Mining Digest 425 – Jan 10, 2020: AI and Human Creativity, Al-Baghdadi Raid, Betel Juice Addiction, Bitcoin in Prison, Cartilage Regeneration, Clifford Stoll, Creativity, Digital Minimalism, Ebola Returns, Feynman Diagrams, Gerrymandering, Indian Water Supply, Influenza Vaccines, Kids and Technology, LED Localization, Lithium Battery Noble Prize, Machine Learning, Malaria Research, Medicare for All Discussion, Microbe Evolution, Montana Subsistence Life, Neural Networks, News Release Problems, Puerto Rican Music, Quantum Communication, Recycling Overview, River Physics, Simulator Special, Solvents, Spinal Manipulation Value, Ultralearning, XKCD Teaches Science

Exercise your ears: the 41 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 564 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,850 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest. Continue reading

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Mining Digest 424 – Jan 3, 2020: Addiction Treatment Industry, Babies with Opioid Addiction, Boeing 737 Crashes, Casualty Counting, Christian Rap, Dan Savage, Dignity in Lower Class America, Dolly Parton, Energy Storage System, Ethics, Forest Protection, Generational Divide, Hit Parade History, Immigration History, Incontinence after Childbirth, Job Interviews, Kurds Roundtable, Metaphysics, Opera, PFOA Chemical Exposure, Plant Based Diet, Race-Culture-Identity, Racial Classification, Small Arms – Gender, Square Dance, Student Exam Stress Control, Tariff History, Unplanned Explosions, Wildfires in California

Exercise your ears: the 39 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 444 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,850 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Addiction Treatment Industry 48 mins – “Editor’s Note: This hour discusses topics of drug addiction that some listeners may find disturbing or offensive.If you or anyone you know is living with addiction and depression, there are resources available for help. Visit the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s website or call the helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357). Also, visit the American Society of Addiction Medicine or American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry to find a list of qualfied physicians by zip code or by state. The high cost of addiction care. Is it a rehab racket? We ask the Vox reporter who investigated.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ALS Patient 27 mins – “Jay DesMazes is bedridden with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). extremely limited movement; Using only eye movement and an ipad, DesMazes assembles words one letter at a time. Through his tablet, Jay tells Dr Brian Goldman about his life and abuse he received at the hands of nurses and health care staff.” At the link find the title, “Jay’s tablet,” right-click “Download Jay’s tablet,” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Babies with Opioid Addiction 29 mins – “Rooming in allows mothers who are dependent on opioids to bond with newborns experiencing withdrawal, a practice that research says is as effective as putting the infants in the NICU and giving them small doses of morphine.” At the link find the title, “Mothering, not morphine best treatment for babies born with opioid addiction,” right-click” Download Mothering, not morphine best treatment for babies born with opioid addiction,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bad Data Control 35 mins – “In this Public Lecture, Director General for Regulation at the UK Statistics Authority, Ed Humpherson, discusses how to stop bad data driving out the good.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Boeing 737 Crashes 47 mins – “Boeing’s CEO faces lawmakers and grieving families. What needs to change to prevent systemic failures in the future?….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Border Crossing Songs 29 mins – “Coming off our adventures with Square Dancing, and Jad’s dive into the world of Dolly Parton, we look back at one our favorites. About a decade ago, we found out that American country music is surprising popular in places like Zimbabwe, Thailand, and South Africa. Aaron Fox, an anthropologist of music at Columbia University, tells us that quite simply, country music tells a story that a lot of us get. Then, intrepid international reporter Gregory Warner takes us along on one of his very first forays into another country, where he discovers an unexpected taste of home.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Casualty Counting 11 mins – “In this episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series, Small Arms Survey consultant Hana Salama—author of our February 2018 Briefing Paper Counting Casualties: Operationalizing SDG 16.1.2 in Libya—speaks about the challenges involved in measuring casualties in conflict settings. The Briefing Paper and the podcast both form part of our Security Assessment in North Africa (SANA) project, which focuses on supporting those engaged in building a more secure environment in North Africa and the Sahel-Sahara region. Further information: Read Counting Casualties: Operationalizing SDG 16.1.2 in LibyaAt the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Christian Rap 46 mins – “The gospel according to Kanye. He’s turned to God for inspiration and a new image. We take a listen.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dan Savage 67 mins – “Trouble in love? Time to call in an expert.  Savage Lovecast is a call-in pod hosted by sex, love and relationship authority, Dan Savage. His sex-advice column titled Savage Love first appeared in The Stranger, Seattle’s alternative biweekly paper, in 1991. To this day, his column is syndicated to more than 50 papers across North America. But to keep up with the growing number of e-mails from those seeking his advice, he created the Savage Lovecast in 2006 which has since emerged as one of the most highly acclaimed podcasts about sexual health and dating.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of it is included in this blog archive.

Dignity in Lower Class America 57 mins – “Chris Arnade, a former Wall Street trader turned photojournalist, talked about his book, Dignity: Seeking Respect in Back Row America, in which he documents the plight of those living on the margins of society in America. He discussed his photos and shared stories about some of the people he befriended during his travels.

DIY Urbanism 36 mins – “Informal urbanism” is a broad term. It applies to everything created outside the legal city planning and development processes. It can be a whole community, like a favela in Brazil. Or it can be a tiny thing, like a homemade road sign that helps drivers avoid a pothole. But there are lots of actions that skirt the boundary between “formal” and “informal.” In the last decade, there’s been a rise in tactical urbanism and guerilla urbanism, where regular people make interventions in their communities. This ranges from hastily painted bike lanes, to do-it-yourself park benches in under-served communities. Gordon C.C. Douglas is the author of The Help-Yourself City and he spoke with Roman Mars about the concept of informal urbanism.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dolly Parton 63 mins – “Radiolab creator and host Jad Abumrad spent the last two years following around music legend Dolly Parton, and we’re here to say you should tune in! In this episode of Radiolab, we showcase the first of Jad’s special series, Dolly Parton’s America. In this intensely divided moment, one of the few things everyone still seems to agree on is Dolly Parton—but why? That simple question leads to a deeply personal, historical, and musical rethinking of one of America’s great icons. We begin with a simple question: How did the queen of the boob joke become a feminist icon? Helen Morales, author of “Pilgrimage to Dollywood,” gave us a stern directive – look at the lyrics! So we dive into Dolly’s discography, starting with the early period of what Dolly calls “sad ass songs” to find remarkably prescient words of female pain, slut-shaming, domestic violence, and women being locked away in asylums by cheating husbands. We explore how Dolly took the centuries-old tradition of the Appalachian “murder ballad”—an oral tradition of men singing songs about brutally killing women—and flipped the script, singing from the woman’s point of view. And as her career progresses, the songs expand beyond the pain to tell tales of leaving abuse behind.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Edgar Allan Poe 53 mins – “How old were you when you first read Edgar Allan Poe. 12 year olds reading he’s you know slicing the head off and burying it in a wall. What do we really know about who he was and how he dumped. S3: There’s the rabies theory. There’s the alcohol theory. S4: I like to say that Poe’s biography starts with his death not with his birth. S5: And why does his legend just keep growing. Suddenly there comes Poe like a breath of fetid air. It tells us dark things about our own souls blowing from some dark European cellar. S6: He is appealing to the monster inside of us. It’s like the Asterix on the American dream. The monster in US responds and PO is becoming the Santa Claus of Halloween. Today on Studio 360 60s American icons hit the disease tear up the blanks the tales of Edgar Allan Poe is the beating of his hideous heart…. At the link left-click “Share” at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Conservation in Schools 56 mins – “On March 26, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Better Buildings Challenge visited Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD)’s Showcase Project Santee Education Complex, to recognize LAUSD for the energy productivity advances made in its schools. Better Buildings Partner LAUSD opened the 338,000-square-foot Santee Education Complex in July 2005 as the first new four-year high school for the Los Angeles Unified School District in more than 35 years. Santee is on schedule to achieve 30% annual energy savings this year. As a result of these upgrades, the school expects to achieve a 23% annual cost savings, equal to more than $195,000 yearly. Tune in as we speak with Maria T. Vargas, Director of the Better Buildings Challenge at the Department of Energy, and Christos Chrysiliou, Director of Architectural & Engineering Services at LAUSD.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Storage System 58 mins – “Never worry about a power outage again. Panasonic Solar has a new solution for consumers who want an eco-friendly, energy independent home: EverVolt™. This new residential energy storage system can be tailored to a homeowner’s individual needs, offering both AC and DC coupled options, as well as options to scale down to as little as 5.7kWh of energy storage or expanded to 34.2kWh. Tune in as we talk with Dan Glaser, senior sales engineer for Panasonic!” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethics 19 mins – “Are thought experiments the best way of doing practical ethics? Not according to James Wilson. He thinks we need the rich detail of real cases or complex imaginary cases not a simplified version of reality to make sense of the moral problems we face.” At the link right-click “Direct download: James_Wilson_on_Real_World_Ethics.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the popup menu.

Forest Protection 55 mins – “Paul Rosolie is a naturalist, explorer, author, and award-winning wildlife filmmaker. For the past decade he has specialized in threatened ecosystems and species in countries like Indonesia, Brazil, India, and Peru.. He has also spent extensive time traveling with poachers documenting the illegal trade in endangered species. Rosolie’s memoir on Amazonian wildlife and exploration, Mother of God, was hailed as “gripping” by Jane Goodall, and the Wall Street Journal applauded Rosolie’s environmental call-to-arms for its “rare immediacy and depth.” His conservation writing has appeared in National Geographic, The Huffington Post and The Guardian. In 2013, Rosolie spoke at the United Nations global Forum on Forests while accepting an award for his Amazonian wildlife short-film An Unseen World. His latest book, “The Girl and the Tiger” is already being hailed as the 21st Century Jungle Book.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Generational Divide 82 mins – “In this launch event co-hosted with the All Party Parliamentary Group(APPG) on Social Integration, Chuka Umunna MP, Wera Hobhouse MP, Dr Matt Dickson, Antony Hawkins, Rachael Dutton and Ivo Gormley discuss the growing age divide in the UK, and what can be done to bridge it, and introduce ‘Healing the Generational Divide’ – an interim report from the APPG.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Henry Ford and Thomas Edison 58 mins – “Historian Jeff Guinn talked about his book The Vagabonds: The Story of Henry Ford and Thomas Edison’s Ten-Year Road Trip, on the highly-publicized summer road trips taken by Henry Ford and Thomas Edison between 1914-1925.” At the link you can listen and purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is also included in this blog archive.

Hit Parade History 85 mins – “Three decades ago, the biggest alternative rock came with a British accent—and morose lyrics.” At the link left-click “Share” at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration History 59 mins – “Alan Kraut, an American University distinguished professor of history, looked back on the transformation over more than 200 years of U.S. laws and policies designed to manage immigration. With President Trump’s focus on immigration, questions as old as the republic have been resurrected: Who is allowed to cross American borders and under what circumstances?.” At the link you can listen and purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is also included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen and purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is also included in this blog archive.

Incontinence after Childbirth..27 mins – “We’re making mention of the common yet often unmentionable problem: pelvic floor dysfunction. Close to 40% of older women are affected by pelvic floor disorders.” At the link find the title, “Mentioning the unmentionable,” right-click “Download Mentioning the unmentionableand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Interviews 47 mins – “Your next job interview might be conducted by a robot recruiter who’s judging your competency on your facial expression and words.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kurds Roundtable 47 mins – “A roundtable of Kurds in the U.S. tell us what they think of the president’s decision to withdraw troops from Syria and protect the oil fields instead of them.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Libyan Peacekeepers 26 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on Libyan female fighters and the role of women during the Libyan conflict and post-conflict peacebuilding, as part of the Survey’s Security Assessment in North Africa (SANA) project. The discussants are: Hasnaa El Jamali, Small Arms Survey consultant who has conducted original research with Libyan women who were active during and after the 2011 revolution; David Lochhead, Small Arms Survey consultant with wide experience on security sector reform, border security, and peacekeeping in different parts of Africa with the United Nations; and Manal Taha, Small Arms Survey consultant and northern Africa regional expert with extensive knowledge on violent extremist, stabilization, and conflict resolution.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opera 41 mins – “Opera used to be a central part of European pop culture, Pavarotti was as big a pop star as they come. But still, it’s now the quintessential art-form of the wealthy and snobbish. What gives? Guest Sean Spyres from Springfield Regional Opera joins his sister Erica along with Mark and Brian to discuss opera’s place in culture (including its film appearances), how it’s different from music theater, the challenges it faces and how it might become more relevant.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

PFOA Chemical Exposure 55 mins – “In the upcoming motion picture, Dark Waters, actor Mark Ruffalo plays the character inspired by Robert Bilott, a lawyer specializing in helping big corporations stay on the right side of environmental laws and regulations. His life took an unexpected turn when a West Virginia farmer named Earl Tennant called. He was convinced his cattle were being poisoned by runoff from a neighboring DuPont landfill. Rob ultimately gains access to hundreds of thousands of pages of DuPont documents that reveal the company has been holding onto decades of studies proving the harmful effects of a chemical called PFOA, used in making Teflon. More toxic than lead, PFOA is often called a “forever chemical,” because once it gets inside the human body, it remains there, building up faster than the body can excrete it. What starts as the case of one farmer soon spawns a shocking realization that virtually every person on the planet has been exposed to PFOA and carries the chemical in his or her blood.

Plant Based Diet 27 mins – “Tofurkey anyone? Two doctors in rural Newfoundland are teaching locals what they need to know about switching to a plant based diet. It’s a win-win for their patients who ditch cod and salt beef in favour of tofu and broccoli. Not only are they losing excess pounds, they are also regaining their health.” At the link find the title, “Food as Medicine: Some doctors are prescribing a plant based diet to address a host of health ailments,” right-click “Download Food as Medicine: Some doctors are prescribing a plant based diet to address a host of health ailments,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcast Picks 53 mins “Roman Mars, John Green, Nate DiMeo, Vanessa Zoltan and Miel Bredouw share their fave podcasts to create a giant, podcast recommendation chain — an idea shared to us from one of our listeners! Featuring: 1. 99% Invisible Recommended Episode: Sound and Health: Cities Is our blaring modern soundscape harming our health? Cities are noisy places and while people are pretty good at tuning it out on a day-to-day basis our sonic environments have serious, long-term impacts on our mental and physical health. Recommended by listeners James Pattison (pitcher) and Krista Dalby (via Facebook) 2. The Anthropocene Reviewed Recommended Episode: Tetris and the Seed Potatoes of Leningrad An episode that goes from history of Tetris, to nostalgia of playing, to how it can distract from existential dread. Recommended by Roman Mars of 99% Invisible 3. Harry Potter and the Sacred Text Recommended Episode: Promises: The Potions Master (Book 1, Chapter 8) Vanessa and Casper explore the theme of expectations in chapter six of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. They discuss Harry and Ron’s budding friendship, the unusual bravery of Scabbers the rat, and how our bodily practices relate to our spiritual experience. Recommended by John Green of The Anthropocene Reviewed 4. The Memory Palace Recommended Episode: Episode 125: Snakes! Host Nate DiMeo tells the story of Missouri’s Great Escaped Snake Scare of 1953. Recommended by Vanessa Zoltan of Harry Potter and the Sacred Text 5. Punch Up the Jam Recommended Episode: Episode 74 – Believe (w/ Nicole Byer) “DO YOU BELIEVE that Nicole Byer came through to absolutely bathe in Cher’s 1998 hit “BELIEVE”?!? WARNING: this episode contains what can only be described as “power giggling” so listen responsibly!!!” Recommended by Nate DiMeo of Memory Place” At the link find the title, “Oct. 30, 2019: Celebrating 200th Episodes with Recommendations from Top Podcasterswhich can be played, but not downloaded; however, a copy of it is included in this blog archive.

Race-Culture-Identity 43 mins – “On Kwame Anthony Appiah’s “Race, Culture, Identity: Misunderstood Connections” (1994), Charles Mills’s “But What Are You Really?, The Metaphysics of Race” (1998), and Neven Sesardic’s “Race: A Social Destruction of a Biological Concept” (2010). Coleman Hughes rejoins Mark, Seth, and Dylan to differentiate “race” as population genetics uses the term from racial identity. Mills argues that the latter has been historically constructed to track several markers that don’t always go together, e.g., parentage vs. skin tone (consider siblings with different skin tones). Race in this sense is real, in that it’s a socially established categorization that has real effects on how people are treated and how they see themselves. But conventions like the “one-drop rule” by which in America folks with mixed black-white ancestry are considered black are historically contingent; our racial thinking does not match the biology involved.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racial Classification 48 mins – “Racial classifications vary geographically, therefore race is socially constructed. Given this, can we retain the positive aspects of group identification without hierarchies and what Appiah calls “imperialism of identity”? Racial breakdowns are different in different places, therefore race is socially constructed. So what does this mean for how we should self-identify? Can we retain the positive aspects of having an identity without this involving hierarchies and what Appiah calls “imperialism of identity”?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Small Arms – Gender 28 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on gender in small arms control, as part of the Gender Lens for Arms Control Support and Sustainability (GLASS) project, funded by the Government of Canada. The Small Arms Survey will publish a Handbook on gender and arms control later in 2019, the authors and editor of which are discussants in this episode: Vanessa Corlazzoli, independent evaluation consultant Emile LeBrun, Small Arms Survey consultant Henri Myrttinen, independent researcher Allison Pytlak, disarmament programme manager, Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF)” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Mobility Control 60 mins – “In this Public Lecture, co-hosted with the Centre for the Analysis of Social Policy (CASP), Emeritus Fellow at Nuffield College, Dr John Goldthorpe, and Associate Professor in Quantitative Social Policy at the University of Oxford, Dr Erzsébet Bukodi, discuss their recently published book, ‘Social Mobility and Education in Britain: Research, Politics and Policy’, in which they show a marked disconnect between the findings of sociological research and the current discussion of social mobility in political and policy circles.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Square Dance 47 mins – “People have been doing the square dance since before the Declaration of Independence. But does that mean it should be THE American folk dance? That question took us on a journey from Appalachian front porches, to dance classes across our nation, to the halls of Congress, and finally a Kansas City convention center. And along the way, we uncovered a secret history of square dancing that made us see how much of our national identity we could stuff into that square, and what it means for a dance to be of the people, by the people, and for the people.” At the link right-click “Download” then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Student Exam Stress Control 12 mins – “Understanding exam stress, how to manage it and tips to prepare for the exam period.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Tariff History 58 mins – “Peter Liebhold, work and industry curator at the National Museum of American History, talked about the history of tariffs from the Revolutionary War-era to the present. With President Trump’s use of tariffs to affect trade policy, including on many Chinese products coming into the U.S., Q&A looked at the history of tariffs policy in the U.S.” At the link you can listen and purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is also included in this blog archive.

Unplanned Explosions 24 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on unplanned explosions at munitions sites (UEMS). Our speakers, Jovana Carapic, Remo Gassmann, and Benjamin King, discuss the problem at hand, the causes behind these explosions, as well as their consequences. The episode forms part of our Gender Lens for Arms Control Support and Sustainability (GLASS) project, funded by the Government of Canada. Further information: Learn more about unplanned explosions at munitions sites (UEMS) Check out our UEMS tools, including the incident reporting template (IRT), available in eight languagesAt the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfires in California 47 mins – “Fires have now torched more than 74,000 acres in Northern California. At least 180,000 residents have evacuated. Millions of residents plunged into darkness from mandatory power shutoffs. We have the latest from the frontlines and look at disaster response at the brink.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 423 – Dec 27, 2019: AI Acceleration, Antiracism, Australia and New Zealand, Australian Economy, Bayocean Fell Into the Sea, Bias Quashing, Bridging the Racial Divide, Cochlear Implants, Consciousness, Corporations and Faith Based Organization, Deep Medicine, Impeachment Primer, Innovation Reform, Intelligence Committee, Leadership for Christians, Mexico Is Mad, Moth Cell Phone Stories, Moth Navajo Story, Music Education, NASA, Organized Crime in Australia, Piracy, Rural American Myths, Shipwreck Kelly, Supreme Court Activities, Windows 10 to Linux

Exercise your ears: the 40 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 551 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

AI Acceleration 39 mins – “Today’s guest stands at the forefront of artificial intelligence advancement. Steve Guggenheimer has been with Microsoft for 26 years and has been heavily involved in the company’s AI ventures. This week on Killer Innovations, Steve Guggenheimer joins us to discuss the progress of AI, the transition into “the cloud,” and what he and his team at Microsoft are doing to advance technology.” At the left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Antiracism 46 mins – “Countering racism is essential to the formation of a just and equitable society — so how can we fight it? Ibram X. Kendi says to be able to recognize racism we need to define it and then understand it’s opposite: antiracism. In his new best-selling book, “How to Be an Antiracist,” Kendi explains that racism is powerful and can change the way we see and value others and ourselves. How can we recognize racism and work to oppose it? In his conversation with Jemele Hill, staff writer for The Atlantic, Kendi talks about his own battle with racism, why it’s so difficult to talk productively about racism, and why an understanding of history is essential to combating racism. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Arbiters of Truth 37 mins – “Facebook has had a bad few weeks. Testifying before the House of Representatives on Oct. 23, CEO Mark Zuckerberg was grilled by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on whether the company’s decision to exempt politicians from the platform’s typical rules prohibiting false advertisements would allow Ocasio-Cortez to distribute ads claiming Republicans had voted for the Green New Deal. Days later, the platform faced another backlash when it took down false ads run by a candidate for the California governorship, who cheerfully admitted that he had registered for the race only to test the boundaries of Facebook’s policy. And on Oct. 30, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey made things even more difficult for Zuckerberg by announcing that the rival platform would ban political ads altogether—a decision that garnered Twitter good press, but will likely prove to be just as much of a minefield for Dorsey once he and his team start struggling to define what constitutes a political ad in the first place.  This dustup is just the latest example of the problems faced by social media platforms as they grapple with how to responsibly govern online spaces. As Zuckerberg wrote after the 2016 election, “We do not want to be arbiters of truth ourselves.”  Today, Lawfare is launching a podcast series on disinformation and misinformation in the runup to the 2020 election. And, with thanks to Zuckerberg for the inspiration, we’re calling it Arbiters of Truth. My colleagues Evelyn Douek, Kate Klonick, Alina Polyakova and I will be sitting down with experts to discuss thorny issues of content moderation, online speech and the erosion of discourse around the world. We’ll talk to writers, academics, government officials, members of civil society and employees of the big social media companies themselves. There are no easy answers to these problems, but our hope is that we can at least make clear what questions should be asked. And there is no more important time to be asking them, with content moderation under the telescope of regulators everywhere, social media still transforming our world and voters heading to the ballot box. This week, we’re introducing the series with a roundtable discussion between Douek, Klonick, Polyakova and myself on the key issues: Just what are disinformation and misinformation, anyway? How much of a problem is fake news? And is effective content moderation even possible?” At the link left-click the – arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Artificial Intelligence 46 mins – “Artificial intelligence isn’t something we’ll see in the future. Thinking machines are already here, and nine powerful companies in the US and China control their development. The spam filter in your email inbox is AI. So are programs like Google Translate. The next level for thinking machines is when they begin learning the way humans learn. As artificial intelligence gets refined, who’s keeping track of whether these machines share our motivations, desires, and hopes for the future of humanity? Amy Webb, author of “The Big Nine: How the Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity,” speaks with Alexis Madrigal, a staff writer for The Atlantic who covers Silicon Valley. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Australia and New Zealand 45 mins – “Deputy Prime Minister of New Zealand & Minister for Foreign Affairs Winston Peters addresses the National Press Club on the topic ‘Australia and New Zealand Working Together In A Changing World’.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Australian Economy 52 mins – “Australian Film Television and Radio School (AFTR) chair and star of ABC’s Gruen Russel Howcroft addresses the National Press Club on the topic ‘The Creative Economy Deficit’. ” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Bayocean Fell into the Sea 11 mins – “There’s a pretty comprehensive book on Bayocean by Bert and Margie Webber called Bayocean: the Oregon Town That Fell Into the Sea There’s also a terrific website that appears to be regularly updating that’s filled with all sorts of stories and resources about Bayocean. ” At the link left-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bias Quashing 56 mins – “Bias is natural — it’s one way we make sense of the world. It becomes problematic when our biases become stereotypes and prejudices. So how do we manage bias, particularly in the classroom and workplace? Jennifer Eberhardt, author of “Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do,” sits down with Adam Grant, host of the WorkLife podcast to go over the science behind bias. How effective are workplace diversity trainings and how can we get at bias early before it becomes ingrained? John Dickerson, correspondent for “60 Minutes,” moderates the conversation. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Bridging the Racial Divide  58 mins  “At a time that many think that our nation has submerged itself in such racially polarizing indulgences that there is no way out, there is yet a smoldering spark of fresh hope. This interview gives all of us marching orders toward a more unified existence without ignoring the difficulties that must be reversed! It’s a very thoughtful discussion for the betterment of #humanity! The conversation deserves our attention! #thethirdoption Learn more about your ad choices. Visit…” At the link find the title, “Bridging the racial divide with Miles McPherson” which can be heard but not downloaded; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Cochlear Implants 14 mins -”The parents of a deaf boy in India are advised to get him a cochlear implant so he can live a “normal” life. When they can’t afford to maintain the device, he’s left with little ability to communicate. How can the concept of “multiple normals” improve clinical practice? Interview with Dr. Michele Friedner on how the concept of normality affects health care decisions.” At the link right-click Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Teaching and Learning 30 mins – “Somewhere in a university lab, a research subject is being slid into a brain-scanning device to try to better understand how humans learn and retain information. It may seem a bit like science fiction, but research like this is taking off around the world. And in recent years more of the findings are making their way onto campus, in the form of new teaching practices. That has Matthew Rascoff, associate vice provost for digital education and innovation at Duke University, excited about the possibility to make wide-scale improvements in how colleges teach. “From a teaching and learning perspective, this is a golden age,” he says. “We know more about how people learn than we ever have in the past.” EdSurge sat down with Rascoff last month at a meeting of a group called Harvesting Academic Innovation for Learners, or HAIL, held at Southern New Hampshire University. He painted a picture of where he sees campus innovation going, and talked about how his new digital tools can navigate issues around protecting student privacy and avoiding algorithmic bias.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness P1 56 mins – “Every parent knows that each child is born with an unique personality. In his new book Innate: How the Wiring of Our Brains Shapes Who We Are. Dr. Kevin Mitchell writes “We are different from each other in large part because of the way our brains get wired before we are born.” (page 7) A key idea is that much of much of our behavior is innate but this is only partly due to genetics. Events during brain development are equally important.” At the link right-click “Kevin Mitchel (click to play interview)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness P2 88 mins – “In this month’s episode of Brain Science (BS 160) we take a deep dive into the neuroscience of consciousness. Until recently, consciousness was considered outside the realm of science, but now it is a growing field of interest. I review several recent books with a cross-section of viewpoints, but there are several concepts that they all share: Consciousness requires a brain; Consciousness is a product of evolution; Consciousness is embodied” At the link right-click “Ginger Campbell, MD (Click to Listen)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness P3 64 mins – “How does the brain generate subjective experience? This is what philosophers of mind have called Qualia and neuroscientist Michael Graziano proposes a fascinating answer In his new book Rethinking Consciousness: A Scientific Theory of Subjective Experience. In BS 162 explains how his Attention Schema Theory compliments several current theories of Consciousness by answering this critical question. His theory had two critical components: one is that whatever circuitry the brain uses to attribute consciousness to others, is also used to attribute consciousness to ourselves. Second, a critical feature of this circuitry is that it provides an incomplete picture of what the brain is actually doing. Since awareness of what the brain is actually doing provides no survival advantage, we have the sense that our Mind is non-physical. This may seem strange, but it is consistent with how we know our other senses work. For instance, we know the world we experience visually is highly processed, rather than an accurate depiction of the world around us. (Note: the is part 3 of a 4 part series, but episodes can be enjoyed in any order.)” At the link right-click “(click to play, Right click to download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness P4 92 mins – “Christof Koch returns to Brain Science for the 3rd time and in BS 163 he shares his new book The Feeling of Life Itself: Why Consciousness Is Widespread but Can’t Be Computed. He tells us why he doesn’t think the Neural Correlates of Consciousness (NCC) are enough to explain subjective experience and he gives us a brief overview of the Integrated Information Theory (IIT) of Consciousness.” At the link right-click “(click to play interview, right click to download MP3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corporations and Faith Based Organizations 41 mins – “I was recently asked to sit down and have a wide ranging conversation with ATT CEO Randall Stephenson to talk about how corporations like his can tap into Faith based organizations like The Potter’s House Church. It was a joy to have this opportunity to discuss some cutting edge ideas about how corporations and churches can work together to change lives and make people and our society stronger and better. What a tremendous privilege it was to welcome Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the president of Liberia, to MegaFest. President Sirleaf is the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Her rise to power against incredible odds, and the lasting impact she has made on her country and the African continent is a powerful story that I’m thrilled to share here in the Village.” At the link find the title, “PRESIDENTIAL VISION & FAITH: President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia,” which can be heard but not downloaded; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Deep Medicine 52 mins – “In modern-day medicine, doctors have little time to spend with patients because rote tasks, like taking notes and performing medical scans, use up their precious time. Eric Topol, a prominent cardiologist, says there has been a steady degradation of the human side of health care – ever since medicine became big business. “We have de-humanized health care. We have gutted the care of health care. This is our only shot to get it back.” He believes artificial intelligence can help free time for doctors so they can listen more closely to patients about their medical concerns. He speaks with David Brooks, op-ed columnist for The New York Times, about Topol’s latest book, “Deep Medicine.” Topol is executive vice president of Scripps Research. Brooks is executive director of Weave: The Social Fabric Project at the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Facebook Moderators 33 mins – “…On May 3, 2017, Mark Zuckerberg announced the expansion of Facebook’s “community operations” team. The new employees, who would be added to 4,500 existing moderators, would be responsible for reviewing every piece of content reported for violating the company’s community standards. By the end of 2018, in response to criticism of the prevalence of violent and exploitative content on the social network, Facebook had more than 30,000 employees working on safety and security — about half of whom were content moderators. The moderators include some full-time employees, but Facebook relies heavily on contract labor to do the job. Ellen Silver, Facebook’s vice president of operations, said in a blog post last year that the use of contract labor allowed Facebook to “scale globally” — to have content moderators working around the clock, evaluating posts in more than 50 languages, at more than 20 sites around the world. The use of contract labor also has a practical benefit for Facebook: it is radically cheaper. The median Facebook employee earns $240,000 annually in salary, bonuses, and stock options. A content moderator working for Cognizant in Arizona, on the other hand, will earn just $28,800 per year. The arrangement helps Facebook maintain a high profit margin. In its most recent quarter, the company earned $6.9 billion in profits, on $16.9 billion in revenue. And while Zuckerberg had warned investors that Facebook’s investment in security would reduce the company’s profitability, profits were up 61 percent over the previous year…” At the link left-click “Share” at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Economy 50 mins – “As the US and China continue their trade war, economic instability is rising in countries around the world. Gita Gopinath, chief economist at the International Monetary Fund says, the number one risk to the global economy is the trade war. The IMF is seeing weakening in industrial production, manufacturing, and investment. “All of this is very closely tied to trade, trade uncertainty, and policies related to that,” she says. In a wide-ranging conversation with Gillian Tett, editor at large for the Financial Times, Gopinath talks about whether a recession is looming for the US or elsewhere, why the IMF is redefining global growth, and how more women economic leaders can rise up. Gopinath is the IMF’s first female chief economist. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Impeachment Discussion 61 mins – “The Conservative Legal Resistance – Stuart Gerson on the case for impeachment from the right. Plus, Cyrus Habib on listening.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment Primer 67 mins – “Answering all the questions you’ve had about the constitutional crisis but were afraid to ask.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Reform 39 mins – “Does innovation need reforming? Can something as nebulous as innovation be changed? The reason that this issue bothers me is due to the misuse of innovation, done in a whole variety of ways. Innovation tends to have minimized support financially. What is the proper role that innovation plays in our daily lives? We tend to view innovation as the new shiny gadget from Apple, Dell, or HP. The reality is that innovation plays a much more significant part of our daily lives. It’s the continuous role of innovation solving issues such as healthcare, education, politics, etc. It allows us to share ideas globally uniting us rather than dividing us. Back to my fundamental question. Does innovation need reforming? If so, what approach should minimize? Should more regulation or other incentives be applied? Or is there another completely different approach?…” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Intelligence Committee 36 mins – “House Intelligence Committee member Rep. Jim Himes on the intersection of the law and national security.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA Interrogations – “Philip Mudd is currently a counterterrorism and national security analyst with CNN, but before that, Mudd spent 25 years working at the Central Intelligence Agency, on the NSC staff, and eventually at the FBI. His third book is “Black Site: The CIA in the Post-9/11 World.” David Priess sat down with Phil to talk about his career at CIA, the book, his research into the advanced interrogations and the interrogation program at CIA after 9/11, and the ethics of it all.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_465.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leadership for Christians 28 mins – “This conversation between these two was originally recorded at Dr. Hybel’s 2016 Global Leadership Summit, an annual training event that aims to transform Christian leaders around the world with an injection of vision, skill development, and inspiration. Together, they hit a range of topics and address Bishop’s philosophy on Leadership. Bishop also leans in on some of the hard truths of leadership; how he balances his life and reconciles the dropping of balls; and lastly, he speaks openly…” At the link find the title, “[replay] The HARD truth about Leadership: Dr. Bill Hybels” which can be heard but not downloaded; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Mexico Is Mad 50 mins – “Is the relationship between the United States and Mexico on shaky ground? This year, President Trump threatened to impose tariffs on Mexican imports if the country didn’t stop the flow of migrants from Central America. And, just this week, Mexican officials called a fatal shooting at an El Paso department store that killed eight Mexican nationals an “act of terrorism.” Will the issues at the border lead to more tension between the two countries, or can they find compromise? Jorge Guajardo, former Mexican ambassador to China, joins Julián Aguilar, a reporter who covers border affairs for The Texas Tribune, and Jeh Johnson, former US secretary of homeland security for a discussion about what’s at stake. Mary Louise Kelly, co-host of NPR’s “All Things Considered,” moderates the conversation. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Moth Cell Phone Stories 48 mins – “In this hour, stories of ringtones, rekindled connections, and revolution. Revealing phone calls, missed messages, and finding one’s calling. This hour is hosted by The Moth’s Executive Producer, Sarah Austin Jenness. The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media. Susan Fee gets a surprise when she calls her daughter. A series of missed calls gets scientist Moran Cerf in hot water. Nancy Mahl gets a call from her mom on 9/11. Cheech Marin finds his calling after dodging the draft.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Moth Navajo Story 48 mins – “In this episode we travel to Chicago, the Navajo Nation in Arizona, and then end the hour on the sidelines of the Tour de France. A man struggles with his unruly neighbors, an artists shares memories of growing up on the Navajo Nation and a journalist exposes one of the greatest sports scandals of our time. The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Music Education 18 mins- “If you were fortunate enough to have music education in school, what were those classes like? Did you pick up an instrument—say, a recorder or violin, and learn how to play the scale and simple melodies? Did you listen to the classics and learn about the history of music? Musicians and music educators alike say that learning music is so much more than just playing an instrument, or learning about your favorite artists. It’s a window into other disciplines—and life skills—and teaches you how to learn and get along. That’s what Lorrie Murray, executive director of the Bay Area Music Project, told EdSurge earlier this fall. And it’s a sentiment echoed by a rock legend, Steven van Zandt, who most people have heard (as a member of Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band) or watched (as the mobster Silvio Dante in “The Sopranos”). Murray and van Zandt are our guests on this week’s EdSurge podcast, and they share their different approaches to music education. Both say that although music may not be a lifestyle and profession for everyone, it can teach everybody lifelong lessons.

NASA 58 mins – “NASA turns 60 this week. We’re joined by Former NASA chief technologist Mason Peck joins us to discuss the agency’s history of spaceflight milestones, which include landing humans on the Moon (six times!), putting rovers on Mars, sending probes to interstellar space, and partnering on the International Space Station. Beyond these physical exploration achievements, NASA has also revolutionized the human view of Earth, the solar system, the Milky Way, and the deep swaths of space and time beyond our local group of galaxies.  We also discuss NASA’s future, including its partnerships with the commercial space sector, megaprojects like the Space Launch System and the James Webb Space Telescope, and human exploration of the Moon and Mars.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Organized Crime in Australia 62 mins – “Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton addresses the National Press Club in Canberra on the topic of organised crime.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Piracy 43 mins – “One of the most lawless places on earth is the high seas – remote waters, often hundreds of miles from shore. These largely ungoverned waters play host to criminal acts like sea slavery, gun running, human trafficking, and abuse of stowaways. “The lack of protections for the people who work above the water line and the creatures below, I think, is a huge problem,” says New York Times investigative reporter Ian Urbina. Urbina spent five perilous years jumping aboard fishing vessels and talking with the victims of these inhumanities. His book “Outlaw Ocean: Journeys Across the Last Untamed Frontier,” chronicles their stories and what can be done to protect workers and the wild places they frequent. M. Sanjayan, CEO of Conservation International, interviews Urbina.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

President Roosevelt Wartime Meeting 13 mins – President’s ship almost torpedoed…” At the link left-share, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rural America 50 mins – “Writers Tara Westover and Sarah Smarsh grew up in rural parts of the mid-section of America and chronicled the stories of their childhoods in best-selling books. While the books vary in emphasis, structure, and theme, both writers agree that people in the Heartland are easily stereotyped by the national media and politicians. “There’s a real gulf between the story we tell ourselves about a country and those conflict- and ratings-driven conversations in New York City studios, and what happens on-the-ground in local communities,” says Smarsh. They tell James Fallows, author of “Our Towns,” about what needs to change to eliminate these damaging stereotypes. Smarsh and Westover also describe how they’re using their platforms to address some of the most complex challenges that rural communities face today. Smarsh is the author of “Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Riches Country on Earth.” Westover wrote the book, “Educated.” The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Rural American Myths 58 mins – “Rural America has come to the nation’s attention. But much discussion in the media and coffee shops, at conferences and dinner tables, relies on incorrect or no data, largely idyllic or dystopic tropes and images, and opinion uninformed by rural experience. The full picture of rural America is quite different. It has gained population in the last two years. Agriculture employs less than 4 percent of the rural workforce. Rural leaders are generating productive economic and social innovations just as in urban America. Immigrants are helping revive rural economies and culture. Placemaking is rampant. Impact investing is on the rise. The voting map is red and blue and purple. Start the day with a frank and revealing exchange with rural doers, knowers, and advocates. Bring all those questions about rural America you have always wanted to ask. Help foster a truer narrative about America’s rural people, places, culture, and economy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Shipwreck Kelly 21 mins – “There’s a lot written about Kelly and his times, none more enjoyable than Bill Bryson’s in One Summer: America, 1927. The best academic book that touches on Kelly and his times is Dance Marathons: Performing American Culture in the 1920s and 30s, by Carol Martin.” At the link left-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Activities 46 mins – “Get Ready for the Most Significant Supreme Court Term in a Decade – The justices are tackling abortion, guns, DACA, and LGBTQ rights.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court and the Law 60 mins – “Dahlia Lithwick is joined by Stuart Gerson of the conservative legal group Checks and Balances to talk about developments in the border wall case he helped bring in El Paso, Texas; the view of impeachment from concerned conservatives; and the latest escalation in the Department of Justice’s investigation into the origins of the Russia investigation. Then, Cyrus Habib, lieutenant governor of Washington state (and owner of the most impressive résumé of any guest ever on the show) shares a refreshingly optimistic take on the law and politics.” At the link left-share, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Windows 10 to Linux P1 46 mins- “In today’s show we start a series on how to switch from Windows and upgrade to Linux. We break the process down into easy steps.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Windows10 to Linux P2 24 mins – “In our second episode dedicated to upgrading from Windows to Linux we describe how to create installation media from Windows, macOS, and Linux, booting from a USB device, making the right setup selections, and getting updates.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

 

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Mining Digest 422 – Dec 20, 2019: 5G Network, African Economic Trends, AI Competition, Bitcoin Explained, Blockchain Background, Colored Student Challenges, Cryptocurrency Scam, Cyberattacks and AI, Dark Web Discussion, Face Based Surveillance, Future of Work, Geothermal Energy in California, Health Care Challenges, Heart Disease, Impeachment History, Kids Need Champions, Leave No One Behind, Libra Cryptocurrency, McDonald’s in Marseilles, Migration Into Venezuela, Phil Rosenthal, Policing in America, Quantum Mechanics, Retirement Issues, Six Day War Effects, Slavery Start in America, Smartphone Upgrades, TikTok Social Media, Treat Williams, Vietnam War Music

Exercise your ears: the 48 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 719 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

5G Network 21 mins – “The 5G network of the future will manage super-complex tasks quickly, and both China and the United States want to control it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

African Economic Trends 315 mins – “With the goal of improving the management of oil, gas, and mineral revenues, curbing corruption, and fighting inequality, African countries—like Ghana, Kenya, Guinea, and Liberia—are stepping up their efforts to support good governance in resource-dependent countries. Long-fought-for gains in transparency—including from initiatives like the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI)—have helped civil society and other accountability actors assess how individual oil, gas, and mining revenues are delivered or lost, and how revenues spending decisions are made. Yet the transparency revolution remains far from complete. Ongoing dependence on extractive industry revenues in many countries continues to limit the policy space for economic diversification and overall growth. At the same time, the use of national and subnational revenue distribution by elites to maintain their control over the democratic process continues to erode trust in government, constraining the political space for human rights and other accountability activists to monitor duty bearers and speak out against violations. Confidence in the quality and reliability of public data further creates challenges. In the end, greater transparency and accountability will make domestic resource mobilization more effective, leading to better economic and social outcomes for all.” At the link right-click “audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Competition 16 mins- “Artificial intelligence is the most important tech frontier, and both the United States and China want to dominate it. We look at how the two countries compare now—and where the race is headed.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Alibaba Trends 18 mins – “The top exec at Alibaba explains “Singles Day,” describes his relationship with Jack Ma, and talks about why cloud computing will be the “main business” for the e-commerce giant in the future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Bioethics 54 mins – “Professor Bartha Knoppers is the 2019 recipient of the Henry G. Friesen International Prize for excellence in health research. Once a scholar of surrealist poetry, she has now become a world-renowned voice and a prolific researcher in the field of medical ethics. Her Friesen lecture is called: “Scientific Breakthroughs: The Prohibition Reflex.” At the link find the title, “‘Shouldn’t there be a law against that?’: Facing our fear of genetic innovation,” right-click “Download ‘Shouldn’t there be a law against that?’: Facing our fear of genetic innovationand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin Background 30 mins – “’Shifting from a perspective of ‘only humans control money’ to ‘machines and software control money’ is really radical and it changes a lot of things,” says the popular blockchain and Bitcoin author and speaker Andreas Antonopoulos. Antonopoulos discusses why the real magic of blockchain is decentralization, why criticisms that Bitcoin is a waste of energy are wrong, and why he now charges a 20% premium to be paid by wire transfer instead of bitcoin. And if you’re amazed by the idea of a self-driving car, wait until you hear his description of how the taxis of the future might operate.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin Explained 112 mins – “Ever wonder what cryptocurrencies are? Do you want to understand how they work? CNBC’s Arjun Kharpal and Saheli Roy Choudhury explain bitcoin, digital currencies and blockchain technology.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Blockchain Challenges P1 12 mins – “Your Biggest Challenge with Blockchain (part ¼) – I sent a survey to about 1,500 people and asked them what their biggest challenges were, when it comes to learning about blockchain and cryptocurrency.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Blockchain Challenges P2 16 mins “I sent a survey to about 1,500 people and asked them what their biggest challenges were, when it comes to learning about blockchain and cryptocurrency. Beyond the Valley explores Facebook’s “Libra” and other global efforts to make cryptocurrencies a part of daily life.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Blockchain Challenges P3 16 mins – “I sent a survey to about 1,500 people and asked them what their biggest challenges were, when it comes to learning about blockchain and cryptocurrency. Here are the final 3 challenges my subscribers submitted. (From the top 10. See previous episodes for the other 7).” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Blockchain Challenges P4 7 mins – “I sent a survey to about 1,500 people and asked them what their biggest challenges were, when it comes to learning about blockchain and cryptocurrency. We created Blockchain Innovation Academy to address those challenges. This is a short tour of the Academy. Watch the video – https://blockchain.global/academy/ Join the Academy – https://memorypool.ca/home/At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Colored Student Challenges 88 mins – “Narratives of race and poverty often interact in a toxic way for young people of color in the United States. Stereotyped as lazy or dangerous, young people of color frequently encounter economic, social, educational, and personal security challenges that diminish their opportunities and are barriers to their success. On October 23, the Race, Prosperity, and Inclusion Initiative at Brookings hosted a discussion with two 2019 Teachers of the Year on how they have been working to upend the pernicious impact of these toxic narratives and empower their students to thrive.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cryptocurrency Scam 15 mins – “Eager investors put money into an initial coin offering, or ICO, led by a figure by the name of Marco Fike. Everything seemed to check out at first. But then they discovered that Marco Fike wasn’t real.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cyberattacks and AI 21 mins – “Cyberattacks are on the rise. And more and more, artificial intelligence is helping both the attackers and the people combating them.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Dam Hazards 18 mins – “People have been building dams for centuries to impound water for drinking and recreation, to support navigation, to manage floods, and as a source of hydroelectric power. But dams can also present dangers. Low-head dams, in particular, can pose invisible and deadly hazards to swimmers and boaters. To learn more about these dams, the risks they present, and what we can do about them we talk with Roger Adams, President of the Association of State Dam Safety Officials, and Paul Schweiger, a member of the Association and Vice President and Dams and Hydraulics Section Manager with Gannett Fleming.” At the link find the title, “Dam Dangers – The Risks of Low-Head Dams,” right-click Listen to this episode nowand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dark Web Discussion 28 mins – “The “dark web” is huge and mysterious, but most people have never been there. Beyond the Valley explores it first-hand.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

E-commerce Issues 22 mins – “E-commerce has opened the whole world to sellers in Asia and Europe. But if they want to be big merchants, they have to contend with big tech.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Education Technology Failure 11 mins – “Is too much technology in our classrooms detrimental to learning? Lifelong educator Mary Jo Madda cautions that tech tools should support the relationship between teachers and students, not replace it. Featured in Forbes “30 Under 30,” Mary Jo is a born educator, from her start as a charter middle school teacher during her years with Teach for America to her current work as a lead at Google on the Code Next team, where she’s working to develop computer science education programs for students of color. Aside from her time served teaching, Mary Jo was also a Director at EdSurge (an edtech news organization), a member of the ScratchED team at the MIT Media Lab, and one of four founding Education Entrepreneurship Fellows at the Harvard University Innovation Lab. She has spoken at SXSWedu, Stanford University, the University of Virginia, and now will grace our stage at TEDxChicago.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Face-based Technology 19 mins – “Technology is being perfected in China that uses cameras, software and artificial intelligence to identify individuals as they go about their daily lives. And now other countries are trying it out.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Federal Trade Commission 64 mins – “The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) plays an increasingly central role in regulating existing and emerging technologies—including privacy and security, competition, and combating unfair and deceptive consumer practices. As the debate over federal privacy legislation heats up on Capitol Hill, the FTC’s scope of authority and enforcement capability are emerging as key issues. On October 28, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings hosted FTC Commissioners Rebecca Kelly Slaughter and Christine S. Wilson for a conversation about the agency’s current and future priorities, perspectives on a national data privacy law, and challenges it may face in performing oversight of emerging technologies, including artificial intelligence systems, platforms, and social media. On October 28, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings hosted FTC Commissioners Rebecca Kelly Slaughter and Christine S. Wilson for a conversation about the agency’s current and future priorities, perspectives on a national data privacy law, and challenges it may face in performing oversight of emerging technologies, including artificial intelligence systems, platforms, and social media. After the discussion, speakers answered questions from the audience.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future of Work 92 mins – “Around the world, and especially in Africa, rapid digitization and the spread of new technologies are ushering in a new era of economic disruption. This has ignited a global debate about the implications for labor markets and the future of work. So far, the future of work discussion has focused mainly on advanced economies and on industrial jobs, which raises questions about its relevance for low-income countries in general and Africa in particular. A new World Bank report, “The Future of Work in Africa: Harnessing the Potential of Digital Technologies for All” examines this issue in the African context. By examining how adopting digital technologies may transform work in sub-Saharan Africa, the authors conclude that economies in the region may be able to turn the promise of a digital revolution into reality. To do so, they will need to prioritize three “Es”: enabling entrepreneurship; enhancing the productivity of the informal sector; and extending social protection coverage. Such an approach requires a competitive business environment that can guarantee the availability of affordable digital infrastructure services as well as incentives that spur the adoption of digital and related technologies across all farms and firms. On Thursday, October 17, the Global Economy and Development Program’s Africa Growth Initiative hosted a discussion on how African policymakers can harness these new technologies to create jobs and grow their economies.” At the link right-click “audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geothermal Energy in California 18 mins – “Geothermal energy brings steam created with the heat of magma deep in the earth to generate electric power. California is endowed with numerous sites where magma is close enough to the surface to make geothermal energy practical. The Geysers, a geothermal field in northern California, is the world’s largest source of geothermal electric energy, where six different companies use steam from 350 wells to provide enough electric power to support nearly half-a-million homes. To learn more about the Geysers, and to explore the functionality and sustainability of geothermal power, we talk with California Energy Commissioner Karen Douglas, an attorney and one of five members of the commission.” At the link find the title, “The Geysers Geothermal Field in California – the World’s Largest Geothermal Energy Producer, right-click “Listen to this episode now,” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu

Health Care Challenges 18 mins – “Health care poses global challenges. Can artificial intelligence and cloud computing help overcome them?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Heart Disease 45 mins – “We talk to cardiologist, writer, and clinical researcher Haider Warraich about his new book State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science, and Future of Cardiac Disease.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Huawei 21 mins – “Beyond the Valley looks at how Huawei has navigated a trade war, a tech blacklist, and other global turbulence — and where it may be headed next.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Impeachment History 22 mins – “Before the House makes history by voting on Trump’s impeachment, let’s go back in history to discuss how the framers of the Constitution thought about impeachment. Yale History Prof. Joanne Freeman guides us through the journey.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Kids Need Champions 7 mins – “Rita Pierson, a teacher for 40 years, once heard a colleague say, “They don’t pay me to like the kids.” Her response: “Kids don’t learn from people they don’t like.'” A rousing call to educators to believe in their students and actually connect with them on a real, human, personal level.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Leave No One Behind 88 mins – “A central theme of the sustainable development goals (SDGs) is a pledge “that no one will be left behind.” Since the establishment of the SDGs in 2015, the importance of this commitment has only grown in political resonance throughout all parts of the globe. Yet, to drive meaningful results, the mantra needs to be matched with action. In that spirit, a newly edited book, “Leave No One Behind: Time for Specifics on the Sustainable Development Goals,” aims to translate that ambitious commitment into an action-oriented mindset, focused on supporting specific people in specific places who are facing specific problems. The volume covers everything from tackling the obstacles faced by women, migrants, refugees and the ultra-poor to closing gaps in access to healthcare and quality education. On October 18, the Global Economy and Development program at Brookings, together with the UN Foundation and the JICA Research Institute co-hosted an event to highlight outcomes from the September SDG summit in New York and to explore how key actors move from incremental action and approaches to transformative change, especially with respect to fulfilling the leave no one behind commitment. Book co-editor and co-author John McArthur, who is also a senior adviser at the UN Foundation, opened the event with a presentation on the volume’s central themes. A moderated panel of experts followed. Following the discussion, the panel answered questions from the audience.” At the link right-click “Audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leonardo da Vinci 54 mins – “Leonardo da Vinci would have loved Halloween. The renaissance artist and engineer was also a monster buff. Writer and historian Ross King unveils da Vinci’s sketches and stories of monsters, beasts, giants and dragons, and explains how the artist’s views on fantasy were in contrast to an increasingly rational age.” At the link find the title, Monster buff Leonardo da Vinci would have loved Halloween” right-click “Download Monster buff Leonardo da Vinci would have loved Halloween,” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Libra Cryptocurrency 16 mins – “A unlikely regulatory body sits firmly on the front line of data protection and privacy, and it wields a very “big stick” over Silicon Valley and beyond.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Libra Cryptocurrency 23 mins – “Beyond the Valley explores Facebook’s “Libra” and other global efforts to make cryptocurrencies a part of daily life.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

McDonald’s in Marseille 46 mins – “Residents of an immigrant neighborhood in northern Marseille gather outside of a McDonald’s they are fighting to keep open.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migration Impacts 76 mins – “Marking the launch of New York Times reporter Jason DeParle’s book tracing the arc of migration and its impacts through the life of an extended family of Filipino migrants over a three-decade period, from Manila and through Dubai to the Houston area, this conversation with MPI’s Andrew Selee and the World Bank’s Dilip Ratha explores migration at both a global and very personal level.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Migration Into Venezuela 73 mins – “Felipe Muñoz, Advisor to the President of Colombia for the Colombian-Venezuelan Border, discusses how Colombia is coping with the influx of Venezuelan migrants, plans for future policy decisions surrounding this migration, and developments in regional and international cooperation. The political and economic unraveling of Venezuela has sparked the flight of more than 4 million people in what now stands as the largest exodus of migrants in the western hemisphere—a number that could exceed 5 million by year’s end. More than 1.4 million Venezuelans have settled in Colombia, which has generously opened its doors.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Migration Pathways for Immigrants to Europe 130 mins – “This event hosted by MPI Europe and the Research Unit of the Expert Council of German Foundations on Integration and Migration featured a discussion on research into legal migration pathways for work and training for low- and middle-skilled migrants.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

North Africa Economic Development 45 mins – “Fragile states in Africa, like Somalia, are grappling with tensions and tradeoffs between development imperatives and stabilization objectives, the need for economic stimulus and debt sustainability, and global financial stewardship and transparency. At the same time such countries need to focus on strengthening local public and private sector capacity. Indeed, the two countries are confronting extraordinary development challenges, including with respect to development finance. For more than a decade, the international community has stepped up efforts to engage more effectively with fragile states whose economic performance is impaired by limited administrative capacity, persistent social tensions, ongoing conflict, and political instability. The International Monetary Fund and World Bank are engaged in some form in almost all fragile states to improve economic management and performance, reduce poverty, and improve governance. Development assistance is inherently risky in these environments, where weak policies and institutions correlate with a lower probability of successful outcomes. Despite the risks, there is a strong rationale for engagement as the impact of well-designed and supervised aid-financed programs can potentially be very high. On October 17, the Brookings Africa Growth Initiative and the Brookings Doha Center hosted Finance Minister Abdirahman Duale Beileh of Somalia for a conversation on these and related issues.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phil Rosenthal 96 mins – “Emmy-winning comedy writer, food lover and raconteur Phil Rosenthal returns to the podcast for an in-depth conversation about New York-style pizza, celebrity PSAs, “non-ethnic” character actors, the cinema of Stanley Kubrick and the emotional resonance of “The Honeymooners.” Also, Will Ferrell works the men’s room, Peter Boyle turns down “The French Connection,” Brad Garrett salutes The Merchant of Venom and Phil breaks bread with Steve Martin and Carl Reiner. PLUS: Nick Apollo Forte! “Ratatouille”! The timelessness of “Tootsie”! Appreciating Walter Matthau! Gilbert hangs at Larry David’s place! And “Broadway Danny Rose” inspires the Amazing Colossal Podcast!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Policing in America 88 mins – “Policing in America has been criticized greatly over the past several years by the general public, politicians, and the media. Most of these criticisms have centered on the increase in officer-involved shootings, particularly involving Black Americans. Policy solutions to improve police-civilian relations, increase trust in policing, and reduce officer-involved shootings have centered on implicit bias trainings, virtual reality technology to improve decision-making, the advent of data science, extra equipment such as body-worn cameras, more transparency, and harsher police sanctions. With increased scrutiny, however, there has been little direct attention on the experience of police officers as policy changes are being implemented. On October 25, Governance Studies, the Race, Prosperity, and Inclusion Initiative, and the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings hosted an event that focused more acutely on police officers and their daily experiences. Expert panelists addressed the strengths and weaknesses of data science and technological enhancements for the policing profession, the mental health of police officers, and policies to advance community policing, improve officer well-being, and reduce officer-involved shootings.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politics in 2016 45 mins – “Update With The Washington Post’s Aaron Blake.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Quantum Mechanics 37 mins – “We talk to theoretical physicist Sean Carroll about his new book Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Retirement Issues 119 mins – Many households approach retirement age with inadequate financial resources, but substantial equity in their residence along with a preference to remain in their homes. For these households, retirement planning presents the challenge of deciding between staying in their home or having sufficient income. In theory, reverse mortgages offer a solution whereby older homeowners can “age in place,” while also consuming their housing equity. Yet, despite their theoretical appeal, few Americans take out reverse mortgages—in part due to historical concerns about high fees and high foreclosure rates. Additionally, the program suffers from ongoing challenges over the cost, with several rounds of reforms implemented in the wake of the housing crisis. On Monday, October 28, in conjunction with the Kellogg School of Management, Brookings featured a wide-ranging discussion on the pros and cons of reverse mortgages and proposals to improve the workings of this market. Debra Whitman of AARP delivered the keynote address, followed by paper presentations by Stephanie Moulton and Donald Haurin of Ohio State University and Thomas Davidoff of the University of British Columbia. After their presentations, Chris Mayer of Columbia and Laurie Goodman of the Urban Institute joined the authors for a panel discussion to explore how policies can contribute to retirement security. Martin Baily of Brookings and Ben Harris of the Kellogg School of Management released a framing paper on the topic and moderated the event.” At the link right-click “audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Secretary of the Navy 85 mins – “America’s maritime forces are undergoing significant changes to address the realities of great power competition. Evolving technology, ongoing uncertainty about the budgetary and fiscal climate, and accelerating innovation by America’s competitors have forced the Navy and Marine Corps to adapt quickly and comprehensively to fulfill the vision laid out for them in the National Defense Strategy. Much work, though, remains to be done. On October 23, the Brookings Institution hosted Richard Spencer, the 76th secretary of the Navy, to discuss naval modernization, the budgetary environment, and the challenges posed by America’s great power rivals to America’s maritime forces.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Silicon Valley: A Satire 27 mins – “We talk to New York Times writer and journalist Matt Richtel about his new novel, written under the pen name A. B. Jewell, called The Man Who Wouldn’t Die.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Six Day War Effects 36 mins – “When Eric Carlson retired, he dove headfirst into an old hobby… philately. Philately is the study of postage stamps, and it’s a tragically underappreciated field of study. A stamp can give you a perfect snapshot of the past on a single square inch of paper. Carlson finds his stamps where every person with an obscure hobby does: eBay. One day he found this really odd looking stamp. “it’s a very cumbersome looking red bird in the middle […] with a yellow background,” describes Carlson….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery Starts in America 46 mins – “Four hundred years ago, inbAugust 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 25- years of slavery that followed. “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hanna-Jones, examines the long shadow of that fateful moment. Today, instead of our usual show, we present episode1: ‘The Fight for a True Democracy.’ This episode includes scenes of graphic violence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Smartphone Upgrades 14 mins – “Smartphone makers have a problem. A lot of people see no reason to upgrade. Manufacturers are trying hard to give them one.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

TikTok Social Media Platform 12 mins – “Chinese-owned app TikTok has become one of the biggest social media platforms in the world. But now it’s facing scrutiny from U.S. lawmakers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Treat Williams 94 mins – “Actor, writer and cinephile Treat Williams stops by the studio to talk about his 45 years in film, his admiration for Frank Capra and William Wyler, his love of old movie theaters and his memories of working with legendary directors Milos Forman, Sergio Leone and Steven Spielberg. Also, Vincent Price disses Alan Thicke, John Belushi auditions for “Hair,” Gilbert hangs with Katharine Hepburn and Treat cameos in “The Empire Strikes Back”! PLUS: “The Phantom”! Praising Bob Balaban! The mastery of Sidney Lumet! Gene Hackman cuts to the check! And Treat remembers James Cagney, Martin Landau and Orson Welles!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam War Music 63 mins – “Inside Media gives Newseum visitors the story behind the story through interviews with journalists and newsmakers. The program format offers the audience an opportunity to ask questions or make comments.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 421 – Dec 13, 2019: Active Learning, Afro Italian, Alzheimer’s Overview, Climate Change in BC – Fire and Forests, Climate Change in BC – Agriculture, Climate Resilience, Conflict Technology, Consumption Reduction, Cop Shooting, Culture and Behavior, Death Row, Democracy Discussion, Educational Podcasting, Electric Grid Protection, Ex-con Job Finding, Free Speech in Colleges, GAO-Podcasts, Google Leadership Changes, Government Cybersecurity, Head Injuries, Homeless Kids in School, Irrigated Agriculture Status, Lead Paint Problem, Liberia Drug Addiction, Manufacturing, Mental Illness Discussion, Microplastics, Nursing Home Abuses, Parkinson’s and Exercise P2, Plastic Pollution, Prison Life, Prodigy Rapper, Public School Financing Opposition, Rapper in Prison, Reading to Children, Resuscitation Issues, Uganda Civil War, Veterans Benefits, Wildfire Disasters

Exercise your ears: the 56 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 730 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Active Learning – 18 mins – “The lecture class is a staple of college education. But research shows it can be an ineffective way to learn. A growing number of colleges and universities are building “active learning classrooms,” which are designed to promote student interaction and to enhance their engagement. Proponents say these classrooms result in better grades and learning that sticks.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Afro Italian Senator 26 mins – “Dickens Olewe meets Italy’s first and only black senator, Tony Iwobi, and hears how a new generation of black Italians are fighting to claim their place in a society that’s still very white. Born and raised in Nigeria, Senator Iwobi moved to Italy as a young man and carved out a successful career in business. Now he’s immigration spokesperson for the right-wing Lega party and wants to stop the illegal flow of migrants coming to Italy from Africa. BBC Africa journalist Dickens Olewe follows Iwobi in the Senate in Rome and finds out what it’s like to be black in a party that’s widely perceived as racist. At a festival on the bank of the River Tiber, Dickens meets aspiring politician Paolo Diop from the Far-Right Brothers of Italy. Diop moved to Italy from Senegal as a baby and describes himself as “an Italian nationalist and an African nationalist” who wants to “make Africa great” by sending migrants home. We also meet the young black activists coming of age in the midst of the migrant crisis and the rise of the political right. Born and bred in Italy, they feel deeply Italian but are not always recognised as such – among them the rapper Tommy Kuti whose work explores his Afro-Italian identity, the founder of Milan’s Afro Fashion Week Michelle Francine Ngonmo and the writer Igiaba Scego, whose parents grew up in one of Italy’s African colonies.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer Overview 53 mins – “In the 1970s, the founder of the National Institute on Aging convinced a nation that senility was really Alzheimer’s and could be cured. Research money flowed to one theory, leaving alternatives unexamined — today it’s come up short.” At the link you may listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Alzheimer’s Disease P1 and 2 62 mins tot – “Almost six million people in the United States have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. And with baby boomers getting older, those numbers are only expected to rise. This disease, despite being studied by scientists for more than 100 years, has no cure. In our two-part series we first dive into the personal lives of the people at the heart of this disease: the patients and their caregivers. Then we uncover why effective treatments for Alzheimer’s lag so far behind those for cancer, heart disease, and HIV. It turns out that for all the decades researchers have been at war with the disease, they’ve also been at war with each other.” (A 3rd short preview segment is also available.) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrows and select “Save Link(s) As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’s Overview 53 mins – “Drug studies for Alzheimer’s disease were long shots because the causes of neurodegeneration were so murky. Studies had among the highest failure rates of any condition. Even today — after 40 years and billions of dollars — researchers still can’t agree on what it is. “I don’t think anybody thought it would take this long and be this hard,” said Eric Siemers, who retired from Eli Lilly in 2017 after 20 years trying to create a drug for Alzheimer’s…” At the link you may listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Climate Change in BC – Intro  22 mins – “Meteorologists call British Columbia ‘the land of a billion micro climates.’ By 2050, the average temperature in BC will have risen by 2.5 C. But that doesn’t mean everything will just get hotter. We explore how BC’s climate will change in just 30 years.” At the link find the title, “Episode 1 – B.C. in 2050,” right-click “Download Episode 1 – B.C. in 2050” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change in BC – Agriculture 30 mins – “What do rising temperatures, changing rain patterns and shifting seasons mean for farmers? We learn about the challenges, as well as opportunities, facing producers.” At the link find the title, “Episode 3 – Agriculture,” right-click “Download Episode 3 – Agriculture” and select “Save Link As” from the popup menu.

Climate Change in BC – Cities 3 mins – “Vancouver says it will run on 100 percent renewable energy by 2050. We look at how climate change will re-shape our cities, and ask if we’re doing enough to mitigate its effects on our environment as well as our society.” At the link find the title, “Episode 4 – Cities,” right-click “Download Episode 4 – Cities” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change in BC – Fire and Forests – “‘There is no ‘no smoke’ option.’ By 2050, forest fires will be more frequent, and more devastating. This has profound impacts on one of our major resource industries, as well as wildlife.” At the link find the title, “Episode 5 – Fire and Forests,” right-click “Download Episode 5 – Fire and Forests” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change in BC – Global Village 27 mins – “By mid-century, life in B.C. will be transformed. But around the world hundreds of millions of people will be facing life or death decisions. In this episode, we hear what climate change means for the rest of the world.” At the link find the title, “Episode 6 – The Global Village,” right-click “Episode 6 – The Global Village” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change in BC – Personal Changes 60 mins – “In this bonus episode taped in front of a live audience at CBC Vancouver we ask “What would it take for you to change for climate change?”. Johanna Wagstaffe hosts a panel of environmental experts to tell us what kind of change is meaningful enough to alter the path as we head towards the year 2050. Hear why it’s not too late to rewrite our future.” At the link find the title, “Episode 7: A New Future,” right-click “Download Episode 7: A New Future” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change in BC – Snow and Ice  25 mins – Without snow, everything changes. In this episode, we reveal the downstream effects of record-low snow packs, melting glaciers and rising sea levels in British Columbia.” At the link find the title,”Episode 2 – Snow and Ice,” right-click “Download Episode 2 – Snow and Ice” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Resilience 6 mins – “In 2018 alone, there were 14 separate billion-dollar weather and climate disasters in the United States, with a total cost of at least $91 billion. These costs will likely rise due to climate change. Investing in climate resilience projects to help communities prepare for hazards such as sea level rise could reduce future costs. The federal government makes ad hoc investments but does not have a strategy for prioritizing projects with the most impact. We recommended that Congress consider establishing a federal entity to identify and prioritize these projects. The government’s fiscal exposure from climate change is a topic on our High Risk List. Infrastructure projects, like this system of levees and other barriers in New Orleans, could reduce risk from coastal storms and flooding—events that could be exacerbated by climate change.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. PDF’s are also available at the link.

Conflict Technology 41 mins – “Harnessing tech during conflict – Twitter and Facebook have removed accounts that originated in mainland China that it says undermines the “legitimacy and political positions of the protest movement”. Evronia Azer knows all about the double-edged sword when it comes to technology in the midst of conflict. On one side there are tools to mobilise protest, on the other are tools of state control and surveillance. She is Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Business and Law at Coventry University in the UK where her research interests include data privacy and governance. She joins us on the programme Map Kibera – Ten years ago Digital Planet reported on the Map Kibera project, which was just an idea to provide information to OpenStreetMap about the Nairobi slum. This quickly turned into the Map Kibera Organisation which makes sure that Kibera is connected and is focussed on improving people’s lives in the slum. Digital Planet has been back to Kibera to see how the project has changed. First ever plant selfie – Hannah Fisher reports on a plant called Pete which could revolutionise field conservation by powering a camera to take selfies as he grows. London Zoo scientists have laid the groundwork for the world’s first plant selfie – a pioneering scientific trial in the Zoo’s Rainforest Life exhibit which will try out how microbial fuel cells power a plant to take its own picture. This they hope will lead to using plants to power camera traps and sensors in the wild allowing conservationists to monitor habitats remotely.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consumption Reduction 94 mins – “Andrew McAfee of MIT’s Sloan School of Management talks about his book, More from Less, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. McAfee argues that technology is helping developed nations use fewer resources in producing higher levels of economic output. The improvement is not just a reduction in energy per dollar of GDP but less energy in total as economic growth progresses. This “dematerialization” portends a future that was unimaginable to the economists and pundits of the past. McAfee discusses the potential for dealing with climate change in a dematerialized world, the non-material aspects of economic progress, and the political repercussions of the current distribution of economic progress.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cop Shooting 41 mins – “Tom was a cop; Jason was a teenager in a gang. One night in 1997, they had a violent encounter that Tom describes as “inevitable.” In our season finale, Tom and Jason relate the story of that night, and the series of events that unfolded in the years afterward. Big thanks to everyone who shared their stories with us for this episode: Jason Samuel and Tom & Christy Morgan. Antwan Williams, David Jassy and Rhashiyd Zinnamon, and a remixed theme song from listener Matt Glasbey. Thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Warden Ron Davis for their support of the entire fourth season, and NativeEPIX and BetterHelp for sponsoring this episode.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Culture and Behavior 70 mins – “Psychologist Michele Gelfand talks about her book, Rule Makers, Rule Breakers, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Gelfand distinguishes between loose cultures and tight cultures–the degree to which culture and regulation restrict behavior or leave it alone. Gelfand explores the causes of why some cultures are tighter than others and the challenges societies face when culture is too tight or too loose. She also applies these ideas of cultural tightness and looseness to corporate mergers and family life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death Row 41 mins – “Historically, death sentences in California have led to eventual execution by the state. But these days, public opinion and state protocol are in flux, and the future is uncertain for those on death row at San Quentin. Big thanks to everyone who shared their stories with us for this episode: Al aka Watson Allison, Abu Qadir Al-Amin, Lt. Sam Robinson and Lonnie Morris. This episode was scored with music by Antwan Williams, David Jassy and Rhashiyd Zinnamon, and a remix of our theme music from listener Ingibjörg Friðriksdóttir. Thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Warden Ron Davis for their support of the show, and NativeEPIX and BetterHelp for sponsoring this episode.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Discussion 54 mins – “Filmmaker, writer and activist Astra Taylor sets out to answer a question we rarely ask: what is democracy? Her conclusion: democracy doesn’t exist — at least, not quite. And yet, she says, it’s still worth fighting for. Taylor takes us on a walking tour in New York searching for the meaning of democracy. Part 2 of a two-part series.” At the link find the title, “Fighting for democracy from the bottom up – Astra Taylor, Pt 2,” right-click “Download Fighting for democracy from the bottom up | Astra Taylor, Pt 2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Podcasting 21 mins – “It’s well-known that podcasting is huge these days. But you might not realize how many educational podcasts are out there. By educational, we mean shows that focus on some super-focused topic, like a specific period of history or an academic discipline. For instance, there are at least 15 or 20 active podcasts about linguistics, and there are several podcasts out there about conversational Latin (and we were pretty sure that was a “dead” language that was no longer spoken). For this week’s EdSurge Podcast, we’re digging into this growing subculture of educational podcasting, and at how educators are using these podcasts in classes.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Grid Protection 21 mins – “The nation’s electric grid is becoming more vulnerable to cyberattacks—particularly those involving industrial control systems that support grid operations. Recent federal assessments indicate that cyberattacks could cause widespread power outages in the United States, but the scale of such outages is uncertain. The Department of Energy (DOE) plays a key role in helping address cybersecurity risks in each component of the electric grid’s infrastructure. However, DOE has not developed plans for electric grid cybersecurity that address the key characteristics needed for a national strategy. We recommended that it do so.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. PDF’s are also available at the link.

Ex-con Job Finding 38 mins – “Getting a job after serving time is crucial to rebuilding your life, but a criminal record inevitably gets in the way. Four people share stories about how their time inside both helped prep them for jobs outside and impacted their getting back to work. Find a full list of episode credits at earhustlesq.com, where you can also download and remix our theme song (remixes are due Aug. 31, so get yours in soon!!), sign up for our newsletter and order a T-shirt, sticker pack or mug. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. As always, thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Warden Ron Davis for their support of the show, and Lantigua Williams & Co. and Audible for sponsoring this episode.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flagship School Problem 23 mins – “Across the country, a gap persists between the number of black and Latino students graduating from state high schools and the number enrolling in state flagship schools….” At the link you may listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Free Speech in Colleges 23 mins – “Every year in late September or early October, student groups are assigned blank panels to paint on the bridge to attract new members. At the start of the 2016 fall semester, this annual activity became another flashpoint in the nationwide debate over inclusivity and free expression on college campuses. Abeer Syedah was a senior and the president of the university’s student government at the time. Syedah, who describes herself as “a South Asian, American, Canadian, immigrant,” is one of the few women of color ever elected to head student government at the mostly white university. The morning after the bridge painting, Syedah remembers waking up to a bevy of messages and photos from students upset about the slogan that the school’s College Republicans had painted on their panel. It read, ‘Build the Wall.’…” At the link you may listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

GAO Podcasts 4 mins – “…Because people are getting information from Facebook and from Twitter and from YouTube, we’re doing all of those things as well so that you can find information about our work there. And we’re always willing to experiment and we’ve done that with the podcast, too. We have tried video podcasts and didn’t– they didn’t find as much of anaudience, so we’re sticking with the audio, and now we’re experimenting on a longer-form podcast. You know, a lot of podcasts can go 30 minutes, an hour. Ours have been only about five minutes to quickly give people alittle insight, but we’re going to delve a little deeper. We’re going to bring in the people who help do the work, who are out in the field, the auditors and policy analysts, and we’re going to start exploring a little bit more. So, that’s something that listeners can keep an ear out for because those are coming soon…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Google Leadership Changes 46 mins – “This week Felix, Emily, and Anna discuss Larry and Sergey, aka The Boys, stepping away from Alphabet, Uber’s big safety report and Silver Lake’s investment in Manchester City soccer. And in the Slate Plus segment: Argentina.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Cybersecurity 5 mins – “To protect against cyber threats, federal agencies should incorporate key practices in their cybersecurity risk management programs. These key practices include: Designating a cybersecurity risk executive. Developing a risk management strategy and policies, Assessing cyber risks. Coordinating between cybersecurity and enterprise-wide risk management functions. All but one of the 23 agencies we reviewed designated a risk executive. However, none of these agencies fully incorporated the other key practices into their programs. We made 58 recommendations to federal agencies to help improve their cybersecurity risk management programs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. PDF’s are also available at the link.

Head Injuries 27 mins – “The death last week of boxer Patrick Day, four days after he was stretchered out of the ring in a coma, is the latest reminder of how vulnerable sportsmen and women are to traumatic brain injury. During the latest Ashes series the Australian batsman Steve Smith was temporarily retired for one test after being struck on the helmet by a bouncer. The current World Cup Rugby has been affected too, with Welsh fly half Dan Biggar withdrawn from a game against Uruguay having received head injuries in two previous matches. In this edition of Discovery, Roland Pease talks to engineers at Imperial College and Loughborough University using the latest techniques to understand the dynamics of blows to the head, and to improve helmet protection. And to experts and Rugby players at Swansea University seeking to make precision measurements of real-life head movements with the help of gum shields stuffed with electronics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless Kids in School 53 mins – “Moving a lot is hard on school kids. And millions of children in the United States have unstable housing. A growing body of research finds that repeatedly uprooted children are more likely to struggle in school and more likely to drop out. But there are ways to help them succeed. This APM Reports documentary focuses on two groups of kids who often change addresses — homeless kids and children of migrant farmworkers — and explores efforts to help these students do well in school.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Illiberal Right 30 mins – “Throughout the impeachment hearings, Republicans have made a show of valuing the “will of the people,” arguing that impeachment would be inherently undemocratic because it would overturn election results. The logic is flawed, to be sure: elections don’t confer upon politicians the right to violate the constitution or otherwise break the law. And more to the point: Republicans have largely shown a disregard for majority rule — as evidenced by, for instance, rampant gerrymandering. So where do conservatives stand on democracy? How can we make sense of the current state of conservatism in general? One place we can begin is the pages of First Things, a right-wing ecumenical publication which published an explosive article last summer — one that launched a debate that, for a couple months at least, took over the right-wing intellectual landscape. To help make sense of the so-called Ahmari–French debate and the political questions for which it stands in, Brooke spoke with Matthew Sitman, associate editor of Commonweal Magazine and co-host of the Know Your Enemy podcast, which released a podcast about these questions this summer.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Home Visitation Program 61 mins – “Home visiting, a two-generation program model that serves young children alongside parents and caretakers to promote their healthy physical, socioemotional, and cognitive development, has the potential to promote improved outcomes for children and families alike. Young children of immigrants and Dual Language Learners (DLLs), who make up one in four and nearly one in three young children in the United States, respectively, are important targets for home visiting programs as they are disproportionately more likely to face risk factors such as poverty and low parental education levels. This webinar marks the release of a policy brief that explores program and policy opportunities to improve home visiting services for immigrant and DLL families currently underparticipating in these programs due to a lack of culturally and linguistically responsive programming and other barriers. On the webinar, speakers provide an overview of the home visiting services landscape in the United States and discuss promising strategies to build effective partnerships with immigrant parents to support their young children’s school readiness and success. The conversation also examines opportunities for states to expand the participation of immigrant and DLL families in home visiting services.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Irrigated Agriculture Status 6 mins – “Nationwide, irrigation consumed 20-30 trillion gallons of water in 2015. Most irrigation is in the West, where water is relatively scarce and precipitation low. The 3 main irrigation technologies—gravity, sprinkler, and micro—can all be modified to be more efficient and save water. But in practice, farms may use such water savings to increase yield, switch to thirstier crops, or irrigate more land. To address water scarcity, federal policymakers could offer incentives to use more efficient technology or practices, in return for farmers’ agreeing to reduce water consumption. Irrigation and water scarcity across the contiguous United States” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. PDF’s are also available at the link.

Lead Paint Problem 29 mins – “One of the longest-running public health epidemics in American history involves a handful of baby teeth, a creepy cartoon character and The Young Lords. This is a story about a fight for accountability.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liberia Drug Addiction 27 mins – “When Miatta was 14 years old, armed rebels stormed into her classroom and forcibly recruited her and her classmates. They were trained to use machine guns and then sent to the front line to fight in Liberia’s devastating civil war. Nineteen years later, Miatta is what many Liberians would call a Zogo. The Zogos are Liberia’s underclass: jobless, homeless and addicted to drugs. They’re a menace on the streets of the capital, Monrovia, where many make their living by snatching purses and phones from passers-by. In this Assignment, Lucy Ash follows a projects aiming to rehabilitate hundreds of Liberia’s Zogos – including Miatta.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Manufacturing 76 mins – “Economist Susan Houseman of the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research talks about the manufacturing sector with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Houseman argues that the data surrounding both manufacturing output and employment have been misunderstood and misinterpreted. In particular, she argues that conclusions about the growth of manufacturing are driven overwhelmingly by computer production while the rest of manufacturing has been stagnant. She also argues that productivity has a small role in reducing manufacturing employment. Trade has been the main cause of employment reductions. These claims go against the standard narratives most economists have been telling for the last 20 years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Illness Discussion 54 mins – “How can it be that psychiatry still doesn’t know what causes major mental problems such as depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia? Historian Anne Harrington and writer Marya Hornbacher explore psychiatry’s messy medical past and surprisingly uncertain present.”..At the link find the title, “What psychiatrists still don’t know about mental illness,” right-clickDownload What psychiatrists still don’t know about mental illness,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microplastics 27 mins – “A Professor of Marine Biology who was not particularly academic at school, Richard Thompson went to university after running his own business selling greetings cards for seven years. When the rest of the world was waking up to the harm caused to marine life by larger plastic items, such as plastic bags, he searched for tiny fragments of plastic, some no bigger than a human hair; and found them in oceans and on beaches all over the world. He has spent decades studying the harm these micro-plastics might cause to marine life and is concerned. His work on plastics in cosmetics led to a UK ban on micro-beads in shower gels and exfoliating scrubs. And he advised government to ban single use plastic bags from supermarkets. Rather than demonize plastic, however, he believes we need to learn to love it more. Often plastic it is the best material for the job. Now we need to make sure that all plastic products are designed so that they can be easily recycled at the end of their useful life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nursing Home Abuses 6 mins – “To protect vulnerable nursing home residents from abuse, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) contracts with state agencies—known as survey agencies—that can cite nursing homes for incidents of abuse. Abuse citations doubled from 2013-2017. We reviewed a 2016-2017 sample of narratives substantiating abuse citations and determined that physical and mental/verbal abuse were more common than sexual abuse, and that perpetrators were often staff. CMS can’t readily access this information, which it could use to improve its oversight by focusing on the most prevalent problems. Our recommendations address this and other issues we found.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. PDF’s are also available at the link.

Old Age Wealth 6 mins – “Income and wealth inequality in the United States have increased over the last several decades. We looked at whether these trends continue for older Americans as they age. We compared income and wealth for all older households from 1989 through 2016 and found households in the top 20% saw disproportionately greater gains than other households. We also looked at income and wealth for a group of older Americans as they aged. We found disparities in income decreased, possibly due to the transition from working to retirement. Disparities in wealth increased, perhaps because of significant differences in the size of some assets, such as home equity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. PDF’s are also available at the link.

Parkinson’s and Exercise P2 27 mins – “Can exercise help people living with Parkinson’s, a neurodegenerative condition, with symptoms such as loss of balance, difficulty walking and stiffness in the arms and legs. Jane Hill travels to the Netherlands to meet Mariëtte Robijn and Wim Rozenberg, coaches at Rock Steady Boxing Het Gooi and co-founders of ParkinsonSport.nl, a unique sports club ran 100% by and for people with Parkinson’s. It doesn’t take long before a transformation begins to take place in the gym. Boxing is popular in the US as well, says Professor Lisa Shulman, Director of the Parkinson’s Centre at the University of Maryland. She has been encouraging her patients to exercise for the last 25 years. Results from over 200 studies suggest that exercise is a good way to empower people as well as having physical benefits such as delaying disability. In Ghana many people receive a late diagnosis. Sheila Klufio a physiotherapist at Korle Bu Hospital in Accra works with people to help them deal with some of the more common symptoms such as freezing when walking so they feel more confident to go out. And it seems all types of exercise can help, Alan Alda and Michael J Fox both box, ballet dancing is popular, walking, cycling and Tai Chi have benefits and it’s never too late to start.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parkinson’s Research P3 27 mins – “James Parkinson described a condition known as the “shaking palsy” over 200 years ago. Today there are many things that scientists still don’t understand explaining why diagnosis, halting the progression or finding a cure for Parkinson’s can seem elusive. But how close are researchers to developing better treatments? Better understanding seems to suggest that Parkinson’s is not one condition but several, with different causes and symptoms in different people. Many researchers think that early diagnosis and greater recognition of the non motor symptoms such as loss of smell, sleep disorders and depression is to be encouraged, while others say without effective treatments then there are ethical issues to consider. Jane visits a brain bank and sees the changes in a Parkinson’s brain that causes many of the symptoms and she takes a test which examines the sense of smell. Could this be a new tool to identify early stages of the condition? Plus repurposing of existing drugs, i.e. drugs that have been developed for one condition but being tested in another are having promising results in Parkinson’s and genetic studies are leading to a greater understanding of the mechanisms involved in PD which in turn is leading to new therapies.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Persuasive Psychology 58 mins – “How good are you at limiting your screen time? Because of the way humans evolved, our brains are no match for the engineers, designers and companies that collectively create the devices and apps that demand our attention all day long, according to technology ethicist Tristan Harris. A former tech entrepreneur himself, Harris is now co-founder of Time Well Spent, a nonprofit movement to create an ecosystem that aligns technology with our humanity.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plastic Pollution 27 mins – “A Professor of Marine Biology who was not particularly academic at school, Richard Thompson went to university after running his own business selling greetings cards for seven years. When the rest of the world was waking up to the harm caused to marine life by larger plastic items, such as plastic bags, he searched for tiny fragments of plastic, some no bigger than a human hair; and found them in oceans and on beaches all over the world. He has spent decades studying the harm these micro-plastics might cause to marine life and is concerned. His work on plastics in cosmetics led to a UK ban on micro-beads in shower gels and exfoliating scrubs. And he advised government to ban single use plastic bags from supermarkets. Rather than demonize plastic, however, he believes we need to learn to love it more. Often plastic it is the best material for the job. Now we need to make sure that all plastic products are designed so that they can be easily recycled at the end of their useful life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Life 33 mins – “Sleep, soundtracks and signing in prison — the Ear Hustle crew tackles questions from listeners about these topics and more, in this season’s “Catch a Kite” episode. Plus, we’ll share some of our favorite listener-generated Ear Hustle theme remixes. Spoiler alert: harps ahead. Big thanks to Tommy Wickerd, Angel Villafan, Jesse Ayers, Timothy Hicks, Juan Haines, Chapple & Tracy Sims, and Ray & Bertha Ford for helping us answer the excellent questions asked by listeners Mollie, Karen, Eddie, Neil, Valerie and Magi. Thanks also to Karen Kitto, Cynabel, Lynda MacNeil, KidMental, Anthony Barilla and Rudy Van for stepping up and remixing our theme song. This episode was scored with music by Antwan Williams, David Jassy, Rhashiyd Zinnamon and contributing listeners. Thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Warden Ron Davis for their support of the show, and Lantigua Williams & Co. and BetterHelp for sponsoring this episode.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prodigy Rapper 39 mins – “Prodigy is supposed to fly back home right after a show in Vegas, but he never gets on the plane. As the world of hip hop mourns, there are still questions surrounding his death. We try to find answers, and go inside Prodigy’s memorial service to say goodbye to a rap icon.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public School Financing 37 mins – “Paul Dorr is a master of tactics to defeat referendums intended to finance public schools. He believes schools run by government steer kids away from Christianity. His campaigns — most of them in the Midwest — have also created lingering bitterness within communities.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Rapper in Prison 29 mins – “It’s The Alchemist’s birthday, but thanks to the NYPD’s “Rap Intelligence Unit,” he and Prodigy are forced to celebrate in a jail cell, and soon after, P is headed upstate. But even Prodigy says prison changed him for the better.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reading Problems 42 mins – “APM Reports correspondent Emily Hanford started wondering about how kids learn to read a few years ago while she was reporting on the large number of college students who aren’t academically ready. She was surprised to learn that 40 percent of college students have to take remedial or developmental classes before they even get into a college-level class. Many of the students she talked with told her they had dyslexia, but it had gone unaddressed for years. “Dyslexia opened up this Pandora’s box about reading that’s kept me going now for the better part of the last three years,” Hanford says. Emily Hanford  – She’s since produced three audio documentaries about the way reading is taught in schools, including one about dyslexia, one about why so many kids in the U.S. struggle to read and one about a flawed idea in reading instruction that’s taken hold in many classrooms. Hanford’s documentaries have ignited a national conversation about how schools teach reading. We asked readers and listeners to send in questions so we could talk with Emily about her reporting on the reading science, what’s being taught in classrooms and what’s next. If you’re interested in learning more about the science of reading, Hanford recommends Ending the Reading Wars: From Novice to Expert as well as What Research Tells Us About Reading Instruction. In this episode, she mentions a report by Australian researcher Kevin Wheldall on the efficacy of some instructional reading programs and whether they are “conceptually consistent.” You can read the full report by Wheldall here. For more, check out the resources page for our documentaries Hard to Read and Hard Words. Also, be sure to check out the footnotes with links embedded in the web story of At a Loss for Words.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Reading Problems 52 mins – “For decades, schools have taught children the strategies of struggling readers, using a theory about reading that cognitive scientists have repeatedly debunked. And many teachers and parents don’t know there’s anything wrong with it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Reading to Children 48 mins – “How many of us – parents and guardians – read out loud to our children? Reading charity The Book Trust has revealed that more than a quarter of parents are increasingly reliant on apps and devices to tell their children a bedtime story, so they don’t have to. And the National Literacy Trust, who work with schools and communities to give disadvantaged children the literacy skills to succeed in life, say more than 380,000 children across the UK don’t actually own a book. So is it a parent’s duty to read to their kids? Comedian and actor Ben Miller, author of children’s book ‘The Boy Who Made The World Disappear’, joins 5 Live’s Nihal Arthanayake to find out” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Resuscitation Issues 35 mins – “As a critical care doctor, Jessica Zitter has seen plenty of “Hail Mary” attempts to save dying patients go bad—attempts where doctors try interventions that don’t change the outcome, but do lead to more patient suffering. It’s left her distrustful of flashy medical technology and a culture that insists that more treatment is always better. But when a new patient goes into cardiac arrest, the case doesn’t play out the way Jessica expected. She finds herself fighting for hours to revive him—and reaching for a game-changing technology that uncomfortably blurs the lines between life and death.” At the link you may listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Stillness Is the Key 82 mins – “Ryan Holiday talks about his latest book, Stillness Is the Key, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Holiday explores how stillness–the cultivation of serenity and focus–can affect how we live and how we perceive life. Topics discussed include the performance artist Marina Abramovic, Winnie the Pooh, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and Michael Jordan’s Hall of Fame induction speech. Holiday also explains how he keeps track of information and how his system makes it easier for him to write his books.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uganda Civil War 50 mins – “Alan Kasujja tells the story of the guerilla war in Uganda which began nearly 40 years ago and led to the current President Yoweri Museveni taking power. After the fall of Idi Amin there was a power vacuum in Uganda which led up to a general election. The former President Milton Obote returned from exile and was declared the winner. But amidst accusations of gerrymandering and intimidation, opposition groups claimed the 1980 election had been rigged. A young politician, Yoweri Museveni, had promised to fight an armed uprising in the bush if Obote won, and in 1981 he began a protracted guerrilla war.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Veterans Benefits 4 mins – “Wartime veterans with limited means age 65 or older and veterans with certain disabilities are eligible for VA’s pension benefit. Those who need help with daily activities, such as bathing, may receive higher payments. These veterans, with an average age over 80, are among the most vulnerable to financial exploitation. Scams that target them include selling bad investment advice and charges for services that should be free. VA does not centrally collect and analyze information, such as complaints made against companies, that could help counter these scams and help law enforcement. We made 4 recommendations, including that VA collect this information.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. PDF’s are also available at the link.

Wildfire Disasters 6 mins – “In 2017 and 2018, wildfires in California killed 159 people and destroyed more than 32,000 structures, including many homes. In response, the Federal Emergency Management Agency put about $2 billion toward housing, debris removal, and other assistance. According to state and local officials, FEMA’s assistance helped their recovery efforts. For example, FEMA set up centers that helped survivors find services. Officials also reported challenges, such as removing debris after large-scale fires. FEMA reviewed its performance but could more broadly assess how its policies and procedures work for large-scale fires. We recommended such an assessment. The Tubbs Fire destroyed homes in Santa Rosa, California, in October 2017” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. PDF’s are also available at the link.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 420 – Dec 6, 2019: African Electrification, AI Arms Race, AI in Law, Artificial Meat, Autistic Security Analyst, Billionaires Bite Back, Biohacking Techniques, Bitcoin Politics, CIA Hacking Tools, Computer Security, Crazy Ideas, Cyber Security Summit, Data and Goliath News, Democracy Future, DNA Evidence Reliability, DNA Meets AI, Equifax Data Breech, Foods and Climate Change, Fungi Impact, Immigrants in the US, Internet Health Report, IoT Testimony, Iraq Shuts Down Internet, Lies in 2017, Low Energy Electronics, Martian Chronicles, Metabolites, NSA and CIA Secrets, Parkinson’s Discussion, Poland, Presidential Purchase Question, Productive Conflict, Propaganda Affects, Rabies Control, Resveratrol and Synthetic Biology, Sexual Harassment, Simple Rules, STEM Cells in Teeth, Web Evidence Authentication, Workplace Jerks

Exercise your ears: the 49 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 600 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

African Electrification 13 mins – “Energy poverty, or the lack of access to electricity and other basic energy services, affects nearly two-thirds of Sub-Saharan Africa. As the region’s population continues to increase, so will the need to build a new energy system to grow with it, says Rose M. Mutiso. In a bold talk, she discusses how a balanced mix of solutions like solar, wind farms, geothermal power and modern grids could create a high-energy future for Africa — providing reliable electricity, creating jobs and raising incomes….As the Research Director of the Energy for Growth Hub, Rose M. Mutiso works with a global network of experts finding solutions for energy deficits across Africa and Asia. She is also cofounder of the Mawazo Institute, helping African women to become scholars and thought leaders.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

African Smartphone Company 40 mins – “Africa’s first smartphone factory has officially opened in Rwanda. Also a new super fast robotic tuna; technology help for people with dementia, and Ushahidi visits Hacktoberfest.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Arms Race 21 mins – “In this issue: Data, Surveillance, and the AI Arms Race, and Fake News and Pandemics” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-07.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Defenses 8 mins – “In this issue: Artificial Intelligence and the Attack/Defense Balance, Can Consumers’ Online Data Be Protected?” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-18-03.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI in Law 44 mins – “Lawyers are excited by the potential of new tech tools using AI, but how can they be sure they’re legal and ethical? This lack of clarity has led the ABA to call for a deeper look at these tools and their use in the profession. In this Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek are joined by Ed Walters to discuss the recently passed resolution urging the study of issues surrounding artificial intelligence. They discuss the importance of moving forward with technology in the profession while still ensuring that new tech is held accountable through audits and product transparency. They also review some of the positive and negative things going on in the AI space and give their take on its future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Artificial Meat 60 mins – “Make beef out of plants instead of cows and you can begin to save the planet. That’s what inspired award-winning scientist Patrick Brown to leave his professorship at Stanford University and found Impossible Foods. In conversation with Stanford Professor of the Practice Tina Seelig, Brown describes how his singular passion for impact prompted him to leave academia and become a food-tech entrepreneur.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Austistic Security Analyst 39 mins- Interview with a security analyst who has Asperger’s Syndrome and works with a new startup company dealing with security and operations (Secops) – “...strengthen your secops team by leveraging neurodiversityAt the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Billionaires Bite Back 21 mins – “Are we in a “billionaire moment”? Three are running for president — if you can count Trump. Two progressive candidates are running on ambitious policies that would require hefty taxes on billionaires. And with the threat of those taxes hanging in the balance, several billionaires have recently begun lobbying the American people through the media. Speaking with Bob, former Labor Secretary Robert Reich argues that we’re well into a second gilded age. Much like the economy in the late 1800’s, a small group of monopolists, old money heirs, and Wall Street executives have amassed more money than the bottom 50% of Americans. In lieu of paying more taxes, our richest citizens have rebuffed populist anger by donating to charities and do-good foundations. But, is that a fair trade off? In his new book, Goliath: The 100-Year War Between Monopoly Power and Democracy, Matt Stoller argues that “philanthropy capitalism” and lax antitrust enforcement are doing fatal damage to our society. He and Bob dig into the forgotten history of Microsoft’s antitrust trial, to demonstrate how many of today’s most generous philanthropists have often bullied and manipulated their way to wield power.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biohacking Techniques (87m)- episode 114 outtakes on the road to hacker summer camp At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biotech Companies 49 mins- “Pam Marrone, founder of AgraQuest, relates the challenges and rewards she experienced in building a successful biotechnology company that specializes in ecologically friendly agricultural products.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin Politics 56 mins – “I’m delighted to post another 2017 show, # 261, my May 31, 2017 interview with Prof. David Golumbia of Virginia Commonwealth University, author of The Politics of Bitcoin: Software as Right-Wing Extremism In his book, David examines the connections between cryptocurrencies and the United States’ far right. Specifically, David identifies the underlying theories that animate both cryptocurrency enthusiasm and far right thinking today. While our wider US political context plays an important role in understanding David’s critique, cryptocurrency structure and stated goals stand at the center of David’s focus. I enjoyed discussing this challenging and timely topic with David, and fully expect that his scholarship will help us understand where we are headed as commerce becomes increasingly decentralized.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA Hacking Tools 28 mins – “In this issue: WikiLeaks Releases CIA Hacking Tools; Botnets; Defense Against Doxing; Buzzword Watch: Prosilience; The CIA’s “Development Tradecraft DOs and DON’Ts” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-17-03.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Infections 12 mins – “In this issue: Spectre and Meltdown Attacks Against Microprocessors, Susan Landau’s New Book: “Listening In”, New Book Coming in September: “Click Here to Kill Everybody”, Daniel Miessler on My Writings about IoT Security” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-18-01.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Security 10 mins – “In this issue: Security in a World of Physically Capable Computers” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-18-10.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crazy Ideas 27 mins – “What if you removed failure from your vocabulary? Patricia Ryan Madson, Improv pioneer and retired Stanford University lecturer, sees improvisation – and the art of “yes, and” – as a route to innovation. In this episode of Stanford Innovation Lab, Tina Seelig meets with Patricia to discuss re-framing experiences as experiments and practicing attentiveness.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security Summit 27 mins – “In this issue: Admiral Rogers Speaking at the Joint Service Academy Cyber Security Summit; The Further Democratization of QUANTUM; The Further Democratization of Stingray; Eighth Movie-Plot Threat Contest Semifinalists; Hacking Airplanes; Counting the US Intelligence Community Leakers; “Hinky” in Action” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-15-05.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data and Goliath News 16 mins – “In this issue: More “Data and Goliath” News; The Eighth Movie-Plot Threat Contest; Metal Detectors at Sports Stadiums; Cisco Shipping Equipment to Fake Addresses to Foil NSA Interception; New Zealand’s XKEYSCORE Use ; Australia Outlaws Warrant Canaries” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-15-04.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Future 56 mins – “I’m pleased to post Show # 262, May 31, 2017, my interview with Prof. Al Roberts, Director of the School of Public Policy at University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and author of Four Crises of American Democracy: Representation, Mastery, Discipline, Anticipation. Al is one of the nation’s leading scholars on government secrecy, and his recent work has focused on the broad functional challenges faced by governmental institutions today. In our wide ranging discussion, we examined the state of government today, its capacity to withstand the pressures exerted on it by outside forces, and what we can reasonably expect government to do and not do in response. Obviously pressing and critical issues, I always enjoy my discussions with Al, and hope that you do as well!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Evidence Reliability 18 mins – “How reliable is DNA evidence in 2019? What about DNA that was collected 20 or more years ago? Is it possible for you to leave DNA in a place you’ve never been? We ask those questions as the case against alleged Claremont serial killer Bradley Robert Edwards is before the court, police and the victim’s families hoping to finally get closure on the deaths of Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Meets AI 51 mins – “Midway through a M.D./Ph.D program at UCLA, Alice Zhang made a discovery that she felt could reverberate far beyond the halls of academia. So she shifted directions, leaving her Ph.D program to found Verge Genomics, a biomedical firm that aims to unite genetic research and artificial intelligence in service of drug discovery. She describes how AI can revolutionize the drug discovery process, and reframes risk-taking as a simple series of optimistic next steps. Workplace Jerks.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNC Hacks 26 mins – “In this issue: Attributing the DNC Hacks to Russia , Are We Becoming More Moral Faster Than We’re Becoming More Dangerous? Security Risks of TSA PreCheck, Law Enforcement Access to IoT Data, Class Breaks, A Comment on the Trump Dossier” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-17-01.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equifax Data Breach 7 mins – “In this issue: On the Equifax Data Breach, iPhone Changes to Frustrate the Police” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-17-09.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foods and Climate Change 60 mins – “Make beef out of plants instead of cows and you can begin to save the planet. That’s what inspired award-winning scientist Patrick Brown to leave his professorship at Stanford University and found Impossible Foods. In conversation with Stanford Professor of the Practice Tina Seelig, Brown describes how his singular passion for impact prompted him to leave academia and become a food-tech entrepreneur.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fungi Impact 16 mins – “Resource inequality is one of our greatest challenges, but it’s not unique to humans. Like us, mycorrhizal fungi that live in plant and tree roots strategically trade, steal and withhold resources, displaying remarkable parallels to humans in their capacity to be opportunistic (and sometimes ruthless) — all in the absence of cognition. In a mind-blowing talk, evolutionary biologist Toby Kiers shares what fungi networks and relationships reveal about human economies, and what they can tell us about inequality.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Immigrants in the US 32 mins – “America has long sold itself as “the nation of immigrants.” But when you look at our history — even the halcyon Ellis Island days — that branding has always come with an asterisk. Give us your tired, your poor, your huddled masses… especially if they’ll work for cheap. Our guests on this episode are Hiroshi Motomura of the University of California and Andre Perry of the Brookings Institution.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Internet Cleanliness 15 mins – “Millions of images and videos are uploaded to the internet each day, yet we rarely see shocking and disturbing content in our social media feeds. Who’s keeping the internet “clean” for us? In this eye-opening talk, documentarians Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck take us inside the shadowy world of online content moderators — the people contracted by major platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Google to rid the internet of toxic material. Learn more about the psychological impact of this kind of work — and how “digital cleaning” influences what all of us see and think.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Internet Report 39 mins – “Mozilla launches new approach to the Health of the Internet; multipurpose drones in Malawi; Nam June Paik The Future is Now exhibition at Tate Modern Art Gallery.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IoT Testimony 33 mins – “It’s been estimated that about 8 billion “things” are connected to the Internet, and that the number of connected “things” could exceed 20 billion by the end of 2020. Sharon Nelson and John Simek are joined by Gail Gottehrer to explore the scope of the Internet of Things. It is critical to understand what data these devices collect, the privacy and security issues associated with them, and how IoT data can be, and has been, used as evidence in court. They also discuss recent legislative efforts to regulate the IoT at the state and federal level and the litigation that may result from them.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Iraq Shuts Down Internet 43 mins – “Iraq’s internet is shut down; technologists and designers challenged to be more inclusive; an environmental protest song linked to 800,000 years of CO2 data; a solar-powered car.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lies in 2017 26 mins – “Our friends at PolitiFact have sorted through a year of lies, fibs, exaggerations, fabrications and outright falsehoods to find the worst of the worst. PolitiFact’s Editor Angie Drobnic Holan joins us to reveal the 2017 lie of the year.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Low Energy Electronics 29 mins – “The 2019 Nobel Prizes for Chemistry and Physics by Ian Woolf, Samuel Bladwell explains Future Low Energy Electronic Technologies…” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martian Chronicles P1 and 2 150 mins total – “Martian Chronicles – by Cory Doctorow: They say you can’t smell anything through a launch-hood, but I still smelled the pove in the next seat as the space-attendants strapped us into our acceleration couches and shone lights in our eyes and triple-checked the medical readouts on our wristlets to make sure our hearts wouldn’t explode when the rocket boosted us into orbit for transfer to the Eagle and the long, long trip to Mars. He was skinny, but not normal-skinny, the kind of skinny you get from playing a lot of sports and taking the metabolism pills your parents got for you so you wouldn’t get teased at school. He was kind of pot-bellied with scrawny arms and sunken cheeks and he was brown-brown, like the brown Mom used to slather on after a day at the beach covered in factor-500 sunblock. Only he was the kind of all-over-even brown that you only got by being born brown. He gave me a holy-crap-I’m-going-to-MARS smile and a brave thumbs-up and I couldn’t bring myself to snub him because he looked so damned happy about it. So I gave him the same thumbs up, rotating my wrist in the strap that held it onto the arm-rest so that I didn’t accidentally break my nose with my own hand when we “clawed our way out of the gravity well” (this was a phrase from the briefing seminars that they liked to repeat a lot. It had a lot of macho going for it)….” At the link right-click “Download” to get P1; do the same here for P2.

Metabolites 5 mins – “Many diseases are driven by metabolites — small molecules in your body like fat, glucose and cholesterol — but we don’t know exactly what they are or how they work. Biotech entrepreneur and TED Fellow Leila Pirhaji shares her plan to build an AI-based network to characterize metabolite patterns, better understand how disease develops — and discover more effective treatments.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

NSA and CIA Secrets 24 mins – “In this issue: Who is Publishing NSA and CIA Secrets, and Why? The Quick vs. the Strong: Commentary on Cory Doctorow’s “Walkaway”; Securing Elections; Surveillance and our Insecure Infrastructure” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-17-05.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parkinson’s Discussion P1 27 mins – “BBC newsreader Jane Hill knows all about Parkinson’s. Her father was diagnosed in t1980s and lived with the condition for ten years — her uncle had it, too. She’s spoken about the dreadful experience of watching helplessly as the two men were engulfed by the degenerative disease, losing their independence and the ability to do the things that they once enjoyed. “I remember feeling how cruel Parkinson’s is. The number of people living with Parkinson’s disease is set to double over the next few decades as we all live longer; it is the only long-term neurological condition that is increasing globally. In this series Jane Hill looks at what it means to be given a diagnosis of Parkinson’s and the reality of living with the condition. She and her cousin Steve remember how their fathers adopted a British stiff upper lip at a time when there was little awareness. In contrast she meets highly successful comedy writer Paul Mayhew Archer, whose reaction to his diagnosis was to create a one-man show exploring the lighter side of living with Parkinson’s. Actors Michael J Fox and Alan Alda both discuss the early symptoms of the disease and their diagnosis. Most people are diagnosed in their sixties but Dutch blogger Mariette Robijn talks about accepting a life changing diagnosis in her forties.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poland 54 mins – “With the US deep in questions of impeachment, what lessons can we learn from divided societies abroad? This week, On the Media travels to Poland, where conspiracy, xenophobia and the rise of illiberalism have the country in an existential fight for its future. On the Media producer Leah Feder reports.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Election Hacking 12 mins – “In this issue: My Priorities for the Next Four Years, Hacking and the 2016 Presidential Election, Dumb Security Survey Questions” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-16-12.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Purchase Question 16 mins – “Michael Bloomberg is one of the world’s richest men, and he’s taking a wildly long shot at becoming the next US President. The problem is, he’s very late to the race, and a long way back in the polls. On the other hand, he’s expected to spend more money on his campaign than the other Democratic candidates combined. Today, who exactly is Michael Bloomberg, and is it possible to buy the presidency?” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productive Conflict 7 mins – “Got an idea to make your workplace better? Labor organizer and TED Fellow Jess Kutch can show you how to put it into action. In this quick talk, she explains how “productive conflict” — when people organize to challenge and change their work lives for the better — can be beneficial for employees and employers alike.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Propaganda Affects 31 mins – “In this issue: Information Attacks against Democracies, How Surveillance Inhibits Freedom of Expression. Propaganda and the Weakening of Trust in Government” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-18-12.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rabies Control 16 mins – “Could we anticipate the next big disease outbreak, stopping a virus like Ebola before it ever strikes? In this talk about frontline scientific research, ecologist Daniel Streicker takes us to the Amazon rainforest in Peru where he tracks the movement of vampire bats in order to forecast and prevent rabies outbreaks. By studying these disease patterns, Streicker shows how we could learn to cut off the next pandemic at its source.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Religious Freedom and Discrimination 43 mins – “The clash of two American values — religious freedom and freedom from discrimination –- didn’t seem so huge when a broad coalition of religious and civil rights representatives got together in a room in 1993. While starting from different ends of the political spectrum, this group came together to push for a new law, The Religious Freedom Restoration Act, meant to protect the religious practice of all faiths, no matter how small. RFRA became the law of the land.  But just a few years and a huge cultural shift later, the law was found to be only applicable at the federal level, and the coalition could not find a way to balance religious freedom with the civil rights of LGBT persons and women. That rift continues today as we continue to ask what does it mean to be free to exercise one’s religion? We hear from the people who were in that room in 1993 – and now are living with the consequences of their efforts.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Resveratrol and Synthetic Biology 29 mins – “Nano-capsules for lower weight and longer life by Ian Woolf, Claudia Vickers talks about synthetic biology and the CSIRO future science platform…” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment 30 mins – “Congress is considering changes to the way it handles sexual harassment complaints after its current rules have been called onerous by critics. We take stock of what might change with Patrick Terpstra of the Scripps Washington Bureau, and we speak with the lawmaker who helped shape the system, retired Rep. Chris Shays, who says it’s imperfect but is a vast improvement over what came before.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Simple Rules 23 mins – “Rules get an unfairly bad rap. In this episode, Stanford Engineering Professor Kathleen Eisenhardt, author of Simple Rules: How to Thrive in a Complex World, and Stanford Professor Bob Sutton discuss the virtues of structure and guidelines. As long as your rules are clear and customized to your organization, Eisenhardt says, they won’t get in your way. In fact, the right set of rules—everything from Michael Pollan’s “eat food, not too much, mostly plants” to “no emails on the weekend”—can keep teams focused, productive, and harmonious.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

STEM Cells in Teeth 29 mins – “Baby teeth worth more by Chris Stewart, Baby teeth update by Ian Woolf, Amanda Hamilton spoke with Professor Malcom Simons about his patent of the “junk” DNA that makes up ninety-five percent of our genetic inheritence, The impact of extreme weather on human history by Tim Baynes, Aphasia by Ian Woolf…” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Web Evidence Authentication 30 mins – “The collection of critical web-based evidence could make or break a case, but many lawyers aren’t quite sure how to go about it. Digital DetectivesSharon Nelson and John Simek get expert advice from Brett Burney on best practices for collection and authentication of online evidence. They discuss several real-world examples of major collection mistakes lawyers have made and offer suggestions for tools that can preserve and produce evidence properly.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Workplace Jerks 57 mins – “Even as adults, we still have to deal with bullies, at work and otherwise. Stanford Professor Bob Sutton has devoted his career to studying organizational behavior and dysfunction, and of late, figuring out how we all can avoid or deal with people who demean, disrespect and drain their peers. The professor of management science and engineering draws on academic research and anecdotal evidence included in his new book, “The Asshole Survival Guide: How to Deal with People Who Treat You Like Dirt.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 419 – Nov 29, 2019: Aging Concepts, AI Arms Race and Fake News, Amazon Rain Forest, American Dollar, Battery Storage Research, Body Dysmorphia, Chinese Quantum Lead, Computer Threats, Cybercrime, Death Zone Wildlife, Doris Kearns Goodwin on Leadership, Edward Snowden Challenge, Energy in Great Britain, Energy Use Changes, Environmental DNA, Face Surgeons, Farming Small Scale, Forensic Cyber Thoughts, Influence Operations, Paris Agreement, Plastic Gardens, Podcast History, Political Violence, Risky Decisions, Teaching 3D Aids, Teaching Aids, Terrorism, Throuple Secrets, Transportation Planning, Witness Depositions

Exercise your ears: the 31 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 421 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Aging Concepts 54 mins – “Recently retired ABC newsreader Ian Henderson sets out on a quest to find the secrets of ageing healthily. He discovers that a new understanding of how the trillions of cells in our bodies age could keep us all younger for longer. He meets Australian scientists working at the cutting edge of ageing biology and learns that their research isn’t just about making us live longer, but also about keeping us healthier into old age — improving our ‘healthspan’. They reveal that we can all improve our healthspan by making simple changes to the way we live our lives.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Concepts 58 mins – “In Australia, one in 40 of us born today will live until we are 100, yet many of us will live our later years in poor health. Neuroscientist Dr Sarah McKay uncovers the extraordinary new science about how to keep our brains healthy into old age. By understanding the biological processes at work throughout our bodies and how they drive ageing, we now know the most effective ways to improve our health and wellbeing as we get older.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.  

AI Arms Race and Fake News 21 mins – “In this issue: Data, Surveillance, and the AI Arms Race, Fake News and Pandemics” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-07.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon Rain Forest 29 mins – “Over the past fifty years, around 17% of the Amazon rainforest has been destroyed, according to the World Wildlife Fund, but as this week’s guest on Sea Change Radio explains, with fires and deforestation out of control, the situation could get even worse before we see any significant improvement. We speak to Christian Poirier of Amazon Watch to get a clearer picture of this largely man-made disaster in Brazil. While some steps to control the fires have been made recently by the Brazilian government, rampant deforestation continues unabated. Poirier gives us a closer glimpse into the agribusiness giants that are involved in the devastation, what his organization is doing to help stop it, and tells listeners what they can do to get involved in the struggle. Then, we take a peek into the Sea Change Radio archives and hear Kevin Walker talk about what he calls our grand food bargain.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Dollar 29 mins – “What is the American dollar based on? It was based on the gold standard until 1971 when it transitioned to a floating monetary system. This week’s guest on Sea Change Radio believes US currency now rests unofficially on the price of oil. What will a successful Green New Deal will look like if the underlying currency upon which the US economy rests is based on fossil fuels? We speak to James Quilligan, the Managing Director of Economic Democracy Advocates and longtime policy analyst in the international development space. Quilligan explains the history of the commons and monetary policy, points out some of the shortcomings of capitalism, and lays out how to ensure the survival of democracy. He argues that understanding the complexities of our global economic system is the first step in fixing it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battery Storage Research 14 mins – “Stationary storage takes the stage in the November edition of S&P Global Platts Battery Metals podcast. Senior pricing specialist Emmanuel Latham is joined by Felix Maire, lead analyst on US and European Power Storage markets at Platts Analytics, to discuss the major drivers on this growing industry, the similarities and differences to the electric vehicle market and what lies ahead for this interesting technology.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Body Dysmorphia 54 mins – “Body dysmorphia is an overwhelming obsession with body image and now affects millions of Australians. Yet these mental illnesses often remain hidden, undiagnosed, and even unrecognised by the people who have them. In this programme, investigative reporter Ruby Jones meets men and women who have experienced serious body image issues and she discovers that far from vanity, these disorders are crippling people’s lives.  Ruby also visits scientists at the forefront of research into what causes them and learns of promising new treatments.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.  

Chinese Quantum Lead 67 mins – “Our interview is with Sultan Meghji, CEO of Neocova. We cover the large Chinese investment in quantum technology and what it means for the United States. It’s possible that Chinese physicists are even better than American physicists at extracting funding from their government. Indeed, it looks as though some quantum tech, such as the use of entangled particles to identify eavesdropping, may turn out to have dubious military value. But not all. Sultan thinks the threat of special purpose quantum computing to break encryption poses a real, near-term threat to U.S. financial institutions’ security. In the News Roundup, we cover the new California Consumer Privacy Act regulations, which devote a surprising amount of their 24 pages to fixing problems caused by the Act’s feel-good promise that consumers can access and delete the information companies have on them. Speaking of feel-good laws that are full of liability land mines for companies, the Supreme Court has let stand a Ninth Circuit ruling that allows blind people to sue under the Americans with Disabilities Act if websites don’t accommodate their needs. Nick Weaver and I explore the risks of making law by retroactively imposing liability.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Threats 15 mins – “-clicks issue: First American Financial Corp. Data Records Leak, Fraudulent Academic Papers, Chinese Military Wants to Develop Custom OS, Computers and Video Surveillance. “ At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-06.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cybercrime 82 mins – “In our 283rd episode of The Cyberlaw Podcast, Stewart Baker interviews Alex Joel, the former Chief of the Office of Civil Liberties, Privacy, and Transparency at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and currently scholar-in-residence and adjunct professor at the American University Washington College of Law. Stewart and Alex are joined by Gus Hurwitz (@GusHurwitz), Dave Aitel (@daveaitel), and Dan Podair to discuss: The Ninth Circuit reversed a district court’s decision on a case involving Section 230 and anticompetitive behavior. Business takeaways from the recently announced regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act. The US launched a cyber operation against Iran following the attacks against Saudi oil facilities. Avast was attacked and compromised, but maybe not fatally. APT group Turla appears to have taken over the attack infrastructure of the APT group OilRig. Some of Equifax’s embarrassing security failings were exposed. FireEye issued a report on APT41’s espionage and cybercrime activities. CrowdStrike issued a report on Chinese efforts to steal aircraft intellectual property. The British government dropped its plan to require identification to view online pornography.” At the link right-click “Download the 284th Episode (mp3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death Zone Wildlife 28 mins – “The Iron Curtain was an accidental wildlife haven. 30 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall, Tom Heap walks the borderlands to see how nature has continued to thrive. Before the fall of the wall naturalists in West Germany had noticed that some bird and mammal species favoured life in the deathzone with its lack of human disturbance. When the Soviet bloc crumbled they joined friends and colleagues in the East to declare a Greenbelt through Europe, from Trieste on the Adriatic to Lubeck on the Baltic. Against the odds their campaign has met with great success, creating new migration routes for some of Europe’s biggest mammals whilst keeping developers away from most of the old border between East and West.” At the link left-click “Download” then right-click the type of download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doris Kearns Goodwin on Leadership 29 mins – “What makes a great leader? This week on Sea Change Radio, we are honored to have Pulitzer Prize-winning presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin here to give us her take on that question. Goodwin’s book, Leadership in Turbulent Times, just released in paperback, re-examines four US presidents she has studied in the past: Abe Lincoln, Teddy and Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson. She discusses the contrast between these presidents’ leadership and the behavior of the current grifter-in-chief, puts today’s impeachment proceedings in historical context, and hypothesize about how past presidents might have addressed momentous issues like climate change and election tampering. Then, we dig into the Sea Change Radio archives and listen to Rebecca Vallas, a Vice President at the Center for American Progress, talk about the Trump administration’s absurd claims that poverty and hunger are now things of the past in this country.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Edward Snowden Challenge 66 mins – “In this episode I cross swords with John Samples of the Cato Institute on Silicon Valley’s efforts to disadvantage conservative speech and what to do about it. I accuse him of Panglossian libertarianism; he challenges me to identify any way in which bringing government into the dispute will make things better. I say government is already in it, citing TikTok’s People’s Republic of China-friendly “community standards” and Silicon Valley’s obeisance to European standards on hate speech and terror incitement. Disagreeing on how deep the Valley’s bias runs, we agree to put our money where our mouths are: I bet John $50 that Donald J. Trump will be suspended or banned from Twitter by the end of the year in which he leaves office. There’s a lot of news in the Roundup. David Kris explains the background of the first CLOUD Act agreement that may be signed this year with the UK.” At the link right-click “Download the 284th Episode (mp3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy in Great Britain 28 mins – “Britain urgently needs a zero carbon source of reliable energy for our homes, industry and the new generation of electric vehicles. This summer’s electricity blackouts suggest that we’re a long way from achieving the goal. Tom Heap and a panel of power experts offer their solutions. Tom is joined by Jillian Ambrose, Energy Correspondent of The Guardian, the Chief Executive of the Committee on Climate Change, Chris Stark and CEO of power company Good Energy, Juliet Davenport.” At the link left-click “Download” then right-click the type of download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Use Changes 28 mins – “Orkney’s strong winds and powerful tides have attracted renewable energy pioneers for decades. For much of the year the islands produce more energy than they can use. Turbines are shut down and green energy goes to waste. The UK government has spotted an opportunity, funding the REFLEX project which aims to use that excess energy to develop new ways to power a community. Tom Heap visits Orkney to see how hydrogen storage, huge batteries and electric ferries and cars can be lashed together with clever software to remove fossil fuels from an entire energy system.” At the link left-click “Download” then right-click the type of download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental DNA 28 mins – “From the Loch Ness Monster and mammoths to the Amazon river and uncharted river flies – ‘environmental DNA’ is revolutionising how we tell what species are present in a certain landscape. Traces of skin, mucus or gametes can be left by creatures in their environment and scientists can use samples from the water, air or soil and sequence the DNA found within to test for a specific species or to get a broader picture of what is there. It can help monitor for invasive species and even look back to ancient history. Samples can be taken by non-experts, in remote locations, quicker than some traditional methods and it’s non invasive. Scientists say this can speed up and revolutionise how we chart our living world….which in some cases might flag up the most urgent need to intervene where species are threatened. The technique has been used recently by Prof Neil Gemmell from University of Otago working with experts from the Loch Ness Centre – to search for evidence of what is and isn’t present in the depths but it’s also being used in more applications around the world. Jheni Osman explores why scientists are so excited about this modern technique, how long the traces last and what it might reveal in the future.” At the link left-click “Download” then right-click the type of download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Face Surgeons 59 mins – “With unprecedented access to the Australian Craniofacial Unit in Adelaide and following some of most delicate and specialised craniofacial surgery in the world, this documentary is an intimate look at what lies behind the face and skull, and the surgeons trusted to make it whole again.  We join head of the unit Dr Mark Moore and his multidisciplinary team as they perform life changing surgeries on a 11-month-old baby who needs to have her skull remodelled to make room for her growing brain, a teenager hoping for a final fix for her cleft palate, and a young man whose facial deformity is affecting his ability to see, speak and smell. The programme also looks at the unique role the unit has in managing the ongoing non-surgical treatment of patients with genetic syndromes and their associated symptoms, including pioneering research into drug treatments that could help reduce the need for invasive surgeries.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.  

Farming Small Scale 42 mins – “This episode is mostly listener questions that we answer about our hoop house, construction methods, and gardening inside the hoop house.  We also touch on garden planning and winter beekeeping.” At the link right-click “Direct download: CoopCast_160.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Cyber Thoughts 15 mins – “In this issue: Palantir’s Surveillance Service for Law Enforcement, Zoom Vulnerability, Attorney General William Barr on Encryption Policy, How Privacy Laws Hurt Defendants, Brazilian Cell Phone Hack” At the link “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-08.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Influence Operations 36 mins – “In this issue: Influence Operations Kill Chain, The Myth of Consumer-Grade Security, Massive iPhone Hack Targets Uyghurs, When Biology Becomes Software” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-09.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paris Agreement 29 mins – “For years, climate denialists put forth the narrative that it would cripple the US economy to sign on to international climate agreements like the Kyoto Protocol. They said that other major carbon emitting countries like India and China needed to be on board in order for the US to join. It’s clear now, however, that this narrative was always just a smokescreen. The Trump Administration is pulling the US out of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, which notably does include India and China, and is an historic accord representing more than 87% of global greenhouse gas emitters. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Helen Mountford the Vice President for Climate and Economics at the World Resource Institute. She breaks down what the US withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement means. We look at when this withdrawal would actually go into effect, examine some Trumpian lies about the Agreement itself, and discuss the impact it will have on the US and the planet moving forward.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plastic Gardens 28 mins – “The last decade has seen a huge rise in the number of people opting for artificial turf in their gardens. Meanwhile businesses and corporations are making more use of plastic plants in both indoor and outdoor spaces. What effect does choosing fake over real plants have on the environment? Peter Gibbs investigates.” At the link left-click “Download” then right-click the type of download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcast History 33 mins – “In the latest episode of Books and Ideas (BI 71) I share an adapted version of the talk I gave last week at the first annual She Podcasts Live event, which was held in Atlanta, Georgia Oct 10-13, 2019. My talk is about my podcasting journey with some reflections on how podcasting has changed over the last 13 years. This talk was originally given to aspiring women podcasters but I have adapted for a broader audience. I look forward to sharing a bit of my journey with you. You don’t have to be interested in podcasting to enjoy this episode, but if you think you might want to give it a try some day, this episode is for you.” At the link right-click “Click to play MP3” and select “Save Link As” to download the podcast.

Political Violence 63 mins – “cswdcd16 The Day of the Dove (Politically-related violence in the U.S. heats up as talk of “Civil War” goes mainstream. What would a “Civil War” in the U.S. even look like? Dan has some thoughts on this and ways to potentially avoid such a fate.)At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Risky Decisions 60 mins – “We’ve all heard the phrase ‘no risk, no reward’ – but how do you assess how risky a decision or situation really is? And why are some people more likely to risk everything, while other consistently play it too safe? Lily Serna sets out to answer these questions by understanding some of the maths of chance. But for her this means getting stuck into some nail-biting situations like power sliding a supercar and learning how to trapeze. She investigates how the latest work in psychology and brain science helps explain why some us are risk avoiders and learns from an Australian woman, who’s climbed Everest twice, the surprising truth about what really goes on inside the mind of someone deciding whether to risk it.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Teaching 3D Aids 66 mins – 3D asset links for teachers. At the link you can access links to aids, but not the podcast; however, the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Teaching Aids 43 mins – “We decided to need to … instead of get off the pot. So here we are! Hopefully we still have a few listeners… Mom? Dad? Anyone?” Maker Space and other teacher link aids. At the link you can access links to aids, but not the podcast; however, the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Terrorism  46 mins  – “The Day of the Dove (Politically-related violence in the U.S. heats up as talk of “Civil War” goes mainstream. What would a “Civil War” in the U.S. even look like? Dan has some thoughts on this and ways to potentially avoid such a fate.)” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Throuple Secrets 46 mins – “You knew we’d go there. I talk about Congresswoman Katie Hill’s “throuple” pics and whether the rush to portray her as a victim of revenge porn raises questions about revenge porn laws themselves. Paul Rosenzweig, emboldened by twin tweets – from President Trump calling Never-Trumpers like him “human scum” and from Mark Hamill welcoming him to the Rebel Scum Alliance – takes issue with me. In a more serious vein, Brian Egan, Paul, and I dig deep into the roots of the battle over how to keep “emerging technology” out of Chinese hands. Paul explains a Georgia Supreme Court ruling that cops need a warrant to access automobile data after an accident.” At the link right-click “Download the 284th Episode (mp3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transportation Planning 29 mins – “Do you ever find yourself driving down a familiar street and suddenly encounter an unfamiliar right turn only sign that diverts all traffic off your intended route? The changing landscape of your city’s streets may be disconcerting and inconvenient, but there’s usually a fair amount of thought and intentional planning behind those changes. This week on Sea Change Radio, we learn about how transportation planning can limit car traffic and even improve socioeconomic equity. We speak with Carter Rubin, a mobility and climate advocate for the NRDC, who discusses various efforts to make cities like Barcelona, San Francisco and New York more livable for mass transit users, cyclists and pedestrians. Take a listen and maybe the next time you’re unceremoniously diverted from a main thoroughfare, your annoyance will be mitigated by a pinch of appreciation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Witness Depositions 30 mins – “Ambiguities under current rules often lead to a variety of problems with 30(b)(6) witness depositions. Sharon and John talk with nationally known litigation consultant Tom O’Connor about the scope of these issues and his tips for avoiding common pitfalls on both sides of the deposition process. Tom offers colorful examples from his many years as a consultant, addressing matters surrounding witness qualification, hostile witnesses, preservation, and more! Check out Tom’s blog series on this topic: The Dos and Don’ts of a 30(b)(6) Witness Deposition” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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