Media Mining Digest 222 – Feb 12, 2016: 3D Printer Plastic Concern, Agriculture in Kenya, AIDS and HIV Updated, Apple Company History, Artificial Intelligence, Assisted Living Research, Bernie Sanders, Biofluorescent Fish, Biomarkers, Black in Tech, Blindness and Depression, Bobcats, Brain Tumor Treatments, Caisson Work, Campus Assault Solutions, Campus Newcomers, Car Trends, Carbon Control in Sweden, Chromatography, Climate Activists, Climate Warming Worsens, Concussion Scandal, Copyright at MIT, Corporate Impact on Society, Cosby, Credit Card History, CRISPR, CSI unmasked, Dan Carlin, Data Collection by Smartphone, DDT, Dessicant Tolerant Seeds, Eating Disorders, Ebola Test, Emotional Stimuli, Future Industries, Gentrification, Graphene, Haitian Iguanas, Health Care Trends, Homeless Youth, Ice Trade, Indigenous People Murders, Internet History, Internet Porn, Investment Strategies, Kurdish People, Leonardo Di Vinci, Lobbyists, Loneliness Impact, Marijuana Laws, Megaliths of Avebury, Mosquito Control, Newspaper Consolidations, Nuclear Energy, Obesity Control, Oil Supply and Demand, Orthotic Nerve Impact, Peru, Peter Thiel of PayPal, Physician Burnout, Podcast Creation, Presentation Preparation, Prison Children, Rutherford’s Legacy, Saudi Arabia Economy, Sleep Science, Startup Rules, Suicide Prevention, Syrian Aid from Students, System Dynamics, Terrorism, Twitter Harassment Trial, Unabomber Story, Water Recycling, Wildlife Corridors, Wired Kevin Kelly, Zika Virus Guide

The best 84 podcasts from a larger group of 250 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 8000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three  free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 280 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded and you can make your own selected list.

3D Printer Plastic Concern 3 mins – “3D printer parts potentially could harm fish and other aquatic life.” (Some plastics used in creating things are more likely to contaminate the environment.) At the link find the title, “Episode 597 – January 27 2016,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_Jan27_2016.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture in Kenya 60 mins – “Florence Muringi Wambugu talks about the contribution of bio-technology, including GM crops, for improving the sustainable livelihoods of resource poor families in Africa.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

AIDS and HIV Updated 60 mins – “This week, we’ve brought together a panel of experts to talk about the history of HIV/AIDS, and get an update on the current science, ongoing research, and medical treatments. Joining us on the panel are Salim Abdool Karim, clinical infectious diseases epidemiologist, Jonathan Engel, author of “The Epidemic: A History of AIDS”, Dázon Dixon Diallo, founder of SisterLove, Inc, the first women’s HIV/AIDS and Reproductive Justice organization in the southeastern United States, and Terry McGovern, founder of the HIV Law Project.” At the link find the title, “#354 HIV and AIDS: Updated and Revisited,” right-click “Media files Science for the People 354, HIV and AIDS Updated and Revisited.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apple Company History 99 mins – “Leo Laporte and Mike Elgan sit down to speak with Bill Fernandez, who is the Chief Executive Officer at Omnibotics Inc. as well as Apple Employee #4!” At the link click “Download options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence 49 mins – “In Episode #111, Jesse speaks with futurist and author Calum Chase about his book Surviving AI: The promise and peril of artificial intelligence , and the increasing impacts of artificial intelligence on the world’s business and society — and the future of humanity itself. The prospect of creating a true “AGI” (Artificial General Intelligence) capable of matching human-level thinking is probably the most transformative tech possibility in the coming decades. Nothing would be unaffected. Just imagine being able to mass-produce competent adult-level minds without needing to wait for the decades-long process of physical growth and education… But that’s ignoring the more exciting/terrifying piece of the AI speculation game: If we can figure out how to manufacture human-level cognitive performance, there’s no reason to suspect that at that point, the sky is not the limit. (Jesse writes at length about that topic here.)…. ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Assisted Living Research 63 mins – “Professor Gail Mountain, Professor of Health Services Research (Assisted Living Research) at University of Sheffield; Director of EPSRC-funded SMART Consortium & Principle Director of KT-EQUAL Consortium will describe how technology can be used to meet the needs of an ageing population.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Bernie Sanders 27 mins -”Presidential Candidate, Independent Senator Bernie Sanders was a guest on Radio Curious in 1991, early in his first term in Congress. Over the course of his 25 years as an Independent member of the House of Representatives and the Senate he has consistently advocated for economic reform and social justice. When Bernie Sanders and I visited in 1991, we discussed what he would do if he were President. This interview, recorded by phone from his office in Washington, D.C., in 1991, began when I asked him to describe his experience in government.” At the link right-click “Click here…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biofluorescent Fish 14 mins – “Just a few meters below the waves, marine biologist and explorer-photographer David Gruber discovered something amazing — a surprising new range of sea creatures that glow in many colors in the ocean’s dim blue light. Join his journey in search of biofluorescent sharks, seahorses, sea turtles and more, and learn how these light-up creatures could illuminate a new understanding of our own brains.” At the link click “Download” and right-click “Download Audio,” then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biomarkers 7 mins – “This is Ileana Piña, Associate Chief of Cardiology at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine here in New York. I have often talked about biomarkers. What are biomarkers? Biomarkers are blood tests that help us define or direct our care, and very often will help us with both diagnosis and prognosis. Creatinine and troponin are biomarkers. We use so many biomarkers that we don’t even recognize what they are. The natriuretic peptides have become the most popular of the biomarkers — either brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) or NT-proBNP [N-terminal fragment BNP]. The values of these differ; BNP usually runs in lower numbers and NT-proBNP in higher numbers, and we have some sense of cut-off values. These biomarkers differ with age, renal function, sex, and obesity. These things must be taken into consideration.” At the link find the title, “Biomarkers in Heart Failure: A Call to Arms,” right-click “Media files 828842.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blacks in Tech 60 mins – “After an extended absence (blame Thanksgiving and Eric’s near-death experience with the flu), FCN is back and talking Fast Company’s recent Tristan Walker profile. Also: Brittany gives away a free business idea.” At the link click “Download” and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Blindness and Depression 20 mins – “The charity, Guide Dogs, says that depression is not being screened for in the newly blind, leaving some people feeling desperate and hopeless. We explore their findings and their solutions. As more foreign content appears on the TV we hear about developments in audio description. And how can we help others in their time of need, when being blind sometimes makes it hard to be useful?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bobcats 4 mins “Bobcats have been all over the news lately. It’s kind of amazing to think that 30 years ago wildlife biologists estimated there were only 150 bobcats in New Hampshire. That’s not the case anymore – their numbers are now estimated to be around 1400! How did these cats make such an impressive recovery?” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select”Save link As” from the pop- up menu.

Brain Tumor Treatments 28 mins – “Demetri Kofinas had a benign brain tumour that was too tricky to remove, so he left it. But then it grew, and threw him into dementia. Today we bring you the story of one man’s journey toward profound loss and the turnaround that brought everything back.” At the link find the title, “How a man with a brain tumour rebooted his memory – Jan. 25, 2016 (3/3),” right-click “ Media files current_20160125_74795.mp3 (MP3 – File, 25.2 KB)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Caisson Work 14 mins – “This is a story I’ve been wanting to do forever. In fact, falling in love with the story of the Brooklyn Bridge was one of the things that sent me on a path to doing The Memory Palace at all. So, most of this stuff I just kind of already knew. But it was a particular pleasure to go back and read David McCullough’s masterful, lovely The Great Bridge. And to read a ton of contemporary accounts of its construction, particularly the New York Time’s piece where the reporter heads down into the Brooklyn Caisson.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campus Assault Solutions 15 mins – “After Aspen Matis was raped on her second day of college, she reported it to her school. A college mediator ruled the findings inconclusive. She felt strongly that the school was in her words, “systematically obscuring justice” in an effort to protect the college’s brand. The CBC News investigative unit recently did a survey of 87 post-secondary schools in Canada, It found that 16 of them reported zero cases of sexual assault over a 6-year period. Diana Swain is the CBC’s Senior Investigative correspondent, She was the lead reporter into the investigation. She dropped by the Campus studio to elaborate on the numbers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campus Newcomers 19 mins – “Our first episode looks at the first few days at campus: the struggle to overcome anxieties of leaving home, finding friends, fitting in and feeling lost. For Jessica, it was all compounded by an unforeseen change just weeks before school started.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Trends 46 mins – “Detroit is feeling the heat all over again. This time, the threat isn’t Japan. It’s Silicon Valley. The automobile is undergoing a revolution more profound than airbags or a rear view camera. When cars become smarter –and they will—they will become a smartphone on wheels. And Silicon Valley has big plans to elbow Detroit aside. But this time, Detroit says it’s ready. This hour On Point, the Detroit –- and the car — of the future.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Control in Sweden 30 mins – “Given its northern latitude, Sweden is warming more rapidly than many other places in the world. Johan Rockström, one of Sweden’s leading environmental scholars, joins us this week on Sea Change Radio to discuss his latest book, Big World, Small Planet, in which he details some of the approaches Sweden has taken to reduce carbon emissions and slow the progress of climate change.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chromatography 47 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the origins, development and uses of chromatography. In its basic form, it is familiar to generations of schoolchildren who put a spot of ink at the bottom of a strip of paper, dip it in water and then watch the pigments spread upwards, revealing their separate colours. Chemists in the 19th Century started to find new ways to separate mixtures and their work was taken further by Mikhail Tsvet, a Russian-Italian scientist who is often credited with inventing chromatography in 1900. The technique has become so widely used, it is now an integral part of testing the quality of air and water, the levels of drugs in athletes, in forensics and in the preparation of pharmaceuticals. With Andrea Sella Professor of Chemistry at University College London Apryll Stalcup Professor of Chemical Sciences at Dublin City University And Leon Barron Senior Lecturer in Forensic Science at King’s College London.” At the link find the title, “Chromatography,” click “Media files p03hhldg.mp3” and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Activists 4 mins – “Every Monday evening for more than a year, demonstrators have stood in protest at an intersection in Boston’s West Roxbury neighborhood. Holding signs and singing protest songs at the cars passing by, they’ve stood in rain, sleet and snow to oppose a planned new natural gas pipeline near their homes. The new pipeline would bring more natural gas to Boston from Pennsylvania and points west…“Everyone knows that we have to end our dependence on fossil fuels, everyone knows this, and this commitment to the build-out of infrastructure that we don’t need and we don’t want flies in the face of logic at a critical inflection point for our climate future and our state’s future,” Wilson said. …Protesting against these new projects are just one way activists who have returned home from the UN summit in Paris are trying to keep the momentum toward a greener future going at home….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 46 mins – “Reverend Professor Ian James questions whether climate change is a challenge or a swindle and presents some of the certainties, complexities and controversies from the science of climate change.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Climate Warming Worsens 60 mins – “We have three interviews this week, including 2 climate scientists. Andy Pitman: new science on how climate really hits us. Plus Johan Rockstrom, the Swedish leader of planetary boundaries, followed by Lynn Benander on community power in New England.” At the link right-click “Download…lo-fi…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concussion Scandal 118 mins – “The National Football League, a multibillion-dollar commercial juggernaut, presides over America’s indisputable national pastime. But the NFL is under assault as thousands of former players claim the league has covered up football’s connection to long-term brain injuries. In a special two-hour investigation, FRONTLINE and prize-winning journalists Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada of ESPN reveal the hidden story of the NFL and brain injuries, drawn from their forthcoming book League of Denial: The NFL, Concussions and the Battle for Truth (Crown Archetype, October 2013). What did the NFL know and when did it know it? What’s the truth about the risks to players? What can be done? The FRONTLINE investigation details how, for years, the league denied and worked to refute scientific evidence that the violent collisions at the heart of the game are linked to an alarming incidence of early onset dementia, catastrophic brain damage, and other devastating consequences for some of football’s all-time greats.” At the link find the title, “League of Denial,” right-click “Media files 114985669-frontlinepbs league of denial.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Copyright at MIT 23 mins – “The latest in the series of podcasts on scholarly publication and copyright is an interview with Hal Abelson, Class of 1922 Professor of Computer Science and Engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. Professor Abelson has played key roles in fostering educational technology initiatives such MIT’s OpenCourseWare and DSpace. He has a broad interest in information technology and policy, and developed and teaches the course “Ethics and Law on the Electronic Frontier.” He was a founding director of Creative Commons, Public Knowledge, and the Free Software Foundation, organizations that are devoted to strengthening our intellectual commons. In the podcast, Professor Abelson reflects on the origins and impacts of these efforts, his reasons for remaining committed to more open access to research, and the concerns he has about the future.” At the link right-click “Download the audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corporate Impact on Society 51 mins – “In his inaugural lecture, titled ‘Disembedded elites? Policy communications and the transformation of elite networks’, Professor David Miller reviewed the main writing on ‘power elites’ in the tradition of power structure research and asked what’s changed with the advent of neoliberalism?” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Cosby 50 mins – “Himself: Kelefa Sanneh’s New Yorker profile on Bill Cosby gets FCN to revisit Cosby’s seminal work of stand-up performance, “Himself”. Also discussed: Chris Rock’s “Never Scared” and what happens when bad people make good art. Trigger warning for sexual abuse/ sexual assault around the 33 minute mark.” At the link click “Download” and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Credit Card History 15 mins – “In September 1958, Bank of America began an experiment – one that would have far reaching effects on our lives and on the economy. They decided after careful consideration to conduct this experiment in Fresno, California. The presumption was that no one was paying much attention to Fresno, so if the plan failed, it wouldn’t get a lot of media attention. Bank of America sent out 60,000 pieces of mail to people in Fresno. Inside was a little plastic object that has become in equal parts emblematic of opportunity, convenience, and debt, a card featuring a $500 line of credit.” At the link find the title, “The Fresno Drop196- The Fresno Drop,” right-click “Media files 196-The-Fresno-Drop.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CRISPR Cas9 Editing 31 mins – “Over the last three years, a new genetic engineering technology has exploded on the scene in biology. CRISPR/Cas9 ene editing has been called revolutionary, game-changing and transformative, due to the fact that it is easier, faster and more powerful, precise, and efficient than any tool we’ve had for making changes to the genome. CRISPR seems poised to revolutionize the way we study and treat a whole range of genetic diseases. It also will have profound impact on genetic engineering of agricultural crops and animals, and on the pharmaceutical and chemical industries. And the fact that it could allow us to make permanent changes in the human genome means we might influence human evolution itself. The power and potential of CRISPR means it raises as many ethical issues as scientific ones, as society will have to deal with new questions about whether we’re wise enough to use the power over the genome that CRISPR provides.” At the link right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CRISPR Regulation 4 mins – “Regulators in the UK today approved research on human embryos using CRISPR-Cas9, a controversial form of gene editing that has been exciting scientists and alarming bioethicists around the world. In a groundbreaking move, the Human Fertilisation and Embryonic Authority has granted approval to a group of researchers at the Francis Crick Institute in London. The UK is the first country to grant such authority. The UK has been on the forefront of regulatory policy in this area, having recently approved the use of “three-parent embryos” through mitochondrial donation, and has previously been a haven for embryonic stem cell and other kinds of controversial research that faced roadblocks in the US. Here’s what you need to know about CRISPR and gene editing.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

CSI Unmasked 43 mins – “Forensic anthropologist Kathleen Conabree discusses issues surrounding what really goes on at a crime scene and what the term forensic actually means.” At the link click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dan Carlin Interview 91 mins – “Dan Carlin is the host of my favorite podcast, Hardcore History. But… what?! History?! I know. I thought the same thing. How could a history podcast have a cult following? And yet it did. During research for launching The Tim Ferriss Show, I asked many of the top dogs on the iTunes charts: what is your favorite podcast? Almost without exception, the answer came back: Hardcore History. Since then, I’ve become friends with Dan (and more obsessed with his show), and this episode explores all the questions I’ve been dying to ask him, including: His early experiments ; What has worked and what hasn’t; His habits, rituals, and routines; How podcasting became his full-time job; His “radio” voice and how to find your own; Creativity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Collection by Smartphone 36 mins – “We love collecting data. That’s why we are happy to welcome Chrystian and Rebecca Vieyra to the show.  Working as an app developer and high school physics teacher, this husband and wife team developed Physics Toolbox – a suite of apps that use the built-in sensors inside smartphones to complement the current probeware used in classrooms. Listen to the show to hear more about Physics Toolbox and how it can be used to easily collect data in your classroom.” At the link right-click “Download” above the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DDT 16 mins – “Americans have had a long, complicated relationship with the pesticide DDT, or dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane, if you want to get fancy. First we loved it, then we hated it, then we realized it might not be as bad as we thought. But we’ll never restore it to its former glory. And couldn’t you say the same about America’s once-favorite pop star? We had a hunch that the usual narrative about DDT’s rise and fall left a few things out, so we talked to historian and CHF fellow Elena Conis. She has been discovering little-known pieces of this story one dusty letter at a time.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop- up menu.

Dessicant Tolerant Seeds 14 mins – “As the world’s population grows and the effects of climate change come into sharper relief, we’ll have to feed more people using less arable land. Molecular biologist Jill Farrant studies a rare phenomenon that may help: “resurrection plants” — super-resilient plants that seemingly come back from the dead. Could they hold promise for growing food in our coming hotter, drier world?” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eating Disorders 23 mins- “An important conversation about why eating disorders are being forgotten in the medical world, despite the fact that they cause the most deaths among all mental illnesses. In our last episode, we met Meredith Healey, a young woman who battled with anorexia and anxiety in her first year of university. But there’s one part of Meredith’s story that really stands out for us. While she was gripped by her first panic attack, she went to the hospital thinking she was having a heart attack. An ER doctor helped by asking her to breathe into a paper bag. When Meredith eventually calmed down, the doctor simply sent her home. At this point, Meredith was 100 pounds. She was skinny and frail, yet the ER doctor didn’t pick up on any physical signs pointing to a mental illness. Where is the disconnect when it comes to recognition by healthcare professionals? For more insight we asked Dr. Brian Goldman, an ER doctor and host of CBC Radio’s White Coat, Black Art, to join us for a chat.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Test 2 mins – “Can sixteen-year-olds be science superheros? Of course!… Meet Olivia Hallisey, a teenager in Greenwich, Connecticut. In 2014 Olivia read about the deadly Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa. She was shocked by how fast it spread. She learned Ebola tests take hours, even days, for results. This means infected people can unwittingly transmit the disease while waiting for a diagnosis. What’s more, test solutions must stay refrigerated to work. That’s tricky in many areas of Africa. Olivia read studies on a protein in silk called fibroin. Fibroin’s unique structure is why silk is so strong. That structure also makes fibroin insoluble: it won’t dissolve! It keeps stuff stored in it stable, too—even at room temperature. Olivia dipped paper strips into fibroin, then added antibodies for Ebola. This made a stable diagnosis card. When you add a patient’s blood and a little water? If Ebola is present, the card turns blue! And in only thirty minutes! Her project earned Olivia Grand Prize at Google’s National Science Fair.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emotional Stimuli 47 mins – “Dr Momna Hejmadi, from the University of Bath, explores some of the non-conventional patterns of behaviour and links them to how the brain works.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Future Industries 63 mins – “Leading innovation expert Alec Ross explains what’s next for the world, mapping out the advances and stumbling blocks that will emerge in the next ten years for businesses, governments, and the global community – and how we can navigate them.” At the link click “Download options,” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gentrification 71 mins – “On Being Black Gentrifiers: Both Brooklyn transplants, Brittany and Eric parse their roles as black gentrifiers in their borough’s rapidly changing landscape.” At the link click “Download” and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Graphene 56 mins – “Dr David Horsell of the University of Exeter explores graphene, nature’s thinnest material.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Haiti’s Iguanas 5 mins – “The Ricord’s Iguana lives only on Hispaniola, the island shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic, but even here you’re not likely to see one. It’s critically endangered on the whole island, and it was thought to be extinct here in Haiti, until a nest was found right here eight years ago, on a hilly stretch of sand and rock in the town of Anse-a-Pitres, running along a cliff overlooking the Caribbean Sea. The small population of Ricord’s iguanas on this isolated stretch of scrubland in Anse-a-Pitres, Haiti, is one of only three remnant populations of the species on the entire island of Hispaniola. Since the population was discovered, volunteer conservation workers have tried to improve the reptiles’ habitat by planting shrubby trees and cacti bearing fruit they call “iguana candy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Trends 49 mins- “‘Internet of Things’ technologies have emerged over recent years as enabling technologies for life-long healthcare. Increasingly these technologies are seen as moving health from the hospital to the home, whilst at the same time shifting responsibility for health from the clinician to Computer Scientists and Engineers. The 27th Designability Annual Lecture, ‘Data Scientist – heal thyself’, explored the possible scenarios with this vision for data-led personalised medicine.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Homeless Youth 8 mins – ““Homelessness doesn’t have a face, it doesn’t have a gender, it doesn’t have a sexuality. It can be anybody.” Here’s an eye-popping stat for you — 50% of homeless youth come from middle to upper income families. That’s according to Covenant House, the largest youth homeless organization in North America. We called a case worker with Covenant House to get some context. Have a listen. It might make you question your own views of homelessness.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ice Trade 18 mins – “In the mid-19th century, decades before home refrigeration became the norm, you could find ice clinking in glasses from India to the Caribbean, thanks to a global commodities industry that has since melted into obscurity: the frozen water trade. In the cold Northeast of the United States, workers would cut ice from frozen ponds, haul it to port, put it on a ship and send it around the world on voyages that could last for months.” At th link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous People Murders 23 mins – “It was in 2014 when Rinelle Harper called for a national inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women, after she was brutally attacked and left for dead. Now increasingly there’s a call to include men and boys in the official quest for answers.” At the link find the title, “Cheam First Nation chief calls for murdered men to be included in inquiry – Jan. 26, 2016 (1/3),” right-click “Media files current_20160126_99565.mp3 (MP3 – File, 20.1 KB)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet History 32 mins – “Craig Timberg, author of the [Washington Post] series “Net of Insecurity,” talks about the creation of the Internet, the founders’ objectives, why security played such a small role for them, and what cybersecurity issues face Internet users today.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Craig Timberg,” right-click “Media files program.421511.MP3-STD.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Porn 51 mins – “…In episode #113, I speak with Gary Wilson, author of Your Brain on Porn about Internet Porn Addiction and its shocking effects on the brain and its dopamine systems. (I hate using words like “shocking” because most things claimed to be shocking just aren’t. But I think this qualifies.) If you haven’t heard of Wilson’s work before, get ready to fall out of your chair. This stuff is not child’s play….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Strategies 24 mins – “Paul discusses 10 ways to make more with your Vanguard investments. He chooses his favorite dividend-based fund, best balanced funds, plus a non-Vanguard ETF that will improve your Vanguard ETF portfolio. Of course he will cover ways to get lower fees and make sure you don’t overlook the funds that are built for higher returns. In each case, he presents how an additional return can be squeezed out of your portfolio. As Paul has stressed in the past, a half a percent can change your retirement.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kurdish People 27 mins – “In this 1997 edition of Radio Curious, we visited with Bob Blincoe, a Presbyterian minister, who lived and worked among the Kurds in the Zagros Mountains from 1990 to 1996. The Kurdish people have long been aptly referred to as a “millet.” This is a Turkish term that originated in the Ottoman Empire when it ruled parts of central Europe to the near east from 1430 to 1921. It means “any ethnic group.” Until the 20th century millets, were able to control their way of life and effectively rule themselves. Now approximately 25 million Kurdish people live in the Zagros Mountains, where the borders of eastern Turkey, northern Iraq, and northwestern Iran converge. These Kurdish people live stateless and many homeless in their ancestral homeland. Currently they have been able to successfully defend themselves from brutal ISIS attacks. When Bob Blincoe lived among the Kurds and worked as a community organizer in their ancestral homeland he first spoke Arabic, so he wouldn’t stand out. He quickly learned Kurdish which he spoke only with great discretion. His stories of the Kurdish people are important to consider now in light of terrorism and other dangers inflicted against them.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leonardo Da Vinci 30 mins – “On the eve of a major new Science Museum exhibition, we look at Leonardo’s designs, and consider his influence on modern robotics and aeronautics Leonardo Da Vinci was an incredible polymath: one of the most diversely talented people ever known. The Science Museum’s new exhibition takes the machines that Leonardo drew and exquisitely reinterprets them in three-dimensional form, alongside games and multimedia installations. Nicola Davis is joined by Claudio Giorgione, curator at the Leonardo Da Vinci National Science and Technology museum in Milan, and by Professor Jim Bennett, Keeper Emeritus for the Science Museum.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lobbyists 65 mins – “What they don’t teach you in business school – and what you need to know. Powerful corporate interests use their lobbyists to wield influence. They impact our daily lives, but who are they and how do they operate? In this episode, George Franklin, previously the head lobbyist for Kellogg Company, gives us an inside look at what it’s really like to represent one of the largest food companies in the world. He gives us a no nonsense look at what it’s like to try to influence government policy for the good of a company. George is a lawyer and former Vice President of Worldwide Government Relations for Kellogg Company. He is currently President of Franklin Public Affairs LLC in Kalamazoo, Michigan, and is the author of the incredible book, Raisin Bran and Other Cereal Wars: 30 Years of Lobbying for the Most Famous Tiger in the World.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Loneliness Impact 13 mins – “What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it’s fame and money, you’re not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you’re mistaken. As the director of a 75-year-old study on adult development, Waldinger has unprecedented access to data on true happiness and satisfaction. In this talk, he shares three important lessons learned from the study as well as some practical, old-as-the-hills wisdom on how to build a fulfilling, long life.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Laws 6 mins – In this GAO – Watchdog Report state marijuana laws are discussed in an “Audio interview by GAO staff with Jennifer Grover, Director, Homeland Security and Justice” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up report.

Megaliths of Avebury 61 mins – “Freelance and professional writer Roger Vlitos examines the theories and myths about Avebury [megaliths]” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Mosquito Control 57 mins – “Zika virus, a pathogen transmitted by mosquitoes, has seemingly established itself in South America and the Caribbean and is now threatening the U.S. Cases have been reported in Florida, Illinois, Texas and Hawaii in patients having traveled to Central and South America, where they acquired the virus through mosquito bites. Our guest today, Joseph Conlon, technical advisor for the American Mosquito Control Association, will discuss how the virus could spread and what we can do to minimize our risks. We’ll also discuss what effect, if any, climate change has on mosquito-borne illnesses.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Newspaper Consolidations 26 mins – “The cuts in news media jobs and circulation are dominating the news this week. If a business model isn’t working anymore, should we use public subsidies to save papers? We convene a panel to discuss how traditional journalism can survive.” At the link find the title, “After massive layoffs, how can Canadian journalism survive? – Jan. 28, 2016 (2/3),” right-click “Media files current_20160128_98352.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Energy 50 mins – “Lecturer, writer and editor, Rick Marshall talks about how explosives are made and what to do if they’re detonated.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Obesity Control 34 mins – “We explore research methodologies for building an evidence base for nutrition and obesity policy that are emerging across disciplines. Well-informed nutrition policy decisions that consider scientific evidence should strive to improve health outcomes on a large scale. But it’s not always easy to find the right evidence to back up those policies. At our October 2015 conference, “Towards Evidence-based Nutrition and Obesity Policy,” speakers discussed emerging research methodologies, ways to interpret research outcomes, and how these outcomes can be used to inform policy. Listen in to this podcast to learn more about the important relationship between research and policy.” At the link find the title, “Building an Evidence Base for Effective Obesity Policy,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Supply and Demand 49 mins – “This week, Marketplace Weekend host Lizzie O’Leary looks at how oil plays a big role throughout our economy. We break down the history of America’s reliance on oil, check in with an oil worker who travels throughout the world to work on rigs and learn why a gallon of gas costs what it does.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Orthotic Nerve Impact 42 mins – “Back in Episode #104, Dr. Vince Clark made reference to a couple of dentists who were using dental orthotics — that is, orthodontics devices worn in the mouth — to affect brain systems in people suffering from conditions as varied as Tourette’s Syndrome to Sleep Apnea to untreatable Migraine Headaches. It took a few weeks to chase down the dentists in question, but the seed of curiosity was too well planted not to turn this into an episode. ow, we get to hear from Dr. Anthony Sims and Dr. Gary Demerjian, who are probably the two leading practitioners nationwide of this counterintuitive treatment approach — based on soothing irritated nerves in the jaw to alleviate symptoms often misdiagnosed as purely neurological.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peru 27 mins – “Peru is a county about which I’ve been curious for over 60 years, beginning when I first learned of the Inca Empire. Ten years later the Peace Corps sent me to Peru as volunteer for two years in 1964.Peru’s current societies are windows into a world in which many Andean people live in the three adjoining countries of Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia… The complex societies which flourished in this region, centuries before the Inca Empire was destroyed by the Spanish invaders in the 16th century are still very much a part of the lives of people whose homes and communities are located high in the Andes between 10,000 and 14,000 feet above sea level… When Radio Curious visited Peru and Bolivia in the fall of 2015 we engaged in several conversations about ancient and current times in Peru. Edith Zapata, an independent licensed Peruvian tour guide, based in Cusco, Peru, is our guest… We began our conversation with her description of the geological history of the Cusco valley, and moved forward in time to how some of the current leaders of the Catholic Church and some of the people of the greater Cusco area related to each other… You may contact her by email at ezv27@hotmail.com….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peter Thiel of PayPal 24 mins – “Peter is a serial company founder (PayPal, Palantir), billionaire investor (first outside investor in Facebook, 100+ others), and author of the new book Zero to One. Whether you’re an investor, entrepreneur, or simply a free thinker aspiring to do great things, I highly recommend you grab a copy. His teachings on differentiation, value creation, and competition alone have helped me make some of the best investment decisions of my life (e.g. Twitter, Uber, Alibaba, etc.).” At the link right-click beside download at “Here it is” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physician Burnout 41 mins – “Dr Dike Drummond is a Mayo trained Family Practice Physician who now specializes in physician burnout. The founder of TheHappyMD.com and author ‘Stop Physician Burnout’ he has come face to face with the realities of burnout as a physician on two separate occasions himself. He understands the complexities of physician burnout and how the one suffering burnout is often the last to know. Dr Drummond has coached thousands of physicians through the challenging times of burnout and speaks regularly across the globe to healthcare institutions in need of guidance on addressing this ever growing problem. This episode is part 1 of a two part series. On this episode we deep dive into what burnout is, what its causes are and how it manifests. This episode will be followed up by Part 2 which will focus on the strategies to target burnout at an individual and organizational level.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcast Creation 24 mins – “I was recently asked by a young man named Lane Cooper who is gettin stuff done at only 14. Give a listen he did a great job on this interview. I have included his youtube video of the interview and also run the audio only as a special edition on the podcast feed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presentation Preparation 56 mins – “Hi my name is Scott Weingart. I am a physician specializing in Resuscitation & Emergency Department Critical Care. My career so far has been devoted to bringing Upstairs Care, Downstairs. That is bringing ICU care down to the ED–where it needs to be. I love my job taking care of the sickest patients, innovating new ways to do it better, and then teaching these concepts to my residents.” This podcast deals with lessons learned about the creation of all types of presentations. At the link right-click “download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Children 26 mins – “The sting of separation and the wearing of an uncomfortable truth is the topic of this edition of Radio Curious. The 2.7 million children of prison inmates in the United States are losing their visitation rights. Sylvia A. Harvey, an investigative journalist, is our guest. Her story about the diminishing opportunities for children to visit their incarcerated parents was published in The Nation magazine on December 14, 2015. Some of Harvey’s most cherished childhood memories are the times she was able to visit her father while he was an inmate at Soledad State Prison, in California when she was between the ages of 5 and 16. When Sylvia Harvey and I visited by phone from her home in New York City, on January 18, 2016, we began with her personal experience and how now absence of not being able visit a parent in prison affects 2.7 million children.” At the link right-click “Click here…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rutherford’s Legacy 73 mins – “Dr Glenn Patrick of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory near Oxford looks at how particle physics has developed following Rutherford’s discovery and what developments we might expect.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Saudi Arabia Economy 16 mins – “For years, Saudi Arabia has been living off one resource and one resource only: Oil. But now, the price of a barrel has plummeted, and the country is scrambling to adapt.” At the link find the title, #681: The Oil Kingdom, Feb 2016,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep Science 89 mins – “Do we really need to sleep? Dr. Thomas Neylan looks at intrinsic sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and insomnia and what to do if they affect you. Dr. Elissaios Karageorgio looks at how aging affects sleep and Dr. Rochelle Zak looks at the neurophysiology of sleep. Recorded on 10/28/2015. (#30139)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup Rules 59 mins – “Mike Maples Jr., co-founder of the venture capital firm Floodgate, explains what entrepreneurs can learn from the very few technology startups that achieve hyper-exceptional success and market disruption. The Silicon Valley veteran urges tomorrow’s innovators to “only do things that you think have a chance to be legendary” – because it takes just as much work to do something mediocre.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide Prevention 20 mins – “When you listen to Blake’s story, you realize how lucky he was to have someone in his life who recognized the signs of mental illness early on. His father could see that Blake was battling some of the same personal demons that Blake’s mother had for years. It was that past experience that led to an intervention that may have saved Blake’s life. But many parents don’t have those experiences to draw from — and the signs of mental illness end up going unnoticed, especially when kids are away from home. This is what happened to Lynn Keane. In 2009, she lost her son Daniel to suicide. Today, Lynn is a highly respected voice on youth depression and suicide prevention. In a candid interview, we talk to her about her experience and what can be learned from Blake’s story.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Aid from Students 23 mins – “Students in Toronto have been mobilizing in huge numbers to respond to the humanitarian crisis in Syria. The Ryerson University Lifeline Syria Challenge was created by four Toronto area universities with a goal to help sponsor and resettle ten Syrian refugee families. In the past few months, hundreds of volunteers have responded to the call to action. Now the network of students is committed to helping 75 families. In this special edition of Campus, we speak with some of the students involved in this massive undertaking, and find out why they’ve come together to help.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

System Dynamics 4 mins – “…Most of us have played the game telephone at one time or another. The game’s leader whispers a phrase to the first person in a line of players. Each player in turn whispers the phrase to the next player in line. When the last player hears the phrase, she shares it out loud. Of course, the final phrase is rarely the same as the original. The differences are normally startling – and humorous. Yet while the end result is often funny, there’s also a lesson: a lesson businesses have learned all too well in recent decades….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism and Technology 27 mins – “Baroness Joanna Shields believes the internet is under siege and under threat and that there needs to be greater international governmental co-operation to see off the threats of groups such as so-called Islamic State. The UK Minister for Internet Safety and Security joins Click to discuss some of her ideas about making the world a safer place online and offline.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorist Concepts 66 mins – “Michael McCaul, U.S. Representative (R-Texas); Chairman of the U.S. House of Representatives Homeland Security Committee; Author, Failures of Imagination: The Deadliest Threats to Our Homeland—and How to Thwart Them; Twitter: @RepMcCaul Kori Schake, Research Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University—Moderator McCaul details the most pressing threats to our country based on his deep knowledge of our national security readiness, and he advocates for the action needed to protect us from them. In detail, he depicts the truth behind these hazards that are closer than we realize and suggests potential solutions for the government to take to keep Americans safe. As the 2016 presidential election quickly approaches, he believes Americans must turn their attention to these real and present dangers, and demand that the executive branch combat them with the seriousness and urgency they require.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorist Movement Technology 35 mins – “Baroness Joanna Shields believes the internet is under siege and under threat and that there needs to be greater international governmental co-operation to see off the threats of groups such as so-called Islamic State. The UK Minister for Internet Safety and Security joins Click to discuss some of her ideas about making the world a safer place online and offline.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Twitter Harassment Trial 28 mins – “Last week an Ontario judge found Gregory Alan Elliott not guilty of criminal harassment for his interactions with two women on Twitter. His acquittal encouraged the trolls and now vocal women’s rights activists are facing a barrage of offensive tweets.” At the link find the title, “Canada’s first Twitter trial highlights need to curb online harassment – Jan. 27, 2016 (3/3),” right-click “Media files current_20160127_35331.mp3 (MP3 – File, 25.2 KB)” and elect “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Unabomber Story 48 mins – “It has been nearly 20 years since the arrest of Ted Kazcynski, the man known as the Unabomber. In the 1980s and 90s, Kazcynski sent a series of mail bombs, killing three and injuring dozens. The attacks might have continued if it weren’t for Ted’s brother, David. After reading the Unabomber’s manifesto in the Washington Post, David Kazcynski grew suspicious. The ideas and writing resembled letters he had received from his mentally ill brother. David’s tip led to Ted’s arrest. Since then David has become an anti-death penalty activist and a mental health advocate. Now he has written a memoir. David Kaczynski and a forensic psychiatrist reflect on the story of the Unabomber and his family.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Water Recyling 14 mins – “As the world’s climate patterns continue to shift unpredictably, places where drinking water was once abundant may soon find reservoirs dry and groundwater aquifers depleted. In this talk, civil and environmental engineer David Sedlak shares four practical solutions to the ongoing urban water crisis. His goal: to shift our water supply towards new, local sources of water and create a system that is capable of withstanding any of the challenges climate change may throw at us in the coming years.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildlife Corridors 18 mins – “The Iron Curtain was an 8,000-mile border separating East from West during the Cold War. Something unexpected evolved in the “no man’s land” that the massive border created. In the absence of human intervention and disruption, an accidental wildlife refuge formed… Such wildlife corridors can be found around the world at a range of scales, from mountain lion freeway overpasses and crab bridges to squirrel wires and fish ladders. Some corridors help expand territories available to wide-roaming mammals, while others facilitate seasonal migrations for various species of bird or fish. The fish ladder was first patented by a Canadian lumber mill owner in 1837… The design takes advantage of a salmon’s natural ability to swim upstream through rapids and over small waterfalls… The Salmon Cannon, however, aims to change the landscape of possibilities, using differential pressure in an air-filled tube. This unlikely-sounding device actually started out as an apple cannon, created to move fresh-picked fruit from trees to central storage bins on an orchard along the Columbia River in Eastern Washington… While compelling, the cannon is not a perfect solution to landscape fragmentation, particularly in cases where too many dams effectively turn rivers into a series of ponds or lakes. They do help salmon make their way upstream, but some current is still required to carry the young hatchlings back downstream… Technologies like the fish cannon can help animals survive in a landscape increasingly dominated by humans, but sometimes the best thing for wildlife is for us to get out of their way.”At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wired Kevin Kelly 115 mins (3 parts) – “Kevin Kelly might be the real-life Most Interesting Man In The World. He is Senior Maverick at Wired magazine, which he co-founded in 1993. He also co-founded the All Species Foundation, a non-profit aimed at cataloging and identifying every living species on earth. In his spare time, he writes bestselling books, co-founded the Rosetta Project, which is building an archive of ALL documented human languages, and serves on the board of the Long Now Foundation. As part of the last, he’s investigating how to revive and restore endangered or extinct species, including the Wooly Mammoth….” At the link right-click “Part 1,” “Part2,” and “Part3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu for each.

Zika Virus Guide 27 mins – “Claudia Hammond finds out how much we know for certain about the mosquito-borne Zika virus and what we need to find out next to be able to assess the scale of the threat and deal with it effectively. In this special Health Check programme, Claudia is joined by Jimmy Whitworth, professor of International Public Health from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and regular studio guest James Gallagher, who is editor of the BBC health news website. The BBC’s Julia Carneiro meets some worried expectant mothers and women in Brazil who have to make the difficult decision about whether it is safe to become pregnant. And your questions on Zika are answered by experts in the studio in London and on the ground in Brazil; including virologist Professor Paulo Zanotto, from the University of Sao Paulo, who provides his expertise on the Zika virus.” At the link find the title, “The Essential Guide to Zika,” right-click “Media files p03hg8xx.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 223 – Feb 19, 2016:

The best 99 podcasts from a larger group of 274 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 8000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 280 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

 

Thank you for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 221 – Feb 5, 2016: Afghani Women, African Agriculture Development, Age and Cognition, Aging and Blindness, Aging Issues, Antarctic Activities, Antisemitism, Arctic Changes, Auction World, Australia Energy, Blended Families, Blindness Onset, Bombing vs Ground Troops, Book Publishing, Boycott Value, Categorizing Mental Disorders, Clean Energy Solutions, Climate Tactics, Compassion, Con Artists, Contrarians, Creationism, Crimean Annexation, Data Analysis, Data Collection by Smartphone, Data Overload, Davos Activities, Desalinization, Econometrics, Elderly Architecture, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Engineering Academic, Ethidium Bromide, Female Friends, Feminism Challenges, Flint Water, Foreign Policy Issues, Galapagos, Great Moghul of India, Healthcare Data Visualization, High Altitude Biology, Holocaust Music, Immortality, InfraGard, Interactive Science, Iran Sanctions Removal, ISTE Student Stndards, Knee Replacement Issues, Latino Factor, Legionnaires Case, Levitating Trains, Lying, Marco Polo, Mass Shooting in Canada, Microbiome Changes, Morality Foundations, Murder Trials, Music Recording Deals, National Cyber Protection, National Health Care Trends, Ocean Decline, One child Policy, Opiates Problem in Canada, Organ Invention, Partially Sighted, Patient Experiences, Perception and Action, Pilot Concerns, Planned Parenthood, Poverty Research, Problem Solving, Race Reality, Racial Divide, Radiology, Rasputin to Putin, Reading Process, Refugees, Republican Party Takeover, Research Replication, Rome Underground, Rwanda Mind Control, Scams and Scammers, Silicon Valley Titans, Slavery, Sneakers Market, Social Media Marketing, South Africa Reconciliation, Space History, Stem Cells, Supplements and Safety, Thomas Paine Common Sense, Treasury Department Automation, Vatican Secrets, Water Keepers, World Progress, Zika Virus

The best 99 podcasts from a larger group of 274 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 8000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 280 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Afghani Women 49 mins – “Two years ago a young couple in Afghanistan fell in love. They’re from different races, ethnic groups and Muslim sects. She’s a Caucasian Sunni and he’s an Asian Shiite. They defied their parents’ opposition to marrying and eloped. His family came to accept the marriage, but hers wants her dead – to restore their honor. This Afghan Romeo and Juliet story gained international attention when a New York Times reporter wrote about the couple in a series of articles – and now in a book. We talk to the author, a young Afghan human rights advocate and an Afghanistan expert about honor killings and the struggle many Muslim women are engaged in to win basic rights.” [3 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

African Agriculture Development 58 mins – “In a global system that seems to be remorselessly concentrating capital into fewer hands, this lecture will examine efforts to move money the other way in order to promote food security, with particular reference to Ethiopia.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Age and Cognition 88 mins – “ Decline in cognition with age and brain is not inevitable; there is considerable variability in how much and how fast. UCSF doctors explore age-related declines, their causes and how to tell if cognitive changes are because of aging or something else. Recorded on 10/21/2015. (#30138)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging and Blindness 19 mins – “The RNIB and Age Concern are worried that social care for older, blind people is steadily declining. They outline their evidence and explain how they think things could be improved. We get reaction to last week’s item about the need for a stylish symbol to indicate that you’re partially sighted. And we hear about a blind travel agent who flew three Channel 4 comedians over Ayers Rock himself.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Issues 65 mins – “Professor Tom Kirkwood, Director of the Institute for Ageing and Health at Newcastle University, explores how the ageing process is influenced by a broad range of lifestyle and environmental factors.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Antarctic Activities 57 mins – “In her recent article for Newsweek, “The Big Melt: The Last Antarctic Explorers Are Seeking Answers Inside The Continent’s Ice” (http://bit.ly/1RcuVpp), Nina Burleigh writes: “The history of the planet is held in frozen suspension in the Antarctic. Vertical miles of ice encase air bubbles that hold bits of atmosphere… some dating as far back as a million years ago. Fossil records show the place was once green, teeming with life,…[but now holds] 90% of the planet’s ice…and those 7.2 million cubic miles of ice are now melting at unprecedented rates… Scientists have predicted that even partial melting of the Antarctic ice will raise sea levels enough to force the 150 million people around the world—including parts of New York City, Miami and Mumbai, India—to abandon their homes.” Tune in as Nina shares her first-hand experience exploring Antarctica, and how vital scientific research being conducted there may provide answers to some of the most dangerous unknowns about climate change.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antisemitism 54 mins – “Anti-semitism has deep roots in France. Recent anti-Jewish demonstrations show that anti-semitism is still a potent force in contemporary France. Philip Coulter talks to scholars, historians and Jewish community leaders in Paris.” At the link find the title, “The Oldest Hatred,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160126_24426.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arctic Changes 30 mins – “When we try to visualize the Arctic, we usually think of ice as far as the eye can see. But, unfortunately, that’s changing. This week’s guest on Sea Change Radio, author Roy Scranton, gives us a first-hand glimpse into the rapidly melting polar cap up North. Scranton, who recently took a cruise through Greenland and Northern Canada for a piece published in The Nation magazine, presents us with the many challenges we face as this vast region undergoes vast transformation. Then, host Alex Wise and Scranton discuss Scranton’s book, Learning How To Die In The Anthropocene, and how his time as a U.S. soldier in the Iraq War gave him a unique perspective on climate change and environmentalism.” At the link right-click “Download’ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Auction World 15 mins – “We uncover the secrets of the auction world. There is conniving. There are tricks. Also: Hydraulic hammers.” At the link find the title, “#678: Auction Fever,” right-click “Media files 20160122 pmoney_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pot-up menu.

Australia Energy Issues 54 mins – “In just over 35 years, the world population is expected to increase by almost 50%, from 7 billion people now to 10 billion. Without change, in less than 20 years enough fossil fuel will have been burnt to increase average global temperature by an average of 2 degrees Celsius. Some areas in the Arctic are already 5 degrees Fahrenheit above average. Urgent action is required. Coal and oil needs to stay in the ground and other sources of power need to be implemented quickly. But such a transition will not happen overnight. So what are the options for Sydney, and other Australian cities? How is it that France became nuclear powered? How has China, with its smog managed to embrace solar power so quickly? The Geological Society of Australia assembled this forum of scientists and engineers to discuss options in Australia and reflect on achievements elsewhere” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blended Families 47 mins – “In the old “Brady Bunch” TV show, two families were thrown together by remarriage and blended. It was an icon early in America’s introduction to widespread divorce and reshuffling. Today, a full 40 percent of marriages are remarriages. And nobody thinks blending families is a snap. Some say it can take a decade. Some don’t even like the phrase “blended family.” There are many configurations. Some never blend. This hour On Point, what it really takes to blend two families, or to make a step-family.At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save LinkAs” from pop-up menu.

Blindness Onset 53 mins – “…we begin our coverage of the Sundance Film Festival with the story of John Hull. Hull went blind in 1983 and he knew that if he didn’t try to understand this massive change, it would defeat him. So he kept an audio diary of his experiences. While he may have appeared to be adjusting well on the surface, his tapes reveal a desperate inner struggle. Directors James Spinney and Peter Middleton will join us to discuss their innovative documentary about Hull’s journey to a “world beyond sight.” The film Notes on Blindness is written, directed, and produced by James Spinney and Peter Middleton, who also created a series of award-winning short documentaries based on John Hull’s audio diary. Notes on Blindness is screening in the New Frontier category at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival. Spinney and Middleton also collaborated with cross-platform artists to create a virtual reality experience called “Notes on Blindness–Into Darkness,” which gives participants an idea of what blindness might have been like for John Hull.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bombing vs Ground Troops 26 mins – “It was widely seen as a stumble on the international stage when PM Trudeau didn’t offer specifics on the pledge to pull Canadian fighter jets out of the coalition that’s bombing ISIS. Today, we look for a clearer picture of Canada’s anti-ISIS plans.” At the link find the title, “Defence minister Harjit Sajjan faces heat over Canada’s anti-ISIS strategy – Jan. 26, 2016 (2/3),” right-click “Media files current_20160126_40256.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Publishing 13 mins – “At the American Booksellers Association’s Winter Institute meeting this week in Denver, indie booksellers heard their online nemesis Amazon branded a monopolist and a tax evader. Douglas Preston, who has led the Authors United movement to force the Dept of Justice to charge Amazon with antitrust violations, even told ABA members that the company is a contemporary equivalent of Standard Oil, the Gilded Age giant that finally fell to the trust-busting sword of President Theodore Roosevelt…“Yes, Amazon is the clear market leader. Yes they are brutal negotiators. But if they went away tomorrow, you could still get books and publish easily. You could still exchange ideas, and speech. God forbid a reader should have to patronize Barnes & Noble, or Apple, or Google, or Kobo, or Sony, or Smashwords, or an indie bookstore. “Whatever Amazon is doing, there is still a vibrant supply chain existing alongside them in publishing that has grown by leaps and bounds in efficiency,” Albanese tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “In that light, the call for an Amazon action looks to me to be less about the free flow of ideas than about preserving a market position.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boycott Value 37 mins – “The Montgomery Bus Boycott, the South African divestment campaign, Chick-fil-A! Almost anyone can launch a boycott, and the media loves to cover them. But do boycotts actually produce the change they’re fighting for?” At the link right-click the three-dot bar beside “Que” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Categorizing Mental Disorders 17 mins – “Steven E. Hyman discusses the philosophical issues that arise from attempting to categorise mental disorders with David Edmonds in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clean Energy Solutions 53 mins – “Professor Saiful Islam, of the University’s Department of Chemistry, gives a flavour of the fascinating chemistry behind green technologies such as hybrid petrol-electric cars and fuel cells.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Climate Tactics 60 mins “Swedish anthropologist Alf Hornborg says economic crash could empower change to save climate. UK scientist Sergei Petrovskii on new paper: warming die-off of oxygen-making plankton. Robert Shirkey gets climate warning labels on Canadian gas pumps. Radio Ecoshock 160120 “ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Compassion 77 mins – “Over the last decade, a quiet revolution has taken place in the sciences of the mind and psychotherapy. Eastern mind training traditions, and Western psychology have come together in an unprecedented fashion, allowing the development of advanced new psychotherapies. Concepts such as mindfulness, acceptance and compassion, which were once typically associated with Eastern meditative practices are now central therapeutic concepts that are being researched the world over… Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is currently considered the best method in existence to treat a variety of mental illnesses ranging from anxiety, to panic, to OCD. However, many people don’t realize that there are a number of different kinds of therapy under the CBT umbrella. Our guest this week is Dennis Tirch, the foremost expert in one of the newest and most effective forms of CBT known as Compassion Focused Therapy….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Con Artists 26 mins – “Why is it that people who are otherwise smart and rational keep getting sucked-in by the con artist’s magic? From snake oil… to email scams, New Yorker writer Maria Konnikova gets inside the con artist’s head in her book, The Confidence Game.” At the link find the title, “Hooked on a feeling: inside the con artist’s confidence game – Jan 19, 2016 (3/3),” right-click “Download Hooked on a feeling: inside the con artist’s confidence game – Jan 19, 2016 (3/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Con Artists 29 mins – “How does the brain of the con artist differ from the rest of us? And how could some of their skills be redeployed for the greater good? Why are we more likely to be tricked when we’re emotionally vulnerable? In The Confidence Game, author Maria Konnikova surveys con artists from different walks of life, from global swindlers to small-time street hustlers. With her, we take a look at the con artist’s shared traits of narcissism, psychopathy and machiavellianism, and Konnikova suggests how some of the skills of the con artist might be redeployed for the greater good.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.”

Contrarians 54 mins – “IDEAS presents some very contrary views from Moses Znaimer’s 2015 ideacity conference: Dr. Amy Lehman on aid & development; Dr. Patick Moore on science & environmentalism; and Alex Epstein on the moral case for fossil fuels.” At the link find the title, “Contrarians, January 2016” right-click “Media files ideas_20160122_51758.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creationism 59 mins – “Steve Jones, professor of genetics at University College London, describes why he believes that creationism is wrong and evolution is right at a lecture organised by the Department of Chemistry at the University of Bath.” At the link click “Download” to download the file.

Crimean Annexation 26 mins – “Two years ago in a referendum, Ukrainian-controlled Crimea voted to be annexed to Russia. Two years on, Mother Russia is anything but nurturing as Ukrainian nationals and a Tatar minority leave out of fear and Western sanctions squeeze those who remain. Russian Regrets?” At the link find the title, “Crimeans disenchanted 2 years after annexation – Jan. 26, 2016 (3/3),” right-click “Media files current_20160126_71390.mp3 (MP3 – File, 23.3 KB)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Analysis 12 mins – “Does collecting more data lead to better decision-making? Competitive, data-savvy companies like Amazon, Google and Netflix have learned that data analysis alone doesn’t always produce optimum results. In this talk, data scientist Sebastian Wernicke breaks down what goes wrong when we make decisions based purely on data — and suggests a brainier way to use it.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Overload 21 mins – “Our friends at Note to Self have just launched a new project called Infomagical, which hopes to be an antidote to “infomania” and a “collective FOMO course correction”. It’s not about your gadgets per se, it’s about all the stuff on them, and all the stuff coming out of them, and getting a grip on the constant stream of information. Through Infomagical, Note to Self hopes to turn your anxiety-inducing information portals into overload-fighting machines. We’re bringing you the introductory episode (listen above). You can visit Note to Self’s page to stay tuned and find out more about Infomagical.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Davos Activities 46 mins – “On this episode of Slate Money, Felix goes to the World Economic Forum in Davos! Felix Salmon of Fusion, Cathy O’Neil of mathbabe.org, and Slate’s Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann are joined by special guest Jenny Anderson, a Quartz reporter at the conference. They discuss: Their first takes on Davos; Diversity at the World Economic Forum; The $68 Davos burger; And, of course, Donald Trump.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Desalinization 15 mins – “Water infrastructure issues are much in the news in the U.S. — not only in the West, where drought continues to take a high toll, but also in other parts of the country, where the water needs for municipalities, energy production, commercial interests, and agriculture intersect and sometimes conflict. In this interview, one in a series of three exploring some of the nation’s water challenges, we talk with Bob Yamada, Director of Water Resources for the San Diego County Water Authority, about the mix of strategies adopted to meet the growing needs of the authority’s customers, and the new Carlsbad Desalination plant. This advanced technology reverse osmosis facility was built, financed, and will be operated through a public-private partnership under a water purchase agreement to serve the region for the next three decades.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Econometrics 64 mins – “Nobel Laureate James Heckman of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the state of econometrics and the challenges of measurement in assessing economic theories and public policy. Heckman gives us his take on natural experiments, selection bias, randomized control trials and the reliability of sophisticated statistical analysis. The conversation closes with Heckman reminiscing about his intellectual influences throughout his career.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elderly Architecture 48 mins – “Our homes are a resource for us as we age. Though age-friendly design is often about grab bars and ramps for supporting mobility and preventing accidents, it is most of all about living well in our homes. Architect and social entrepreneur Susi Stadler will help the audience discover the potential of our homes to adapt to our changing needs. She will teach us how, by demanding practical, creative and elegant solutions, to arrive at a different way of living in our homes by seeing age-friendly design as a way to enhance overall quality of life.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eleanore of Aquitane 45 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the life, times and influence of Eleanor of Aquitaine (c1122-1204) who was one of the most powerful women in Twelfth Century Europe, possibly in the entire Middle Ages. She inherited land from the Loire down to the Pyrenees, about a third of modern France. She married first the King of France, Louis VII, joining him on the Second Crusade. She became stronger still after their marriage was annulled, as her next husband, Henry Plantagenet became Henry II of England. Two of their sons, Richard and John, became kings and she ruled for them when they were abroad. By her death in her eighties, Eleanor had children and grandchildren in power across western Europe. This led to competing claims of inheritance and, for much of the next 250 years, the Plantagenet and French kings battled over Eleanor’s land…” At the link find the title, “Eleanor of Aquitaine,” right-click “Media files p03gt847.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineering Academic 101 mins – “Jon Ellis (@profgears), researcher and professor at the University of Rochester, talks about the rigors of being on the tenure track, doing high precision distance measurement and helping define NIST standards” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethidium Bromide 5 mins- “…Originally used as an anti-parasitic, anti-bacterial and anti-viral drug in the 1940s, ethidium bromide has a passionate affinity for DNA, which gives it its medicinal properties. Made up of linked rings of carbon and hydrogen atoms (with a few nitrogens and a bromine ion thrown in) its flat, plate-like shape enables it to easily slip between the rungs of DNA’s double helical ladder – a feat known as intercalation. By locking into DNA like this, ethidium bromide blocks the enzyme responsible for copying out the genetic code when cells, bacteria and viruses reproduce. Not only that, but by slotting into the helix it also changes the way that DNA interacts with UV light, creating that characteristic orange gleam….” At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Ethidium bromide.mp3” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Female Friends 16 mins – “Legendary duo Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin have been friends for decades. In a raw, tender and wide-ranging conversation hosted by Pat Mitchell, the three discuss longevity, feminism, the differences between male and female friendship, what it means to live well and women’s role in future of our planet. “I don’t even know what I would do without my women friends,” Fonda says. “I exist because I have my women friends.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feminism Challenges 60 mins – “Anne-Marie Slaughter is the Washington power player who upset the feminist applecart. At the peak of her career — as first female Director of Policy Planning at the US State Department — she turned her back on her dream job with Hillary Clinton in order to spend more time with her teenage sons. How, cried her contemporaries, could she have sacrificed her high-powered career for her family? Slaughter’s ensuing article for The Atlantic, ‘Why Women Still Can’t Have It All’, went viral, sparking furious debate about how men and women juggle their working lives. Having it all, Slaughter argued, remained a mirage. Women who managed to be both mothers and top professionals were either ‘superhuman, rich or self-employed’. On January 26, Anne-Marie Slaughter came to the Intelligence Squared stage, together with Amanda Foreman, award-winning historian and presenter of the recent BBC documentary series The Ascent of Woman, which charts the role of women in society over 10,000 years. They were joined by neuroscientist and broadcaster Daniel Glaser and Sky News social affairs editor Afua Hirsch, as they examined what real equality might look like for both men and women. Is gender equality a matter of women ‘leaning in’ harder in their careers? Or do we all need to fundamentally rethink the roles we assign ourselves, so that both sexes can break free from traditional gender stereotypes?” At the link find the title, “What Next For Feminism?” right-click “Media files 244413825-intelligence2-what-next-for-feminism.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flint Water 54 mins – “The economically depressed city of Flint, Michigan, is making headlines across the country because there’s something in its water that shouldn’t be there. You may have heard about the problems in Flint: about how the tap water can be brownish, stinky, funny-tasting. After denying there was a problem for more than a year, state and city officials finally admitted it – there was too much lead in the water. On this hour of Reveal, you’re going to hear the whole story of how people in Flint went from trusting their tap water to fearing it. And thanks to Michigan Radio’s Lindsey Smith, who produced an incredible documentary called “Not Safe to Drink,” we dive right in.” At the link find the title, “Do not drink: The water crisis in Flint, Michigan,” right-click “Media files Do-not-drink_-The-water-crisis-in-Flint-Michigan.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foreign Policy Issues 57 mins – “Lord Rees-Mogg, former Editor of The Times, gives a free public lecture on the changing international scene.” At the link click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Galapagos 54 mins – “This week, a glaring omission is corrected. The Science Show goes to the Galapagos Islands. Despite being on holidays, Robyn Williams has his trusty recorder and microphone on hand as he takes a boat trip between the islands. Naturalists explain the habits of fish, reptiles and birds and we visit the sites where Charles Darwin was so inspired by what he saw, that it led to the development of his theory of natural selection, explaining evolution and the diversity of life on Earth.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Great Moghul of India 59 mins – “Nicholas Fogg describes life at the Court of the Great Moghul, his campaigns, his foibles and his lasting impact on the history of India.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Healthcare Data Visualization 55 mins – “Dr Este Geraghty is the Chief Medical Officer of Esri (Environmental Systems Research Institute) in Redlands, California. Having originally trained in Internal Medicine and working as an Assistant Professor of General Internal Medicine at UC Davis her primary focus is now on how healthcare data visualization can change how we deliver healthcare in the modern world. This is an exciting conversation with topics ranging from how technology will guide the patient to the best car parking space to how recent infectious diseases crisis like the ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone and Liberia was managed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

High Altitude Biology 46 mins – “Like the mutating cells it was trying to investigate, and through a serendipitous series of unrelated coincidences, what started out as a multi-disciplinary UK-based research project to explore the stratosphere using helium balloons somehow evolved and mutated into a high-powered rocketry based research collaboration with NASA Astrobiologists in the Nevada Desert. At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Holocaust Music 27 mins – “Music teacher Francesco Lotoro resurrects the music of Holocaust victims, with the help of the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra. For the past few decades Francesco has been collecting music written in concentration camps from World War Two. Working closely with composer Adam Gorb, together they pick through an archive of 8000 pieces, much of which has never been heard.” At the link find the title, “Raising the Dead,” right-click “Media files p03gnshg.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immortality 53 mins – “Professor Malcolm Johnson from the Department of Social and Policy Sciences at the University of Bath looks at the changing face of death in an ageing society.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

InfraGard 28 mins – “InfraGard, one of the longest running outreach associations, represents a partnership between the FBI and the private sector. Members include businesses professionals (including many law firm employees), people from academic institutions, and local participants who share their experience and expertise with the FBI to assist in crime prevention. In the recent climate of rampant cyber security issues, many in the private sector are better equipped to fight these cyber threats. So why is it important for lawyers to know about and potentially join InfraGard? In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview FBI special agent and InfraGard coordinator Kara Sidener about the way InfraGard works and why lawyers and other law firm professionals should be interested in joining this two-way information sharing platform.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interactive Science 53 mins – “Professor Stephen Payne from the University of Bath, will discuss how his research combines an understanding of the human mind with the design of interactive systems.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Iran Sanctions Removal 28 mins – “After years of isolation, Iran has flung open it doors, at least to foreign investment. How will this affect Iranian-Canadians who have family and friends still in Iran, who have felt the brunt of economic sanctions in the past?” At the link find the title, “How will renewed economic relations with Iran affect Iranian-Canadians? – Jan 29, 2016 (3/3),” right-click “Media files current_20160129_81653.mp3 (MP3 – File, 25.2 KB)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISTE Student Standards 41 mins – [International Society for Technology in Education] “We decided to need to … instead of get off the pot. So here we are! Hopefully we still have a few listeners… Mom? Dad? Anyone” [The Tech Chicks recommended these useful and interesting sites: ISTE Standards for Students Draft, Star Wars DC Posters, Nearpod Revisited, ClassKick, Sites for Sources Images on the iPad, NYPL Release of Images, H&R Block Budget Challenge, 50 iPad Apps for Struggling Readers and Writers, 10 Google Add-Ons for Teachers, 5 Makerspace Books You Need to Read, What Was There, History Pin, and Pixar in a Box At the topic link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Knee Replacement 51 mins – “Modern knee replacement is a highly successful operation, relieving the pain and disability of knee osteoarthritis. However, it has limitations and these, combined with the changes in population demographics, present significant challenges for both current and future healthcare systems. Professor Richie Gill’s inaugural lecture ‘What is wrong with knee replacement?’ explores these issues and the research being done to overcome them.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Latino Factor 48 mins – “The Latino factor in 2016 and beyond. We’re in California, where Latinos are now the biggest ethnic group in the state.” At the link find the title, “On Point Live: Lessons For The Country In California’s Latino Plurality,” right-click “Media files npr_464328054.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Legionnaire Case 30 mins – “An unwelcomed stranger snuck into the city last summer, and New Yorkers were panicking. A sudden outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease, a type of pneumonia caused by waterborne bacteria, had landed in the city in July… They narrowed down the search to five suspect water coolers in the South Bronx, and shared this information with the public… Though they eventually tracked the source to one cooling tower, they couldn’t be sure. They still needed to grow more Legionella in the lab and match it to the bacteria in infected people to confirm that they had indeed cleaned the right unit, which would take weeks… New legislation was passed that required building owners in the entire city, not just the Bronx, to clean their cooling towers within two weeks. In the public’s eyes, this mass effort was something close to heroic. The deaths stopped, new cases weren’t reported. The whole city seemed to be actively fighting this strange disease. But it was the city health department, quietly waiting for the Legionella to grow in labs, that would truly put an end to the outbreak. Dr. Varma and his team were able to match the bacteria samples to one single water cooler tower on top of a hotel. A tower they had, luckily, cleaned weeks before. At the link find the title, “How to Stop and Outbreak,” right-click “Media files onlyhuman012616_cms569032_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Levitating Trains 50 mins – “*sorry about the audio quality* *one guy was in china, and my mic broke and all sorts of bad stuff happened. :(* Erika Ensign, from all the dr. who podcasts, has come on our show so that Darren Peets and Abby Shockley and I can do our best to explain how VORTICES enable MAGNETIC PINNING in TYPE 2 SUPERCONDUCTORS.” At the link right click “Direct download: Ep 61 Levitating Trains.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lying 54 mins – “Everyone agrees that lying is, generally, a bad thing to do. But it’s actually quite hard to figure out what’s wrong with it! Philosophers Michael Blake, Samantha Brennan, Arthur Ripstein and IDEAS host Paul Kennedy tell us the truth about lying.”At the link find the title, “The Truth About Lying, January, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160120_85184.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marco Polo 54 mins – “Almost everything we think we know about Marco Polo – traveller, explorer, the man who brought the wonders of the East to the west – is being questioned. Tony Luppino searches for the real man and story behind the legendary wanderer.” At the link find the title, “Making Maro Polo, January 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160121_23195.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Shooting in Canada 23 mins – “It has been a weekend of mourning, disbelief and a multitude of questions, in tiny La Loche, Sask., after a 17-year-old boy was charged in Friday’s mass shooting. Today we’re asking how the tight-knit community is coping and what it needs now.” At the link find the title, “La Loche, Sask., struggle to cope with tragic mass shooting – Jan 25, 2016 (1/3),” right-click “Media files current_20160125_71580.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbiome Changes 60 mins – “Why are obesity, juvenile diabetes and asthma increasing? Is it something in the environment or in our modern lifestyle? Dr. Martin Blaser thinks that it may be due to changes in our microbiome – the ecosystem of tiny microscopic creatures that live in and on us. Learn about his hypothesis that some of the greatest medical advances in the 20th century – antibiotics, C-sections and antiseptics- may be having unintended consequences. Dr. Martin Blaser has studied the role of bacteria in human disease for over 30 years. He is the director of the Human Microbiome Program at NYU. He founded the Bellevue Literary Review and has been written about in newspapers including The New Yorker, Nature, Science, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal. His more than 100 media appearances include The Today Show, The Daily Show, Fresh Air (NPR) GMA, the BBC, The O’Reilly Factor, and CNN. He lives in New York City.” At the link you can view the video with many visual aids or right-click “MP3 Audio Only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Morality Foundations 54 mins – “Jonathan Haidt is a social psychologist at the NYU-Stern School of Business. Haidt’s research examines the intuitive foundations of morality, and how morality varies across cultures–including the cultures of American progressive, conservatives, and libertarians.” At the link click “Download options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Murder Trials 52 mins – “…On this episode of BackStory, the Guys will explore our fascination with courtroom drama. What makes for a compelling case and why have some landmark proceedings received little attention? We’ll consider why so many Americans followed the trial of a young clerk accused of murdering a New York City prostitute in 1836, and why we’re still talking about Sacco and Vanzetti nearly a century after they were sentenced to death. From public hanging in Puritan Massachusetts, to the murder trial of Black Panther leader Huey Newton in the late 1960’s, the Guys will reveal the deep-seated issues beneath American trial-watching.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Recording Deals 52 mins – “Stepping away from radio promotion to attend law school, George Gilbert began a record label with the intent of licensing out-of-print R&B titles from Atlantic Records. When financing fell through, George began working on the musical reunion of Meat Loaf and Jim Steinman that would eventually result in the release of the multi-platinum ‘Bat Out of Hell 2’. Listen to part two of Gilbert’s interview as he explains how he convinced label executives that despite having four consecutive flops, Meat Loaf was still as popular as ever. He also tells of how the key man clause in Whitney Houston’s contact saved Clive Davis’s job; why musicians are often afraid to audit their record labels; and how the upcoming battle over copyright termination rights is going to be one fierce fight. Hear this and more, exclusively on Between the Liner Notes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Cyber Protection 6 mins – “DHS [Department of Homeland Security] Information Security – Audio interview by GAO staff with Greg Wilshusen, Director, Information Technology” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Health Care Trends 36 mins – “We look at the innovations that are changing the NHS today and asks what science on the horizon will transform the health service in the next decade It employs 1.6 million people, spends more than £4,000 a second, and performed 10m operations last year in England alone. Millions more visit emergency units, have outpatient care, and receive help for mental health problems. This week we’re focusing on the NHS and how science and technology underpin the care doctors can give to patients. Ian Sample talks to Professor Sir Bruce Keogh, NHS England’s Medical Director and professional lead for NHS doctors. Bruce is responsible for promoting clinical leadership, quality and innovation, having previously been a surgeon and physician who specialised in cardiac surgery. And we hear from three specialists from very different parts of the NHS:….” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Decline 60 mins – “Arlene Blum, Executive Director, Green Science Policy Institute Liz Cunningham, Author; Environmental Activist From the depths of the ocean to the highest mountain summits, our planet is under assault as never before. From very different perspectives, two female adventurers share their extraordinary worldwide experiences to inspire action to meet urgent environmental challenges that face us now and in the future. Their message is one of inspiration and hope that all of us working together can save and preserve the wild and wonderful environments on our planet. Learn about their work, adventures and inspiration, now and for the future of planet earth.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

One Child Policy 56 mins – “Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Mei Fong talks about her book, [One Child: The Story of China’s Most Radical Experiment], about the one-child policy in China and its impact on the country” At the link find the title, “After Words with Mei Fong,” right-click “Media files program.425831.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opiates Problem in Canada 26 mins – “Starting in February, codeine will no longer be available without a prescription in Manitoba. How bold of a move is this? And will it be enough to curb abuse?” At the link find the title, “Codeine will require a prescription in Manitoba in February – Jan. 29, 2016 (2/3),” right-click “Media files current_20160129_98633.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Organ Invention 4 mins – “…In the very first years after Alexander, people like Euclid and Archimedes worked in Alexandria. So, too, did one of the greatest engineers who ever lived — a man named Ktesibios. Ktesibios was fascinated by fluid flow — the movement of water and air. He revolutionized the measurement of time when he invented a new water clock. The flow of water into it was held steady by the first feedback-controlled water supply valve. He invented a piston-powered water pump and used it to force water into a closed reservoir where it trapped air. That compressed air could then expel water through, say, a fire-fighting nozzle. Ktesibios was also interested in music. Writer Thomas Levenson tells how Ktesibios solved the problem of supplying air to a set of pipes. He used his water-powered air-reservoir to fill a box that fed the pipes. He created a keyboard that let performers open individual pipes to the air box. In one stroke he’d given us the pipe organ, close to its modern form, over 2200 years ago… ….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Partially Sighted 19 mins – “Symbols to Say You Are Partially Sighted – News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patient Experiences 59 mins – “…Despite enormous sums spent on health care and extensive training of professionals, patients are largely dissatisfied with the service they receive. A growing body of evidence points to the human experience as a key driver for improved patient satisfaction, health outcomes and loyalty. How can we turn this around? What role can patients, with unprecedented access to health-care information, play in a system that historically has disempowered them? What is a realistic vision of a patient-centric system that delivers both medical care and compassionate health-care journeys? Dr. Bridget Duffy, the nation’s first chief experience officer at the Cleveland Clinic and the leader of the patient experience movement, has spent more than 20 years defining the components of an ideal healing environment. Relentless in her mission to fix this broken system, Dr. Duffy will share 10 ways to restore humanity, respect and trusted relationships in health care.” At the linkr ight-click “play now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Perception and Action 68 mins – “The idea that our brains are prediction machines is not new, but in his latest book, Surfing Uncertainty: Prediction, Action, and the Embodied Mind, Andy Clark explores how this idea can be integrated with embodied cognition. The key idea is that while our brains are constantly predicting sensory input, this is intimately tied to action. Perception is active, not passive, and there is an ongoing loop between perception, attention and action. I explore these ideas with Dr. Clark in the latest episode of the Brain Science Podcast. Thanks to Dr. Clark these potentially intimidating ideas are accessible to listeners of all backgrounds.” At the link right-click “FREE audio mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pilot Concerns and Issues 172 mins – “The crew for this week’s episode is Captain Jeff, Miami Rick, and Captain Nick. NEWS: Retired Alaska Airlines Captain Accused Of Piloting Plane While Under The Influence; ‘Plane wreckage’ found in Thailand fuels talk of missing Malaysian jet; FAA updates flight review guidance; JFK allowed passengers arriving on international flight to exit without going through Customs; German tourist escorted off plane by police after ‘opening emergency exit door just for fun’; It happened again: AA flight diverted back to DFW, airline claims dark runway; FAA Registered Nearly 300,000 Unmanned Aircraft Owners.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Planned Parenthood Cases 48 mins – “A grand jury in Texas investigating Planned Parenthood instead indicted two abortion opponents who made undercover videos of the organization. We discuss what makes an undercover investigation criminal and the ongoing political battle over Planned Parenthood’s role and funding.” [5 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Poverty Research 52 mins – “The President of the Child Poverty Action Group, Baroness Ruth Lister, gives an insight into poverty research in the UK.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Problem Solving 7 mins – “The water hyacinth may look like a harmless, even beautiful flowering plant — but it’s actually an invasive aquatic weed that clogs waterways, stopping trade, interrupting schooling and disrupting everyday life. In this scourge, green entrepreneur Achenyo Idachaba saw opportunity. Follow her journey as she turns weeds into woven wonders” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race Reality 50 mins – “ On Martin Luther King Day, a conversation about racism in America and Black Lives Matter with poet Claudia Rankine and activist DeRay Mckesson. Protesters hold signs at a press conference in front of city hall in North Charleston, S.C., Friday, Jan 8, 2016, in the wake of the release of former North Charleston police officer Michael Slager on bond. Slager was charged with murder in the shooting death of an unarmed black motorist in April 2015. The last year and a half have been hot in a way many didn’t see coming on the subject of race in this country. From Ferguson on, exploding layers of dissatisfaction with the way things are – all these years after the civil rights movement. On this Martin Luther King Day, we’re taking on this new chapter in American race relations with celebrated poet Claudia Rankine and Black Lives Matter activist DeRay Mckesson. This hour On Point, America’s next chapter on race.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racial Divide 65 mins – “On this episode of BackStory, the Guys will consider how and why Americans throughout the centuries have crossed the lines of racial identity, and find out what the history of passing has to say about race, identity, and privilege in America. We’ll look at stories of African-Americans who passed as white to escape slavery or Jim Crow and find out how the “one-drop rule” enabled one blonde-haired, blue-eyed American to live a double life without ever arousing suspicion. We’ll also explore the story of an African-American musician who pioneered a genre of exotic music with a bejeweled turban and an invented biography, and examine the hidden costs of crossing over.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radiology 88 mins – “Most cases of kidney cancer are found incidentally by imaging. How can this technology help to not only diagnose but treat? Hear from UCSF radiologists on new insights into cutting edge techniques. Recorded on 11/17/2015. (#30136) “ At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rasputin to Putin 38 mins – “Professor David Gillespie, from the University of Bath’s Department of European Studies & Modern Languages, explores Russian culture and the country’s search for a national identity.” At the link click “Download” and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Reading Process 41 mins – “My guest today is Liz Schotter, a postgraduate student in psychology at UC San Diego and one of the most active researchers in the field of reading and eye-tracking at the moment. I reached out to her when I was doing research for the 3rd video in the speed reading series, and the insight she was kind enough to provide really helped to make that video shine. After finishing that video series, however, I still had questions…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Health Issues 14 mins – “Etienne Langlois discusses the importance of access to appropriate health-care services for refugees worldwide.” At the link find the title, “Refugees and health-care services: The Lancet: January 22, 2016,” right-click “Media files 22january.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Summits 62 mins – “With global displacement at record levels, it is clear that humanitarian protection will continue to be a key focus for policymakers and the international community throughout 2016. This year’s calendar is dotted with a series of high-profile international events related to migration and refugee protection—including conferences in London (February 4) and Geneva (March 30) addressing the fallout of the Syrian civil war, and a pair of summits on refugees and migrants hosted by the United Nations and the United States in September. These high-level meetings could prove crucial in paving the way for meaningful solutions for the world’s forcibly displaced populations. Migration Policy Institute (MPI) experts join the UN Secretary-General’s Special Representative on International Migration, Peter Sutherlan, for a webinar focusing on what can be expected to be discussed at this year’s high-level migration summits, and what tangible results might occur. In addition to Mr. Sutherland, the webinar features MPI Senior Fellow T. Alexander Aleinikoff, former UN Deputy High Commissioner for Refugees, and MPI Senior Fellow and Co-Founder Kathleen Newland.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Republican Party Takeover 63 mins – “Cliff and Digby discuss Trump and the fracturing GOP. Planned Parenthood developments—good news in Texas, but Ohio still a major battleground. The centrist Democrat leadership terrorized by Sanders, and the concomitant rise of the Bloomberg spectre. Digby: Hillman Award-winning blogger; American political writer and founder of the liberal blog Hullabaloo; contributing writer for Salon Magazine.@digby56 http://digbysblog.blogspot.com/ http://www.salon.com/writer/heather_digby_parton/ Cliff: President, Libertas, LLC (PR). Bestselling Author: The Real McCain; Daily Beast columnist; weekly guest, The Majority Report; co-founder and part owner of Washington DC’s independent progressive radio station, We Act Radio, 1480AM. Find his firm at http://www.libertasllc.com and his site at cliffschecter.com Follow @cliffschecter The 2016 Virtually Speaking Media Panel Avedon Carol, Cliff Schecter, Culture of Truth, David Dayen, Dave Johnson, David Waldman, digby, Gaius Publius, Isaiah Poole, Joan McCarter, Marcy Wheeler, Sara Robinson, Susie Madrak, Spocko, Stuart Zechman” At the link find the title, “digby & Cliff Schecter • VS Sundays,” right-click “Media files digby-cliff-schecter-vs-sundays.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Research Replication 21 mins – “How much of published scientific research is false? Scientists are trying to figure it out.” At the link find the title, “#677: The Experiment Experiment,” right-click “Media files 20160115 pmoney pmoneypod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rome Underground 54 mins – “Delving into Rome’s past by venturing into what lies below it. Megan Williams goes underground in the city that was once known as the capital of the world. She uncovers the quiet secrets it continues to offer up and the questions that hang unsolved.” At the link find the title, “Underground Rome (Encore March 12, 2015),” right-click “Media files ideas_20160127_49226.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rwanda Mind Control 26 mins – “After covering brutal conflict and crisis in several African countries. Anjan Sundaram headed to Rwanda to teach journalism. He was excited to be in a country praised by the West for its progressive President. And then he tried actually reporting.” At the link find the title, ‘Bad News’ author exposes repression of journalists in Rwanda – Jan. 25, 2016 (2/3),” right-click “Media files current_20160125_84825.mp3 (MP3 – File, 22.9 KB)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scams and Scammers 23 mins – “You’ve seen these ads: “You can work from home and get rich. It’s easy. Call this number!” So, what happens when you respond?” At the link find the title, “#680: Anatomy Of A Scam,”Media files 20160129_pmoney_podcast012916.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Silicon Valley Titans 25 mins – “It was a meeting of two American masters: Robert Noyce, who, in inventing the integrated computer chip and founding Intel, willed Silicon Valley into being, and Tom Wolfe, who in holding a magnifying glass over the social and class currents that shape America, rewrote the laws of what it meant to be a journalist. Their resulting Esquire story from 1983, “The Tinkerings of Robert Noyce,” remains one of the most revealing and entertaining portraits of early Silicon Valley and the personalities, imagination, and free wheeling gall that triggered and continue to power the computer revolution. Kara Swisher, who spent two decades covering digital issues for The Wall Street Journal before cofounding the influential technology site Re/code, joins host David Brancaccio to discuss what both Noyce and Wolfe wrought, and how the influence of each—in computers and nonfiction writing, respectively—remains as powerful and mesmerizing as ever.” At the link find the title, “The Tinkerings of Robert Noyce, by Tom Wolfe,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13153/2415459/Esquire-Classic_-The-Tinkerings-of-Robert-Noyce-by-Tom-Wolfe.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slave Geneology 46 mins – “Regina Mason’s great, great, great grandfather, a man named William Grimes, was as runaway slave and the author of what is now considered the first fugitive slave narrative. Mason talks about finding out her family’s secret history. [then] Kevin Whitehead reviews two unusual cross-cultural recordings from musicologist Joachim-Ernst Berendt.” At the link find the title, “January 18, 2016 , A Family Discovers Its Connection To An Escaped Slave,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery 48 mins – “Kevin Bales discusses the lives of enslaved people and the environmental impact of human bondage. Slavery often exists in places where “the local environment [has] just been destroyed,” Bales says. His book is ‘Blood and Earth.’ [then] Ken Tucker reviews Benji Hughes’ album ‘Songs in the Key of Animals.’” At the link find the title, “January 20, 2016 ‘Blood And Earth’: How Modern Slavery Contributes To Ecocide,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sneakers Market 63 mins – “How many pairs of sneakers do you own? Josh Luber of Campless and StockX talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the world of sneakerheads–people passionate for collecting and trading sneakers. Each week people line up to buy classic sneaker models Nike re-releases. Luber has collected millions of transactions from Ebay on these sneakers and others and has analyzed the return to investing in various sneaker models. The conversation includes a discussion of how Nike has helped to create this market and Luber’s work creating a stock market for sneakers and other goods.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Marketing 56 mins – “Thanks to social media, today’s teens are able to directly interact with their culture — artists, celebrities, movies, brands, and even one another — in ways never before possible. But is that real empowerment? Or do marketers still hold the upper hand? In “Generation Like,” author and FRONTLINE correspondent Douglas Rushkoff (“The Merchants of Cool,” “The Persuaders”) explores how the perennial teen quest for identity and connection has migrated to social media — and exposes the game of cat-and-mouse that corporations are playing with these young consumers. Do kids think they’re being used? Do they care? Or does the perceived chance to be the next big star make it all worth it? The film is a powerful examination of the evolving and complicated relationship between teens and the companies that are increasingly working to target them.” At the link find the title, “Generation Like, Feb 2014,” right-click “Media files 136878864-frontlinepbs-generation-like.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Africa Reconcilitation 54 mins – “Judge Richard Goldstone presents the 2015 Vancouver Human Rights Lecture. It’s been twenty-one years since the end of Apartheid. Goldstone reviews the successes and the failures of the African Truth and Reconciliation Commission in his lecture.” At the link find the title, “Reconciliation in South Africa – Richard Goldstone,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160125_37835.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space History 49 mins – “ Award-winning space historian, Piers Bizony, presents an illustrated account of the Space Age, from the first tiny satellites to America’s colossal project to land men on the moon.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Stem Cells 53 mins – “Professor Melanie Welham from the University of Bath’s Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology talks about the benefits of stem cells.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Supplements and Safety 56 mins – “FRONTLINE, The New York Times and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation examine the hidden dangers of vitamins and supplements, a multibillion-dollar industry with limited FDA oversight.” At the link find the title, “Supplements and Safety, January 20, 2016” right-click “Media files 242902953-frontlinepbs-supplements-and-safety.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thomas Paine Common Sense 46 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Thomas Paine and his pamphlet “Common Sense” which was published in Philadelphia in January 1776 and promoted the argument for American independence from Britain. Addressed to The Inhabitants of America, it sold one hundred and fifty thousand copies in the first few months and is said, proportionately, to be the best-selling book in American history. Paine had arrived from England barely a year before. He vigorously attacked monarchy generally and George the Third in particular. He argued the colonies should abandon all hope of resolving their dispute with Britain and declare independence immediately. Many Americans were scandalised. More were inspired and, for Paine’s vision of America’s independent future, he has been called a Founding Father of the United States….” At the link find the title, “Thomas Paine’s Common Sense, January 2016,” and click it to download the file.

Treasury Department Automation 65 mins- “In 1997, as a freshly-minted lawyer, Mariano-Florentino (Tino) Cuéllar joined the staff of the Treasury Department’s Office of Enforcement. Almost immediately, he was drawn into some of the fascinating issues that Treasury confronted at the time, from the regulation of electronic money to international policing and anti-corruption initiatives. In this talk, he reflects on his years at Treasury and discusses some of the connections between the challenges he encountered at Treasury then, and some of the dilemmas facing the world today.” At the link right-click “Download the MP3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vatican Secrets 86 mins – “ Thanks to social media, today’s teens are able to directly interact with their culture — artists, celebrities, movies, brands, and even one another — in ways never before possible. But is that real empowerment? Or do marketers still hold the upper hand? In “Generation Like,” author and FRONTLINE correspondent Douglas Rushkoff (“The Merchants of Cool,” “The Persuaders”) explores how the perennial teen quest for identity and connection has migrated to social media — and exposes the game of cat-and-mouse that corporations are playing with these young consumers. Do kids think they’re being used? Do they care? Or does the perceived chance to be the next big star make it all worth it? The film is a powerful examination of the evolving and complicated relationship between teens and the companies that are increasingly working to target them.” At the link find the title, “Secrets of the Vatican ,” right-click “Media files 136878961-frontlinepbs-secrets-of-the-vatican.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Keepers 57 mins – “On today’s episode of Go Green Radio, we will talk to Marc Yaggi, Executive Director of Waterkeeper Alliance (www.waterkeeper.org), about how- in 21st century America- a town of 100,000 people in Flint, Michigan was exposed to extremely high levels of lead in their drinking water. We will talk about the public policy failures, the actions taken by policymakers, how individual residents will be affected, and lessons that every community in America should learn from this disaster. Waterkeeper Alliance is the world’s fastest growing environmental movement, with over 270 Waterkeeper Organizations protecting rivers, lakes and coastal waterways on 6 continents. The organization’s President is Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Progress 44 mins – “On this episode of Slate Money, Felix Salmon of Fusion, Cathy O’Neil of Mathbabe, and Slate Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann are joined by special guest William Easterly, professor of economics at New York University and author of The Tyranny of Experts: Economists, Dictators, and the Forgotten Rights of the Poor. They dig into: The realities of the developing world; Poor and displaced populations; The World Bank” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus 48 mins – “ Health officials are alarmed at the rapid spread of Zika virus in Latin America and the Caribbean. Brazil reported its first case of the mosquito-borne virus last year. Since then, cases have been reported in 21 countries and territories throughout the region. Disease experts suspect the virus of causing an unusual spike of a rare birth defect. It may also be linked to a syndrome that can lead to paralysis. The Centers for Disease Control is advising pregnant women to avoid travel to countries where the virus is spreading. Guest host Indira Lakshmanan and a panel of guests discuss efforts to control the virus and develop a vaccine.” [4 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 221 – Jan 29, 2016: Academics in Government, Age Friendly Homes, Alcoholism Movie, Anxiety, Aquaponics, Assisted Dying, Astronomy History, Bee Decline, Black Politician, Brain Diseases, Brown v. Board of Education, Building Materials, Cat Trapping, Chernobyl, Common Rights, Computers Replace Lawyers, ConArtists, Corruption in China, Creative Problem Solving, CRSPR Technology, Crusades, CSI Unmsked, Dead Body Disposal, Death and Dying, Disaster Stories, Drug Reserch Costs, Elderly Aids from Technology, Emotional Robots, Energy from Microbes, Every Student Succeeds, Eye Witness Indentification, Fear, Financial Strategies, Flint Water, Genius Defined, Gravity and Light, Greenland Glaciers, Habits and Happiness, Hounds for Heroes, Information Architecture, International Security, Policy Kew Gardens, Koch Brother Activities, Logical Fallacies, Marijuana in Canada, Money and Power, Nanotechnology, National Health System History, Nuclear West Tests, Oscar Awards Controversy, Particle Physics, Police Shootings in Canada, Political Decline, Political Stagnation, Probability, Radio Astronomy, Rage Causes, Rosenwald and racism, Siege of Moscow, Soil Rehabilitation, Stabilizing Peace, Stock Market Trends, Tea History, Time of Death Bacteria, United Nations History, Wildlife, Zika Virus

The best 72 podcasts from a larger group of 254 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 8000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three  free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 280 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded and you can make your own selected list.

Academics in Government 44 mins – “Professor Dame Janet Finch talks about how academia and government can work together.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Age Friendly Homes 58 mins – “Our homes are a resource for us as we age. Though age-friendly design is often about grab bars and ramps for supporting mobility and preventing accidents, it is most of all about living well in our homes. Architect and social entrepreneur Susi Stadler will help the audience discover the potential of our homes to adapt to our changing needs. She will teach us how, by demanding practical, creative and elegant solutions, to arrive at a different way of living in our homes by seeing age-friendly design as a way to enhance overall quality of life.” At the link right-click Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcoholism Movie 25 mins – “Can a pill cure alcoholism? It’s one of the questions explored in Wasted, a new documentary that follows Mike Pond, a psychotherapist and alcoholic, who seeks out the latest, science-based addiction treatments.” At the link find the title, “Wasted’ documentary looks at how prescription drugs can fight addiction – Jan 20, 2016 (2/3),” right-click “Download ‘Wasted’ documentary looks at how prescription drugs can fight addiction – Jan 20, 2016 (2/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anxiety 71 mins – “Professor Paul Salkovskis talks about understanding and treating anxiety.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Aquaponics 44 mins – “ In the second part of my interview with Doug Burdette we talk about aquaculture as a community development strategy, the mechanics of aquaponics, and I read a listener’s comments.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Assisted Dying 76 mins – “Lord Joel Joffe believes that there is an ‘urgent need’ to change the law on assisted dying and will argue in his lecture that assisted dying and palliative care are essential and complementary aspects of care for people suffering from painful incurable diseases.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Astronomy History 47 mins – “Michael Lemonick, a freelance science journalist from Princeton University, looks at the discoveries of William and Caroline Herschel.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bee Decline 41 mins – “Stuart Roberts, research fellow at the University of Reading, discusses the decline of bees and its effect on the environment. Evidence is presented on the state and trends of bees, the likely drivers of change and the possible long term effects.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Black Politician 54 mins – “Civic leader Michael Tubbs shares his story of growing up in the California Central Valley, attending Stanford and going on to become one of the youngest elected officials in U.S. history. The Stockton City Councilman calls on entrepreneurs behind today’s biggest tech innovations to also focus on solving society’s biggest problems, like poverty, illiteracy and inequality.

Brain Diseases 89 mins – “A look at the causes and treatments of progressive dementia with UCSF’s Dr. Michael Geschwind and Dr. Jeff Gelfand. Recorded on 10/14/2015. (#30137) “ At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brown v. Board of Education 94 mins – “Jeffrey Rosen and Tomiko Brown-Nagin talk about the 1954 Supreme Court case [Brown v. Board of Education], in which the Court unanimously ruled that separate public schools were not equal, reversing previous court decisions.” At the link find the title, “Supreme Court Landmark Case [Brown v. Board of Education],” right-click “Media files program.411314.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Building Materials 46 mins – “Professor Peter Walker discusses research into new ways of using traditional building materials such as earth, hemp and straw as a greener choice for modern construction. Professor Walker is Director of the BRE Centre for Innovative Construction Materials at the University.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Cat Trapping 51 mins – “We live in a country of cat lovers. About 80 million cats live in our homes today, but what about the other 80 million living outside of the house? In this episode of Reveal, we take a look at two cats whose fates diverged – one, an invasive predator, is encouraged to thrive and hunt; the other, a native wildcat, is being hunted and trapped.” At the link find the title, “Cat Fight, Jan 2016,” right-click “Media files Cat-Fight_PCAST.mp3” nd select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chernobyl P2 18 mins – “Alla Kravchuk, the daughter of two former employees at the power station, returns to the nearby town of Pripyat. Now a world famous ghost town with trees growing through the once neat concrete squares and streets, it used to be her hometown. As well as an emotional journey back, Alla also talks to other people dealing with the aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster.Burying “ At the link find thte title, “Chernobyl – Part Two,” right-click “Media files p03fz0ln.mp3” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Common Rights 48 mins – “In this lecture, Dr Susan Oosthuizen, historic landscape specialist from the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education, will explore the archaeological evidence for the management of prehistoric pasture.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Computers Replace Lawyers 40 mins – “After years of writing and thinking about the future of the legal profession, Richard Susskind began to run into legal professionals whose careers are being affected by technology. In addition to lawyers, those in the medical, architecture, financial, and other fields have begun to notice a shift in the provision of professional services. Richard got together with his son, Daniel Susskind, at the time working in justice policy, education policy, and health policy for the British Prime Minister, to examine how technology is increasingly playing a fundamental role in how all service-based professions work. They recently published a book on the subject called “The Future of the Professions.” In this episode of The Digital Edge, Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview Richard and Daniel Susskind about their new book and key topics within that might interest lawyers who wish to prepare for the future. They discuss a “grand bargain” concept of exclusivity, the capability of machines to replace cognitive, physical/manual, and emotional skills currently provided by human professionals, and the right questions to ask about the future of legal services. Are there any tasks that computers won’t be able to do?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Con Artists 26 mins – “Why is it that people who are otherwise smart and rational keep getting sucked-in by the con artist’s magic? From snake oil… to email scams, New Yorker writer Maria Konnikova gets inside the con artist’s head in her book, The Confidence Game.” At the link find the title, “Hooked on a feeling: inside the con artist’s confidence game – Jan 19, 2016 (3/3)” right-click “Download Hooked on a feeling: inside the con artist’s confidence game – Jan 19, 2016 (3/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in China 28 mins – “To make way for growth, China’s government is seizing land from farmers and villagers. The seeds of unrest have been planted and property owners seem to be the biggest losers in the country’s urban boom.” At the link find the title, “China’s government land grab fuels unrest with farmers, villagers – Jan 20, 2016 (3/3)”,” right-click “Download China’s government land grab fuels unrest with farmers, villagers – Jan 20, 2016 (3/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creative Problem Solving 16 mins – “Challenges and problems can derail your creative process … or they can make you more creative than ever. In the surprising story behind the best-selling solo piano album of all time, Tim Harford may just convince you of the advantages of having to work with a little mess. “ At the link right-click “Download,” then right=click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CRSPR Technology 27 mins – “Science Magazine recently reported on the Top Scientific Breakthroughs of 2015, and on this episode of Science Studio, we’ll learn about two of them: CRISPR Gene Editing Technology, and Reproducibility in Psychology.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crusades 39 mins – “Ms Lambert, of Goldsmiths University, has worked as a history lecturer for 20 years. Her talk will look at the repeated failures to recover ‘holy land’ territories after 1147.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

CSI Unmasked 43 mins – “Forensic anthropologist Kathleen Conabree discusses issues surrounding what really goes on at a crime scene and what the term forensic actually means.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Dead Body Disposal 53 mins – “Why is it that we care for the dead? The philosopher Diogenes suggested that his corpse simply be tossed over the city wall, but it’s an idea that seems unthinkable. Historian Thomas Laqueur says bodies matter because we’ve decided they do – from prehistoric times, regardless of faith or creed. Laqueur’s new book explores the ways we’ve ritualized and remembered the dead throughout history. Wednesday, he joins Doug to explain how our relationship to the dead has helped shape the modern world. Thomas Laqueur is is the Helen Fawcett Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley. His book is called The Work of the Dead: A Cultural History of Mortal Remains.At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death and Dying 57 mins – “Professor Allan Kellehear, Professor of Sociology at the University of Bath’s Centre for Death & Society, gives an overview of the changing attitudes and behaviour of human beings and other hominids in their response to death, dying and loss over the last two million years.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Disaster Stories 34 mins – “In this week’s episode hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and Sam Bradley got the chance to interview EMS author B.J. Schneider over Skype to find out more about his book, “Welcome to New Orleans: How Many Shots Did You Hear?” In this return episode, B.J. continues to discuss his experiences in New Orleans. This week he talks specifically about his response with New Orleans EMS to Hurricane Katrina. This is a rare look at Katrina response from the inside. We have had federal and NGO responders on the show before, but we’ve never taken a hard look at the local responders and what they went through during the devastation following that storm. Check out this amazing episode with B.J. and check out his book via the links below.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Research Costs 48 mins – “Mobile technology is emerging as a powerful tool for transforming the way clinical research is conducted now and in the future.” At the link find the title, “Improving Clinical Trials through Mobile Technology,” right-click “Media files 160119_mobiletech.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elderly Aids from Technology 63 mins – “Professor Gail Mountain, Professor of Health Services Research (Assisted Living Research) at University of Sheffield; Director of EPSRC-funded SMART Consortium & Principle Director of KT-EQUAL Consortium will describe how technology can be used to meet the needs of an ageing population.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Emotional Robots 50 mins – “Dr Joanna Bryson, an expert in machines that have their own artificial intelligence, explores the issues associated with the concept.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Energy from Microbes 73 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, and Elio Schaechter.The microbophiles investigate the ratio of bacterial to human cells in our bodies, and how placing solar panels on a bacterium enables it to carry out photosynthesis.” At the link right-click “download TWiM#119” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Every Student Succeeds 62mins – “”The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) recently signed into law updates the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and provides a stronger focus on closing the achievement gap between English learners and other students. The law maintains accountability for subgroups of students, including English learners. Most importantly, it builds on that requirement by elevating English proficiency outcomes to be a key element of statewide accountability systems. Despite these changes and other improvements for English learners, the law moves many critical accountability decisions from the federal to the state level, meaning that new strategies and efforts will be needed to ensure quality education services for these children. The creation of state plans and accountability measures to implement the new law’s provisions will provide immigrant groups and other English learner stakeholders with numerous opportunities to safeguard English learners’ rights to an equitable education and ensure they can excel along with other students. Join us January 21 to learn more about ESSA’s provisions and particular areas of concern for stakeholders who seek to maintain and build policies and practices that support immigrant and English-learner students’ success.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eye Witness Identification 43 mins – “Dr Adrian Scott, from the University’s Department of Psychology, considers the fallibility of human memory and how past experience and knowledge of the world influence recollection.” At the link click ‘Download” to get the file.

Fear 60 mins – “This week we’re talking about fear: how it works, what it does to our bodies and brains, and why we sometimes seek it out. We’ll spend the hour with Margee Kerr – a sociologist, fear researcher, and diehard haunted house fan – talking about her new book “Scream: Chilling Adventures in the Science of Fear”.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Strategies 30 mins – “Paul responds to the many questions he has received regarding what to do during this highly volatile market. Should investors respond by rebalancing or changing their choice of assert classes or asset allocation? Paul discusses several internet resources he believes give investors a better understanding of how difficult it is to predict the future. The first is a link to a portion of a chapter of Larry Swedroe’s book, “The Successful Investor Today: 14 Simple Truths You Must Know When You Invest.” While the book was published in 2003 it totally valid today. The second is a link to the most powerful graphic lessons for investors trying to understand how difficult predicting the future can be. “The Callan Periodic Table of Investment Returns” allows you to quickly see the returns of the last 20 years and how each of 10 asset classes performed each year. If you believe a picture is worth 1000 words this one may be worth 10,000 words.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flint Water Crisis 49 mins – “In April 2014, the water supply in Flint, Michigan, was switched from Lake Huron to the Flint River to save money. Almost immediately, residents reported problems with its smell, taste and appearance. Even a local GM plant stopped using it. Officials insisted the water was safe but then, last fall, a Flint pediatrician found dangerous levels of lead in children had risen since the water switch. Fast forward to today – a state of emergency has been declared and there are growing calls to hold government officials accountable. Guest host Susan Page discusses the latest on the Flint water crisis.” [4 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Flint Water Crisis 28 mins – “For over a year, Flint, Michigan’s water has been unfit to drink. Many say it points to a continuing neglect of a poor, and largely black community, in the former industrial heart of America. We discuss the water woes in Flint and its correlation to race.” At the link find the title, “Flint’s water crisis reflects history linking lead levels to race and poverty – Jan 22, 2016 (3/3),” right-click “Download Flint’s water crisis reflects history linking lead levels to race and poverty – Jan 22, 2016 (3/3)and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genius Defined 49 mins – “Athens. Vienna. Silicon Valley. Calcutta. Hangzhou, China. Edinburgh. Florence. All of them are cities that, at different moments in history, have seen genius thrive. With artists like Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, philosophers like Aristotle and Plato, and with our modern tech innovators, Steve Jobs and Bill Gates. This hour On Point, the geography of genius and creativity around the globe.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gravity and Light 56 mins – “Professor Mark Birkinshaw talks about the effect of gravity on light as part of the 2008 Herschel lecture, named in remembrance of the Bath astronomer who discovered the planet Uranus in 1781.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Greenland Glaciers 16 mins tot – “In Greenland, a climate change mystery with clues written in water and stone The effects of climate change are starting to make themselves clear just about everywhere, but nowhere more dramatically than Greenland. The giant island holds the world’s second largest ice sheet, and it’s melting fast—an average of 287 billion metric tons of ice a year. Global warming is the big culprit, but scientists aren’t so sure about a lot of the details. And they need to be, to help figure what might be ahead for the rest of us as melting ice leads to sea level rise and big changes in the oceans. Recently The World’s Ari Daniel traveled to Greenland, with a group of researchers who are trying to unlock parts of the mystery. Here’s the first of his reports from the edge of the ice sheet.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu. Do the same here for Part 2.

Habits and Happiness 58 mins – “We repeat about 40 percent of our behaviors every day. Whether they are good or bad, Rubin believes that when we change our habits, we change our lives. So how do we change? Through research and experimentation, Rubin offers a framework of different strategies to fit our individual personalities. Rubin is the bestselling author of The Happiness Project and Happier at Home, with more than two million copies sold worldwide.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hounds for Heroes 43 mins – “June Ward talks about the charity Hounds for Heroes.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Information Architecture 47 mins – “Jeffrey Zeldman’s guest is Abby Covert, Information Architect; curator of IA Summit; co-founder of World IA Day; president of IA Institute; teacher in the Products of Design MFA program at New York’s School of Visual Arts; and author of How To Make Sense of Any Mess, a “brilliant introduction to information architecture” (Peter Morville) that is frequently purchased at Amazon with Don’t Make Me Think and The Design of Everyday Things, the two classics of usable design. Discussed: why IA matters now more than ever, the difference between IA and content strategy (IA is building the vehicle, CS is putting fueling it and making sure it won’t run out of gas), writing and designing a book, building agreement among stakeholders, “not having opinions, not having ideas of one’s own,” IA’s origins in language and structure, the fun of the IA Summit, the creation and growth of World IA Day, the joy of teaching, and more.

International Security Policy 51 mins – “Professor Adrian Hyde-Price from the University’s Department of Politics, Languages & International Studies examines the nature and causes of contemporary war and conflict, and considers the prospect of peace in the 21st Century.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Kew Gardens 74 mins – “Professor Angela McFarlane explores how The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, is using digital media to engage new, global audiences in its science and conservation work.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Koch Brothers Activities 49 mins – “Jane Mayer investigates the Koch family and how ‘Dark Money’ enters and influences our political system. [then] Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews ‘The Past’ by Tessa Hadley.” At the link find the title, “January 19, 2016, The ‘Hidden History’ Of The Koch Brothers,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Logical Fallacies 41 mins – “If you have ever been in an argument, you’ve likely committed a logical fallacy, and if you know how logical fallacies work, you’ve likely committed the fallacy fallacy. Listen as three experts in logic and arguing explain just what a formal argument really is, and how to spot, avoid, and defend against the one logical fallacy that is most likely to turn you into an internet blowhard.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana in Canada 22 mins – “The Liberal government will introduce legislation that will legalize, regulate, and restrict access to marijuana. And there are already competing interests making their voices heard over who will get to grow and sell legalized recreational marijuana.” At the link find the title, “How Canada can ensure legalized pot trumps the black market – Jan 20, 2016 (1/3),” right-click “Download How Canada can ensure legalized pot trumps the black market – Jan 20, 2016 (1/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Money and Power 38 mins – “Entrepreneur and journalist Margaret Heffernan takes a fresh look at money and power.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Nanotechnology 48 mins – “Richard Jones, professor of Physics at the University of Sheffield, looks at how we can manipulate matter at the level of individual atoms and molecules and the possible impact this will have on advances of medicine, energy and information technology.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

National Health System History 89 mins – “Delivered by Professor Allyson Pollock, public health research and policy specialist at Queen Mary, University of London, this IPR lecture explored major changes and challenges to the NHS through government reform, what this means for patient access and what needs to be done about it.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Nuclear West Tests 52 mins – “…we’re talking about the effects of nuclear weapons on people who lived near uranium mines and downwind from testing sites during and after the Cold War. Historian Sarah Alisabeth Fox says that all wars happen where people live, grow their food and raise their children. So to understand what happened, she talked to ranchers, farmers, and housewives who suffered from cancer and economic ruin. Fox joins Doug to talk about “A People’s History of the Nuclear West.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oscar Awards Controversy 25 mins – “The lack of diversity in this year’s Oscar nominees has led American stars to call for an Oscars boycott. We convene a panel of Canadian industry movers-and-shakers for an overdue conversation and ask for their thoughts on diversity in the Canadian scene.” At the link find the title, “Why Oscar nominee diversity matters beyond Hollywood – Jan 22, 2016 (2/3) ,” right-click “Download Why Oscar nominee diversity matters beyond Hollywood – Jan 22, 2016 (2/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Particle Physics 61 mins – “Dr Glen Patrick. of Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxford, talks about how it’s possible to probe the hidden universe and what particle physics can tell us about its secrets.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Police Shootings in Canada 25 mins – “In Canada, almost 40 per cent of civilians killed by police were dealing with a mental health crisis. As a jury deliberates in the police shooting of Sammy Yatim, we look at a documentary exploring lethal encounters between police and the mentally ill.” At the link find the title, “Close to 40 per cent of civilians killed by police are in mental crisis – Jan 21, 2016 (2/3) ,” right-click “Download Close to 40 per cent of civilians killed by police are in mental crisis – Jan 21, 2016 (2/3)”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Decline 49 mins – “ Former Senate leaders Republican Trent Lott and Democrat Tom Daschle say the partisan gridlock in Washington has become a national crisis. While they disagree on many issues, they agree that congressional dysfunction has had a crippling effect on democracy. In their new book, “Crisis Point: Why We Must — And How We Can — Overcome Our Broken Politics In Washington And Across America,” they propose a number of reforms, including limiting filibusters, shortening the campaign season and having all state primaries on one day. But more important than reforms, they say is changing Washington’s political culture. Guest host Susan Page talks with the senators about how politicians from both parties can work together.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Political Stagnation 48 mins – “The level of political partisanship has surged in recent years. Some point to the election of Barack Obama as the cause. But Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne argues the roots of today’s politics go back to Barry Goldwater’s failed campaign for the presidency in 1964. Dionne argues it was “Goldwaterism,” with its promises to abolish large parts of the federal government that created what he calls a cycle of disappointment and betrayal among Republican voters. He says the result was a steady march rightward within the GOP. Guest host Susan Page and guests discuss the history and evolution of contemporary American conservatism.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Probability 55 mins – “Professor Andreas Kyprianou from the Department of Mathematical Sciences gives a gentle introduction to probability theory and its pivotal role in current mathematics research.” At the link click “Download” to download the file.

Radio Astronomy 58 mins – “Professor Phil Diamond, Director of the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, talks about the research activities at the observatory, home to one of the world’s biggest and most powerful radio telescopes.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Rage Causes 66 mins – “[5 min mark on] On the show this week we talk to neurobiologist Douglas Fields about his new book Why We Snap: Understanding the Rage Circuit in Your Brain.” At the link find the title, “117 Douglas Fields – The Science of Rage and Why We Snap,” right-click “Media files 2cfad8e6-41e4-45cf-ba6b-847d5e284f1c.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rosenwald and Racism 58 mins – “Filmmaker Aviva Kempner discusses her documentary [Rosenwald], about the life of American businessman and philanthropist Julius Rosenwald.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Aviva Kempner,” right-click “Media files program.424002.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Siege of Moscow 21 mins – “This episode, narrated Tim Martin, of the newly launched Valiant: Stories of Heroes Podcast, covers Guderian’s dash to Tula. Ray will be back next time, with full vocal ability in tow.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode152, 11816_8.30_PM.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soil Rehabilitation 30 mins – “Author Courtney White believes he has a quick fix for what ails the planet: build topsoil, fix creeks and eat meat from pasture-raised animals. He outlines this strategy in his latest book Grass, Soil, Hope: A Journey Through Carbon Country. White and Sea Change Radio host Alex Wise discuss the profound impact that could result from some simple changes in ranching and farming practices, and why this might appeal to both liberals and conservatives. Then, we hear from British-based sustainability consultant, Michael Townsend who explains why we need to re-frame how we view the economy to better incorporate well-being.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stabilizing Peace 71 mins – “Lord Paddy Ashdown – former High Representative in the successful reconstruction of Bosnia and a former leader of the Liberal Democrats – severely criticises the reconstruction of Iraq, calling it a ‘catastrophic failure’ in which ‘daily carnage’ is taking place. This lecture was organised by the University of Bath and the Royal Society of the Arts.” At the link click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stock Market Trends 50 mins – “The report Friday as Wall Street closed for a long weekend: US markets have never had a worse start to a new year than this one, 2016. From Shanghai to New York and way beyond, the opening weeks of the year were down, down, down. There’s room to bounce. Asian markets did at the opening bell today. But big fears still, too. On China. On oil On troubles all over, and what’s being called the “crisis economy.” This hour On Point, 2016’s rough start in the markets and what it means.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tea History 56 mins – “Garden historian Russell Bowes talks about the horticultural history of the tea bag, from its origins in the foothills of the Himalayas right through to the modern tea bag.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Time of Death Bacteria 25mins – “This week on How on Earth, we speak with Jessica Metcalf, an evolutionary biologist, who studies bacteria, specifically the microbiome. One of her research interests is using molecular biology to address basic hypotheses about the role of microbes in corpse decomposition. The time since death, or postmortem interval, also known as (PMI), is important for criminal investigations because it can lead to the identification of the deceased and validate alibis. PMI is critical to both forensic science and pop culture (e.g. TV shows Bones, CSI). Recently she co-authored a paper published in Science, describing how various species of the microbiome can be used to accurately and repeatedly determine the post-mortem interval” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

United Nations History 69 mins – “Honorary Professor and Research Associate of the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex and co-ordinator of the UN Intellectual History Project draws on the 17-volume official history of the UN” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Wildlife Preservation 56 mins – “In this lecture, Mr Simon Garrett, Head of Learning at Bristol Zoo, asks the controversial question of how much wildlife we actually need, or even like in this thought provoking insight into the future.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Wildlife Smuggling 18 mins – “This week, Actuality visits a lab at the front line of the fight against a peculiar crime — animal trafficking. The global black market for snakes, sea cucumbers, ivory and the like is hot, but the world is starting to crack down. Plus, whale euthanasia.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus 50 mins – “More Zika virus news in the US yesterday. Three women recently back from South America found infected in Miami, Tampa. Another in Hawaii, back from Brazil. Her baby born with the birth defect. The small head. The CDC is advising pregnant women not to travel to areas of Zika transmission. But that area may soon stretch into the US. It’s mosquito-born. It is spreading fast. This hour On Point, all about the Zika virus. Plus, Joe Biden’s “moonshot” push to find a cure for cancer.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus 9 mins – “There’s an increase in microcephaly, a condition when babies are born with unusually small heads. And the increase is being linked to a surge in cases of Zika. But what exactly is Zika? “It’s related, quite distantly, to yellow fever virus,” says virus researcher Derek Gatherer at Lancaster University in England. “Zika was also discovered in Uganda in 1947 in the great lakes region. But there we no reports of any serious illness associated with it.” He says the interest in Zika was so low that no case studies had appeared in the tropical medicine literature from 1947 onward to 2008. Mosquitos spread Zika. And the classic symptoms are a relatively mild fever and muscle aches. “But in all of the classic cases, until the turn of the millennium, it always resolves successfully and no patients had ever died.” That’s not the case in Brazil, where at least five people have died from Zika. Gatherer says it’s serious, but still not that deadly when you consider there are 1.3 million case of Zika. “It might represent an indication that Zika is becoming more virulent,” he says. But what’s caused real concern — and a CDC travel warning — is the disease’s possible connection to the birth defect of microcephaly….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 41 mins – “

Zika Virus 22 mins – “A mosquito carrying the Zika virus is believed to be responsible for rare birth defects, triggering travel warnings for pregnant women. The rise in mosquito-borne viruses in Brazil has experts concerned South America is losing the war on the mosquito.” At the link find the title, “New mosquito-borne virus in Brazil linked to thousands of birth defects – Jan 19, 2016 (1/3),” right-click “Download New mosquito-borne virus in Brazil linked to thousands of birth defects – Jan 19, 2016 (1/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 219 – Jan 22, 2016: Agri-therm Pyrolysis, Alcohol Issues, Algae Systems, Appropedia Aquaculture, Best-By-Date Issue, Brooke Gladstone, Bruce Dern, Cancer and Dogs, carbon Footprint of Food, Carly Simon, Carol Loomis, Cartoonist Threats, Chemical Weapon Neutralization, Chernobyl, Coal Industry, Coalition for Local Internet, Collective Bargaining, Colonoscopies, Copyright and Technology, Counter Culture Krassner, Dark Matter, David Bowie, Dementia, Deportation Raids, Dick Cheny, Emission Control, George Takei, Head Lice, Healthcare Decisions, Holistic Management of Nature, Homeless in New Hampshire, Immigrant Boarder Crossings, Inca Empire, Ira Glass, Jane Goodall, Lotteries, Malcom Gladwell, Martin Luther King Death, MCR-1 Gene, Mein Kampf, North Korea Abductions, Nuclear Threats, Ocean Preservation, Parasite Diagnosis and Research, Prostitution in Europe, Racism in U.S., Refugees, Rhino Poaching Prevention, Saturn, Second Amendment, Sepsis Management, Siege of Leningrad, STEAM Movement, Stroke Story, Tribalism, Venezuela Conditions, Voice of America, Washington Post Editor, Wine Vine Protection

The best 66 podcasts from a larger group of 224 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 8000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but are limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile.  The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three  free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 270 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded and you can make your own selected list.

Agri-therm Pyrolysis 24 mins – “Ron Golden gives us the break down on Agri-therm’s mobile pyrolysis technology. Pyrolysis is an ancient technology that is being upgraded for the distributed energy economy of the 21st century, and Agri-therm is on the front lines of this transformation. From bio-oil to char, fast pyrolysis produces a number of outputs, all the while being carbon neutral and opening a whole new range of possibilities in agricultural residue management.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcohol Issues 26 mins – “Private medical clinics are offering a cure for the common hangover, if you are willing to pay the fee. An IV drip infused with vitamins to hydrate you may be a useful wellness cure for many people but to some it’s simply a slow steady trickle of denial.” At the link find the title, “IV hangover cure prompts concern service endorses binge drinking,” right-click “Download IV hangover cure prompts concern service endorses binge drinking – Jan 13, 2016 (3/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Algae Systems 30 mins – “Who doesn’t need a miracle? As the lyricist for many timeless Grateful Dead classics, as a privacy rights activist, or as the founder of the biofuel company, Algae Systems, John Perry Barlow has used creativity and sheer will to advance a wide array of “miracles.” That is until a devastating illness left him hospitalized for most of 2015. Sea Change Radio host Alex Wise sat down recently with Barlow, who’s still on the mend, along with the CEO of Algae Systems, Matthew Atwood. They discuss the company’s technology which turns waste water into fuel, and the current Indiegogo campaign to raise new capital for Algae Systems. They also delve into Barlow’s relationship with Edward Snowden, his recovery from this illness, and the unfortunate tale of how he missed out on the Grateful Dead’s Fare Thee Well mini-tour.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Appropedia 1 46 mins – “There’s a lot of synergy going in the open source appropriate technology (OSAT) world, and this podcast is a perfect example of that. On the same day that Agroinnovations posted a call for collaborators on the appropedia website, I spoke with Lonny Grafman and Curt Beckmann, founder and system administrator, respectively, of this premier open source AT wiki and online community. If you’re interested in OSAT, then THIS is the podcast to listen to. If you’ve never heard of OSAT, then listen and learn.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. In part 2 “…we discuss Open Source AT (OSAT) in a historical context, and look at some of the tensions and areas where Appropedia must improve if it is to truly have a lasting impact.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. For Part 2, at this link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aquaculture 1 22 mins – “Doug Burdette has over 40 years of experience in the area of aquaculture. He has pioneered a number of important technologies in this area. In this interview, we speak with Doug about the history of aquaculture, his aquaculture innovations, and the biological efficiency of aquaculture systems. Visit Doug’s website to learn more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. “In the second part of my interview with Doug Burdette we talk about aquaculture as a community development strategy, the mechanics of aquaponics, and I read a listener’s comments.” At this link for part 2 right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Best-By-Date Issue 17 mins – “Montana throws more milk down the drain than other states because the sell-by date on the milk is required by state law to be just 12 days after pasteurization (the industry standard is 21 days). After these 12 days, Montana law requires that the milk be thrown away. It can’t be sold or donated. Thousands of gallons of milk are thrown away each week that many believe is perfectly fine to drink….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brooke Gladstone 65 mins – “Brooke Gladstone is the co-host of On the Media and the author of The Influencing Machine.” At the link right-click the “Pod” beside “Episode 175: Brooke Gladstone” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bruce Dern 86 mins – “Gilbert and Frank dial up one of their favorite actors, screen legend and two-time Oscar nominee Bruce Dern, for a refreshingly candid conversation about acting, risk taking, the definition of genius and the value of teamwork. Also, Bette Davis bashes Joan Crawford, Alfred Hitchcock “punks” Karen Black, Jack Nicholson coins a phrase and Bruce attends the “University of Corman.” PLUS: Paging Dr. Death! The wisdom of Elia Kazan! The brilliance of Douglas Trumbull! Bruce “kills” the Duke! And “The Incredible 2-Headed Transplant.” At the link find the title, “Bruce Dern,” right-click beside “Enclosure:…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer and Dogs 25 mins – “Loyal, loving and furry. There’s a new partner in the fight against cancer: dogs. Author of “Heal” joins us to explain how dogs could unlock a cure for cancer and how some dogs are literally sniffing-out cancers in humans.” At the link find the title, “Dogs could be the key to curing cancer,” right-click “Download Dogs could be the key to curing cancer – Jan 13, 2016 (2/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Footprint of Food 33 mins – “This second part in a three part series on food, organized by Kathy Issacson and Phil Pohl, features Jack Mizner of Sandia National Labs. Jack talks us through the idea of carbon footprints and ecological footprints, and uses this concept to show us the differing carbon footprints of two very different meals.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carly Simon 48 mins – “In the early seventies, singer-songwriter Carly Simon scored a string of hits including “Anticipation” and the feminist anthem “You’re So Vain.” With her gravelly voice, deeply personal lyrics, and endless smile, she became an icon of the era. Her romance with fellow musician James Taylor seemed to complete the folk-rock fairy tale. Yet in her new memoir, “Boys in the Trees,” Simon says that was hardly the case. A childhood filled with secrets and trauma left her insecure. Crippling stage fright plagued her career. And the end of her marriage to Taylor almost destroyed her. A conversation with Carly Simon about heartbreak, resilience and taking refuge in song.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Carol Loomis 60 mins – “Carol Loomis retired last summer after 60 years at Fortune. She continues to edit Warren Buffett’s annual report.” At the link find the title, “Episode 152..,” right-click “Media files Ep._152, Carol_Loomis.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cartoonist Threats 57 mins – “Pulitzer Prizing-winning editorial cartoonists Ann Telnaes of The Washington Post and Signe Wilkinson of the Philadelphia Daily News will talk about the role of political cartoonists and will reflect on the one-year anniversary of the Charlie Hebdo massacre and the terrorist attacks in Paris in November 2015.” At the link find the title, “Charlie Hebdo: One Year Later,” right-click “Media files IM_20160109.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chemical Weapon Neutralization 3 mins – “Clothing resistant to chemical weapons moves a step closer to reality.” At the link find the title, “Episode 590 – January 11 2016,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements, Jan11, 2016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chernobyl P1 27 mins – “Alla Kravchuk, the daughter of a former Chernobyl engineer, returns to her father’s workplace as the huge mobile Sarcophagus built to cover the damaged reactor nears completion. Can the site of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in April 1986 be made safe without risking the health of those involved it the task?” At the link find the title, “Burying Chernobyl – Part One,” right-click “Media files p03fb1tc.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Industry 48 mins – “Are we nearing the end of the age of coal? The headlines on the industry are pretty dire. Two of the largest coal producers in the U.S. have filed for bankruptcy, and American coal production has fallen to its lowest level in decades. Reasons for the decline include competition from cheap natural gas and new environmental policies… not to mention a slowing of global demand from places like China, and a new climate change agreement out of Paris. While this is bad news for the industry, with significant implications for jobs, some environmentalists argue its great news for the planet. Still it appears coal isn’t quite done just yet. We’ll talk about its future.” [3 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Coalition for Local Internet 19 mins – “The Coalition for Local Internet Choice (CLIC) has its first local chapter with the formation of CLIC-NC. Catharine Rice, who is both part of CLIC-NC and the Project Director for CLIC, explains what is happening on episode 184 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast. We remind listeners what CLIC is and the goals of CLIC-NC more specifically. We also discuss the interesting comments of NC Attorney General Roy Cooper, who is both challenging the FCC’s authority to remove North Carolina’s anti-muni law and supportive of removing the law via the state legislature. Catharine has long been involved in the effort for Local Internet Choice and put up an incredibly strong fight to stop anti-competition bills advanced by Time Warner Cable, AT&T, and others over multiple years in North Carolina. She was the guest on our 5th episode of this show.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Collective Bargaining 37 mins – “Ever since 1977, government workers in half of the states have paid mandatory administrative fees to the unions that represent them. This week, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case that could put an end to that practice. The plaintiffs in Friedrichs v California Teachers Association argue that public sector union activity is inherently political, and so forcing them to support that activity violates their First Amendment rights. On this week’s episode, we hear from lawyers who submitted amicus briefs on each side of the case. Ilya Shapiro is a senor fellow in constitutional studies at the Cato Institute who submitted a brief on behalf of the Cato Institute. Samuel Bagenstos is a professor at the University of Michigan Law School who authored a brief for a group of cities, counties, and elected officials who support the unions’ right to collect mandatory fees from their workers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Colonoscopies 86 mins – “Colorectal cancer is the 3rd most common cancer but early screening and knowing your risk factors can make a big difference in your prognosis. Judy Yee, MD, FACR, Professor and Vice Chair, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, UCSF; Chief, Department of Radiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA discusses why getting a colonoscopy is important and dispels myths about the process. Recorded on 11/10/2015. (#30135)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Copyright and Technology 16 mins – “It’s a truism in intellectual property that copyright legislation is in a never-ending race with technology, and always playing catch-up. When copyright and technology first found themselves in this circular arrangement, the disruptive technology of the moment was the player piano. On Tuesday, January 19, at New York University, attorneys, bureaucrats, entrepreneurs, and educators will take turns untwisting the tangled relationship of Copyright and Technology at a one-day conference. Among the unusual perspectives is a look at how piracy-related data could drive business innovation, as well as predictions for the future of collective licensing schemes, first conceived in the 1940s. In addition, the U.S. Copyright Office last month published Notices of Request and Public Comment for so-called “Section 512,” regarding limitations of copyright liability for online service providers under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Jacqueline Charlesworth, General Counsel of the Copyright Office, will discuss that topic — and more — when she delivers the conference keynote speech.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Counter Culture Krassner 24 mins – “For more than half a century, social satirist Paul Krassner has been calling it like he’s sees it. He was a co-founder of the Yippies and remains an ambassador from the counter-culture of yore. He joins Lara Rae to talk about satire and politics.” At the link find the title, “Social-satirist Paul Krassner blurs absurdity with humour” right-clickDownload Social-satirist Paul Krassner blurs absurdity with humour – Jan 15, 2016 (2/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dark Matter 31 mins -”We look at the science of uncertainties, taking in meteoroid impacts and gravity, to ask what role dark matter may have played in the demise of the dinosaurs Joining Nicola Davis is Lisa Randall, theoretical physicist at Harvard University and author of Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs, Malcolm Fairbairn, physicist at King’s College London and Gerry Gilmore, Professor of Experimental Philosophy at the University of Cambridge.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

David Bowie 49 mins – “ David Bowie seemed ageless. An icon beyond the space and time he sang about. A pop artist who was always new, always changing. But he knew otherwise, finally. David Bowie died Sunday at 69 after a fight with cancer. He left new music that speaks directly to the death he faced. And a life’s work that speaks to much more. This hour On Point, beyond boundaries. We’re looking at the life and work of David Bowie.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia 53 mins – “Every 67 seconds, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s disease. That’s more than 5 million people and the number is growing. Add to that the fact Alzheimer’s is only one type of dementia, and it makes sense that journalist David Shenk calls this an epidemic. Wednesday, as we launch a new short documentary series profiling one Utah woman’s advancing dementia, Shenk joins us to talk about the disease and its impact on individuals and the community. David Shenk is the author of The Forgetting, Alzheimer’s: Portrait of an Epidemic [Indiebound|Amazon], which was also the basis of the PBS documentary of the same name. Shenk is also creator and executive producer of a film project called Living with Alzheimer’s.At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deportation Raids 48 mins – “The Department of Homeland Security announced last week that it has started deporting people who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally within the last two years. Authorities apprehended 121 adults and children in raids in Georgia, Texas and North Carolina earlier this month. Despite an uproar from Democrats and immigrant advocates, officials say raids will continue. Authorities argue that they hope to send a message to prevent a repeat of the surge in illegal border crossings last year. Officials say more than 10,000 children crossed the U.S.-Mexico border in October and November. Guest host Derek McGinty and a panel of guests discuss what’s behind the new wave of deportations and reaction from communities and political leaders.” [4 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Dick Cheney 56 mins – “Fox News Correspondent James Rosen discusses his book, [Cheney One on One], about the life and political career of former Vice President Dick Cheney. He is interviewed by former White House Press Secretary Dana Perino.” At the link find the title, “After Words with James Rosen,” right-click “Media files program.422567.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emission Control 48 mins – “Making big commercial airplanes more climate-friendly. From batteries to alternative fuel and new designs, we’ll look at what’s on the drawing board for cleaner air travel. Plus, a look at whether the new cars at the Detroit auto show will meet federal emissions standards. All over the world, people are bending over backwards now to try to figure out how to lower the CO2 emissions that lead to climate change. But every time we step onto a jet airliner, those big jet engines pour out greenhouse gases. If it were a country, the world’s aviation industry would be the sixth-biggest CO2 emitter. Now there are big ideas on the drawing board to change that. This hour On Point, thinking outside the box to clean up air travel.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

George Takei 48 mins – “George Takei found stardom through his role as Sulu on the original “Star Trek” television series. But today many people know of him through his (often humorous) online presence: prolific sharing of memes and a prominent voice for LGBT rights have earned him millions of followers on Facebook and Twitter. Now, Takei has turned his focus to a painful chapter in his family’s past – and a moment in American history he says is still not discussed enough: Japanese-American internment in the ’40s. His Broadway musical “Allegiance,” on stage now, was partly inspired by his own experience as a young boy forced to live in internment camps. Takei discusses his career, his musical and why he’s saving a seat at the theater for Donald Trump.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Head Lice 25 mins – “An Ontario school board has decided it will no longer force kids with head lice out of school, citing lice is not a medical condition. But many parents are concerned the new policy will force them to spend too much time… literally, nit-picking.” At the link find the title, “New lice policy that allows children back in class bugs parents,” right-click “Download New lice policy that allows children back in class bugs parents – Jan 14, 2016 (2/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Healthcare Decisions 66 mins – “Mileva Saulo Lewis, Ed.D., RN, Associate Professor, Samuel Merritt University; Vice President, The Center for Medical Ethics and Mediation The values that guide our medical treatment decisions become increasingly important when we face the sudden onset of a stroke or heart attack and become even more critical when we cannot speak for ourselves after serious trauma from a car accident or fall. Dr. Lewis’ presentation draws on a values history approach developed at The Center for Medical Ethics and Mediation in San Diego, which examines the decision-making process and quality-of-life factors. It provides a way to shape and share health-care decisions with family and health-care providers, and to review or revise them as your health changes. It is a critical component of end-of-life choices.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Holistic Management of Nature mins – “Allan Savory is the pioneer of Holistic Management, a decision making framework that has had exceptional success stories in the areas of range and livestock management. In this interview, Allan lays out the basics of Holistic Management, how he discovered it, and how it works. This is part one of a two part series.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. “In part two of our interview with Allan Savory, we discuss the process of developing a holisticgoal, the role of monitoring in Holistic Management, and the scientific evidence that supports the claims of Holistic management. I conclude with a brief summary of the work Agricultural Innovations is doing with Holistic Management International, and some other general comments about the podcast.” At this link right-click “Download” for Part 2 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in New Hampshire 57 mins – “It’s a question Granite State communities are grappling with, as progress appears to have stalled on finding housing for homeless people. Advocates agree a dearth of affordable housing exacerbates the problem. But there’s debate over whether providing temporary shelter can forestall lasting solutions on such challenges as unemployment and substance abuse.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Border Crossings 19 mins – “Sneaking people across the U.S.-Mexico border is a well established, booming business. Today on the show, we meet a businessman and a client in the evolving industry of human smuggling.” At the link find the title,”#675: The Cost Of Crossing, Jan 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160108 pmoney_pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Policy 48 mins – “The world has been focused on the rush of Syrian refugees into Europe. The Obama administration is eyeing a push that’s closer to home. In 2014, mothers and children from troubled Central America streamed to the US border. Now there’s a spike again. The White House fears a flood. In response, it’s rounding up Central American families and sending them home. To send a message. This hour On Point, humanity, politics, border order – and the Obama administration’s new deportation drive.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inca Empire 54 mins – “A small ancient city is perched high up in the Andes. Constructed around 1450 at the height of the Incan Empire, its natural defences include sheer drops of 2000m. But it all ended suddenly just 130 years later with the arrival of the Spanish. As Robyn Williams visits Machu Picchu, we hear about the amazing culture which survived for hundreds of years succumbing to the invaders and their guns, steel, disease and one of the worst genocides in human history. ” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inca Gold 10mins – “When the civilization of the Incas as at its peak the elite surrounded themselves with gold, silver, precious stones, textiles and ceramics. This exhibition at the National Gallery of Australia until 21st April 2014 features over 200 objects, almost all of which were found in graves. Curator Christine Dixon takes Robyn Williams on a tour of the exhibition which reveals so much about the brief civilization which flourished in the high mountains of Peru.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ira Glass 65 mins – “Ira Glass is the host and executive producer of This American Life.” At the link right-click “Pod” beside “Episode 159: Ira Glass” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jane Goodall 54 mins – “Pioneering primatologist and conservationist Jane Goodall discusses the evolving relationship between humans and animals, saving the planet and the role the next generation can play in both.” At the link find the title, “Jane Goodall’s Hope,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160115_56377.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lottery Odds 23mins – “If those are the winning Powerball numbers, this will be our last show. Also: The story of Queen Elizabeth’s 1567 lottery, and we meet a man who has won multiple jackpots, no luck needed.” At the link find the title, “10 11 51 52 62 18, Jan 2016” right-click “Media files 20160113 pmoney_pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lottery Psychology 48 mins – “It’s nuts to play. The odds of winning are infinitesimally small. The payout isn’t really what it seems. And yet, and yet. Just say the number…$1.5 billion…and the urge to be in the running, be in the game, have a shot, clearly begins to eat at a whole lot of people. And the dreams. The big spread. The place on the beach. The ease and splendor.  Oh look, there we go. Powerball fever. This hour On Point, the human psychology and raw mechanics of Powerball.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malcolm Gladwell 58 mins – “Malcolm Gladwell is a staff writer at The New Yorker. His latest book is David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants.” At the link right-click “Media files Ep._62, Malcolm_Gladwell.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malcom Gladwell 58 mins – “Malcolm Gladwell is a staff writer at The New Yorker. His latest book is David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants.” At the link find the title, “Episode 62: Malcolm Gladwell,” right-click “Media files Ep._62_-_Malcolm_Gladwell.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martin Luther King Death 30 mins – “In 1968, just hours after Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, the legendary historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills—then a young writer for Esquire—rushed to Memphis, Tennessee, where he watched as King’s body was embalmed at the mortuary, then later traveled twelve hours by bus with mourners to King’s funeral in Atlanta. Nearly fifty years later, Wills’s “Martin Luther King Jr Is Still on the Case!” remains one of the most revealing and lasting portraits of King and his turbulent era ever written. Writer and director John Ridley—who won an Oscar for his screenplay for 12 Years a Slave—joins host David Brancaccio to discuss why Wills’s wrenching portrait of King continues to resonate today, what has changed in America since it was written, and, most important, what still needs to change.” At the link right-click the link beside “Enclosure:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MCR-1 Gene 27 mins – “The MCR-1 gene that enables bacteria to be resistant to the strongest antibiotics we have raises questions about what we’re giving to livestock, not to mention what we’re giving ourselves. We hear from the doctor who found the MCR-1 link.” At the link find the title, “MCR-1 and the dawn of the post-antibiotic age,” right-click “Download MCR-1 and the dawn of the post-antibiotic age – Jan 12, 2016 (3/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mein Kampf 47 mins – “Years before he became the leader of the Third Reich, Adolph Hitler went on trial and served prison time for an attempted coup. Author Peter Ross Range says 1924 paved the way for his rise to power.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Abductions 48 mins – “Imagine walking on a beach in Japan with your girlfriend. Suddenly you’re being stuffed into a sack and taken to North Korea, where you’ll spend the next 25 years of your life completely cut off from the outside world. This actually happened. In the 1970s and ’80s, North Korean agents abducted dozens of people from Asia, Europe and the Middle East. A new book recounts the experiences of the few Japanese victims who were eventually allowed to return home. The bizarre but true story of North Korean abductions, and insights into the hermit kingdom today.” [3 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Nuclear Threats 72 mins – “William Perry, Ph.D., U.S. Secretary of Defense 1994-97;Senior Fellow, Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute and Hoover Institution … As secretary of Defense, Dr. Perry galvanized efforts to secure nuclear stockpiles inherited by former Soviet states and presided over the dismantlement of more than 8,000 nuclear weapons. Since then he has unrelentingly practiced a unique form of diplomacy that blends his warm personal relationships with officials in many countries with diplomatic initiatives focusing on the world’s most critical security hotspots, including North Korea, Iran, Russia and China. In 2007, Dr. Perry, George Shultz, Sam Nunn and Henry Kissinger together formed the Nuclear Security Project, to share the vision of a world free from nuclear weapons with urgent but practical steps that can be taken immediately to reduce nuclear dangers. To implement this imperative, Dr. Perry also founded the William J. Perry Project in 2013, educating a new generation of young people to understand the nuclear threat and work to eliminate it.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Preservation 48 mins – “National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Enric Sala is on a mission to save the oceans. From everything that threatens to erase their majesty. His scientific expeditions take him all over the world: from the coast of Gabon to the Galapagos Islands. He dives, takes gorgeous videos and is taking a big message to world leaders: protect the oceans or watch them die. This hour On Point, under the deep blue sea with Enric Sala.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parasite Diagnosis and Research 113 mins – “The TWiP trifecta solves the case of the Woman from Bolivia with Belly Pain, and discuss a method for population modification of malaria mosquitoes using a Cas9-mediated driver gene. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, and Daniel Griffin” At the link right-click “TWiP #100beside “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prostitution in Europe 50 mins – “Despite both liberal and conservative reforms in different countries being hailed as the answer to stamping out prostitution, Europe seems to be losing the battle against sex trafficking. Why do these countries, which work successfully together against other crimes, struggle to combat sexual exploitation and forced prostitution?” At the link find the title, “Red Lights and Red Lines: Prostitution in Europe,” right-click “Media files p03dyhz2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in U.S. 48 mins “When Barack Obama was elected president in 2008, some believed it would usher in a post-racial era. But Eddie Glaude, chair of the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University, was leery of these predictions from the beginning. He says people were caught up in the symbolic nature of Obama’s presidency — not the substance of his policy positions. Now as Obama enters his final year in office, Glaude says he believes he was right to be skeptical. In a new book, “Democracy In Black: How Race Still Enslaves The American Soul,” Glaude calls for major changes when voters go to the polls in 2016. He joins guest host Derek McGinty to talk about race, democracy and the presidency.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Refugee Child Story 25 mins – “Gulwali Passerlay was just 12 years old when his mother paid human traffickers to get him out of Afghanistan. The trip became a year-long odyssey of suffering, abuse, deprivation and only occasional kindnesses. He shares his story.” At the link find the title, “A 12-year-old refugee’s harrowing escape from Afghanistan,” right-click “Download A 12-year-old refugee’s harrowing escape from Afghanistan – Jan 12, 2016 (2/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Podcast 52 mins – “In November, independent radio producer Scott Carrier traveled overland from Copenhagen, Denmark, south to the Greek island of Lesbos. His journey traced the trail taken by refugees fleeing conflict in Central Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa. Carrier wanted to talk to the refugees themselves and find out why they left their homes, where they were going, and what they thought their futures would be like. He joins us Tuesday share what he learned about the European refugee crisis.Scott Carrier is a writer and independent radio producer. His podcast is called Home of the Brave, and he produced a series of episodes for it that document his journey along Europe’s refugee trail. The following links will take you to those stories, in chronological order: The Refugee Trail–Introduction On the Border of Greece and Macedonia On the Isle of Lesbos On the Ferry from Lesbos to Athens The Balkan RouteAt the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rhino Poaching Prevention 6 mins – “Ectoparasiticides are compounds used deter or kill animal parasites like tics and fleas. Martha Henriques asks how conservationists at a rhino reserve in South Africa are making use of ectoparasiticides to keep not fleas, but poachers away from their rhino population…. “ At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Ectoparasiticides.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saturn 47 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the planet Saturn with its rings of ice and rock and over 60 moons. In 1610, Galileo used an early telescope to observe Saturn, one of the brightest points in the night sky, but could not make sense of what he saw: perhaps two large moons on either side. When he looked a few years later, those supposed moons had disappeared. It was another forty years before Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens solved the mystery, realizing the moons were really a system of rings. Successive astronomers added more detail, with the greatest leaps forward in the last forty years. The Pioneer 11 spacecraft and two Voyager missions have flown by, sending back the first close-up images, and Cassini is still there, in orbit, confirming Saturn, with its rings and many moons, as one of the most intriguing and beautiful planets in our Solar System. With Carolin Crawford Public Astronomer at the Institute of Astronomy and Fellow of Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge Michele Dougherty Professor of Space Physics at Imperial College London And Andrew Coates Deputy Director in charge of the Solar System at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory at UCL.” At the link find the title, “Saturn,” right-click “Media files p03fgfgb.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Second Amendment 48 mins – “The Second Amendment was added to the U.S. Constitution in 1781 as part of the Bill of Rights. Drafted by James Madison, the amendment went largely unnoticed for decades. Then in the 1970s and 80s, gun advocates began pointing to the Second Amendment as an absolute right, and justification for limiting firearms regulation. In 2008, the Supreme Court narrowly ruled that individuals have a right to gun ownership. Many gun control advocates argue that the high court’s decision keeps Congress from enacting meaningful gun control legislation. Diane and a panel of constitutional scholars discuss the origin and evolution of the Second Amendment and implications for U.S. gun policy.”[4 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Sepsis Management 78 mins – “At smaccChicago, I had the honor to host an incredible panel of Sepsis Experts. I think most everyone who heard it was left with more questions than answers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Siege of Leningrad 2 18 mins – “OKH Chief Franz Halder makes plans for a modest end to 1941 for Operation Barbarossa, but Hitler overrides him and orders the capture of Moscow, before the heavy snows come. Yet, Stalin, finally taking an advisor’s advice, allows several armies from the Russian Far East to transfer west and help with the defense of his capital.” At the link find the title, “ Episode 151-Operation Typhoon Part 2” right-click “Media files Episode151, 1916_10.32_AM.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

STEAM Movement 63 mins – “The STEM to STEAM movement takes the benefits of STEM and integrates access principles in and through the arts, connecting learning in these critical areas together with arts practices, elements, design principles and standards. Donn Harris, executive and artistic director of Oakland School for the Arts and the chairman of the California Arts Council, is joined by science and technology leaders in talking about the future of STEAM at the center of transforming the 21st-century economy through research policy,education and workplace innovation.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stroke Story 13 mins – “A neuroscientist tests the limits of wonder when his own father suffers a stroke.” At the link click “Download” to download the podcast.

Tribalism 54 mins – “In a time of accelerated global migration and communication, lifelong traveller and writer Pico Iyer finds pathways to adventure and connection by making time to sit still.” At the link find the title, “Global Migration and Finding Home – Pico Iyer,” right-click “Media files ideas 20160112_17958.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela Conditions 25 mins – “If you think the plunging price of oil has rocked the Canadian economy, wait until you hear about the societal effects it’s having on oil-rich Venezuela… a country teetering on the brink of despair.” At the link find the title, “Venezuela verges on meltdown as opposition takes control of parliament,” right-click “Download Venezuela verges on meltdown as opposition takes control of parliament – Jan 11, 2016” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voice of America 29 mins – “John Lansing, the new CEO of the Broadcasting Boarding Board of Governors, speaks with Ron Nixon of the [New York Times] about the agency and its media operations, which include Voice of America, Radio Free Europe, Radio Marti and Alhurra.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with John Lansing,” right-click “Media files program.427077.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Washington Post Editor 59 mins – “[Washington Post] Executive Editor Marty Baron discusses the changes at the [Post] since he took over in 2013. He also talks about the depiction of his work as editor-in-chief of the [Boston Globe] in the movie [Spotlight].” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Marty Baron,” right-click “Media files program.426272.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wine Vine Protection 3 mins – “Scientists, wine vintners go out on the limb to make a better grape.” At the link find the title, “Episode 592,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_Jan14_2016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 218 – Jan 15, 2016: 3D Printed Clothing, Aging and Young Blood, Aluminum, Animal Feeling, Anti-Government Radicals, Attention Issues, Beatrix Potter Mycologist, Blogging Trends, Climate Trends, Computer History, Contraception, Corruption in Brazil, Emotional Intelligence, EMT Work, Gender Pay Gap, Gun Control Reform, Gun Culture, Gut Bacteria, Habits, How Things Work, Integration in Canada, ISIS Life, Khan Academy School, Lunchroom Economics, Medical Student Age, Obsidian, Paris Attack Insights, Physician Burnout, Political Trends in U.S., Racism in RCMP, Refugee Camp in Kenya, Refugees, Saudi Arabia and Iran, The Four Hour Workweek

The best 38 podcasts from a larger group of 216 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 8000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but are limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile.  The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three  free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 270 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded and you can make your own selected list.

3D Printed Clothing 6 mins – “Downloadable, printable clothing may be coming to a closet near you. What started as designer Danit Peleg’s fashion school project turned into a collection of 3D-printed designs that have the strength and flexibility for everyday wear. “Fashion is a very physical thing,” she says. “I wonder what our world will look like when our clothes will be digital.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

3D Printing Faster 11 mins – “What we think of as 3D printing, says Joseph DeSimone, is really just 2D printing over and over … slowly. Onstage at TED2015, he unveils a bold new technique — inspired, yes, by Terminator 2 — that’s 25 to 100 times faster, and creates smooth, strong parts. Could it finally help to fulfill the tremendous promise of 3D printing?” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging and Young Blood 14 mins – “Tony Wyss-Coray studies the impact of aging on the human body and brain. In this eye-opening talk, he shares new research from his Stanford lab and other teams which shows that a solution for some of the less great aspects of old age might actually lie within us all.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aluminum 4 mins – “…Have you ever wondered why the English say aluMINium instead of alUminum? When Sir Humphry Davy identified the stuff in 1809 he called it alumium after its kinship to potash alum. That word soon became aluminum. Then, to get a Latin-sounding word, the English put in an extra letter I. They’ve called it aluMINium ever since. Pure aluminum doesn’t occur in nature. It’s chemically bound to other elements. Aluminum oxide, or bauxite, is the commonest source. It’s very hard to separate aluminum from oxygen. Not ’til 1845 did a German chemist isolate a pinpoint sample of aluminum. In 1854 a French chemist, Henri Deville, invented a commercial process for extracting aluminum from bauxite. But his aluminum was still very expensive — practically a new precious metal. Napoleon III commissioned a breastplate, spoons for banquets, and a baby rattle — all made of aluminum….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Feelings 53 mins – “Animals have deeply fascinated the writer Carl Safina since he was a little kid, and he’s always wondered what animals do and why they do it. More than anything, Safina wants to know what it’s like inside other animals’ minds and in their day to day lives. To try to find out, he traveled to Yellowstone to observe wolf packs, visited elephants in Africa, tracked orcas in Vancouver, and just hung out with his dog at home. Safina joins us Wednesday to offer his insight into what animals think and feel. Carl Safina is the founding president of the Safina Center at Stony Brook University, where he also co-chairs the University’s Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science. He’s the author of seven books, most recently, Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel .” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anti-Government Radicals 28 mins – “The Oregon armed standoff is a reminder of how U.S. domestic threats can arise out of the blue. We speak with a former Department of Homeland Security analyst who says the U.S. government is not taking the threat of domestic terrorism seriously.” At the link find the title, “US government ignoring threat of domestic terrorism, says former Homeland Security Analyst – Jan 6, 2016 (3/3),” right-click “Download US government ignoring threat of domestic terrorism, says former Homeland Security Analyst – Jan 6, 2016 (3/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Attention Issues 62mins – “Psychologist Daniel Goleman shot to fame with his groundbreaking bestseller ‘Emotional Intelligence’. The premise of the book, now widely accepted, is that raw intelligence alone is not a sure predictor of success in life. A greater role is played by ‘softer’ skills such as self-control, self-motivation, empathy and good interpersonal relationships. In this exclusive talk for Intelligence Squared, Goleman discusses the themes of his latest book, ‘Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence’. Attention, he argues is an underrated asset for high achievers in any field. Incorporating findings from neuroscience, Goleman shows why we need three kinds of focus: inner, for self-awareness; other, for the empathy that builds effective relationships; and outer, for understanding the larger systems in which organisations operate. Those who excel rely on Smart Practices such as mindfulness meditation, focused preparation and positive emotions that help improve habits, add new skills, and sustain excellence.” At the link find the title, “From the Library – Daniel Goleman On Focus: The Secret to High Performance and Fulfilment,” right-click “Media files 241000865-intelligence2-daniel-goleman.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beatrix Potter Mycologist 54 mins – “Most people only know Beatrix Potter as the author of children’s books such as The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Her books have sold more than 100 million copies in 35 languages. But Beatrix Potter only began writing seriously in her 30s and before this pursued an interest in the natural sciences. She made intricate drawings of fungi and lichens and worked as an amateur scientist. She even wrote a scientific paper which despite its quality was dismissed as it was written by a female amateur. Sharon Carleton traces the scientific life of author Beatrix Potter.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blogging Trends 19 mins – “Where it comes to media, as digital diva Clay Shirky once noted, consumers are now producers, and that is the big story. The once-great wall separating reporters from readers has crumbled like sand…In the just-released Elements of Blogging, coauthor Mark Leccese celebrates this democratization, though he cautions that the best blogs take hard work and require the authors to act responsibly…Mark Leccese is the author, with his Emerson colleague Jerry Lanson of the book The Elements of Blogging: Expanding the Conversation of Journalism. Lanson and Leccese also co-blog at theelemementsofblogging.comAt the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Trends 60 mins – “Why the wild weather & floods across N. Hemisphere, rain at N. Pole? Then Alex talks with David Montgomery, author of “Dirt The Erosion of Civilizations”, with co-author Anne Bikle, new book “The Hidden Half of Nature: The Microbial Roots of Life and Health”. Radio Ecoshock 160106 Welcome to Radio Ecoshock in this new year of 2016. In this program I’ll talk with two guests who tell us about the erosion of civilizations, climate answers in the soil, and the danger of killing off your own ecology – of microbes in your body. But first in this new year of 2016, I need a little time to talk with you.” At the link near “Download…” right-click “Lo-Fi” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer History 108 mins – This Week in Technology host, Leo Laporte, interviews Lee Felsenstein who was “One of the first to apply principles of “open architecture” to computer hardware design” [At the program end Felsenstein describes a new programming hardware game he calls AndOrBit which he wishes to crowdfund.] At the link click “Download Options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Contraception 60 mins – “This week we’re taking a closer look at our current – and potential future – contraceptive methods. We’ll speak with Beth Sundstrom and Andrea DeMaria, Co-Directors of the Women’s Health Research Team at the College of Charleston, about why the pill is still our go-to birth control choice when we have long acting reversible contraception methods like the IUD and the implant available for women. And we’ll talk with Elaine Lissner, Executive Director of the Parsemus Foundation, about their continuing work to bring Vasalgel, a long acting, reversible, non-hormonal male contraceptive, to market.” At the link find the title, “#351 Contraception,” right-click “Media files Science for the People, 351_Contraception_v2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in Brazil 27mins – “Brazil is in trouble. Confronted with a massive downturn in the economy, its currency the Real has crashed, while its political class sinks in a quagmire of corruption allegations linked to the state oil company, Petrobras… Meanwhile in Maranhao’s state capital, Sao Luis, a Governor with just a year in post, is attempting to bring a new broom to one of Brazil’s poorest regions – Flavio Dino claims to have cut expenses by thousands of Reals just by removing luxury items like seafood and champagne from state banquet menus. Linda Pressly reports from one of Brazil’s least known regions. Produced and presented by Linda Pressly” At the link find the title, “Brazil versus Sleaze,”Media files p03dr087.mp3” and select “Save Link Ass” from the pop-up menu.

Emotional Intelligence 13 mins – “Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence, asks why we aren’t more compassionate more of the time.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

EMT Work 47 mins – “Former paramedic Kevin Hazzard has rescued people from choking, overdoses, cardiac arrest, gunshot wounds and a host of other medical emergencies. His memoir is, ‘A Thousand Naked Strangers.’ Also, [last 11 mins] we remember late cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond in an excerpt of his 1990 interview.” At the link find the title, “January 5, 2016 Paramedic Shares His Wild Ride Treating ‘A Thousand Naked Strangers’” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Pay Gap 44 mins – “Discrimination can’t explain why women earn so much less than men. If only it were that easy.” At the link find the title, “The True Story of the Gender Pay Gap,” right-click “Media files freakonomics_podcast010616.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Culture 54 mins – “Mass shootings in the U.S. have become commonplace. Yet the culture of gun ownership remains stronger than ever. A.J. Somerset, Dr. Taiaiake Alfred, and Christopher Hedges in conversation with Paul Kennedy about gun culture in Canada and the U.S.” At the link find the title, “Gun Crazy,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160107_22989.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Control Reform 51 mins – “President Obama began the year with a plea for “common sense” gun safety but admitted that it won’t be easy. We examine the myths and messages that surround, and often obscure, the national conversation on gun safety. Plus, do most Americans really support reform? And, if so, does it matter?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gut Bacteria 55 mins – Roughly one hundred trillion bacteria are living, and gorging, in our gut–all the more so during the indulgent holidays. Microbes influence our health and well-being, by affecting our gut directly, as well as the crops we eat and the soils in which we grow crops. These microbial communities – called the gut microbiome — have been linked to many disorders, including obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, cancer, immune disorders, and even mental illness. We are just at the dawn of a new era of microbial treatments for many illnesses. After a recent How On Earth show generated so much interest, we decided to bring our guest, Amy Sheflin, back for an hour-long call-in show on A Public Affair on KGNU. Amy is a doctoral student at Colorado State University in food science and human nutrition. She studies how the food we eat alters the microbial communities in our gut, and how those microbes in our bodies influence our overall health. For more info on the gut microbiome, check out Amy’s favorite books on the topic: The Good Gut, by Justin and Erica Sonnenburg; and The Inside Tract, by Gerard Mullins. Also check out the American Gut Project.” At the link find the title, “Our Microbes, Ourselves — Special Call-in Show, Dec 2015,” right-click “Media files Sheflin-Interview-edit-KGNU-123015×112.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Habits 36 mins – “Habit is the topic at hand for our inaugural episode of 2016. Postdoctoral Research Associate Jen Labrecque joins Jesse for an in-depth look at habit and human behavior. Tune in to find out more about habit formation, the power of environmental cues, and ideal ways to implement changes in your habits — for New Years Resolutions and beyond. Elsewhere in the episode, Jesse offers some good news for those who want to boost their long-term memory without supplements, without mnemonic tricks, and without extra time for sleep. Is this even possible? According to new research: Yes. And it’s surprisingly simple — but you’ll have to listen to find out.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

How Things Work 24 mins – “This month we discuss Thing explainer by Randall Munroe. In this book the xkcd creator attempts to explain things as diverse as the International Space Station and the human body, using only the most common ten hundred words in the English language (‘thousand’ is not one of those words).See if you can guess the objects from the extracts we read out and hear about our experiences of imposing the rules on our own writing. Finally, take up our challenge and have a go yourself using the xkcd simple writer.” At the link right-click beside “Download:…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Integration in Canada 22 mins – “Ujjal Dosanjh, the former B.C. premier, has published a provocative piece, arguing fear of a political correctness backlash is keeping powerful politicians from saying what they really think… damaging Canadian democracy as a direct result.” At the link find the title, “White male politicians are being stifled by political correctness, says Ujjal Dosanjh – Jan 6, 2016 (1/3),” right-click “Download White male politicians are being stifled by political correctness, says Ujjal Dosanjh – Jan 6, 2016 (1/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Life 29 mins – “We seldom hear voices from inside the so-called Islamic state. But after interviewing some twenty ISIS defectors, we hear from a researcher who shares a picture of life inside their Caliphate… as well as a clear idea of why they left.” At the link find the title, “Lessons from ISIS defectors on how to fight indoctrination – Jan 5, 2016 (3/3),” right-click Download Lessons from ISIS defectors on how to fight indoctrination – Jan 5, 2016 (3/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Khan Academy School 27 mins – “Salman Khan’s Lab School in Mountain View, CA, has slowly been gaining recognition—but is it really as innovative as people might imagine? EdSurge asked that very question last week. Khan had the idea to open a school long before he started his online platform Khan Academy, and after visiting the Lab School, we at EdSurge were curious about whether he wants to expand to other cities—but before engaging in a Q&A with the man himself, we took to Twitter to get an idea of what our podcast listeners would want to know. Questions came rolling in: Are students actually learning? Is this just an easy way for Khan Academy employees to try out new products on children? After all, the Lab School and Khan Academy are in the same building; the school’s on the first floor, and the nonprofit’s on the second. Check out EdSurge’s podcast interview with Khan to see what we found out.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lunchroom Economics 75 mins – “On today’s Planet Money, the complex economy of one elementary-school lunchroom.” At the link find the title, “#15: Delicious Cake Futures,” right-click “Media files 20160106_pmoney_pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Student Age 20 mins – “In this episode of the Medical School Headquarters podcast, we hear a different podcast – the OldPreMeds Podcast! This is a new podcast in partnership with OldPreMeds, which is now part of the MSHQ family! Ryan and Rich dive into the forums over at OldPreMeds.org where they pull a question and deliver the answers right on to you. Here are the insights from Ryan & Rich: Age is not a factor. Here are some facts and figures:About a thousand a year over the age of 30 matriculate every year into an allopath medical school which is about 5% of the total number of students who start the year. From that number, about 200 are of the age of 35. About 350 people a year over the age of 31 start osteopathic school; 10-12 people a year over the age of 50 start medical school” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obsidian 4 mins – “Today, we ask why the Aztecs didn’t make full use of metal… One question that torments historians of technology is the “Why didn’t?” question. Why didn’t the Chinese, with all their inventions, produce the industrial revolution? Why didn’t the Romans ever make full use of water wheels? Why was Europe 400 years behind China in printing with movable type? All those questions come back upon the present, of course. Why aren’t we doing the right thing today — whatever that might be? So: why didn’t the Aztecs ever emerge from the stone age? Why did such a remarkably advanced people make such limited use of metal? Anthropologist Terry Stocker offers a troubling answer. When you already have a fine technology, you don’t see beyond it. And the Aztecs had obsidian for their axes and knives….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paris Attack Insights 54 mins – “This edition of The Enright Files looks back at some of our conversations from 2015 with people who tried to help us understand the terror attacks in Paris and the questions that flow from them.” At the link find the title, “The Enright Files – Understanding the terror attacks in Paris,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160104_55850.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physician Burnout 51mins – “Dr Dike Drummond is a Mayo trained Family Practice Physician who now specializes in physician burnout. The founder of TheHappyMD.com and author ‘Stop Physician Burnout’ he has come face to face with the realities of burnout as a physician on two separate occasions himself. He understands the complexities of physician burnout and how the one suffering burnout is often the last to know. Dr Drummond has coached thousands of physicians through the challenging times of burnout and speaks regularly across the globe to healthcare institutions in need of guidance on addressing this ever growing problem. In this episode we discuss how burnout manifests in physicians, how men and women differ in their display of symptoms and most importantly we discuss the steps to addressing burnout. This discussion was one of the most eye opening conversations on burnout I have had and explained so much of why we feel the way we do in times of stress.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Trends in U.S. 63 mins – “Dave Johnson and Marcy Wheeler wrote posts in December referring to Jimmy Carter’s “Malaise Speech” and its relationship to where the United States is today. Marcy and Dave describe some key inflection points we can expect to see in 2016, ranging from the impact of climate change policy to the Saudi/Iranian axis’ impact on the Middle East and US policy. Also, the effect of the Transpacific Partnership (TPP) on American policy and politics, and the role of declining middle class wages on the Presidential election. Jay Ackroyd hosts. Marcy’s post “Obama’s Terrorism Cancer Speech, Carter’s Malaise Speech” link Dave has several at Seeing the Forest. The 2016 VS Media Panel: Avedon Carol, Cliff Schecter, Culture of Truth, David Dayen, Dave Johnson, David Waldman, digby, Gaius Publius, Isaiah Poole, Joan McCarter, Marcy Wheeler, Sara Robinson, Susie Madrak, Spocko, Stuart Zechman” At the link find the title, “Marcy Wheeler and Dave Johnson Virtually Speaking Sundays,” right-click “Media files marcy wheeler and dave johnson virtually speaking sundays.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in RCMP 25 mins – “RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson says he wants to kick racist officers out of the force. Today, we are picking up on this conversation on racism in Canada’s police force and hear from two former police officers.” At the link find the title, “Racism within RCMP stirs debate over bad apples or systemic problems – Jan 5, 2016 (2/3),” right-click “Download Racism within RCMP stirs debate over bad apples or systemic problems – Jan 5, 2016 (2/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Camp in Kenya 28 mins – “In many ways, 2015 was the year of the refugee. More than a million people made their way to Europe seeking shelter. And the world was forced to reckon with the fact that millions more have already made their way to the relative safety of UN run camps in countries like Turkey and Lebanon. But, inside the world’s largest refugee camp, 2015 was just another year that came and went, with very little attention paid by the wider world. That camp is an inhospitable corner of northern Kenya, in the desert, where only thorn bushes grow. That camp is Dadaab, and it’s home to more than half-a-million people. The camp first opened in the early 1990s, Dadaab was meant to be a temporary city in the desert. But its hardened since into an uneasy permanence. “There’s no plumbing, no permanent roads, there’s no drainage, no electricity… everybody operates on the fiction that this place is temporary but it’s actually become permanent.” – Journalist Ben Rawlence, author of “City of Thorns.” The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) reports about 15.2 million refugees live in camps. (Reuters) For the past four years, journalist Ben Rawlence has been visiting the camp, and collecting its stories in his book, “City of Thorns: Nine Lives in the World’s Largest Refugee Camp.” Ben Rawlence joined Connie Walker from London, England.” At the link find title, “Forgotten Dadaab camp refugees share their harrowing stories of survival – Jan 4, 2016 (3/3),” right-click “Download Forgotten Dadaab camp refugees share their harrowing stories of survival – Jan 4, 2016 (3/3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Camp in Kenya 2 48 mins – “Founded in 1991 as a temporary shelter for Somalis, the Dadaab complex in northern Kenya now houses nearly half a million refugees. Ben Rawlence profiles nine of its residents in his new book, ‘City of Thorns.’ Also, [last 8 mins] Ken Tucker reviews Ellie Goulding’s new album, ‘ Delirium.’” At the link find the title, “January 4, 2016 Inside The World’s Largest Refugee Camp,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Problem 20 mins – “UN High Commissioner for Refugees António Guterres thinks that we can solve the global refugee crisis — and he offers compelling, surprising reasons why we must try. In conversation with TED’s Bruno Giussani, Guterres discusses the historical causes of the current crisis and outlines the mood of the European countries that are trying to screen, shelter and resettle hundreds of thousands of desperate families. Bigger picture: Guterres calls for a multilateral turn toward acceptance and respect — to defy groups like ISIS’s anti-refugee propaganda and recruiting machine.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Stories 27 mins – “Life as a refugee after fleeing the war in Syria to make a new life in Lebanon.” At the link find the title, “The Listening Project in Lebanon,” right-click “Media files p03dnk1m.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Story 3 24 mins – “Having arrived in Germany, the Dhnie family’s dramatic journey to their new home may be over, but the difficulties of adjusting to a new life are just beginning.” At the link find the title, “A New Life 3 – Germany,” right-click “Media files p03cy2tx.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Arabia and Iran 46 mins – “Robin Wright, who writes about Saudi Arabia and Iran in the current issue of ‘The New Yorker,’ says the latest conflict between the countries comes at an especially sensitive moment. Also, [last 6 mins] film critic David Edelstein reviews ‘Anomalisa.’” At the link find the title, “January 7, 2016 Journalist Says Iran-Saudi Showdown Comes At A ‘Really Dangerous’ Time,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

The 4 Hour Workweek 41 mins – “Usually, it’s my job to deconstruct world-class performers. This time around, the tables are turned. Many of you have asked to hear me interviewed, so this week Daymond John (@thesharkdaymond), star of ABC’s Shark Tank and CEO and founder of FUBU, is in charge and asking the questions. Daymond has a new book called The Power of Broke, and he is an expert interviewer and interrogator. In this episode, you’ll learn untold stories about my beginnings and rough starts. If you’ve ever felt like a beginner in business, or found your back against a wall, you will learn how to take your lack of resources and turn it into a strength.” [Ferris authored “The 4 Hour Workweek”.] At the link right-click beside “Download as a MP3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 217 – Jan 8, 2016: 3D Printer Impact, 911 System, Bloomberg at City Lab, Bullshit Detection, Chemical Pollutants, Christmas Humor, Church and State, Cilantro, Climate Warming Weather, Complex Diseases, Condoms, Constitutional Law, Cosmology Story, Credit for US Poor, Drew Pearson, Drones, Economic Anomalies, Engineered Networks, Extreme Giving, Farming in Texas, Financial Commandments, Football Schools, Ice Ages, Intelligent Design in Court, Iron Age History, Jim Crow Continues, Job Per State, Landing Approahces, Libyan Reconstruction, Life Coach, London Fogs, Los Angeles, Lusitania, Marissa Mayer, Med School HQ Founder, Medical Tests, Medicating Women, Mein Kampf, Mental Facilities, Music Business, Neil Gaiman, Neurologist, New Hampshire Life, Oil Decline in Alberta, Otis Redding, Pesticides on Food, Philippine Immigrants, Pilot Training Schools, PTSD in the Workplace, Racism in America, Refugee Children, Refugees, Rescue Death, Sari Description, Shenck v. U.S., Science Comedy, Seabed Mining, Sharing Cities, Solar Cell Windows, Song Writer Bill Medley, Steam Turbines, Strokes, Syrian Life, Syrian Refugees, Technology Assisted Review, Vitamin D, WWII US POW Camp

The best 73 podcasts from a larger group of 295 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 8000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but are limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile.  The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three  free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 270 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded and you can make your own selected list.

3D Printer Impact 1 32 mins – “In this episode of the podcast I interview Andrew Bowyer of the Reprap Machine Project. Reprap is a self-replicating prototyper with profound implications for the Open Source Appropriate Technology Movement.” At the link find the title, Episode #39: Reprap with Adrian Bowyer Part I, Jan 05, 2009,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

3D Printer Impact 2 28 mins – “Part II of my interview with Adrian Bowyer deals with two aspects of the reprap project: the global economic implications of distributed fabrication and practical tips for getting Reprap out there in as many hands as possible. Other issues, like economic collapse and Peak Oil are also addressed.” At the link find the title, “Episode #40: Reprap with Adrian Bowyer Part II, Jan 12, 2009,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

911 System 49 mins – “In the late 1950s, the National Association of Fire Chiefs recommended creating a single number for reporting fires. That was the catalyst for what is now the most recognized telephone number in the country: 911. A decade later the first 911 was call was made. Today, an estimated 96 percent of the population is covered by the emergency service. But the system was created for the landline, so as the country migrates quickly to mobile devices, government officials say the system is “dangerously out of date.” Diane and her [4] guests discuss what can be done to upgrade 911.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Bloomberg at City Lab 24 mins – “The philanthropist and former mayor of New York City is offering $125 million to reduce traffic fatalities and injuries in low- and middle-income cities and countries.” At the link find the title, “Michael Bloomberg on safer cities, new urban thinking,” right-click “Media files CITYCAST, Bloomberg bounce_v1, cc-0d0f22eb.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bullshit Detection 46 mins – “How strong is your bullshit detector? And what exactly IS the scientific definition of bullshit? In this episode we explore what makes a person susceptible to bullshit, how to identify and defend against it, and what kind of people are the most and least likely to be bowled over by bullshit artists and other merchants of pseudo-profound, feel-good woo.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chemical Pollutants 30 mins – “Thousands of chemicals are used in everyday products – in our water, our food and in the air we breathe. It’s the chemical soup of modern life and it’s virtually impossible to escape them. In this special edition of Catalyst, Dr Maryanne Demasi investigates the safety of these chemicals, and compares the level of chemicals in her own body with clean living convert and media personality Sarah Wilson. Is there adequate regulation and testing, or are we in the midst of an uncontrolled, human experiment?” At the link right-click “Download video: MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Christmas Humor 61 mis – “No Christmas can ever be as good as the ones you had as a kid. But this week we go all in and bring the joy, the spontaneity, the sense that anything can happen back to Christmas. We’ve got a live Christmas performance from some of the best improvisors in the country including Mike Birbiglia, Chris Gethard, and SNL’s Aidy Bryant and Sasheer Zamata. Also holiday meals – on fire.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Church and State 49 mins – ““Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” These sixteen words from the first amendment of the Constitution have guided the career of Reverend Barry Lynn. As head of Americans United for the Separation of Church and State, he has spent the last 25 years helping define what this phrase means in our everyday lives. From prayer in public schools, to abortion, to same-sex marriage, he’s debated in courts of law and the court of public opinion. Now, Lynn reflects on the issues that have defined his career and those that continue to concern him.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Cilantro 32 mins – “On the surface, it’s just a leafy green herb. Its feathery fronds add a decorative note and a distinctive flavor to dishes across Latin America and Asia, from guacamole to phở. And yet cilantro is the most divisive herb in the kitchen, inspiring both deep dislike and equally deep devotion. What’s the history and science behind these strong reactions—and can cilantro disgust ever be overcome?” At the link find the title, “The post The Good, The Bad, The Cilantro,” right-click “Media files The Good The Bad The Cilantro.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming Weather 28 mins – “Gregg Garfin is an associate professor in climate, natural resources and policy in the University of Arizona’s School of Natural Resources and the Environment. He joins us to tell us about the projections for a significantly warmer climate in the Southwestern United States in the next century. He also explains why a monsoon doesn’t necessarily have to do with precipitation, and how an especially strong El Niño weather system can actually affect the Earth’s rotation.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Complex Diseases 28 mins – “Six smart, strong women – mothers of children with complex diseases – are on a mission to make the system better. Not just for them but for you.” At the link find the title, “One More Thing,” right-click “Download One More Thing” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Condoms 30 mins – “Regardless of the ever present risk of sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy, condoms are still a hard sell. But what if one could be made from a material that mimics human skin and is imperceptible to wear? Dr Jonica Newby puts them to the test.” At the link right-click “Download video: MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constitutional Law 39 mins – “John Yoo, former deputy assistant attorney general for President George Bush and now a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, and Hugh Hewitt, former Reagan administration official and now a talk radio host, discuss the Constitution and current events in America. Topics range from Obamacare to the Middle East, the future of the United States, and how the Constitution applies to today’s problems.” At the link find the title, “The Constitution,” right-click “Media files 20150904.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cosmology Story 18 mins – “When Adam Becker realizes a visiting film crew is made up of geocentrists, he has to prevent them from exploiting his adviser’s work. Adam Becker is a cosmologist, a journalist, a programmer, and a science publishing troublemaker. He hails from a tiny town in northern New Jersey, and he has a PhD in physics from the University of Michigan. He strongly believes that scientific research should be open, that the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics is nonsense, and that David Tennant was the best Doctor.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Credit for US Poor 57 mins – “Author Mehrsa Baradaran discusses her book, [How the Other Half Banks: Exclusion, Exploitation, and the Threat to Democracy], in which she argues there are two banking systems in the U.S. – one for the poor and one for everyone else.” At the link find the title, “Washington Journal: Mehrsa Baradaran on Inequality in the U.S. Banking System,” right-click “Media files program.425016.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drew Pearson 60 mins – “Tyler Abell, editor of [The Drew Pearson Diaries: Vol. II], discusses the second volume of his stepfather’s diaries, which provide an insider’s view of Washington, D.C. from 1960-1969.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Tyler Abell,” right-click “Media files program.423557.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drones 22mins – “Drones, unmanned aerial vehicles, have been put to use by various military bodies around the world as silent harbingers of death and destruction. But they might also be put to use for good causes: deployed in rescue operations, for example, or accurately dropping seeds to aid reforestation. Realistically, will they ever be used to deliver your mail? And can the danger from drones that fail and drop out of the sky ever be nullified? Click assembles a panel of experts to discuss the future of drones. Joining Gareth Mitchell and Bill Thompson in the BBC Radio Theatre will be Dr Mirko Kovac, Director of the Aerial Robotics Laboratory at Imperial College London, Lauren Fletcher, CEO of BioCarbon Engineering, Mya Padget, a licensed commercial drone pilot, Liam Young, one of the key people behind the Barbican’s Drones Orchestra. Click also hears from Adrien Briod, Head of Technology at Flyability.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Anomalies 43 mins – “Hoover Institution fellow Thomas Sowell discusses poverty around the world and in the United States. Poverty in America, he says, compared to the rest of the world, is not severe. Many poor people in poverty in the United States have one or two cars, central heating, and cell phones. The real problem for the poor is the destruction of the family, which Sowell argues dramatically increased once welfare policies were introduced in the 1960s.” At the link find the title, “Wealth, Poverty, and Politics,” right-click “Media files 20151208.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineered Networks 4 mins – “Today, let’s talk about engineered social networks. The University of Houston Mathematics Department presents this program about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them. The chain of acquaintances between two typical people in the world is not very long. So why do contagious diseases not always spread across the globe? The reason is that not all acquaintances are equal: A person with the flu is much more likely to infect people they interact with daily than a former high school friend. How we interact, not only who we interact with determines how epidemics spread. Ideas and behaviors also spread through social networks. Suppose a friend recommends a movie to you. Will you go see it? This depends on how much you trust her opinion. The number of friends that recommend the movie is also important. To know how a movie recommendation spreads through social interactions, it is important to understand the dynamics and structure of social networks.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Extreme Giving 19 mins – “For many the holiday season is a time for acts of charity, but some people are wary of selflessness because it may harm people you are close to. Larissa MacFarquhar examines what motivates people to become extreme do-gooders and the backlash against them.” At the link find the title, “Sacrificing everything for others: a look at people who are “extreme do-gooders” – December 24, 2015 (1/3)” right-click “Download Sacrificing everything for others: a look at people who are “extreme do-gooders”” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in Texas 31 mins – “In this interview I speak with Eric Herm, who blogs at Sonofafarmer.com. Eric is a fourth generation farmer in West Texas who shares his personal story and his perspectives on soil health, Peak Oil, sustainability, and economic collapse. If you want to hear the perspective of farmers who are in the trenches and on the frontlines of the fight for sustainable food production, then listen to this episode.” At the link find the title, “Episode #44: Son of a Farmer,right-click the image above it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Commandants 60 mins – “On this episode of Slate Money, Felix Salmon of Fusion, Slate’s Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann, and author Harold Pollack discuss:Harold’s simple financial guide, The Index Card: Why Personal Finance Doesn’t Have to Be Complicated; The current state of the Affordable Care Act; The economics behind neglected diseasesAt the link find the title, “The Stay Healthy Edition,” right-click “Media files SM6290852802.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Football Schools 52 mins – “The highest paid public employee in Utah—not to mention 31 other states—is a college football coach. For the journalist Gilbert Gaul, that fact is perfect evidence of the financial powerhouse that is college pigskin. In a new book, Gaul investigates how college football programs became “giant entertainment businesses that happen to do a little education on the side.” He joins us Thursday. We’ll also talk to the sports economist David Berri about how student athletes are affected by all of this.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Ice Ages 42 mins – “Jane Francis, Richard Corfield and Carrie Lear join Melvyn Bragg to discuss ice ages, periods when a reduction in the surface temperature of the Earth has resulted in ice sheets at the Poles. Although the term ‘ice age’ is commonly associated with prehistoric eras when much of northern Europe was covered in ice, we are in fact currently in an ice age which began up to 40 million years ago. Geological evidence indicates that there have been several in the Earth’s history, although their precise cause is not known. Ice ages have had profound effects on the geography and biology of our planet. With: Jane Francis Professor of Paleoclimatology at the University of Leeds Richard Corfield Visiting Research Fellow in the Department of Earth Sciences at Oxford University Carrie Lear Senior Lecturer in Palaeoceanography at Cardiff University. Producer: Thomas Morris.” At the link find the title, “Ice Ages, Mar 2013,” right-click “Media files p02q5b5c.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligent Design in Court 32 mins – “Evolutionary biologist Nicholas Matzke talks about the Kitzmiller v. Dover evolution trial on the 10th anniversary of the decision. He advised the plaintiffs while working for the National Center for Science Education. He also discusses the continuing post-Dover attempts to get creationist narratives taught in public school science classrooms “ At the link find the title, “Evolution Still on Trial 10 Years after Dover,” right-click “Media files podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iron Age History 42 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the dawn of the European Iron Age.In around 3000 BC European metalworkers started to make tools and weapons out of bronze. A complex trading network evolved to convey this valuable metal and other goods around the continent. But two millennia later, a new skill arrived from the Middle East: iron smelting. This harder, more versatile metal represented a huge technological breakthrough.The arrival of the European Iron Age, in around 1000 BC, was a time of huge social as well as technological change. New civilisations arose, the landscape was transformed, and societies developed new cultures and lifestyles. Whether this was the direct result of the arrival of iron is one of the most intriguing questions in archaeology. With:Sir Barry Cunliffe Emeritus Professor of European Archaeology at the University of Oxford; Sue Hamilton Professor of Prehistory at University College London; Timothy Champion Professor of Archaeology at the University of Southampton; Producer: Thomas Morris” At the line find the title, “The Iron Age, Mar 2011,” right-click “Media files p02q5d5z.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jim Crow Continues 11 mins – “When it was released in 2010, Michelle Alexander’s book “The New Jim Crow” became a sensation and redefined the way many look at the incarceration of black men in the United States. The book led to many public and private discussions of the role that race plays in prison statistics and the legacy of racism in the legal treatment of blacks. While many praised the book, there were also critics. Adolph Reed, professor of political science at The University of Pennsylvania says that the analogy between mass incarceration and “Jim Crow” doesn’t hold up, because they are not identical systems. “I think that a lot of younger scholars find it [the comparison] powerful because they don’t understand the old Jim Crow,” says Reed.” At the link find the title, “What ‘The New Jim Crow’ gets wrong about the old Jim Crow,” right-click “ Media files reed-crow-edit.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Per State 41 mins – “His email went something like this: “My friend Heath just finished working an hourly job in all 50 states while living in an RV and paying off $15,000 in student debt. You should meet him.” …and of course I was interested. And here we are. To be a bit more specific, Heath graduated college and initially got a job like most people. After doing that for a while (and being very nonchalant about paying off his student loans), he and his wife Alyssa decided to do something crazy for their honeymoon – buy an RV and take a trip to every U.S. state. Of course, the idea had to get crazier – so Heath decided to attempt working an hourly job in all 50 states and make a documentary out of it. Along the way, he and Alyssa learned that living in an RV can be really, really cheap – and pretty awesome as well….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Landing Approaches 56 mins – “In the second episode of Plane Safety Podcast we’re discussing the Stable Approach concept.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Landing Distances 73 mins – “In this episode we’re looking at landing distances, news and feedback.” At the right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Libyan Reconstruction 27 mins – “Twenty three of Libya’s finest technology graduates plan to rebuild their country.” At the link find the title, “Young, Clever and Libyan,” right-click “Media files p03c52vb.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Life Coach 38 mins – “By popular demand, this is a follow-up with the amazing Derek Sivers (@sivers)! This episode can be listened to independently of our first popular conversation, and he answers some of my (and your) favorite questions. Originally a professional musician and circus clown, Derek created CD Baby in 1998. It became the largest seller of independent music online, with $100 million in sales for 150,000 musicians. If you only listen to one answer from this episode, don’t miss his response to “What do you believe that other people think is insane?” It gets progressively weirder and weirder and starts around 34:09…save as an MP3 by right-clicking here):” Or listen at the link and read more.

London Fogs 24 mins – “The fog rolls in and we are enveloped in the history and lore of the mysterious mist – from foggy London Town, to foggy Nova Scotia. Today we go into the fog to understand its place in poetry, and reality.” At the link find the title, “Into the fog: ominous, deadly and persistent in English literature – Dec 28, 2015,” right-click “Download Into the fog: ominous, deadly and persistent in English literature” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Los Angeles Renovation 20 mins – “The new mayor says he governs like he is “the city’s CEO,” requiring department heads to reapply for their jobs and undergo data-driven performance reviews. Here, he’s interviewed by Walter Isaacson, president of The Aspen Institute.” At the ink find the title, “LA Mayor Eric Garcetti on ‘reinventing city hall,’” right-click “Media files CITYCAST, Garcetti_bounce v1_cc-07c6de93.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Los Angeles Transportation 9 mins – “The former Transportation Commissioner of New York transformed Times Square from a cab-choked bottleneck into an airy pedestrian mall. Now, she’s working on walking, biking and commuting in Southern California.” At the link find the title, “Janette Sadik-Khan on LA, NYC and the future of transportation,” right-click “Media files FY15_CityCast, JSK_bounce-a2b36c58.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lusitania 60 mins – “Author Erik Larson discusses his book, [Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania], about the world politics surrounding the 1915 sinking of the Lusitania at the hands of German U-Boat submarines during its voyage from New York to England.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Erik Larson,” right-click “Media files program.393251.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marissa Mayer 28 mins – “Nicholas Carlson talked by video from New York City about how Silicon Valley companies operate. The author of Marissa Mayer and the Fight to Save Yahoo!, he focused on Ms. Mayer’s career in Google and becoming the chief executive officer of Yahoo!” At the link you can listen and look, but an audio file download costs $.99; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Med School HQ Founder 46 mins – “Dr Ryan Gray is a Flight Surgeon and Aerospace Medicine Physician who has also founded MedicalSchoolHQ.net, which guides applicants through the often arduous process of applying to medical school. In this interview we deep dive into some of the ingredients to an excellent medical school application, what a Flight Surgeon really does and how to deal with adversity when unexpected things come your way.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Tests 16 mins – “When Mary sat down with Zeke Emanuel, one of the main architects of the Affordable Care Act, she basically wanted to know one thing: if the ACA was supposed to revolutionize healthcare, how come she still can’t understand her medical bills? Even though he’s an oncologist, bioethicist, and healthcare wonk, Dr. Emanuel still struggles to navigate the system. Arcane hospital bills stump him, too. So if patients aren’t to blame for not understanding medical costs, is there anything we can do? Emanuel suggests that we start looking closely at the number of medical tests we sign up for. Take the PSA blood test for prostate cancer: it prevents a very small number of deaths, and often results in overdiagnosis. Some doctors disagree with him, but Emanuel sees it as a totally unnecessary expense that can lead to even more costs. He has never wanted one for himself, yet he’s been given the test twice — without being aware of it. When a doctor called to give him his results, Dr. Emanuel slammed the phone down before hearing them. He believes the PSA leads to unnecessary worry — and, more importantly, unnecessary treatment for men in this country. This week, Dr. Emanuel talks about what you can do to be a smarter consumer of healthcare, and the ways the system might be slowly changing to help all of us — doctors, hospitals, insurers, and patients — understand cost better.” At the link find the title, “Why is Healthcare So Expensive? We Ask an Expert,” right-click “Media files onlyhuman122915_cms560768_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicating Women 46 mins – “Are American women being prescribed psychiatric drugs – anti-depressants, anti-psychotics — for normal emotions? We’ll hear out one psychiatrist’s bold claim. Americans take a lot of pharmaceuticals to control their moods, their emotions, their state of mind. And women take a lot more than men. One in four American women, now on some kind of psychiatric medication. You know the names from the ads all over TV: Cymbalta, Zoloft, Abilify, more. My guest today, psychiatrist Julie Holland, says that flood of drugs is shutting down natural emotions that women need. Numbing women in a way that’s bad for many of them, and bad for society. This hour On Point: a cry against medicating women’s feelings.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mein Kampf 55 mins – “What should be done with Hitler’s autobiography Mein Kampf? Scholars in Munich have just finished a new, heavily annotated version of the book before the copyright expires on December 31, 2015.” At the link find the title, “The Struggle Over Mein Kampf (Encore June 6, 2014),” right-click “Media files ideas_20151229_16386.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Institutes 58 mins – “The Closing of Lakeview: Why it Happened and What’s Next – After months of scrutiny for abuse and neglect, this residential facility for people with brain injuries and developmental disabilities closed. We’re following up on an investigation by NHPR and the radio program Reveal about the history of the center, its connections to similar facilities nationwide – and what this means for a vulnerable population.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Business 30 mins – “Allen Bargfrede, Berklee School of Music professor, discusses how the music industry functions, payment systems for new music platforms, and what actions musicians would like Congress to take to bring fairness to those systems.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Allen Bargfrede,” right-click “Media files program.416634.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neil Gaiman 49 mins – “ There are things in this book, as in life, that might upset you. There is death and pain in here, tears and discomfort, violence of all kinds, cruelty, even abuse.” That is how best-selling author Neil Gaiman introduces his latest collection of short fiction and poems. The book is called “Trigger Warning,” named for the caution now used on images, films and literature that could trigger flashbacks or anxiety. The anthology is filled with what the Newbery Medal-winning author is best known for: ghost stories, science fiction and fairy tales. Join Diane for a conversation with Gaiman on why he says these stories are about the masks we all wear.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Neurologist 12 mins – “ As grad school for neuroscience wears on, Michael Nitabach feels the pull of law school, and goes. But he had another surprise coming. Every week the Story Collider brings you a true, personal story about science. Find more here: storycollider.org/ Mike Nitabach is Associate Professor of Cellular & Molecular Physiology and of Genetics at Yale School of Medicine, where he directs a research program aimed at understanding how neural circuits process information and control behavior. He received his PhD at Columbia University and post-doctoral training at NYU. He also made a detour between graduate school and post-doctoral training to law school at NYU, and practiced law for five years at Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP, where he focused on biotech and pharmaceutical patent prosecution and litigation.” At the link find the title, “Mike Nitabach: I was supposed to be a lawyer., Jun 2013,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save LinkAs” from the pop-up menu.

New Hampshire Life 8 mins – “This week, The Bookshelf features Brendan Smith. When you move to northern New England from somewhere else, you join a group of people known as “flatlanders.” Once a pejorative, the word “flatlander” is now a more acceptable term for folks from away and does not refer to the geography of the place those folks came from. Humor columnist Brendan Smith lives in Laconia, but he’s been a “flatlander” since he moved to New Hampshire from Long Island in the mid-1980s. He’s been sharing his observations about life and New Hampshire in columns in The Weirs Times and Cocheco Times for years, and he’s collected some of his best in Best of a F.O.O.L. in New Hampshire—that’s “Flatlander’s Observations On Life.‘” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Decline in Alberta 26 mins – “It’s been one of this year’s biggest reversal-of-fortune stories, as the high-flying economy of Alberta has been laid low by the plunging price of oil. We revisit our show in Calgary for stories of how life has been turned upside down in the province.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Calgarians re-imagine lives amid Alberta’s economic downturn – Dec 29, 2015 (3/3),” right-click “Download ENCORE: Calgarians re-imagine lives amid Alberta’s economic downturn” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Otis Redding 49 mins – “By the time singer Otis Redding was a teenager, he was already a star in his hometown of Macon, Georgia. But thanks to a recording contract with Memphis-based Stax records, he started to produce R&B chartoppers like “These Arms of Mine” and “Try a Little Tenderness.” But Redding’s biggest hit — “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” — wouldn’t come until after he died: Three days after he recorded it, Redding was killed in a plane crash at just 26 years old. The song, a blend of folk and soul that marked a big departure from his usual sound, was released posthumously and became one of the most popular tunes of the 20th century. Diane and biographer Mark Ribowsky discuss the short life and legendary career of soul superstar Otis Redding.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Pesticides on Food 18 mins – “About one-third of the fresh tomatoes sold in the U.S. come from Florida. Mainly migrant workers from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean hand-pick the tomatoes in or near the town of Immokalee, just north of the Everglades. For decades, Florida tomato pickers endured some of the worst working conditions in America. Beatings, rape and sexual harassment were common problems. Often, there were no toilets, shade or clean drinking water. Work hours were unpredictable and wages were extremely low. There were even cases of slavery. In 1993, the Coalition of Immokalee Workers began to organize. At first, it focused on ending slavery in the fields, then expanded its work to deal with wage theft and abuse. In 2001, it launched the Fair Food Program. The group brought about change by pressuring large retailers to use their market muscle to demand higher standards from suppliers. Host Al Letson and producer Jonathan Miller of Homelands Productions travel to the Sunshine State to tell us what happened after the tomato workers organized, pushed for reform and got the public to help.” At the link find the title,”When working conditions are ripe for change,” right-click “Media files When working conditions are ripe for change.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Philippine Immigrants 103 mins – “The Philippines has the most sophisticated labor-exporting model in the world. Despite the robust supply of workers in the Philippines, there is a concern that emigration—coupled with limited capacity of local training institutions—has contributed to labor shortages in key industries. The International Organization for Migration and the Migration Policy Institute hosted a breakfast briefing to discuss these critical issues and launch the Issue in Brief, Shortage amid Surplus: Emigration and Human Capital Development in the Philippines, the fifteenth in this joint-publication series offering succinct insights on migration issues affecting the Asia-Pacific region today.” At the link find the title, “Shortage Amid Surplus: Emigration and Human Capital Development in the Philippines,” right-click “Media files 151216_003.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pilot Social Media 79 mins – “Do you have a social media policy for your career? Welcome to the podcast where we inform, motivate, and give you an inside look at the many aviation careers. Some of our favorite co hosts join us. First , Eric Crump, Aerospace Director at Polk State College and a passionate aviation educator. We also have Tom Wachowski, Corporate Pilot and career advocate. Welcome to the show Eric and Tom!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pilot Training Schools 51 mins – “Welcome to Episode 84. The goal of this podcast is to inform, entertain, and motivate you to achieve your career goal. We to bring you the viewpoint of all those involved with careers in aviation and aerospace. Although we primarily focus on the positive aspects of a career in aviation and specifically as an airline pilot we also know that we must represent the challenges of choosing a career in aviation. To help you understand some of the challenges concerning salaries in the piloting career I have with me Ben Mandell author of Don’t Pay Any Flight School More Than $2500 In Advance: The Censored Information The Bad Guys Don’t Want You To Know and Pilots on food stamps: An Inside Look At Why Your Flight Was Cancelled.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PTSD in the Workplace 25 mins – “Manitoba is breaking new ground when it comes to recognizing PTSD in professions you might not associate with trauma. So who has been falling through the cracks when it comes to treating workplace related PTSD? Should the new approach go nationwide?” At the link find the title, Manitoba legislation recognizes PTSD as workplace related condition – Dec 30, 2015 (2/3)” right-click “Download Manitoba legislation recognizes PTSD as workplace related condition” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in America 54 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University African American Studies Program, and is titled “All Eyes are Upon Us – Race and Politics from Boston to Brooklyn.” Our speaker is Jason Sokol, Associate Professor of History from the University of New Hampshire.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Children Education 24 mins – “Thousands of children entering public schools across this country are there as refugees of war. We revisit our conversation with an expert on the integration of refugee children who says Canadian teachers are ill-prepared for the new arrivals.” At the link find the title, ENCORE: Teachers struggle to meet the needs of Syrian refugee children – Dec 31, 2015 (3/3) ,” right-click “Download ENCORE: Teachers struggle to meet the needs of Syrian refugee children,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Story (2 parts) 24 mins “Meet the Dhnie family in Turkey as they prepare to make the journey to Greece, along with thousands of others, from Syria.” At the link find the title, “A New Life 1 – The Dhnie Family,” right-click “Media files p03cy2fk.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. In part two, “The Dhnie family find themselves sleeping rough, getting caught up in riots and being detained as they try to reach Europe after their flight from Syria.” at “Media files p03cy24j.mp3”.

Refugees in Italy 25 mins – “Young refugees are going it alone. Today we revisit the stories of unaccompanied minors seeking a better life in Italy, and here in Canada. Humanitarian workers in Italy say thousands of migrant children are simply disappearing into Europe. At the link find the title,” ENCORE: Unaccompanied refugee minors learn how to live on their own – Dec 31, 2015 (2/3),” right-click “Download ENCORE: Unaccompanied refugee minors learn how to live on their own” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rescue Death 7 mins – “With winter now here, New Hampshire’s search-and-rescue teams are watching for storms in the Presidential mountains and worrying that once again, a hiker will make a decision that puts lives at risk.That’s what happened last February, when Kate Matrosova, a 32 year-old from New York, who thought she could beat an approaching storm….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sari Description 27 mins – “Shahidha traces the story of the sari, explores how it feels to wear one and asks what it meant for women like her mother. She discovers the unexpected ways in which clothing can be imprinted with feelings of nostalgia, love and loss.” At the link find the title, “My Mother’s Sari,” right-click “Media files p03cy8yq.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Schenck v. U.S. 92 mins- “Beverly Gage and Thomas Goldstein talk about the 1919 Supreme Court case [Schenck v. United States], in which the Court unanimously ruled that the Espionage Act of 1917 was constitutional.” At the link find the title, “Supreme Court Landmark Case [Schenck v. United States],” right-click “Media files program.411306.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Comedy 54 mins – “Where are the laughs in global warming? Is there a comedy of climate? Three renowned experts in the field offer their considered opinions: Rod Quantock, Hannah Gadsby and Andrew Denton. Recorded at Womadelaide’s 2015 Planet Talks, our guests provide advice on boiling billionaires for dinner, and how to change the minds of sceptics.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seabed Mining 10 mins – “In this exclusive interview for Oil & Gas IQ, Caitlyn L. Antrim, Executive Director of the Rule of Law Committee for the Oceans gives us a bite-size summary of 140 years of seabed mining, including the stumbling blocks, advances and why this exotic form of mining is beginning to make sense in the 21st century. Caitlyn Antrim researches the future of the oceans, the Arctic, and the environment. Her experience as a diplomat at the Law of the Sea Conferece and the UN Conference on Environment and Development reinforce her capability as an analyst of regimes for the international commons. Her current areas of study are the geopolitics of Arctic governance, and the implementation of the Law of the Sea Convention.” At the link you can sign up for the podcasts and a copy is included in the blog archive.

Sharing Cities 43 mins – “From bike share to Airbnb, the urban landscape now shows new systems of people passing private property around and using resources in new ways. We’ll look at this with April Rinne, Sharing Economy Advisory Board, City of Seoul, South Korea; David Sheard, Council Leader, Kirklees; Brian Chesky, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Airbnb; and Arun Sundararajan, Professor and Rosen Faculty Fellow, New York University.” At the link find the title, “What’s mine is yours? The new dynamics of the sharing city,” right-click “Media files FY15 CityCast, The_Sharing_city-8cb8ead6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Cell Windows 28 mins – “Imagine a world where every window-laden skyscraper generates its own solar power, where the skylights in your ceiling are a source of light and electricity, and where your iPhone charges itself through the power of the sun. What could make this imagined world possible? Photovoltaic solar cells that are as transparent as regular glass. Our guest this week on Sea Change Radio is Prof. Richard Lunt, the lead researcher on the MIT team that developed the technology, an assistant professor at Michigan State University, and co-founder of Ubiquitous Energy, the commercial enterprise through which this energy-capturing glassy-film will be distributed. Lunt talks about the science behind transparent luminescent solar concentrators and the opportunities ahead with applications ranging from power-generating car and building windows, to use on every device you can think of, from smart phones to store signs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Song Writer Bill Medley 49 mins – “Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield were the Righteous Brothers. In the 1960s, they brought out some of the biggest pop hits in history. Unchained Melody. You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’. Some of the most-played songs in the history of recording. And their songs came back. In soundtracks of “Top Gun” and “Ghost.” In “Dirty Dancing.” Year after year, still with a hold on popular culture. Something deep in our minds. This hour On Point, we’ll talk with Bill Medley about those songs, his life, and the Righteous Brothers.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Steam Turbines 4 mins – “…In the 250 years before Cleopatra, the Egyptians created all kinds of steam-driven toys. They all worked on the same principle: they had small water tanks heated by a fire. Steam escaped through jets to drive the toy. But no one could quite figure out how to make steam jets produce useful power. Finally, in the early 1700s, English engineers came up with a completely different scheme for getting power out of steam. They used steam to drive pistons. Soon, the whole world was powered by piston steam-engines, and those Egyptian jets were forgotten….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As”from the pop-up menu.

Strokes 83 mins – “Stroke is the 5th leading cause of death in the US and can occur at any age. Randall Higashida, MD discusses the symptoms of stroke, the importance of early diagnosis, new treatments and more. Recorded on 11/03/2015. (#30134)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Life 27 mins – “A fuzzy team photo from the 1980s sends Tim Whewell on a journey to track down football players from a small town in northern Syria who were once the champions of Aleppo province. In the last four years of war their hometown, Mare’a, has become a war zone – bombed by the Assad regime, besieged by Islamic State, subject even to a mustard gas attack. And the civil war has torn through what was once a band of friends – some now pro-rebel, some pro-regime. They’re scattered across Syria and beyond, some fighting near Mare’a, some in refugee camps abroad. What have they gone through since they won that cup? And do they think they can ever be reunited? Shabnam Grewal producing.” At the link find the title, “The Battered Champions of Aleppo,” right-click “Media files p03d9bj1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugees 52 mins – “Caren Bohan, editor in charge of U.S. Politics for Reuters, and Kathleen Newland, senior fellow and co-founder of the Migration Policy Institute, discuss the Syrian refugee crisis and the U.S. response amid national security concerns.” At the link find the title, “The U.S. Response to the Syrian Refugee Crisis,” right-click “Media files IM_20151219.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Assisted Review 29 mins – “Technology Assisted Review (TAR), also known as Computer Assisted Review, Predictive Coding, Computer Assisted Coding, and Predictive Ranking, has been around for 50 years, but is now becoming incredibly useful in the legal field. This technology can speed up cases of all kinds and greatly reduce discovery costs for their clients. But how do lawyers learn about TAR? After all, we’re not dummies. In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview John Tredennick, the CEO of Catalyst Repository Systems, about his new book “TAR for Smart People,” what exactly TAR includes, and specific ways it has helped companies reduce discovery costs….” At the link find the title, “Technology Assisted Review for Smart People,” right-click “Media files technology-assisted-review.mp3” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Vitamin D 74 mins – “This special episode from 2009 featured a rare off-topic discussion about Steve Gibson’s research into vitamin D.” At the link click “Download options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII US POW Camp 60 mins – “Jan Jarboe Russell discusses her book, [The Train to Crystal City: FDR’s Secret Prisoner Exchange and America’s Only Family Internment Camp During World War II], about the Texas camp, which was home to Japanese, German and Italian detainees.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Jan Jarboe Russell,” right-click “Media files program.389119.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment