country away from its failing relationships toward more productive, and less costly, partnerships. Michael Nacht, Ph.D., Professor and former Dean, Goldman School of Public Policy, U.C. Berkeley;  Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Global Strategic Affairs, Obama Administration – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Security Issues  68 mins – “Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times senior writer Schmitt has covered the military, terrorism and national security affairs for two decades. He is currently covering the evolving story of the FBI Investigation that led to the resignation of CIA Director David Petraeus. He co-authored Counterstrike: The Untold Story of America’s Secret Campaign Against Al Qaeda. Since the September 11 attacks, he has made many reporting trips to Iraq and Afghanistan to cover American military operations there. He has also reported on counter-terrorism operations in Pakistan, Mali and Southeast Asia.  As Pentagon correspondent, he covered the Persian Gulf War from Saudi Arabia and Kuwait and also reported from Haiti and Somalia. Domestic reporting included covering Congress, following financial and business news, demographic and immigration issues, commercial aviation and the travel industry. Come hear his inside view on the conflicts and challenges facing the U.S. in the post-9/11 world and the latest on the breaking news of the day.” Eric Schmitt, New York Times National Security Senior Reporter; Stephen Zunes, Professor, Department of Politics/Middle East Studies, University of San Francisco – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nature of Things  70 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy hosts Harvard scholar and prolific author Greenblatt, who has crafted a stunning historical account and a thrilling story of discovery. Nearly 600 years ago, a cannily alert man took a thousand-year-old manuscript off a library shelf and soon realized it was the last surviving manuscript of Lucretius’s epic, On the Nature of Things. This rediscovery unearthed ancient but dangerous ideas: that the universe functioned without the aid of gods, that religious fear was damaging to human life, and that matter was made up of tiny atoms in eternal motion. Those ideas helped inspire the Renaissance and later influenced the scientific thought of Galileo, Freud, Darwin and Einstein, and the writing of Montaigne, Shakespeare and Thomas Jefferson.” Stephen Greenblatt, Author, The Swerve; Professor of English and American Literature, Harvard University. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nature-Deficit Disorder 69 mins – “Louv’s best-selling book Last Child in the Woods sparked a national debate that spawned an international movement to reconnect kids to nature. He coined the term “nature-deficit disorder,” influenced national policy and helped inspire campaigns in more than 80 cities, states and provinces throughout North America. Now, Louv delivers another powerful call to action, this time for adults, offering a new vision of the future, in which our lives are as immersed in nature as they are in technology. Richard Louv, Journalist; Author, The Nature Principle: Human Restoration and the End of Nature-Deficit Disorder” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Navigation on Land 55 mins – “You Are Here…but how do you know exactly where you are? And then how do you know how to get from there…to somewhere else? Dave Redel explores new ideas about why some people are wizards at navigation, while others get completely lost.” At the link find the title, “You Are Here. Feb 23, 2015,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150223_24137.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Negro Justice 62 mins – “The Negro and Equal Justice – Poole, Cecil F., 1914- Clemency secretary to Governor Brown of California, 1959-61; United States Attorney; U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit judge, 1979″ At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neighborhood Revival 17 mins – “Theaster Gates, a potter by training and a social activist by calling, wanted to do something about the sorry state of his neighborhood on the south side of Chicago. So he did, transforming abandoned buildings to create community hubs that connect and inspire those who still live there (and draw in those who don’t). In this passionate talk, Gates describes his efforts to build a “miniature Versailles” in Chicago, and he shares his fervent belief that culture can be a catalyst for social transformation in any city, anywhere.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurology and Behavior 60 mins – “Unlock the deepest mysteries of the human brain with the man Richard Dawkins has dubbed the “Marco Polo of neuroscience.” Ramachandran reveals intriguing and profound insights into the evolution of the human brain tracing back the strange links between neurology and behavior. With innovative approaches to answer age-old questions, Ramachandran takes on exciting and controversial topics including new directions for treating autism. Dr. V.S. Ramachandran, Director, Center for Brain and Cognition, UC San Diego; Author, The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Quest for What Makes Us Human” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Newspaper Future 65 mins – “The average San Franciscan is more likely to get their media from a screen than from a paper, so it’s no surprise that newspapers and magazines are shutting down all around us; the editorial space and the way we consume news has changed. What will editorial look like years from now? Will curated content really be king? Can non-digital publications stay afloat? Leading digital experts will share their experiences, honest thoughts and predictions for the future of publishing.” Clara Jeffery, Editor in Chief, Mother Jones; Mark Johnson, CEO of Zite; Laney Whitcanack, Chief Community Officer, Federated Media; Chris Taylor, Deputy Editor, Mashable; Peter Ha, Managing Editor, TechCrunch – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nietzsche 60 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy explores ideas in Friedrich Nietzsche’s Will to Power, including connecting Nietzsche’s focus on self-overcoming to Abraham Maslow’s theory of self-actualization. Schickel will investigate her favorite Nietzschean insights, followed by a Socratic dialogue with George Hammond and an open discussion with the audience. Denise Schickel, Nietzsche fan.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nora Ephron 65 mins – “Acclaimed director of Julie & Julia and  writer of When Harry Met Sally, Ephron offers her hilarious observations and insights into the past, present and future, sharing everything she hasn’t (yet) forgotten. She reflects on what women really think when they reach a certain age and what she’s learned along the way. Nora Ephron, Film Director, Sleepless in Seattle; Screenwriter; Author, I Feel Bad About My Neck and I Remember Nothing ; In conversation with Jane Ganahl, Author; Co-founder, Litquake” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea 67 mins – “North Korea shocked the world when it recently threatened nuclear war with the U.S. and announced it was severing the armistice signed in 1953 signifying the end of the Korean War. What does this threat mean for the U.S., and particularly for those living on the West Coast? Experts well acquainted with North Korea weigh in on both the political climate and military threat in the short as well as the long term. Please bring your questions. Philip Yun, Executive Director, Ploughshares Fund; Former Senior Member of U.S. Delegation and Negotiator, Peace Talks with North Korea; David Straub, Associate Director, Korean Studies Program, The Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, Stanford University; Former U.S. State Department Officer for Korean Affairs; Dr. Gloria Duffy, President and CEO, Commonwealth Club – Moderator”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Threat  66 mins – “Three distinguished statesmen discuss their vision for international security in these precarious times. Secretaries Shultz and Perry and Senator Nunn will assess the current state of nuclear threats, including Iran’s drive to build a bomb, the North Korean nuclear weapons program, and future prospects for limiting the spread of nuclear materials and eventually eliminating nuclear weapons.” George Shultz, Former U.S Secretary of State under President Reagan; William Perry, Former U.S. Secretary of Defense under President Clinton; Sam Nunn, Former U.S. Senator, Georgia (1972-96), Co-Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Nuclear Threat Initiative; Philip Taubman, Consulting Professor, Stanford University Center for International Security and Cooperation; Former New York Times Washington Bureau Chief; Author, The Partnership: Five Cold Warriors and Their Quest to Ban the Bomb – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nutrition and Longevity 88 mins – “Two new studies supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council have discovered a link between nutrition and increased immunity while aging, giving new meaning to the phrase, “You are what you eat.” Join Dr. Robert J. Marshall as he discusses the scientific connections between nutrients, regeneration and disease prevention.” Robert J. Marshall, Ph.D., CCN, DACBN. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Occupy Movement  64 mins –  “#OWS, pepper spray, book sharing, tents, mic checks and protest signs: Since September, the Occupy movement has staked a claim in every Facebook feed, almost every news program and in literally more than 100 major cities in the United States alone. Using the tools of collective assembly, occupiers have mobilized thousands in their fight for global change and against the richest 1 percent, but so many people are still less than sure what Occupy is all about. What have been the strategies and intent of this people-powered movement? Now that they have the world’s attention, what are they going to do with it? What is driving the movement forward?” Iris Brown, Organizer, Occupy Oakland ; Nadim Haidar, Nonviolent Direct-Action Trainer; Travelling Occupier, Denver, Boulder, Santa Fe, Oakland; George Lakoff, Cognitive Linguist & Professor, UC Berkeley; Jean Quan, Mayor, Oakland; Melissa Griffin, Columnist, San Francisco Examiner; Co-Host, Necessary Conversations- Moderator”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Ecology 62 mins – “Science and policy are not the only tools to improve ocean sustainability – entrepreneurs and investors are coming together to fashion solutions that empower coastal communities and preserve biodiversity. Using the SOCAP model of impact investing, these opportunities will be brought to life through a Ghanaian tech entrepreneur working with tilapia farmers, as well as the investor perspective which provides a framework for evaluating these complex market-based approaches to sustainability. Alloysius Attah, Founder and CEO, Farmerline; Kevin Jones, Founder, Good Capital; Convener, SOCAP; Monica Jain, Founder, Fish 2.0; Executive Director, Manta Consulting; Jeff Leifer, CEO, Circadian Media Lab – Moderator”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oklahoma Earthquakes 47 mins – “Until 2008, the state of Oklahoma averaged one or two earthquakes magnitude 3.0 or greater a year. Then the lid blew off those numbers.  Rising year by year. To 20. Then 42. Then hundreds. Last year, Oklahoma had 585 earthquakes that size. This year, it’s on track for more than 700. Walls shake. Bricks fall. It’s nerve-wracking. And, say experts, it’s all about how the state’s energy companies go after oil and gas. And huge volumes of water being pumped deep in the earth. Now the earth is moving. This hour On Point: the earthquakes of Oklahoma.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids 32 mins – “In episode #32, Dr. Michael Lewis, President of the Brain Health Education and Research Institute, joins us to discuss the positive impacts that Omega-3 fatty acids can have on the health and maintenance of the human brain… Dr. Lewis has several years of experience developing programs for the military involving the use of omega-3 fatty acids to treat traumatic brain injury.  He has been a pioneer in the clinical use of omega-3 fatty acids for the prevention, acute treatment, and rehabilitation of brain issues from physical to psychological trauma, including concussions, stroke, PTSD, and more. His insights  have impacted thousands of lives, and he is passionate about continuing to find improved solutions to the age-old problem of brain injury.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opportunity Makers  10 mins – “We all want to use our talents to create something meaningful with our lives. But how to get started? (And … what if you’re shy?) Writer Kare Anderson shares her own story of chronic shyness, and how she opened up her world by helping other people use their own talents and passions.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oxytocin  22 mins – “As part of our Science and the Seven Deadly Sins series, Dr. Paul Zak discusses his work studying the relation of hormones to human behavior. Specifically, his research focuses on oxytocin’s role in regulating generosity and greed.” At the link find the title, “Greed: Hormones and Moral Behavior, Jul 2013,” right-click “Media files greed.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pavlov 60 mins – “This week, we’re learning about the life and work of a groundbreaking physiologist whose work on learning and instinct is familiar worldwide, and almost universally misunderstood. We’ll spend the hour with Daniel Todes, Ph.D, Professor of History of Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University, discussing his book “Ivan Pavlov: A Russian Life in Science.’” At the link find the title, “#307 Pavlov,” right-click “Media files Science for the People 307 Ivan_Pavlov.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peripheral Artery Disease 65 mins – “Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) is a condition that results from blockage of arteries in the extremities, affecting between 8 and 12 million Americans and growing. Patients with PAD have 3 times the risk of a heart attack or stroke. Risk factors include hypertension, diabetes, smoking, age and menopause – 25 percent of women between the ages of 55 and 74 may have PAD and the rate is even higher for men. Many PAD sufferers have severe disabilities, with potential need for amputation. This disease is under-diagnosed and undertreated, and a concerted effort is needed to educate the public and physicians, and to accelerate research to develop new treatments. Michael S. Conte, M.D., Professor and Chief, Division of Vascular Surgery, UCSF

Plant Directed Behavior 18 mins – “What if human consciousness isn’t the end-all and be-all of Darwinism? What if we are all just pawns in corn’s clever strategy game to rule the Earth? Author Michael Pollan asks us to see the world from a plant’s-eye view.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plato On Knowledge 60 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy delves deep into Plato’s dialogue on knowledge. Mink will focus on the Platonic ideas that underlie the search for truth in a jury trial, which led to the development of the common law on hearsay. Mink’s analysis will be followed by a Socratic dialogue with Hammond and an open discussion with the audience.James Mink, Litigation Attorney; Classics Aficionado” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Play Is Important  55 mins – “Play: How It Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination and Invigorates the Soul – Have you played today? Brown explores the power and importance of play, drawing from his own clinical research, as well as the latest developments in neuroscience, social science and behavioral studies. Looking at the science of play, Brown expands on it and brings it into a broader context, maintaining that it ignites the tools one needs to succeed, whether on the playground or in the boardroom. Stuart Brown, M.D., Founder, the National Institute for Play, Co-author, Play: How it Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul (with Christopher Vaughan)” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PMS Controversy 15 mins – “Everybody knows that most women go a little crazy right before they get their period, that their reproductive hormones cause their emotions to fluctuate wildly. Except: There’s very little scientific consensus about premenstrual syndrome. Says psychologist Robyn Stein DeLuca, science doesn’t agree on the definition, cause, treatment or even existence of PMS. She explores what we know and don’t know about it — and why the popular myth has persisted.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power Choice 64 mins – “Rising interest in clean power is presenting electric monopolies with competition for the first time. Marin Clean Energy now gives consumers an alternative to PG&E, and San Francisco and Sonoma are preparing their own programs to offer consumers new options for powering their homes. Monterey and Santa Cruz counties are considering jumping on the consumer choice bandwagon, which is growing nationally. In San Francisco, Shell Oil won the contract to deliver electricity generated from 100 percent renewable energy. But city supervisors are worried that the customer base is lacking. Opponents such as the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers claim that higher rates would burden the community and point out that such local efforts are not required to generate new clean energy. How could community choice change the shape of electricity supply in San Francisco and other communities? Join us for a discussion of disruption, innovation and consumer choice. Kim Malcolm, Director, CleanPowerSF; Shawn Marshall, Mill Valley Council Member; Executive Director, Local Energy Aggregation Network; Marcie Milner, Senior Regulatory Manager, Shell Energy North America; Hunter Stern, Business Manager, Brotherhood of Electrical Workers” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Predator Nation 62 mins – “Could the global economic meltdown of the last few years have been prevented? Ferguson believes the crisis was no accident. After Inside Job won the 2011 Academy Award for Best Documentary Film, Ferguson started his acceptance speech by charging that there was a lack of accountability of the finance industry and Wall Street, pointing out that three years after the horrific crisis started not a single financial executive had gone to jail. Predator Nation continues to examine the important issues raised in Inside Job, arguing that an out-of-control finance industry took advantage of a deregulated atmosphere and purposely got rich at the expense of others. Through his extensive interviews with financial insiders and government officials, Ferguson exposes the “corrupted networks” that caused the economic collapse and offers a plan of action to help our country get back on track. Charles Ferguson, 2011 Academy Award Winning Documentary Filmmaker, Inside Job; Author, Predator Nation; Kirk O. Hanson, Director, Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University and Commonwealth Club Silicon Valley Advisory Council Member – Moderator insiders and government officials, Ferguson exposes the “corrupted networks” that caused the economic collapse and offers a plan of action to help our country get back on track. Charles Ferguson, 2011 Academy Award Winning Documentary Filmmaker, Inside Job; Author, Predator Nation”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Entrepreneur  16 mins – “Frederick Hutson is an entrepreneur whose biggest early venture landed him in prison for nearly five years—distributing marijuana through UPS and FedEx. While in prison, he realized that a lot of the problems of everyday prison life could use a business solution. And then, he got out. Today on the show, a businessman goes to prison, and decides he is going to disrupt the biggest captive market in America.” At the link find the title, “#610: The Prisoner’s Solution, Mar 2015,” right-click “Media files npr_392889455.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productivity 49 mins – “Laura Roeder – Social media is for real. To be honest, I wasn’t a believer. I think social media often times just adds to the noise. But after speaking with our guest this week, I realized that what I think doesn’t really matter. Social media is here and it’s a necessity for any business these days. Even more importantly is the specific way you interact on social media, what you share, how you share it, and what your strategy is. Love it or hate it, it’s time to step up your social media game. This week we interview entrepreneur and social media expert, Laura Roeder.” At the link find the title, “Episode 182 – Laura Roeder – Social Media is for Real,” right-click “Media files Episode_182_Laura_Roeder.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychopath Identification 68 mins – “What Is a Psychopath? – Ponder this chilling fact: Chances are, you’ve already met at least one psychopath. Psychopathy is a diagnostic term used to classify men and women who, due to an ingrained antisocial lifestyle, display prominent interpersonal problems and a marked lack of empathy and conscience, pose a unique danger to society. They’re not all in prisons, either. The great majority live in our communities. Murthy will explain how psychopaths can be diagnostically identified and how they are biologically different from the rest of us. Hari Murthy, Psychological Assessment Services Coordinator, San Quentin State Prison” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Broadcasting Future 67 mins – “Come meet the leaders of PBS and KQED. Ask them their plans for future programming and let them know your thoughts. Kerger is president and CEO of PBS, the nation’s largest non-commercial media organization, with more than 350 member stations throughout the country. Boland oversees KQED Public Media, including KQED Television – one of the nation’s most-watched public television stations during primetime, with more than 1.5 million households viewing per month – as well as KQED Radio, the most-listened-to public radio station in the country, reaching more than 745,000 listeners each week.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Shaming 59 mins – “Public shaming is back. Once done in town squares, the subjects of our ridicule locked in pillories and unable to avoid the rotten fruit and insults we hurled at them, now the shaming takes place on the internet. No longer our neighbors, the new targets are strangers and celebrities, and instead of courts meting out justice, it is the aggregate outrage of well-meaning people on Twitter just like you. Listen as author Jon Ronson describes his new book, “So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed,” in which he spends time with people who have had their lives ruined by modern, web-based public shamings in an attempt to reveal to each of us what can happen when, alone but together, we obliterate people for unpopular opinions, off-color jokes, offensive language, and professional faux pas.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Speaking 19 mins – “Public speaking has moved out of the limelight in recent years as online marketing continues to gain prominence in the industry. The Conversation Agent, Valeria Maltoni, talks about the value of public speaking, how she uses public speaking to establish herself as an authority in her industry, and how you can get over your stage jitters and do it, too. Connect with Valeria and Alex on Twitter @ConversationAge and @TechAlly, respectively.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rachel Maddow  68 mins –  “Rhodes Scholar, AIDS activist, civics geek, “blindly partisan” and even the “grand doyenne of liberal demagoguery” according to Gawker – Rachel Maddow has been called many things over the years, but until now, “author” has not been one of them. This year the sassy and smart-as-a-whip host of MSNBC’s politico program, The Rachel Maddow Show, joins the literary fold and takes on what she believes to be the debate between civilian life and the war machine in her new book, Drift. Join us for an organ intro, popcorn munchies, and an exclusive interview with Rachel Maddow.” Rachel Maddow, Host, The Rachel Maddow Show; Author, Drift in Conversation with Daniel Handler, aka Lemony Snicket, Author; Screenwriter; Accordionist”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Residential Solar 52 mins – “Residential solar is surging in the U.S. The price of the average solar panel is down more than 60 percent in the past five years, and more and more solar customers are earning credit for the extra energy they produce for the grid. But that practice – known as “net metering” – has some utilities worried about the future. In a number of states, utilities are fighting to cut back on net metering, as concerns grow about the cost of maintaining the grid and adapting to the changing energy picture. For this month’s Environmental Outlook, we look at what the surge in solar could mean for consumers…and for the future of the electric grid.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Right to Work Laws 51 mins – “Over the weekend, a few thousand union members gathered outside the statehouse in Wisconsin. They were there to voice their opposition to so called right-to-work legislation. If signed into law, which is expected, Wisconsin would become the 25th state with right-to-work laws on the books. These laws ban workers from having to pay union dues. Organized labor leaders say it’s another blow to their diminishing numbers. Supporters say the laws attract business and are good for economic development. Guest host Tom Gjelten and our guests discuss right-to-work laws and the future of unions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Rosalyn Carter 71 mins – “Rosalynn Carter: Ending the Mental Health Crisis – Former First Lady Carter is an icon and an advocate for mental health, early childhood immunization, human rights and conflict resolution through her work at The Carter Center in Atlanta. Carter will discuss her decades working in the mental health field. Following the program, she will also sign copies of her new book, Within Our Reach: Ending the Mental Health Crisis.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rwanda IT  20 mins – “As part of the BBC’s Richer World season, Alan Kasujja travels to three countries in his native east Africa to meet young Africans determined to build a better future. In the second programme, Alan travels to Rwanda, a country notorious for the genocide that took place there in 1994. Yet a bright new future beckons for some of its youth, as young female schoolteacher Jessie trains them in the high technology that promises to transform the nation.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: My Africa – Rwanda 17 Feb 15,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150217-0300b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salmon Future 64 mins – “The fight to restore salmon runs in the Pacific Northwest involves billions of dollars in public funds and politicking all the way up to the White House. This twisted story is captured in a new documentary airing on PBS this spring. Also this spring, a federal judge is expected to hand down a decision that will shape federal salmon policy in the Columbia River Basin. What impact will that decision have on the area’s ecosystems and economies? Can any lessons be applied to the fierce confrontations between fisherman, farmers and environmentalists in California?  Phil Isenberg, Chair, Delta Vision Task Force
James Norton, Filmmaker,  Salmon: Running the Gauntlet; Jonathan Rosenfield, Ph.D., Conservation Biologist, The Bay Institute

Salmon in the Trees 62 mins – “Most of us will never visit the vast wilderness of Alaska, so the phrase “Salmon in the trees” may seem a bit whimsical.  But in the Tongass rainforest, there really are salmon in the trees. Come to our Earth Day event to meet the award-winning conservation photographer Gulick, see her astounding photos, and hear what’s it’s like to live for months in the wilderness hoping to have a near-bear encounter.Amy Gulick, Conservation Photographer; Author”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Samurai Spirit 53 mins – “The Japanese samurai were a class of warriors who dominated Japan’s military, political and social culture for almost a thousand years. Ferocious warriors, they have become known as much for their “spirituality” as for their lethal swordsmanship. Hall, author of the Encyclopedia of Japanese Martial Arts, will discuss the training methods used by the samurai, which taught both martial skills and spiritual/psychological armoring. These methods, evolved over hundreds of years, have been preserved in a number of classical martial arts schools in Japan today. Join us for a fascinating look at martial arts and the spirit of the samurai. David A. Hall, Ph.D., Author; Professor; Ordained Buddhist Priest”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

San Antonio Mayor 67 mins – “San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro electrified the Charlotte audience during his keynote speech at the 2012 Democratic National Convention, reminding the audience that “The American dream is not a sprint, or even a marathon, but a relay!” Castro’s rise began in San Antonio, encouraged and inspired by his Mexican-American single mother, a political activist. Mayor Castro has prioritized creating economic and educational opportunities for his constituents, because he knows it can change the course of your life. Indeed, both Mayor Castro and his twin brother, Texas Congressman Joaquin Castro, went to Stanford University and Harvard Law School. Come hear from the man many say is a rising star of the Democratic Party.”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sandra Day O’Connor 66 mins – “In a rare public appearance, Justice O’Connor will discuss the need for a better-informed citizenry as well as her life, career, and views on the role of the U.S. Supreme Court. O’Connor, the first woman appointed to the Supreme Court, strongly believes that America suffers from a lack of civic education, and that is hurting Americans’ capacity to solve 21st century challenges. To revitalize civic education, she founded iCivics, which uses innovative methods such as video games to engage young people in learning about government and civic participation. Since 2009, iCivics has reached over 1.5 million young people and sparked a national discussion about this important cornerstone of our democratic heritage.” Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, Former Justice, U.S. Supreme Court in conversation with Dr. Mary Bitterman, President, Bernard Osher Foundation; Past Chair, Commonwealth Club’s Board of Governors. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Arabia 67 mins – “House has spent the last 30 years writing about Saudi Arabia — as diplomatic correspondent, foreign editor, and then publisher of The Wall Street Journal. Through observation, anecdote, extensive interviews and analysis she navigates the maze in which Saudi citizens find themselves trapped and reveals the mysterious nation that is the world’s largest exporter of oil, critical to global stability, and a source of Islamist terrorists. Join us for an in-depth examination of what all this portends for Saudi Arabia’s future, and for our own. Karen Elliott House, Author, On Saudi Arabia: Its People, Past, Religion, Fault Lines – and Future; Robert Rosenthal, Executive Director, Center for Investigative Reporting – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Arabia History 56 mins – “Chan will give a presentation about the fascinating exhibit, “Roads of Arabia: Archeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia”, which is at the Asian Art Museum until January 18. The San Francisco Chronicle described the exhibit as a “mesmerizing and astonishing journey to the Arabian Peninsula.” Some of the more ancient objects were discovered as recently as 40 years ago.” Dany Chan, Assistant Curator for Exhibition Projects, Asian Art Museum; Philippa Kelly, Educator, Author, Dramaturg At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Talk 61 mins – “The scientific literature is one of humanity’s greatest creations – a complete record of the ideas, experiments and discoveries of generations of researchers across the globe. While most of this corpus is now online, it remains as inaccessible to the public as it was centuries ago – with the physical limitations of print journals replaced by expensive publisher pay walls. Eisen, a leader in the movement to reinvent scientific communication, will discuss the origins of this absurd system, why it still exists, how the “open access” movement he helped to launch is finally bringing it to an end.Michael B. Eisen, Ph.D; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Associate Professor, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley; Co-founder, Public Library of Science” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seed Libraries 47 mins – “We all know what a library is. But do you know seed libraries? Not the corporate seed catalogs that plenty of people have already been scouring this season, to get their gardens going. But a seed library, where ordinary citizens – gardeners – check seeds in and out. Check them out when it’s planting time. Bring seeds back when you’ve harvested. To keep and celebrate the local, the regional, in veggies and more. To keep and celebrate diversity – bio-diversity – at a time when Big Food pushes toward monocultures. This hour On Point: the populist push in local seed libraries, to save the world.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Publishing P1 74 mins – “Program 1 – Options, Directions and Resources – Book publishing is undergoing a sea change. Come and participate in our dynamic and interactive three-part series covering all aspects of self-publishing, taught by front-line experts who have done it themselves Ð and succeeded. Attend one or all sessions of these in-depth seminars. The other events occur on April 12 and April 19. What does it take to publish a book, and how do you choose which route to follow? Discover your options – from traditional to cooperative to true self-publishing – with industry experts who’ve done it themselves. Get a clear direction and insider tips on the variety of strategies, resources and tools available. Lisa Alpine, Publisher, Good to Go Media; Co-author, Self-Publishing Boot Camp Workbook; Peter Beren, Literary Agent; Publishing Consultant; Author, The Writer’s Legal Companion; Carla King, Publisher, Good to Go Media;  Social Media Consultant; Author, Miss Adventuring Series.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Publishing P3 79 mins – “Book publishing is undergoing a sea change. Come and participate in our dynamic and interactive three-part series covering all aspects of self-publishing, taught by front-line experts who have done it themselves Ð and succeeded. Attend one or all sessions of these in-depth seminars. The other events occur on April 6 and April 12. Bookstores are closing; newspaper book reviews are almost gone; and online options can be overwhelming. What’s an author or publisher to do? Join the discussion with successful authors, who will share their stories of what has worked for them – from building relationships with independent bookstore buyers and distributors to using technology and social media in new ways; from digging into niche markets to selling directly to their fan base. Scott James, Columnist, The New York Times; Author (aka Kemble Scott), SoMa, The Sower; Elizabeth Block, Author, A Gesture Through Time; Recipient, the Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fiction Fellowship; Teresa LeYung Ryan, Author, Love Made of Heart, Build Your Name, Beat the Game: Be Happily Publishedn.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Publishing P2 76 mins – “Self-Publishing, Part Two: The Nuts + Bolts of Making Books – Book publishing is undergoing a sea change. Come and participate in our dynamic and interactive three-part series covering all aspects of self-publishing, taught by front-line experts who have done it themselves Ð and succeeded. Attend one or all sessions of these in-depth seminars. The other events occur on April 6 and April 19. What goes into making a book truly a book? What are the essentials of editing and page layout – and how can they make or break you? Learn from an insider panel of experts about the critical design and production of your book and the ins and outs of available formats, from traditional to e-books and apps. Find out how typesetting can be sexy, and how to create covers that will sell. Lee Foster, Owner, Foster Travel Publishing; Author, The Photographer’s Guide to San Francisco ; Joel Friedlander, Proprietor, Marin Bookworks; Blogger, TheBookDesigner.com; V. Vale, Publisher, RE/Search Publications; Founder, Search and Destroy.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shari’ah Law 74 mins – “What Is Shari’ah and Shari’ah law  in Islam? – Join Ali-Karamali, an attorney with a graduate degree in Islamic law and author of The Muslim Next Door: The Qur’an, the Media, and that Veil Thing, as she demystifies commonly used Islamic terms like “shari’ah” and “shari’ah law” and discusses how the rules of Islam were developed and have been implemented, with examples regarding women, finance and criminal law. Sumbul Ali-Karamali, Author, The Muslim Next Door” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharing Economy 66 mins – “With a slow economy consumers are looking for ways to spend less and waste less. New technologies and innovative business models are changing the way people consume and invest.  Yerdle is opening up the overstuffed garages of old trumpets, unused camping tents, and rarely used power tools to the wider community. Airbnb is making spare bedrooms and empty apartments available to thrifty travelers and homeowners looking to make a profit. Solar Mosaic is taking solar investment to the people to fund community solar projects around the country. Is crowd-funding the future of investment? Does sharing really cut down on waste? How is the sharing economy forcing slow moving tax and regulation models to change with the times? Andy Ruben, Co-founder, Yerdle; Bill Parish, President and Co-founder, Solar Mosaic; Lisa Gansky, Author, The Mesh: Why the Future of Business is Sharing” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stockmarket Future 58 mins – “Investors, economists, and quantitative finance experts discuss how technological innovations have hastened the growth of the markets.” At the link find the title, “Future of the Stockmarket, 2008,” right-click “Media files stockmarket.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Target Date Funds 28 mins – “This podcast was made to accompany the Marketwatch article on combining target date funds with small cap value. A major problem with target date funds (TDFs) is they don’t give enough exposure to the small cap or value asset classes. By simply adding a second position in a small cap value fund or ETF, most of the limitations of TDFs can be overcome. Paul compares the risk and expected additional return of the two-fund portfolio, as well as making sure you are aware of the nature of small cap value as an asset class. Paul suggests you have a copy of  The Four Fund Solution Table  to reference with this podcast.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trade and Commerce 49 mins – “‎This week on Innovation Hub, we’re ready for some tradeoffs. We’ve got author William Bernstein explaining how trade has shaped our daily lives, from camels to the compass to that cute new pair of shoes. Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers talks about what the government is trading away when it doesn’t fund science. Writer Andrew Winston sees if profit-driven companies might give something up in return for a healthier environment. Finally, engineering professor Anne Goodchild looks at the trade-offs of our new delivery economy.” At the link find the title, “4.18.15 Making Trades,” right-click “0418-FullShowWEBMIX.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vanguard Funds 39 mins – “Paul focuses on 10 important advantages that set Vanguard apart from it’s competition. The discussion includes the obvious quantifiable differences, as well as the qualifiable aspects that add to the likelihood of investors reaching their financial goals. Paul adds a huge bonus advantage he thinks will be a surprise to most investors.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Game Gender 17 mins – “Maddie Messer is 12, and she loves a good video game. One of her favorites is called Temple Run. In fact, it’s one of the most successful games out there. Temple Run is free to play—if you play as the default character, Guy Dangerous. But playing as a girl character can cost extra. Maddie found out this was true for a lot of games, and she didn’t think that was very fair. Today on the show: a 12-year-old girl takes on the entire video game industry.” At the link find the title, “#615: A 12-Year-Old Girl Takes On The Video Game Industry,” right-click “Media files npr_397387479.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Volcanoes 25 mins – “Island on Fire (04:45): In 1783, a crack opened up in the Earth, began to spew out lava and ash and poisonous gases, and didn’t stop for eight months. The volcano was Laki, one of many volcanoes in Iceland, and the effects of the eruption went global. Laki’s story is one of geology, chemistry, atmospheric science,…” At the link find the title, “Island On Fire: The Story of Laki,” right-click “Media files HowOnEarth-2015-03-31e.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 35+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

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Media Mining Digest 179 – Apr 17, 2015: 3D Roundtable, Australian Afghani Camelmen, Billie Holiday, Biomimicry, Book Trends, Brain Plasticity, Cancer Film, Cassava in Columbia, Chemical Pollutants, Children and Nature, China’s Hukou Reform, Drones for Conservation, Duxford War Museum, Economics Q and A, Environmentalist Hawken, Female Genital Mutilation, Financial Crisis Causes, Forensic Linguistics, Fridgenomics, Healthcare Randomized Evaluations, Hear Diet, Hispanics in America, Hollywood Blacklist, HPV Vaccine, Human Trafficking, Humor Helps, Ig Noble Awards, Immigration in America, India, Inside Job, Intelligence Testing, Internet Worm, Intuition Pumps, Islamic Religious Education, Islamic Women, Israel and Palestine, Japanese Internment, Job Search Skills, Kurds, Language Learning Quickly, Large Cap Value Funds, Larry Wilmore, Latin American Upgrade, Learning Tactics, Lee Kuan Yew, Less Traveled Road, Lethal Injections, Liberal Arts Education, Liberia Upswing, London Undocumented, Loneliness Hazard, Looted Antiquities, Louis Gossett Jr, Makers, Marijuana Future, Mark Twain On Truth, Martian Book, Math Education, Medicare Primer, Mental Enhancement, Merchants of Doubt, Metabolic Wellness, Mexico, Microchip Future, Mobile Device Dark Side, Morocco Evolution, Ms Pat, News Trends, Oil Price Impact, Oil Prices and Food, Parasitism Case Study, Permaculture, Podcasting Discussion, Premed Case Study, Prison Gangs, Public Shaming, Ravensbruck Camp, REITs, Ritalin, Shadow Banking System, Space Exploration, Supplements Quality, Trans Pacific Partnership, Violence Technology, Water History – America, Wealth Creation, Wondrous Women, Yellowstone Job

The following audio files come from a larger group of 248 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 97 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

3D Roundtable 96 mins – Mostly surveying related: photogrammetry, lidar. Autodesk, UAV use and reference to Catch 3d software that turns 2D photo series into 3D images. At the link find the title, “Taking 3D to the Next Level Roundtable Podcast,” right-click “Media files 2015-04-02, taking 3d to the next level septembers roundtable podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Afghani Camelmen 27 mins – “Dawood Azami focuses on the life and legacy of the Afghan cameleers, who first arrived in Australia in the 1860s. They played a crucial role in the development of railway lines, overland Telegraph line and provided supplies to remote mission stations and farms. They became part of the pioneering legend of inland Australia by opening up the Australian deserts, exploring it and enabling the early white settlers to survive.” That’s Part 1. In part two Dawood Azami talks to some of the descendants of the thousands of Afghan pioneers in Australia, Afghanistan and Pakistan, who, with their camels, first arrived in Australia in the 1860s and criss-crossed the harsh interior of Australia for several decades. He explores the adventurist nature and the entrepreneurial spirit of the Afghans and discusses their ancient and unwritten code of life called – Pashtoonwali. “At the link find the titles, “DocArchive: Australia’s Afghan Cameleers – Part One,” (and Part Two) right-click “Media files docarchive_20150331-0300a.mp3” for Part One and “Media files docarchive_20150407-0232a.mp3” for Part Two, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Billie Holiday 49 mins – “When Billie Holiday sang, it was like a soul opening up. Cautiously, enigmatically, powerfully. Her personal story – burnished and mythologized – had poverty and prostitution, racism, addiction, abuse, heartache. But in her music – says my guest today, jazz musician and scholar John Szwed – Billie Holiday was no victim.  She was a self-taught artist bringing a unique intimacy and emotion to song.  Breaking through to new terrain. This hour On Point: a meditation on the great Billie Holiday.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biomimicry 22 mins – “Today’s special edition of How on Earth, brought to you in conjunction with this week’s Conference on World Affairs is a conversation on Biomimicy as a new lens to view science and technology with Margo Farnsworth. Margo has coached two Top Twelve graduate teams for the International Student Biomimicry Challenge and currently serves as a Biomimicry Institute education fellow. She is also on the board of both the Missouri Prairie Foundation and South Carolina’s Experience Green. She has worked as a park ranger, science teacher, and mammalogist. With degrees in science education and parks administration, her professional accomplishments include research in environmental education, qualitative mammal studies, and involvement in numerous local and state environmental boards and committees. Farnsworth has written pieces for the Center for Humans and Nature as well as Treehugger, and has two biomimicry book projects pending.  She joins us live for an in-depth talk about how Biomimicry has the potential for changing scientific culture.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Trends 12 mins “…This week, the book world began poring over the findings, covering everything from shares of print and digital sales, to preferences for digital platforms. The two most intriguing findings confirm suspicions that the drive to digital is slowing. “First, the e-books share of new book sales increased only slightly in 2014 over 2013” reports Andrew Albanese, Publishers Weekly senior writer.  “And the share of sales through online retailers and bookstore chains actually dipped.” Recently, publishing pundits have trumpeted that the death of print is greatly exaggerated. Perhaps so, says Albanese, but the prognosis is mixed. “Print accounted for 70% of new book spending in 2014, and that is in fact a drop of seven percentage points from 2013. Reports that print sales are in fact on the rise are generally due only to authors named John Green, or Veronica Roth. Format-wise, the survey shows that the biggest print declines came in trade paperback and hardcover, while mass market paperbacks actually had a slight increase in their share of spending….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Plasticity 58 mins – “Norman Doidge, M.D., is a psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, researcher, author, essayist and poet. He is on faculty at the University of Toronto’s Department of Psychiatry, and Research Faculty at Columbia University’s Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research, in New York. On the show this week we talk to Doidge about neuroplasticity—once you reach adulthood, is your brain in a kind of fixed state, or does it keep changing? And can you do things to make it change?” At the link find the title, “80 Norman Doidge – How Plastic Is Your Brain?” right-click “Media files “19030762-inquiringminds-80 norman-doidge how-plastic-is-your-brain.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Film 52 mins – “Cancer was first mentioned in an ancient Egyptian scroll and through the modern era, its history is marked by the epic battles we’ve waged against it. Siddhartha Mukherjee is a cancer physician, and in trying to understand what his patients must endure, he turned a historical and literary eye on cancer. His Pulitzer-prize winning book is now a PBS documentary premiering Monday. So, we’re rebroadcasting our conversation with Mukherjee about the disease he calls “The Emperor of All Maladies.’” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer P1 52 mins -“For years, cancer was a shameful secret. Now, a huge number of us are “living cancer” – whether we’re being treated ourselves, or helping a family member or friend. Over the last 2,500 years, cancer has shifted from a disease in the shadows to one at the center of scientific research and public discussion. In the first of two special episodes, On the Media dives deep into the way we talk about cancer: in the news, in the hospital, and in our private lives.” At the link find the title, “The Cancer Show Part One,” right-click “Ply Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Part Two: “Today, the impact of cancer is not limited to patients and loved ones, not confined to hospital wards and research labs. It’s a powerful symbol appropriated by Hollywood, the news media, and every realm of expression to signify what we most fear. In the second hour of “The Cancer Show,” the stories we tell about cancer: on stage, on the big screen, and online.” Click the link, find “The Cancer Show Part Two,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cassava in Columbia 7 mins – “ASM traveled to Colombia to speak with and film the researchers behind an innovative biotechnology project that is producing exciting results. The international Swiss – Colombian collaborative research team from the University of Lausanne – Switzerland, the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, and the Universidad de la Salle – Utopia campus has been working to create and test novel strains of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to improve cassava production. AMF forms symbiotic relationships with the majority of the world’s plant species, including cassava and other major food security crops. By colonizing internal structures within the plant and extending its root system, AMF transports nutrients such as phosphate to the plants from inaccessible areas and sources in the soil. In exchange, the plant provides carbon to AMF species that have colonized the plant.” At the link you can watch, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in the blog archive.

Chemical Pollutants 29 mins – “Plastics will play as large a role in peace as they do in war. The 20th century gave rise to the chemical industry. It has revolutionised our world and transformed the way we live. After the Second World War, there was a sudden burst of activity in the chemicals industry and the environment has become flooded with new chemicals. Over 80,000 chemicals are used in everyday products. We handle them, they’re in our water, our food and in the air we breathe. It’s impossible to escape them. But now there’s growing concern that these chemicals are not safe. There’s no requirement to show that these chemicals are actually safe before people are exposed to them….: At the link find the title, “Catalyst – Episode 09,” right-click “Media files catalyst_15_16_09.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Children and Nature 52 mins – “Scott Sampson grew up outdoors: family camping trips … exploring the forest near his home. He says it’s part of the reason he’s a paleontologist and science educator today. Sampson cites studies that show how nature can combat obesity, reduce bullying, and boost grades for kids. So, here’s the question at the heart of his new book: why are American children staring at screens and not getting out into nature? Wednesday Scott Sampson joins Doug to talk about How to Raise a Wild Child.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China’s Hukou Reform 134 mins – “…At the March meeting of the National People’s Congress, Premier Li Keqiang announced that controls over China’s household registration system—or hukou—will be relaxed to ensure that migrant workers can become urban citizens. To facilitate this, he hopes to enhance the carrying capacities of smaller cities and counties while controlling the population sizes of mega cities. The success of these urbanization efforts will not only determine whether China can maintain robust economic growth, but also will have strong implications for sociopolitical stability and environmental sustainability.” At the link right-click “China’s urbanization and hukou reform” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drones for Conservation 27 mins – “Drones are being used to track rhino poachers in South Africa; Exploring the use of drones for conservation; What happened when ants were sent to the International Space Station?” At the link find the title, “SciA: Drones for conservation,” right-click “Media files scia_20150402-2030a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Duxford War Museum 36 mins – “Join me, Pilot Pip, for this special Bonus Easter episode as I talk about some of the great aircraft at the Imperial War Museum Duxford, UK.  No Squawks, no topic of the week, no news, just awesome aircraft from one of Europe’s biggest aviation museum.” At the link right-click “  Direct download: duxforda.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics Q and A 81 mins – “Peter Thiel and Tyler Cowen, both New York Times bestselling authors, are among today’s top global thought leaders and influential innovators. Listen as these two engage in a serious dialogue on the ideas and policies that will shape the future of innovation and progress in the coming years and decades. Peter Thiel is among the most impressive innovators of the past two decades. As co-founder of Paypal and seed-funder for Facebook, Thiel has been instrumental in the conception and growth of some of today’s most entrepreneurial and innovative companies. In his latest best-selling book, Zero to One, Thiel explains how to build a better future by capitalizing on innovation. A staunch optimist, he maintains that progress can be achieved anywhere the human mind is able to think creatively. Thiel describes how entrepreneurial thinking leads to innovation, which builds something new and moves the mark from zero to one. Note: Due to a technical malfunction, the audio quality briefly drops from 11:15 – 13:30.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmentalist Hawken 30 mins – “Paul Hawken on corporate social responsibility and the evolution of the open-source and sharing economy movements.” At the link find the title, “Paul Hawken: Cultivating Progress,” right-click “Media files SC-2015-03-31.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Genital Mutilation 27 mins – “The story of a Tanzanian safe house, a place where girls find refuge from female genital mutilation – a bloody and life-threatening rite of passage.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Escaping Tanzania’s ‘cutting season’ – 2 Apr 2015,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150402-0245b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Crisis Causes 59 mins – “Peter Wallison, a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, talks about his book [Hidden in Plain Sight], in which he argues that government housing policies caused the 2008 financial crisis.” At the link find the title, “After Words: Peter Wallison,” right-click “Media files program.388359.MP3-STD.mp” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Linguistics 51 mins – “Emails, texts and tweets may be changing how we solve crimes: Word choice, spelling and punctuation can all serve as virtual fingerprints. A look at how technology is changing criminal linguistic evidence in court.” At the link find the title, “How Technology Is Changing Criminal Linguistic Evidence In Court, right-click “Media files r2150401.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fridgenomics 50 mins – “What’s in your fridge? That’s the question former BBC Africa Service editor Elizabeth Ohene has been asking as she opens fridge doors on three continents to find out how the fridge has changed – and continues to change – millions of lives around the world.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Fridgeonomics 29 Mar 2015,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150329-2115a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Healthcare Randomized Evaluations 42 mins – “A lot of the conventional wisdom in medicine is nothing more than hunch or wishful thinking. A new breed of data detectives is hoping to change that….As we’ve regularly noted in the past, economists and other academic researchers have increasingly been using RCTs to study all sorts of things, including how to best fight poverty. At the forefront of this movement is J-PAL, or the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, at MIT. The award-winning economist Esther Duflo, one of J-PAL’s founders, has helped run many RCTs in India, Kenya, and elsewhere, trying to learn how best to prevent teen pregnancy and anemia, and drunk driving; and how to better incentivize nurses, small-business growth, and modern farming techniques.” At the link find the title, “How Do We Know What Really Works in Healthcare?,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Diet 81 mins – “Heart attacks are the number-one killer in the United States, but that doesn’t have to be true. The latest research shows that diet is strongly linked to heart attacks. Steve Blake suggests that there are plenty of fun, healthy foods that you can add to your diet to reduce your risk of a heart attack. He’ll also discuss how vitamin D deficiency is linked to heart attachs, and how certain oils can reduce risk and certain fats can increase risk. Through this inspiring discussion, you can learn how to implement heart-safe lifestyle options.” Steve Blake, ScD, Faculty Nutritional Biochemist, Hawaii Pacific Neuroscience LLC; Author, Vitamins and Minerals Demystified“ At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hispanics in America 12 mins – Impact and trends of Hispanics in America. At the link find the title, “America’s Hispanics,” right-click “Media files 20150311 david_sr.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Hollywood Blacklist 57 mins – “Allan Ryskind, son of Marx Brothers screenwriter Morris Ryskind, talked about his book, Hollywood Traitors: Blacklisted Screenwriters – Agents of Stalin, Allies of Hitler, about the Communist party in Hollywood in the 1930s. He spoke with Tucker Carlson, editor-in-chief of The Daily Caller.” At the link find the title, “After Words: Allan Ryskind,” right-click “Media files program.384674.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HPV Vaccine 64 mins -“The HPV Vaccine: Helpful or Harmful? – HPV can be deadly, and many studies have suggested that the new vaccine Gardasil can be effective in preventing most types of HPV. But controversies still surround the vaccine. Many women can’t get their hands on it because of its high cost and age requirements. Others worry about being forced to give the shot to their daughters when the long-term effectiveness is still unknown. Come hear a panel of experts discuss the health and socio-political issues surrounding Gardasil and the future of HPV prevention and treatment. Joel Palefsky, M.D., UCSF-Infectious Disease Specialist; Dean Blumberg, M.D., Associate Professor, Pediatric Infectious Disease, UC Davis Medical Center; Unpaid Speaker for Merck (maker of Gardasil);
Alina Salganicoff, Vice President and Director, Women’s Health Policy and KaiserEDU.org, Kaiser Family Foundation; Ph.D. in Health Policy, The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health; Sarah Varney, Health Reporter, KQED’s “The California Report” – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Trafficking 62 mins – “The distinguished panel of activists and experts will discuss the tragedy of human trafficking and efforts to combat what has been described as the fastest growing criminal industry, second only to drug trafficking in profitability, in the world. Human trafficking, considered a modern form of slavery, has historical roots in the Middle East, where it still thrives.” David Batstone, Founder & CEO, Not For Sale; Professor of Business, USF; Mimi Chakarova, Photo Journalist, Filmmaker, Price of Sex 2011; Correspondent, Center for Investigative Reporting; Dr. Dolores Donovan, Professor & Director of International Programming, USF School of Law; Author, Law Review & Journal Articles on Human Rights, Developing Law Systems and Criminal Justice Systems;
Joel Brinkley, Professor of Journalism, Stanford University; Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist. Author, Cambodia’s Curse – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Humor Helps 59 “Monday Night Philosophy laughs along with the enlightening philosophy of humor elucidated by Bhaerman (the man behind Swami Beyondananda). His hilarious and insightful talk will inspire you to use the magic of humor to gain wisdom, perspective and of course, joy. You’ll laugh while you learn and learn while you laugh! Steve Bhaerman, Author; Performer (as Swami Beyondananda) At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ig Noble Awards 13 mins – “As founder of the Ig Nobel awards, Marc Abrahams explores the world’s most improbable research. In this thought-provoking (and occasionally side-splitting) talk, he tells stories of truly weird science — and makes the case that silliness is critical to boosting public interest in science.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration in America 66 mins – “At The Commonwealth Club in 1984, Cesar Chavez said “The fight is never about grapes or lettuce. It is always about people.” The U.S. Committee of Refugees and Immigrants celebrated its 100th anniversary this year, and the Club is taking the opportunity to find out more about those at the center of the immigration debate, which dates back to the founding of the United States. In the Bay Area, the immigration conversation often centers around limited H1-B visas for techies, while most of the country broods over access to education, employment, social services and integration into the broader community. What does a “typical” immigrant really look like in the U.S. in 2012? How do immigration policies actually impact the lives of documented and undocumented immigrants? Our diverse panel dives deep into the issues. Come hear the true stories shared by more than 10 million individuals.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Biodesign 86 mins – “The emerging health-care needs of the rapidly expanding Indian population require the development of novel, cost-effective medical technologies that are relevant for the needs of the Indian people. However, the medical technology industry in India is still in its infancy, and there have been relatively few successful examples of medical technology innovation in that country’s history. Stanford University’s program in biodesign has been working closely with the government of India to promote medical technology innovation within industry and academia, with the goal of creating scalable medical technology innovation for the masses. Doshi and Mairal will share their experiences in medical technology innovation for India and discuss the opportunities and challenges for medical technology innovation in the future. Rajiv Doshi, M.D., Executive Director (U.S.), Stanford-India Biodesign; Consulting Assistant Professor of Medicine, Stanford University; Anurag Mairal, Ph.D., Director, Global Biodesign Exchange Programs, Stanford University” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Business Growth 66 mins – “How could a nation become the world’s second fastest growing economy despite a weak, flailing state? Its recent economic slowdown is a sign that India may have begun to experience the limits of growing at “night” – private growth outside the scope of government involvement. What India needs, Das says, is a strong liberal state. Such a state would have the authority to take quick, decisive action; it would have the rule of law to ensure those actions are legitimate; and finally, it would be accountable to the people. But achieving this will not be easy, says Das, because India has historically had a weak state and a strong society. Gurcharan Das, Columnist, The Times of India; Contributor, The New York Times; Author, India Grows at Night In conversation with Lata Krishnan, Chair, American India Foundation” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India’s Girls 60 mins – “Caputi describes how the age-old preference for sons in India, fueled by technological advances and a growing materialism, is leading to increased incidents of discrimination, violence and the eradication of millions of girls in that country. In regions where the sex ratios are skewed, female trafficking and bride buying run rampant. Caputi will address the reasons behind this phenomenon, the implications for India’s population and possible solutions. Nyna Pais Caputi, Producer and Director, Petals in the Dust: The Endangered Indian Girls” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Entrepreneurs 54 mins – “India’s pervasive resource and capital scarcity combined with massive diversity and growing connectivity are turning the country into a large-scale, living laboratory where grassroots entrepreneurs and corporations are coming up with frugal inventions that are both affordable and sustainable. Radjou explains how “indovations” have relevance not only within India but worldwide.Navi Radjou, Independent Consultant and Fellow, Cambridge Judge Business School; Former Executive Director, Centre for India & Global Business, University of Cambridg” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Immigrants 52 mins – “The story of India’s 30-million-and-growing worldwide diaspora is reshaping trade, identity and culture all around the globe. Hajratwala will speak on what she says Americans need to know today about the rapidly changing country to which nearly 2 million Americans trace their roots. Hajratwala will draw from the seven years of research that led to her nonfiction book, Leaving India, winner of a California Book Award (Silver) and other literary awards.M inal Hajratwala, Author.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Wealth and Power 64 mins – “Raghavan crisscrosses the globe to uncover the story of Rajat Gupta’s meteoric rise from Delhi’s hyper-competitive Indian Institute of Technology to the inner sanctum of corporate America as head of McKinsey & Co., and his tragic fall in 2012, when he was convicted on insider trading charges connected with an investigation of one of the world’s largest hedge funds, The Galleon Group. Raghavan peels back the curtain on the recent rise of Indian emigres (and children of emigres) up through the ranks of the United States’ most influential companies. Anita Raghavan, Former Reporter, Wall Street Journal; Winner, Overseas Press Club Award and the New York Press Club Award; Former London Bureau Chief, Forbes; Contributor, New York Times Dealbook and Forbes” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inside Job 66 mins – “Come hear from the filmmaker of this year’s Academy Award-winning best documentary feature film. Could the global economic meltdown of the last few years have been prevented? Ferguson believes that the crisis was no accident. His latest documentary, Inside Job, makes the powerful case that an out-of-control finance industry took advantage of a deregulated atmosphere and purposely sought to get rich at the expense of others. Through extensive interviews with financial insiders and government officials, Ferguson crossed the globe to find proof that the financial industry intentionally engaged in unethical behavior. His gripping account of the global recession is sure to evoke feelings of disgust, anger, and concern that this all may happen again unless our regulatory system is changed. Ferguson’s previous film, No End in Sight, was nominated for an Oscar, and Inside Job brought home the grand prize at this year’s awards ceremony. Charles Ferguson, Documentary Filmmaker, Inside Job and No End in Sight; Adam Lashinsky, Senior Editor at Large, Fortune magazine – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Testing 60 mins – “This week we’re learning about how scientists and society measure intelligence, and the relationship between smartness and success. We’re joined by cognitive psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman, to talk about his book “Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined.” And we’ll talk to Nathaniel Barr, postdoctoral fellow at the University of Waterloo, about research into the relationship between smartphone use and cognitive skills. Guests: Scott Barry Kaufman and Nathaniel Barr” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Worm 65 mins – “When the Conficker computer “worm” was unleashed in 2008, security experts were dumbfounded. Through a Windows security flaw, the worm infected 12 million computers, including machines vital to air traffic and banking systems. The worm then linked them together to form a network that could be controlled externally. Bowden explores the struggle between brilliant hackers bent on defeating the worm and those who exploit the Internet, whose origins and intentions remain unknown today. Mark Bowden: The First Digital War, Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair; Author, Black Hawk Down and Worm: The First Digital World War; Brian Hackney, Correspondent, “Eye on the Bay,” CBS 5 Television – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intuition Pumps, etc 63 mins – “Dennett will share the “imagination extenders and focus-holders” that he and others have developed for addressing life’s most fundamental questions, cognitive tools purpose-built for the most treacherous subject matter: evolution, meaning, mind and free will. Daniel Dennett, Co-director, Center for Cognitive Studies; Professor of Philosophy, Tufts University; Author, Intuition Pumps and Other Tools for Thinking; Roy Eisenhardt – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islamic Religious Education 58 mins – “Islamic religious education in Europe and the United States has become a subject of intense debate after Muslims raised in the West carried out attacks against their fellow citizens. People worry their states are doing too little or too much to shape the spiritual beliefs of private citizens. In her upcoming Brookings paper, Jenny Berglund explains the differences in publicly-funded Islamic education in Europe and the United States. Her report details existing religious education programs, teacher training, and ongoing political debates, grounded in the historical and religious norms of the countries. Berglund also recommends good practices for governments to further their citizens’ knowledge about Islam and promote inclusive citizenship and respect.” At the link right-click “Islamic religious education in Europe and the United States” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islamic Women 51 mins – “A Somali-born author and activist says a reformation of Islam is needed to address extremism and mistreatment of women. Diane and guests discuss the ongoing debate over the roots of Islamic extremism and the role of women in the Muslim world.” At the link find the title, “Islam, Extremism And The Role of Women,” right-click “Media files r2150331.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Israel and Palestine 60 mins – “Come hear firsthand experiences from seasoned Middle East reporters. Zacharia was the Washington Post’s Jerusalem bureau chief and has reported widely on the Middle East for Bloomberg, Reuters and Washington Week in Review. She will discuss her experiences in the region, especially in Israel and the Palestinian territories, with her Pulitzer Prize-winning colleague Brinkley, author and former New York Times Jerusalem bureau chief.” Janine Zacharia, Journalist; News Analyst; Visiting Scholar, Stanford University; Joel Brinkley, Professor of Journalism, Stanford University; Pulitzer Prize-winning Journalist. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Japanese Internment 74 mins – “70 Years On: The Japanese-American Curfew, Exclusion and Detention Orders and Civil Rights Today – In 1942, President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066, and as a result, 120,000 Japanese Americans, more than half of whom were U.S.-born citizens, were uprooted from their homes, businesses and friends and held in camps. A few, including Fred Korematsu, brought legal challenges against the imprisonment, and the Supreme Court ruled against them. Decades later, their convictions were overturned based on serious governmental misconduct. Join us to hear the daughter of Fred Korematsu, who is carrying on her father’s civil rights work, and the lawyers on the “pro bono” team that succeeded in overturning his conviction and others for defying the incarceration order, discuss the curfew, exclusion and detention, the legal challenges and their reflections on how the Japanese American experience informs the debate today about national security and civil liberties in the United States. Karen Korematsu, Co-founder, The Korematsu Institute, Civil Rights Activist; Dale Minami, Partner, Minami Tamaki LLP; Don Tamaki, Partner, Minami Tamaki LLP” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Search Skills 62 mins – “Today’s job market is anything but traditional. Job seekers have to go beyond the paper resume, leveraging social media tools and maintaining an online persona that highlights not only IQ but also EQ (emotional intelligence). How can you, as an applicant, use these new indicators of talent to better showcase your skills and convey competency, let alone find a job that you’ll love? Some say that cultural fit can be as important as title and salary, so how do you persuade an employer that you can not only do the job, but that you’re one of the team? Our panel of career coaches and modern job experts will help you craft your most-hirable self and conquer the evolving job market.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kurds 59 mins – “Educator, researcher and activist Faraj will discuss the history of the Kurdish people, who number more than 30 million and yet do not have their own country. Faraj received his masters degree in Laws in Kurdistan, Iraq, where he taught law. He has researched and led workshops on several subjects including human rights and has investigated violations such as honor killings.” Karaman Mamand Faraj, Student of International Legal Systems, Golden Gate University; Joel Brinkley, Professor of Journalism, Stanford University; Pulitzer Prize-winning Journalist” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language Learning Quickly 64 mins – “When Benny Lewis graduated college, he spoke just one language: English. Like me, and like countless other people, Benny spent years taking foreign language classes in high school – to no avail. When he started college, he had all but given up on the prospect of becoming bilingual. Today, the picture couldn’t be more different. […]” At the link find the title, “How To Actually Learn A New Language With Benny Lewis of Fluent in 3 Months (Ep. 19),” right-click “Media files 1707.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Large Cap Value Funds 58 mins – “Paul discusses 10 of the most important things you should know about value investing. Using stories about three of the most famous value investors, he explains why your long-term performance should be amongst the best in the industry. He compares two value funds so that you can understand why one made 3.5% more for 15 years. As Paul did in his podcast on the S&P 500, he also reviews the 1, 15 and 40-year track records and compares them to the S&P 500. It is recommended you listen first to the S&P podcast and read this article.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Larry Wilmore 7 mins – “Larry Wilmore is the co-creator of “The Bernie Mac Show” and “The PJs.” He was also a writer for “The Office,” the Senior Black Corresponent for “The Daily Show,” and has a new special on Showtime. He sits down with the Champs to dicuss all of it. Funny, interesting guy.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latin American Upgrade 36 mins – “Hinckley Forums: The Post Hemispheric Americans – Beyond Bridges and Borders in the 21st Century By Hinckley Institute of Politics • Mar 9, 2015; Evan Ward, Visiting Fellow, The Wheatley Institute, BYU” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Learning Tactics 76 mins – “A New Culture of Learning – Gaming, mentorship, increasing connection and design thinking converge in a world of constant change, and invite us to imagine a future of learning that is as powerful as it is optimistic. By exploring play, innovation and the cultivation of the imagination as cornerstones of learning, our panelists will show you how to create a vision that is achievable, scalable and grows along with the technology that fosters it and the people who engage with it. John Seely Brown, Co-chairman, Deloitte Center for the Edge; Author, The Power of Pull; Former Chief Scientist, Xerox Corp.; Director, Palo Alto Research Center; Douglas Thomas, Professor, USC Annenberg School for Communication; Author, Hacker Culture; Scott Stropkay, Co-founder and Partner, Essential;Kevin O’Malley, CEO, TechTalk / Studio – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lee Kuan Yew 27 mins – “Edward Stourton looks back at the remarkable life of Lee Kuan Yew, who transformed Singapore from a backwater into one of the world’s richest nations. He talks to critics and admirers as he assesses the record of the man who laid down the blueprint for the modernisation of the island nation.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Lee Kuan Yew: The Man who Made Singapore,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150329-1000a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Less Traveled Road 29 mins – “…Vincent Nguyen has held three internships at the same time, while still taking classes full-time. He’s reached out to some of the most popular and successful people in the online entrepreneurship world, and has build relationships with several of them. He’s written for several huge blogs, including LifeHack.org, Marc and Angel Hack Life, and UnCollege. He also started his own blog on personal development called Self Stairway, which is only around 10 months old but is already getting thousands of visitors and around 30 comments per post…. But here’s the craziest part: Vincent is only 19. So, how does a 19-year-old beginning blogger a college student (well, former – but we’ll get to the details about that in the episode) do all of this? Trust me, I was just as curious as you probably are – so I asked him to talk about it on the podcast….” At the link find the title,“The Less-Traveled Road To Success With Vincent Nguyen (Ep. 15),” right-click “Media files 1711.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lethal Injections 59 mins – “Hinckley Forum: Outstanding Professor Series By Hinckley Institute of Politics; Mar 6, 2015; Professor Jim Ruble,  Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Pharmacotherapy; College of Pharmacy Distinguished Teaching Award 2010-2011 and  2013-2014” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liberal Arts Education 47 mins – “A liberal arts education was, for a long time, the proud and distinctive hallmark of an American university education. Old Europe had a burnished few and a lot of trade apprentices. We, the young and vibrant United States, had citizens with a handle on the humanities. Philosophy, history, literature, arts. That served us pretty well. Lately, the humanities are in trouble at a lot of colleges. Politicians talking them down. Students fleeing for the sciences. History major, public thinker, Fareed Zakaria says don’t let them go. This hour On Point:  Fareed Zakaria, in defense of the liberal arts.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liberia Upswing 67 mins – “The Carter Center: Partnering in the New Liberia – After enduring 14 years of civil war and economic collapse, Liberia is on the upswing. Led by the continent’s first female president and supported by the international community, Liberia is held up as an example of development-work success. Learn how the Carter Center is waging peace and building hope through partnerships with local government officials, tribal leaders and civil society organizations. Hear from a group of Bay Area women philanthropists who recently traveled to this unique nation in Africa. Cate Biggs, Writer; Consultant; Founder, Writing for Global Engagement; Emilie Ogden, Community Activist; Trustee, World Learning; Kate Ridgway, Educator; Community Activist; Nancy Hitz, World Traveler; Winemaker; Trustee, the Worldwatch Institute and the Hitz Foundation” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

London Undocumented 27 mins – “Ahmed has spent much of the last three and a half years sleeping on London’s night buses. He fled to the UK from India in 2002 during the communal riots in Gujarat, fearing that he was going to be a target. He had his asylum application turned down but, still nervous about the situation at home, he stayed in the UK. Through Ahmed we enter a netherworld where many other failed asylum seekers like him exist.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Sheltering on the Night Bus,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150401-0300a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Loneliness Hazard 17 mins – “We’ll go to the doctor when we feel flu-ish or a nagging pain. So why don’t we see a health professional when we feel emotional pain: guilt, loss, loneliness? Too many of us deal with common psychological-health issues on our own, says Guy Winch. But we don’t have to. He makes a compelling case to practice emotional hygiene — taking care of our emotions, our minds, with the same diligence we take care of our bodies.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Looted Antiquities 27 mins – “As evidence grows that major historical sites are being looted in Syria, how much are groups such as Islamic State profiting from the global trade in illicit antiquities?” At the link find the topic, “DocArchive: ISIS: Looting for Terror – 5 Mar 2015,” right-click “docarchive_20150305-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Louis Gossett Jr 63 mins – “Gossett became a Broadway star at 17, starring with Sidney Poitier, Ruby Dee, and Ossie Davis in “A Raisin in the Sun.” He later won an Emmy for his performance in the “Roots” miniseries and an Oscar for best supporting actor for his role as Sgt. Emil Foley in An Officer and a Gentleman. Drawing on a theatre, film and television career that spans more than 50 years, Gossett will discuss some of his most memorable experiences as well as his personal efforts to end racism, violence and ignorance through the work of his Eracism Foundation. Louis Gossett Jr. Actor; Winner, Academy Award; Activist; Author, An Actor and a Gentleman” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Makers 65 mins – “You know that guy or girl who can make or fix anything? Yes, the same MacGyver wannabe who repairs a flat tire with an empty water bottle and a pen. You can now compete with these handy heroes. Especially now, in times of financial hardship, people want to fix and create useful and awesome gadgets from scratch. Make Magazine leads this “yes I can” attitude with tips for new self-sufficiency. From fixing your cracked iPhone screen to make-shifting an aerial camera rig from Popsicle sticks, a drugstore kite and Play-Doh, Make has it all. Find out where technophile and editor-in-chief Frauenfelder plans to lead this DIY movement. Mark Frauenfelder, Editor, Make Magazine; Dale Dougherty, Publisher, Make Magazine; Co-founder, O’Reilly Media; In conversation with Adam Savage, Host, “Mythbusters’” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Future 73 mins – “Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychoactive component of marijuana, has extraordinary therapeutic qualities, claims Lee. Discover the various molecular mechanisms through with CBD exerts its effects as an anticonvulsant, antipsychotic and neuro-protective compound. This lecture will also address recent efforts to reintroduce CBD-rich remedies and how the medical marijuana industry has responded to the rediscovery of CBD, which doesn’t make people feel high and can actually counter the psychoactive effects of THC. Beyond THC: Cannabidiol and the Future of Medical Marijuana Martin A. Lee, Author, Smoke Signals” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mark Twain On Truth 60 mins – “Mark Twain wanted to write a completely candid autobiography, without “shirkings of the truth,” so he decided to speak from the grave 100 years after his death. The Mark Twain Papers Project at the Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley has fulfilled that desire. Editor Smith will discuss Twain’s numerous observations about the difficulty of speaking the truth, and the strategies he adopted to remove his inhibitions, illustrating her talk with passages he suppressed during his lifetime. Come hear Mark Twain’s “whole, frank mind” highlighted by his characteristic blend of humor and ire.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martian Book 60 mins – “This week we’re exploring the limits of science exploration in both fictional and fact. We’re joined by “lifelong space nerd” Andy Weir, to talk about his debut novel “The Martian,” that pits human inventiveness and ingenuity against the unforgiving environment of the red planet. And astrophysicist and science blogger Ethan Siegel returns to explore so-called “impossible space engines,” and what news stories about them can teach us about journalism and science literacy.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Math Education 78 mins – “What kinds of math skills will the citizen of tomorrow require? Are we providing our children with the math education that will most benefit them? Join NPR’s math expert as he offers his thoughts on this vital issue.  Keith Devlin, The Math Guy, National Public Radio; Co- Founder and Executive Director, Stanford University’s H-STAR Institute; Angie Coiro, Radio Host, Live from the Left Coast – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicare Primer 59 mins – “2011 marked the year the first Boomers turned 65 and qualified for Medicare benefits. For most, a true understanding of what these benefits are, how to determine what options are best for you, and how to actually sign-up is not clear at all. Learn the realities of what you can expect, and more important, what not to expect. Here’s what every Boomer needs to know before they turn 65!” Esther Koch, Encore Management; Medicare Aging Network Partner, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Enhancement 74 mins – “When you think of the word meditation, what come to mind? Hippies? Connecting with your spirit animal? Becoming a badass monk who knows kung-fu? Let’s throw all those associated topics out the window right now, because meditation is not strictly limited to the realm of spiritual/zen practices. Rather, it’s a practice rooted in the idea […]” At the link find the title, “How To Strengthen Your Mind With Tony Stubblebine of Lift.do (Ep. 31),” right-click “Media files 4760.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Merchants of Doubt 30 mins – “A recent Pew survey found that 48% of Americans are still unconvinced that global warming is happening and that human activity is causing it. How can this high level of doubt persist in the face of overwhelming scientific evidence? Our guest today on Sea Change Radio is Naomi Oreskes, co-author of the book Merchants of Doubt. As the title suggests, Oreskes believes that seeds of doubt have been planted quite intentionally. The same playbook that was used by tobacco companies to hoodwink the public is now being applied to climate change….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Metabolic Wellness 95 mins – “Learn how you can assess the factors affecting your metabolism and what steps you can take to customize restoring your optimal metabolism. Each person’s metabolism is unique and influenced by lifestyle, diet, stress metabolism, genes, environmental influences and relationships. James LaValle, R.Ph.; C.C.N.; N.M.D.; Cofounder, Living Longer Institute; Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Cincinnati College of Pharmacy; Author, Cracking the Metabolic Code” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexican Relations 54 mins – “Hinckley Forum: The Future of U.S. – Mexican Relations by Hinckley Institute of Politics • Mar 9, 2015; Ambassador Alejandro Estivill-Castro, Deputy Head of Mission of the Mexican Embassy to the United States of America” T the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexico Future 69 mins – “Jorge G. Castaneda: Mexico’s Future and Its Relationship with the U.S. – Mexico’s future is most certainly dependent on its relationship with the United States. In fact, Mexico ranks third in total trade with the United States behind Canada and China. But in the midst of this positive relationship, there is also a drug cartel war that has claimed the lives of more than 34,000 Mexicans and over 100 Americans in the past four and a half years. Ongoing issues of immigration and border control are also high on the list of mutual concerns. Mexico’s foreign minister under former President Vicente Fox, Castaneda will offer a broad perspective on the future of the Mexican people and on relations between our two countries. Come hear from one of Mexico’s most profound social thinkers. Former Foreign Minister, Mexico; Professor of Politics and Latin American and Caribbean Studies, NYU; Author, Manana Forever? ; Mariano-Florentino Cuellar, Professor of Law and Political Science, Stanford University – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microchip Future 58 mins – “A single cellphone today has more computing power than all the computers in the world combined had before semiconductor chips were part of the equation. Mounting evidence shows that the rapid movement of integrated circuits’ cost and power will plateau. When and why might it happen and what are technologists doing about it? What does all this mean to consumers and the industry? Hu has been called a “microelectronics visionary” by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers for “achievements critical to producing smaller yet more reliable and higher-performance integrated circuits”. His new transistor, FinFET, is replacing the transistor that the industry has used for the past five decades. Chenming Hu, Distinguished Professor of Microelectronics, UC Berkeley” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mobile Device Dark Side 64 mins – “The Dark Side of Mobile Gadgets – If you thought your privacy was only threatened on the Web, think again. In an age when personal technology devices reign supreme, consumers take gadgets for granted. Award-winning journalist and cybercrimes expert Vamosi contends that the dangers inherent in certain gadgets far surpass their convenience. As technologies continue to develop, people continue to trust them, blindly, sacrificing their privacy and safety in ways they never imagined possible. Robert Vamosi, Author, When Gadgets Betray Us; Contributing Editor, PCWorld; Former Senior Editor, CNET. Chris O’Brien, Business and Technology Columnist, San Jose Mercury News – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Morocco Evolution 60 mins – “Well known in Europe and Africa for his work in business development, Azoulay was a leading architect of the remarkable economic reforms and growth Morocco has experienced over the last three decades. He is also a respected advocate of pluralism and inter-religious dialogue. He will discuss Morocco’s constitutional reforms and election following the Arab Spring and share his views on the future of Morocco and North Africa. André Azoulay, Senior Advisor to King Mohammed VI of Morocco” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ms Pat 63 mins – “Comedian Ms. Pat sits down with the Champs to discuss having her first child at 14, selling crack, and getting shot in the tittie. It’s wild, homey.” At the link find the title, “Ms. Pat, Friday, February 20, 2015,” right-click “Media files Ms._Pat_Output.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

News Trends 51 mins – “We are more exposed to media than ever before but pay less attention to the news. We explore trends in news consumption and what this means for an informed and engaged public.” At the link find the title, “Why Americans Seem To Be Paying Less Attention To The News,” right-click “Media files r1150401.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Price Impact 48 mins – “Oil inventories in the United States are at the highest level in 80 years, piling up as supply runs ahead of demand. An American boom in oil production – extraction – has made the United States now the number one oil producer in the world, ahead of Saudi Arabia. At the same time, oil prices have plummeted from over $100 dollars a barrel to forty-something. The last time oil prices cratered, Americans jumped into SUVs and stayed there. Alternative energy suffered. What about now? This hour On Point:  American energy production in a time of low oil prices, from drilling rigs to wind farms.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Prices and Food 60 mins – “Oil guru Richard Heinberg on life after fossil fuels. Five percent of the world’s oil tanker capacity is waiting to load up near Basra Iraq, where production is way up. The United States has only one month of oil storage capacity left. After that, what comes in must go straight to market, likely for as little as $20 a barrel. Is peak oil dead? And why isn’t the economy responding to cheaper oil? We’ll ask the guru, Richard Heinberg. He’s one of the people who popularized the oil squeeze, with his book “The Party’s Over”. Heinberg has a new book out: “Afterburn, Society Beyond Fossil Fuels”. After that, during this Spring in the Northern Hemisphere, a couple of us hope to persuade you to grow some of your own food. Marjory Wildcraft, from growyourowngroceries joins us. There’s a lot of reasons we need to pay attention to the food supply.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” besides “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parasitism Case Study 123 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, and Daniel Griffin discuss how filarial infection modulates the immune response to mycobacterial infection, and reveal a new case study.” At the link right-click “Download TWiP #86” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Permaculture 50 mins – “Join Jason Hartman as he interviews Paul Wheaton, founder of Richsoil.com and Permies.com, on the benefits of permaculture, which is a different way of gardening without irrigation… Paul’s definition of permaculture is  creating a more symbiotic relationship between himself and nature so that he can be lazier. Permaculture includes how you build your building, the energy used, social interaction, as well as the horticultural aspects…. As a certified master gardener and a certified permaculture designer, Paul Wheaton has written numerous articles (richsoil.com) and founded the permaculture forums (permies.com), which have since become the largest permaculture web site on the internet. …has been practicing and preaching this new way of gardening, farming and living for the last nine years….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasting Discussion 47 mins – “On this week’s episode of Slate Money, host Felix Salmon of Fusion, Cathy O’Neil of mathbabe.org, plus special guests Alex Blumberg of Gimlet Media and Will Mayo of Spoken Layer discuss the business of digital audio. This week’s podcast is sponsored by Automatic: a connected car adapter that pairs your car to your smartphone, empowering you to diagnose engine problems, drive more efficiently, remember where you parked, automatically notify emergency services in case of an accident, and more. Go to automatic.com/money to get 20% off.” At the link find the title, “The Podcast Podcast,” right-click “Media files SM15032801_money.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Premed Case Study 35 mins – “Matt tells his story of a failed start as a premed undergrad career and how he turned it around. Now he has a med school acceptance. Listen to his whole story!” At the link find and click on episode 123, then right-click the down-pointing arrow above the episode description and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Gangs 76 mins – “David Skarbek of King’s College London and author of The Social Order of the Underworld: How Prison Gangs Govern the American Penal System talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the written and unwritten rules in America’s prisons for the most violent and dangerous criminals. Skarbek explains how and why prison gangs emerged in the last half of the 20th century, their influence both inside and outside of prisons, and how their governance structure is maintained.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Shaming 52 mins – “Social media has made a judge and jury out of everybody. A poorly worded tweet, post or comment can upend our lives, ruin our careers, and fill us with regret. Journalist Jon Ronson says that we are reducing people to the worst thing they’ve ever done, and losing our own moral compass in the process. He joins Doug Thursday to give voice to the shamed and to explain why we all so easily become the shamers.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ravensbruck Camp 52 mins – “On a scenic lake 50 miles north of Berlin, Hitler opened a compound known as Ravensbrück — his only concentration camp for women. Opened in 1939, the camp initially held a few thousand political prisoners. By the end of World War II, nearly 130,000 women had passed through its gates. The prisoners there were subjected to slave labor and brutal forms of torture. Yet relatively little has been written about the camp. The SS burned all inmate records; the material that did exist lay locked behind the Iron Curtain for years. Now, a new book pieces together historical evidence to tell the stories of the women who lived and died at Ravensbrück.” At the link you can listen, but not download: however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

REITs 19 mins – “This podcast discusses the relatively short history of REIT returns. Paul informs investors about the long-term returns of this asset class, including long periods of mediocre returns. He also highlights what a great fit REITs have been with the S&P 500 due to their unusually high non-correlation. Listeners are encouraged to read both his MarketWatch REIT articles: 10 Things You Need to Know About Reits and Why REITs belong in your retirement portfolio” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ritalin 32 mins – “For Episode #69, we welcome back Dr. Jehangeer Sunderji, of Mind Body Medicine in Santa Monica, California, to speak about a household name among cognitive enhancers: Ritalin.  Dr. Sunderji runs through the benefits – as well as the risks – of this powerful smart drug and stimulant, and advocates the importance of careful diagnosis and responsible dosing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shadow Banking System 11 mins – “The shadow banking system is a term for the collection of non-bank financial intermediaries that provide services similar to traditional commercial banks. – Wikepedia. At the link find the title, “Special report: Shadow banking,” right-click “Media files 20140506 shadow banking ad.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Space Exploration 61 mins – “Does Space exploration benefit or suffer from the input of volunteers and Citizen Science?” At the find the title, “DigitalP: Space and Citizen Science,” right-click “Media files, right-click “digitalp_20150331-2005a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supplements Quality 47 mins – “Americans love herbal supplements. They spend billions a years on all kinds, hoping for relief, remedy, cure. This week, the New York attorney general reached a deal with the country’s largest supplement retailer, GNC, to guard against selling bottles that contain nothing of the herbs. The attorney general said four out of five tests of herbal supplements from GNC, Target, Walgreens and Walmart showed none of the product advertised was actually in the bottle. Other stuff was. This hour On Point:  we’re looking at the purity, safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements, in the supplement-crazy USA.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Pacific Partnership 50 mins – “The ideas of secrecy, democracy, special interests and international trade deals are interwoven into this episode that uses the negotiations over two upcoming international trade agreements to highlight current trends.” At the link find the title, “Show 290 – The Illusion of Control,” right-click “Media files cswdcc90.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Violence Technology 51 mins – “Advances in cybertechnology, biotechnology and robotics mean that more people than ever before have access to potentially dangerous technologies.” At the link find the title, “Benjamin Wittes and Gabriella Blum: “The Future of Violence’” right-click “Media files r2150330.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water History – America 52 mins – “The western United States is in the grip of a punishing drought. Reservoir levels are dropping, and farmers are struggling to ensure their access to water for crops and livestock. Consider California. According to a water scientist at NASA, the state has only a year’s worth of water left in its reservoirs. Some scientists even fear the West has reached “peak water” — the point at which water resources simply can’t keep up with water usage. In this episode, Brian, Ed and Peter look at how Americans have managed access to water across the generations. From early legal struggles over natural waterways to the shared irrigation systems of New Mexico, they’ll consider how Americans have divvied up water rights for private profit and public good. And they’ll dive into the debate over who could and couldn’t use swimming pools in the 1920s.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wealth Creation 59 mins – Host Leo Laporte interviews Peter Diamandis. “Peter Diamandis is an engineer and entrepreneur best known for being the founder and CEO of the X PRIZE Foundation, the co-founder and chairman of Singularity University, and the co-author of the New York Times bestseller “Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think.” His latest book is “BOLD: How to Go Big, Create Wealth and Impact the World.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the blue down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Wondrous Women 60 mins – “Guest host John Lithgow introduces two stories about strong women. The English writer E. Nesbit puts a satirical spin on the Rapunzel story in “Melisande.” The reader is Jane Curtin. In Barbara Kingsolver’s “Fault Lines,” the narrator has lost her husband to an industrial accident, and can’t come to terms with his death until her brilliant son, and an earthquake, realign her with the universe. Jill Eikenberry reads.” At the link find the title, “Wondrous Women,” right-click “Media files 198756653-selectedshorts-wondrous-women.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yellowstone Job 12 mins – “A summer job in Yellowstone National Park isn’t quite what Molly Payne Wynne had been expecting. Molly is the Monitoring Coordinator for the Penobscot River Restoration Trust, an unprecedented collaborative effort to restore 11 species of sea-run fish in New England’s second largest river, the Penobscot. Molly has pursued a variety of research topics in fisheries; most recently, river herring habitat use patterns through otolith chemistry at the University of Southern Maine and otolith growth and microchemistry as a research assistant at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) in Syracuse, NY. She loves the water and exploring Maine and awaits her next scientific adventure.” At the link find the title, “Molly Payne Wynne: An Accomplice To Fish Murder,” right-click “Media files 199079043-the-story-collider-molly-payne-wynne-an-accomplice-to-fish-murder.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 35+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

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Media Mining Digest 178 – Apr 10, 2015: Afghanistan – Iraq Failure, American Inequality, Arabian Nights, Ballerina Story, Balloon Bombs, Beale Street – Memphis, Biofuel, BRCA Cancer Gene, Broadband Barriers Removal, Broken Future, China’s Health Program, Circumcision, Coal Control, Cognitive Neuroscientist, Crime Scenes, Deforestation Control, Drought in California, Drs and Patients, Earthquakes, Ebola – African Efforts, Economic Inequality, Economics, Ecosystem Services, Education Future, Elder Abuse, Elder Exploitation, Electric Power Trends, Electricity, Elephant Protection, Encore Careers, Environmental Debt and Stewardship, Ethical Traveling, Ethiopia Land Grab, Facebook Conference, Farming Is Us, Fatigue Prescription, Federal Aviation Jobs, Female Circumcision, First Responders, Flying the Concord, Foreign Languages, Fracking, Freelancing, Frugal Innovation, Gateway to Freedom, Gay and Lesbians in India, Gaza Grand Piano, Gender Pay Gap, Genius Is You, Genius via Trauma, Genomic Research, Geoengineering, Getty Museum Loot, Global Business Trends, Global Crisis, Googlization of Books, Grace Hopper, Graphic Novels, Grasslands Importance, Growing Food, Guardians of Science, Guatemala Forensic Anthropology, Gun Laws Talk, Harvard Digital Issues, Health Care Costs, Horse Whips, Immune System Affects Brain, Internet Mechanics, Joan of Arc Film, Journalist Rescue Effort, Migrating Families, Mobile Money, MS Diet, New Yorker History, NYC Data, Pedestrian Deaths – NYC, Playing Outside, Prison Youth, Professional Wrestling, Psychedelic Therapy, Randomness, Recycling, Sandhogs, Seafood Consumption, Surveillance Awareness, Tech Trends, Ten Most Wanted Men, Universities, Wanderu

The following audio files come from a larger group of 242 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 93 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Afghanistan – Iraq Failure 59 mins – “General Daniel Bolger (Retired) talked about his book, Why We Lost: A General’s Inside Account of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. He also spoke about his deployments to the two war zones, the inherent dangers to U.S. troops there, his job commanding the training operations of Iraqi and Afghan police and military forces, and what he believes what went wrong. In addition, General Bolger discussed his views of other generals such as David Patraeus and Stanley McChrystal, and what he thinks we should have done differently in Iraq and Afghanistan.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Daniel Bolger,” right-click “Media files program.385449.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Inequality 47 mins – “American inequality is once again at historic levels. A second Gilded Age.  Everybody knows it. A top tier doing great. Scooping up every luxury. Building mind-boggling fortunes. And millions really struggling to get by. To keep hope alive of a better life. In the first gilded age, in the 19th century, Americans were in the streets over inequity. Marching. Brawling. Demanding change. This time, says my guest today, labor historian Steve Fraser, it’s weirdly quiet out there. The Age of Acquiescence, he calls it. This hour On Point: wealth, power and “where’s the protest?” in America.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arabian Nights 51 mins – “Perhaps you know the tale. In order to save her life, Sheherazade starts spinning stories for the vengeful King Shahriyar. One story leads to another that leads to another, on and on for 1,001 nights. For the scholar Robert Irwin, Sheherazade’s plight is our own, for what are our lives but stories related to countless other stories, all told under the shadow of death, the terminator of all stories? Irwin joins us Thursday as we explore the world of the Arabian Nights and ask what they can offer us today.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Ballerina Story 52 mins – “Misty Copeland went from a child living in poverty in a motel, to a breakout star in the world of ballet. She discovered her extraordinary talent at the late age of 13, and just four years later, escaped her tumultuous childhood to join the elite American Ballet Theatre. Today, she is the only African American soloist with the company and one of very few black women in the highest ranks of classical ballet nationwide. Now, she’s calling for change in an art form she says is still stuck in the past. Ballerina Misty Copeland shares her unlikely rise to stardom, and bringing color to the white world of ballet.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Balloon Bombs 30 mins – “During World War II, something happened that nobody ever talks about. This is a tale of mysterious balloons, cowboy sheriffs, and young children caught up in the winds of war. And silence, the terror of silence. Reporters Peter Lang-Stanton and Nick Farago tell us the story of a seemingly ridiculous, almost whimsical series of attacks on the US between November of 1944 and May of 1945. With the help of writer Ross Coen, geologist Elisa Bergslien, and professor Mike Sweeney, we uncover a national secret that led to tragedy in a sleepy logging town in south central Oregon.” At the link right-click “Stream m3u” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beale Street – Memphis 48 mins – “The Sweet Memphis Sound Of ‘Beale Street’ – Walkin’ in Memphis. We’ll look at the history of Beale Street and how the Memphis Sound came to be.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biofuel 23 mins – “Solazyme Co-Founder Dillon talks about growing biofuel maker Solazyme into a multi-million dollar, publicly traded company.” At the link find the title, “Solazyme Co-Founder Harrison Dillon,” right-click “Media files SC-2015-03-24.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

BRCA Cancer Gene 51 mins – “in an opinion piece for the New York Times filmmaker, Angelina Jolie Pitt describes her decision to have her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed. The surgery comes just two years after her choice to have a double mastectomy. Genetic tests had confirmed she carried a mutation in the BRCA gene which put her at greater risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Many doctors say her decision was a good one, but it highlights the kinds of challenges genetic test results can present: Please join us to discuss BRCA test results and efforts to stop breast and ovarian cancers before they start.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Broadband Barriers Removal 31 mins – “After anticipating this moment for many months, we have a ruling from the FCC that has restored local authority to build and expand networks in North Carolina and Tennessee. Though we have already pulled out the key passages for readers, we wanted to discuss the decision with Jim Baller of Baller, Herbst, Stokes, & Lide. Jim worked with Wilson and Chattanooga in crafting their petitions and sat down with me last week at the Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities Broadband Conference in Des Moines last week. We went over the key issues in the ruling, including why the FCC had authority to take action, how the state laws limited investment in advanced Internet networks, the impact of the ruling, and what comes next.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broken Future 60 mins – “Welcome to another round of Radio Ecoshock. I’m Alex Smith, with two of the world’s top climate scientists talking about the severe challenges we face right now, and in the future. From the United Kingdom, we have Dr. Kevin Anderson, who pulls no punches. Then Rutgers distinguished scientist Alan Robock tells us why geoengineering might not be a good idea. Open your ears and your mind to what’s coming next.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China’s Health Program 11 mins – “This Series marks an unprecedented scientific collaboration between The Lancet, Peking University Health Sciences Centre, and the China Medical Board. Health System Reform in China brings together the most recent scientific evidence on China’s major health challenges, strategies, and future. The Series was produced by a team of 63 scientists, with Chinese scientists constituting two-thirds of the authors, collaborating with an international team from 10 countries.” Documents for various aspects are available at the site. At the link right-click “Download” (below the video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Circumcision 60 mins – “This week we’re looking at the contentious medical and ethical history of circumcision. We’re joined by Sarah B. Rodriguez, medical historian and lecturer in global health and bioethics at Northwestern University, to talk about about her book “Female Circumcision and Clitoridectomy in the United States: A History of a Medical Treatment.” And we’ll discuss the medical and ethical implications of infant male circumcision with Brian Earp, University of Oxford Research Fellow in Science and Ethics.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Control 46 mins – “Coal And American Energy Futures – The new battle over American coal, before the Supreme Court and beyond.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cognitive Neuroscientist 41 mins – “Pioneering neuroscientist Dr. Michael Gazzaniga has written many wonderful books that share neuroscience with a general audience. In his latest book Tales from Both Sides of the Brain: A Life in Neuroscience he looks back on his 50+ year career from a uniquely personally vantage point. He shares the people and collaborations that have enriched his life and when I interviewed him for BSP 117  he said “My pitch to the young person is that there is nothing on this planet that compares to the pleasures of scientific discovery.” But he also emphasized the importance of finding a question that people really care about. “Is it a question anyone wants the answer to?” But the young scientist needs more than curiosity she also needs the impulse to question current explanations and the urge to find better answers.” For a limited time right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crime Scenes 60 mins – “From crime scene to court room and all the evidence in between. Join Chris Smith and Ginny Smith at our reconstructed crime scene to find out how science is used to help solve a forensic investigation, including dissecting pig organs, testing for drugs, planting false memories into our audiences’ brains and trying out the world’s first lie detector suit…” At the link right-click “Download as mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deforestation Control 10 mins – “The sounds of the rainforest include: the chirps of birds, the buzz of cicadas, the banter of gibbons. But in the background is the almost-always present sound of a chainsaw, from illegal loggers. Engineer Topher White shares a simple, scalable way to stop this brutal deforestation — that starts with your old cell phone.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought in California 48 mins – “New Solutions For Dire California Drought – California Governor Jerry Brown, and his billion-dollar emergency drought plan. We’ll look at dry California’s options, including turning to the sea.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drs and Patients 16 mins – “Wouldn’t you want to know if your doctor was a paid spokesman for a drug company? Or held personal beliefs incompatible with the treatment you want? Right now, in the US at least, your doctor simply doesn’t have to tell you about that. And when physician Leana Wen asked her fellow doctors to open up, the reaction she got was … unsettling.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Earthquakes 29 mins – “  Keith talks with Thorne Lay, Distinguished Professor and Director of the Center for the Study of the Imaging & Dynamics of the Earth at the University of California Santa Cruz.  An El Paso High School graduate, Lay talks about his path towards a career in seismology.  He also explains the difference between P- and S-waves, and why nuclear testing during the Cold War led to advances in seismic technology.” at the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola – African Efforts 27 mins – “How did the disease originate & how was its deadly progress checked? Statistician Hans Rosling & the WHO’s Margaret Lamunu discuss their experiences of fighting the disease.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Understanding Ebola,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150323-1500a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Inequality 50 mins – “If the statistics can be believed, over the last 30 years the gap between rich and poor in the West has grown as cavernous as it was in the Nineteenth Century. In the US, for example, the richest 1% of the population is estimated to own more than 40% of the country’s wealth. And it is a similar picture across the planet. But who are the 1%? How have they made their wealth? And why have the rest of us seemingly been left behind? Robert Peston speaks to leading policymakers and opinion shapers as he charts the new consensus that inequality is the biggest economic challenge we face.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Price of Inequality,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150301-2005a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Economics History 67 mins – “In his best-selling books in the Czech Republic, former advisor to Vaclav Havel Sedlacek shows how economics is woven out of history, myth, religion and ethics. Come listen to a fascinating ride that will take you from the Epic of Gilgamesh through the Bible and the Greeks to today’s pop culture in film – a fresh look at economics as part of our culture.” Tomas Sedlacek, National Economic Council, Prague; Lecturer, Charles University; Author, The Economics of Good and Evil; Advisor to Vaclav Havel” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economist Jokes 14 mins – “We got on stage at a comedy club to read a bunch of weird economics jokes. We bombed. Today on the show, we do what you’re never supposed to do: explain the joke.” At the link find the title, “#614: Two Radio Guys Walk In To A Bar,” right-click “Media files npr_396899726.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ecosystem Services 66 mins – “The many services that nature provides to humans are undervalued in commercial markets because it is difficult to put a price tag on them. Now, with increasing awareness about sustainability and resource limitations, companies are paying more attention to such ecosystem services. That means better understanding activities such as crop pollination, pest control and waste decomposition, and calculating economic impacts including the benefits of those services and the costs to companies and society if they are diminished. Join us for a conversation with a consultant advising Wal-Mart and other companies on how to think about ecosystem services and a visionary environmentalist working to preserve and value biodiversity around the world.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Future 66 mins – “From rising tuition costs to public concern over sexual assaults on college campuses, higher education faces a growing number of issues as 2015 begins. The University of California, with 10 campuses across the state, is no exception. The system is currently grappling with proposed tuition hikes, student protests and a statewide drop in funding. Join Napolitano and Yudof as they discuss the challenges currently facing America’s higher education system and, in particular, the University of California.” Janet Napolitano, President, University of California; Former Secretary of Homeland Security; Former Governor of Arizona; Mark Yudof, President Emeritus, University of California; Former Chancellor of the University of Texas System.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elder Abuse 62 mins – “You’ve heard it before – an unsuspecting elder puts his or her trust in a caregiver only to discover that person has stolen their life savings. Elder financial abuse is often referred to as the “silent crime.” It cuts across social status, gender, race and ethnicity. In many cases, a victim might not know someone is stealing from them, or be so embarrassed that they stay silent. Perpetrators are usually loved ones, family members and caregivers putting the victim in a vulnerable position of being reliant on their abuser for help. San Francisco is home to an increasing aging population making it ripe for elder financial crimes to occur. Our panel of speakers, including DA Gascón, will discuss current prosecutorial successes in curbing scams, real estate fraud and financial abuse targeting seniors. They will also provide useful tips to prevent and where to report elder financial abuse. George Gascón, San Francisco District Attorney; Hubert Horatio “Skip” Humphrey III, Assistant Director, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Office of Older Americans; Shay Matthews, Assistant District Attorney, San Francisco District Attorney’s Office; Helen Karr, Elder Abuse Special Assistant, San Francisco District Attorney’s Office” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elder Exploitation 62 mins – “Again and again, we hear stories in which older adults have been exploited by unfair, deceptive and abusive practices ­– Power of Attorney abuse, for example. Often these crimes are perpetrated by the victim’s own family, caregivers or another trusted individual. Our speakers will provide information on advances in combating the hidden epidemic of fraud and scams and other forms of exploitation that target that target older persons. They’ll address this pervasive issue in our society, providing tips on how to prevent, identify and report financial exploitation. Jenefer Duane, Sr. Program Analyst, Office for Older Americans, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau; Helen Karr, Elder Abuse Special Assistant, San Francisco District Attorney’s Office” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Power Trends 63 mins – “How will electric utilities adapt to a world of distributed generation and choice among formerly captive customers? Will utilities become a combination of eBay and UPS, shuttling electrons between many buyers and sellers? How will electric vehicles, renewables and smart meters fit into the equation? What policy and infrastructure changes will be required for mass adoption of electric vehicles? Join a conversation with leading lights rethinking the way California generates and uses electricity. Dian Grueneich, Former Commissioner, California Public Utilities Commission; Mark Duvall, Director of Electric Transportation and Energy Storage, Electric Power Research Institute; Ted Howes, Partner, IDEO.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electricity 52 mins – “Let there be light! Well, it’s easy to do: just flip a switch. But it took more than the invention of the light bulb to make that possible. It required new technology for the distribution of electricity. And that came, not so much from Thomas Edison, but from a Serbian genius named Nikola Tesla. Hear his story plus ideas on what might be the breakthrough energy innovations of the future. Perhaps hydrogen-fueled cars, nuclear fusion electrical generators or even orbiting solar cells? Plus, a reminder of cutting-edge technology back in Napoleon’s day: lighthouses.” At the link right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elephant Protection 57 mins – “The African elephant was originally listed as “threatened” by the U.S. Government in 1978. Since then, the species’ population has declined by about 60 percent, primarily due to poaching for the ivory trade. Habitat destruction and unsustainable trophy hunting also contributed to the decline. Today we’re joined by Peter LaFontaine, Campaign Officer, International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and Masha Kalinina, International Trade Policy Specialist, Humane Society International, who will discuss a recent petition filed with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to uplist African elephants from threatened to endangered under the Endangered Species Act.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Encore Careers 60 mins – “Alboher will give a comprehensive, nuts-and-bolts guide to finding passion, purpose and a paycheck in the second half of life. She will discuss how to plan the transition; how much you need to make; the pros and cons of going back to school; when to volunteer and when to intern; how to network effectively and harness the power of social media; and she’ll present an Encore Hot List of 35 viable careers.”  At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Debt 66 mins – “The traditional “grow now, clean up later” economy does little to account for unmeasured externalities like carbon pollution and health impacts. But as the national and world economies struggle with the mounting costs of pollution and climate change, many companies are drawing a connection between a degraded environment and a degraded bottom line. Amy Larkin says pollution can no longer be free and that government must play a vital role in catalyzing growth while preventing environmental destruction. John Hofmeister agrees that pollution and waste must be dealt with, but he points out that the American consumer might be less willing to pay the higher prices for electricity and fuel that would result from internalizing these costs. Come hear a conversation with a leading environmentalist and former oil executive on pricing pollution and finding business solutions for creating a sustainable economy. Amy Larkin, Author, Environmental Debt: The Hidden Costs of a Changing Global Economy; Director, Greenpeace Solutions; John Hofmeister, CEO, Citizens for Affordable Energy; Former President, Shell Oil Company” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Stewardship 62 mins – “The appeal of seeing nature as a vital asset – as natural capital – has spread like fire over the last decade. This concept appears in thinking about agriculture, water, energy, health, fisheries, forestry, protection from hazards, mining, cities and the infrastructure supporting these and other vast sectors – and it increasingly appears in the ways communities, corporations, governments and other institutions frame decisions. Despite this awareness and energy, however, our state and planet remain besieged by degradation and growing threats of catastrophic change. Leaders of The Natural Capital Project and The Nature Conservancy will talk about how they are using the power of open-source software tools to transform how communities and institutional leaders around the world include the value of natural capital in decisions improving outcomes for biodiversity and human wellbeing. Mary Ruckelshaus, Ph.D., Managing Director, The Natural Capital Project; Heather Tallis, Ph.D., Lead Scientist, The Nature Conservancy; Rich Sharp, Ph.D., Lead Software Developer, The Natural Capital Project”  At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethical Traveling  61 mins –  “Greenwald says one of the most important things savvy travelers can do is “vote with their wings,” supporting places that uphold core values like human rights and environmental protection. Every November, Berkeley-based Ethical Traveler releases its often controversial list of The World’s Best Ethical Destinations. Join a discussion of which nations made the 2011/2012 list, how the winners were selected, and why some wildly popular destinations may never make the cut.” Jeff Greenwald, Executive Director, Ethical Traveler; Malia Everette,  Director, Global Exchange Reality Tours” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethiopia Land Grab 60 mins – “Land Grab in Africa: The Case of Ethiopia – Though Africa is no longer threatened by armed colonizers, foreign exploiters are threatening Ethiopian farmers by obtaining fertile land from African leaders. The governments of many African countries are benefiting from these land transactions, but the people are left impoverished and hungry. Tolossa will suggest ways to improve the desperate situation for Ethiopian farmers. Fikre Tolossa, Ph.D.; Playwright; Author”  At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Conference 63 mins – “Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mike Elgan discuss the Facebook F8 developer conference as it streamed live. Facebook’s venture into virtual reality.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing blue arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Is Us 64 mins – “Did you know that our biological makeup is similar to that of soil? This fascinating fact led practicing family physician Miller to ask: What can a family farmer teach a family doctor? So she spent time on seven ecological family farms, meeting inspiring farmers and renowned biomedical scientists. She will present their insights and research along with stories from her own medical practice.Daphne Miller, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine, UCSF; Author, Farmacology”  At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fatigue Prescription 55 mins – “How in the world did you get so busy? The reasons are legion, and Clever will describe some of them. She will also outline consequences of overload and signs of trouble before she gives tips, self-assessment guides and a doctor’s best advice on how to deal with competing demands. The goal, she says, is to maintain or regain your sense of meaning, your creativity and even joy. She will show how taking care of yourself – body, soul, attitudes, relationships – is not selfish; it is self-preservation. Clever will provide practical and powerful ways to refresh, regroup and renew your energy, health and life. Linda Hawes Clever, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine, UCSF; Founder, RENEW”  At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Federal Aviation Jobs 90 mins – “With the growth in the number of federal job openings related to aviation you might want to satisfy your passion for aviation and serve your country at the same time. There are many benefits and rewards to working for the government but how does one go about finding jobs and applying?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Circumcision 19 mins – “ Khadija Gbla grew up caught between two definitions of what it means to be an “empowered woman.” While her Sierra Leonean mother thought that circumsizing her — and thus stifling her sexual urges — was the ultimate form of empowerment, her culture as a teenager in Australia told her that she deserved pleasure and that what happened to her was called “female genital mutilation.” In a candid and funny talk, she shares what it was like to make her way in a “clitoris-centric society,” and how she works to make sure other women don’t have to figure this out.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Responders 60 mins – “First responders include police, fire and emergency medical services. They have unique cultural norms that allow them to function individually and as a team during high-stress events. The ability to suppress emotions and remain functional despite what is encountered is an asset but can also be a liability when they need help. This presentation will discuss some common first responder cultural norms, how those norms affect treatment, and lessons learned at the West Coast Post-Trauma Retreat.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flying the Concord 126 mins – “Here is another episode in our ongoing (and hopefully never ending :-)) series on flying iconic airplanes. This time we talk with former Concorde pilot John Hutchinson about flying this Mach 2 airliner. We discuss the cornerstones of the design and construction of the aircraft, its operation (mostly with British Airways), flying characteristics as well as the infamous accident in Paris in 2000 (on which John has some very specific opinions).” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foreign Languages 64 mins – “Like me, and like countless other people, Benny spent years taking foreign language classes in high school – to no avail. When he started college, he had all but given up on the prospect of becoming bilingual. Today, the picture couldn’t be more different. Benny speaks 10 different languages, including Spanish, French, Italian, Mandarin Chinese, Irish, and German (and he knows American Sign Language as well).” At the link find and select episode 19, then right-click the orange down-pointing arrow next to the rss link and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Fracking 66 mins – “With a thriving natural gas market in the U.S., oil and energy companies are in a race for fracking rights across the country. The fracking bonanza has led to concern about the oversight of hydraulic fracturing practices. Some states, including Vermont, have reacted by banning fracking altogether until further research is done. Others are working to create regulations as fracking continues apace. Will fracking bolster U.S. economic competitiveness? What are the environmental impacts? How is fracking challenging the status quo in American energy? TJ Glauthier, Former Deputy U.S. Secretary of Energy; former board member, Union Drilling; Mark Zoback, Professor, Stanford University School of Earth Sciences; Kassie Siegel, Senior Counsel, Climate Law Institute Director”  At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking Debate 66 mins – “Supporters of hydraulic fracturing see it as a driver of affordable domestic energy that can create jobs. Opponents see a risk to water supplies, ecosystems and human health. Join in a conversation with reporters covering fracking in California and nationally on the dangers and potential of the natural gas bonanza. Will California pass a moratorium? Will the Monterey Shale really be developed? Is gas really better than coal? David Baker, Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle; Abrahm Lustgarten, Reporter, ProPublica” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking Regulation 51 mins – “…the White House released the first federal regulations on hydraulic fracturing. The new rules, which have been in the works since 2012, apply only to fracking that occurs on public land. But they are an attempt by President Barack Obama to set more uniform safety procedures for fracking throughout the country. The plan was met with immediate criticism from environmental and industry groups alike. Diane and her guests discuss reaction to the new fracking regulations and what the rules will mean for drilling for oil and gas.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Freelancing 17 mins – “Pepsi, GM, and Google are looking to hire journalists, and Contently co-founder Shane Snow is helping them do just that. He discusses the future of freelancing for journalists, and how big companies fit into the picture.” At the link find the title, “The Art (and Business) of Freelancing,” right-click “Media files IHUB-030715-Snow.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Frugal Innovation 62 mins – “Learn about a groundbreaking new paradigm – frugal innovation – being pioneered by visionary entrepreneurs, corporations and government agencies to innovate cost-effectively and sustainably under severe resource constraints. Using frugal innovation methods, these American pioneers are creating affordable solutions that deliver more value at less cost to consumers and citizens in sectors like health care, education and financial services. Beth Comstock, Chief Marketing Officer, General Electric; Mark Hatch, CEO, TechShop ; Halle Tecco, Co-founder and CEO, Rock Health; Jennifer Tescher, President and CEO, Center for Financial Services Innovation; Navi Radjou, Co-author, Jugaad Innovation: Think Frugal, Be Flexible, Generate Breakthrough Growth – Moderator.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gateway to Freedom 37 mins – “Eric Foner talked about his book Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad, in which he examines the efforts of free blacks and white abolitionists to secure freedom for fugitive slaves during the mid-19th century. In his book, the author recounts the development of the New York Vigilance Committee in 1835 as protection against slave kidnappings that occurred in New York City. This group spawned similar organizations throughout the North and ultimately lead to a network that secured the freedom of over 3,000 slaves. He spoke with Edna Greene Medford, chair of the history department at Howard University.” At the link find the title, “After Words: Eric Foner,” right-click “Media files program.389443.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gay and Lesbians in India 62 mins – “Growing up gay and lesbian in India imbues a broad world view consistent with the multi-culturalism of secular India and the pluralistic religions of the subcontinent. At the same time, Asian family pressures drive conformity amid strong expectations of an individual born to be part of a collective. Our speakers have each forged powerful identities as accomplished LGBT activists, authors and builders of a new class of LGBT world citizens equally at home in India and the United States. Devesh Khatu, Minal Hajratwala, Rakesh Modi, Dipti Ghosh” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gaza Grand Piano 27 mins – “Tim Whewell tells the story of how Gaza’s only grand piano is being restored and of how music – for so long played behind closed doors – is being re-introduced to school children.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Saving Gaza’s Grand Piano,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150326-0245a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Pay Gap 46 mins – “Actress Patricia Arquette got the Oscars fired up in a hurry Sunday night when she took the microphone – gleaming statuette in hand – to go after pay disparities for women.  “We’ve fought for everybody else’s equal rights,” she proclaimed from center stage.  “It’s our time to have wage equality.”  Meryl Streep was on her feet in a nano-sceond, fist pumping.  Jennifer Lopez was right beside her.  It’s a hot-button issue.  There was praise for Arquette.  And also questions about the numbers, the message.  This hour On Point:  Gender equity.  What women earn.  And the Arquette cry for equal pay.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genius Is You 59 mins – “Many people think, “If I were a genius, I would have to be as smart as Einstein or as creative as JK Rowing of Harry Potter fame.” Why is that a myth? Sullivan will explain that it’s not true that geniuses are limited to brilliant, highly successful people who have done something the world finds amazing. That widespread notion is actually a modern idea that distorts the original meanings and great potential for the word “genius.” She will discuss the top three things we can do to recover our lost five-year-old genius: First, we explore carefully the true meaning of genius. Next we deal with the elephants in the room: impending death or helplessness as we age ­­ ­– the things we weren’t supposed to see or talk about when we were children. Then, we develop a practice of listening to ourselves so we become fluent in the language of our own heart, and know what we are called to do with our lives. Pat McHenry Sullivan, Founder, Visionary Resources in Oakland, CA; Author, Your Natural Genius: Lost, Found, Ready for Adventure” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genius via Trauma 60 mins – “This week we’re looking at brain injuries, and the ways they change the lives of patients. We’ll talk to Jason Padgett and Maureen Seaberg, authors of “Struck by Genius: How a Brain Injury Made Me a Mathematical Marvel.” And we’ll speak to neuroscientist Dr. Adrian Owen about his brain imaging research detecting awareness in vegetative patients. Note: The article Accidental Genius by Darold A. Treffert can be found on page 52 of the August 2014 issue of Scientific American.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genomic Research 45 mins – “Advances in genomics are allowing us to see how a person’s DNA interacts with their environment and lifestyle to influence his or her health. On this episode, Dr. Eric Green discusses next-generation genomic technology and precision medicine.” At the link right-click Listen to episode” and select “Save Lin As” from the pop-up menu.
Genomic Research 45 mins – “Advances in genomics are allowing us to see how a person’s DNA interacts with their environment and lifestyle to influence his or her health. On this episode, Dr. Eric Green discusses next-generation genomic technology and precision medicine.” At the link right-click “Listen to Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geoengineering 65 mins – “On the show this week we talk to Ken Caldeira, a climate scientist working for the Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Global Ecology at Stanford University. He investigates issues related to climate, carbon, and energy systems. In the interview, we focus on geoengineering—the process of making big changes to the Earth’s climatic system in an attempt to solve issues related to climate change.” At the link find the title, “79 Ken Caldeira – Can Geoengineering Save the Planet?” right-click “Media files 197904675-inquiringminds-79-ken-caldeira-can-geoengineering-save-the-planet.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Getty Museum Loot 63 mins – “Felch and Frammolino led an investigation of the Getty Museum’s four-decade effort to build a world-class antiquities collection and revealed an astounding case of tax fraud, deceit and controversial acquisition relationships across the Mediterranean. Hear these intrepid reporters reveal some of the most shocking secrets and lies in the art world.Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino, Co-authors, Chasing Aphrodite: The Hunt for Looted Antiquities at the World’s Richest Museum” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Business Trends 59 mins – “The Internet is democratizing access to the global marketplace for millions of people around the world. Thanks to online platforms, payment systems and logistics services, companies, nonprofits and individuals can embark on global journeys like never before. In this conversation, Usman Ahmed — Policy Counsel for eBay Inc — and Jake Colvin — Executive Director of the Global Innovation Forum at the National Foreign Trade Council — explore the opportunities for economic development that the Internet unlocks, and the specific challenges that global entrepreneurs and micromultinationals in developing countries face.” At the link beside “Download” right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Crisis 54 mins – “The Global Environmental Crisis: Is There a Place for an Individual Response? Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Center for the Study of Europe and titled “The Global Environmental Crisis: Is There a Place for an Individual Response?”  Our speaker is Dr. Katia Vladimirova, visiting scholar at the Center.” At the link right-click “Download this story” ad select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Googlization of Books 69 mins – “Learn about the legal, cultural and economic implications of Google moving into the center of the publishing ecosystem. Will Google’s presence cheapen the value of “book culture,” or will the power of the service to connect people to information generate a boost to the hopes of those who wish to preserve “long-form” writing and reading? The panel will answer these questions and raise new concerns about our heavy dependence on Google to navigate the world. Siva Vaidhyanathan, Professor of Media Studies and Law, University of Virginia; Author, The Googlization of Everything (And Why We Should Worry); Brewster Kahle, Digital Librarian and Founder, Internet Archive and the Open Content Alliance” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grace Hopper 56 mins – “The Woman Who Invented the Information Age – When we think of the pioneers responsible for the information age, our thoughts often turn to Thomas Watson, Bill Gates, Andy Grove and Steve Jobs. But Beyer will share with us the amazing story of Grace Hopper, the woman whose achievements as a business executive, inventor and visionary created the technical foundation upon which the modern computer industry has been built. Beyer will also discuss the roots of the computer revolution, the role of government in the process of large-scale technical transformation, and the process of invention. Kurt W. Beyer, Author, Grace Hopper and the Invention of the Information Age” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graphic Novels 65 mins – “The popularity of graphic novels is exploding. For many years, these comics were not taken seriously by readers or critics; however, with the recognition and success of works like Ghost World, Persepolis and American Born Chinese, graphic novels have surged to a widely respected status in the literary and art landscape. How did this happen? Are we as a society simply tired of reading huge, verbose novels? Or does this shift illustrate a new appreciation of the synthesis between visual art and literature? Leaders of the form talk about these issues and more. Gene Yang, Creator, American Born Chinese; Andy Hartzell, Creator, Fox Bunny Funny; ; ark Pien, Creator, Long Tail Kitty; Colorist, American Born Chinese ; Dash Shaw, Creator, Body World and Bottomless Belly Button; Summerlea Kashar, Acting Director, Cartoon Art Museum” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grasslands Importance 63 mins – “Forests are often at the center of conversations about using natural systems to capture and store carbon pollution, but research shows grasslands and prairies are similarly important. How they are managed can potentially have a big impact on storing greenhouse gases so they don’t enter the atmosphere. Nudged by researchers and environmentalists, ranchers are learning new ways to handle livestock and the forage they graze on. Conservationists are also having to rethink their strategies as the changing climate pushes species up mountains, while others move toward the poles. How is climate affecting land conservation in the United States and other parts of the world? What is California doing to turn rangelands and cows grazing on them from part of the problem to part of the solution? Join conservationists and a researcher for a discussion about protecting ecosystems in the era of climate disruption.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Growing Food 69 mins – “A young farmer and an older one will speak about the joys and frustrations of food production in the wilds of Oakland and in a Hudson River village. From chard and soybeans to chicken and hogs; death lessons, life lessons, and growing lessons from the authors of Farm City and Growing, Older. Joan Gussow, Author, Growing, Older; Novella Carpenter, Author, Farm City

Guardians of Science 62 mins – Host Vincent Racaniello and guests Maria Julia Marinissen, Edward H. You, and David R. Howell at the ASM Biodefense and Emerging Infections Research meeting talk about alternative careers for scientists. At the link right-click “TWIM#99” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guatemala Forensic Anthropology 9 mins – “In Guatemala’s 36-year conflict, 200,000 civilians were killed — and more than 40,000 were never identified. At the Forensic Anthropology Foundation of Guatemala, Fredy Peccerelli and his team use DNA, archeology and storytelling to help families find the bodies of their loved ones. It’s a sobering task, but it can bring peace of mind — and sometimes, justice.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Laws Talk 66 mins – “Come hear a wide range of views and expert voices tackle one of the most polarizing issues vexing our nation. A spate of recent high-profile massacres, including the shootings in Newtown, Connecticut, has sparked a vigorous national conversation about designing new laws – at the state and federal level – that protect all citizens, including the rights of responsible gun owners. More than 30,000 people die in American annually from gun violence, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Our panel will discuss the national issues and California’s role in the dialogue regarding proposals to ban assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines, to pass stricter laws to buy and license guns and ammunition, to require gun vendors to do background checks on potential owners, and report sales so law enforcement can track guns and their owners. Nancy Skinner, Member, California State Assembly; Benjamin Van Houten, Managing Attorney, Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence; Sgt. Kelly Dunn, SFPD Special Victims and Psychiatric Liaison Units; Gene Hoffman, Chairman, The Calguns Foundation; Member, Board of Trustees, Second Amendment Foundation; John Diaz, Editorial Page Editor, San Francisco Chronicle – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Harvard Digital Issues 53 mins – “The Digital Problem-Solving Initiative (DPSI, or “dip-see”) at Harvard University, is an innovative and collaborative project, hosted through the Berkman Center. DPSI brings together a diverse group of learners (students, faculty, fellows, and staff) to work on projects to address challenges and opportunities across the university. In this talk DPSI participants showcase: a smartphone app to reduce campus assault; a method statisticians can use to protect the anonymity of their subjects; and an innovative, immersive documentary project.” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Costs 61 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy explores the ideas underlying the American health-care system, whose costs, compared to all other countries’, are out of control. Many people argue that our quality and safety of care and clinical outcomes do not justify these costs. Lundberg will describe the whats, the whys and the what-to-dos, followed by a Socratic dialogue with Hammond and an open discussion with the audience. George Lundberg, Editor-at-Large, MedPage Today; Editor-in-Chief, Cancer Commons” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Horse Whips 21 mins – “Race horses are bred to race, but does the whip really make them run faster, or is it just an unnecessary tool that inflicts pain? Dr Jonica Newby reveals some surprising new science about horse tissue and their nervous systems, and even takes a strike herself.” At the link right-click “MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. It’s a video file, but the blog version is audio.

Immune System Affects Brain 57 mins – “This week, how rogue antibodies turned one woman’s existence into a living nightmare of delusions, hallucinations and paranoia, we examine the evidence that ME – or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) – might be an autoimmune disease, and why the blues might be down to a hostile immune response. Plus, how tracking eye movements can be used to influence decisions, why remembering causes you to forget, a new 3d-printer inspired by Hollywood’s Terminator, and the genetic map of the UK: apparently the Romans didn’t fancy breeding with us very much… “ At the link right-click “Download as mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Mechanics 171 mins – “John tackles how the internet works – the most requested topic as voted by Pragmatic listeners in this, the penultimate episode of the show.” At the link and way down at the bottom of the page right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Joan of Arc Film 66 mins – “Composer Richard Einhorn, and CTO of MTI Film Kevin Manbeck talk about restoring the 1928 silent film “The Passion of Joan of Arc,” finding the long lost film print in a janitor’s closet, and correcting the film maker’s mistakes, such as anachronisms.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalist Rescue Effort 58 mins – “Australian journalist Peter Greste addresses the National Press Club after his release from an Egyptian prison.” (“On 29 December 2013, he and two other Al Jazeera English journalists, Mohamed Fadel Fahmy and Baher Mohammad, were arrested by Egyptian authorities. On 23 June 2014, Greste was found guilty by the court, and sentenced to seven years of incarceration. On 1 February 2015, a month after a retrial of Greste, Fahmy and Mohammad was announced, Greste was deported and flown to Cyprus. His colleagues were released on bail on 12 February 2015.”- Wikipedia) At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Peter Greste,” right-click “NPCc_PeterGreste_2603_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrating Families 60 mins – “The number of Central American unaccompanied children and family units arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border has surged in recent years, reaching a peak of 137,000 in 2014. In this Migration Policy Institute webinar, experts from MPI discuss the shifting pattern of Central American migration and expectations for 2015; why inflows present a particularly acute policy challenge; and how states, localities, the federal government, and other countries in the region are responding. Speakers Marc Rosenblum, Margie McHugh, and Doris Meissner provide recommendations on policies that advance both critical protection and enforcement goals in situations of complex, mixed-status flows as well as means to address impacts in communities where child migrants have settled.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mobile Money 50 mins – “When your smart phone is your wallet.  Swipe the phone.  Pay the bill.  We’ll look at life and cash in the age of mobile payment.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MS Diet 46 mins – “Dr. Terry Wahls is a clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa, where she teaches internal medicine residents, sees patients in a traumatic brain injury clinic, and conducts clinical trials. She is also a patient with a chronic progressive neurological disorder – secondary progressive multiple sclerosis – which confined her to a tilt-recline wheelchair for four years. But thanks to the Wahls Protocol™, based on her research into functional medicine and the Paleo diet, Dr. Wahls made a major recovery and now pedals her bike five miles to work each day.  She is the author of Minding My Mitochondria: How I Overcame Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis and Got Out of My Wheelchair, and teaches the public and medical community about the healing power of intensive nutrition.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New Yorker History 28 mins – “The first issue of The New Yorker was published in February of 1925, ninety years ago this month. In celebration of our anniversary, David Remnick, the magazine’s editor, hosts a special episode of Out Loud in which writers and editors revisit New Yorker history, share memories, and discuss how the tone and direction of the magazine have evolved since its founding editor, Harold Ross, first envisioned a publication of “gaiety, wit, and satire.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

NYC Data 12 mins – “City agencies have access to a wealth of data and statistics reflecting every part of urban life. But as data analyst Ben Wellington suggests in this entertaining talk, sometimes they just don’t know what to do with it. He shows how a combination of unexpected questions and smart data crunching can produce strangely useful insights, and shares tips on how to release large sets of data so that anyone can use them.” t the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pedestrian Deaths NYC 30 mins – “Stephen J. DUBNER: Hey podcast listeners. This week we’re replaying an episode from last year called “The Perfect Crime.” Here are a few things that have happened since we ran the episode. In 2014, 132 pedestrians were killed in traffic crashes in New York City, the fewest in a century; this was after 180 pedestrian deaths a year earlier, which was the highest number in a decade. The 2014 decline coincided with Mayor Bill de Blasio’s embrace of a traffic-safety plan called Vision Zero, an import from Sweden, which is meant to eliminate pedestrian deaths entirely within 10 years. Some of the elements of New York’s Vision Zero: a lower default citywide speed limit, 25 mph, down from 30; the aggressive reengineering of problematic intersections; and tougher enforcement of traffic laws, including some of the ones you’ll hear about in this episode. Unless you’re in favor of reckless driving and dead pedestrians, you will probably all of this is a good idea.” At the link find the title, “The Perfect Crime (Rebroadcast),” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Playing Outside 46 mins – “ Hey Kids! Go Outside, Already – American kids today spend only four to seven minutes a day playing outdoors. We hear a new call to raise the “wild child.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Youth 11 mins – “As a teenager, Ismael Nazario was sent to New York’s Rikers Island jail, where he spent 300 days in solitary confinement — all before he was ever convicted of a crime. Now as a prison reform advocate he works to change the culture of American jails and prisons, where young people are frequently subjected to violence beyond imagination. Nazario tells his chilling story and suggests ways to help, rather than harm, teens in jail.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up value.

Professional Wrestling 16 mins – “Five sons enter the wrestling ring, but only one walks out alive.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychedelic Therapy 16 mins – “In the nineteen-fifties and sixties, researchers explored the therapeutic effects of LSD on alcoholism, depression, and a number of other conditions. Then the counterculture came along, LSD became a recreational drug, and the research dried up. In this week’s magazine, Michael Pollan writes about a new wave of researchers who are using hallucinogenic drugs to help terminally ill cancer patients cope with the fear of death. On Out Loud, Pollan joins host Amelia Lester, the executive editor of newyorker.com, to discuss the history of psychedelics research, the difference between a recreational psychedelic journey and a therapeutic one, and why he finds the effects of these drugs so intriguing. Whereas we don’t typically trust the insights we have when we’re drunk or dreaming, Pollan says, patients who take hallucinogens report having “a sturdy, authoritative experience.” “It takes us into an interesting and difficult to navigate intellectual space,” he says. “It’s very exciting territory.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Randomness 65 mins – “Campbell Harvey of Duke University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his research evaluating various investment and trading strategies and the challenge of measuring their effectiveness. Topics discussed include skill vs. luck, self-deception, the measures of statistical significance, skewness in investment returns, and the potential of big data.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recycling 14 mins – “One day it’s profitable to recycle a bottle. The next day, some number in the global economy changes and that bottle suddenly becomes trash. The line between trash and recycling is moving a lot these days. For a bunch of reasons, it’s a tough time to be a recycler” At the link find the tile, “#613: Trash!” right-click “Media files npr_395868155.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sandhogs 26 mins – “Eighty years ago, New York City needed another tunnel under the Hudson River. The Holland Tunnel and the George Washington Bridge could no longer handle the mounting traffic between New Jersey and Manhattan. Thus began construction of the Lincoln Tunnel. But this is not a story about the Lincoln Tunnel. This is about the men who made it. The Sandhogs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seafood Consumption 5 mins – “Here’s yet another food dilemma for the 21st century: Ethically speaking, what’s left that you can actually eat from the ocean? Given how hard it is to know the backstory of the fish on your plate, is there any effort being made to draw down demand for seafood in this country? We put these questions to Paul Greenberg, the bestselling author of “Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food” and “American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood.” [Americans eat] 15 pounds of seafood per person per year. Compare that to Asia [where] you’ve got 35 to 40 pounds of seafood per person per year [or] with the American meat consumption, land food meats. That’s like 200 pounds per person per year. What’s the best fish to buy? The best fish you could buy isn’t a fish, it’s a mollusk. I’m really big these days on mussels, farmed mussels, particularly those grown in the United States — and Canada is not bad either….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right-end of the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Awareness 22 mins – “Yes, all of the usual corporate and government entities know you’re here. Google remembers everything you’ve ever searched, BuzzFeed knows how you’ve scored on all their quizzes, and your cell phone provider knows who you talk to and who you sleep with. Terms of Service agreements are an exercise in futility, encrypted email often takes more trouble than it’s worth, and yeah, sure, go ahead and give Facebook a fake name, but don’t think you’re fooling anyone. Companies are collecting your data from just about everywhere, storing it through time unknown, and using it however they want. Oh, and that’s where the FBI-and-friends find it. But Bruce Schneier, security technologist, cryptographer, and author of a new book called “Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World,” says the fact that you’ve taken the time to read this far means you’ve got the one reliable protection available to us in year 2015: awareness….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tech Trends 52 mins – “In Radio Berkman 216 we tackle the web as we know it in 2014-2015. Hate speech online, freedom of speech online, censorship and surveillance online, and, of course, whether our smart machines are out to destroy us….” At the link right-click “ or download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ten Most Wanted Men 38 mins – “FBI Deputy Director Mark Giuliano and FBI historian John Fox talk about the history and significance of the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted list, which marks its 65th anniversary in March.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Universities 12 mins – Their impact, demands and trends, worldwide. At the link find the title, “A special report on universities: Roll up, pay up,” right-click “Media files 20150325 sr universities_ad.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universities 12 mins – Their impact, demands and trends, worldwide. At the link find the title, “A special report on universities: Roll up, pay up,” right-click “Media files 20150325 sr universities_ad.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wanderu 47 mins – “We talk with Wanderu CEO Polina Raygorodskaya.” Wanderu claims it is the simplest way to book bus and train transportation. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing blue arrow.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 35+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 177 – Apr 3, 2015: Acting Profession, Azheimer’s, Australia Pharmacology, Barbed Wire, Bhutan, Biodiversity Decline, Buffington Post, Brain Split, Brian Copeland, Bubble Control, Butterflies Find Drugs, Cambodia’s Baggage, Chinese Translations, Cinderella Story, Civil Rights Movement, Climate Change, Climate Friendly Diet, Climate Hope, Climate Journalists, Climate Stories, Cognition, Colin Powell, Commercial Trucks, Company Construction, Congo Violence,Courtroom Cameras, Creative Process, Creativity, Crisis Responses, Crowdsourcing, Cultivate Stillness, Cults, Culture, Death Penalty, Death Valley, Deforestation Control, Delusions, Denialism, Desalination, Design Thinking, Dianne Fienstein, Digestive Health, Digital Mastery, Digital Vellum, Disaster Response, Disease Prevention, Doctor’s Emotions, Dollar Strength, Double Agent Nutrients, Drug Trafficking, Dylan Ratigan, Economic Growth, Fecal Transplants, Fraternities, Gay Berlin, Graphene, Hockey, India’s Lower Casts, Investing Balance, James Randy Film, Katie Couric, Liberal Arts Education, Marijuana Is Bad, Microprocessor History, Music Copyright, Net Neutrality Discussion, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Online Dating, Pearson College, Rodeos, Serial Killer Dad, Sex Trafficking, Social Security Maze, South America Turmoil, Spotify, Synthetic Biology, Television Unbundled, Tumor Tests Improve, Urban Cities, Violence Causes, Watchdog Project on Drugs, Yemen

The following audio files come from a larger group of 245 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 9 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Acting Profession 52 mins – “ In a new book, film critic David Thomson tackles this question: Does acting matter? Put another way, when economies struggle, wars explode, and climate change looms, what’s the value of the performing arts? Thomson thinks acting is important, but not because it tries to be realistic. Acting matters, he says, because it empowers us to escape reality, and to exalt and despair over it. Thomson joins us Thursday to examine the methods and genius of the great actors and to explore how we all perform every day.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’s Summary 12 mins – “In an interview Michael Heneka considers the contribution of neuroinflammatory mechanisms to Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis.” At the link find the title (newest material at bottom of page), “Neuroinflammation in Alzheimers,” right-click “Media files laneur_150316.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’s Treatment 4 mins – “…apart from symptomatic relief, there are currently no treatments that can actually halt the disease process. Now University of Queensland scientist Gerhard Leinenga has found that ultrasound waves can be used to remove from the brain the toxic chemical amyloid-beta, which, scientists think, causes Alzheimer’s Disease. He spoke to Chris Smith…” At the link right-click “download as mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australia Pharmacology 58 mins – “Medicines Australia Chairman Dr Martin Cross addresses the National Press Club in Canberra on health policies and medicine.” Of note are Australia’s efforts to reduce drug costs. At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Dr Martin Cross, Medicines Australia,” right-click “Media files NPCc_MartinCross_1803_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Barbed Wire 23 mins – “In the mid 1800s, not many (non-native) Americans had ever been west of the Mississippi. When Frederick Law Olmstead visited the west in the 1850s, he remarked that the plains looked like a sea of grasses that moved  “in swells after a great storm.” Massive herds of buffalo wandered the plains. Cowboys shepherded cattle across long stretches of no man’s land. It was truly the wild and unmanaged west, but it was all about to change, due, in large part, to one very simple invention that would come to be known as “the devil’s rope.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bhutan 27 mins – “Bhutan is a landlocked country in the eastern Himalaya, best known as a Buddhist kingdom where the policy of ‘Gross National Happiness’ replaced GDP. Anthropologist and linguist Mark Turin documents the country’s endangered oral traditions. Can Bhutan’s languages and cultures be preserved in the face global influences through television and the internet?” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: On Language Location: Bhutan,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150318-0245a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biodiversity Decline P1 29 mins – “’Learning from Past Extinctions” by Anthony D. Barnosky PhD: The fossil record contains evidence of five mass extinctions, when more than 75 percent of species went extinct. Mammals are a key group for comparing past and present extinction rates. Many living species are threatened, but there is still time to avoid a sixth mass extinction.” At the link find the title, “2014 Biodiversity Lecture 1,” right-click “Media files 14Lect1_400.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biodiversity Decline P2 33 mins – “’Humans, Biodiversity, and Habitat Loss” by Elizabeth A. Hadly PhD: Human activities have caused the extinctions of many species in the past, and that is also happening today. Human population growth is driving habitat destruction and climate change, both direct threats to biodiversity.” At the link find the title, “2014 Biodiversity Lecture 2,” right-click “Media files 14Lect2_400.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biodiversity Decline P3 29 mins – “’Rescuing Species” by by Elizabeth A. Hadly PhD: The loss of biodiversity also means a loss of genetic diversity, which is the biological toolkit for adaptation. As populations of animals become increasingly isolated due to habitat fragmentation, assisted migration may be a strategy for preserving genetic diversity.” At the link find the title, “2014 Biodiversity Lecture 3,” right-click “Media files 14Lect3_400.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biodiversity Decline P4 29 mins – “’Extreme Life of the Sea” by Stephen R. Palumbi PhD: Ocean biodiversity is also threatened by human activities. But because the ocean is huge and has highly diverse environments, marine organisms appear to be more resilient than land animals when threatened by extinction and can bounce back with modest conservation efforts.” At the link find the title, “2014 Biodiversity Lecture 4,” right-click “Media files 14Lect4_400.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biodiversity Decline P5 29 mins – “’Ocean Species Respond to Climate Change” by Stephen R. Palumbi PhD: Coral reefs are threatened by many human activities, including global ocean warming from climate change. Some corals can survive unusually high temperatures by virtue of their genetic makeup. These heat-tolerant corals may hold the key to preserving coral reefs into the future.” At the link find the title, “2014 Biodiversity Lecture 5,” right-click “Media files 14Lect5_400.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biodiversity Decline P6 30 mins – “’Dodging Extinction” by Anthony D. Barnosky PhD: The current threats to biodiversity are tightly coupled to human demand for power, food, and money. We can avoid a sixth mass extinction by rethinking how we use energy, how we feed the world, and the value we place on intact ecosystems.” At the link find the title, “2014 Biodiversity Lecture 6,” right-click “Media files 14Lect6_400.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biodiversity Decline P7  57 mins – “’Saving Biodiversity” with Anthony D. Barnosky PhD, Elizabeth A. Hadly PhD, Stephen R. Palumbi PhD: A sixty minute discussion on biodiversity with the lecturers and students attending the 2014 Holiday Lectures. Moderated by HHMI vice president of Science Education, Dr. Sean Carroll.” At the link find the title, “2014 Biodiversity Discussion,” right-click “Media files 14Discussion1_400.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bluffington Post 18 mins – “Laura Jolliffe talks about her fight to get her deafblind 8 year old daughter Ava the benefits to which she is entitled, and explains the confusion between the German System and the DWP. And Kristina Venning-Rose talks about her blog, The Bluffington Post, in which blind and partially sighted people are sounding off on all manner of things.” [and herWhite Noise Show podcast] At the link find the title, “InTouch 17 Mar 15: Children Disability Living Allowance – Bluffing,” for a short time, only, right-click “Download 9MB” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Split 47 mins – “Dr. Michael Gazzaniga – Left Brain vs. Right Brain. We often hear that if we’re creative we must be “right-brained” but if we’re logical we must be “left-brained”. Science tells us that each hemisphere controls certain cognitive functions, so it only makes sense that there is a dominant side that gives us our tendencies – but is it true? Are we either “left-brained” or “right brained”? Or better yet, what happens when you disconnect the two regions from each other entirely? For over 40 years, our guest this week has been studying patients who have had their left and right brain disconnected via surgery, and he is here to set the record straight.” At the link right-click “Download” at the bottom of the page and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brian Copeland 68 mins – “Copeland grew up in San Leandro when it was ranked one of the most racist suburbs in America. Segregation, housing discrimination and police harassment welcomed him when he moved to San Leandro with his parents in 1972. Congressional hearings and federal investigations were conducted, and through a series of media inquiries and court cases the city started to change. Copeland lived through it all and turned his story into one of San Francisco’s longest running one-man shows. He shares with us his comedic and touching tale about a part of California history mostly forgotten. Brian Copeland, Actor; Host, KGO Radio; Playwright, “Not a Genuine Black Man”; Author, Not a Genuine Black Man.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bubble Control 14 mins – “In a classic bubble—housing for example, or tech stocks or Beanie Babies—the fun ends in a crash. Things go belly up, and people can lose a lot of money. The creators of the collectible card game Magic: The Gathering faced such a bubble. The cooler they made their cards, the more the resale value increased—and threatened to send Magic cards the way of the Beanie Baby. Today on the show: how the folks who made Magic cards came up with a plan. A plan to once and for all conquer the science of bubbles, and make a collectible toy that could live forever.” At the link find the title, “#609: The Curse Of The Black Lotus,” right-click “Media files npr_392410696.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Butterflies Find Drugs 8 mins – “Just like us, the monarch butterfly sometimes gets sick thanks to a nasty parasite. But biologist Jaap de Roode noticed something interesting about the butterflies he was studying — infected female butterflies would choose to lay their eggs on a specific kind of plant that helped their offspring avoid getting sick. How do they know to choose this plant? Think of it as “the other butterfly effect” — which could teach us to find new medicines for the treatment of human disease.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cambodia’s Baggage 61 mins – “More than a generation after the fall of the Khmer Rouge, Cambodia shows many signs of having overcome its devastating history. But under this facade lies a country still haunted by terror. As many as two million Cambodians, one-third of the nation’s population, were killed during the Khmer Rouge regime. In 1992, the United Nations began an ambitious program to rebuild the country. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Brinkley returned to Cambodia to find that its people still face brutal oppression and personal tragedy, including the PTSD that stalks much of the population. He’ll talk about what he learned, and what can be done.” Joel Brinkley, Professor of Journalism, Stanford University; Former Reporter and Editor, The New York Times. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Translations 14 mins – “Amelia Lester hosts Evan Osnos and Peter Hessler. They discuss the pros and cons of translating ones work into Chinese.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cinderella Story 48 mins – “Cinderella is back again, Disney-style. We’ll look at the origins of the Cinderella story.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil Rights Movement 55 mins – “A former leader of the US civil rights movement recalls the 1965 epochal march for black voting rights. And a Toronto filmmaker tells his story going to Mississippi in the 1960s to help the civil rights cause.” At the link find the title, “The Enright Files – Memories of the US Civil Rights Movement,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150302_10454.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 61 mins – “One of the world’s leading scientists and notable climate experts offers a pragmatic roadmap of the environmental challenges we face in dealing with climate change and the potential solutions toward sustainable living. Rather than looking backward and assigning blame, Flannery offers a powerful argument for immediate action and highlights some of the advancements made by wind-energy companies and automobile manufacturers to create electric cars that could end the reign of oil. Though he argues that we are approaching the point of no return, he believes there is hope that steps can be taken to avoid the worst effects of climate change. Chairman, Copenhagen Climate Council; Author, Now or Never: Why We Must Act Now to End Climate Change and Create a Sustainable Future; Greg Dalton, Founder, Climate One – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change and Fires 16 mins – “…In the last decade or so wildfires have been getting more intense, and more dangerous, and more frequent.  No one knows this better than the firefighters themselves. Climate change—making the region hotter and drier—has a lot to do with it. But so does fire management—namely, fire suppression over recent decades. And humans living in houses in the so-called wildland-urban interface is another culprit. A new documentary that will be screened in Boulder this week documents the changes taking place with wildfires and the impact they’re having. The film is called “Unacceptable Risk: Firefighters on the Front Lines of Climate Change.” One of the film’s creators, journalist Dan Glick, joins us in the studio. Dan was also the science editor of the National Climate Assessment that came out last year. Our other guest is Don Whittemore, a long-time firefighter. He was incident commander on the massive Fourmile Canyon Fire of September 2010. …” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Skeptic 65 mins – “Physicist Richard Muller generated headlines last fall when he said evidence for climate change “is clear and incontrovertible.” Until then he had questioned temperature measurements gathered around the world, which he now says are valid and without bias.  Yet his views on specific figures and funding from industrialists David and Charles Koch still make him a controversial figure among the climate intelligentsia. Muller says while average temperatures are rising one third of US cities have undergone cooling in the last 100 years. He also contends that scientists who claim that human fingerprints can be found on extreme weather events are “cherry picking” evidence. Despite those differences, he agrees with IPCC scientists that climate disruption “is urgent and we need to do something about it.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Friendly Diet 63 mins – “With as much as one-third of total greenhouse emissions related to food production, the cost of our eating habits on the environment has never been more apparent. Lappe highlights the hidden cost of America’s culinary culture and outlines seven principles for a climate-friendly diet. Anna Lappe, Founding Principal, Small Planet Institute; Author, Diet for a Hot Planet: The Climate Crisis at the End of Your Fork and What You Can Do About It; Steve Wright, Vice President of Strategic Communications, Silicon Valley Leadership Group – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Hope 55 mins – “News about climate change is almost always alarming, depressing, or both. Tim Flannery is a mammalogist, paleontologist and novelist. He’s also world authority on climate. Tim Flannery believes there is qualified hope that things will get better.” At the link find the title, “Climate Hope,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150316_36970.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Journalists 63 mins – “In a warming world, developing countries are being hit hard by drought, storms and sea level rise. Their effort to develop energy resources is increasingly complicated by a choice between cheap fossil fuels and more expensive clean energy. With political strife and economic woes often taking precedence over environmental issues, journalists, in partnership with Internews’ Earth Journalism Network, are stepping up to fill the information gap and tell the stories of climate change. Join journalists representing Brazil, China, Nigeria and the Philippines for an in-depth conversation on the trials and triumphs of environmental journalism in the developing world. Imelda Abano, President, Philippine Network of Environmental Journalists Inc., Philippines; Gustavo Faleires, Environmental Journalist and Knight Fellow, Brazil; Lican Liu, Water Director, Greenovation Hub, China; Michael Simire, Deputy Editor, Sunday Independent, Nigeria” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Stories 68 mins – “The lead character in the story of carbon is a gas that is invisible and has no smell. The impacts of that gas are often thought to fall first on polar bears and people in faraway lands, in a time far into the future. While human creation of carbon pollution is believed to be hitting closer to home faster than many think, there is still a dearth of compelling narratives about how global warming affects the lives of average people. Join an evening with skilled storytellers for a look at the story of our times. Carrie Armel, Researcher, Stanford; Co-Chair, Behavior, Energy and Climate Change Conference;nJon Else, Cinematographer, Last Call at the Oasis; Professor of Journalism, UC Berkeley
Jonah Sachs, Co-founder, Free Range Studios; Author, Story Wars” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cognition 76 mins – “A fundamental challenge of modern society is the development of effective approaches to enhance brain function in both healthy and impaired individuals, and some people have serious concerns about the ability of either our current education or health-care system to meet this challenge. Gazzaley will share a vision of the future in which video games integrated with technological innovations in software and hardware are used as an engine to harness brain plasticity and enhance our cognitive abilities, thus reducing our reliance on non-specific drugs to treat neurological and psychiatric conditions and allowing us to better target and personalize our educational efforts. Adam Gazzaley, M.D.; Ph.D; Founding Director, Neuroscience Imaging Center, Associate Professor in Neurology, Physiology and Psychiatry, UCSF” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Colin Powell 68 mins – “Throughout his decades of service to the country, General Powell has kept his private life out of the limelight. Now, in his new book, It Worked for Me: In Life and Leadership, Powell is opening up to reveal the important principles that guided his journey from being the son of Jamaican immigrants to becoming chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the first African-American secretary of state. He will reveal the foundations for achievement and leadership that worked for him and can help make others’ dreams come true, too.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Commercial Trucks 62 mins – “For the first time ever, commercial trucks will soon be subject to federal standards for fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions. How will that impact buyers and makers of medium- and heavy-duty trucks? California is a center of activity for creating and deploying hybrid and fully electric drivetrains and other technologies. We’ll discuss the move to increase efficiency, create jobs and build a cleaner transportation sector. John Boesel, CEO, CALSTART; Mike Tunnell, Director, Environmental Affairs, American Trucking Associations; Alan Niedzwiecki, CEO, Quantum Technologies” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Company Construction 67 mins – “Join Silicon Valley serial entrepreneur-turned-educator Blank in a lively discussion with  Dan’l Lewin of Microsoft. This program will introduce best practices, lessons and tips that have swept the startup world, offering a wealth of proven advice and information for entrepreneurs of all stripes. Hear about a tested and proven Customer Development Process, helping get it right –and how to “get, keep, and grow” customers.” Steve Blank, Serial Entrepreneur; Founder, E.piphany; Professor, UC Berkeley and Stanford Engineering; Author, The Startup Owners Manual; In conversation with Dan’l Lewin, Corporate Vice President of Strategic and Emerging Business Development (SEBT), Microsoft” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Congo Violence 16 mins – “Severine Autesserre studies the Democratic Republic of Congo, which is in the middle of the deadliest conflict since World War II; it’s been called “the largest ongoing humanitarian crisis in the world.” The conflict seems hopelessly, unsolvably large. But her insight from decades of listening and engaging: The conflicts are often locally based. And instead of focusing on solutions that scale to a national level, leaders and aid groups might be better served solving local crises before they ignite.” At the link click ‘Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Courtroom Cameras 37 mins – “Dahlia Lithwick speaks with Sonja West and RonNell Andersen Jones, two Supreme Court experts who don’t buy the justices’ arguments against allowing cameras in the courtroom” At the link find the title, “Cameras in the Courtroom,” right-click “Media files 2015-01-31-Amicus-010.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creative Process 55 mins – “Revolutionary ideas don’t come out of nowhere. Or do they? Starting with Archimedes’ original “eureka” moment, producert John Chipman dissects “aha” moments both big and small, and draws a road map to understanding Big Ideas.” At the link find the title, “Eureka! Mapping the Creative Mind,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150319_33821.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity 62 mins – “Acclaimed science writer and popular blogger Jonah Lehrer helped us learn about our decision making process in his best-selling book How We Decide. Now he delves into the human mind to decipher the anatomy of imagination and explore the new science of creativity with Imagine. Lehrer introduces us to musicians like Bob Dylan and Yo Yo Ma, artists working at Pixar, engineers at Procter and Gamble, and even a bartender who thinks more like chemist, to demonstrate our most important mental talent: the ability to imagine what has never existed. Find out what cities and companies are doing to double our creative output and make our culture more creative.” Contributing Editor, Wired; Author, How We Decide and Imagine: How Creativity Works; Tim Ritchie – President, The Tech Museum- Moderator” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crisis Responses 66 mins – “In a world beset with global financial, climate and poverty crises, getting a good handle on the problems is as important as finding good solutions. What steps can we take to better anticipate and manage mega-crises, such as Haiti, Katrina and 9/11? Engaging with one of the fathers of modern crisis management, this panel will offer tools and frameworks you and your organization can use to more effectively deal with the interconnected “messes” and crises of today and tomorrow.” Ian Mitroff, Professor Emeritus, USC; Adjunct Professor, UC Berkeley; Author, Why Some Companies Emerge Stronger and Better from a Crisis; Can M. Alpasian, Professor, College of Business and Economics, California State University, Northridge; Kevin O’Malley, President, TechTalk / Studio – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crowdsourcing 62 mins – “Since Jeff Howe coined the phrase “crowdsourcing” in 2006, the idea of tapping into the power of the human cloud has brought both innovation and controversy. From building a people-powered online encyclopedia to algorithm contests, crowdsourcing might be the world’s largest real-time workforce. But questions remain: Can you trust the crowd to give high-quality information? Will this movement allow a whole new way to work for the disenfranchised? How will being able to share knowledge more efficiently than ever before change the world? Lukas Biewald, CEO, CrowdFlower; Sharon Chiarella, Vice President, Mechanical Turk at Amazon; Lilly Irani, Ph.D. Candidate, UC Irvine, Dept. of Informatics; Previously a User Experience Designer, Google; Leila Chirayath Janah, Founder and CEO, Samasource; Brad Stone, Technology Correspondent, The New York Times – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cultivate Stillness 38 mins – “Rosenbaum combines his experience in neuropsychology, psychotherapy and Zen teaching with the Tao’s ancient guidance to suggest that rather than always “pouring more and more into a vessel,” we all need to also stop and cultivate stillness order to recover, revive and endure. Come hear a refreshing new interpretation of the Tao te Ching and glean insights into how to ensure a life well-lived. Robert Rosenbaum, Ph.D., Neuropsychologist; Psychotherapist; Zen teacher; Credentialed mountaineer; Dayan QiGong instructor; Author, Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cults 71 mins – “Learn about cults from a man who’s seen them from the inside. Professional investigator Sullivan describes the process of identifying and investigating cults, providing an overview of how cults recruit, convert and maintain control of their members through a variety of psychologically coercive techniques. A licensed private investigator for more than 19 years, Sullivan has worked in collaboration with leading authorities in the area of undue influence.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Culture 31 mins – “Is your state of mind from one situation to the next drastically altered by the state in which you live? According to cultural psychologists, yes it is. Studies show that your thoughts, perceptions, emotions, and behaviors in response to a particular setting will reliably differ from those of others in that same setting depending on where you spent your childhood or even where you spent six years or more of your adult life.On this episode of the You Are Not So Smart podcast, we explore cultural cognition and the psychological effects of the region you call home on the brain you call yours.” At the link find the title, “Culture | Hazel Rose Markus.” right-click “Culture Hazel Rose Markus.mp3“ and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death Penalty 47 mins – “Capital punishment by lethal injection may soon be impossible because of drug shortages. Firing squads are back on the table. We’ll look at how the way we execute affects our thinking about the death penalty.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death Penalty Concerns 61 mins – “While most know him as Captain B.J. Hunnicutt from the hit television series “M*A*S*H,” Farrell has been a fierce advocate for progressive political causes for decades, using his celebrity to speak out on important human rights issues. In this capacity he has served as a board member for Human Rights Watch, and he has been the president of Death Penalty Focus for more than 15 years. He has also written two books, Just Call Me Mike and Of Mule and Man, which detail his path from actor to activist. He will explain his belief that the death penalty is an ongoing human rights violation and will outline the punishment’s moral and policy failings. He will also discuss the importance of zealously searching for more effective alternatives to capital punishment and will suggest how concerned citizens can bring about lasting policy change in this important arena.” Mike Farrell, Actor; Human Rights Activist” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death Valley 56 mins – “Many think of Death Valley as a land of geological wonder and remarkable wildflowers, but few know its protection has not been simple. Ackerman will speak about the conflicting forces driving decisions made in Death Valley, part of the National Park Service for nearly 80 years. Ackerman will discuss policies on mining and groundwater extraction, the effects on the region, and where the preservation mandate is paradoxically in conflict with itself. Frank Ackerman, Retired National Park Ranger, Death Valley; Curator of Education, Nevada State Railroad Museum.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deforestation Control 30 mins – “Greenpeace’s Rolf Skar brings us up to date on the latest Greenpeace campaigns to push paper companies into adopting more sustainable forestry practices.” At the link find the title, “Greenpeace’s Rolf Skar On Big Paper,” right-click “Media files SC-2015-03-17.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Delusions 40 mins – “David McRaney joins us to speak about delusion from his blog and book, You Are Not So Smart: Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You’re Deluding Yourself.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Denialism 57 mins – “Denialism: How Irrational Thinking Hinders Scientific Progress, Harms the Planet, and Threatens Our Lives – Specter says that Americans have come to mistrust institutions, especially science, more today than ever before. For centuries, the general view had been that science is neither good nor bad, that it merely supplies information and that new information is always beneficial. Now, science is often viewed as a political constituency that isn’t always in our best interest. Michael Specter, Author, Denialism; Staff Writer, The New Yorker” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Desalination 56 mins – “For California, 2013 was the driest calendar year ever recorded across virtually the entire state. On January 17, 2014, Governor Jerry Brown proclaimed the drought to be a State of Emergency, directed state officials to take all necessary actions to assist the hardest hit communities, and called for all Californians to pitch in to reduce water use by 20 percent. While CA agencies and experts have clearly identified those actions best suited to provide relief, some observers wonder whether the long-term answer to California’s drought lies in the ocean through the promotion of seawater desalination. On today’s episode, we’ll explore an overview of the science and policy related to seawater desalination and demonstrates why this option is generally the least promising option for drought relief.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Design Thinking 66 mins – “Design is not just for house interiors or a tech gadget’s user interface. Design has come to infiltrate how great leaders think, collaborate and tackle the world’s smallest and greatest problems. The idea of design thinking, often credited to IDEO CEO Tim Brown, has transformed analytical thinking into creative yet practical problem solving. It is thinking outside the box come to life. Yves Béhar has leveraged his design ethos with a dedication to quality and a positive consumer-product relationship, and has led a number of diverse design projects like One Laptop Per Child and the NYC Condom, for that city’s Department of Health. Join us as the wizards of design thinking Brown and Béhar dissect the formula for harmonizing industry, beauty, brand and meaning. Yves Béhar, CEO/Founder, fuseproject; COO, Jawbone; Tim Brown, President and CEO, IDEO; Peter Schwartz, Co-founder, Global Business Network; Senior Vice President, Salesforce – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dianne Feinstein 64 mins – “With the Middle East in turmoil and America’s main Asian ally reeling from a tsunami-triggered crisis, the United States is facing unexpected challenges overseas. Senator Feinstein, chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, will offer her views on what the United States should do to promote democracy in countries attempting to throw off authoritarian regimes.  What national interest is really at stake in Libya and Afghanistan? Will the United States ever wean itself from foreign oil? Also, Senator Feinstein recently toured California’s two nuclear plants and will discuss how Japan’s disaster impacts existing and planned U.S. atomic reactors. Can they help reduce carbon emissions along with investments in California’s clean tech sector? Join us for a broad conversation with California’s senior senator about advancing freedom abroad and pursuing a clean and safe future at home.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digestive Health 66 mins – “Three experts will discuss the most common maladies of the digestive tract, such as belching, bloating and flatulence, heartburn, inflammatory bowel disease, constipation and dietary fiber intake, absorption of nutrients, and the effects of aging and medication on the digestive tract. Liz Lipski, Ph.D. and C.C.N.; Richard Auld, M.D.; Len Saputo, M.D.” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Mastery 61 mins – “Like it or not, knowing how to make use of online tools without being overloaded with too much information is an essential ingredient to personal success in the 21st century. How can we use digital media so that they make us empowered participants rather than passive receivers? In Net Smart, author and Stanford lecturer Rheingold shows how to use social media intelligently, humanely, and, above all, mindfully. There is a bigger social issue at work in digital literacy, one that goes beyond personal empowerment. If we combine our individual efforts wisely, it could produce a more thoughtful society: countless small acts like publishing a Web page or sharing a link could add up to a public good that enriches everyone.” Howard Rheingold, Lecturer, Stanford University; Author, Net Smart: How to Thrive Online” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Vellum 55 mins – “Why games are crashing through the screen and into the physical world, looking for the digital elephant that never forgets, reclaiming online ephemera and more.” At the link find the title, “277: Digital vellum, reclaiming ephemera, room escape games and more,” right-click “Media files spark_20150301_41749.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Response 59 mins – “The citizen response to 2012’s Hurricane Sandy was in many important ways more effective than the response from established disaster response institutions like FEMA. New York-based response efforts like Occupy Sandy leveraged existing community networks and digital tools to find missing people; provide food, shelter, and medical assistance; and offer a hub for volunteers and donors. In this talk Willow Brugh — Berkman fellow and Professor of Practice at Brown University — demonstrates examples ranging from Oklahoma to Tanzania where such distributed and digital disaster response have proved successful, and empowered citizens to respond in ways traditional institutions cannot.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disease Prevention 67 mins – “Learn how a significant portion of cardiovascular diseases and Alzheimer’s disease can be delayed or avoided completely when adults pursue active lifestyle habits throughout their adult years. Survey responses from 1,600 Bay Area residents reveal important differences in the cognitive experience of fitness buffs vs. people who are rarely active. Psychological research provides insights into specific methodologies that create opportunities for shaping new active lifestyle behaviors and improving outcomes for physical and behavioral health.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doctor’s Emotions 56 mins – “In this episode, we talk to Danielle Ofri, a physician and author of “What Doctors Feel” – a book about the emotional lives of doctors and how compassion fatigue, biases, and other mental phenomena affect their decisions, their motivations, and their relationships with patients. You’ll also hear Ofri discuss emotional epidemiology, the viral-like spread of fear and other emotions that can lead to panics like those we’ve seen surrounding Ebola, the Swine Flu, SARS, and other illnesses.” At the link find the title, L”045 – Doctors – Danielle Ofri,” right-click “Media files 045_-_Doctors_-_Danielle_Ofri.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dollar Strength 47 mins – “The almighty dollar. It is at big highs right now against currencies all over the world. We’ll look at why, and what it means for the US economy.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Double Agent Nutrients 88 mins – “Two new studies supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council have discovered a link between nutrition and increased immunity while aging, giving new meaning to the phrase, “You are what you eat.” Join Dr. Robert J. Marshall as he discusses the scientific connections between nutrients, regeneration and disease prevention. Robert J. Marshall, Ph.D., CCN, DACBN” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Trafficking 37 mins – “General John Kelly, commander of the U.S. Southern Command, briefs reporters and responds to their questions on a variety of defense topics, including stemming the flow of illegal narcotics, Guantanamo prison conditions, and combating extremism.” At the link in Podcast of the Week find the title, “Defense Department Briefing with General John Kelly,” right-click “Media files program.392618.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dylan Ratigan 66 mins – “Dylan Ratigan, host of one of the highest rated daytime shows on MSNBC, graces The Commonwealth Club with his hardball, gloves-off approach to American politics and big business. In his first book, Greedy Bastards, Ratigan details what he calls a “broken system” and “illustrates how fixing these problems will release a renaissance of growth and innovation.” Prior to joining MSNBC, Ratigan previously launched CNBC’s highly successful Fast Money and Closing Bell. Come join the debate as Ratigan discusses the repercussions and remedies to the problems we face in America today.” Quentin Hardy, Deputy Technology Editor, The New York Times- Moderator” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Growth 50 mins – “Theo Leggett looks at our apparent addiction to economic growth as the secret to prosperity and cure for global poverty. In a finite world with limited resources, can economies continue to grow indefinitely, or will physical and environmental constraints have the final word?” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Can the World Get Rich Forever,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150315-2100a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fecal Transplants 16 mins – “…Emily Eakin reports on fecal transplantation, a medical procedure in which the stool from a healthy person is transferred to the bowel of a sick person to restore the balance of flora in the latter’s gut. On Out Loud, Eakin explains that it’s “a procedure that grew out of desperation”—patients suffering from certain untreatable conditions, such as infection with the superbug C. difficile, formed a D.I.Y. fecal-transplant movement. In a conversation with Nick Thompson, the editor of newyorker.com, Eakin and Alan Burdick—an editor at the magazine, as well as the editor of the Web site’s Elements blog—discuss the science world’s fascination with the microbiome, the F.D.A.’s attempts to regulate the procedure, and the reasons fecal transplantation caught their interest as a story worth reporting. Eakin says, “the notion that stool—something that we associate with aversion and repulsion—was being elevated into a substance that was lifesaving and precious was tremendously appealing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fraternities 47 mins – “Another spate of awful headlines from college fraternities this week.  What is going on with ‘Greek life?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gay Berlin 17 mins – “Recently in the magazine, Alex Ross wrote about the little known history of gay rights in Germany in the late nineteen and early twentieth century. He joins Amelia Lester on this week’s Out Loud podcast to discuss how many of the ideas that we consider foundational to the modern gay-rights movement were first articulated in Germany more than a hundred years ago, and why this period is often overlooked. “German culture over the last couple centuries is so often seen through the lens of Hitler, of the Nazi period,” he says. “We tend to omit aspects of the story that don’t fit that narrative. And this astonishingly progressive movement around gay rights is an example of something that just doesn’t fit our stereotype.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graphene 16 mins – “If you’ve heard about graphene, you’ve probably heard that it’s a miracle substance. The only atom-thick material known to man, it seems to also be the lightest, strongest, and most conductive material on earth. Its potential applications seem almost limitless. The only problem, as John Colapinto explained in a recent magazine piece, is that nobody has figured out what to do with it yet. On this week’s Out Loud, Colapinto joins Nicholas Thompson, the editor of newyorker.com, and Vauhini Vara, a business and technology blogger for the site, to discuss the challenges that hyped new technologies face in the marketplace, and whether graphene is likely to live up to its promise.” At the link find the title, “ThePuzzling Promise of Graphene,” right-click “Media files 141222_outloud_graphene.mp3” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Hockey 23 mins – “The New Yorker’s staff contains a small but vocal contingent of hockey fans. On this week’s Out Loud podcast, three of the magazine’s most ardent rink rats—Ben McGrath, who recently wrote about the hockey player P. K. Subban; Nick Paumgarten, who plays regularly in a local league; and Adam Gopnik, who is Canadian—join the editor John Bennet to discuss the sport. They talk about how they first encountered hockey and learned to love it, the relationship between hockey and writing, and why, as Bennet puts it, having a child who plays hockey “seems to exacerbate the psychosis that is parenthood.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right-end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India’s Lower Casts 27 mins – “Journalist Rupa Jha travels to her own state of Bihar, where nearly 10% of the population now live, and who face many of the issues confronting the average citizen. In part two Dalit student Sunil hopes his exam results will help lift his entire family out of poverty.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Living India – A Dalit’s Tale,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150317-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Balance 23 mins – “In this podcast Paul reviews the returns of combining into one portfolio the S&P 500, large cap value, small cap blend and small cap value. He answers questions most investors have: What happens to the risk and return over the short to long term? What happens to the best and worst returns? If this is the first of the Performance Series podcast you have heard, Paul recommends you review the four MW articles on the pertinent asset classes. He has prepared a new table to support the 4 asset classes as well as the combination of all four.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

James Randy Film 51 mins – “James “The Amazing” Randi is a renowned magician and escape artist, but he can’t abide charlatans. So he turned his energy to exposing psychics and con-artists with intricate investigations and hoaxes of his own. His story is the focus of a documentary by Utah filmmaker Tyler Measom. It’s opening in Salt Lake City this weekend, so we’re rebroadcasting our conversation with Measom about Randi’s crusade for truth and how all of us, even “The Amazing” Randi himself, are susceptible to deception.”

Katie Couric 63 mins – “The Ounce that Saves a Life by Couric, Katie” At the link right-click “Play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liberal Arts Education 31 mins – “Joseph Epstein and Andrew Ferguson discuss where liberal arts came from and what has happened to them. Liberal arts, they say, emerged from an ancient stream of thought, learning, and belief about what is important in life, yet liberal arts degrees are not held in high regard today.” At the link find the title, “Joseph Epstein and Andrew Ferguson discuss the state of liberal arts education,” right-click “Media files 20130530.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Is Bad 57 mins – “William Bennett, former director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy under President George H.W. Bush, talks about his book [Going to Pot], in which he argues against the legalization of marijuana.” At the link find the title, “After Words: William Bennett,” right-click “Media files program.389973.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microprocessor History 180 mins – “Welcome Chuck Peddle, inventor of the 6502 and the father of the personal computer revolution! A lot of Chuck’s timeline can be seen on the Commodore history site and on his wiki page. The 6502 was used in seminal personal computers like the PET, the Atari 2600, the original Nintendo, the C64 and the Apple II….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Copyright 49 mins – “Music, copyright and the “Blurred Lines” verdict. How it may lock the music industry, and songwriting.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Net Neutrality Discussion 30 mins – “Mignon Clyburn, the longest-serving commissioner at the Federal Communications Commission, discusses the political and industry response to the newly adopted net neutrality rules, and other major communications issues.” At the link find the title, “The Communicators: Mignon Clyburn,” right-click “Media files program.392286.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder 53 mins – “  The average person has about 4,000 thoughts a day. Most are fleeting snippets, some are banal, and sometimes, they can be disruptive. But when most people question whether they left the coffee maker or imagine something bizarre like jumping out into traffic, they shake it off. A person with OCD though can’t let it go, and may spend as many as 6 hours a day obsessing over that one idea. Tuesday, Doug’s guest is the science writer David Adam. He’s written a book about OCD and his own life lost in thought.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online Dating 30 mins – “The episode is, for the most part, an economist’s guide to dating online. (Yes, we know: sexy!) You’ll hear tips on building the perfect dating profile, and choosing the right site (a “thick market,” like Match.com, or “thin,” like GlutenfreeSingles.com?). You’ll learn what you should lie about, and what you shouldn’t. Also, you’ll learn just how awful a person can be and, if you’re attractive enough, still reel in the dates.” At the link find the title, “ What You Don’t Know About Online Dating,” right-click “Play Now “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pearson College 55 mins – “Dr. Joe MacInnis profiles Pearson College- a place where education is a “force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future” At the link find the titl,e “Learning to Lead,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150318_71080.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rodeos 20 mins – “…Burkhard Bilger writes about the children who compete in rodeo in his home state of Oklahoma. Bull riding is the most dangerous sport in the world, and it’s become even riskier in recent years, as bull breeders have begun selecting for extreme aggression. But in the families Bilger interviewed for his story, little boys as young as three or four years old participate in rodeo events, and begin riding bulls around the age of ten. Bilger and Mark Singer, another staff writer and Oklahoma native, join host Amelia Lester on this week’s Out Loud podcast to discuss the kids who compete in rodeo, the parents who let them do it, and the attraction of trying to ride an angry two-thousand-pound animal. As Bilger describes it, when the kids start out, riding sheep and calves, “it’s like the best bumper-car ride you’ve ever been on. And then what you’re doing is just gradually turning up the volume. Or another metaphor might be the frog in the water.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Serial Killer Dad 59 mins – “Next, on an all-NEW SnaP, “Infamous.” Sure they want to take your picture, have your autograph… but for all the wrong reasons. Snap Judgment, storytelling with a beat…from NPR and PRX.” Rapper life and serial killer father. At the link find the title, “Snap #607 – Infamous,” right-click “Media files npr_394214172.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Trafficking 47 mins – “A former prostitute is trying to help young women escape the sex trade in the Bakken Oil Fields of North Dakota.  We’ll talk to her, and look at the big picture of sex trafficking in the USA.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Security Maze 48 mins – “Many Americans never collect thousands they’re due in Social Security.  We’ll look at why and how to get what – under current, confusing law – is yours.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South America Turmoil 47 mins – “South America in turmoil. Brazil. Argentina. Venezuela and more. Going volatile right now. We’ll ask why.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spotify 19 mins – “In this week’s issue of The New Yorker, John Seabrook writes about how the streaming service Spotify is changing the landscape of the music industry. On Out Loud, Seabrook joins Kelefa Sanneh, who also writes frequently about music for the magazine, and Nicholas Thompson, the editor of newyorker.com, to discuss how artists, record companies, and their own listening habits are adapting to the economics of streaming. They discuss how Spotify became the dominant streaming company, why Taylor Swift recently pulled her entire catalogue from the service, and how the industry is likely to evolve as the tech industry and the music business continue to converge. Seabrook says, “The tips of the two continents are just touching. And that is going to be a fascinating, enormous cultural change, conflict, and hopefully synthesis to watch.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Synthetic Biology 96 mins – “…Massively collaborative synthetic biology: Natural genomes are nearly impossible to figure out, Endy began, because they were evolved, not designed. Everything is context dependent, tangled, and often unique. So most biotech efforts become herculean. It cost $25 million to develop a way to biosynthesize the malaria drug artemisinin, for example. Yet the field has so much promise that most of what biotechnology can do hasn’t even been imagined yet….” At the link hover over “Download,” right-click “Audio Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Television Unbundled 47 mins – “The Internet “unbundles” cable TV. We’ll look at big new deals and what they mean for cost, content and you.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tumor Tests Improve 17 mins – “Is there a way to identify early stage cancer while treatments are an option? On this episode, Sanjiv Gambir discusses the detection of tumor cells using blood sampling.” At the link right-click “Listen to episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban Cities 63 mins – “Paul Romer of New York University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about reforming cities to allow growth and human flourishing. Topics discussed include charter cities, the role of population density in city life, driverless cars, and various ways to help the poorest people in the world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from thepop-up menu.

Violence Causes 55 mins – “Mass murder, senseless violence, random brutality. The human thirst for atrocity is at the heart of what psychologist Jordan Peterson has to say, in a talk he gave at the Stratford Festival, and in conversation with Paul Kennedy.” At the link find the title, “A History of Violence,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150320_91244.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Watchdog Project on Drugs 58 mins – “Dr. Adriane Fugh-Berman, director of PharmedOut, talks about the organization, the money made by the pharmaceutical industry, the advertising the industry produces, how pharmaceutical companies lobby Congress, and how they try to influence doctors.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Dr. Adriane Fugh-Berman,” right-click “Media files program.390059.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yemen 27 mins – “Lyse Doucet talks to journalist Safa al-Ahmad about her recent reporting trip to Yemen to cover the takeover of the capital Sanaa by Houthi rebels from the north of the country.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Meeting the Houthis and Their Enemies in Yemen,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150319-0232b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 5000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 30+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here MP3

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Media Mining Digest 176 – Mar 27, 2015: Adaptive Video Acceleration, Addiction Elimination, Admissions Mania, Afghanistan, Africa, Agent Orange, Aging, Alice Dunnigan, Allison’s Brain, Amateurs vs Pros, Amazon Forest Loss, America, American Indians, Ancient Wooden Sidewalk, Aneesh Chopra, Ant Life, Anthropocene Age, Antimicrobial Resistance, Apollo Computer System, Area 51, Arguing, Arianna Huffington, Arsenic, Artificial Intelligence, Australian Detention Camp, Autism, Awake Intubations, Azerbaijan, Battle of the Bulge, Belva Davis, Berlin Airlift, Big Data Revolution, Bihar India, Biodiversity Weds Tech, Biomedicine Status Panel, Bishop’s Wife, Blindness Case Study, Blueseed Project, Bollywood, Book of Unknown Americans, Brain Trauma, Broadband in Bozeman and Mesa, Challenge Coins, Clash of East and West, Climate Change and Fires, College Closings, Computer Generated Stories, Dept of Interior, Digital Vellum, Doctor’s Emotions, Drone Investigations, Female Engineers, Ferguson, Frog Watch, Future Crimes, Geoengineering andChem Trails, Human Age, Human Trafficking Abortions, Incubators, Irrationality, ISIS Evolution, Island Histories, Kidzania, Language Type, Latin American Upgrade, Lusitania, Mediacom Founder, Mexican Relations, Microbiome, Photojournalists, Podcasting Trends, Prison Entrepreneur, Prozac, Rhino Dung, Right to Work, Scanning, Social Media, Spirit of America, Terrorism and Media, Twitter Stories and Rushdie, Typography, Urban Travel, Water Shortage in San Paulo

The following audio files come from a larger group of 316 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 96 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Adaptive Video Acceleration 66 mins – “Yoel Zanger, CEO of Giraffic, talk about video streaming from codecs, bandwidth limitations and bottle necks, 4K, and the solution Giraffic Adapative Video Acceleration provides for streaming content to consumer electronics.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the blue down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Addiction Elimination 66 mins – “Addiction affects 23.2 million Americans. The head of the National Institute on Drug Abuse believes that all addictions can be eliminated if the brain’s receptors can be controlled. She will explain her groundbreaking work and the amazing personal story that has allowed her, as the great-granddaughter of famed Russian dissident Leon Trotsky, to achieve her current prominence.”

Admissions Mania 51 mins – “The announced closing of Sweet Briar College in Virginia spotlights declining enrollment at many liberal arts schools nationwide. The financial challenges for small colleges and what some institutions are doing to attract students.” At the link find the title (for a short time), “Worries About the Future of Liberal Arts Colleges” right-click “Media files r2150319.mp3,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Afghanistan 59 mins – “Ansary, author of Games Without Rules: The Often Interrupted History of Afghanistan, and Arghandiwal, author of Lost Decency: The Untold Afghan Story, moved to the West from Afghanistan as young men. Arghandiwal was born into a military family and Ansary into an academic family. They will discuss the past, present and future of their troubled homeland.Tamim Ansary, Director, SF Writers Workshop; Atta Arghandiwal, Banking Consultant; Robert Rosenthal, Executive Director, Center for Investigative Reporting – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Afghanistan Challenge 65 mins – “Afghanistan’s Challenge: A View from Ghazni Province – As we approach the 10-year anniversary of the U.S. intervention in Afghanistan, many Americans ponder the human costs of this conflict. Rarely in our calculations do we have direct input from the leaders of Afghanistan who are working the gritty issues and building a working representative government in a troubled land. Come hear the official who is working on urban development and construction issues in Afghanistan address the future of his country and his government. Listen to a female member of parliament speak about the development of democratic institutions and the role of women in Afghan society. And hear the governor of Ghazni province speak to the challenges and opportunities he faces. Mohammad Yousef Pashtun, Senior Advisor to President Karzai on Urban Development and National Construction; Mohammad Musa Khan, Governor of Ghazni Province; Shah Gul Rezaie, Member of Parliament from Ghazni Province.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Africa 68 mins – “Africa 2007 by  Ledgard, J.M.- Africa Correspondent, The Economist; Author, Giraffe, 2006; also known as Jonathan Ledgard” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Africa IT 64 mins – “How Africa’s Entry into the Information Age Is Changing Its Economic and Political Perspective – Through CherryPal, Max is dedicated to changing the world, one computer at a time. He has been succeful where others failed in providing laptop computers that cost less than $100 to millions of Africans. He believes that it’s crucial to bridge the “digital divide”, and make computers affordable for everyone. That’s why he’s developed the most energy-efficient, user-friendly and green laptop ever created – at the lowest price point the world has ever seen! Max Seybold, CEO, CherryPal” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Aid 67 mins – “The current system of aiding Africa is not working, says Moyo, citing the fact that more than $1 trillion in aid has been given in the past 50 years, with no improvement in most Africans’ lives. Moyo proposes a complete overhaul in the way prosperous nations reach out to African countries in need, in an effort to end the cycle of corruption and co-dependence, and to alleviate the suffering that persists. Dambisa Moyo, Head of Economic Research for Africa, Goldman Sachs; Author, Dead Aid: Why Aid is Not Working, and How There is a Better Way for Africa; Smita Singh, Program Director for the Global Development Program, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African American Art 51 mins – “This year, State of the Re:Union recognizes Black History Month through the lens of African-American art, the role it has played in social movements and everyday life, and why it matters both to the black community and the United States as a whole.” At the link find the title, “ The Power of African American Art: A Black History Month Special,” right-click “Media files PowerofAfricanAmericanArt_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Conflicts 64 mins – “South Africa’s Conflict Resolution Role in Africa – While dramatic changes are taking place on the international scene and among the major powers, Africa continues to suffer from a multitude of violent conflicts. Ebrahim, a hero in the struggle against apartheid, will provide insights and perspectives on the current state of Africa’s conflict zones, the outlook for reconciliation and peace, South Africa’s role on the UN Security Council, and the role South Africa is playing as mediator in Africa. Hon. Ebrahim Ismail Ebrahim, Deputy Minister of International Relations and Co-operation, the Republic of South Africa; In conversation with Dr. Saleem Badat, Vice Chancellor of Rhodes University, South Africa; Kevin O’Malley, President TechTalk / Studio – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agent Orange 69 mind – “Wars don’t end when the guns fall silent. Thirty-five years after the end of the Vietnam War, the legacy of Agent Orange – dioxin contaminated soils and a heavy burden of disability on people in Vietnam as well as on American veterans – continues to be a challenge. Recent progress, however, has created a window of opportunity for the U.S. to intensify its effort in a shared commitment to reduce the public health impact in Vietnam. Drawing on extensive experience in today’s Vietnam, the speakers will show how this is a humanitarian concern that we can do something about.Bob Edgar, President and CEO, Common Cause; Charles R. Bailey, Director, Ford Foundation Special Initiative on Agent Orange/Dioxin” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging 67 mins – “On the show this week we talk to Bill Gifford, author of the new book Spring Chicken: Stay Young Forever (or Die Trying).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alice Dunnigan 37 mins – “Carol McCabe Booker discusses pioneering journalist Alice Dunnigan, who shattered barriers in the late 1940s by becoming the first black female reporter credentialed to cover Congress and the White House. Booker edited and annotated a newly published edition of Dunnigan’s autobiography, “Alone Atop the Hill,” providing historical context to the journalist’s remarkable story.” At the link find the title, “Alice Dunnigan, Pioneer of the National Black Press,” right-click “Media files IM_20150228.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Allison’s Brain 55  mins – “In 2011, Allison Woyiwada was told that she had a giant brain aneurysm. After surgery, she experienced severe cognitive and physical defects. But then she began a programme of music therapy: this is the remarkable story of her brain’s recovery.” At the link find the title, “Allison’s Brain, February 19, 2015,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150219_68457.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amateurs vs Pros 58 mins – “This week, stories of people who are in put into positions they’re completely unqualified to handle … but who try to make it work anyway. Including one story of a tough group of soldiers who attempt to save lives through the power of show tunes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon Forest Loss 57 mins “Hinckley Forum: How Green Gold Will Save the Amazon by Mark Neeleman, Chairman and Founder of Bamazon” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America Fragmented 66 mins – “George Packer: The New America – Packer argues that seismic economic shifts during a single generation have created a country of winners and losers, leaving the social contract in pieces and setting citizens adrift to find new paths forward. He will present the story of this America over the past three decades, which he sees as a superpower in danger of coming apart at the seams, its elites no longer elite, its institutions no longer relevant.”

American Dream Declines 66 mins – “Hedrick Smith: Who Stole the American Dream? – Is the American Dream becoming a lost ideal of the past? Pulitzer Prize- and Emmy-winning journalist Smith suggests that it is as a result of four decades of erosion induced by corporate and political decisions. Smith will discuss the extent to which the American Dream has declined, as well as the future. Hedrick Smith, Former Reporter, The New York Times; Producer, PBS; Author, Who Stole the American Dream?; Robert Rosenthal, Executive Director, California Watch, Center For Investigative Reporting – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Imperialism 61 mins – “America’s Imperial Overstretch by Johnson, Chalmers- Professor emeritus, University of California at San Diego; president, Japan Policy Research Institute. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Indians 56 mins – “Hinckley Forum: Decolonizing Settler-Colonialism and Native Americans by Leo Killsback, Assistant Professor of American Indian Studies at Arizona State University; Co-sponsored by the Peace Advocacy Coalition (PAC); Wasatch Coalition for Peace and Justice; Tanner Center for Human Rights, U of U; Utah Valley University Peace & Justice Studies, Salt Lake Community College (SLCC), School of Humanities and Social Sciences; Salt Lake City Public Library; Utahns for a Just Peace in the Holy Land.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Justice Peril 67 mins – “Lauded as one of the country’s best lawyers in 2011 and the American Bar Association’s first Hispanic president, Zack will discuss underlying threats to the American legal system such as underfunding and political indecisiveness. Zack fled Cuba at the age of 14 after a harrowing night of detention and isolation at the hands of the Cuban secret police. After building up a powerhouse Florida litigation firm, he was tapped by David Boies to work on Gore vs. Bush in 2000. Following that monumental case, the two law firms merged. Come listen to one of the nation’s top legal voices speak about what he sees as a failing system. Stephen Zack, President, American Bar Association; Geoffrey Hazard, Thomas E. Miller Distinguished Professor of Law, UC Hastings College of Law – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ancient Wooden Sidewalk 4 mins – “Today, we walk a six-thousand-year-old highway. The University of Houston’s College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them. Roman roads loom large in legend and song! We forget there was ever anything before them. But archaeologist John Coles tells about a strange road, far older. In 1970, Raymond Sweet was cleaning drainage ditches in a peat bog near Bristol, England. Deep in the peat, he struck a wooden plank. It was the wrong thing in the wrong place. He took it to Coles at Cambridge University. Coles dated it at 4000 B.C. A major dig was begun, and the full story began to come clear. The trail of wood went on and on, from what had been one island in the fen to another — over a mile away….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aneesh Chopra 64 mins – “Chopra was sworn in by President Obama in May 2009 as the nation’s first Chief Technology Officer. Chopra has sought to use information technology to raise public awareness about President Obama’s policies on health care, energy and the environment. Chopra will discuss how investing in technological innovation is a crucial aspect of job creation, reducing health-care costs and protecting the country. Aneesh Chopra, United States CTO; Michael Moritz, Managing Member, Sequoia Capital; Former Board Member, Google, PayPal and Yahoo!; Current Board Member, GameFly and Kayak; Former Correspondent and San Francisco Bureau Chief, Time – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ant Life 56 mins – “Teamwork is part of life for ants. These social insects live in a society where group work is wired into each individual’s brain. Listen in as co-host Jane Rector and Dr. Biology learn about the world of ants from biologist Jennifer Fewell. Could leafcutter ants be one of the first animals to farm?” Two parts. At the link (part 1), right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same here for part 2.

Anthropocene Age 52 mins – “The world is hot, and getting hotter. But higher temperatures aren’t the only impact our species is having on mother Earth. Urbanization, deforestation, and dumping millions of tons of plastic into the oceans … these are all ways in which humans are leaving their mark. So are we still in the Holocene, the geological epoch that started a mere 11,000 years ago at the end of the last ice age? Some say we’ve moved on to the age of man – the Anthropocene. It’s the dawn of an era, but can we survive this new phase in the history of our planet?” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antimicrobial Resistance 21 mins – “On this week’s show: antimicrobial resistance in low-income countries, and a roundup of daily news stories.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 file for this show” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apollo Computer System 115 mins – “This episode is a mix between computer architecture, programming and (historic) space flight. We cover the ins and outs of the Apollo Guidance Computer. Our guest ist Frank O’Brien, who wrote an incredibly detailed book about this machine. In the episode we cover the hardware architecture, the instruction set, the various layers (native, executive and interpreter) as well as some mission programs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Area 51 67 mins – “Myths and hypotheses about Area 51 have long abounded, thanks to the intense secrecy enveloping it. Some claim it is home to aliens, underground tunnel systems and nuclear facilities, and some conspiracy theorists believe that the lunar landing itself was filmed there. No credible insider has ever divulged the truth about his time inside the base. With unprecedented access to military and intelligence personnel, Jacobsen takes an unprecedented look into the Nevada desert activities, from testing nuclear reactions to building super-secret, super-sonic jets to pursuing the war on terror. Annie Jacobsen, Columnist, Los Angeles Times Magazine; Author, Area 51: An Uncensored History of America’s Top Secret Military Base; Gil Gross, KGO Radio Host – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arguing 71 mins – “Why do human beings get into arguments? What does science have to say about argumentation? Is there an evolutionary explanation? Is arguing adaptive? Is all our bickering in comments, forums, social media and elsewhere a good or a bad thing? Those are some of the questions posed in this episode of the You Are Not So Smart Podcast. We ask those questions of. Jeremy Sherman is an evolutionary epistemologist. He says that means he researches how humans evolved to draw conclusions from inconclusive data. At 24, he was an elder in the world’s largest hippie commune, but now he lectures at the Expression College for Digital Arts in Emeryville California and is a chief researcher at Berkely’s Consortium for Emergent Dynamics where he and others research how minds emerge from matter. He is now working on a book, “Doubt: A Natural History; A User’s Guide” and he blogs at Psychology Today.” At the link right-click “Pod” beside the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arianna Huffington 63 mins – “Arianna Huffington: Beyond the Post – “It is no longer an exaggeration to say that middle-class Americans are an endangered species,” says Huffington. She is now sounding the alarm on “Third World America” She takes on the menacing duo of Washington and Wall Street, brazenly charging politicians with abandonment of the middle class and claiming the disappearance of the American Dream. Is the American middle class really in danger of extinction? How can we close the widening gap between the haves and have-nots? Hear what one of the most influential voices in modern media has to say about America’s imminent (or not so imminent) collapse. Arianna Huffington, Co-founder and Editor-in-Chief, The Huffington Post; Author, Third World America: How Our Politicians Are Abandoning the Middle Class and Betraying the American Dream; In conversation with Raj Patel, Journalist, Activist, Author, Stuffed and Starved – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arsenic 4 mins – “In a remote area in the Andes mountain there exist perilously high levels of arsenic: one of the most toxic substances known to man. But people have been living there for thousands of years, and it has now been discovered that this population has adapted to this dangerous environment. The group have a DNA mutation associated with a fast metabolism- this means they can flush arsenic out of their system much more quickly than most people. Georgia Mills spoke to researcher Karin Broberg to find out more…” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence   79 mins –  “For decades pioneering inventor and theorist Kurzweil has explored how artificial intelligence can enrich and expand human capabilities. Now he takes this exploration to the next step: reverse-engineering the brain to understand how it works, then applying that knowledge to create vastly intelligent machines. Drawing on the most recent neuroscience research, his own research and inventions in artificial intelligence, and compelling thought experiments, Kurzweil describes his new theory of how the neocortex (the thinking part of the brain) works: as a self-organizing hierarchical system of pattern recognizers. He shows how these insights could enable us to vastly extend the powers of our own mind and provides a roadmap for the creation of superintelligence.” Ray Kurzweil Inventor; Futurist; Author, How to Create a Mind: The Secret of Human Thought Revealed” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Detention Camp 27 mins – “ Australia is one of the most popular destinations for asylum seekers escaping their home countries. But Australia doesn’t want them. Asylum seekers dreaming of a life in Australia are being banished to camps in Papua New Guinea. Fariba Sahraei presents.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Banished to Papua New Guinea 19 Feb 15,” right click “Media files docarchive_20150219-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism 6 mins – ““People are so afraid of variety that they try to fit everything into a tiny little box with a specific label,” says 16-year-old Rosie King, who is bold, brash and autistic. She wants to know: Why is everyone so worried about being normal? She sounds a clarion call for every kid, parent, teacher and person to celebrate uniqueness. It’s a soaring testament to the potential of human diversity.” At he link click ‘Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Awake Intubations 27 mins – “It requires forethought and humility–you must be able to say to yourself, “I am not sure I will be able to successfully intubate this patient.” However, the payoff for this thought process is enormous. You can attempt an intubation on a difficult airway with very few downsides. If you get it, you look like a star, if you don’t you have not made the situation worse. Two of my critical care resident specialists, Raghu Seethala and Xun Zhong, volunteered to intubate each other awake. The purpose of this was to let them gain experience, understand what their patients would feel during the procedure, and to prove that awake intubation can be done without complicated nerve block injections or fragile equipment, such as a bronchoscope.” At the link you can watch or right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Azerbaijan 67 mins – “Azerbaijan: Central Asia’s Non-OPEC Energy Option – Standing at the crossroads of cultures and civilizations, Azerbaijan, a secular, modern, majority-Muslim nation, has an important geographic position, on the western shore of the energy-rich Caspian Sea. It is a significant producer of oil and natural gas, distributing energy to Europe and other regions through its huge BTC Pipeline, a non-OPEC source of oil terminating in NATO-allied Turkey and the open Mediterranean. Azerbaijan is also an important hub for transit of Eastern Caspian oil and gas from other Central Asian nations including Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan. Suleymanov, the Republic of Azerbaijan’s first consul general to the Western United States, will explain the global significance of this Central Asian country. Elin Suleymanov, Azerbaijan Consul General, Western United States” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battle of the Bulge 66 mins – “A veteran of the Battle of the Bulge takes us behind the scenes of the biggest and costliest battle ever fought by the U.S. Army, lasting from December 16th, 1944, to January 25, 1945. As many as 250,000 German soldiers and 1,000 tanks pushed the Allied line back during a very cold, snowy Ardennes Forest winter. Jameson, who was a decorated 19-year-old sergeant in the battle, will describe with visuals and maps both the German and American perspectives on this historic event. Andrew Jameson, Military Historian; Former Assistant Vice Chancellor, UC Berkeley” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Belva Davis 65 mins – “Raised in a dysfunctional family in Louisiana and the Bay Area, Davis rose through the black radio industry, became the first black female reporter west of the Mississippi with her hiring at KPIX, and eventually anchored KQED’s “Evening Edition,” the station’s nightly news show. Davis will discuss her extraordinary journey, personal and professional. Belva Davis: A Bay Area Legend Tells All; Broadcast Journalist; Host, “This Week In Northern California,” KQED Television; Author, My Wildest Dreams; In conversation with Ray Taliaferro, KGO Radio Host” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Berlin Airlift 65 mins – “Daring Young Men: The Heroism and Triumph of the Berlin Airlift – Best-selling author Reeves offers a gripping account of one of the most audacious and perilous actions of the post-WWII years – the Berlin Airlift. When the Soviets cut off all supplies to two million West Berliners in 1948, President Truman boldly resolved to resupply the isolated city by air. What followed was a daring humanitarian operation in which American and British planes delivered 2.3 million tons of supplies, demonstrating the West’s resolve to keep Berlin independent. Reeves shares the gripping story and discusses its impact. Richard Reeves, Author, Daring Young Men” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Data Revolution 65 mins – “What does a car’s paint color reveal about its roadworthiness? How did Google searches predict the spread of the H1N1 flu outbreak? One key to answering questions like these is big data. “Big data” refers to our ability to crunch vast collections of information, analyze it instantly, and draw conclusions from it. Two leading experts in the field reveal what big data is, how it may change our lives, and what we can do to protect ourselves from its hazards. Viktor Mayer-Schonberger, Professor of Internet Governance and Regulation, Oxford University; Co-author, Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think; Kenneth Cukier, Data Editor, The Economist; Co-author, Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think; Moira Gunn, Host, “Tech Nation,” NPR – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bihar India 27 mins – “India is home to an extraordinary number of people, languages and religions, but one of the more surprising statistics is that hundreds of millions of people still live on, or below, the poverty line. Indian journalist Rupa Jha starts her journey in Patna, capital of the state of Bihar. She gets to know four local residents, who come from very different backgrounds, but are unified by their sense of ambition.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Living India – Bihar,” right-click “docarchive_20150310-0232c.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biodiversity Weds Tech 68 mins – “How are bold new technologies helping in the fight to retain global biodiversity? Google’s Birch will talk about the life-and-death consequences of empowering indigenous peoples in Brazil and Africa to monitor their biodiversity. Loarie and Ueda will share the goals of iNaturalist, an online social network for naturalists, and discuss ways social media and mobile technology can bring the power of crowds to the problems of biodiversity. Scott Loarie, Co-director, iNaturalist.org, California Academy of Sciences; Ken-ichi Ueda, Co-founder and Co-director, iNaturalist.org, California Academy of Sciences; Tanya Birch, Program Manager, Google Earth Outreach; Mary Ellen Hannibal, Journalist – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biomedicine Status Panel 160 mins – “As policy agendas for 2015 come into sharper focus, much of the national conversation is aimed at tackling challenges in biomedical innovation. The first two months of the year alone have seen landmark proposals from Congress and the Obama Administration, including the House’s 21st Century Cures initiative, a bipartisan Senate working group focused on medical progress, President Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative and a number of additional priorities being advanced by federal agencies and other stakeholders. On March 13, the Engelberg Center for Health Care Reform hosted the State of Biomedical Innovation Conference to provide an overview of emerging policy efforts and priorities related to improving the biomedical innovation process. Senior leaders from government, academia, industry, and patient advocacy shared their thoughts on the challenges facing medical product development and promising approaches to overcome them. The discussion also examined the data and analyses that provide the basis for new policies and track their ultimate success.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bishop’s Wife 53 mins – “Utah novelist Mette Ivie Harrison had already written YA novels and a memoir, but she was still trying to work through her thoughts about Mormonism, women’s roles, motherhood and grief. Her ideas eventually coalesced around a female detective in Draper, Utah. The result is a crime novel that’s been getting attention around the country. Wednesday, Harrison joins Doug to talk about the real stories that influenced the book, her faith, and her observations on Mormon culture.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Case Study 63 mins – “Stanford University sociologist Krieger presents a romance, a travel adventure, an emotional quest, and a deeply reflective discussion of coming to terms with lack of sight. Krieger will offer pointed observations on vision, blindness and learning to walk with a service animal, Teela, her “lively golden guide.” Susan Krieger, Author, Traveling Blind: Adventures in Vision with a Guide Dog by My Side

Blueseed Project 61 mins – “Projected to be the first floating city in international waters, The Blueseed Project is dedicated to harvesting entrepreneurship by creating a place where the world’s top tech minds can collaborate. Twelve miles off the coast of Northern California, residents would not be subject to work visa limitations. Called the “Googleplex of the Sea,” The Blueseed Project is awakening a host of complex issues including immigration policy, visa limitations, international policy, social entrepreneurship and more. Max Marty, CEO, The Blueseed Project; Vivek Wadhwa, Vice President of Academics and Innovation, Singularity University; University Director of Research, Center for Entrepreneurship and Research, Pratt School of Engineering; Arthur & Toni Rembe Rock Center for Corporate Governance, Stanford; Nate C. Hindman, Small Business Editor, The Huffington Post – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bollywood 58 mins – “In this special program, Stanford Fellow Tiwari introduces us to historical and contemporary Indian Hindi film. She will provide insight into the significant conventions, economics and genres, including a screening of excerpts from old and new musical film performances. Bulbul Tiwari, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow, Stanford University” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book of Unknown Americans 51 mins – “ Thursday, we’re wrapping up our coverage on US-Latin American relations with novelist Cristina Henriquez. Her latest book, The Book of Unknown Americans, is about immigrants who have come here from various Latin-American countries and have settled in one apartment building in Delaware. It’s not the typical setting for immigrants maybe, but Henriquez says immigration is a story that’s everywhere … it’s an American story. The Book of Unknown Americans is Cristina Henríquez’s second novel, and it’s due out in paperback next.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Trauma 24 mins – “In this episode, we discuss what is known about chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), an increasingly discussed issue due to its effects on current and former football players. We discuss who else CTE affects, what is happening in the brain of affected individuals, and how more research is needed to solve this serious problem.” At the link find the title, “Punch Drunk: Boxing, football, and why chronic brain trauma matters,” right-click “135336499-thepetridish-punch-drunk-boxing-football.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Bozeman 15 mins – “ In Montana, local businesses and the city of Bozeman have been working on a public-private partnership approach to expanding Internet access that is likely to involve the city building an open access fiber network. We discuss their approach this week with Brit Fontenot, Economic Development Director for the city of Bozeman; David Fine, Bozeman Economic Development Specialist; and the President of Hoplite Industries, Anthony Cochenour. Bozeman has long been known as a city with opportunities for outdoor activities but it also has a significant tech presence though like nearly every other community in the United States, many recognize the need for more investment in better options for connectivity.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Mesa AZ 13 mins – “Arizona’s city of Mesa is one of the largest communities in the nation to benefit from the city taking role in ensuring conduit and fiber are available throughout the area. This week we talk with Alex Deshuk, the city’s Manager of Technology and Innovation that was brought on in 2008. We talk about how Mesa has, for longer than a decade, ensured that it was putting conduit in the ground and making fiber available to independent providers as needed to ensure they had multiple options around town and especially to select areas where they wanted to encourage development. Having this fiber available has helped to encourage high tech investment, including the new Apple Global Command Center.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Challenge Coins 22 mins – “The United States Military is not known for being touchy-feely. There’s not much hugging or head-patting, and superiors don’t always have the authority to offer a serviceman a raise or promotion. When a member of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard wants to show appreciation, love, sympathy, or professional connection, they can use challenge coins….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clash of East and West 18 mins – “Tiger moms or helicopter dads? Psychologist Hazel Markus talks about the stark differences between Eastern and Western cultures, and how they affect the way we all view the world.” At the link find the title, “The New East Meets West,” right-click “Media files IHUB-Markus-WebMix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change and Fires 19 mins – “Today we are joined in the studio with Mark Gross of the Alliance for Technology, Learning and Society institute at CU and Alicia Gibb Director of The Blow Things Up Lab, one of the spaces part of the ATLAS department. ATLAS was formed in 1997 as a university wide initiative to integrate information technology into social endeavor. Snowy frigid weather here in February may put wildfires way on the back burner for many of us here in Colorado. But as fire managers have been telling us, wildfire season has become a year-round phenomenon….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Closings 52 mins – “After a century of educating women, Sweet Briar College in rural Virginia announced this month it would close. Its endowment of about $84 million did not protect the school from the financial strains of declining enrollment. Some higher education experts warn Sweet Briar is part of a national trend of declining student interest in expensive liberal arts education and single-sex schools in place of more vocational degrees. The challenges many small private colleges face, what some schools are doing to attract students, and if it matters.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Computer Generated Stories 21 mins – “Robot art has come a long way from HAL singing “Daisy” in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Algorithms are writing novels now. Bot artist Darius Kazemi and computer scientist Kris Hammond talk about the future of computer-generated narratives.” At the link find the title, “Robots Become Writers,” right-click “Media files IHUB-0321-BWEB.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dept of Interior 51 mins – “Department of Interior Secretary Sally Jewell talks about the Obama administration’s energy priorities and why she wants tougher pollution rules for federal land, incentives for wind and solar and a focus on cutting carbon pollution.” At the link find the title, (for a short time). “A Conversation With Interior Secretary Sally Jewell,” right-click “Media files r1150319.mp3,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up men.

Digital Vellum 55 mins – “Why games are crashing through the screen and into the physical world, looking for the digital elephant that never forgets, reclaiming online ephemera and more.” At the link find the title, “277: Digital vellum, reclaiming ephemera, room escape games and more,” right-click “spark_20150301_41749.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doctor’s Emotions 56 mins – “In this episode, we talk to Danielle Ofri, a physician and author of “What Doctors Feel” – a book about the emotional lives of doctors and how compassion fatigue, biases, and other mental phenomena affect their decisions, their motivations, and their relationships with patients. You’ll also hear Ofri discuss emotional epidemiology, the viral-like spread of fear and other emotions that can lead to panics like those we’ve seen surrounding Ebola, the Swine Flu, SARS, and other illnesses.” At the link right-click beside “Direct Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Investigations 34 mins – “We speak with Bill English from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) about that agency’s investigations of unmanned aircraft accidents. Bill talks about the scope of their involvement, the data available to investigators, and the similarities to manned aircraft. We also talk about the FAA NPRM and the role of the NTSB when FAA enforcement penalties are appealed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Engineers 20 mins – “In our inaugural episode of 2014, we discuss how a company called GoldieBlox is helping to create the next generation of female engineers, how the three of us got bitten by the science “bug”, and what can be done to get kids more interested in STEM fields.” At the link find the title, “She Blinded Me With Science,” right-click “131168648-thepetridish-she-blinded-me-with-science.mp3” ad select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ferguson Federal Report 24 mins – “Attorney General Eric Holder spoke to reporters about the results of the Department of Justice’s investigation into the fatal police shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. The investigation concluded there was racial bias within the Ferguson Police Department and the city’s municipal court.” At the link find the title, “Attorney General Eric Holder on Ferguson, Missouri Investigation,” right-click “Media files program.391654.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Frog Watch 2 mins – “The season to spot frogs and toads has arrived, and Hogle Zoo is part of a nationwide, citizen-science effort to monitor them in Utah. The zoo’s Suzanne Zgraggen, coordinator for FrogWatch USA in Utah, teaches volunteers how to identify frogs and toads.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future Crimes 69 mins – “Host: Leo Laporte interviews: Marc Goodman is a global strategist, author and consultant focused on the disruptive impact of advancing technologies on security, business and international affairs. His latest book is “Future Crimes.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing blue arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geoengineering and Chem Trails 60 mins – “In this program we talk with one of the world’s top experts on geoeningeering to cool the planet, Harvard’s Dr. David Keith. Then from the UK, Dr. Rose Cairns investigates the internet phenomenon of chemtrails, the belief that aircraft are already poisoning the sky. Is it an expression of public fears about geoengineering?” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Age 11 mins – “Climate change, megacities, ocean acidification. Author Diane Ackerman believes humans have shaped the world so much that we’re now living in a new geologic epoch, one that’s defined by our actions.” At the link find the title, “The Human Epoch,” right-click “Media files IHUB-ACKERMAN-WEB-MIX.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Trafficking Abortions 51 mins – “It’s already been more than four months since President Barack Obama nominated Loretta Lynch to be the next U.S. attorney general. Now a Senate stalemate threatens to extend that delay. Majority leader Mitch McConnell said this week there will be no vote on Lynch until the Senate passes a contested human trafficking bill, but Democrats refuse to move forward, opposed to a provision barring abortion funding. Both sides could take a political hit for the delay, Democrats for blocking what was to be a rare bipartisan bill and Republicans for appearing to hold up the historic nomination of the country’s first black woman as attorney general. We look at what’s behind the stalled nomination of Loretta Lynch. ” At the link find the title, (For a short time), “The Stalled Nomination Of Loretta Lynch For Attorney General,” right-click “Media files r1150317.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Incubators 5 mins – “Incubators. They’re supposed to help startups raise capital, build revenue, and maybe become the next Facebook or Yahoo! But how effective are they? Reporter Daniel Gross examines the industry.” At the link find the title, “Cracking Open Incubators,” right-click “Media files IHUB-Gross-WebMix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Irrationality 17 mins – “We’re all irrational some of the time, probably more of the time than we are ready to acknowledge.  Lisa Bortolotti discusses the nature of irrationality with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Evolution 51 mins – “In their new book, “ISIS: The State Of Terror,” Jessica Stern and JM Berger, experts on violent extremism and terrorism, explain the genesis, evolution and implications of today’s barbaric jihadist army.” At the link find the title, “Jessica Stern and J.M. Berger: “ISIS: The State Of Terror,’” right-click “Media files r2150317.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Island Histories 59 mins – “For those of us who live on the mainland, islands are something we tend to think of as destinations. As places to visit, perhaps, to take a break from our ordinary lives. And then to leave again. They’re places on the periphery — and that’s borne out not only in the way we draw our maps, but also in the way we write our history. On this episode, we make the peripheral central. From the Caribbean, through the Great Lakes, to the San Francisco Bay and beyond, it’s an hour all about islands in American history.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kidzania 18 mins – “In this week’s magazine, Rebecca Mead writes about KidZania, a company that operates giant children’s play centers resembling miniature cities. Rather than escape into a fantasy world, at KidZania children take jobs, purchase items branded by corporate sponsors, pay taxes, and even run a legal system. On this week’s Out Loud, Mead joins Michael Agger, the culture editor of newyorker.com, along with the staff writer Nick Paumgarten, to discuss KidZania’s unusual approach to play. They discuss the parenting and educational philosophies behind various forms of kids’ entertainment, the challenge of finding safe play spaces for children that offer real freedom, and some of the disconcerting aspects of the KidZania model. Like a Vegas casino, Paumgarten says, “on the one hand, you’re impressed by the verisimilitude; on the other it’s spooky and cheesy.” At the link find the title, “Play and Parenting at KidZania,” right-click “Media files 150112_outloud_kidzania.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language Types 49 mins – “In this hour, TED speakers reflect on how words and methods of communication affect us, more than you might expect.” At the link find the title, “Spoken And Unspoken,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latin American Upgrade 56 mins – “Hinckley Forum: Trends and Transformations – The New Latin America By Hinckley Institute of Politics by Peter Schecter​, Atlantic Council, Director of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lusitania 51 mins – “A hundred years ago, a German U-boat torpedoed a British passenger liner, one of the most significant maritime tragedies in history. Best-selling author Erik Larson retells the story of the last crossing of the Lusitania.” At the link (for a short time) find the title, “Erik Larson: “Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania,” right-click “Media files r2150318.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mediacom Founder 29  mins – ”Mediacom Founder and CEO Rocco Commisso discusses his company, the Federal Communications Commission’s vote to approve new rules to regulate the Internet as a public utility, and Republican legislative efforts to pare back the rule changes.” At the link find the title, “Communicators: Rocco Commisso,” right-click “Media files program.390384.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexican Relations 54 mins – “Hinckley Forum: The Future of U.S. – Mexican Relations: By Hinckley Institute of Politics by Ambassador Alejandro Estivill-Castro, Deputy Head of Mission of the Mexican Embassy to the United States of America” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbiome 52 mins – “You are what you eat. Whether you dine on kimchi, carnitas, or corn dogs determines which microbes live in your stomach. And gut microbes make up only part of your total microbiome. Find out how your microbes are the brains-without-brains that affect your health and even your mood. Also, why you and your cohorts are closer than you thought: new research suggests that you swap and adopt bugs from your social set. Plus, the philosophical questions that are arise when we realize that we have more microbial DNA than human DNA. And a woman who skipped soap and shampoo for a month to see what would grow on her.” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photojournalists 49 mins – “Award-winning photographers MaryAnne Golon and Lucian Perkins share their experiences of recording crises around the world and putting themselves in harm’s way to capture conflict on the human level. They are joined by Michael Abramowitz, director of the Levine Institute for Holocaust Education at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, which relies on documentation taken by photojournalists to provide evidence of war crimes and to capture stories of destruction and devastation.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasting Trends 45 mins – “Ray Ortega is a professional podcaster.  In addition to his own part-time entrepreneurial work as an audio podcaster (with his own shows like The Podcasters Studio and Podcasters Roundtable), his main day-job is that of a video podcaster for a non-profit organization. In this episode, Ray delivers his story of how he creates video content and then repurposes it as an audio podcast, with the proper iTunes listing and feed to his audience — the Podcasters Roundtable. In addition, Lon Naylor also describes the formula for repurposing audio podcast episodes into compelling, creative, visually engaging and message-driven screencasts with a good call-to-action.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Entrepreneur 17 mins – “Frederick Hutson is an entrepreneur whose biggest early venture landed him in prison for nearly five years—distributing marijuana through UPS and FedEx. While in prison, he realized that a lot of the problems of everyday prison life could use a business solution. And then, he got out. Today on the show, a businessman goes to prison, and decides he is going to disrupt the biggest captive market in America.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prozac 7 mins – “The 19th century American poet Emily Dickinson could well have been writing about depression from her own experience; sadly there were no medicines to treat it. It is only since the second world war that antidepressant molecules have been available. The effects of amphetamines on mood had been discovered in the 1930s. They were widely used during the second world war to improve alertness, and their use (and abuse) continued afterwards; into the 1960s medicines like Drinamyl (a combination of dextroamphetamine and Amobarbital) were seen as innocuous medications, which they were not. The first specific antidepressants were hit upon accidentally. A drug named imipramine which was unsuccessful as a treatment for schizophrenics proved ideal for people suffering from depression….” At the link right-click “Download: CIIE_Prozac.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rhino Dung 5 mins – “In a small factory in the northeastern India, a strange type of swill churns in a vat. Bits of chopped-up old hosiery swirl around in almost 200 gallons of water while, at six-second intervals, 72-year-old Mahesh Bora adds fists full of rhino dung… Manesh Bora says he was inspired to try a new approach to protecting rhinos after others had failed. When he heard about an effort elsewhere in India to use elephant dung in paper, he figured the same could work for rhinos… He visited the elephant project, came back to Assam, and set up a business called Elrhino. It started with his wife’s kitchen blender and some window screens, but now employs 50 people. They gather the dung and other natural ingredients and work in the factory. Rhino dung is rich in fiber useful in making paper, and relatively easy to find in the animals’ territory. One rhino can drop up to 900 pounds in one spot over 10 days or so. The dung is easy to find; when rhinos find a good place to poop, they tend to return there for at least 10 days. And they drop a lot of it, maybe 900 pounds or so in one spot.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Right to Work 45 mins – “Lawmakers across the country are racing to pass so-called “right-to-work” legislation, the euphemistically named union-busting policy that restricts the collection of fees from all workers covered by a union contract. Militating against the principle of the union shop, right-to-work campaigns have pushed bills in various states, coupled with court battles and fierce anti-union rhetoric peddled by politicians like Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker. This week, Loyola University historian Elizabeth Shermer speaks with Belabored about the politics and history of right-to-work policies, and what labor can do to fight back. We also discuss the groundbreaking new student debt strike led by the Debt Collective, the truth about Walmart’s wage hike, the battle in Seattle for fair wages, and catering workers pressuring airlines to beef up their paltry healthcare benefits….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scanning 65 mins – “Ancient monuments give us clues to astonishing past civilizations, but they’re under threat from pollution, war and neglect. Kacyra invented a groundbreaking 3D laser scanning system and is using his invention to scan and preserve the world’s heritage in archival detail. His nonprofit organization, CyArk, is now launching the 500 Challenge, an ambitious goal to “digitally preserve” 500 heritage sites. Digital Preservation, a technology twist on brick and mortar conservation, takes advantage of digital content to share the stories and significance of these ancient places with children and adults through virtual tours, online lesson plans, and soon, “the holodeck,” in addition to making critical data available to conservators for their conservation

Social Media in Business 42 mins – “…Social media is here and it’s a necessity for any business these days. Even more importantly is the specific way you interact on social media, what you share, how you share it, and what your strategy is. Love it or hate it, it’s time to step up your social media game. This week we interview entrepreneur and social media expert, Laura Roeder. Laura is a social media marketing expert who teaches small businesses how to become well-known and claim their brands online. She is the creator of LKR Social Media Marketer and Creating Fame,.. In 2011, Laura Roeder was honored at The White House as one of the top 100 entrepreneurs under the age of 30.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media in Science 25 mins – “Have you wanted to reach out to other science teachers with your questions about NGSS?  Our guests this week can help.  Using Twitter, Fred Ende and Tricia Shelton moderate #NGSSchat – an online forum to learn and share around the Next Generation Science Standards and great science teaching.  Listen to the show to find out how you can “lurk”, learn and contribute to #NGSSchat.” [Synchronous and asynchronous messaging are mentioned. Here’s a link that defines these.] At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spirit of America   21 mins –  “Jim Hake, General Jim Mattis, And Spirit Of America In this episode, the host of Uncommon Knowledge speaks with Jim Hake, founder of Spirit of America, a nonprofit organization created to save lives and support the missions of US soldiers abroad. Hake’s goal was to go beyond what the government could do, with the motive of seeing America succeed. Begun in 2003, the idea gained enormous support, including from General Jim Mattis, commander of some of the first missions in Iraq. Today, Spirit of America is working around the world, sending our troops material needs, from sewing machines to Frisbees, wherever there is a need.” At the link find the title, “Uncommon Knowledge with Jim Hake, General Jim Mattis, and Spirit of America,” right-click “20150313.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism and Media 55 mins – “Terrorism and Today’s Media: Roles, Responsibilities and the Changing Dynamics of Reporting a War on Terror by Amos N. Guiora, Professor of Law, Co-Director, Center for Global Justice, University of Utah; Bill Warren, Chief Marketing and Communications Officer, University of Utah and moderator Kirk Jowers Director of the Hinckley Institute of Politics” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Twitter Stories and Rushdie 60 mins – “Teju Cole’s Twitter-based faction project “Small Fates 1912” (newspaper headlines rendered as short shorts) is performed by Blythe Danner and Jeffrey Wright. And old frenemies in Chennai are caught up in disaster in Salman Rushdie’s “In the South,” performed by Michael Stuhlbarg.” At the link find the title, “In an Instant,” right-click “Media files 196644144-selectedshorts-pcast-ss201426.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Typography 15 mins – “Paul Shaw, an award-winning graphic designer, typographer, and calligrapher in New York City, teaches at Parsons School of Design and the School of Visual Arts. The designer or codesigner of eighteen typefaces, he is the coauthor of Blackletter: Type and National Identity and the author of Helvetica and the New York City Subway System (MIT Press). He writes about letter design in the blog Blue Pencil.” At the link find the title, “EPISODE 70 (MAR. ’15): Paul Shaw,” right-click “Listen to Interview” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban Travel 30 mins – “We’ve all deliberated ad nauseum about which road to take to avoid traffic. Today’s discussions about transportation choices are more about the mode than the route, with greener options like biking, public transit, and innovative ride-sharing ideas exploding. This week on Sea Change Radio, Amanda Eaken of the Natural Resources Defense Council takes us on a tour of the latest innovations in urban transport – from car and bike-sharing services to mapping to the potential of self-driving cars. ” At the link find the title, “Getting Around: Urban Transport Solutions,” right-click “ Media files SC-2015-03-10.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Shortage in San Paulo 4 mins – “Imagine this: São Paulo, South America’s largest city and economic hub, running out of water by June. That’s what Brazil’s federal government predicted just weeks ago. The region is in its worst drought in 80 years. The reservoir that supplies half the city is just over 10 percent full. The government has begun rationing water, though haphazardly. Many people in São Paulo are worried their future may look a lot like what happened last year in the small, nearby city of Itu. Last August, without warning, the city’s homes had their water supplies shut off. Residents had to use public taps, and neighbors fought neighbors as dozens of people swarmed around the faucet. The outage went on for weeks, stretching into September. Itu resident Alexandre Oliveira remembers it as “a water war.” Oliveira volunteered as a water carrier for homebound neighbors, but others charged for the service and became known as “water traffickers.” Emergency water trucks were eventually called in, but there weren’t enough. When they did arrive, some residents blocked the trucks with flaming barricades to make sure they didn’t leave before every house on the street got water.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right-end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 5000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 30+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here MP3

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Media Mining Digest 175 – Mar 20, 2015: Africa Mobile Health, American Leadership in Asia, Aniracetam, Ara Sea, Arsenio, Baha’i Faith, Barbituric Acid, Blindness Variations, Blood Analysis Breakthrough, Blood Analysis Help, CIA Reorganization, Cold Storage Film, Cuba-U.S. Relations, Cuban Detente, Drug Disposal Program, Education, Email Assistants, Ferguson, Foreign Service Careers, Forensic Science, Forenisc Toxicology, Freak and RowHammer, Human Powered Helicopter, Human Rights, Immigrant Education Help, Immigrant Youth, India and China, Innovation Science, Intelligence, Kidnapping for Ransom, Kids Chances Decline, Longevity Kitchen, Malaria Resistance, Microbiome Hype, Middle Class Decline, Neuroscience future, Overmedication of Women, Palm Tree Rustling, Palm Rustling, Police Commissioner of Baltimore, Police Issues, Racism Challenge, Russian Deception Strategy, S&P 500, Salmon, Science Talk, Small Cap Funds, Ukraine Crisis, Undocumented Immigrant, Wall Street Reform, Water Evaluation, Wayne Brady, West Without Water, Women in Science, Women in STEM,

The following audio files come from a larger group of 219 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 67 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Africa Mobile Health 112 mins – “Mobile technology is upending how healthcare is delivered in Africa. Mobile devices and mobile health (mHealth) services have, for example, revolutionized maternal care, chronic disease prevention, and the management of Ebola and malaria epidemics. Innovations in mHealth have shown to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of African medical systems through patient tracking and reporting, as well as extend critically needed health services to underserved areas, found both in rural and urban African communities. On March 12, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings examined mHealth applications in Africa, with a particular emphasis on mHealth innovations in Nigeria, Liberia and Sierra Leone paying specific attention to child and maternal health. Discussion centered on current implementation in Nigeria and elsewhere, how mobile solutions can serve to improve patient treatment and public health reporting in the developing world, and how communities are using such technologies to provide crucial epidemic treatment information to address health issues such as maternal mortality and epidemic outbreaks. Brookings Vice President Darrell West also presented his findings from a forthcoming paper, “Using Mobile Technology to Improve Maternal Health and Fight Ebola: A Case Study of Mobile Innovation in Nigeria.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Leadership in Asia 42 mins – “In this episode of Uncommon Knowledge Dartmouth professors of government Jennifer Lind and William Wohlforth join Peter for an in-depth conversation about foreign policy and national security strategies in an ever-changing environment. Jennifer Lind is an associate professor of government; her most recent book is Sorry States: Apologies in International Politics. William Wohlforth is the Daniel Webster Professor of Government; his most recent book is World Out of Balance: International Relations and the Challenge of American Primacy.” At the link find the title, “Uncommon Knowledge with Dartmouth professors Jennifer Lind and William Wohlforth,” right-click “Media files 20150226.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aniracetam 28 mins – “Aniracetam has been reported to yield significant increases in cognitive functioning and abilities. This is further enhanced by its effects on memory recall and, probably more importantly, its high-level effects on learning. To add to that, the drug has been proven as an anxiolytic, a drug which helps reduce anxiety.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Sve Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aral Sea 27 mins – “As part of the BBC’s A Richer World season, Rustam Qobil visits a desert where people have lost their sea, health and loved ones to a man-made disaster. He meets 86 year-old Khojabay who lives in Kazakhstan in the middle of a vast toxic desert made of mud, dust and pesticides – once The Aral Sea. 40 years ago his village was a seaside fishing port surrounded by freshwater lakes and barley fields, and he could catch up to 400 kilos of fish in one go. However, 26,000 square miles of sea is now called Aralkum or ‘The Aral Sands’ locally. When the Soviets started building dozens of dams and canals in the 1960s they deprived the Aral Sea of its two main tributaries and the sea started shrinking. Rustam Qobil travels to ‘The Aral Sands’ and hears from the people whose lives and families have been affected.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Gone,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150225-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arsenio 82 mins – “The Late night legend sits down with the Champs to discuss a variety of things, including how his career began, Richard Pryor, Jay Leno, Redd Foxx, and of course, the making of “Coming To America.”  He also refers to Neal as a “negrophile.”  And does a mean Paul Mooney impression.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Baha’i Faith 60 mins – “Come learn about the history, tenets and values of the Baha’i faith, which upholds the unity of God and the oneness of the human race. The Faith was founded in 19th century Persia by the Prophet/Founder Baha’u’llah. It is the 2nd largest minority religion in Iran, but its adherents have been discriminated against in Iran and elsewhere. Its Holy Shrines and offices are in Israel. Sabetan is the spokesperson for the International Baha’i community in the United States.” Farhad Sabetan, Ph.D. in Economics; Human Rights Defender; Michael Pappas, Executive Director, SF Interfaith Council. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Barbituric Acid 8 mins – “‘No small art is it to sleep: it is necessary for that purpose to keep awake all day.’ Thus speaks the sage in Thus speaks Zarathustra, Friedrich Nietzsche’s work of philosophical fiction, pronouncing untroubled sleep God’s reward for a day lived virtuously. But Zarathustra, the vehicle for Nietzsche’s new, godless philosophy, is unconvinced – he dismisses the sage and his followers as unenlightened sleepwalkers, retorting ‘Blessed are the sleepy ones, for they will soon drop off.’ Now, whether you believe that deities dictate dozing, or that sleep is assuredly secular, adherents of both philosophies at least agree that sleep is not always easily achieved. Who has not lain awake feeling the dawn’s slow approach, exhausted but unable to slumber? Thankfully, merciful chemistry is agnostic and throughout history, the sleepless just and unjust alike have appealed to her for reprieve.” At the link right-click “Download CIIE_Barbituric_acid.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blindness Variations 20 mins – “Listener, Chris Markiewicz explains how colour contrasts on some packaging makes the labelling difficult to read. Also, Lyndall Bywater who was born blind, and Ken Reid, who lost his sight in his late thirties discuss which of the two situations is ‘better’. And In Touch listeners’ response to Damon Rose column, broadcast last week, about the colours and light show he is constantly seeing, even though he is totally blind.” At the link find the title (for a limited time), “InTouch 03 Mar 15: Born Blind – Gone Blind,” right-click “Download 9MB” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blood Analysis Breakthrough 20 mins – “If 29-year-old Elizabeth Holmes has her way, patients will no longer have to go to physicians’ offices, hospitals, or laboratories to get high-complexity diagnostic blood tests. Nor will vial after vial of blood draws be necessary to do these tests. Barely out of the gate after a decade of secrecy, the Stanford dropout is already drawing comparisons with Steve Jobs (she often wears the same black turtleneck). And her company, Theranos, Inc., which emerged from the shadows in September, just might be healthcare’s answer to Apple. The so-called disruptive technology that Ms. Holmes, a former engineering major, and Theranos have created is said to have the potential to shake up and forever change the way laboratory medicine is conducted. Since forgoing college at 19, Ms. Holmes has secured millions of dollars in funding for her new venture, including $45 million in private equity funding in 2010. The board of directors of her company is a Who’s Who of distinguished former and current technology, academic, and government officials. In an exclusive interview, Ms. Holmes talks to Medscape Editor-in-Chief Eric J. Topol, MD, about the decade she spent building her company; plans for the present and the future, including a recent deal with Walgreens drugstores; and whether she’s on the path to the creative destruction of laboratory medicine.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of is included in the blog archive.

Blood Analysis Help 31 mins – “In Episode #60, we’re joined by Dr. Alexis Shields, naturopathic doctor and blood chemistry specialist. Dr. Shields shares her knowledge of blood chemistry analysis as a way to monitor and improve overall health, and how the insights we gain can help us maintain optimal neurotransmitter levels and boost cognition….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA Reorganization 47 mins – “ The Central Intelligence Agency – the CIA – was officially launched in 1947 to ensure, it was said at the time, that the United States would never face another Pearl Harbor.  In the decades that followed, its activities – and reputation – were all over the place.  But there was no new Pearl Harbor.  Until 9/11 came, and that comparison was all over.  And the Iraq War case, with its flawed intelligence.  And American torture, with the CIA at its center.  Last week, the CIA announced its biggest overhaul in decades.  This hour On Point: reorganizing the CIA.” At the link right-click “Download this story” ad select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cold Storage Film 17 mins – “In ancient Sumer, more than 4,500 years ago, the first libraries were archives of clay tablets etched with cuneiform script.  In our own time, a library may contain not only printed books and journals, but also audio and visual recordings in analog and digital form.  Yet the purpose remains little changed over the millennia – to share information from one human being to another and to preserve a body of knowledge from generation to generation. The Harvard Depository in rural Massachusetts is a library, too, but on a scale and with a purpose unlike your local public library branch.  The just-released documentary Cold Storage takes us inside the HD and offers a chilling glimpse of the future of scholarship.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuba – U.S. Relations  52 mins – “For almost fifty years, the United States has maintained economic sanctions against Cuba. Little human, financial, or commercial traffic flows between the two countries, although much bad blood does. Recent political events suggest that might be changing. Wednesday, we’re examining the tense history of relations between the U.S. and Cuba, and we’ll focus on the embargo. Just how effective has it been? What was its original purpose? What has it achieved? And will America and Cuba ever get along?” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Detente 52 mins – “Hinckley Forum: A Long 90 Miles – Reality of Cuban Detente b Rachel DeLevie-Orey​, Atlantic Council, Assistant Director of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Disposal Program 57 mins – “In June 2012, Alameda County in California became the first local government body to pass a safe drug disposal ordinance that would hold pharmaceutical companies responsible for the safe collection and disposal of unused medications from the public. Now San Francisco and numerous additional local governments are on the cusp of doing the same. Today we’ll talk with former Center for Disease Control physician, Dr. Matt Willis; Heidi Sanborn, executive director of the CA Product Stewardship Council; Guillermo Rodriguez of the San Francisco Department of the Environment; and Conor Johnston, from the office of the President of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education By Doing 70  mins – “It’s no secret California and the nation continue to fight an uphill battle to stay educationally competitive. A recent study showed that American students ranked 25th among 34 countries in math and science, behind China, South Korea, Hong Kong and Finland. And California ranked “below average” in the U.S. What are the solutions for getting back on track? How can students develop the critical thinking and communication skills necessary for postsecondary success and citizenship in a world fueled by innovations in science and technology? Hear from a panel of educational experts who say the answer lies in real world problem solving, what’s termed “experiential education” or learning by doing. Hear about innovative work that could well hold the key to turning around the educational system and America’s future.” Charles Best, Founder, Donorschoose.org; Vince Bertram, Ph.D., President and CEO, Project Lead the Way; Helen Quinn, Ph.D., Emerita Professor of Physics and Former Chair, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Stanford University; Chair, National Board on Science Education; Dennis Bartels, Ph.D., Executive Director, Exploratorium; Member, Education Working Group for the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology – Moderator. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Issues 13 mins – “Private foundations are now pouring billions into public education. But Elizabeth Green, CEO and editor-in-chief of Chalkbeat, says that this may not fix the system.” At the link find the title, “Billionaires and Education,” right-click “Media files IHUB-022815-A.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Email Assistants 23 mins – “A look at two algorithmically-aided approaches to email overload.” At the link find the title, “Less Mail,” right-click “Media files misenerontech_20141104_87133.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ferguson 51 mins – “Last year, a Saint Louis grand jury declined to indict officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of Michael Brown. But the Justice Department launched its own investigation and yesterday we learned the results: No civil rights charges will be brought against Officer Wilson. But the Justice Department said it did find a pattern of bias and discrimination against African-Americans by Ferguson police and the courts. Blacks were twice as likely as whites to be searched at traffic stops, and local courts used heavy fines to send many black residents to jail. Diane and [5] guests discuss the Justice Department’s report on Ferguson and what it means for civil rights and police departments around the country.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Ferguson Report 47 mins – “If you wondered last summer why Ferguson, Missouri blew up so fast and hard after the killing of Michael Brown, yesterday the Department of Justice had one answer for you.  This, said Attorney General Eric Holder and a big DOJ report, was a town under a racist police force.  Emailing starkly racist jokes – the President as a chimpanzee.  Stopping and arresting African-American citizens at a far higher rate than whites.  Using force and dogs and poverty in a way that trapped people – jailed people – to fill city coffers.  This hour On Point:  the Ferguson report, and what comes now” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ferguson Traffic Fines 24 mins – “Claire Bolderson reports on the tiny independent cities that make up St Louis County and how they stand accused of fuelling community tensions.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Bizarre Workings of St Louis County Missouri – 26 Mar 2015,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150226-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foreign Service Careers 55 mins – “Hinckley Forum: Careers in the Foreign Service By Hinckley Institute of Politics by Harry K. Thomas, State Department diplomat-in-residence for the Southwest” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Science 60 mins – “This week, we’re listening to “Getting Away With Murder,” a panel discussion abouForensic Sciencet forensic science and pop culture recorded live at CONvergence 2014. Panelists Amanda Leinbaugh, Emily Finke, Bug Girl Gwen Pearson, and Raychelle “Dr. Rubidium” Burks discuss the Hollywood treatment of forensic investigations, and the way crime scene security, DNA analysis, and pattern evidence work in the real world.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Science Report 28 mins – “There have been several programs looking at exoneration of people previously convicted of crimes. This includes The Innocence Project, currently boasting 325 DNA exonerations, and a project of the University of Michigan Law School that works on cases in which DNA is unavailable. The latter project has exonerated 1,553 individuals when we recorded this podcast. As it turns out, many of these people were convicted based on forensic science that was later proved to not be scientifically valid. So, what particular forensic disciplines are actually valid in the criminal justice system? At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the ringt end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Toxicology 29 mins – “Keith welcomes Bonnie Gunn, UTEP Forensic Science Advisor; and Vanessa De La Rosa, IRACDA Post-Doctoral Fellow in Toxicology at the University of New Mexico.  They discuss forensic toxicology, and the long-term effect toxins in the environment have on people.  In De La Rosa’s case, she is studying how arsenic & uranium are affecting Native American populations in Northern New Mexico.” At the link right-click on “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freak and RowHammer 107 mins – “Steve Gibson with Leo Laporte: Steve and Leo catch up with several VERY interesting security events and stories of the week, then we take a deep dive into two of the week’s big security stories: FREAK and RowHammer.” At the link find “SN 498: Freak & RowHammer,” right-click “sn0498.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Powered Helicopter  5 mins – “Here are three words to strike fear into your heart: Human. Powered. Helicopter. And by “powered,” I don’t mean a foot on the gas pedal. I mean if you stop pedaling, it falls. The only “power” in this helicopter is the Power Bar you eat before you climb inside. And you better eat a lot of them. “It is extremely difficult because the faster you go, the more power it takes,” says Cameron Robertson, co-founder of AeroVelo, a company in Canada dedicated to human-powered engineering. In 2013, AeroVelo won the Sikorsky Prize, a $250,000 award for building a human-powered helicopter that can stay in the air at least 60 seconds and reach an altitude of 3 meters — about 10 feet. How big a feat of engineering was this? The prize had gone unclaimed for 33 years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Rights 64 mins – “During the last half of the 20th century, human rights became a plumb line against which the international community measured a country’s respectability. Today human rights are nominally accepted as the lingua franca of international relations, invoked by politicians, jurists and young people leading revolutions in the Middle East. In this address, Schulz will outline the major human rights challenges around the globe today and reflect on how our understanding of human rights may change in the future.” Dr. William F. Schulz, Former Executive Director, Amnesty International USA; President, Unitarian Universalist Service Committee. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Education Help 57 mins – “Laurene Powell Jobs, in conversation with Stanford Engineering Professor Tom Byers, shares her path to entrepreneurship and her strong commitment to addressing massive challenges in education and immigration reform through College Track and Emerson Collective, organizations she founded to spark systemic change and improve lives at the individual level.” At the link hover over “Podcast,” then right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Youth 54 mins – “Hinckley Forum: Indocumentado – Immigration and Youth in Crisis By Hinckley Institute of Politics with Julie Stewart, Assistant Professor, Sociology, Westminster College; Sol Jimenez, Latino/a Youth Immigrant Activist, Mestizo Arts and Activism, Undergraduate Student in political Science, Sociology, and Ethnic Studies; Ciria Alvarez, Project Leader, U Dream Advising Corps, Somos Dreamers Scholarship Foundation, Undergraduate Student in Political Science, Sociology; Luis Garza, Executive Director, Comunidades Unidas; Nina Frias Valle, Community Relations, Mexican Consulate, and Felix Vivanco-Salazar (moderator) Community Engaged Scholar Leadership Team, Bennion Center – Co-sponsored by the Bennion Center” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India and China 65 mins – “India and China are the world’s two most populous countries, with dynamic, fast-growing economies that are reshaping the economic balance of power. It is widely accepted that both countries are becoming forces to contend with – which will present the United States with challenges and opportunities. But though they are often spoken of together, their political and economic systems are very different. The similarities and differences between India and China, the distinct economic paths they have chosen, and the success of their respective models will heavily influence the shape of the future global economy – and the United States. Two noted experts on China and India will compare and contrast modern India and China, and assess their present and future roles.” William Miller, Herbert Hoover Professor of Public and Private Management Emeritus, Stanford Graduate School of Business; President Emeritus, SRI International; Rafiq Dossani, Senior Research Scholar, Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, Stanford University; Executive Director, South Asia Initiative; Sean Randolph, President and CEO, Bay Area Council Economic Institute – Moderator At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Science 67 mins – “A new generation of emerging entrepreneurs is coming to this country from the Middle East, Africa and Asia. They have been competitively selected to visit entrepreneurship and innovation hubs all over the U.S., including Silicon Valley, to share high-tech inventions that will help address challenges in medicine, the environment, cosmetics, mobile phone technology and more. Known as “GIST Transformers,” these men and women are winners of rigorous competitions under the Global Innovations through Science & Technology (GIST) initiative, a program designed to accelerate technology commercialization and entrepreneurship through global networking, entrepreneurship skill-building, mentorship and strategic funding. Come learn about this remarkable initiative and the future of innovation.” Cathy Campbell, President and CEO, CRDF Global, Washington, D.C.; Jonathan Margolis, Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of State; Hasanul Qader Mirza, Director of Operations, Greennovation Technologies, Bangladesh; Khairul Idzwan Baharin, CEO, MyDerm, Malaysia; Moustapha Kane, Founder, Amarante, Senegal, West Africa Chiri, Co-founder, SmellNat, Algeria, North Africa Quentin Hardy, Deputy Technology Editor, The New York Times – Moderator. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence 11 mins – “We’ve long debated whether intelligence is innate or acquired. Author Annie Murphy Paul talks about the latest scientific research – and looks at simple techniques that may be able to enhance our brains.” At the link find the title, “Get Smart…er,” right-click “Media files IHUB-022115-A.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kidnapping for Ransom 21 mins – “Someone is kidnapped every day in Nigeria. It’s big business, with potentially big rewards in ransom money. And like any business, kidnapping has a particular set of principles and best practices. Today on the show: how a consultant analyzed the kidnapping industry in order to find its weak points and better protect the people he loved.” At the link find the title, “#607: Captive Market,” right-click “Media files npr_389614736.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kids Chances Decline 47 mins – “Robert Putnam is perhaps the most famed social scientist in the United States.  A kid from working class Ohio.  Now a big deal at Harvard.  He went out to see how it is now for kids hoping to rise up in working class America.  And he was shocked.  Deeply unsettled at how difficult it has become.  At how rocketing American inequality has shoved the American dream stunningly out of reach for millions and millions of kids.  “Our kids,” he says.  And put America’s very future at risk.  This hour On Point:  Robert Putnam’s new cry to save our kids and our country.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Longevity Kitchen 67 mins – “Wondering how you can eat your way to a longer life? Nationally recognized culinary translator and nutrition expert Rebecca Katz has put together more than 100 recipes that highlight the top superfoods proven to fight the most chronic conditions in her latest cookbook, The Longevity Kitchen. Author of the award-winning cookbook The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen, Katz is the founder and director of the Healing Kitchens Institute at Commonweal, which focuses on educating individuals on the healing power of the kitchen and creating healthy connections with food. Join Katz for a discussion on how to increase your longevity through tasty recipes, such as roasted asparagus salad with arugula and hazelnuts or yogurt berry brûlée with almond brittle.” Rebecca Katz, Chef; Educator; Author, The Longevity Kitchen and The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen; In conversation with Cathy Curtis, Chair, Bay Gourmet Member-Led Forum; Vice President of Board of Directors, CUESA. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malaria Resistance 51 mins – “There are an estimated 200 million cases of malaria worldwide each year, and around 600,000 deaths. But the last 15 years represent a success story in the fight against the disease: Increased investment in treatment and prevention have cut the death rate nearly in half. Now, researchers warn that resistance to the primary drug used to treat malaria is spreading. A new study has detected a resistant strain in Myanmar near the Indian border, raising concerns that resistance could soon extend its hold to sub-Saharan Africa, where more than 90 percent of malaria deaths occur. Diane and her guests discuss new concerns about combating malaria worldwide.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Microbiome Hype 64 mins – “On the show this week we talk to evolutionary biologist Jonathan Eisen, who studies the evolution and ecology of microbes and genomes. We delve into the tiny world of the microbiome—the thousands of microorganisms that live inside all of us.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Middle Class Decline 53 mins – “President Obama and his critics have been arguing a lot lately over whose policies best serve America’s middle class. And you can understand why when close to half of Americans identify as “middle-class.” In his State of the Union address, the president defined “middle-class economics” as “the idea that this country does best when everyone gets their fair shot, everyone does their fair share, everyone plays by the same set of rules.” Now, however you think of it, the middle class is a powerful idea in American culture. So on this episode, we explore the rise — and, some would say, the fall — of the middle class in the United States. What is the middle class, anyway? Who’s in it, and who isn’t? And how have middle-class lives and middle-class values changed over time? “ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select ‘Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuroscience Future 64 mins – “A fundamental challenge of modern society is the development of effective approaches to enhance brain function in both healthy and impaired individuals, and some people have serious concerns about the ability of either our current education or health-care system to meet this challenge. Gazzaley will share a vision of the future in which video games integrated with technological innovations in software and hardware are used as an engine to harness brain plasticity and enhance our cognitive abilities, thus reducing our reliance on non-specific drugs to treat neurological and psychiatric conditions and allowing us to better target and personalize our educational efforts.“ Adam Gazzaley, M.D.; Ph.D; Founding Director, Neuroscience Imaging Center, Associate Professor in Neurology, Physiology and Psychiatry, UCSF. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Overmedication of Women 47 mins – “Americans take a lot of pharmaceuticals to control their moods, their emotions, their state of mind.  And women take a lot more than men.  One in four American women, now on some kind of psychiatric medication.  You know the names from the ads all over TV:  Cymbalta, Zoloft, Abilify, more.  My guest today, psychiatrist Julie Holland, says that flood of drugs is shutting down natural emotions that women need.  Numbing women in a way that’s bad for many of them, and bad for society.  This hour On Point:  a cry against medicating women’s feelings.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Palm Tree Rustling 17 mins – “…Reports of palm theft have appeared in San Diego, and in Texas; palm rustling also gets a mention in Susan Orlean’s The Orchid Thief. To understand why someone would want to steal a palm tree, we need to understand their value—which has a lot to do with the space they occupy in our collective imagination. We don’t plant palms for any of the normal reasons we want other trees around. They produce little shade, are difficult to climb, and don’t, for the most part, produce edible fruit…..” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paul Allen 63 mins – “In conversation with John L. Hennessy, President, Stanford University. In 2007 and 2008, Time named Microsoft co-founder Allen one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Since making his fortune with Bill Gates, Allen’s impact has been felt in science, technology, business, medicine, sports, music and philanthropy. Allen explains how he has solved problems, what he’s learned from his many endeavors (the triumphs and the failures) and his compelling vision for the future.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Commission of Baltimore 60 mins – “Anthony Batts talked about the challenges of policing the city of Baltimore, Maryland, tensions between the community and the police force, issues of police brutality, and the U.S. Department of Justice review of the practices of his department. He also spoke about the declining murder and crime rates in the city and his initiatives in the coming year. Commissioner Batts also discussed growing up in a poor neighborhood in Los Angeles, his past experiences as a beat officer and police chief in Long Beach, California, and his tenure as chief of police in Oakland.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Anthony Batts,” right-click “Media files program.385634.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Issues 63 mins – “Our second hour of stories about policing and race. We hear about one city where relations between police and black residents went terribly, and another city where they seem to be improving remarkably. And one of our producers asks: Why aren’t police chiefs talking about race after incidents where unarmed black men are wrongly killed by officers? (Here is the bleeped version.)” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism Challenge 14 mins – “Fifty-three years ago, James A. White Sr. joined the US Air Force. But as an African American man, he had to go to shocking lengths to find a place for his young family to live nearby. He tells this powerful story about the lived experience of “everyday racism” — and how it echoes today in the way he’s had to teach his grandchildren to interact with police.” At the link click ‘Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Deception Strategy 27 mins – “Lucy Ash examines the Russian military strategy of deception, maskirovka, from the 14th Century to the current crisis in Ukraine.” At the link find the title, “Docarchive: Maskirovka: Deception Russian-Style,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150303-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

S&P 500 43 mins – “This podcast is the first in a series dedicated to the asset classes recommended in the combination of equity asset classes that comprise the Ultimate Buy and Hold Strategy (put link to article). Through the articles and podcasts, investors will get a better idea of the good, bad and ugly of each asset class.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salmon 8 mins – “David Suzuki says science and resource managers share a common problem. They chop up the world studying, or managing individual segments, often missing the big picture which shows vital connectivity between individual pieces. He describes the ecology of the coastal forests along the Canadian Pacific coast. Here, salmon swim up the rivers to spawn. The salmon are a major food source for bears and so begins a series of links where one species feeds on another and nutrients move from ocean to land supporting tall forests. Meanwhile government departments compete for resources, with self-interest winning out over the interest of the entire ecosystem.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Talk 54 mins – “We live in an age in which science and technology pervade our lives like never before. Yet, over the last several years Americans have become increasingly skeptical of scientific findings, especially when it comes to hot button issues like climate change, vaccines and genetically modified food. In a recent survey of U.S. scientists, only half said it is a good time for science. Some blame politics. They argue that research is being held hostage by ideology. Others say the growing complexity of our world makes us cling to our beliefs, even when confronted with evidence that demonstrates the contrary. Why many Americans doubt science and how scientists can better communicate their findings.” [3 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Small Cap Funds 40 mins – “10 Things You Should Know About Small Cap Funds: This podcast looks at the one year, 15 year and 40 year returns of the Small Cap Index as well as the impact of size, value and diversification on returns. Paul compares the Small Cap Index at Vanguard and DFA, and discusses the problems of active management with this asset class.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ukraine Crisis 55 mins – “Hinckley Forum: The Ukraine Crisis and the Challenge of Kremlin Revisionism by Ambassador John Herbst, Director of the Atlantic Council’s Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center; US Ambassador to Ukraine (2003-2006)” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ukraine Crisis 54 mins – “The Ukraine Crisis: Implications for Foreign Policy: This week we feature a panel discussion presented by the Boston University Center for the Study of Europe, titled “The Ukraine Crisis: Implications for Foreign Policy.”  Our speakers are: Harvard University visiting professor, Pawel Karolewski; Brandeis University assistant professor, Chandler Rosenberger; and New School professor, Nina Khrushcheva.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ukraine Crisis 63 mins – “World tensions spike as the situation in Ukraine seems capable of boiling over into a larger conflict between Russia and the West. Dan blames hubris and political short-sightedness.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undocumented Immigrant 64 mins – “’I convinced myself that all would be OK if I lived up to the qualities of a ‘citizen': hard work, self-reliance, love of my country.” Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post journalist Vargas just revealed to The New York Times that he immigrated to the United States illegally at the age of 12. Raised and educated in the Bay Area, Vargas won the Pulitzer Prize in 2008 for his breaking news piece on the Virginia Tech shootings. Now 30 and no longer a reporter at the Post, Vargas has founded Define American, to changed the conversation on immigration reform. Fresh on the heels of this game-changing Times article, hear Vargas speak first at the Club.Jose Antonio Vargas, Former Reporter, The Washington Post; Founder, Define American In conversation with Phil Bronstein, Editor-at-Large, Hearst Newspapers. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wall Street Reform 64 mins – “Wall Street is a giant casino where gambling masquerades as investment, says Faust; pundits, politicians and regulators suggest only meager reforms that do nothing to eliminate the systemic rot that is leading us to financial disaster. Faust, an outspoken financial services insider and investment advisor, argues that a fundamental overhaul of the system is needed to rebuild the great economic engine that once powered prosperity. He offers insights to accomplishing this.” Leland Faust, Founder and Chairman, CSI Capital Management. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Evaluation 62 mins – “The global water crisis is real, and in many parts of the world, worsening. Growing populations, increased competition for scarce resources, the impacts of climatic changes, and other risks and threats are all contributing to local, regional and international concerns over freshwater. Dr. Gleick will look at the future of our water challenges here and abroad, drawing on lessons learned over the past 2,000 years to describe the three “Ages of Water.” He will offer suggestions for moving to a more equitable and sustainable future.” Peter Gleick, Water Expert; Co-founder, Pacific Institute; MacArthur Fellow. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Innovation 66 mins – “Water: We can’t live without it – but most of the world practically does. The event will begin with a meaningful but refreshing conversation about the global water crisis and those working on creative new approaches for providing clean drinking water. Hear from the leaders in the field and find out more about innovative projects like a town run entirely off recycled water, collaborative coalitions and breakout projects that deliver on reliable and safe water for those who need it most. After the kick-off panel, we’ll dive right into an interactive social in an attempt to grasp the realities of H20 hardships and opportunities. It’s the ultimate genesis of life as we know it – let’s hear the stories and wade neck-deep into the worldwide water crisis.” Jake Norton, Co-founder and Lead Climber, Challenge 21; Evan Thomas, Assistant Professor and Director, The SWEET Lab; Executive Vice President, Manna Energy Limited; Jon Rose, Professional Surfer; Founder, Waves for Water; Peter Gleick, Water Expert; Co-founder and President, Pacific Institute; MacArthur Fellow; Jason Mark, Editor, Earth Island Journal – Moderator. A the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Scarcity 60 mins – “David Zetland of Leiden University College in the Netherlands and author of Living with Water Scarcity talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the challenges of water management. Issues covered include the sustainability of water supplies, the affordability of water for the poor, the incentives water companies face, and the management of water systems in the poorest countries. Also discussed are the diamond and water paradox, campaigns to reduce water usage, and the role of prices in managing a water system.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Use in California 41 mins – “How should California manage its water in the future and which incentives will motivate the biggest changes in conservation and agricultural efficiency? Which water policies and practices have backfired? Join water economist David Zetland for a fresh perspective on how we can manage our most precious resource in the 21st century and what we can learn from past mistakes.” David Zetland, Author, The End of Abundance: Economic Solutions to Water Scarcity.At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wayne Brady 83 mins – “Neal’s old buddy stops by to talk with the Champs to discuss Vegas, Cruise Ships, the Chappelle’s Show sketch, the appopriate amount blackness and High School liars.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

West Without Water 59 mins – “The West Without Water documents the tumultuous climate of the American West over 20 millennia, with tales of past droughts and deluges and predictions about the impacts of future climate change on water resources. Its authors ask the central questions of what is “normal” for the West, and whether the relatively benign climate of the past century will continue into the future. Their answers are derived by merging climate and paleoclimate research from a wide variety of sources.” B. Lynn Ingram, Professor, Earth & Planetary Science and Geography, UC Berkeley; Co-author, The West Without Water; Frances Malamud-Roam, Senior Environmental Planner and Biologist, Caltrans; Co-author, The West Without Water. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Science 28 mins – (2 parts) Part 1:”Young scientists, CG Schultz and Jessica Mathews, two of the top winners at the Arizona Science and Engineering Fair talk about their work and interview ASU ecologist Kiona Ogle. Pauline Davies hosts the show as Dr. Biology is exploring the Panama rainforest to bring back fun and exciting stories.” Part 2: “Young scientists, Farah Eltohamy, Amanda Benedetto and Sarah Sakha, three of the top winners at the Arizona Science and Engineering Fair talk about their work and interview ASU biologist Susan Holechek. Pauline Davies hosts the show as Dr. Biology is exploring the Panama rainforest to bring back fun and exciting stories.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save LinkAs” from the pop-up menu for Part 1; the same here for Part 2.

Women in STEM 60 mins – “ This week, we’re celebrating Women in Science by looking at the victories and challenges of women working in science and tech. Join us for a panel discussion with postdoctoral research associate and science communicator Raychelle “Dr. Rubidium” Burks, Colgate University Professor of Psychology Jessica Cundiff, Ph.D., Physics Professor Dr. Shohini Ghose, Director of the Wilfrid Laurier University Centre for Women in Science, and Catherine Hill, Ph.D, vice president for research at the American Association of University Women. And we’ll speak to Brianna Wu, Head of Development at videogame company Giant Spacekat, about feminism, gaming industry culture, and her experience as an outspoken critic of #GamerGate.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 5000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 30+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here MP3

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Media Mining Digest 174 – Mar 13, 2015: Adverse Childhood Experiences, Affordable Care Act, Alcohol Misuse, Allergy Solutions, Alzheimer’s Sensor, American Dream Fades, Antibiotic Resistance, Beet Juice for Brain, Big Data Impact, Bioethics, BPA Reduction, Brazil Guns and Drugs, Bretton Woods Conference, Broadband in Missouri, California Wine Tasting, Carbon Math, Cell Phone Surveillance, Censorship, Combat Objectives, Commercial Trucks, Community College Catapult, Connectome, Consent to Harm, Consumer Electronics Show, Copyright Research, Critical Thinking, Cybercrime, Dr King’s Last Year, Drones, Drones Over Paris, Econ 101, Emotional Responses, End of Life, Energy Efficient Homes, Ethiopia Coffee, Financial Inequality, Food Waste in U.S., Fracking Air Pollution and Earthquakes, Google Earth Outreach, Google Insights, Heart Attack Prevention, Honor Killings, Influenza Treatment, Information Leak Websites, John Cleese, Kellogg’s Cereal, Kevin MD, Learning Process, Lethal Injections, Marijuana Uses, Medical Tactics, Misconceptions of Science, Noah Webster, Oil and Earthquakes, Parasitism Case Study, Patient Advocates, Poverty Innovation, Prevention Not Treatment, Prohibition in Wine Country, RNA, Sandhurst and Sheikhs, Sexologist, Technology Impact, Terrorism Prevention, Toxic Risk Help, Transcranial Stimulation DIY, Vaccinations, Video Games Value, Wayans Brothers, Why Do We Exist, Wisdom

The following audio files come from a larger group of 260 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 73 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Adverse Childhood Experiences 16 mins – “Childhood trauma isn’t something you just get over as you grow up. Pediatrician Nadine Burke Harris explains that the repeated stress of abuse, neglect and parents struggling with mental health or substance abuse issues has real, tangible effects on the development of the brain. This unfolds across a lifetime, to the point where those who’ve experienced high levels of trauma are at triple the risk for heart disease and lung cancer. An impassioned plea for pediatric medicine to confront the prevention and treatment of trauma, head-on.” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Affordable Care Act 39 mins – “As the Supreme Court prepares to hear arguments in the latest challenge to the Affordable Care Act — King v. Burwell — Dahlia Lithwick hears from experts on both sides of what could be the most important case in the Court’s entire term. First, she speaks with Jonathan Adler, a law professor at Case Western Reserve University and a one of the lawsuit’s chief architects. Then she hears from Abbe Gluck, a professor at Yale Law School and a co-author of an amicus brief submitted in the case.” At the link find the title, “The Letter of the Law,” right-click “Media files 2015-02-28-Amicus-012.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcohol Misuse 34 mins – “As the level of alcohol consumption goes up, so the risk of physical, psychological, and social problems increases. In this podcast we’re joined by Ed Day, consultant addiction psychiatrist at Kings College London, Alex Copello, professor of addiction research at the University of Birmingham, and Martyn Hull, GP with a special interest in substance misuse at the Ridgacre Medical Centres in Birmingham. They discuss practical aspects of the assessment and treatment of alcohol use disorders from the perspective of the non-specialist hospital doctor or general practitioner. “ At the link find the title, “Assessment and management of alcohol use disorders,” right-click “Media files 191951284-bmjgroup-alcohol-misuse.mp3“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Allergy Solutions 47 mins – “Peanut allergies have exploded in recent years.  The bane of many families.  A big fear in many schools.  And the big message that parents took from the medical community was to keep their young children – babies – away, away, away from peanuts.  This week, new research says wait a minute: the opposite may be better advice.  At-risk babies given small amounts of peanut product had far fewer peanut allergies.  And there’s more on the allergy front — a Swedish study says we may be keeping things too clean for our own good.  This hour On Point:  everything you need to know about the allergy breakthroughs.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’s Sensor 6 mins – “60% of people with dementia wander off, an issue that can prove hugely stressful for both patients and caregivers. In this charming talk, hear how teen inventor Kenneth Shinozuka came up with a novel solution to help his night-wandering grandfather and the aunt who looks after him … and how he hopes to help others with Alzheimer’s.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Dream Fades 66 mins – “Is the American Dream becoming a lost ideal of the past? Pulitzer Prize- and Emmy-winning journalist Smith suggests that it is as a result of four decades of erosion induced by corporate and political decisions. Smith will discuss the extent to which the American Dream has declined, as well as the future.” Hedrick Smith, Former Reporter, The New York Times; Producer, PBS; Author, Who Stole the American Dream?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Resistance 15 mins – “Antibiotic drugs save lives. But we simply use them too much — and often for non-lifesaving purposes, like treating the flu and even raising cheaper chickens. The result, says researcher Ramanan Laxminarayan, is that the drugs will stop working for everyone, as the bacteria they target grow more and more resistant. He calls on all of us (patients and doctors alike) to think of antibiotics — and their ongoing effectiveness — as a finite resource, and to think twice before we tap into it. It’s a sobering look at how global medical trends can strike home.” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beet Juice for Brain 26 mins – “In episode #41 Jesse speaks to Daniel Kim-Shapiro, Director of the Translational Science Center at Wake Forest University and expert on this week’s topic: beetroot juice. They discuss the nitrogen cycle and its effects on brain function, safe levels of nitrate consumption, and why you should have listened to your mother all those years!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Data Impact 16 mins – “Self-driving cars were just the start. What’s the future of big data-driven technology and design? In a thrilling science talk, Kenneth Cukier looks at what’s next for machine learning — and human knowledge” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bioethics 60 mins – “This week, we’re looking at the debates over the ethics of medicine and medical research, and the future of new medical technology. We’ll talk bioethics and public policy with Center for Inquiry CEO Ronald Lindsay. And we’re joined by Dr. Rob Tarzwell, to discuss Nootropics, the so-called “smart drugs” that might make designer brains a reality.” At the link fiind the title, “#197 Future Bioethics,” right-click “Skeptically_Speaking_197_Future_Bioethics_2013.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

BPA Reduction 4 mins – “Scientists are reporting discovery of a more sustainable way of disposing of plastics that contain bisphenol A (BPA) — without releasing that potentially harmful substance to the environment. The new method involves exposing polycarbonate plastic waste to ultraviolet light and heat. Just as cooking makes food more digestible for humans, this pretreatment approach makes polycarbonate plastic more digestible for certain fungi, which the scientists used to break down polycarbonate plastic. Their study appears in the ACS’ monthly journal Biomacromolecules.” At the link right-click “Listen to Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazil Guns and Drugs 14 mins – “Throughout her career in banking Ilona Szabó de Carvalho never imagined she’d someday start a social movement. But living in her native Brazil, which leads the world in homicidal violence, she realized she couldn’t just stand by and watch drugs and guns tear her country apart. Szabó de Carvalho reveals four crucial lessons she learned when she left her cushy job and took a fearless stand against the status quo.” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bretton Woods Conference 65 mins – “Benn Steil of the Council on Foreign Relations and author of The Battle of Bretton Woods: John Maynard Keynes, Harry Dexter White, and the Making of a New World Order talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Bretton Woods, the conference that resulted in the IMF, the World Bank, and the post-war international monetary system. Topics discussed include America and Britain’s conflicting interests during and after World War II, the relative instability of the post-war system, and the personalities and egos of the individuals at Bretton Woods, including John Maynard Keynes and Harry Dexter White.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Missouri 19 mins – “As high quality Internet has become more essential for business and quality of life, those who realized that the existing telecom providers had no intention to invest in better connections in their rural Missouri communities began to ask their electric cooperative – Co-Mo – to step up and do it. This week, we talk with Randy Klindt, General Manager of Co-Mo Connect, which is building a gigabit fiber network out to its members despite having not been chosen to receive any stimulus funds. We discuss how they have structured the network, why they felt compelled to get into the business, and some of the results from their approach….” At the link right-click “… download this Mp3 file ….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Wine Tasting 67 mins – “In The New California Wine, James Beard Award-winning wine editor Jon Bonné brings us the untold story of the innovative producers who are rewriting the rules of contemporary winemaking and transforming the California wine industry. Uncovering vintners’ quest to express the uniqueness of California terroir and revealing the continuing battle to move the state away from the overly technocratic, reactionary practices of the recent past, Bonné takes us to the front lines of the California wine revolution. Join us as he shares the fascinating stories, philosophies and techniques of the iconoclastic young winemakers who are changing the face of California viticulture.Jon Bonné, Wine Editor, San Francisco Chronicle; Author, The New California Wine: A Guide to the Producers and Wines Behind a Revolution in Taste; In conversation with Fred Swan, Wine Writer, NorCalWine; Educator, The San Francisco Wine School. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Math 70 mins -“Energy companies have five times as much oil and coal and gas on their books than climate scientists think is safe to burn. That was the takeaway from McKibben’s recent Rolling Stone article on “Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math.” McKibben says it is his single most important work since his first book The End of Nature nearly 30 years ago.Now the activist is launching a “Do the Math” campaign around the country to galvanize support for stronger action to reduce carbon pollution. Hofmeister says environmental measures driven too quickly will only backfire as the inconvenience or cost meets grass roots resistance. Time is an ally, he says, and enhances our ability to adapt to change, and energy companies are not monoliths and can be part of the solution. Join us for a conversation.” Bill McKibben, Founder, 350.org, Author, Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet; John Hofmeister, CEO, Citizens for Affordable Energy; Former President, Shell Oil Company. “At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cell Phone Surveillance 57 mins – “I am pleased to post Show # 229, February 11, my interview with Prof. Stephanie Pell of the Army Cyber Institute and Chris Soghoian of the American Civil Liberties Union on StingRay and their newly-published Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy article entitled Your Secret Stingray’s No Secret Anymore: The Vanishing Government Monopoly over Cell Phone Surveillance and Its Impact on National Security and Consumer Privacy….” At the link right-click “Show #229” in the narrative and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Censorship 52 mins – “Joel Simon, executive director of the Committee to Protect Journalists, talks about his new book, “The New Censorship: Inside the Global Battle for Media Freedom.” At the link right-click beside “Direct Download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Combat Objectives 41 mins – “In this episode, Uncommon Knowledge is honored to have retired four-star General James Mattis. General Mattis retired from the Marine Corps as a full general in 2013, where he served as the eleventh commander of the United States Central Command. He also served as the commander for NATO supreme allied transformation, and as commander of the United States Joint Forces Command. Mattis is now an Annenberg Distinguished Visiting Fellow fellow at the Hoover Institution.” At the link find the title, “Uncommon Knowledge with General Jim Mattis,” right-click “Media files 20150306.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Commercial Trucks 62 mins “For the first time ever, commercial trucks will soon be subject to federal standards for fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions. How will that impact buyers and makers of medium- and heavy-duty trucks? California is a center of activity for creating and deploying hybrid and fully electric drivetrains and other technologies. We’ll discuss the move to increase efficiency, create jobs and build a cleaner transportation sector.” John Boesel, CEO, CALSTART; Mike Tunnell, Director, Environmental Affairs, American Trucking Associations; Alan Niedzwiecki, CEO, Quantum Technologies. “At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Community College Catapult 79 mins – “Does going to a community college eliminate your opportunities for achieving your goals? Or, to put it more bluntly, is your life over if you can’t attend your dream school? Well, in the words of Batman, Teddy Roosevelt, and my dad: “No.” To elaborate on that, I brought my friend Isa Adney onto the show this week. Isa is a professional speaker, educator, and the author of the book Community College Success. Moreover, she started out in community college herself after realizing she’d be unable to afford her dream school. Fast forward a couple year from when she started college, and Isa had won a prestigious scholarship that gave her $30,000/year to complete her 4-year degree… and $50,000/year to go on and finish a Master’s….” At the link find Episode 46 (How to Make Comm8nity College an Ivy League Experience with Isa Adney) and load it on the web page. Then right-click the orange down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Connectome 65 mins -“Are we simply the products of our genes? Seung says otherwise. The MIT professor has found what he calls the nexus of nature and nurture: the network of connections between neurons in the human brain. He will take you inside his ambitious quest to model what he calls the Connectome, which, if successful, would uncover the basis of personality, intelligence, memory and disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. McGill University Professor of Psychology and Neurosciences Daniel Levitin wrote in The Wall Street Journal that Connectome is “the best lay book on brain science I’ve ever read.'” Sebastian Seung, Ph.D., Author, Connectome: How the Brain’s Wiring Makes Us Who We Are. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consent to Harm 55 mins – “’Yes means yes. No means no.” Giving consent seems straightforward. But what we’re allowed to consent to is actually deeply fraught territory. And it gets especially fraught when the question of sex enters the equation. When does the law intervene?” At the link find the title, “Consent to Harm, Part 2,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150226_99710.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consumer Electronics Show 33 mins – “Joining from the 2015 Consumer Electronic Show, Ericsson Chief Technology Officer Ulf Ewaldsson and Cisco Senior Vice President Kelly Ahuja discuss the networks on which the Internet, mobile phone networks, and cloud technology are built.” At the link find the title, “The Communicators: Ulf Ewaldsson and Kelly Ahuja,” right-click “Media files program.389622.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Copyright Research 57 mins – “I’m thrilled to post Show # 230, February 18, my interview with Prof. Elizabeth Townsend Gard of Tulane University Law School and Ron Gard of Limited Times LLC, on The Durationator, an online tool to determine whether any work of authorship is covered by copyright, and social entrepreneurship. I have been a big fan of Elizabeth’s copyright duration work for a long time, and had her on the show in 2009 to discuss her amazing project entitled The Durationator. Now, after many years of work, The Durationator is a reality and publicly available through a partnership with Thomson Reuters. Having formed an entity, Limited Times LLC, with her husband Ron Gard to run The Durationator as well as focus on their social entrepreneurship efforts, we had a wide ranging and celebratory discussion about social entrepreneurship, as The Durationator launched on February 18, 2015, the day that the show aired on KZSU! I hope that you enjoy the discussion and learning about Elizabeth and Ron’s fascinating and useful work. Congrats Elizabeth and Ron!” (Difficult to find information about prices for the research services.) At the link find the title, “Show #230,” then right click the same in the description and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Critical Thinking 12 mins – “Does a set of data make you feel more comfortable? More successful? Then your interpretation of it is likely wrong. In a surprisingly moving talk, Susan Etlinger explains why, as we receive more and more data, we need to deepen our critical thinking skills. Because it’s hard to move beyond counting things to really understanding them.” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cybercrime 68 mins – “Governments and the private sector are losing billions of dollars a year fighting an ever-morphing, often invisible and very smart new breed of criminal. Intrepid investigative reporter Glenny gives an edge-of-your-seat account of a new form of crime spawned by the digital world. He has traveled the world speaking with members of military and intelligence communities, police, politicians, lawyers and with the hackers themselves and their victims. He advances often-surprising suggestions for the ways in which the authorities might begin to end the cybercrime epidemic.” Misha Glenny: Author; Journalist; Visiting Professor, London School of Economics. “At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dr King’s Last Year 66 mins – “Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. died in one of the most shocking assassinations in U.S. history, but little is remembered about the trials and tribulations he faced in his final year. Award-winning television and radio broadcast host Smiley (and new Dancing with the Stars contestant) chronicles the final 365 days of Dr. King’s life. Despite assaults on his character and ideology, Dr. King remained committed to ending racial inequality and segregation in our country. Hear more about his story of leadership and perseverance.” Tavis Smiley, TV Host, Public Broadcasting Service; Radio Host, Public Radio International; Author, Death of a King: The Real Story of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s Final Year. “At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drones 47 mins – “New rules proposed last week for small drones – 55 pounds and under – in America.  For the kinds of buzzing, hovering, little workhorses that are suddenly showing up all over the country, the culture, even – uninvited – on the White House lawn.  The Federal Aviation Administration is proposing only “within sight” use.  Within 500 feet of the operator.  Enough to do a lot of cool or unnerving things – depending on how you look at it.  Not enough for Amazon to send your new purchase by drone.  Amazon’s pushing back.  We’ve got their lobbyist, and more.  This hour On Point: the future of drones in America.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drones Over Paris 4 mins – “Paris woke up to a mystery today. On Monday night, at least five drones — the kind you can buy at a store, not the military variety — were spotted flying above Paris landmarks like the Eiffel Tower. The city, still in shock over the Charlie Hebdo attacks, is taking it seriously.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Econ 101 37 mins – “On this week’s episode of SlateMoney, host Felix Salmon of Fusion, Slate’s Jordan Weissmann, and Cathy O’Neil of Mathbabe.org devote the entire episode to a letter from Nathan Connelly, running down a list of the top nine (or maybe ten, depending on who’s counting) essential economic concepts every high school graduate should understand. At the link find the title,“The “Econ 101″ Edition,” right-click “Media files SM15010301_MONEY.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emotional Responses 14 mins – “There’s a reason why you spent twelve hours mainlining every episode of House of Cards — your brain can’t tell the difference between fiction and reality. Cognitive scientist Jim Davies explains the science behind why we laugh, why we cry, and why we binge watch.” At the link find the title, “Why Jokes are Funny,” right-click “IHUB-030715-Davies.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

End of Life 17 mins – “End of life care is rarely discussed, although it is perhaps one of the most important conversations that one must have. On this episode, Dr. Angelo Volandes discussed end-of-life medical care.” At the link right-click “Listen to Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Efficient Homes 11 mins – “The suburb was established in the 1950s This house looks like any other. Josh Byrne set out to prove that with minimal financial outlay, this rather common looking house could be built at the same cost as any other. A 3KW rooftop system allows the house to produce 30% more power than it uses over the whole year. Cross ventilation means there is no need for air conditioning. The house contains energy efficient lighting and appliances. Grey water, rain water and bore water means this most precious resource is not wasted. After having looked at individual houses, and the behaviour and attitudes of their occupants, the focus is now on entire precincts as a means of minimising use of energy and water.”

Ethiopia Coffee 63 mins – “Ethiopia is fighting to shed its history and public image of drought, famine and war by embracing the heritage and potential of its defining crop: coffee, one of the world’s 10 most-valued commodities. Burhardt recounts that process in a tale of opportunity, resources, education and tradition, transcending the bean itself to explore food anthropology, development, adventure, Ethiopia’s landscape and peoples, and the impact of coffee on world politics and global understanding. Burhardt has traveled throughout the world by bike, canoe and – more often than not – by hand and foot. For the past two decades, she has journeyed from Africa to the waters of the Arctic, and her stories of unlikely human interaction inspire and inform international audiences.” Majka Burhardt, Author, Coffee Story: Ethiopia; Climber; Guide. “At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Inequality 50 mins – “As evidence grows that major historical sites are being looted in Syria, how much are groups such as Islamic State profiting from the global trade in illicit antiquities?” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: ISIS: Looting for Terror,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150305-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Waste in U.S. 62 mins – “The ubiquity of food in the United States blinds the mind to a tragic fact: much of it is wasted. …estimates suggest that at least a quarter and as much as half of the food produced in this country is never consumed. A panel of food experts convened by Climate One says that much of the waste is unnecessary… “We have tremendous inefficiencies on both sides, pre-harvest and post harvest,” says A.G. Kawamura, former Secretary, California Department of Food and Agriculture. If prices collapse, he says, a farmer might not be able to afford to pay for the fuel and labor needed to harvest a crop. Fortunately, he says, groups such Farm to Table are partnering with farmers to offset the cost of a second or third harvest to prevent food from wasting in the field. For Michael Dimock, President, Roots of Change, the primary driver of waste in the food system is how we think. “It’s really changing our consciousness about what is waste and what is not. That’s the first step in combating this problem,” he says….” Jonathan Bloom, Author, American Wasteland; Michael Dimock, President, Roots of Change; A.G. Kawamura, Former Secretary, California Department of Food and Agriculture. “t the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking Air Pollution 30 mins – “The potential damage posed by hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking” to ground water, its contribution to earthquake risk, and overall deceptive practices by the industry, have all been exposed through science and good journalism. Today on Sea Change Radio we explore aspects of fracking that may be less known. This week’s guest is Caroline Cox, the Research Director for the Center for Environmental Health who recently co-authored an important study tracking the air pollution associated with this controversial extraction process. We talk about the study’s methods, findings, and what it may mean moving forward. Then, we re-visit our interview with Jaeah Lee and James West of Mother Jones and their profile of the burgeoning fracking industry in China.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking Earthquakes 8 mins – “Earthquake activity has been increasing in parts of the US which historically have low earthquake activity.  The increase is not uniform and is affected by local geology. Induced earthquakes have been linked to the injection of waste water underground following the extraction of oil. One barrel of oil produces dozens of barrels of salt water which need disposal. The challenge is to identify any link between changing frequency of smaller earthquakes and potentially larger earthquakes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Google Earth Outreach 60 mins – “Moore conceived of and now leads the Google Earth Outreach program. The program supports nonprofits, communities and indigenous peoples around the world in applying Google’s mapping tools to the world’s problems such as environmental conservation, human rights and cultural preservation. Moore also initiated the development of Google Earth Engine, a new technology platform that supports global-scale monitoring and protection of the earth’s environment. Moore will discuss the company’s latest projects to help preserve our planet.” Rebecca Moore, Lead, Google Earth Outreach Program and Google Earth Engine….” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Google Insights 63 mins – “Is it the five-star chefs, free laundry and on-site masseuses that are the secret to Google’s success? Perhaps its unique management style and innovative team? Either way, the revolutionary search engine has so deeply impacted our work and culture that we have turned the company name into a verb. Despite being one of the most successful and celebrated companies in history, Google maintains an air of mystery, and cultural myths abound. How has Google stayed innovative and cutting edge while making the transition to tech giant? What exactly happens inside the elusive Google campus? Levy took a deep dive into Google management, its products and its company culture. Join us as he shares untold stories and unpacks the mythology behind Google.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Attack Prevention 81 mins – “Heart attacks are the number-one killer in the United States, but that doesn’t have to be true. The latest research shows that diet is strongly linked to heart attacks. Steve Blake suggests that there are plenty of fun, healthy foods that you can add to your diet to reduce your risk of a heart attack. He’ll also discuss how vitamin D deficiency is linked to heart attachs, and how certain oils can reduce risk and certain fats can increase risk. Through this inspiring discussion, you can learn how to implement heart-safe lifestyle options.” Steve Blake, ScD, Faculty Nutritional Biochemist, Hawaii Pacific Neuroscience LLC; Author, Vitamins and Minerals Demystified.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honor Killings 18 mins – “Nearly 1000 “honor” killings are reported in Pakistan each year, murders by a family member for behavior deemed “shameful,” such as a relationship outside of marriage. When Khalida Brohi lost a close friend to the practice, she resolved to campaign against it. Yet she met resistance from an unlikely source: the very community she hoped to protect. In this powerful, honest talk, Brohi shares how she took a hard look at her own process, and offers sharp insights for other passionate activists.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Influenza Treatment 29 mins – Australian discussion of tamiflu issues and the pharmaceutical industry involvement with flu treatment. At the link find the Episode 6 for 2015, right-click adjacent “Mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Information Leak Websites 57 mins – “I’m pleased to post Show #228, January 28, my interview with Prof. Lisa Lynch of Concordia University, on WikiLeaks and information leakers. Lisa has written extensively about the nature and role of information leakers in society today. Having interacted with Julian Assange for several years — including before he was the infamous figure that he is today (she’s even benefited from his editing suggestions) — her insights regarding the role of WikiLeaks draws on both scholarly and personal experience.“ At the link right-click “Show #228” in the narrative and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

John Cleese 78 mins – “Join Cleese as he takes us on a grand tour of his ascent in the entertainment world, from his humble beginnings in a sleepy English town to the pinnacle of comedy and worldwide success.” John Cleese, Actor; Writer; Producer; Author, So, Anyway…; In conversation with Adam Savage, Host, “Mythbusters”. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kellogg’s Cereal 47 – “Hard times in Battle Creek, Michigan, home of Kellogg’s, the world’s largest cereal maker.  Cereal sales are dropping.  Kellogg’s fortunes are dropping with them.  The home of Frosted Flakes and Tony the Tiger is in trouble as Americans’ breakfast habits and menus change.  Carbs and sugar are no longer the hot “go-to.”  Greek yogurt and fruit smoothies and even green salads are moving in.  Eggs have a new lease on breakfast life with the latest report on cholesterol.  We’ve got Chinese, Vietnamese, Turkish, Mexican-style — all at the table.  This hour On Point:  what’s for breakfast now in the USA.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kevin MD 30 mins – “Kevin Pho is most known for his blog, KevinMD, is still a practicing physician. We talk about healthcare today and what you should know about it as a premed.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow beside the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Learning Process 58 mins – “What if almost everything we know about learning was wrong? With our brain sensitive to mood, timing, location and environment, how do we absorb and retain information? Find out more about whether repetition is necessary, why sleeping and daydreaming can be important to the learning process, and hear Carey’s tips for the best techniques to remember more. Carey has been with The New York Times for 10 years and writes about neuroscience, psychiatry, neurology and everyday psychology.” Benedict Carey, Science Reporter, The New York Times; Author, How We Learn: The Surprising Truth About When, Where, and Why It Happens; Twitter: @bencareynyt.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lethal Injections 28 mins – “As the Supreme Court prepares to revisit the constitutionality of lethal injection, Dahlia Lithwick speaks with two experts about the controversial drugs being used for execution and whether the capital punishment system can be repaired. This week’s excerpts from the Supreme Court’s public sessions were provided by Oyez, a free law project at the Chicago-Kent College of Law, part of the Illinois Institute of Technology.” At the link find the title, “Botched Protocols,” right-click “Media files 2015-02-07-Amicus-012.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Uses 62 mins – “If using marijuana can reduce our chances for developing a variety of cancers as well as dementia from Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases, asks Werner, why is it still illegal? Sixteen states have approved the use of marijuana for medical purposes, but the federal government continues to battle these efforts, claiming that there is no evidence that marijuana is safe or effective. Werner says that surprising scientific discoveries tell a different story. Werner argues that research has uncovered a previously unknown but significant biological communications and regulatory network known as the endocannabinoid system, which influences nearly all of our physiological activity. He explains that the unique compounds found in the cannabis plant, the cannabinoids, closely mimic and supplement the health-protective activity of our bodies’ own endocannabinoids, which work to prevent and interrupt disease processes through the endocannabinoid system.” Clint Werner, Author, Marijuana Gateway to Health: How Cannabis Protects Us from Cancer and Alzheimer’s Disease. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Tactics 27 mins – “Interactive training for Ebola healthcare workers; Portable cervical cancer treatment in Peru; Psychological support in Eastern Ukraine.” At the link find the title, “HealthC: Interactive Training for Ebola Health Care Workers,” right-click “Media files healthc_20150304-2035a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Misconceptions of Science 55 mins – “…There’s a progression that happens when you hear a new idea – you run it through your brain, try to envision where it might lead. Who will benefit from this new idea? Who will it hurt? Will it be worth the cost? Is it legal; is it morally defensible? Is it, in fact, a good idea? In our latest episode of Freakonomics Radio, we run that progression in reverse. Rather than asking if a new idea is a good one, we ask whether it’d be better if some of the ideas we cling to were killed off. The episode is called “This Idea Must Die.’” At the link find the title, “This Idea Must Die,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Noah Webster 14 mins – “Noah Webster may be the most important founding father you’ve never heard about. Historian Joshua Kendall talks about how Webster helped write the Constitution, invented American English, and was so crotchety we’ve basically forgotten about him.” At the link find the title, “Defining Noah Webster,” right-click “IHUB-030715-Kendall.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil and Earthquakes 59 mins – “How do natural resources and geologic features affect the course of Middle East history and geopolitics? Barazangi highlights the critical importance of better understanding Islamic history and cultures of the Arab/Persian region, which has the world’s largest oil reserves. He will also discuss the earthquake hazards of the Dead Sea Fault and the decline of science and technology in Arabia. Dr. Barazangi was educated in Syria and the U.S. and has had a distinguished career in research and education in the U.S and in the Middle East.” Dr. Muawia Barazangi, Professor Emeritus, Cornell University; Ph.D Seismology. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parasitism Case Study 106 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, and Daniel Griffin consider the delivery of anti-trypanosome nanobodies to the tsetse fly via a bacterial symbiont, and present a new case study.” A great many sidebars occur during this discussion that will interest even lay listeners. At the link right-click “Download TWIP #84” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patient Advocates 63 mins – “Many Americans today are dealing with chronic illnesses, trying to navigate through insurance, to decide what treatments are best or most affordable, and what decisions to make for themselves and their families. To address the issue of patient-oriented health care, we are bringing together healthcare innovators and experts to share their first-hand perspectives.” Jennifer Brokaw, MD; Founder, Good Medicine; Sean Duffy, Co-Founder and CEO, Omada Health; Marty Tenenbaum, Founder, Cancer Commons; Wayne Pan, MD; Chief Medical Informatics Officer, Health Access Solutions; Chief Medical Officer, Pacific Partners Management Services Inc. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty Innovation 64 mins – “Professor Patell will discuss lessons learned in the development of Entrepreneurial Design for Extreme Affordability, an interdisciplinary project course taught at the Stanford d-school in which graduate students apply design, engineering and business skills to create comprehensive solutions for challenges faced by the world’s poor. Now in its ninth year, the course has partnered with 22 organizations in 14 countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Projects have ranged from irrigation systems to solar-rechargeable lights to incubators for low birth-weight infants.” James M. Patell,  Herbert Hoover Professor of Public and Private Management, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prevention Not Treatment 175 mins – “The paradigm of Western medicine focuses on disease management. Interventions typically come when organ damage is identified. At that time medications are given to modify the symptoms. Allopathic medicine and insurance companies have been slow to incorporate research looking at interventions that address the causes of illnesses rather than the damage that follows years later. This program will include steps we can take to prevent/reverse atherosclerosis, hypertension, and the worse crippler of all, dementia.” Mark Houston, MD; Author, What Your Doctor May not Tell You About Hypertension and What Your Doctor May not Tell You About Heart Disease; Pamela Smith, MD, MPH; Director, Center for Healthy Living and Longevity; International Speaker; Author, HRT: The Answers and Vitamins Hype or Hope; Richard Smayda, DO, Journalist; Co-author,The Healing Nutrients Within and journal articles. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prohibition in Wine Country 52 mins – “Sosnowski details the enthralling, true story of California winemakers and their battle to survive Prohibition. She explores the passion of these vintners to preserve one of America’s most beloved and romantic industries. With their livelihoods in jeopardy and limited options available to them, winemakers across Napa and Sonoma counties kept the wine industry alive through its darkest years.Vivienne Sosnowski, Author, When the Rivers Ran Red; Editorial Director, Washington Examiner, San Francisco Examiner and Baltimore Examiner; Photographer.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

RNA 5 mins – “RNA, short for ribonucleic acid, is the less famous cousin of deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA. This, as you will probably be aware, stores our genes in a series of nucleotide bases, often represented as the letters G, A, T and C and forms the iconic double stranded helix. RNA is very similar in many ways: it too is made up of four bases attached to a backbone, although in RNA the ‘T’ (thymine) is replaced by ‘U’ (uracil) and the backbone is made of ribose sugars. Much like DNA, it is used by the body to encode information. Yet unlike DNA, the chains of RNA are generally single stranded. Further, the small chemical difference in the structure of RNA that distinguishes it from DNA, just the presence of a hydroxyl group on the sugar backbone, makes RNA far less stable than its counterpart.” At the link right-click “Download: CIIE_RNA.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sandhurst and the Sheikhs 27 mins – “Four reigning Arab monarchs have passed through the UK’s Royal Military Academy Sandhurst or its associated institutions – the kings of Bahrain and Jordan, the Emir of Qatar and the Sultan of Oman, alongside a long list of lesser sheikhs and princes, and many of the region’s military chiefs of staff. Is training at Sandhurst Military Academy, bolstering militarised monarchies in the Arab world?” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Sandhurst and the Sheikhs,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150304-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexologist 55 mins – “Feminist and sexologist, Leonore Tiefer in conversation with IDEAS producer Mary O’Connell about women’s sexuality and our “hypersexual” culture.” At the link find the title, “Sex and the Sisterhood,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150303_11826.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Impact 71 mins – “…Is all this new technology improving our thinking or dampening it? Are all these new communication tools turning us into navel-gazing human/brand hybrids, or are we developing a new set of senses that allow us to benefit from never severing contact with the people most important to us? That’s the topic of this episode of the You Are Not So Smart Podcast, and to answer these questions we welcome this episode’s guest, Clive Thompson, who is the author of Smarter Than You Think: How Technology is Changing Our Minds for the Better….” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Prevention 62 mins – “Despite the billions of dollars that have poured into wars, homeland security and disaster response, are we fundamentally no better prepared for the next terrorist attack or unprecedented flood than we were in 2001? Our response to catastrophes remains unchanged: add another step to airport security, another meter to the levee wall. Military leaders, public health officials and business professionals would all like to be more adaptable, but few have figured out how. Sagarin argues that we can learn from observing how nature is organized, how organisms learn, how they create partnerships, and how life continually diversifies on this unpredictable planet.” Rafe Sagarin, Ph.D,, Marin Ecologist and Environmental Policy Analyst, University of Arizona; Author, Learning from the Octopus. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Toxic Risk Help 71 mins – “When the news media report on contamination in the air, drinking water or food supply, the public understandably demands to know straight away, “Is it safe?” A distinguished panel of toxicologists and environmental journalists will discuss why the question defies straightforward answers, what’s keeping the public in the dark, and how citizens can make informed decisions on toxic risks in the absence of certainty.” Linda S. Birnbaum, Ph.D., Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Kent R. Olson, M.D., Medical Director of the California Poison Control Center;John Incardona, Supervisory Research Toxicologist, Northwest Fisheries Science Center; Philip Wexler, Technical Information Specialist, National Library of Medicine’s Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program; Chris Bowman, Chairman, Environment-Energy News Initiative, Capital Public Radio; Marla Cone, Editor-In-Chief, Environmental Health News; Janet Raloff, Senior Editor, Science News; Jane Kay,San Francisco- based environment writer. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transcranial Stimulation 38 mins – “Dr. Felipe Fregni is the director of the Laboratory of Neuromodulation and Center of Clinical Research Training. He is an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School of Neurology and Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, and an active clinical researcher and educator. In this episode, Dr. Fregni talks about his research into the use and benefits of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transcranial Stimulation DIY 23 mins – “Jesse interviews Nathan Whitmore, creator of the open-source project OpenBrainStim, an affordable alternative to commercial transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) devices. Nathan tells us how the project got started, how the “DIY-tCDS” community has grown, and how you can experiment from the comfort of your own home.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccinations 52 mins – “Wondering whether to vaccinate your children? The decision can feel like a shot in the dark if you don’t know how to evaluate risk. Find out why all of us succumb to the reasoning pitfalls of cognitive and omission bias, whether we’re saying no to vaccines or getting a tan on the beach. Plus, an infectious disease expert on why it may take a dangerous resurgence of preventable diseases – measles, whooping cough, polio – to remind us that vaccines save lives. Also, a quaint but real vaccine fear: that the 18th century smallpox vaccine, made from cowpox, could turn you into a cow! It’s our monthly look at critical thinking … but don’t take our word for it!” At the link right-click “Download file” ad select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Games Value 72 mins – “Our brains exhibit an amazing ability to modify both their structure and function in response to new experiences throughout our lives, a phenomenon known as neuroplasticity. Efforts to capitalize on neuroplasticity have led to the development of brain training software to improve cognitive abilities in healthy adults, as well as those suffering from cognitive impairment. There is emerging evidence showing the power of commercially available video games to improve cognitive function and transfer skills to different domains. Dr. Gazzaley will present data that demonstrate the range of cognitive abilities enhanced by action video game play, the methods used to study this, and the elements of video games that we believe most strongly mediate these effects. He will also describe the latest research by his laboratory to understand brain mechanisms that underlie video game-induced cognitive enhancement.” Dr. Adam Gazzaley, M.D., Ph.D., Founding Director, Neuroscience Imaging Center, UCSF; Associate Professor of Neurology, Physiology and Psychiatry, UCSF. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wayans Brothers 78 mins – “The stars of the Scary Movie franchise as well as the Wayans Brothers sitcom sit down with The Champs to discuss their long careers in comedy, snapping on Eddie Murphy’s pants when they were in grade school, Tupac Shakur, and why Shawn drives a minivan.” At the link find the title, “Shawn + Marlon Wayans,” right-click “Direct download: Wayans Brothers.output.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Why Do We Exist 22 mins – “What if your job didn’t control your life? Brazilian CEO Ricardo Semler practices a radical form of corporate democracy, rethinking everything from board meetings to how workers report their vacation days (they don’t have to). It’s a vision that rewards the wisdom of workers, promotes work-life balance — and leads to some deep insight on what work, and life, is really all about. Bonus question: What if schools were like this too?” At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wisdom 16 mins – “The place that travel writer Pico Iyer would most like to go? Nowhere. In a counterintuitive and lyrical meditation, Iyer takes a look at the incredible insight that comes with taking time for stillness. In our world of constant movement and distraction, he teases out strategies we all can use to take back a few minutes out of every day, or a few days out of every season. It’s the talk for anyone who feels overwhelmed by the demands for our world.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

 

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 5000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 30+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here MP3

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