Media Mining Digest 437: American Comparison, Bacteria Control, Blockchain Discussion, Books Replacement, Brain Divided, Breast Cancer Story, Chinese Capitalism, Cloud Computing, Covid-19 in California, Covid-19 Lessons from China, Culture and Morality, Data Breeches in Law Firms, Disease Spillover Event, Economics in 21st Century, Economics Research Flawed, Electronic Discovery, FBI InfraGard, Genomics Sequencing, HIV Vaccine Research, Home Depot Founder, Hong Kong History, Improving the World, Malaria Discussion, Martin-Luther-King Jr, Native American Diet, Native Americans and Smallpox, Nuclear Bomb Security, Ocean Viruses, Pandemic Lessons, Pneumonia Discussion, Poverty Solution, Prison History in US, Puerto Rico Hurricane Recovery, Recommendation Engines, Robot Law, Sex Trafficker Investigator, Telemedicine Discussion, Tuberculosis Discussion

Exercise your ears: the 50 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 199 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 27,750 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Alan Lightman Interview 72 mins – “Author and Physicist Alan Lightman talks about his book Searching for Stars on an Island in Maine with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. This is a wide-ranging conversation on religion, science, transcendence, consciousness, impermanence, and whether matter is all that matters.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America Comparison 29 mins – “How Does America Compare to the Rest of the World? Last week we looked at how you might compare to the average American. This week we’re looking at how America compares to the rest of the world around issues of debt, college spending, retirement savings, and more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Bacteria Control 43 mins – “In this podcast I talk to Carl Bergstrom of the University of Washington about the mathematics of microbes. Bergstrom is a mathematical biologist who probes the abstract nature of life itself. We talk about how life uses information, and how information can evolve. But in Bergstrom’s hands, these abstractions shed light on very real concerns in medicine, from the way that viruses jam our immune system’s communication systems to to the best ways to fight antibiotic resistance.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Bioluminescence 42 mins – “In this podcast I talk to Bonnie Bassler, a professor at Princeton and the president-elect of the American Society for Microbiology. Bassler studies the conversations that bacteria have, using chemicals instead of words, Her research is not only helping to reveal how bacteria work together to make us sick, but also how we might interrupt their dialogue in order to cure infections.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Blockchain Discussion 41 mins – “What is the blockchain according to Bill Tai? The internet. The blockchain is the same thing but with assets. It can aggregate history into groups of information with communities of interests surrounding it. CEO of ABRA, Bill Barydt. ABRA has recently partnered with the extremely well known American Express. ABRA is a digital currency wallet for IOS and Android. It allows you to store digital dollars on your smartphone with no bank involved. It is the only application that interoperates between the traditional and the new worlds. The third guest was Toni Lane Casserly, founder of Vnation.io. The idea? To leverage core innovation made by Blockchain infrastructure so that people can design new systems of governance. Next was Kevin Shen from Averon with a goal to make sure people aren’t forgetting they are secure on that side. Lastly, on the legal end of the blockchain was Pawel Kuskowski from Coinfirm. Coinfirm serves as a foundation for the safe adoption and use of blockchain.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Books Replacement 66 mins – “Software Engineer Andy Matuschak talks about his essay “Why Books Don’t Work” with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Matuschak argues that most books rely on transmissionism, the idea that an author can share an idea in print and the reader will absorb it. And yet after reading a non-fiction book, most readers will struggle to remember any of the ideas in the book. Matuschak argues for a different approach to transmitting ideas via the web including different ways that authors or teachers can test for understanding that will increase the chances of retention and mastery of complex ideas.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Divided 84 mins – “Psychiatrist and author Iain McGilchrist talks about his book, The Master and His Emissary, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. McGilchrist argues we have misunderstand the purpose and effect of the divided brain. The left side is focused, concrete, and confident while the right side is about integration of ourselves with the complexity of the world around us. McGilchrist uses this distinction to analyze the history of western civilization. This is a wide-ranging conversation that includes discussions of poetry, philosophy, and economics.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Breast Cancer Story 23 mins – “A 39-year-old woman gets diagnosed with breast cancer, then makes a decision that not only helps her survive — it changes the lives of hundreds of other patients and their families.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Chinese Capitalism 35 mins – “A Westerner’s Guide to China – We’re joined by Motley Fool Analyst Ben Ra to discuss how China’s history influences its mindset on capitalism and business.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cloud Computing 32 mins – “The large volume of data that many law firms handle makes utilizing cloud computing services a very enticing prospect. What ethical standards should lawyers expect these companies to abide by? What should lawyers look for in a cloud computing provider? In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway speak with Clio founder and CEO Jack Newton and Rocket Matter founder and CEO Larry Port about cloud computing and the new cloud security standards for legal professionals released by the Legal Cloud Computing Association. Larry explains what the LCCA is and how it formed out of a need to educate lawyers about what is happening in the cloud. Jack provides some insight into the creation of the security standards, such as terms of service privacy policies and encryption, and states that with these standards as a baseline lawyers will be able to more easily assess if a cloud computing provider is adhering to certain ethical standards. Larry also lists a few factors lawyers should consider, like where the SaaS data center is located, and the four things (vulnerability scans, penetration testing, and aesthetic code and dynamic code reviews) that the standards require in security testing. They both end the interview with an analysis of in-transit and at rest encryption and the benefits and drawbacks of zero knowledge level security.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 in California 20 mins – “San Diego County has Dr. Kristi Koenig as medical director of its emergency medical services. That’s fortunate for the county, because she’s co-edited a definitive textbook, “Koenig and Schultz’s Disaster Medicine: Comprehensive principles and practices.” We’re fortunate to have her as our guest. She’s full of sound advice on organizing a community’s response (for example, setting up “incident command” structures) and evaluating patients as new threats emerge (the well-known “three-I’s” approach — Identify, Isolate, and Inform). With the number of COVID-19 cases rising quickly there in San Diego, she’s been busy (as have all of you).At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid-19 Lessons from China 57 mins – “China was the first country in the world to experience effects from COVID-19. Now the epidemic there is slowing. How did the country of more than 1 billion people make it through? Technology played a big role. In this episode, Lydia Lee, Gary Liu, and Andrew McLaughlin join Vivian Schiller, executive director of the Aspen Digital program at the Aspen Institute, to talk over the kinds of technology that were launched or re-purposed to address aspects of the crisis. How did technology help keep the virus from spreading? How was misinformation handled online? Are there lessons that the United States can draw from? The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link find the title, “China, Technology, …” and right-click the play button to hear the podcast. A copy is also included in this blog archive.

Culture and Morality 67 mins – “Economist and author Arnold Kling talks about the economic impact of culture and morality with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Drawing on a recent essay on the importance of social interactions, Kling explores the role of culture and norms and their broad impact on economic life. At the end of the conversation, Roberts discusses the implications of human sociality for the way economics is taught and the way economists think about public policy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Breach Reports 24 mins – “In the aftermath of the Panama Papers data breach many law firms have become hyper aware of their digital security risks. With the number of breaches on the rise what can lawyers do to keep informed of the most pertinent risks facing legal practitioners? In this episode of the Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek speak with Clark Hill PLC Of Counsel David G. Ries about data security, Mandiant’s M-Trends, and Verizon’s Data Breach Investigation Reports. David opens the interview with an explanation of what these reports are (summaries developed by security service providers on data breach trends during the past year) and talks about how they help to organize collected information for ease of use. He then analyzes the subtle differences between the two reports, like the way they define terms like data breach and security incident, and gives some insight into the ways each company acquires their data. David also covers the top three key findings provided by each report and gives examples of how this information can be invaluable to law firms seeking to shore up their security shortcomings. He closes the interview with his major takeaways from this year’s’ reports and tips for law firms on how this research can aid in strengthening your comprehensive cybersecurity program.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Data Breeches in Law Firms 29 mins – “’33% of Fortune 100 Organizations will experience an information crisis by 2017.’ – Gartner, an information technology research and advisory firm Recently, data breaches have become one of the most serious threats to companies worldwide, and as more corporate infrastructure moves online, studies suggest that the rising number of data breaches will cost 2.1 trillion dollars globally by 2019. Because of this, a new market of data breach practice groups has emerged to assist with e-discovery, information governance, data security, and preparation for high-risk technological emergencies. In light of this, what should your law firm or company do to prepare for one of these potentially imminent situations?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Disease Spillover Event 46 mins – “A spillover event occurs when a human is infected from an animal reservoir. Most spillover events are dead ends for the microbe. Only in a few events does the infected person lead to a transmission chain, in which other people are infected. Convincing funding agencies to conduct surveillance when no outbreaks are occurring is like convincing a healthy adult to buy insurance: a tough sell. Investment in surveillance is the most critical thing, however, to successful outbreak prediction. There is no shortage in the number of scientists who will measure these important parameters, when given the funding and resources, and their basic science observations are critical to predicting what happens when an ecosystem becomes unbalanced. Learning the aspects that grant one vector or pathogen a potential for spreading human disease helps researchers and public health officials to determine other vectors or pathogens that might have similar characteristics. Mapping these geographically can inform surveillance efforts and make a case for increased basic research to define these characteristics.At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Economics in 21st Century 64 mins – “Economist, blogger, and author Arnold Kling talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the state of economics in the 21st century. Kling argues that economics would be more useful if it took account of intangibles like culture, incorporated the role of financial intermediation in the economy, and modeled some of the the subtleties of the labor market–how wages are set and the role of team production.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics Research Flawed 64 mins – “John Ioannidis of Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his research on the reliability of published research findings. They discuss Ioannidis’s recent study on bias in economics research, meta-analysis, the challenge of small sample analysis, and the reliability of statistical significance as a measure of success in empirical research.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronic Discovery 24 mins – “Many of our listeners will know the term Technology-Assisted Review (TAR) by it’s more common nickname, “predictive coding.” Lawyers and judges alike need to pay attention to TAR due to potential changes to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP) coming up in December 2015. And since almost all courts accept when lawyers utilize TAR for document review, it is important to keep up. In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Judge Andrew Peck, an expert in issues relating to electronic discovery. Together they discuss the current state of technology-assisted review, how FRCP amendments will affect the way lawyers do discovery, and best practices when using TAR. Judge Peck explains the origin of using “technology-assisted review” as terminology over “predictive coding” or “computer-assisted review.” He explains that training the TAR program effectively is important, but the technology has progressed to a point where TAR will be successful as long as the training is sufficient and the scope of the team is in line. Finally, since the predictive coding programs are very expensive he explains when a case is big enough to warrant its use. Stick around to the end for a tip on using Federal Rule of Evidence 502 in court.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

FBI InfraGard 24 mins – “InfraGard, one of the longest running outreach associations, represents a partnership between the FBI and the private sector. Members include businesses professionals (including many law firm employees), people from academic institutions, and local participants who share their experience and expertise with the FBI to assist in crime prevention. In the recent climate of rampant cyber security issues, many in the private sector are better equipped to fight these cyber threats. So why is it important for lawyers to know about and potentially join InfraGard? In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview FBI special agent and InfraGard coordinator Kara Sidener about the way InfraGard works and why lawyers and other law firm professionals should be interested in joining this two-way information sharing platform.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Genomic Sequencing 56 mins – “Jonathan Eisen is a professor at the University of California, Davis Genome Center. Over the course of his career, he has pioneered new ways of sequencing microbial genomes and analyzing them. I talked to Eisen about some of the weirdest creatures he’s studied, such as bacteria that only live on the bellies of worms at the bottom of the ocean, and how we may be able to exploit their genomes for our own benefit. We also discussed the new movement for open access to scientific literature, a subject that’s a particular passion of Eisen, who is academic editor in chief at the open-access journal PLOS Biology.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play,” but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Government Innovation 67 mins – “Economist and author Mariana Mazzucato talks about her book The Value of Everything with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mazzucato argues that economists have mismeasured value and have failed to appreciate the role of government as innovator. She argues for a more active role for government in the innovation process and for government to share in revenue proportional to its role in the creation of new technology.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV Vaccine Research 37 mins – “Why have scientists struggled to generate a protective HIV vaccine? Dan Barouch lays out the unique challenges and discusses the ongoing clinical trial with an adenovirus-based vaccine developed in his lab.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Home Depot Founder 14 mins – “Langone came from nothing to become a founder of The Home Depot, but never forgot his roots. He’s given staggering sums, but says his money isn’t truly charity. Discover a refreshing outlook that proves you don’t need riches in order to give richly.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Hong Kong History 74 mins – “Neil Monnery, author of Architect of Prosperity, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book–a biography of John Cowperthwaite, the man often credited with the economic success of Hong Kong. Monnery describes the policies that Cowperthwaite championed and the role they played in the evolution of Hong Kong’s economy. How much those policies mattered is the focus of the conversation. Other topics include the relationship between Hong Kong and China and the irony of the challenges Hong Kong faced from U.S. and British protectionism.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Improving the World 72 mins – “Bjorn Lomborg, President of the Copenhagen Consensus Center, talks about the costs and benefits of attacking climate change with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Lomborg argues that we should always be aware of tradeoffs and effectiveness when assessing policies to reduce global warming. He advocates for realistic solutions that consider the potential to improve human life in other ways. He is skeptical of the potential to move away from fossil fuels and argues that geo-engineering and adaptation may be the most effective ways to cope with climate change.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innate Immune System 16 mins – “Christine Biron is the chair of the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at Brown University in Providence, and she focuses her research program on the mechanisms of the innate immune system – the body’s system of non-specific munitions for fighting off pathogens.  Dr. Biron is also a newly elected fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology. When a pathogen gets on or in your body, your innate immune system is on the front lines, working against the pathogen is a non-specific manner.  In research, the innate immune system got short shrift for a long time, and only in the last 10 or 20 years has the field picked up momentum.  Dr. Biron says back when she was in graduate school “the innate immune system wasn’t thought to be very cool”, but she says the field is fast-moving today, in part because of some major discoveries involving Type-1 interferons, natural killer cells, and an increased appreciation of a wider range of antigen processing cells that link the innate and adaptive immune responses. In this interview, I talked with Dr. Biron about our increasing awareness of the innate immune system, why it’s important to bring microbiologists and immunologists together under one big tent, and why it’s best that a battle between a virus and a host ends not in victory for one and defeat for the other, but in détente.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Insect Microbes 54 mins – “How many genes can a species lose and still stay alive? It turns out, bacteria can lose just about all of them! In this podcast, I talk to Nancy Moran of Yale University about her fascinating work on the microbes that live inside insects such as aphids and cicadas. After millions of years, they have become stripped down creatures that are revealing some profound lessons about how superfluous most genes are–at least if you live inside a host.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Lincoln 55 mins – “Abraham Lincoln wasn’t the first lawyer to occupy the Oval Office (and he wouldn’t be the last). Lincoln came to national prominence after a long career settling disputes between farmers and representing litigious railway companies. So what did this enterprising lawyer pick up along the way and how did his legal career influence the President he became? Ed and guest host Lindsay Graham of the American History Tellers podcast explore the career of Lincoln the Lawyer.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malaria Discussion 55 mins – “In this podcast, I talk with Irwin Sherman, professor emeritus at the University of California at Riverside, about the century-long quest for a vaccine against malaria. Scientists have been trying to make a vaccine for the disease almost since the discovery of the parasite that causes malaria. Yet decade after decade, they’ve encountered setbacks and failures. We talked about why it’s so hard to make a malaria vaccine, and how likely it is that scientists will ever be able to do so in the future. If you want to find out more about this long-running saga, check out Sherman’s new book, The Elusive Malaria Vaccine: Miracle or Mirage. About the Book – Chronicling a 100-year quest, this book tells the fascinating story of the hunt for the still-elusive malaria vaccine. Its clear, engaging style makes the book accessible to a general audience and brings to life all the drama of the hunt, celebrating the triumphs and documenting the failures. The author captures the controversies, missteps, wars of words, stolen ideas, and clashes of ego as researchers around the world compete to develop the first successful malaria vaccine.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Martin Luther King Jr 30 mins – “In 1968, just hours after Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, the legendary historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills—then a young writer for Esquire—rushed to Memphis, Tennessee, where he watched as King’s body was embalmed at the mortuary, then later traveled twelve hours by bus with mourners to King’s funeral in Atlanta. Nearly fifty years later, Wills’s “Martin Luther King Jr Is Still on the Case!” remains one of the most revealing and lasting portraits of King and his turbulent era ever written. Writer and director John Ridley—who won an Oscar for his screenplay for 12 Years a Slave—joins host David Brancaccio to discuss why Wills’s wrenching portrait of King continues to resonate today, what has changed in America since it was written, and, most important, what still needs to change.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

More from Less 93 mins – “Andrew McAfee of MIT’s Sloan School of Management talks about his book, More from Less, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. McAfee argues that technology is helping developed nations use fewer resources in producing higher levels of economic output. The improvement is not just a reduction in energy per dollar of GDP but less energy in total as economic growth progresses. This “dematerialization” portends a future that was unimaginable to the economists and pundits of the past. McAfee discusses the potential for dealing with climate change in a dematerialized world, the non-material aspects of economic progress, and the political repercussions of the current distribution of economic progress.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Native American Diet 44 mins -”Lewis and Krithivasan Sankaranarayanan—“Krithi”– both from the University of Oklahoma in Norman talk with Jeff Fox about their analyses of the gut microbiomes of American Indians of Cheyenne and Arapaho ancestry. Lewis, Krithi, and their collaborators learned that the gut microbial taxonomic profiles of these Native Americans are characterized by a reduced abundance of anti-inflammatory bacteria and also that their fecal metabolite profiles are similar to those found in individuals with metabolic disorders. Although this was a random sampling from a generally healthy group of individuals, their gut microbiota suggests that some of them might have health problems brewing below the surface—not a surprise among a population prone to metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. “For three years, we collaborated with the Cheyenne and Arapaho to discuss these topics and identify common ground for the research process, including our microbiome data,” Lewis says. I don’t believe the microbiome pattern resulted from the genetics of the American Indian. It is likely related to the socioeconomic challenges and resource availability in rural areas of Oklahoma.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Native Americans and Smallpox 29 mins – “Paul Kelton of the University of Kansas, Lawrence, talks with Jeff Fox about the introduction of infectious diseases among Native American populations. Kelton’s book Cherokee Medicine, Colonial Germs: an Indigenous Nation’s Fight against Smallpox, 1518–1824, published in April 2015 by the University of Oklahoma Press, looks at how Native American communities responded to new diseases, including establishing quarantines, to protect themselves against smallpox and other diseases. He offers evidence that the high mortality rate ascribed to smallpox in native populations had as much to do with cultural factors and the ferment of trade and warfare during the colonial period, as to any lack of immunity to the new disease. Kelton also discusses the question of whether Europeans may have means to deliberately infect Native Americans.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Nuclear Bomb Security 56 mins – “In 1942, American scientists created the first sustained, controlled nuclear reaction, under the bleachers of a football field. Needless to say, it was the beginning of a new era. On this week’s show, Brian, Joanne and Ed talk atomic power, and the indelible mark it left on American culture. Correction: The Nuclear Test Ban treaty wasn’t signed in 1958. Instead, the U.S. & USSR reached an unofficial moratorium on above-ground weapons testing. Both countries resumed above-ground testing in 1961, but ended it permanently when The Nuclear Test Ban treaty was signed in 1963.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Viruses 27 mins – “In this podcast I talk to Curtis Suttle, a professor and associate dean at the University of British Columbia.Suttle studies the diversity and population of viruses across the entire planet. He has helped show that viruses are by far the most common life forms on the planet. They also contain most of the genetic diversity of life, and they even control how much oxygen we have to breathe. I talked to Suttle about coming to terms with the fact that we live on a virus planet, and how hard it is to find a place on Earth that’s virus-free–even two miles underground.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Pandemic Lessons 14 mins – “Perhaps the only good news from the tragic Ebola epidemic in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia is that it may serve as a wake-up call: we must prepare for future epidemics of diseases that may spread more effectively than Ebola. There is a significant chance that an epidemic of a substantially more infectious disease will occur sometime in the next 20 years; after all, we saw major epidemics during the 20th century, including the Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918–1919 and the ongoing pandemic of human immunodeficiency virus. In fact, of all the things that could kill more than 10 million people around the world, the most likely is an epidemic stemming from either natural causes or bioterrorism….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photosynthesis 21 mins – “In this episode I speak to Sallie “Penny” Chisholm, the Lee and Geraldine Martin Professor of Environmental Studies at MIT. Dr. Chisholm studies photosynthesis—the way life harnesses the energy of the sun. Plants carry out photosynthesis, but so do microbes in the ocean. Dr. Chisholm studies the most abundant of these photosynthetic microbes, a species of bacteria called Prochlorococcus.  There are a trillion trillion Prochlrococcus on Earth. Dr. Chisholm researches these microbial lungs of the biosphere, and how they produce oxygen on which we depend. Along with her scientific research, Dr. Chisholm is also the author of a new children’s book, Living Sunlight: How Plants Bring The Earth To Life.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Pneumonia Discussion 24 mins – “In this podcast I talk to Keith Klugman, William H. Foege Chair of Global Health at Emory University. Dr. Klugman studies the disease that is the number one killer of children worldwide. If you guessed malaria or AIDS, you’d be wrong. It’s pneumonia. Two million children under five die every year from it every year–one child every 15 seconds. Dr. Klugman and I spoke about his research on how pneumonia causes so much devastation, its hidden role in the 50 million deaths in the 1918 flu pandemic, and how a new pneumonia vaccine can stop the disease in its tracks. For more information on pneumonia and how we can all help fight it, visit the World Pneumonia Day web site.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Political Partisanship 68 mins – “Political scientist Lilliana Mason of the University Maryland and author of Uncivil Agreement talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mason argues that political partisanship has become stronger in America in recent years because it aligns with other forms of community and identity. People are associating primarily with people who share their political views in their other social activities outside of politics. As a result, they encounter fewer people from the other side. The intensity of partisanship can even overcome ideology as partisans change their policy positions in their eagerness to be on the winning side. The conversation closes with a discussion of what might be done to improve political discourse in America.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty Solution 76 minsPoverty activist, social entrepreneur and author, Mauricio Miller, talks about his book The Alternative with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Miller, a MacArthur genius grant recipient, argues that we have made poverty tolerable when we should be trying to make it more escapable. This is possible, he argues, if we invest in the poor and encourage them to leverage their skills and social networks. Miller emphasizes the importance of self-determination and self-respect as keys to helping the poor improve their own lives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison History in US 38 mins – “(Contains archival audio in segments 1 and 3.) The United States imprisons more of its citizens than any other nation in the world. This month prisoners across the U.S. took part in a National Prison strike protesting how they are used as cheap labor, and calling for an end to “prison slavery.” In this episode, Brian, Nathan and Joanne reflect on the history of prison labor, and learn more about the challenges facing those behind bars.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Puerto Rico Hurricane Recovery 54 mins – “In August of 2018, officials in Puerto Rico reported that over 3,000 people died in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. One year after the disaster, Brian, Ed and Nathan take a look at the historical relationship between Puerto Rico and the United States. Are Puerto Ricans really Americans in the eyes of the federal government?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recommendation Engines 16 mins – “Agents and publishers want to find authors. Authors want to find readers. And readers, they want to find books. Helping make these discoveries happen is a powerful digital tool that evaluates writing styles and matches a work with books just like it. Inkubate is a data analytics platform expressly designed for authors to reach audiences with pinpoint accurate marketing. Research has shown that readers respond more to writing style than either genre or subject matter. The digital service at Inkubate “reads” a manuscript to find writing characteristics it has in common with other works. On social media platforms, authors then match their books with readers already inclined to like them. “We use very powerful algorithms to look for patterns within a manuscript,” explains Inkubate cofounder Jay Gale. “This allows us to hone on how an individual author uses the underpinnings of the construction of language. We then compare this to the pre-computed ‘fingerprints’ of thousands of manuscripts previously published in the marketplace, and we are able to measure the similarities to find the closest matches.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Law 23 mins – “From self-driving cars and drones to robotic surgeons and soldiers, humans are delegating more tasks to machines and software. But who is responsible when then these new innovations cause damage, injury, or death? Can we trust machines to prioritize preserving human life when accidents inevitably occur? Should we be thinking about sweeping regulations? In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview The Law of Robots Professor Ed Walters. Together they discuss our robotic world and potential future risks. Can humans keep up, will our laws protect us, and how worried should we be? Tune in to hear insight on these questions plus many more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Sex Trafficker Investigator 24 mins – “In middle school, Emily Kennedy thought sex trafficking “was the worst fate I could think of.” Now she’s the CEO of Marinus Analytics, a tech company that’s helping cops send traffickers to jail.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Solzhenitsyn Discussion 60 mins – “Historian and author Stephen Kotkin of Princeton University and Stanford University’s Hoover Institution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the historical significance of the life and work of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of Solzhenitsyn’s birth.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Telemedicine 21 mins – “Has your clinical practice shifted to telemedicine yet? In the era of COVID-19, clinicians everywhere are being thrown into telemedicine, often without any experience or background knowledge. To help us all get up to speed with this patient care technology, Hippo Education’s Dr. Neda Frayha sits down with Dr. Edward Kaftarian, the Vice Chair of Mental Health at the American Telemedicine Association and CEO of Orbit Health Telepsychiatry. Together they explore the benefits and potential pitfalls of telemedicine, the equipment required, billing and coding considerations, appropriate etiquette, and much more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Trent Lott 25 mins – “Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott talked about how the Senate has changed since he left in 2007, what he thinks needs to be done to get both parties to work together, and lessons from Watergate, the Clinton impeachment trial, and some of the grand political bargains of the 1980’s and 1990’s.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Tuberculosis Discussion 24 mins – “Ian Orme is a professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology at Colorado State University, and his research focuses on the immune response to tuberculosis (TB) – a bacterial disease that most often infects the lungs. He’s speaking at the American Society for Microbiology’s Conference for Undergraduate Educators (ASMCUE). In the U.S., TB seems like a thing of the past. Here, public health measures and medical care have all but wiped out the threat from this infection. But worldwide, the WHO says there were 9.2 million new TB cases in 2006 alone, and each person with TB infects an average of 10 to 15 people with the TB bacterium every year. These are just some of the reasons Dr. Orme is delivering a talked titled “Tuberculosis: Why Now Is a Good Time to Leave the Planet” at ASMCUE. He admits leaving the planet isn’t a practical suggestion, but he wants to raise awareness of the disease and he’s not afraid to stir the pot a little. Orme and his group not only study the immune responses to TB bacteria, they’re also following a number of different avenues for developing new vaccines and improving the existing vaccine, BCG (bacille Calmette-Guérin). In this interview, I talked with Dr. Orme about his vaccine work, why he thinks latent TB bacteria aren’t really latent, and how he sometimes feels like the wild-haired radical, cat-calling from the corner of the lecture hall.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

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Media Mining Digest 436: Bioethics, Boomers Impact, Burning Man, Cloud Technology, Covid-19 and Healthcare Workers, Covid-19 Treatment Options, Cybersecurity, Democracy Declines, Explosives Detection and Neutralization, Forensic Myths, Gawker Lawsuit, Governments Dark Data, Green Roofs, High Fructose Sugar Kills Bees, Hillary Clinton Emails, Human Rights Discussion, Hunting Warhead, Irrationality, Jamaican Author, Liquid Metal Batteries, Malware Analyst, Manufacturing in US, Measles Vaccine Powder, Mental Illness History, Nationalism Value, Pandemic Innovation, Placebo Effect, Precognition, Ricin Detection, Technification of Defense, Time Use, Trumpism Globally, Universal Basic Income, Vineyards

Exercise your ears: the 49 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 601 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 27,350 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Adam Smith 53 mins – “Revered as the ‘father of economics’ the name Adam Smith carries a lot of weight. Since the 18th century, he’s been quoted, misquoted, celebrated and blamed for capitalism’s excesses. Few people have actually read his books all the way through to understand what he was really trying to say, according to Glory Liu, a post-doctoral teaching fellow at the Political Theory Project at Brown University. “I was recently giving a talk and an economist came up to me and was like ‘isn’t the most common thing about Adam Smith that nobody reads him and everybody just quotes him?’ And I said ‘yeah’, and actually there’s a big story behind that,” Liu told IDEAS Adam Smith was a professor of moral philosophy. He saw himself primarily as a philosopher, not an economist. Yet his most famous book, The Wealth of Nations published in 1776, laid the foundations for the modern study of economics. In a 1988 address about Free Trade, then-U.S. President Ronald Reagan referred to The Wealth of Nations as revolutionary, saying it “exposed for all time the folly of protectionism.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Bioethics 54 mins‘Shouldn’t there be a law against that?’: Facing our fear of genetic innovation Professor Bartha Knoppers is the 2019 recipient of the Henry G. Friesen International Prize for excellence in health research. Once a scholar of surrealist poetry, she has now become a world-renowned voice and a prolific researcher in the field of medical ethics. Her Friesen lecture is called: “Scientific Breakthroughs: The Prohibition Reflex.” At the link right-click “Download ‘Shouldn’t there be a law against that?’: Facing our fear of genetic innovationand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boomers Impact  54 minsDebate| Do baby boomers owe millennials an apology? British sociologist Jennie Bristow debates U.S. author Bruce Cannon Gibney over the baby boom generation and its legacy for the world. Should boomers be held responsible for high house prices, the climate crisis, national debts, insolvent pension funds, and the woes of millennials?” At the link right-click “Download Debate| Do baby boomers owe millennials an apology?and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadway Musicals 54 mins – Lessons off Broadway: Princeton professor dissects zeitgeist in musicalsThe Broadway musical is an art form both beloved and maligned. Whether you love it or hate it, the Broadway musical has the power to tap into the zeitgeist, capturing and propelling social change. Princeton musical theatre scholar Stacy Wolf takes host Nahlah Ayed on a tour of the hidden power of musicals from the 1950s to today.” At the link right-click “Download Lessons off Broadway: Princeton professor dissects zeitgeist in musicalsand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burning Man 72 mins – “Marian Goodell, CEO of the Burning Man Project, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Burning Man, the 8-day art and music festival in the Nevada Desert. Goodell explains how Burning Man has evolved over the years, the principles and rules that govern the experience today, and plans for expanding the Burning Man experience around the world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cloud Technology 33 mins – “Tim Beyers, lead analyst from The Motley Fool’s cloud technology service, hops on the show to talk about the various elements of the cloud value chain: components and connectivity, data centers, infrastructure as a service, platform as a service, and software as a service. We break down how they all come together to form the cloud as we know it and some of the most interesting ways to play cloud technology.

Covid-19 Healthcare Workers 13 mins – “Our panel of podcast hosts from a variety of practice settings discuss the logistical and psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare workers and discuss strategies to mitigate the stress associated with the pandemic. Featuring: Solomon Behar, MD, Neda Frtingayha, MD, Mike Weinstock, MD, and Matthieu DeClerck, MD” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select ‘OK” from the pop-up menu.

Covid-19 in NYC 6 mins – “An emergency room doctor in Elmhurst, Queens, gives a rare look inside a hospital at the center of the coronavirus pandemic. “We don’t have the tools that we need.” At the link you can watch/listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 Resident Dr Viewpoint 13 mins – “Dr. Matt Young is a first-year resident in obstetrics and gynecology in suburban Delaware. Between the day I invited him to be interviewed and the interview itself (a 36-hour span) things had changed a lot for him. Anxiety levels are up among his colleagues, and everyone in his hospital must wear a mask all the time. A ground-level view of an incipient epidemic is what we offer.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid-19 Response 16 mins – “How Mayo Clinic created and disseminated an enterprise-wide Covid-19 care delivery plan through existing resources and real-time updates and adaptations. By Namita Seth Mohta, MD & Priya Sampathkumar, MD – Trust, teamwork, effective communication, and transparency are among the success factors that enabled Mayo Clinic to develop Covid-19 care delivery processes and procedures for its hospitals and care settings. Priya Sampathkumar, MD, a specialist in infectious diseases, discusses the roles of executive leadership and frontline clinicians in building, deploying, and maintaining best practices for the fast-moving, ever-changing novel coronavirus pandemic. …Dr. Sampathkumar and I will talk about generalizable themes and learnings from Mayo’s expertise and scaling a coordinated and comprehensive plan during emergency situations, using Covid-19 as a real-time example. The goal will be to have you — our audience of health care executive, clinical leaders, and clinicians — leave with some enduring insights and lessons that you could apply not only to Covid-19, but also to your care redesign efforts long after we collectively have successfully addressed this current pandemic.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 Treatment Options 16 mins – “The rapid spread of SARS-CoV-2, a novel coronavirus that emerged in late 2019, and the resulting Covid-19 disease has been labeled a Public Health Emergency of International Concern by the World Health Organization. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on March 18, 2020, the editors look beyond supportive care to evaluate possible treatments for the disease.

Cybersecurity 33 mins – “In the inaugural show of HackerNinjaScissors, Bret Padres interviews Robert M Lee. Robert M. Lee is the CEO and Founder of the critical infrastructure cyber security company Dragos where he has a passion for control system traffic analysis, digital forensics, and threat intelligence research. He is also a non-resident National Cybersecurity Fellow at New America focusing on policy issues relating to the cyber security of critical infrastructure. For his research and focus areas, Robert was named one of Passcode’s Influencers, awarded EnergySec’s Cyber Security Professional of the Year (2015), and inducted into Forbes’ 30 under 30 for Enterprise Technology (2016).” At the link right-click “Direct download: HNS_Podcast_1_Final.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Declines 88 mins – “Jonah Goldberg of National Review talks about his latest book, Suicide of the West, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Goldberg argues that both capitalism and democracy are at risk in the current contentious political environment. He argues that we take for granted what he calls “the miracle”–the transformation of the standard of living in the democracies with market economies. Goldberg argues that unless we actively work to preserve our political and economic systems, the forces of populism, nationalism, and tribalism will work steadily to destroy them.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

E-Discovery 24 mins – “Joe Looby recently released his documentary The Decade of Discovery about the United States versus Philip Morris tobacco lawsuit in the early 2000s and email e-discovery issues. The film also discusses the emergence of the Sedona Conference as a think tank and forum for discussion about cooperation in e-discovery. Many prominent federal judges were interviewed about the issues with open government and record keeping. Also in the documentary, Jason R. Baron, Esq. talks about open government, record keeping at the White House, and how the e-discovery issues played out in the lawsuit. We are beginning to wonder, in this world of big data, how are we dealing with information governance, specifically within issues of open government and data security?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” to download the podcast.

Earnings Accuracy 70 mins – “As investors, we depend on financial statements to understand how the businesses we own are performing. Therefore, we also depend on auditors to make sure those financial statements are accurate. Financial journalist Francine McKenna joins the show this week to discuss auditing and accounting issues including conflicts of interest between auditors and shareholders, the role of auditing in catching fraud, accounting issues at companies like Disney and Square, what we lose as non-Gaap accounting becomes more and more commonplace, how companies will decide to disclose coronavirus impacts on their business, and more. 

Explosives Detection and Neutralization  4 mins – “Scientists today described development and successful initial tests of a spray-on material that both detects and renders harmless the genre of terrorist explosives responsible for government restrictions on liquids that can be carried onboard airliners. They reported on the new ink-like explosive detector/neutralizer at the 241st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), being held here this week. “This stuff is going to be used anywhere terrorist explosives are used, including battlefields, airports, and subways,” said study leader Allen Apblett, Ph.D. “It’s going to save lives.At the link find the title, “Promoting Personal Safety and national Security: New nanomaterial detects and neutralizes explosive,” right-click “Plan Now” and select “Save target as” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Forensic Myths 30 mins – “We wanted to address the so-called “CSI Effect,” caused by the simplification of forensic science in popular culture. CSIand like-minded TV shows–with their heroic investigators solving crimes in mere minutes–mislead viewers and affect real court cases. The reality of investigation is much slower and more complex, but no less fascinating. Hosts Michal Meyer and Robert Kenworthy speak with experts Anna Dhody, a physical and forensic anthropologist, and Lisa Rosner, a historian. They discuss the early days of solving crime and the on-going chemistry of the human body throughout life and death.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Freud Impact  54 minsWishful dreaming: Freud and the discovery of our inner lifeSigmund Freud had many radical ideas about our inner life and how mental illness or trauma might be treated. Perhaps his most radical idea was that the patient should be listened to. This episode features a panel discussion at the Stratford Festival about the current state of Freud’s legacy on self-knowledge.” At the link right-click “Download Wishful dreaming: Freud and the discovery of our inner lifeand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gawker Lawsuit 52 mins – “Author Ryan Holiday discusses his book, Conspiracy, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. This is a crazy episode about a crazy book about a crazy set of events–the Hulk Hogan lawsuit against the website Gawker, a lawsuit that was secretly funded by Peter Thiel. Holiday explains how this happened and the lessons for all of us related to conspiracies, patience, strategy, and revenge. Along the way, Holiday discusses his techniques for reading and lessons for how to grab someone’s attention when looking for a job or opportunity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Governments Dark Data 16 mins – “Joe Looby recently released his documentary The Decade of Discovery about the United States versus Philip Morris tobacco lawsuit in the early 2000s and email e-discovery issues. The film also discusses the emergence of the Sedona Conference as a think tank and forum for discussion about cooperation in e-discovery. Many prominent federal judges were interviewed about the issues with open government and record keeping. Also in the documentary, Jason R. Baron, Esq. talks about open government, record keeping at the White House, and how the e-discovery issues played out in the lawsuit. We are beginning to wonder, in this world of big data, how are we dealing with information governance, specifically within issues of open government and data security?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio is included in this blog archive.

Green Roofs 3 mins – “The American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society, today took another major step in transforming its headquarters into one of the most energy-efficient and sustainable structures possible with existing technology by starting construction of a meadow on the roof ― a “green roof” for its headquarters building. Only 1 in 10 office buildings in the Washington, D.C., area have these innovative surfaces, according to Joanna Brosnan, director of ACS’s Facilities Department, who initiated the project. Green roofs use green plants growing on a specially engineered surface to absorb carbon dioxide from the air, save energy on heating and cooling, promote cleaner air, and reduce stormwater runoff that can overburden city sewers. When completed in the autumn, the ACS’ Clifford & Kathryn Hach Building, 1155 16th Street NW, will sprout a garden consisting of a specialized mix of plants that thrive in the harsh, dry, hot conditions that exist at roof level. Employees will be able to enjoy lunch or breaks in an observation area and enjoy the wildflowers, grasses, and water-storing, drought-resistant flowering sedums in the meadow-on-the-roof.” “We are delighted to be able to transform our headquarters building into an even-more environmentally friendly and sustainable structure,” said Madeleine Jacobs, ACS Executive Director and CEO. “This project is consistent with the core values of ACS, the world’s largest scientific society ― to work for a more sustainable city, country, and world.” At the link right-click “Website episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

High Fructose Sugar Kills Bees 3 mins – “In the United States, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) has become a sucrose replacement for honey bees and has widespread use as a sweetener in many processed foods and beverages for human consumption. It is utilized by commercial beekeepers as a food for honey bees for several reasons: to promote brood production, after bees have been moved for commercial pollination, and when field-gathered nectar sources are scarce. Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is a heat-formed contaminant and is the most noted toxin to honey bees. Currently, there are no rapid field tests that would alert beekeepers of dangerous levels of HMF in HFCS or honey….” At the link right-click “Website episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hillary Clinton Emails 29 mins – “’It is very difficult to conceive of a scenario — short of nuclear winter — where an agency would be justified in allowing its cabinet-level head officer to solely use a private email communications channel for the conduct of government business.’ – Jason R. Baron to the New York Times On March 2nd, 2015, The New York Times published a breaking story about Hillary Clinton, who used a private email account to conduct government business. Due to The Freedom of Information Act, many people questioned whether Clinton acted inconsistently with her federally mandated record keeping obligations. Furthermore, is this a wakeup call for companies and governmental entities who are not controlling shadow IT, the practice of employees using private devices and softwares at work? In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Jason R. Baron, of counsel to Drinker Biddle & Reath, LLP and co-chair of The Information Governance Initiative, about the Hillary Clinton controversy and the future of Shadow IT, BYOD, and information governance.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in this blog archive.

Human Rights Discussion 54 mins – “If you support human rights you’re obliged to be an anti-colonialist, argues scholar – Author of Insurgent Empire, Priyamvada Gopal on why everyone should be an ‘anti-colonialist’ — and what that means for Canadians.” At the link right-click “Download If you support human rights you’re obliged to be an anti-colonialist, argues scholarand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hunting Warhead 36 mins – “This episode explores the existence of the deep web and dark web, and how these non-indexed sites occupy more space on the internet than anything else. (Sarah Claydon) Einar Stangvik is a white-hat hacker — an internet security expert with an expertise in cracking the most secure and disturbing parts of the web. He discovers a troubling phenomenon online and joins forces with journalist Håkon Høydal. It leads them to Australia, to confront two men who are running the largest child abuse site on the dark net.” At the link find the title, “Episode 1: Hacker vs. Hacker,” where you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Irrationality  36 mins – “Why too much logic leads to irrationality: Justin E. H. Smith The Parisian-American philosopher Justin E. H. Smith argues that attempts to impose the victory of reason always lead to explosions of irrationality, whether in our individual lives or at the level of society. His book is called Irrationality: a History of the Dark Side of Reason.” At the link right-click “Download Why too much logic leads to irrationality: Justin E. H. Smithand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jamaican Author  36 mins – “Olive Senior delivers prestigious 2019 Margaret Laurence Lecture: A Writer’s Life – With wit and heart, Olive Senior delivered the 2019 Margaret Lawrence Lecture to a packed audience. Born in Jamaica in 1941, the seventh of 10 children, she went on to become one of Canada’s most acclaimed writers. Hear excerpts from her lecture, readings from her work and a conversation with IDEAS producer Mary Lynk.” At the link right-click “Download Olive Senior delivers prestigious 2019 Margaret Laurence Lecture: A Writer’s Lifeand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Killer Spices 4 mins – “Mention rosemary, thyme, clove, and mint and most people think of a delicious meal. Think bigger…acres bigger. These well-known spices are now becoming organic agriculture’s key weapons against insect pests as the industry tries to satisfy demands for fruits and veggies among the growing portion of consumers who want food produced in more natural ways. In a study presented here today at the American Chemical Society’s 238th National Meeting, scientists in Canada are reporting exciting new research on these so-called “essential oil pesticides” or “killer spices.” These substances represent a relatively new class of natural insecticides that show promise as an environmentally-friendly alternative to conventional pesticides while also posing less risk to human and animal health, the researcher says. “We are exploring the potential use of natural pesticides based on plant essential oils — commonly used in foods and beverages as flavorings,” says study presenter Murray Isman, Ph.D., of the University of British Columbia. These new pesticides are generally a mixture of tiny amounts of two to four different spices diluted in water. Some kill insects outright, while others repel them….” At the link right-click “Website episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leonardo da Vinci 36 mins – “Monster buff Leonardo da Vinci would have loved Halloween Leonardo da Vinci would have loved Halloween. The renaissance artist and engineer was also a monster buff. Writer and historian Ross King unveils da Vinci’s sketches and stories of monsters, beasts, giants and dragons, and explains how the artist’s views on fantasy were in contrast to an increasingly rational age.” At the link right-click “Download Monster buff Leonardo da Vinci would have loved Halloweenand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liquid Metal Batteries 63 mins – “On 29 November 2018 Energy Futures Lab and the Dyson School of Design Engineering hosted Professor Donald Sadoway of MIT to discuss the impact the liquid metal battery could have on the future of gridscale energy storage. Abstract: Massive-scale electricity storage would offer huge benefits to today’s grid, reducing price volatility, improving stability against loss of power, increasing utilization of generation assets by enabling us to design towards average demand instead of peak demand, and deferring the costs of upgrading existing transmission lines. When it comes to tomorrow’s grid, storage is key to widespread integration of renewables, i.e., solar and wind, which due to their inherent intermittency present challenges for contribution to base load. Comprising two liquid metal electrodes and a molten salt electrolyte, the liquid metal battery offers colossal current capability and long service lifetime at very low cost, i.e., the price point of the electricity market. The round-trip efficiency of these batteries is greater than 80% under daily 4 h discharge (C/4). Fade rates of 0.00009%/cycle have been measured which means retention of of more tahn 99% of initial capacity after 10 years of daily cycling at full depth of discharge. There is much to be learned from the innovative process that led to the discovery of disruptive battery technology.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however an audio copy of the presentation is available at this blog.

Malware Analyst 24 mins – “Today we talk with Lauren Pearce – a member of the IR team and a malware analyst for Los Alamos National Labs.  Lauren shares with us her journey to become a malware analyst and talks about the importance of flailing and mentorship.” At the link right-click “Direct download: HNS_Podcast_2_Final.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Manufacturing in US 51 mins – “Economist Susan Houseman of the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research talks about the manufacturing sector with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Houseman argues that the data surrounding both manufacturing output and employment have been misunderstood and misinterpreted. In particular, she argues that conclusions about the growth of manufacturing are driven overwhelmingly by computer production while the rest of manufacturing has been stagnant. She also argues that productivity has a small role in reducing manufacturing employment. Trade has been the main cause of employment reductions. These claims go against the standard narratives most economists have been telling for the last 20 years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save target as” from the pop-up menu.

Margaret Lawrence 37 mins – “The celebrated Jamaican-Canadian author shared a soulful, witty and tender exploration of becoming a writer in her recent Margaret Laurence Lecture. Since 1987, the Writers’ Trust of Canada has selected a prominent Canadian author to deliver a lecture on the topic: “A Writer’s Life.” Born in 1941, Olive Senior was the seventh of ten children, raised in rural Jamaica. After graduating high school, Senior came briefly to Canada as a Commonwealth Scholar to attend Carleton University in Ottawa. But it wasn’t until the early 1990s that the prolific writer settled in Toronto full-time.  Senior has published 18 books of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and children’s literature, including Summer Lightning and Other Stories, Over the Roofs of the World, and The Pain Tree. Her work has been translated into several languages worldwide and has won many awards for her work, including the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, the OCM Bocas Prize for Caribbean Literature and F.J. Bressani Literary Prize.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Measles Vaccine Powder 3 mins – “The first dry powder inhalable vaccine for measles is moving toward clinical trials next year in India, where the disease still sickens millions of infants and children and kills almost 200,000 annually, according to a report presented here today at the 238th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS). Robert Sievers, Ph.D., who leads the team that developed the dry-powder vaccine, said it’s a perfect fit for use in back-roads areas of developing countries. Those areas often lack the electricity for refrigeration, clean water and sterile needles needed to administer traditional liquid vaccines.” At the link right-click “Website episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Illness History 36 mins – “Anne Harrington puts it plainly: “We don’t understand any major mental disorder biologically.” The Harvard historian of science takes no pleasure in relating this surprising fact. She knows that people with depression, schizophrenia and bipolar conditions want better treatments for their symptoms. She also acknowledges that psychiatrists and researchers ARE “working hard to change that situation.” But her book, Mind Fixers: Psychiatry’s Troubled Search for the Biology of Mental Illness, surveys a flawed medical field that has been unable to come to any clear consensus around the causes of — or cures for — mental illness.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Nationalism Value 55 mins – “Yoram Hazony discusses his book, The Virtue of Nationalism, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Hazony argues that nationalism, for all its flaws, is a better system than a global system of governance. He argues that while the competition between nationalist states can lead to violence, the opportunity for each nation to pursue its own policies creates the benefits that trial-and-error innovation create in the marketplace. He also points out the dangers of global government systems and argues that U.S. military dominance and various international institutions such as European Union and the International Criminal Court have been growing in power.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Orientalism37 minsForty years on, Edward Said’s ‘Orientalism’ still groundbreakingEdward Said’s seminal book, Orientalism (1978), proposed one of the most influential and enduring analyses of the relationship between the West and the Middle East. In many ways, his ideas seem uncontroversial, perhaps even obvious today. But four decades ago, what Said proposed was radical. It still is.” At the link right-click “Download Forty years on, Edward Said’s ‘Orientalism’ still groundbreakingand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pandemic Discussion 95 mins –How to identify a pandemic.” Here are three video sessions made in 2018 discussing how to identify an epidemic, how to gather data, then how to innovate during the pandemic. The videos are provided via the New England Journal of Medicine. The audio part of each video is provided in this blog archive.

Pandemic Innovation 51 mins – “Innovation for Pandemics” Here are three video sessions made in 2018 discussing how to identify an epidemic, how to gather data, then how to innovate during the pandemic. The videos are provided via the New England Journal of Medicine. The audio part of each video is provided in this blog archive.

Pandemic Knowledge 78 mins – “Acquiring knowledge while saving lives.” Here are three video sessions made in 2018 discussing how to identify an epidemic, how to gather data, then how to innovate during the pandemic. The videos are provided via the New England Journal of Medicine. The audio part of each video is provided in this blog archive.

Placebo Effect 62 miins – “Author and psychotherapist Gary Greenberg talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the placebo effect. Is it real? How does the placebo effect influence drug testing? If it’s real, what is the underlying mechanism of why it works and how might it be harnessed to improve health care? The conversation concludes with a discussion of how knowledge of the placebo effect has influenced Greenberg’s psychotherapy practice.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Precognition 54 mins – “In 2011, an American psychologist named Daryl Bem proved the impossible. He showed that precognition — the ability to sense the future — is real. His study was explosive, and shook the very foundations of psychology.  “This would probably be the most important research paper I would say ever published in any field, if it were true,” said Jeff Galak, psychologist at Carnegie Mellon University.  “If this paper were true, our understanding of the entire world, the universe, physics, [and] psychology, for sure, would be completely different,” Galak said. “We would no longer see time as this linear thing that we move through, but instead something that can go forwards and backwards. And we could reach into the future and pull information from that — if it were true. And ‘if ‘is a big part of that statement.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ricin Detection 5 mins – “Ricin is a highly toxic protein largely existing in castor beans, which could be used as a warfare agent due to its unique properties. As a deadenylase, inactivation of ricin means a loss of its toxic threat. Therefore, developing simple, accurate, and sensitive on-site detection of biologically active ricin in wide types of complex matrices is most valuable…. Compared with previously proposed methods, this on-site detection strategy offered an easy to handle on-site test for trace amounts of active ricin in a wide range of complex matrices.” At the link right-click “Website episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Techification of Defense 27 mins – “Energy: The Techification of Defense –  Per a listener request on Twitter, we’re diving into the defense industry with Industry Focus contributor Lou Whiteman. On the first half of the show, we take a look at the winners and losers from the most recently proposed defense budget. On the back half of the show, we discuss Leidos (NYSE:LDOS), the biggest IT business in the defense industry and an interesting way to play increased “techification” of the defense industry. 

Time Use 63 mins – “Economist and author Daniel Hamermesh of Barnard College and the Institute for the Study of Labor talks about his latest book, Spending Time, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Hamermesh explores how we treat time relative to money, how much we work and how that has changed over time, and the ways economists look at time, work, and leisure.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trumpism Globally  54 mins – “‘Global Trumpism’: Bailouts, Brexit and battling climate changeWith panache, humour, and a dash of outrage, political economist Mark Blyth explains how the 2008 bank bailouts led to Trump, Brexit, and a whole new era of populism. He also sheds light on how a tiny percentage of the 1% got even richer after a decade of austerity — and yet he remains hopeful about combating climate change.” At the link right-click “Download ‘Global Trumpism’: Bailouts, Brexit and battling climate changeand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universal Basic Income 66 mins – “Why are fewer men working over the last few decades? Is a universal basic income a good policy for coping with the loss of employment? Economist Edward Glaeser of Harvard University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about what Glaeser calls the war on work–the policy changes that have reduced employment among prime-aged men. Glaeser does not see the universal basic income as a viable solution to the decrease in work especially if technology ends up reducing employment opportunities more dramatically in the future. The conversation also includes a discussion of the role of cities and the reduction in geographic mobility in the United States.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vineyards 46 mins – “Richard Hoff is the Director of Viticulture of Mercer Ranches. Mercer Ranches is a grape farm that produces high-quality wine through strict quality control and precise technology. Richard is considered an expert in wine tasting, wine manufacturing, and general viticulture. He obtained his Master’s Degree in Viticulture from Washington State University and his Bachelor’s Degree in Horticulture from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. Richard joins me today to discuss in great detail how the production of wine works – from the grape to the bottle. He describes the vineyards Mercer owns, the grapes they produce, their different yields, and their farming practices. He explains some of the details involved in processing such as pruning and de-leafing, as well as the technologies they use. Richard also shares some of the problems he looks forward to being solved by technology in the future.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 435: Acid Rain, Bitcoin Uses, Boarder Wall with Mexico, Cephalopods, Chinese AI Impact, Covid-19 Conversations, Crime Analysis, Data Breaches Forensics, Data Breaches in Healthcare, Domestic Surveillance, Drug Company Monopolies, Edwin Moses, Health Insurance Plans, Hormone History, Immune System, Insects Decline, Intelligence Briefings, Intelligent Machines Change Everything, Meatless Meat, Mobile Device Forensics, Opioid Withdrawal, Ozone Hole, Robots Take Our Jobs, Roy Cohn Interview, Steve Jobs, Telephone Security Discussion, Tesla, Tom Hanks Interview, Virtual Reality Impact, Virus Communication

Exercise your ears: the 45 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 456 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 27,250 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Acid Rain 33 mins – “Remember acid rain? If you were a kid in the 1980s like our hosts were, the threat of poison falling from the sky probably made some kind of impression on your consciousness. But thanks to the work of scientists, government, the media, and the pope—that’s right, the pope—the problem was fixed! Well, mostly fixed is probably more accurate. This complicated story spans 27 years, six U.S. presidents, and ecologist Gene Likens’s entire career. Discover the insidious details in the second chapter of our three-part series on environmental success stories.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.  

Beavers 42 mins – “Ben Goldfarb is a writer covering wildlife conservation and fisheries management. We talk to him about his new book Eager: The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers and Why They Matter.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin Uses 42 mins – “Facebook’s cryptocurrency ambitions scrutinized; UNICEF to accept digital donations; new spy technology uses wi-fi to see through walls” At the link left-click “Download,” then select version of MP3 to download.

Boarder Wall with Mexico 42 mins – “When we think about the U.S.-Mexico border, it’s hard not to think about the current immigration conflict and the contentious idea to build a wall. But the concept of a border wall isn’t new: proposals for walls have been made for more than 100 years. Our story starts in 1947, when a group of Texas ranchers demanded a fence along their state’s border with Mexico. Their motivation, though, was to stop an outbreak of a disease that struck farm animals. The response to the crisis was complicated and often messy. But in the end two countries came together to solve a complex predicament—instead of building a wall.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit 54 mins – “In 2016, David Cameron held a referendum on whether the U.K. should stay in the European Union. A longtime Euroskeptic, he nevertheless led the Remain campaign. So what did Cameron really want? We ask him that and much more — including why he left office as soon as his side lost and what he’d do differently if given another chance. (Hint: not much.)” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cephalopods 33 mins – “We talk to Danna Staaf, a science writer with a PhD in invertebrate biology from Stanford University, about her new book Squid Empire: The Rise and Fall of the Cephalopods.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese AI Impact 46 mins – “We talk to artificial intelligence expert and former president of Google China Kai-Fu Lee about his recent book AI Superpowers: China, Silicon Valley, and the New World Order.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cognition, Rationality and Perception 64 mins – “Teppo Felin of the University of Oxford talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about perception, cognition, and rationality. Felin argues that some of the standard experimental critiques of human rationality assume an omniscience that misleads us in thinking about social science and human capability. The conversation includes a discussion of the implications of different understandings of rationality for economics, entrepreneurship, and innovation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid-19 Conversations 12 mins – “We have Dr. Anthony Fauci of NIAID to talk with us about COVID-19, the disease caused by the 2019 novel coronavirus (also known as SARS-CoV-2). He’s full of sound advice in the midst of a rapidly changing epidemic. We wanted to know, How do you talk with patients about this rapidly spreading infection? How do you keep informed about it?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crime Analysis 82 mins – “Economist Jennifer Doleac of Texas A&M University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about her research on crime, police, and the unexpected consequences of the criminal justice system. Topics discussed include legislation banning asking job applicants if they’ve been in prison, body cameras for police, the use of DNA databases, the use of Naloxone to prevent death from opioid overdose, and the challenges of being an economist who thinks about crime using the economist’s toolkit.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Breaches in Healthcare 29 mins – “The first thing guest Alan Goldberg highlighted was the colossal cost of data breaches. He explained that the minimum cost is $100,000 and it has the potential to amount to millions. In this edition of Digital Detectives, your hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek invite Goldberg to discuss the usual reasons for a breach, likely consequences, prevention, and more. Goldberg is a solo practitioner in McLean, Virginia. A past President of the American Health Lawyers Association, he teaches Health Law and Health and Information Technology as an adjunct professor at American University, Washington College of Law, and George Mason University School of Law.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in this blog archive.

Data Breaches Forensics 28 mins – “Every law firm can run into incidents of employee misconduct, data breaches, and intellectual property theft. In the age of modern technology, data breaches, insider trading, and other security problems require extensive technological forensics. Partners and firm owners, as well as lawyers working within the firm, need to understand why a digital investigation is needed, what steps should be taken within an investigation, and who should be involved. Having this knowledge can save the firm thousands of dollars while uncovering the truth. In this episode of Digital DetectivesSharon Nelson and John Simek interview ediscovery and compliance attorney Patrick Oot about how attorneys should be prepared on technology issues when they start to investigate criminal and civil matters. Everyone leaves technology footprints, Oot explains. Whether dealing with an internal investigation or with client data, the most important asset is unbiased, comprehensive, and well documented research. When hiring a digital investigator, the firm should always find an outside expert who is experienced with data breaches, understands how data moves through the system, and can manage proper narrative to the regulators. Properly conducting a digital investigation can make the difference in the credibility and success of a law firm.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in this blog archive.

Domestic Surveillance 33 mins – “In the wake of the Panama Papers breach, securing law firm and client data has been a huge concern for many practitioners in the legal space. Similarly, other information leaks like the Edward Snowden revelations have made the general public more aware of government surveillance than ever before. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek sit down with executive director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation Cindy Cohn to discuss domestic surveillance concerns, encryption technology, and how lawyers and law firms can protect themselves and their clients from cyber attacks. Cindy Cohn is the executive director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation. From 2000-2015 she served as EFF’s Legal Director as well as its General Counsel. Ms. Cohn first became involved with EFF in 1993, when EFF asked her to serve as the outside lead attorney in Bernstein v. Dept. of Justice, the successful First Amendment challenge to the U.S. export restrictions on cryptography.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in this blog archive.

Drug Company Monopolies 66 mins – “Law professor and author Robin Feldman of UC Hastings College of the Law talks about her book Drugs, Money, and Secret Handshakes with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Feldman argues that the legal and regulatory environment for drug companies encourages those companies to seek drugs that extend their monopoly through the patent system often with insufficient benefit for consumers. The prices for those drugs are then protected from new competition. She also argues that the pharmacy benefit management system allows drug companies to exploit consumers. The conversation concludes with a discussion of what can be done to improve the situation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Edwin Moses 26 mins – “Between 1977 and 1987, Edwin Moses won 122 consecutive races in the men’s 400-meter hurdles—including his second Olympic gold—in a streak as fantastic and improbable as Joe DiMaggio’s fifty-six-game hitting streak. In his 1987 interview with Moses, Mark Kram, known for writing penetrating and lyrical boxing profiles, probes the champ’s cool, implacable exterior to discover what kind of person can sustain such excellence—and to measure the toll it took. With the Summer Olympics now under way in Rio, Sports Illustrated veteran Tim Layden joins host David Brancaccio to shed further insight on Moses, an enigmatic star who helped usher in the professionalization of what was previously an amateur sport, and who left a record that remains peerless.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in this blog archive.

Health Insurance Plans 64 mins – “Economist Ed Dolan of the Niskanen Center talks about employer-based health insurance with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Dolan discusses how unusual it is relative to other countries that so many Americans get their health insurance through their employer and the implications of that phenomenon for the structure of the health insurance market. Dolan explores the drawbacks of this structure and makes the case for what he calls Universal Catastrophic Coverage.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hormone History 37 mins – “We talk to Randi Hutter Epstein, M.D, lecturer at Yale university, writer in residence at Yale Medical School, and author of the new book Aroused: The History of Hormones and How They Control Just About Everything.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immune System 50 mins – “We talk to Matt Richtel about his new book An Elegant Defense: The Extraordinary New Science of the Immune System: A Tale in Four Lives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Insects Decline 27 mins – “A study taking a deep look into insect populations and their decline; bad news about global warming four generations from now, new research showing why older mice benefit from receiving younger blood; and a new study on microwaving grapes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Briefings 50 mins – “Back in February, we hosted Bill Harlow and Marie Harf, two former public affairs officers at the Central Intelligence Agency, to discuss how the CIA interacts with reporters on sensitive national security topics. For this episode, we thought it only fair to turn that around and also talk about how it’s seen on the other side. Mary Louise Kelly is a voice familiar to many as an anchor of All Things Considered on NPR. She previously spent a decade as national security and intelligence correspondent for NPR News after working for CNN and the BBC. Shane Harris, in addition to co-hosting the Rational Security podcast, now covers intelligence and national security for The Washington Post, after writing about the same for outlets like The Wall Street Journal, Daily Beast, and National Journal. David Priess recently sat down with Mary Louise and Shane to discuss the challenges of covering national security, to address myths about the intelligence beat, and, unsuccessfully, to uncover their sources.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_405.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligent Machines Change Everything 45 mins – “How do we create artificial intelligence that isn’t bigoted? Can we teach machines to work exactly like our brains work? “You don’t program a machine to be smart,” says our guest this week, “you program the machine to get smarter using data.” We talk to James Scott, statistician, data scientist, and co-author (with Nick Polson) of the new book AIQ: How People and Machines Are Smarter Together.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mao’s Cultural Revolution 75 mins – “In Mao’s Great Famine, Frank Dikötter joins the elite club of historians who live up to their duty to impose “the undying penalty which history has the power to inflict on wrong.”  On purely literary terms I still prefer Jasper Becker’s Hungry Ghosts, but Dikötter’s archival work on the Great Leap Forward is unsurpassed.  His bottom line: The standard horrific body count of 20-30 million deaths from starvation is grossly understated.  The true death toll is much higher – and open violence was an important secondary cause of death: [A]t least 45 million people perished above a normal death rate during the famine from 1958 to 1962… [I]t is likely that at least 2.5 million of these victims were beaten or tortured to death.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meatless Meat 49 mins – “Mike Selden is the Co-Founder and CEO of Finless Foods, a startup that aims for a more sustainable future through advanced cellular agriculture technologies. Their projects revolve around growing fish meat and other seafood products from cells. Mike is a trained biochemist and has experience working as a researcher and educator. He also has researched numerous ways to solve food crises in Africa as well as marine conservation in South East Asia.   Mike joins us to explain the many benefits of growing meat from cells and the ways it can improve life, not just on Earth but also in outer space. He shares how their company can produce real meat without the animal and the big scale effect it will have on the economy. Mike also discusses some of the reasons why this project isn’t against fishermen, how it can solve overfishing problems, and how it can help otherwise expensive fish products become more affordable.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in this blog archive.  

Mobile Device Forensics .32 mins – “In our increasingly mobile world, lawyers face many new challenges in digital forensics for their practice. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek talk to Brett Burney about what lawyers need to know about digital forensics on mobile devices. They discuss Brett’s mobile data collection spectrum, which outlines methods of data collection and preservation for lawyers and their clients. Brett gives tips on what lawyers should consider in these processes to ensure the best results, including the importance of hiring digital forensics technologists when lawyers are uncomfortable with technology. Brett Burney is Principal of Burney Consultants LLC, and focuses the bulk of his time on bridging the chasm between the legal and technology frontiers of electronic discovery.” At the link you can listen, but not download: however, a copy of the file is included in this blog archive.

Neal Stephenson Interview 33 mins – “We talk to celebrated speculative fiction writer Neal Stephenson about his latest book Fall; or, Dodge in Hell: A Novel.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Treatments P1 33 mins – “Treating America’s Opioid Addiction is a three-part series that investigates how we’ve understood and treated opioid addiction over more than a century. Through the years we’ve categorized opioid addiction as some combination of a moral failure, a mental illness, a biological disease, or a crime. And though we’ve desperately wanted the problem to be something science alone can solve, the more we look, the more complicated we learn it is. Part 1 focuses on a government-run prison-hospital, the Narcotic Farm, just for people addicted to opioids. When it opened in 1935, it promised to find a cure for drug addiction.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Opioid Treatments P2 45 mins – “Treating America’s Opioid Addiction is a three-part series that investigates how we’ve understood and treated opioid addiction over more than a century. Through the years we’ve categorized opioid addiction as some combination of a moral failure, a mental illness, a biological disease, or a crime. And though we’ve desperately wanted the problem to be something science alone can solve, the more we look, the more complicated we learn it is.  Part 2 focuses on a controversial rehabilitation program called Synanon, which became the first significant therapeutic community for opioid addiction. From the time it opened its doors in 1958, it seemed to do what no other hospital, prison, or sanitarium had done before: cure the supposedly incurable heroin addict. But over the years its changing methods became increasingly questionable, and the controversy would ultimately lead to its demise. Despite its faults Synanon had a profound influence on subsequent generations of drug treatment programs—many of which still exist today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Opioid Treatments P3 49 mins – “In the final chapter of this series we travel to the heart of our modern opioid crisis. In what is now a notorious Philadelphia neighborhood called Kensington, we meet two victims of the epidemic and follow them on two distinct paths toward recovery. Our current devastating opioid crisis is unprecedented in its reach and deadliness, but it’s not the first such epidemic the United States has experienced or tried to treat. In fact, it’s the thirdTreating America’s Opioid Addiction is a three-part series that investigates how we’ve understood and treated opioid addiction over more than a century. Through the years we’ve categorized opioid addiction as some combination of a moral failure, a mental illness, a biological disease, or a crime. And though we’ve desperately wanted the problem to be something science alone can solve, the more we look, the more complicated we learn it is.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. ­ 

Opioid Withdrawal 62 mins – “We talk to bioethicist Travis Rieder about his new book In Pain: A Bioethicist’s Personal Struggle with Opioids.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ozone Hole 24 mins – “If you were around in the 1980s, you probably remember the lurking fear of an ominous hole in the sky.  In the middle of the decade scientists discovered that a giant piece of the ozone layer was disappearing over Antarctica, and the situation threatened us all. The news media jumped on the story. The ozone layer is like the earth’s sunscreen: without it ultraviolet rays from the sun would cause alarming rates of skin cancer and could even damage marine food chains. And it turns out we were causing the problem. Today, more than three decades after the initial discovery, the ozone hole in Antarctica is finally on the road to recovery. How did we do it? This environmental success story gives us a glimpse into what happens when scientists, industry, the public, and the government all work together to manage a problem that threatens all of us. Happy Earth Day!” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Robots Take Our Jobs 9 mins – “In short, yes they will, continuing the trend of humans working less. This video was sponsored by “Robot-Proof” written by Northeastern University’s President, Joseph E. Aoun. Learn more here: https://goo.gl/hqBDLA When I think about robots taking our jobs, I am neither of the opinion that we need to panic amidst the imminent robopocalypse, nor am I confident there will always be work for everyone. Instead I think we will see something similar to previous revolutions (e.g. agricultural and industrial). That is, ultimately everyone will be better off, working fewer hours and doing tasks more suited to people than to machines (thanks to widespread automation), but during the transition there will be discomfort. This discomfort arises when people who have been working particular jobs for most of their lives find themselves out of work, or find their jobs don’t even exist anymore. Then education and retraining is the challenge, something that’s not easily accomplished and something our educational system is not setup to do.” At the link play the YouTube video, or listen to the audio part in this blog archive.

Roy Cohn Interview 26 mins – “If president-elect Donald Trump learned anything from his mentor Roy Cohn, it was this: punch first and never apologize. Cohn was notorious for going on the attack—as counsel for Senator Joseph McCarthy during the communist witch-hunts of the fifties, and later as a pugnacious attorney for whom the only bad publicity was no publicity. With hooded eyes and a scar running along his nose, Cohn relished playing the intimidating outlaw in a black hat. He was fearless and bullying yet always considered himself as a victim. Despite this loathsome reputation, Cohn was resolutely loyal and counted among his friends Democrats and Republicans alike. More than partisanship, what mattered most to Cohn was power, as we learn in Ken Auletta’s searing 1978 profile, “Don’t Mess with Roy Cohn.” Auletta joins host David Brancaccio on the Esquire Podcast this week to discuss Cohn’s unrelenting cruelty and drive, and how it helped shape the man who will now lead the country.” At the link find the title, “Don’t Mess With Roy Cohn, by Ken Auletta,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Sam Donaldson Interview 30 mins – “Our guest this week is former ABC News White House Correspondent and co-host of “This Week,” Sam Donaldson. He gave us his assessment of how this White House press corps is covering President Trump and the job of Press Secretary Sean Spicer.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Steve Jobs 26 mins – “Back in 1986, Joe Nocera spent a week shadowing Steve Jobs, who was then leading his start-up, NeXT, and attempting to build a new kind of computer. What resulted is one of the most intimate and honest appraisals of the computer visionary ever written. The Steve Jobs we recognize now—obsessed by design and unwilling to bend to anyone or anything—is in Nocera’s profile, but so is a more human Jobs, one rarely seen after he returned to lead Apple a year later. Nocera, a longtime New York Times reporter and op-ed writer, joins host David Brancaccio to discuss Jobs’s legacy, and how the man he wrote about twenty years ago is far different from the one portrayed today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in this blog archive.

Telephone Security 30 mins – “During the investigation of the San Bernardino shooting the FBI obtained a company iPhone that was used by Syed Farook, one of the assailants. The investigators obtained a warrant to search the phone, but it’s currently locked and the FBI hasn’t been able to access the encrypted data. This prompted the agency to request assistance from Apple to bypass the phone’s security features, but Apple has refused. Does the FBI have the authority to compel a company to re-engineer its own product in order to undermine the security of its own customers? In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech Privacy and Technology Project Director and principal legal advisor to Edward Snowden Ben Wizner about the legal battle between Apple and the FBI. Wizner begins by explaining The All Writs Act and how it’s being used to coerce Apple, the FBI’s potential objectives in making this request, and what dangers might be present if the FBI prevails. The conversation then shifts to the global implications for all tech companies if the the precedent is set that Apple must aid in helping the FBI get the contents of this phone and what that might mean for the national security of the United States of America – and the privacy of its citizens. Wizner then gives some insights into what it has been like to be the principal advisor for Edward Snowden and what the case has been like for him as a lawyer.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in this blog archive.

Tesla 37 mins – “We talk to author Richard Munson about his new Nikola Tesla biography Tesla: Inventor of the Modern.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tom Hanks Interview 35 mins – “On this special episode of “The Daily,” a magazine writer for The Times reflects on her experience interviewing Tom Hanks last fall — and on the generosity he showed her in a difficult personal moment. In this time of collective stress, we wanted to bring the story to you in audio as a reminder that “contagion is real, but it doesn’t just work for viruses,” our writer said. “It works for kind words and generous thoughts, and acts of selflessness and honesty.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Virtual Reality Impact 56 mins – “We talk to Peter Rubin, editor at Wired and author of Future Presence: How Virtual Reality Is Changing Human Connection, Intimacy, and the Limits of Ordinary Life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Communication 16 mins – “This week: A look into quorum sensing, a field of research looking into if bacteria, particularly bacteria that are trying to invade another host, can communicate with each other—and new research suggesting viruses can exhibit the same behavior; new research into using alpha waves to stimulate creativity; and Indre and Kishore’s 2018 science gift recommendations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWI P1 189 mins – “The planet hadn’t seen a major war between all the Great Powers since the downfall of Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815. But 99 years later the dam breaks and a Pandora’s Box of violence engulfs the planet.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWI P2 276 mins – “The Great Powers all come out swinging in the first round of the worst war the planet has ever seen. Millions of men in dozens of armies vie in the most deadly and complex opening moves of any conflict in world history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWI P3 264 mins – “The war of maneuver that was supposed to be over quickly instead turns into a lingering bloody stalemate. Trench warfare begins, and with it, all the murderous efforts on both sides to overcome the static defenses.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWI P4 235 mins – “Machine guns, barbed wire and millions upon millions of artillery shells create industrialized meat grinders at Verdun and the Somme. There’s never been a human experience like it…and it changes a generation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWI P5 270 mins – ”The USA is rising, Russia is falling. Casualties are mounting and the politicians have had enough! Politics, diplomacy, revolution and mutiny take center stage at the start of this episode, but mud, blood, shells and tragedy drown all by the end.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWI P6 258 mins – “The Americans are coming, but will the war be over by the time they get there? Germany throws everything into a last series of stupendous attacks in the West while hoping to avoid getting burned by a fire in the East they helped fan.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mining Digest 434: 3D Printed Houses, 5G Wrecks Weather Forecasting, Autism and Oxytocin, Broadband Economic Development, Broadband Network Criticism, Coral Reef Die Off, Corona Virus Discussion, Disease Detection, DNA Origami, Fake News Detection, Food Forward, Fund Raising, Gravity Waves, Head Transplants, Health Care Costs, Homeboy Industries, Homeless in Las Vegas, Internet Society, Julian Assange, Magic Wheelchairs, Medical Treatment Questions, Nano-engineering, Prisoners become Farmers, Purposity, Quantum Dots, Rainbows Pack, Smart Dust, Travis Roy Foundation, UFO’s in the US. Viral Based Obesity, Vision Basic Science, Vision Spring, War on a Whim

Exercise your ears: the 36 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 567 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 27,250 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Printed Houses 26 mins – “Millions of people have seen the incredible 3D printer capable of building a 700-square foot house in 24 hours. Not as many know the equally incredible story of Brett Hagler and New Story, the people behind that machine — and who plan on using it to build communities worldwide.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

5G Wrecks Weather Forecasting 29 mins – “5G wrecks weather forecasting by Ian Woolf, Thomas Grant talks about Platypus Science, Produced and hosted by Ian Woolf” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Future 29 mins – “Andrew Despi talks about his vision of an artificial intelligence future, Produced and hosted by Ian Woolf ” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism and Oxytocin 29 mins – “Vasopressin and autism, UN Million species extinction report by Ian Woolf, Marilena Demayo talks about autistic spectrum disorder and oxytocin. Produced and hosted by Ian Woolf

Autism Center 29 mins – “For Bernie Marcus, the co-founder and former CEO of Home Depot, the answer is: farther than most would ever imagine. In the 1980s, Marcus had a personal accountant whose 4-year-old son had autism. What started as a simple desire to help her developed into a 30-year campaign to improve the resources available to kids with autism and their families. Today the Marcus Autism Center is one of the world’s leading institutions for autism research and treatment. In this episode, you’ll hear about the incredible personal philosophy that drove Marcus to build the Marcus Autism Center and go so far as to commit more than $100 million of his own money to the cause. All told, Bernie and his wife Billi, through the Marcus Foundation, have donated more than $1 billion to address some of the nation’s most pressing health issues, including stem cell research, spinal cord issues and brain injuries….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Broadband Economic Development 42 mins – “In late October 2019, Christopher travelled to the D.C. area to attend a Broadband Communities Economic Development event and while he was there, he sat down with Executive Director Adrianne Furniss and  Senior Fellow Jon Sallet from the Benton Institute for Broadband & Society. This week, we get to sit in on their conversations about the recent change at Benton from “foundation” to “institute” and about their recent report, Broadband for America’s Future: A Vision for the 2020s. First, Christopher speaks with Adrianne, who discusses the reasons why the organization has recently changed in order to stay current with their mission and with the times. She talks a little about the history of Benton and describes some of the reasons for developing the report. Christopher spends most of the interview with Jon Sallet, who authored the report and who has a long career in antitrust and communications. After working in D.C. in telecommunications and Internet policy for several decades, he’s seen the influence of the Internet grow. In this report, Jon analyzes stories and situations from around the U.S. and establishes a vision that will help us move forward to connect as many people as possible. He and Christopher discuss the four major factors that, if nurtured correctly, can help us integrate broadband into all sectors of society and maximize its usefulness. Christopher and Jon give special time to competition, an issue that arises repeatedly in the work at Benton and in our work at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. The interview will spark your interest in the report that provides more depth into the way broadband can be used as a versatile social tool. Broadband for America’s Future: A Vision for the 2020s [PDF] is filled with examples in which local communities have been able to expand local connectivity to achieve goals that went beyond better Internet access.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Indiana 30 mins – “South Bend, Indiana, is a mid-sized city of around 100,000 people where they are making practical use of their dark fiber network and technology. In episode 378 of the podcast, Christopher talks with Denise Linn Riedl, Chief Innovation Officer. Denise describes many of the “non-sexy” ways the community and her department are using technology to encourage interdepartmental cooperation, efficiency, and the idea that technology is a standard tool, rather than a “shiny new thing.” Denise introduces us to the publicly owned dark fiber infrastructure, Choice Light, and shares a little about its history. She describes how Internet access companies use the infrastructure to provide service to various sectors of the community. Digital inclusion is on the minds of South Bend leadership and Denise describes partnerships that have helped shrink the lack of access for people who struggle to get online. Christopher and Denise delve into the subtle digital inclusion efforts that happen every day in South Bend.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Tennessee 24 mins – “Even though the state of Tennessee adopted legislation long ago to discourage municipal networks, local communities in the state are finding ways to deliver high-quality Internet access via public utilities. This week, Chief Broadband Officer from BrightRidge Stacy Evans visits with Christopher. They talk about the power utility and their expansive broadband project in eastern Tennessee. BrightRidge used to be known as the Johnson County Power Board, but limitations changed for the entity when it became an energy authority. Stacy provides some history about the region, the energy authority, and the considerations that contributed to the change. He also describes some of the challenges they’ve faced deploying over a very large area in a multi-phased roll-out that employs both Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) and fixed wireless. They’re still in the early deployment phases, but BrightRidge is already hearing stories about benefits from subscribers. In addition to sharing a few with us, Stacy talks about how BrightRidge has adopted a layered approach at the premise that will make implementing future innovations easier. He and Christopher review some of the indirect benefits from the network, such as improved service from incumbents and improved electrical services.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Tennessee 25 mins – “This week, we have a returning guest from Tennessee to tell us about the many positive changes occurring in Clarksville, home of CDE Lightband. Christy Batts, Broadband Division Director at the network joins Christopher; her last appearance on the podcast was in 2013. This time, Christy describes how the community network has been innovating for better services and finding undiscovered benefits for local businesses. Voice service from CDE Lightband, is helping small- and mid-sized establishments cut costs and increase revenue. The city is also implementing a new video platform and continues to increase speeds in order to allow subscribers to make the most of their Internet access. Christopher and Christy talk about how this town has started using innovations in technology to maximize home Wi-Fi with indoor ONTs. The network has had better then expected financial success, even in a place where people tend to relocate frequently, and how other utilities have reaped benefits from the fiber. Christy gives a run down of the future ideas for Clarksville, including plans for free Wi-Fi in public spaces, such as parks. This may not be the first city you think of when you consider municipal broadband in Tennessee, but maybe it should be.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Lobbying 31 mins – “If you’re a regular reader of MuniNetworks.org, you’ve seen Karl Bode’s name and it’s almost certain you’ve read his work elsewhere. Karl has had his finger on the pulse of telecom, broadband, and related legislative events for a long time. This week, Karl comes on the show to talk about how his career trajectory led to where he is right now, the surprising and unsurprising things he’s seen, and how media coverage of telecom and technology has changed over the years. There are some issues, notes Karl, that should be handled more aggressively both in developing policy and in how the media covers them. The impact of large monopolistic Internet service providers, privacy concerns, and network neutrality are a few matters that affect us more than most people realize. Christopher and Karl talk about the FCC and corruption of the commenting system that surrounded the decision to retract federal network neutrality protections. They also talk about Washington D.C.’s different attitudes toward big tech companies such as Google and Facebook versus big ISPs like AT&T and Comcast.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Connect American Fund 34 mins – “The Connect America Fund (CAF) from the federal government has been both praised and criticized as a mechanism to expand rural broadband deployment. In this episode of the podcast, Principal of Mattey Consulting Carol Mattey talks in depth with Christopher about the program. Carol was a Deputy Bureau Chief in the Wireline Competition Bureau at the FCC to help develop the program and has worked on the National Broadband Plan. In addition to offering a primer on CAF for those of us who aren’t familiar with its inception or purpose, Carol offers a historical perspective that includes the broad goals of the program. She looks back and offers her opinions on the aspects of the program she considers successful and those that need improvement. Carol and Christopher consider the challenges of creating such a program, including political pressures and the difficulty of navigating unchartered waters. They compare the different phases of the CAF program and how large national ISPs and smaller entities have used the awards. Christopher and Carol also discuss possible changes in benchmarks that could make the resulting infrastructure more future proof and useful to rural communities.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coral Reef Die Off 29 mins – “Tracey Ainsworth and Steph Gardner from UNSW talk about NSW coral reefs Produced and hosted by Ian Woolf” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus Discussion 118 mins – “The TWiVerers continue their coverage of the new coronavirus outbreak in China, as the number of cases increase dramatically and the virus begins person-to-person transmission in other countries. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 585” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus Update P1 85 mins – “Vincent and Rich update the current situation with COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2, including fatality ratios, virus spreading outside of China, immunity to infection, vaccines, antivirals and much more. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Rich Condit” At the link right-click “Download TWIV 589” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus Update P2 127 mins – “The TWiV trio continues in-depth coverage of COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2, including discussion on genome mutation and circulating lineages, handwashing, facemasks, cruise ship outbreaks, the South Korean situation, and much more. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler” At the link right-click “Download TWIV 590” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid-19 Disease 16 mins – “The rapid spread of SARS-CoV-2, a novel coronavirus that emerged in late 2019, and the resulting Covid-19 disease has been labeled a Public Health Emergency of International Concern by the World Health Organization. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on March 3, 2020, the editors discuss the current state of SARS-CoV-2 diagnostic testing in the United States and what clinicians can do for patients who test positive.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu,

Disease Detection 7 mins – “Cases of Wuhan coronavirus in China have increased to 830 and deaths to 25. Most of the new cases are relatives or health care workers who have come into close contact with a sick person. CDC’s Advanced Molecular Detection (AMD) program plays a pivotal role when outbreaks occur, especially when the a novel virus emerges. Next generation sequencing allows for more precise identification of these pathogens, and AMD is being deployed in the current work on the coronavirus.” At the link you can listen/watch, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in this blog archive.

DNA Origami 29 mins – “Kids without religion are more altruistic, Election poll mathematics by Ian Woolf, Jasleen Singh designs nanotech devices to kill cancer. Hosted and produced by Ian Woolf” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News Detection 16 mins – “In the emerging area of online trust technology, the startup NewsGuard has decided to disinfect the web of false reporting with the detergent of journalism. A team of experienced journalists researches online news brands; determines when a website has a hidden agenda or publishes falsehoods; and then posts red or green rating signals visible as a plug-in on many web browsers. Public libraries can use NewsGuard as a news literacy tool, while advertisers can keep their brands off unreliable sites. Journalism advocates the Knight Foundation and global advertising conglomerate Publicis are among the company’s investors. “The world has become such that regular people feel very anxious about whether they’re getting news from reliable sources or not,” says Gordon Crovitz, a distinguished publishing veteran who co-founded NewsGuard with acclaimed journalist Steve Brill in 2018. In 2016 and 2017, Crovitz was interim CEO, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. He is also a former publisher, editorial board member, and opinion columnist for the Wall Street Journal.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Forward 19 mins – “On paper it doesn’t make any sense. One out of every six people in the United States lack access to sufficient food, yet 40 percent of the food produced in this country goes to waste. These statistics may be staggering, but they aren’t unique to the U.S. According to the new documentary WASTED: The Story of Food Waste, more than 1.3 billion pounds of food gets thrown away across the globe each year, while 800 million people worldwide go hungry.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Fund Raising 34 mins – “One thing that’s become obvious to me, from several years of doing this podcast, is the biggest frustration for those who help others. It’s fundraising — the illogic, the inefficiency, and sometimes, just the plain stupidity of it.  Why do I say it’s stupid? As you’ll hear in today’s show, sometimes, as a nonprofit gets better at the work they do, they’ll receive less funding from donors. In other cases, the resources they receive aren’t tied to their impact at all. Instead, the organization’s survival depends on its ability to throw big fundraisers or galas. It’s a system that makes no sense. And the women we’ll speak with in this episode are out to change it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Gravity Waves 29 mins – “High Frequency Gravitational Wave generator by Ian Woolf, Alcubierre warp drive, EM inertia-less drive and anti-gravity with Professor Geraint Lewis, The strange case of the disappearing anti-gravity researchers by Dr Tim Baynes, Hosted and produced by Ian Woolf” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Head Transplants 29 mins – “Stephen Juan talks with Lachlan Whatmore and Ian Woolf about keeping a severed head alive , Head transplants – HEAVEN? by Ian Woolf, RE: Your brains by Jonathan Coulton. Production checked by Charles Willock, Produced and hosted by Ian Woolf ” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Costs 64 mins – “U.S. Health Care from a Global Perspective: Spending, Use of Services, Prices, and Health in 13 Countries – published October 8, 2015” At the link find “Common Sense 314,” right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeboy Industries 22 mins – “After burying a growing number of young people killed by gang violence, a Jesuit Priest took matters into his own hands.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Homeless in Las Vegas 21 mins – “The glittering neon and bustle of the Vegas strip hide a vast maze of underground flood channels that hundreds of men and women call home.  Hear how journalist turned activist Matt O’Brien discovered this homeless community and what he’s doing to help.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Internet Society 33 mins – “The history of the Internet Society (ISOC) reaches back to the early 1990s when a group of early Internet pioneers, realizing the power of connectivity, developed an organization aimed at  bringing safe and secure Internet access to everyone. Since then, ISOC has worked in policy, deployment, and the difficult task of creating collaborations. This week, we have ISOC’s Director of the North American Bureau Mark Buell and Senior Policy Advisor Katie Watson Jordan to talk about the organization, its history, and the work they do. In addition to learning about the growth of the organization, which now has chapters all over the globe, Mark and Katie describe their current community network project in remote Ulukhaktok, Northwest Territories, Canada. They discuss their role in this and other community network projects, including the next location in Hilo, Hawaii. Read more about Ulukhaktok and the challenges they faced in developing their network in Katie’s recent article on the project.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Julian Assange 27 mins – “Journalism is not a crime, by Ian Woolf, Matthew Laplante talks about his book Superlative: The biology of extremes, Part 1, Hosted and produced by Ian Woolf.” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Magic Wheelchairs 24 mins – “What happens when you email a legendary special effects school and ask for some advice on a Halloween costume? Well, in the case of this nonprofit’s story, Hollywood magic ensues, families are forever transformed — and Halloween will never be the same.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Medical Treatment Questions 74 mins – “Physician and author Adam Cifu of the University of Chicago talks about being a medical conservative with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Cifu encourages doctors to appreciate the complexity of medical care and the reality that many medical techniques advocated by experts are not always beneficial or cost-effective. The conversation explores the challenges of finding reliable evidence to support medical interventions and the inherent uncertainty surrounding outcomes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Municipal Network Attacks 37 mins – “Hey, Community Broadband Bits fans, it’s time for Crazy Talk again! This time, our Communications Specialist Jess Del Fiacco joins Christopher and I to address recent insanity attacking municipal networks….Every once in awhile, anti-municipal network initiatives get wind of particular projects in local communities and make extra efforts to spread misinformation. They usually rely on the same tired old talking points and refer to the same incorrect data from old reports that have been called out for inaccuracies. This time is no different. Lately, the community of Lakeland, Florida, has discussed the possibility of building off their existing fiber optic infrastructure in order to offer services to residents. Reliably, anti-municipal soundbites have appeared in the local press which quote past research that we showed as based on faulty data. Nevertheless, a corrected version of the report was never published and it continues to be quoted in order to sway public opinion against local efforts to improve connectivity. We also discuss other recent crazy publications that try to show local networks that residents love as outliers. In reality, a majority of the 500+ communities served by publicly owned networks get high marks from locals. Jess, Christopher, and I also review a new report that attacks the positive economic development potential of municipal networks. All in all, it appears to be another report that’s based on inaccurate data in order to paint municipal networks in a negative light. Junk in, junk out. Be sure to check out the Community Fiber Fallacies page, where you can pick up tips on addressing the most common negative attacks on community network projects.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nano-engineering 29 mins – “Cyber attack on Australia, Weird technology from the US Navy, by Ian Woolf, Nano-engineering molecular motors by Dr Shelley Wickham, Sound and facts checked by Charles Willock, Hosted and produced by Ian Woolf” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Reactors in Australia 29 mins – “Australian national nuclear dump by Ian Woolf, Sex in space by Ian Woolf, Daughter of Time by Gina Sartore, Produced and hosted by Ian Woolf” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prisoners Become Farmers 27 mins – “How do you get someone out of jail and into a better life? Cul2vate and The Last Mile take drastically different approaches.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Purposity 16 mins – “Connecting the dots with a text. Learn how one young entrepreneur is leveraging technology and human kindness to create an army of philanthropists.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Quantum Dots 29 mins – “ANSTO workers hurt again by Ian Woolf, Alison Campbell talks about quantum dots. Hosted and produced by Ian Woolf” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rainbow Pack 19 mins – “School supplies. May seem like a simple thing – but basic supplies like pencils, crayons and erasers might be all it takes to excite a child to learn.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Smart Dust 29 mins – “Pitanga extends life in worms, Smart dust has shrunk by Ian Woolf, David Hinwood designs robots to recycle old clothing. Produced and hosted by Ian Woolf” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

State Broadband Policy Explorer 29 mins – “For community leaders, advocates, and researchers who follow broadband policy, trying to stay up-to-date on the many variations of state policy across the U.S. is a daunting task. As approaches change, the work becomes more complicated. Now, the Pew Charitable Trusts has launched a new tool that helps keep all that information sorted and accessible — the State Broadband Policy Explorer. Manager of the Broadband Research Initiative at Pew Charitable Trusts Kathryn de Wit sits down with Christopher to talk about the tool for this week’s podcast. Kathryn describes some of the challenges and discoveries her team encountered while developing the tool. She talks about the wide variations her team documented, especially in definitions, and their determination that those variations rely on who in each state determines which definitions will be used. While working on the State Broadband Policy Explorer, Kathryn and her team were surprised to learn that, contrary to popular reporting, not as many states have established official offices of broadband deployment as they had expected.  She shares commonalities between states that they found surprising while she and Christopher ponder some of the many ways the tool may be used moving forward.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Travis Roy Foundation 22 mins – “There’s an old saying in sports that the best athletes “refuse to lose.” In this episode, you’ll meet a former athlete who’s lived that to the letter–even as a twist of fate took almost everything from him. Travis Roy was a hockey standout with a promising career ahead of him. But then everything changed in an instant. A tragic accident left the talented young hockey player paralyzed from the neck down. But Roy refused to let his story end there. In fact, as you’ll hear in this show, it was just the beginning. Today the Travis Roy Foundation helps the fight against severe spinal cord injuries on two fronts. First, it funds a tremendous amount of research. Roy aspires to regain many of the abilities that were taken away from him that fateful day, and his organization is putting their money where their mouth is. Second, it offers direct assistance to the injured and their families. Because as you’ll hear, they face high costs and steep daily challenges in their recovery. But you’ll also see how that, for people like Travis and Les Foster (a recipient of a grant from Travis’s foundation), the only thing that’s tougher than the road they face is their resolve to overcome….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

UFO’s in the US 62 mins – “The national Sunspot Solar Observatory was mysteriously shut down on Sept. 6. Located near Almagordo, New Mexico, local law enforcement reported that the FBI was behind the closure that lasted approximately one week. However, the FBI would neither confirm nor deny the reports. The shutdown sparked numerous rumors across the internet with many believing that alien activity was involved. So, on this week’s episode, Nathan, Brian and Ed discuss things in the sky we can’t explain – unidentified flying objects. What the heck are they? And what do they say about American history?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Viral Based Obesity 29 mins – “The virus that makes you fat but healthy – by Ian Woolf, Alex Kelly talks about a new model for the Biofoundry, and CRISPR kits in development. Hosted and produced by Ian Woolf” At the link right-click “VBR MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vision Basic Science 29 mins – “Blood test for ME/CFS, Safe alcohol replacement drink by Ian Woolf, Calvin Eiber investigates the basic science of vision, Produced and hosted by Ian Woolf” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vision Spring 32 mins – “Vision isn’t just sight. It’s opportunity. VisionSpring brings it to millions around the globe each year. It started with one personal transformation.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

War on a Whim 67 mins – “There’s a lot in this show subject-wise, but it’s really supposed to be about War Powers in the USA and how events in Syria and North Korea play into the issue.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 433: Ambassador Samantha Power, Antenna Densification, Bias Research, Capitalism, Climate Change in Court, Deepak Chopra, Drug Costs, Economics Background, End of Life Response, Epigenetics, Food Production, Gender Balance, Healthcare Quality, Immigrant Story, Immigration Crisis, Kavanaugh Background, MK Ultra Project, Native Americans, NSA Operations, PTSD Defined, Quantum Mechanics, Renaissance Women, Salesforce, Scorched Earth, Susan Rice, Technology Concerns, Wild Salmon, Witchcraft

Exercise your ears: the 36 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 567 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 27,030 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Ambassador Samantha Power 56 mins – “Samantha Power, former President Barack Obama’s U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, is widely known as a leading moral voice of her generation. Power has been described by President Obama as one of America’s “foremost thinkers on foreign policy” and is revered as a Pulitzer Prize winner and a relentless advocate for promoting human rights.  In her memoir, The Education of an Idealist, Power traces her extraordinary career and her change from an outspoken war correspondent and vocal critic of U.S. foreign policy to working with Obama in the Senate, on the campaign trail and throughout his presidency. Power takes us across the world from the streets of war-torn Bosnia to the White House Situation Room and delves into the complex networks of high-stakes diplomacy through her humorous, stirring and ultimately unforgettable account of the striking power of idealism. Join us for an invigorating and honest conversation with a world leader and human rights activist as she empowers us to approach global politics with a clearer eye and a kinder heart.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

America and Russia P1 84 mins – “Panelists will discuss the current state of U.S.–Russia relations and assess whether and how enhanced communication, better crisis management and more fruitful cooperation between our countries may be possible.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

America and Russia P2 30 mins – “This panel will explore historic ties between Native California Indians and Russia by sharing images from a rare collection of Native California artifacts collected during the Fort Ross era. Ksenia Vozdigan, leading coordinator of exhibition department at the Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography (Kunstkamera) of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Saint-Petersburg, Russia, will describe how the largest collection of Native California artifacts came to reside in Russia. Jerry and Kaylee Pinola, from the Kashaya Pomo and Coast Miwok Tribes, will talk about their 2014 trip to the museum in St. Petersburg to see their ancestral artifacts for the first time, and they will describe how this connection with Russia remains relevant today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

America and Russia P3 30 mins – “The final panel looks towards the future by bringing four young Russians and Americans from different disciplines to discuss their bilateral work and ideas for the future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Antenna Densification 132 mins – “Facing Our Reality: Humanity at a Crossroads – Electromagnetic Factors in Health and New Risks of 4G/5G ‘Antenna Densification’” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Bias Research 54 mins – “How biased are you? According to Jennifer Eberhardt, we live in a world where unconscious bias and innate prejudices affect our visual perception, attention, memory and behavior. These stereotypes can dramatically influence and impact our education, employment, housing and our criminal justice system. Eberhardt has worked extensively as a psychologist and consultant with numerous companies and law enforcement agencies. She shares her groundbreaking research, covering courtrooms, boardrooms, classrooms and prisons, to better understand and invoke change at all levels in society. Eberhardt is the co-founder and co-director of SPARQ (Social Psychological Answers to Real-World Questions), a university initiative that uses social psychological research to address significant social problems. She was also the recipient of a 2014 MacArthur Genius Grant.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Capitalism 66 mins – “Peter Georgescu arrived in this country as a penniless Romanian refugee and rose to prominence as the CEO of Young & Rubicam. It’s an American dream success story that could not play out in today’s economic environment—one that is plagued with disappearing jobs, flat wages and a shrinking middle class. In his latest book, Capitalists, Arise!, Georgescu argues that the stark reality of our current economic malaise and social breakdown can be attributed, in large part, to the short-term thinking spawned by shareholder primacy. With deeply sobering statistics and new research, Georgescu points the way toward a future that will only be possible with enlightened capitalism. The author will offer concrete steps forward.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Charles Schwab 66 mins – “Charles Schwab is one of the world’s most influential financial executives, with, as of 2019, nearly $3.6 trillion worth of assets managed by the eponymous Charles Schwab and Co. He founded the brokerage firm in 1971 with a $100,000 loan and has since grown it into a financial service juggernaut. Schwab’s memoir, Invested: Changing Forever the Way Americans Invest, lays out his passion to change the way we invest and the hard work, ingenuity and entrepreneurship that propelled his vision into one of the leading financial service firms in the world. From studying economics at Stanford University to guiding his company through decades of economic transformations and fluctuations, Schwab recounts the defining moments of his life while providing unique insight into the evolutionary dynamics of entrepreneurial companies. Join us for an insightful conversation with Charles Schwab as he discusses the how-tos of finance management and imparts advice on obtaining a fulfilling career and life.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Climate and Smart Food 53 mins – “Is clinging to habits and cravings destroying our future? An outspoken critic of factory farming and animal-centric diets, Jonathan Safran Foer writes that stopping climate change begins with a close look at what we eat—and don’t eat—at home for breakfast. At the office, industry leaders such as Google are taking steps toward veggie-forward diets by reducing meat rather than cutting it out entirely. But when it comes to global food habits, is it better to be purist or effective? Foer writes that mobilizing at the level needed to solve global climate change will require relinquishing an all-too-human desire for comfort. Are societies up for changing norms—individually and collectively—at a scale ambitious enough to meet the challenge? Join us with Jonathan Safran Foer, author of Eating Animals and We Are the Weather: Saving the Planet Begins at Breakfast; and Helene York, head of social and environmental responsibility at ISS Guckenheimer, for a conversation on the power of individual choices and collective action.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Climate Anxiety 53 mins – “Nearly half of all Americans are dealing with a new mental stressor: climate anxiety. Whether from reading the news, coping with the immediate trauma of a natural disaster or fearing for a warming planet, according to the American Psychological Association, climate anxiety is undermining our health and well-being.  What’s the solution to preventing stress, fear and helplessness from taking a toll on your well-being? Psychologists say to cultivate awareness and resilience, which is easier said than done in an age of political volatility and rapid change. How does the human brain reconcile scary headlines with the desire to make sure our most basic needs—food, water, shelter and safety—are met? Can we simultaneously enjoy a beautiful day in nature and worry about the future of human civilization? Join us with Mark Coleman, mindfulness meditation teacher and author of Awake in the Wild, for a conversation about mindfulness in an age of unprecedented disruption.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Climate Change in Court 53 mins – “Climate change is affecting every aspect of our lives – our environment, our health, our economy and our future. And now, it’s even creeping into our courtrooms. Climate change has brought on a wave of new reasons to go to court, for those on both sides of the issue. In Julian vs. the United States, youths sued the government for violating their constitutional right to life and liberty by encouraging climate-altering activities. Fossil fuel companies are fighting back by advancing new laws that have a chilling effect on the activist movement – such as an Oklahom law that equates protests with domestic terrorism. “Basically what the bill did is it took actions that are somewhat common in environmental activism movement… sort of blocking a gate or, in the case of Standing Rock, a protest [that] bleeds onto private land,” explains reporter Nicholas Kusnetz. “It took something where there were previously kind of misdemeanor minor charges, and suddenly they became really serious charges.”  The increase in weather-driven disasters over the past few years has given rise to a whole new branch of legalese, known as “Disaster Law.” Laura Tuggle of Southeast Louisiana Legal Services helps disaster survivors navigate the muddy waters of federal relief, insurance claims and inheritance rights. She recommends that people not wait for a disaster to get their affairs and paperwork in order. “Even if everybody knew that grandma wanted her niece or her granddaughter to inherit her home, if that’s not written down in a will that’s not what’s going to happen by operation of law,” Tuggle warns.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Daniel Handler Interview 67 mins – “Daniel Handler, best-selling author known for his adult novels and children’s books under the pseudonym Lemony Snicket, returns with a new dark comedy about his hometown of San Francisco. As Handler knows, San Francisco is a one-of-a-kind place, but it’s leaving its residents behind. The city is flooded with tech money and innovation, but skyrocketing rents, income inequality, homelessness and other issues in the city have never been more urgent. Handler’s new novel, Bottle Grove, addresses love, greed and the precipice of change as two couples living in San Francisco deal with the effects of the tech boom looming over its citizens. Join us in welcoming Daniel Handler back to INFORUM and San Francisco this fall.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Deepak Chopra 66 mins – “Is it possible to venture beyond our everyday lives and experience heightened states of awareness? Deepak Chopra, a world-renowned advocate for alternative medicine and personal transformation, answers yes. Chopra believes that higher consciousness is available here and now. In his new book, Metahuman: Unleashing Your Infinite Potential, Chopra explains his secrets to moving beyond our physical limitations and accessing peak experiences that revolutionize our lives. Once you wake up, Chopra writes, life becomes transformed, and through pure consciousness—which is the field of all possibilities—your infinite potential becomes your personal reality. Chopra is the author of more than 85 books including 25 New York Times best sellers. A global force in the field of human empowerment, his books have been published in more than 43 languages. Time magazine has described Chopra as “one of the top 100 heroes and icons of the century.” Join us for this deeply meaning conversation with Chopra on becoming metahuman.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Drug Costs 77 mins – “Prescription drug costs keep escalating with no cap in sight. Is it the drug companies that are marking up the prices, or is something else driving these high costs? The increase has been astronomical and affects patients’ ability to pay for drugs and take them as prescribed. This creates a dangerous situation for the patient. Come learn about pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs), an industry secret that explains why drug prices are both confusing and expensive. Find out how PBMs control the amount paid for prescription drugs, why discounts don’t get to the patient and what actions we can take to reduce prescription drug costs.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Economics Background 64 mins – “Robert Kaplan has served as the 13th president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas since September 8, 2015. He also represents the 11th Federal Reserve District on the Federal Open Market Committee in the formulation of U.S. monetary policy. Prior to joining Harvard in 2006, Kaplan was vice chairman of the Goldman Sachs Group Inc., with global responsibility for the firm’s investment banking and investment management divisions. Previously, he served as global co-head of the investment banking division. He serves as chairman of Project ALS and co-chairman of the Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation, a global venture philanthropy firm that invests in developing nonprofit enterprises dedicated to addressing social issues. Come for a rare conversation with a representative of the Federal Reserve about international and national economies and U.S. monetary policy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

End of Life Response 58 mins – “How do we cope with the inevitability of death? How can we make better decisions for ourselves and our families? B.J. Miller and Shoshana Berger offer step-by-step instructions on managing the end of life, including how to navigate a complex system of hidden costs and intense emotions without shame and guilt often associated with this period of life. Miller is an assistant clinical professor of medicine at UCSF, where he practices and teaches palliative medicine. Berger is a journalist and editorial director at IDEO. Together they offer a lesson on dying—and how to live fully until you do.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Epigenetics 60 mins – “The food you eat and the choices you make impact your health and, according to the science of epigenetics, becomes interwoven with the genes you pass on to your children. Thanks to the discovery of epigenetics, we now know that the experiences of your ancestors are at work to influence your health and well-being. Everything from chronic diseases and trauma to how you age and sleep is determined by the epigenetics that turn on and off your DNA sequences. In You Are What Your Grandparents Ate: What You Need to Know About Nutrition, Experience, Epigenetics, and the Origins of Chronic Disease, best-selling author Judith Finlayson charts the steps you can take to making healthy dietary choices that have shown to spark epigenetic adjustments leading to better health, not only for yourself, but for your offspring and their children in the generations to come. Finlayson has dedicated her career to sharing her wide-ranging passions—from women’s history to the joys of cooking—through her best-selling books. Her penchant for cooking translates to her successful cookbooks which have sold over a million copies worldwide.  Come join us for an exciting conversation about the intergenerational impact of nutrition on long-term health with cooking expert Judith Finlayson.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Food Production 66 mins – “Author, editor-in-chief of Heated, and former New York Times columnist Mark Bittman talks about what it means for food to be “good,” how to know it’s good, buy it and cook it. He guides us to think deeply about the food system and how it can be improved. Bittman is celebrating the 20th anniversary of his generation-defining cookbook How to Cook Everything, the definitive guide to simple home cooking. The new edition of the book has been completely revised for today’s cooks while retaining Bittman’s trademark minimalist style: easy-to-follow recipes and variations, and tons of ideas and inspiration. Bittman will celebrate this landmark in American food with a reception. He will be in conversation with author and Real Food Media’s Anna Lappé.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Gender Balance 70 mins – “There are more women earning college degrees and participating in the workforce than ever before. Even still, women spend far more time on unpaid labor than men. Eve Rodsky, author of the new book Fair Play: A Game-Changing Solution for When You Have Too Much to Do (and More Life to Live), seeks to address this universal imbalance. Rodsky began her journey to address this inequality after reaching a tipping point in her own marriage. After recording all of the unrecognized work she was doing for her busy household, she realized the disparity between her and her partner was striking.  Fair Play offers four simple and practical steps to redistribute invisible work, reignite your relationship and reclaim your own time. Join Eve Rodsky and INFORUM on the quest for domestic rebalance.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Health Care Quality 53 mins – “In this Ninth Annual Lundberg Institute Lecture, Kenneth Kizer will provide an overview of the state of health care quality in the United States after taking a historical look at improvement strategies over the past 4,000 years. He will especially focus on the forces and strategies driving health care quality improvement in the past 20 years following several landmark events in the late 1990s. Despite these efforts, receiving high-quality health care remains illusory for many Americans. As the co-chair of the National Quality Task Force, he will then discuss the likely strategies to normalize high-quality health care over the next 10 years.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

HIV Detection 57 mins – “Join us for a discussion with experts about PrEP and a new tool designed to identify who might be more at risk of HIV infection.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Immigrant Story 67 mins – “The American political discourse is constantly calibrating its interpretation of what it means to be American. Coming from an undocumented family herself, writer Aarti Shahani has spent her life navigating the shifting tides of anti-immigrant sentiment in the United States. Her book Here We Are: American Dreams, American Nightmares documents Shahani and her father’s disparate versions of the immigrant experience, coexisting as the scholarship kid at one of Manhattan’s most elite prep schools and the shopkeeper who mistakenly sells watches and calculators to the notorious Cali Cartel. In addition to being an author, Shahani is an award-winning correspondent for NPR in Silicon Valley, covering the largest companies on Earth. Shahani remains a resounding voice advocating on behalf of our country’s immigrant community. INFORUM hosts Aarti Shahani to address a question that plagues immigrants and natives alike: Who really belongs in America?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Immigration Crisis 66 mins – “Michelle Malkin is a nationally recognized syndicated columnist who made her name through sharp humor to become an unapologetic conservative voice in America’s political discourse. A popular Fox News Channel contributor, Malkin has more than 2 million Twitter followers. Adding to her collection of four no. 1 best sellers, Malkin’s new book, Open Borders, Inc., is her exposé about what happens at America’s borders. Beginning with a thorough reexamination of the southern border’s history of immigration to its current state of crisis, Malkin argues that powerful special interest groups are working behind the scenes to keep America’s borders open for an influx of cheap labor in order to enrich the nation’s elite and create new generations of Democratic voters. Unafraid to challenge the status quo, Malkin offers her insight and confrontational approach on a variety of issues, from identity politics to social matters. Join us for an engaging conversation with one of the most outspoken voices of the American Right, and be sure to bring your questions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Kavanaugh Background 74 mins – “Last year’s Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh were dominated by allegations of sexual misconduct during Kavanaugh’s past, including during his prep school and college years. While Kavanaugh was ultimately sworn in for a lifetime position on the Supreme Court, many questions about his past remained unanswered. In the new book, The Education of Brett KavanaughNew York Times reporters Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly—two journalists who broke many critical stories about Kavanaugh during his confirmation hearing—take a deeper look at the formative years of the Supreme Court justice and his confirmation. Their research fills in some of the blanks and explores the essential question: Who is Brett Kavanaugh? By offering commentary from key players from his confirmation process who haven’t yet spoken publicly and pursuing lines of inquiry that were left hanging, the new book will be essential reading for anyone who wants to understand our political system and Kavanaugh’s unexpectedly emblematic role in it. The authors are the perfect people to tell this story: Kate Kelly was in the same Washington, D.C. high school circuit as Kavanaugh, while Robin Pogrebin was one of his former classmates at Yale.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

MK Ultra Project 67 mins – “Stephen Kinzer is the author of nine books, including: The True Flag, The Brothers, Overthrow and All the Shah’s Men. He is also an award-winning foreign correspondent and writes a world affairs column for The Boston Globe. His new book tells the astonishing story of the man who oversaw the CIA’s secret medical experiments of the 1950s and ’60s. Drawing on original interviews, survivors’ testimonies and documentary research, Kinzer brings to light this massive hunt for the secret of mind control that spanned several countries, including the work of Nazi scientists, and lead to experimentation on government employees (willing and unwilling), foreign politicians, children, prisoners, sex workers and anyone else the poisoner in chief deemed threatening or expendable. Come hear a startling tale of the most powerful unknown Americans of the 20th century and of government lies and deception.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Native Americans 68 mins – “Come for an intergenerational conversation on Native American representation in film and media from experienced Apache actress Sacheen Littlefeather to breakout Apache actress Sivan Alyra Rose. Sacheen is known for the protest at the Oscars, in which she represented Marlon Brando and raised attention about the Wounded Knee standoff, and Sivan for her role as the first Native American actress to lead a TV series—”Chambers” on Netflix. Both are known for utilizing their platforms for tribal rights and issues.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

NSA Operations 60 mins – “The National Security Agency (NSA) is both a member of the Defense Department and an Intelligence Community agency. NSA’s expertise is cryptology—making and breaking codes. The agency’s goal is to discover adversaries’ secrets, protect U.S. secrets and outmaneuver adversaries in cyberspace, executing this mission while balancing the privacy rights of the American people. Jonathan Darby has been with the agency since 1983, when he was initially assigned as a Russian language analyst. Darby has served in a variety of field and operations positions at NSA/CSS, including currently as the director of operations. Previously, he served as the signals intelligence directorate deputy director of analysis and production and the deputy chief of cybersecurity operations. Darby will characterize the security threats to our nation, our primary adversaries and their objectives. He will also talk about the role of NSA and what they are doing about these threats, providing some basic guidance for actions the public can take. Join us for a rare public discussion with an individual at the forefront of America’s intelligence capabilities.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

PTSD Defined 56 mins – “Shaili Jain will share nuanced cartography of PTSD, a widely misunderstood yet crushing condition that afflicts millions of Americans. Jain’s new book, The Unspeakable Mind, is the definitive guide for a trauma-burdened age. With profound empathy and meticulous research, Jain—a practicing psychiatrist and PTSD specialist at one of America’s top VA hospitals; trauma scientist at the National Center for PTSD; and a Stanford professor—shines a long overdue light on the PTSD epidemic affecting today’s fractured world. Post-traumatic stress disorder goes far beyond the horrors of war, and it is an inescapable part of all our lives. At any given moment, more than six million Americans are suffering with PTSD. Jain’s groundbreaking work demonstrates the ways this disorder cuts to the heart of life, interfering with one’s capacity to love, create and work—incapacity brought on by a complex interplay between biology, genetics and environment. Beyond the struggles of individuals, PTSD has a tangible imprint on cultures and societies around the world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Quantum Mechanics 63 mins – “Quantum mechanics is the most accurate and far-reaching theory in physics, yet physicists themselves readily admit that they don’t understand it. But Caltech physicist and New York Times best-selling author Sean Carroll suggests that we do have a very promising way of understanding the mysteries of the quantum world. Previously featured on “The Colbert Report” and PBS’s “Nova,” theoretical physicist Carroll will explore quantum discoveries throughout history, unveiling how the atomic and subatomic worlds impact our daily lives and giving us a whole new way of comprehending the cosmos.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Renaissance Women 64 mins – “Discover the lives and legacies of Italy’s Renaissance women as well as those of several unheralded Italian women who inspired Botticelli, Raphael and Michelangelo and some of the greatest art of all time. Carla Gambescia will revitalize your amore with Italy and its remarkable art treasures and cultural gifts. Learn about Artemisia Gentileschi and Isabella d’Este, whose lives and accomplishments can still inspire us today, and gain new perspectives on some of the Renaissance’s most beloved paintings.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Salesforce 64 mins -”When Marc Benioff started Salesforce 20 years ago, he envisioned building a company that would not only change the way the world does business but also change the world at the same time. Benioff believes that businesses are the greatest platforms for change and that they should serve not only shareholders but all stakeholders, including customers, employees, partners, communities and the environment, to make the world a better place. On day one, Benioff created the 1-1-1 model of philanthropy, which leverages the resources of Salesforce to improve communities around the world. And with the core values of trust, customer success, innovation and equality as its foundation, Salesforce has not only been one of the fastest-growing enterprise software companies ever, it’s become one of the world’s most admired companies and is consistently ranked globally as one of the best companies to work for.  Benioff is an unapologetically outspoken social advocate and has publicly admonished other business leaders for not doing enough for the local community in San Francisco and beyond.  In his new book, Trailblazer: The Power of Business as the Greatest Platform for Change, Benioff touches on these values and shares his insights and best practices for anyone, from the CEO to an intern, who wants to make the world a better place. He also discusses his belief that in the future, profits and progress will not be sustainable unless they serve the greater good. Join us for a conversation with a pioneering business leader who wants to challenge us all to be agents of change in a fast-moving world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Scorched Earth 52 mins – “Wildfires are breaking records as they burn through acres of Amazon rainforest, northern California countryside and even the Arctic tundra. This loss carries major implications for the global climate: The Amazon alone is responsible for removing 5 percent of the world’s 40 billion tons of CO2 emissions from the air each year. When forests burn, this carbon storage along with biodiversity and the Amazon’s indigenous culture—is lost. As land use, climate change and resource consumption drive higher rates of wildfires and deforestation each year, why should people care about the loss of trees they might never see?  Join us with Corey Brinkema, president of the Forest Stewardship Council U.S.; Tara O’Shea, director of forest programs at Planet; and Paul Paz y Miño, associate director at Amazon Watch, for a conversation on the importance of faraway forests.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Susan Rice 69 mins – “Susan Rice, President Obama’s former national security adviser and U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, is heralded as one of the most influential foreign policy voices of our time. Having dedicated her career to public service, Rice is now a distinguished visiting research fellow at American University, a senior fellow at Harvard University, a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times and author of the new book Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For. With humor and grace, Rice reflects upon the pivotal moments of her career on the front lines of American diplomacy and foreign policy. With unflinching honesty, Rice navigates her readers through the well-known 2012 terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya, as well as the untold stories involving a secret channel to Iran and behind-the-scene confrontations with Russia and China. A dedicated public servant, join Susan Rice as she invites us to take a look at some of her biggest triumphs and failures, while teaching some important life lessons for all of us who dream of success and aspire to serve.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Technology Concerns 4G-5G 32 mins – “’Humanity at a Crossroads: New Insights Into Technology Risks for Humans and the Planet’, Commonwealth Club of California, San Francisco, December 3rd, 2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Wild Salmon 56 mins – “Salmon is the keystone species of the Northern Rim. Their annual migrations support hundreds of species including bears, eagles and whales as well as dozens of indigenous groups and local fishing based economies that provide one of the last healthy sources of wild protein for humankind. Wild salmon runs are declining on both sides of the Pacific Rim, triggering multibillion dollar restoration efforts. Guido Rahr will describe the salmon’s fate and campaign to save critical stronghold rivers, from Japan to the wilds of the Russian Far East to Alaska, British Columbia and the U.S. Pacific Northwest, to focus on the battle to stop a massive open gold pit and copper mine proposed in the headwaters of Alaska’s Bristol Bay—home to the greatest wild salmon runs left on Earth.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Witchcraft 62 mins – “Witches in various guises have been with us for centuries, and they are notorious shape-shifters. In both spiritual culture and pop culture, they’ve changed from diabolical villains to empowered heroines as women and femmes have sought more autonomy in their own lives.  In celebration of her spellbinding book Waking the Witch: Reflections on Women, Magic, and Power, Pam Grossman will delve into why witches matter, how they reflect our fear and love of feminine power, and what they can teach us during this age of profound transformation. Grossman will be joined by CEO, entrepreneur and documentary film executive Anne Devereux-Mills, founder of Parlay House, for this evening of feminist magic and bewitching conversation.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 432: Alzheimers, Antibiotic Misuse, Anti-racism, Astronomy vs Catholic Church, Bayard Rustin and Segregation, Being Certain, Body Parts Farm, Brain Covering Tear, Carbon Offsets, College Behind Bars, Con Artists, Debtors’ Prison, Education Waste, Flying Cars, Foreign Policy, Gender Equality, Harvey Milk, Healthcare Fix, Homeless Myths, Homlessness Prevention, Infections, Journalism and Intelligence, License Bottleneckers, Meatless Meat, Medicare View by Conservatives, Meeting Improvements, National Archive Disruption, Secondhand Stuff, Surgery History, Trump and Racism, Uber Overview, Vagina Bible, Video Games Impact

Exercise your ears: the 52 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 720 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 27,030 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

African Safaris 22 mins – “This is an interview with my friend Jody Cole, founder of Wild African Rainbow Safaris. We explore how she built her business from the ground up based on her love of Sub-Saharan Africa. I think you will find her story inspiring.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimers 78 mins – “Everyone knows someone who’s survived cancer. But no one knows anyone who’s survived Alzheimer’s—until now. Alzheimer’s disease is a global pandemic and the third leading cause of death in the United States. Of the 326 million Americans currently living, approximately 45 million will develop Alzheimer’s disease during their lifetimes unless effective prevention programs are instituted. The 99 percent failure rate of Alzheimer’s drug trials underscores both the area of greatest biomedical failure and the need for a more complete understanding of the drivers (i.e., the root causes) of the disease. Despite these alarming statistics, it has now been demonstrated that early stage Alzheimer’s and its precursors, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), can be prevented and in some cases reversed.  Join Dale Bredesen as he presents a novel programmatic approach that identifies and targets the multiple contributors to cognitive decline. Based on his findings from over 30 years of research into the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, this approach led to the first published reports of the reversal of cognitive decline. Currently, over 3,000 patients use the protocol described in these initial reports, with success that has not been described previously.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Anti-Racism 69 mins -”The struggle for racial justice is far from over. Inequality is built on many aspects ingrained in our society—history, law and culture. How do we confront this inequality embedded in American life? How can we play an active role in building an anti-racist society? National Book Award winner Ibram X. Kendi returns to INFORUM to deliver an honest critique of modern America and our own role in perpetuating inequality. In his new book, How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi holds up both a magnifying glass and a mirror to examine how to uproot racism from society—starting with ourselves.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Antibiotic Misuse 51 mins – “We can’t say we weren’t warned.  More than 75 years ago, bacteriologist Rene Dubos cautioned that misuse of antibiotics could breed drug-resistant bacteria – and he has been proved prescient.  In this episode: the rise of superbugs, why we ignored the warnings about them, how some are enlisting an old therapy to fight back, and whether we’ll heed history’s lessons in the face of a future pandemic.  Plus, a weird unforeseen effect of antibiotics being investigated at the Body Farm.” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Astronomy Cast 49 mins – “This episode of Books and Ideas features the return of Podcasting Hall of Famer, Dr. Pamela Gay. Dr. Gay is co-host of the long running show Astronomy Cast. As a professional astronomer she has dedicated her career to public outreach and she is very involved with the citizen science project Cosmos Quest. Her passion for science is contagious.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Astronomy vs Catholic Church 53 mins – “400 years ago, some ideas about the cosmos were too scandalous to mention. When the Dominican friar Giordano Bruno suggested that planets existed outside our Solar System, the Catholic Inquisition had him arrested, jailed, and burned at the stake for heresy. Today, we have evidence of thousands of planets orbiting other stars.  Our discovery of extrasolar planets has dramatically changed ideas about the possibility for life elsewhere in the universe.  Modern theories about the existence of the ghostly particles called neutrinos or of collapsed stars with unfathomable gravity (black holes), while similarly incendiary, didn’t prompt arrest, of course.  Neutrinos and black holes were arresting ideas because they came decades before we had the means to prove their existence. Hear about scientific ideas that came before their time and why extrasolar planets, neutrinos, and black holes are now found on the frontiers of astronomical research.” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Audio Books Increase 32 mins – “As the audio revolution has unfolded, audiobooks and podcasts have existed largely in worlds adjacent, with the simplicity of a major retailer for audiobooks and a major source for podcasts. But change is upon us. The recent acquisition of multiple podcast networks is creating rivals in the world of podcasts. Meanwhile, audiobook publishers are evolving beyond their signature format with the development of original works that exist in a middle ground between audiobooks (longer) and podcasts (shorter). This coming collision of audiobooks and podcasts means more choice for consumers along with more confusion – and more opportunity – for publishers, authors, and other content producers. What’s driving the change is consumer listening behavior, as Michele Cobb of the Audio Publishers Association (APA) told CCC’s Chris Kenneally in October at the Frankfurt Book Fair.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Bayard Rustin and Segregation 53 mins – “August 28th, 1963 will forever be tied to Martin Luther King Jr.’s hallowed “I Have a Dream Speech.” This historic moment would probably have never come to fruition if it weren’t for a man standing in King’s shadow, Mr. Bayard Rustin.   Bayard Rustin was a man with a number of seemingly incompatible labels: black, gay, Quaker . . . identifications that served to earn him as many detractors as admirers. Although he had numerous passions and pursuits, his most transformative act, one that certainly changed the course of American history, was to counsel MLK on the use of non-violent resistance. Rustin also helped to engineer the March on Washington and frame the Montgomery bus boycott.  With such lofty achievements, why isn’t Rustin considered an icon of both Civil Rights and humanity?   Why is Rustin not synonymous with Civil Rights? How could a person who changed the course of American history not be a household name? Was he purposely kept out of the history books? On State of the Re:Union, host Al Letson normally sets out to take listeners to a specific place, but for this special, the program takes the audience to a specific time in history that shapes the way we live now. More than just a Black History Month special, we found his complex story one for all seasons.” At the linkk you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Being Certain 80 mins – “Neurologist and author Robert Burton talks about his book, On Being Certain, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Burton explores our need for certainty and the challenge of being skeptical about what our brain tells us must be true. Where does what Burton calls “the feeling of knowing” come from? Why can memory lead us astray? Burton claims that our reaction to events emerges from competition among different parts of the brain operating below our level of awareness. The conversation includes a discussion of the experience of transcendence and the different ways humans come to that experience.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Ben Franklin’s World 39 mins – “This is an interview with historian Liz Covart about her highly respected podcast “Ben Franklin’s World.” We explore what it means to be an historian in the 21st Century and the challenges of sharing early American history via podcasting.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Body Parts Farm 50 mins – “We could choose not to pay income tax and suffer the consequences. But we can’t avoid death. The biological functions of all organisms eventually cease. But why should this be? Find out why animals die and meet one creature that is biologically immortal. Plus, a trip to the Body Farm where decaying bodies help science…how we might cheat the Big Sleep with drugs… why Mexican cemeteries look like villages… and a doctor’s fight against one of the world’s deadliest diseases.” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Covering Tear 44 minsAndrea Buchanan lost her mind while crossing the street one blustery March morning. The cold winter air triggered a coughing fit, and she began to choke. When the coughing finally stopped, she thought it was over. She could not have been more wrong. When she coughed that morning, a small tear ripped through her dura mater, the membrane covering the brain and spinal cord. But she didn’t know that yet. Instead, Andrea went on with her day, unaware that her cerebrospinal fluid was already beginning to leak out of that tiny opening. We talk to author Andrea J. Buchanan about her experience with a brain injury and how she used playing the piano to recover. Buchanan’s new book is The Beginning of Everything: The Year I Lost My Mind and Found Myself.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Carbon Offsets 49 mins – “Carbon offsets: They’ve been called everything from a band-aid solution to “the best thing a consumer can do right now.” A new service even offers customers a monthly subscription to offset their carbon footprint. Meanwhile, offset providers are scrutinized for transparency, and purchasers are criticized for using them as a get-out-of-jail-free card. In the race to bring carbon emissions to zero, are offsets a legitimate tool—or a scam to allow heavy emitters a way out of taking real action? What impact does purchasing offsets have on poorer communities?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

College Behind Bars 67 mins – “For 30 years, Lynn Novick has been directing and producing landmark documentary films about American culture, history, politics, sports, art and music. With co-director Ken Burns, she has created more than 80 hours of acclaimed programming for PBS, including The Vietnam WarBaseballJazzFrank Lloyd WrightThe War and Prohibition. This duPont–Columbia and Peabody-Award winning filmmaker’s new documentary series, College Behind Bars, reveals the transformative power of higher education through the experiences of men and women trying to earn college degrees while incarcerated. Executive produced by Ken Burns and produced by Sarah Botstein, College Behind Bars is Novick’s solo directorial debut and will air November 25 and 26 on PBS stations. The four-hour series, distilled from nearly 400 hours of cinéma vérité footage, explores the lives of a dozen incarcerated men and women as they struggle to earn degrees in the Bard Prison Initiative (BPI), one of the most rigorous and effective prison education programs in the country. In this era of mass incarceration, America is the world’s largest jailer, with more than 2 million men and women behind bars; 630,000 are released annually, and nearly 50 percent end up back in prison within five years, trapped in a cycle of imprisonment, release and reincarceration. Once commonplace in American prisons, higher education declined precipitously after 1994, when Congress ended federal Pell Grants for inmates as part of the Clinton crime bill. In the nearly 20 years since BPI began, more than 500 alumni have been released, and fewer than four percent have gone back. The program currently enrolls 300 men and women in six prisons and costs $6,000 per student per year, most of it privately funded.  Here’s a chance to get a preview of the series and hear a discussion with the filmmakers and formerly incarcerated BPI students featured in the film about the power of education to transform lives and benefit society at large.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Con Artists 44 mins – “This past week, Indre traveled to London and got her credit card number lifted on the airplane. And that made her feel like she was conned. So we called up Maria Konnikova, author of the new book “The Confidence Game: Why We Fall for It … Every Time”. Maria is a Ph.D. pyschologist from Columbia University, but is best known for her science writing in the New Yorker. Have you ever been conned? Some people who falls for scams, and we all do, seem to fall for cons over and over again. We explore why this is the case and what that means for our own psychology.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Debtors’ Prison 51 mins – “Six months ago this week, Michael Brown was shot dead in Ferguson, Missouri.  Around the world, people wondered at the depth of anger and frustration that poured into Ferguson’s streets.  There are many strands to follow.  One goes to the municipal courts around St. Louis.  They are major money-makers for little cities like Ferguson.  Traffic fees and fines on many who are black and poor.  Jail time.  Lost jobs.  A sense of systematic oppression.  Debtors’ prison.  Now there’s reform talk.  It’s a national issue.  This hour On Point:  American justice and the rage in Ferguson.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dignity and Despair 80 mins – “Do you avoid certain neighborhoods deemed “unsafe?” What exactly gives them that reputation? And what might you find if you did not avoid a stroll through these places? That’s exactly what Chris Arnade, a former small town guy turned Wall Street trader, set out to do. He started in such neighborhoods in his New York home, and then took an epic road trip to better understand life in aAmerica in the “back row.” His experience turned into his new book, Dignity: Seeking Respect in Back Row America, also the subject of this week’s EconTalk episode.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Waste 69 mins – “Bryan Caplan of George Mason University and the author of The Case Against Education talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Caplan argues that very little learning takes place in formal education and that very little of the return to college comes from skills or knowledge that is acquired in the classroom. Schooling, he concludes, as it is currently conducted is mostly a waste of time and money. Caplan bring a great deal of evidence to support his dramatic claim and much of the conversation focuses on the challenge of measuring and observing what students actually learn.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evolution 59 mins – “Books and Ideas is back with an interview of Jonathan Losos, author of Improbable Destinies: Fate, Chance, and the Future of Evolution. This fascinating book reveals the surprising world of experimental evolutionary biology. We explore how experiments both in the laboratory and in the wild are answering long-standing questions about how evolution works.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Expat Experience 61 mins – “What happens when you go abroad to live and work in another culture, surrounded by the strange sounds of a different language, different food, music and customs? What does it take to achieve a successful expatriate experience? Come and learn about the diverse experiences of 14 Americans who worked and lived in various countries—from England to Vietnam, Belarus to India. Learn about their challenges and how they finally adjusted and thrived in their foreign environments. Schickel presents the results of her recent qualitative research, conducted years after she herself experienced the expat life during her two years in the U.S. Peace Corps in Morocco, which inspired her continuing interest in these issues and led to her recently successfully defended dissertation.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Flying Cars 50 mins – “Blade RunnerStar Wars and “The Jetsons” envisioned futuristic worlds of flying cars and mile-high commutes. Now, dozens of companies are moving forward with airborne vehicles, including Airbus’ electric flying car and Uber’s helicopter taxi. Tesla is also hinting at a flying Roadster using rocket technology. Is taking cars off the road and putting them in the sky a realistic solution or just a techno-fantasy? What are the human, technological and regulatory barriers to this high-flying future? Are drones the first step in advancing battery and jet technologies that could reduce the growing carbon impact of aviation?  Join us for a conversation with Joby Aviation founder and CEO JoeBen Bevirt, Akin Gump attorney Jennifer Richter, former Voom CEO Uma Subramanian and “The Flying Car Radio Show” co-host Charlie Vogelheim on the future of personal flight in a changing climate.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Foreign Policy 64 mins – “This week: an episode we recently recorded live in Chicago, on a topic that’s a bit unusual for us: American foreign policy. A few important things have already changed since our recording. For one: President Trump’s decision to withdraw some U.S. troops from Syria, which scrambled the calculus for the U.S., as well as for the Kurds, Syria, Turkey, Russia and who knows how many other players, eventually. And then, even more recently, U.S. Special Forces closed in on ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who reportedly then killed himself; this too happened in Syria. The Democrats’ impeachment proceedings have also accelerated, thanks to Trump’s interactions with Ukraine. So: this topic is a moving target, to say the least. In any case: we learned a lot, and hope you do too.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free-market Economics 81 mins – “At the end of the Carter administration and throughout the Reagan Revolution, belief in the power of markets became America’s preferred economic policy doctrine. President Bill Clinton all but announced the triumph of free markets when he declared that “the era of big government is over.” President Barack Obama faced the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression and pushed a recovery plan that was more limited than many had hoped, seeming to protect the very sectors that had created it. By 2016, the economy was still uneven enough to play a role in Donald Trump’s election. Over the past decade, free-market economics (also known as neoliberalism) has been challenged and questioned on multiple fronts, particularly by the Democratic Party. With the Left making its voice heard as the primaries approach, many former Clinton and Obama officials are openly questioning a governing approach dominated by free-market economics. In his new book, A Crisis Wasted, Reed Hundt, chair of the Federal Communications Commission under Clinton and a member of Obama’s transition team, makes the argument that Obama missed an opportunity to push for a new progressive era of governance, a miscalculation that ultimately hobbled his administration. Hundt is not alone on this score. Former Clinton administration economist Brad DeLong, who is one of the market friendly neoliberal Democrats who has dominated the party for the last 20 years, believes that the time of people like himself running the Democratic Party has passed. “The baton rightly passes to our colleagues on our left,” DeLong wrote in a much-discussed Vox piece earlier this year.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Freedom to Read Foundation 17 mins – ““Reading Dangerously,” features excerpts from famous banned books. The Freedom to Read Foundation marks a half century of court battles to protect the right of free access to controversial books and other media in schools and public libraries. In 1969, the American Library Association organized the Freedom to Read Foundation as a legal defense fund fighting censorship and other challenges to free speech. That same year, 250,000 protesters marched in Washington against the Vietnam War; the Woodstock Festival attracted 500,000 spectators; and the trial began of the Chicago Seven, radical activists who were accused of inciting riots at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. At the annual ALA conference now underway in Washington, DC, the Freedom to Read Foundation is marking a half century of court battles to protect the right of American citizens to free access of controversial books and other media in schools and public libraries. A commemorative book, Reading Dangerously, will be launched too.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Equality 56 mins – “Geena DAVIS: In my opinion, the biggest problem we have in the world — of all the problems that we have — is gender inequality. If we were able to fix that, so that women were no longer second-class citizens, I think it would impact every other problem that we have — hunger and the environment and war. I don’t mean to say that it will cure the other problems, but it would go a long way toward improving these other stubborn problems. I mean, women in most sectors of society — well, in every single sector — there’s big gender inequality. But as far as the leadership positions go, a lot of times, progress seems to stall out at about 20 percent. Congress is 20 percent women, and so many other areas of society are similar. So we’re not using, by any means, all of the talent of women. And the evidence has shown that if you correct that, and get all of the best minds working, things will improve. And women and men just have a different view of the world. There’s all these studies that show that when a body is more blended, where it’s not homogenous, it makes smarter and better decisions.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Harvey Milk 54 mins – “In honor of Pride month I am sharing an interview I recorded earlier this year with LGBT historian Lillian Faderman about her latest book Harvey Milk: His Lives and Death. Milk was the first openly gay man elected to public office, but unfortunately he was assassinated in 1978, after less than a year in office. We discuss some of the highlights of his short career and explore why many consider him the Martin Luther King of the fight for LGBT Civil Rights.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Healthcare Fix 52 mins – “In this Ninth Annual Lundberg Institute Lecture, Kenneth Kizer will provide an overview of the state of health care quality in the United States after taking a historical look at improvement strategies over the past 4,000 years. He will especially focus on the forces and strategies driving health care quality improvement in the past 20 years following several landmark events in the late 1990s. Despite these efforts, receiving high-quality health care remains illusory for many Americans. As the co-chair of the National Quality Task Force, he will then discuss the likely strategies to normalize high-quality health care over the next 10 years.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Homeless Myths 61 mins – “If we build homeless housing, won’t that just attract more homeless people? I read an article about this cool thing they’re doing in Utah; why don’t we do that? What about tiny homes? We know the causes of and solutions to homelessness, but public opinion is based on anecdotes and personal observation rather than facts. This talk will look at some of the most common misconceptions and provide a nuanced, evidence-based response on one of the country’s most pressing issues.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Homelessness Prevention 67 mins – “On October 8, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law the nation’s most far-reaching bills, which are designed to prevent homelessness, protect tenants from being evicted and make it possible to create new homes for many thousands of Californians. The work was made possible by a collaboration of diverse allies who are attempting to preserve existing affordable homes, protect the families in them and produce more housing at all income levels. They were joined by a broad coalition of elected officials, including Assemblymember David Chiu, who authored several of the recently passed bills and who has made preventing homelessness and providing affordable homes to all Californians one of his signature issues. While these represent important strides, some say a great deal of work still needs to be done. On November 4, The Commonwealth Club will host a panel discussion about the implications of this new legislation as well as what the future holds for addressing the challenge of homelessness and housing in the Bay Area.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Infections 26 mins – “Puscast: September 1 to 15, 2018. CD4 dont return to normal. Mumps and cheerleaders. More H. flu. PJP atovaquone resistance. I love Lucy. More including actual useful stuff.” At the link find the title, “Puscast: September 1 to 15, 2018.” right-click Download (for non ipod mp3 players)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journaling Method 45 mins – “Episode 64 of Books and Ideas is an interview with Ryder Carroll, author of The Bullet Journal Method: Track the Past, Order the Present, Design the Future. He describes how he developed this popular method that combines to-do lists and journaling. I have never featured a “self-help” like title before, but I decided to make an exception this month because I have found bullet journaling to be an effective method for organizing my complicated life.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism and Intelligence 64 mins – “As most long-standing news outlets have shuttered their foreign bureaus and print operations, the role of Global News Networks (GNNs) as information collectors and policy influencers has changed. Western GNNs are both untethered to government entities and able to produce accurate yet critical situational analyses. But due to the emergence of other GNNs owned or directed by national governments, the global news cycle has become thoroughly manipulatable. Kounalakis’ interviews with a diverse set of GNN professionals vividly depicts the momentous sea change that has occurred in global news production. He also traces the evolution of GNNs from the 20th century to now, revealing today’s drastically altered global news business model. Find out why countries such as Russia and China invest heavily in their news media, and how some GNNs operate in tandem with state strategies and diplomatic sensitivities. Get a firsthand look at how the global media is shaping policy and morphing the public’s consumption of information.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

License Bottleneckers 76 mins – “Dick Carpenter of the Institute for Justice and author of Bottleneckers talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book–a look at how occupational licensing and other regulations protect existing job holders from competition.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Longevity Project 68 mins – “The Longevity Project explores the drivers of the length of life. It also examines the quality of life in Mediterranean countries such as Spain, France, Italy, Greece, Croatia, Lebanon, Israel and Tunisia. A goal is to explain how the Mediterranean diet is a transnational, intangible asset that can prolong life when combined with biodiversity, healthy lifestyles, beauty and art. Eating together is the basis of the cultural identity and continuity of the communities in the Mediterranean Basin. The Mediterranean diet emphasizes the values of hospitality, neighborhood, intercultural dialogue and creativity, and it represents a way of life guided by respect for diversity. The Longevity Project features expert scientists, chefs, authors, researchers, celebrities and locals to discover the secrets of longevity. Recent film clips from Mediterranean locations will be screened and discussed.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Math Education 48 mins – “Most high-school math classes are still preparing students for the Sputnik era. Steve Levitt wants to get rid of the “geometry sandwich” and instead have kids learn what they really need in the modern era: data fluency.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meatless Meat 59 mins – “If you haven’t tried a meatless burger yet, scarcity won’t be an excuse much longer. Plant-based meat is exploding in popularity, with fast-food chains and grocery stores now peddling various companies’ veggie patties. Plant-based meat companies used to be underdogs, but as Forbes reports, major food producers are betting big on what they see as the future of food. So what’s causing companies and consumers alike to think twice about the ubiquitous beef patty? A changing climate and swelling global population add up to grave concerns about our increasingly precarious food system.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Meatless Meat 63 mins – “What’s in our food and how it’s grown has a profound impact on the health of our communities. Schools and hospitals are an increasingly critical intervention point for food access and long-term food systems shifts. Food and health issues are set against a seemingly paradoxical backdrop: One in eight Californians face hunger because of distribution and incentive problems. At the same time, one in four Californians suffer from diet-related diseases, directly related to social inequality, poverty and food availability. Learn more from California leaders who are improving lives and working to ensure the success of ecological farming through the food reaches the forks of families.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.  

Medicare View by Conservatives 63 mins – “Though it’s not apparent in the media, there is support among conservatives for universal health care coverage. The preferred approach involves the use of market forces to control costs and activation of consumers to bring the benefits of competition to the health care industry. Avik Roy is a leading conservative thinker, writer and adviser to senior Republican politicians. Yet his views surprise many progressives. A fierce proponent of the use of market forces in health care, Roy is equally vocal about the need for health care to better serve disadvantaged Americans.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Meeting Improvements 44 mins – “In the U.S. alone, we hold 55 million meetings a day. Most of them are woefully unproductive, and tyrannize our offices. The revolution begins now — with better agendas, smaller invite lists, and an embrace of healthy conflict.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Health Reform 70 mins – “Congressman Tim Murphy, Ph.D, believes in rebuilding the nation’s broken mental health system. As chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee, Murphy conducted a year-long investigation with multiple congressional hearings, forums, interviews and research into why those who need help the most have been the least likely to get it. Dr. Murphy, who is also a clinical psychologist, will discuss his groundbreaking Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act (H.R. 3717).” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

National Archive Disruption 9 mins – “As George Orwell wrote in 1984: “Who controls the past, controls the future. Who controls the present, controls the past.” And with the impeachment proceedings behind him, President Trump is well on his way to securing the power he has sought all along. For proof, look to our recent past, which has already been blurred to soften political dissent: last month, the National Archives acknowledged making multiple alterations to photos of huge crowds at the 2017 Women’s March. And that doctored photo might just be the tip of the iceberg. Writing in the New York Times, Matthew Connelly, a professor of history at Columbia University, detailed new evidence that the National Archives is letting millions of documents from the Trump administration vanish. In this conversation with Bob, Connelly explains how these opaque policies might come to distort the record about Trump’s time in office.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nora Ephron 43 mins – “’A Few Words About Breasts,’ from May 1972, is Nora Ephron’s comic lament about how her late onset of puberty and earliest sexual experiences gave her a lifelong obsession with her breasts. Jessi Klein, head writer for “Inside Amy Schumer,” joins David Brancaccio to discuss Ephron’s famous Esquire story and its lasting influence on the way women perceive and voice themselves in writing and comedy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Oil Spill Affects 10 mins – “This week: Stingrays are especially affected by oil spills because they’re so good at smelling; and research into using a spicy cactus to treat pain.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rwanda Genocide 52 mins – “Our lecture this week is titled “Moving On: Reconstruction and Reconciliation in Post-Genocide Rwanda.”  Our speaker is Anne Kubai, Associate Professor of World Christianity and Interreligious Studies at Uppsala University, Sweden.  The lecture was presented by the Boston University Institute on Culture, Religion and World Affairs.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Secondhand Stuff 47 mins – “The need for used items to have a secondhand life is increasing both in the U.S. and around the world. We unpack where your used, discarded and donated stuff ends up after its left your possession.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surgery History 44 mins – “Arnold van de Laar, a surgeon in the Slotervaart Hospital in Amsterdam. uses his own experience and expertise to tell this engrossing history of surgery through 28 famous operations―from Louis XIV and Einstein to JFK and Houdini. We talk to him about his new book Under the Knife: A History of Surgery in 28 Remarkable Operations.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Textbooks Go Digital 13 mins- “In July, Pearson announced it would end the longstanding practice among textbook publishers of revising all active titles every three years according to a printing schedule. Instead, the British-based education publisher will employ a digital-first discipline for its publishing program. As textbooks give way to courseware, publishers will be looking for an education in 21st century business models. Publishing analyst and Michael Cairns recently examined the latest developments in the creation, sourcing, and delivery of textbooks. Administrators, instructors, and students, says Cairns, will increasingly demand all-inclusive and unlimited access to online educational materials (think, Netflix for textbooks). Such an all-access model naturally favors global players who already have won prominent positions in university library systems. Meanwhile, a fight looms over control of usage data. “It’s long been prophesized that the print textbook would disappear, but it’s actually taken quite a bit longer than I think people would have anticipated, especially when you look at the growth of eBooks on the trade side, or if you look at the transition from print journals to online databases that has taken place over the last 20 years now,” notes Cairns.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thoreau 53 mins – “This week, we have a lecture by Laura Walls, Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame. Professor Wall’s lecture is titled “Henry David Thoreau’s Legacy of Resistance and Hope,” and is presented by the Boston University College of Arts and Sciences.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and Racism 68 mins – “There are 2.2 million people in American prisons and jails—a 500 percent increase over the last 40 years. We have heard about the role of government policies and law enforcement practices that factor into the creation of this statistic, but we rarely hear about the individuals who interact most closely with putting these people in jail: prosecutors. Renowned journalist and legal commentator Emily Bazelon investigates the power prosecutors hold in the outcome of a case in her new book, Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution­ and End Mass Incarceration. Prosecutors are some of the most powerful actors in the criminal justice system, as they are virtually unchecked in their power to decide what to charge defendants with, how to set bail and determine the plea bargain. Bazelon shows how prosecution in America is at a crossroads and details both the damage that overzealous prosecutors can do as well as the second chances they can extend, if they choose. Join us for a conversation that investigates the unchecked power in the criminal justice system and identifies a possible solution to this mass incarceration crisis.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Uber Overview 67 mins – “Since its launch in 2009, ride-hailing service Uber has undergone major shifts to become a worldwide transportation network despite severe setbacks. Harassment allegations that led to the firing of 20 employees and the resignation of former CEO Travis Kalanick publicly embarrassed the company, yet Uber has grown to become the highest valued private tech company in Silicon Valley. In his new book, Super Pumped: The Battle for UberNew York Times tech reporter Mike Isaac delves into the ambition, excess and massive loss of Uber and Kalanick over the last few years. Isaac has nearly a decade of experience writing about technology industry in the San Francisco Bay Area. He has spent the past few years covering the controversial ascent of Uber and the company’s issues of workplace harassment, sexism and allegations of misconduct that reveal the problematic work culture of Silicon Valley tech companies. Join us as he narrates the deception and bad behavior of Uber that culminated in one of the most controversial periods in American corporate history.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Vagina Bible 67 mins – “In this age of clickbait, pseudoscience and celebrity-endorsed products, it’s hard to know what’s best for our bodies. Jen Gunter, ob-gyn and the Internet’s go-to doctor, is dedicated to debunking the myths, marketing and misinformation surrounding reproductive health. While much of the dialogue surrounding women’s health targets the shame or inexperience of women and girls, Gunter aims to educate and empower with both humor and evidence. Join Gunter in conversation with Mary Roach, author and popular scientist, to answer your burning questions about women’s health.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Video Games Impact 69 mins – “Books and Ideas 68 is an interview with psychologist Dr Pete Etchells about his new book Lost in a Good Game: Why we play video games and what they can do for us. We explore both the myths and the science behind video games and consider why the effects of video games are actually quite difficult to study. It seems strange that many people in this field don’t play games themselves. Most of the bad things you have heard about video games do not stand up to the basic standards of good science. Whether or not you enjoy video games yourself this is a fascinating interview.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Yoga Instructor Interview 66 mins – “Every breath you take has the power to heal, but learning how to breathe takes practice. In her book Breathwork, established yoga and breathwork teacher Valerie Moselle leads you through a practical program to boost your energy and physical health.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 431 – Feb 21, 2020: African Resource Management, AI Impact, Algorithm Impact on Humans, Anti-money Laundering, Army Modernization, Climate Change Fix, Crypto AG, DNA Evidence Faults, Driverless Cars, Drug Purchases in Louisiana, Energy Future, Explosive Networks, Fake Content, Financial Crisis of 2008, Gene Location Impact, Gerrymandering Fight, Housing Experiment, Information Privacy, Kibbutz, LED Upgrade, Memories that Hide, Militia Group Conflicts, Natures Warning System, Neural Networks Impact, Podcasting Evolution, Privacy Laws, Robots and AI Transform America, Science and Math Trends, Shared Prosperity, Spiderwebs, Transportation Trends, US – Asia Relations, Virus Swarms Spread, VR to Preserve Evidence, Wind Powered Ships

Exercise your ears: the 50 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 622 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 27,030 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

African Resource Management 78 mins – “On Tuesday, September 17, the Africa Growth Initiative at the Brookings Institution hosted His Excellency President Alpha Condé of Guinea to share his thoughts on the many priorities that need to be balanced when managing revenues from natural resources in Africa. This is an abiding priority for Guinea, a nation blessed with one-third of the world’s reserves of bauxite, as well as a wealth of iron, diamonds, gold, among other natural resources. While the country’s mining sector produces more than 90 percent the country’s exports, the sector only accounts for 17 percent of tax revenue and 2.6 percent of employment. Reforms are underway in Guinea to improve the business environment and open up to high-quality foreign investment. However, myriad challenges remain, including attracting more investors and optimizing the mining sector, diversifying the economy, and boosting job creation. His Excellency also reflected on how Guinea’s reforms may offer lessons for other resource-rich nations in Africa.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI and Ethics 27 mins – “Cansu Canca is a philosopher and the founder/director of the AI Ethics Lab, where she leads teams of computer scientists, philosophers, and legal scholars to provide ethics analysis and guidance to researchers and practitioners.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio is included in this blog archive.

AI Impact 21 mins – “No human, or team of humans, could possibly keep up with the avalanche of information produced by many of today’s physics and astronomy experiments. Some of them record terabytes of data every day — and the torrent is only increasing. The Square Kilometer Array, a radio telescope slated to switch on in the mid-2020s, will generate about as much data traffic each year as the entire internet. The deluge has many scientists turning to artificial intelligence for help. With minimal human input, AI systems such as artificial neural networks — computer-simulated networks of neurons that mimic the function of brains — can plow through mountains of data, highlighting anomalies and detecting patterns that humans could never have spotted…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Algorithm Bias 24 mins – “Algorithms spread bias at gigabit speeds. What does this mean for society? And who can fix it?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio is included in this blog archive.

Algorithm Bias 34 mins – “What can a mistake in a computer program from 1843 tell us about modern-day biases in software algorithms?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Algorithm Impact on Humans 31 mins – “We talk to mathematician and science writer Hannah Fry about her latest book Hello World: Being Human in the Age of Algorithms.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anti-money Laundering 107 mins – “America’s anti-money laundering (AML) system is designed to catch criminals and deter illicit activity. Since its inception in the 1960s, AML has grown beyond organized crime and tax evasion to combat drug dealers, human trafficking, and after September 11, 2001, terrorists. Today, AML compliance is a multi-billion-dollar industry generating millions of annual reports and is used in law enforcement cases spanning a wide range of activities. New questions about AML’s goals, effectiveness, and impact on financial inclusion today have prompted proposals in Congress to modify AML in significant ways. On September 11, Brookings convened current and former policy makers and leading thought leaders to examine whether we have arrived at the right place with our AML policy, and if not, what needs to change.” At the link right-click “audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Army Modernization 62 mins – “The Army must evolve to win. The multi-domain operations concept details how the Army, as part of the joint force, integrates multi-domain capabilities to defeat adversaries. This concept reflects the role that emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence and hypersonics are increasingly playing in the changing nature of warfare. But to be able to operate under this concept and achieve a multi-domain, operations-ready force by 2028, the Army must undertake significant modernization efforts. The Army Futures Command, led by Lieutenant General Eric Wesley, has led a year-long project to define not only the future operating environment but also the force structure the U.S. will need to succeed.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Holes Collide 22 mins – “On Sept. 14, 2015, at almost the exact same time that a pair of sprawling gravitational-wave detectors heard the last gasp of a collision between two black holes, another, more perplexing observation took place. Over 500 kilometers above the surface of the Earth, the orbiting Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope logged a passing burst of gamma rays, a high-energy form of light. The signal was so slight that the NASA scientists who run the satellite didn’t notice it at first. “[The gravitational-wave detector] LIGO saw a bright event, clear in their data, and we found a little blip in our data that’s really only credible because it happened so close in time to the gravitational wave,” said Valerie Connaughton, a member of the Fermi team. On Feb. 11, the Fermi researchers posted a paper to the scientific preprint site arxiv.org describing the gamma-ray burst and speculating that it likely originated from the same black-hole merger that produced the gravitational waves observed by LIGO (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory). The correlation, which is far from certain, would upend entrenched assumptions in physics. Astrophysicists have long believed that black holes exist in a vacuum, as they tend to swallow up all nearby matter. This absence of matter means it should be impossible for two merging black holes to generate a flash of light….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Fix 34 mins – “Could we pull the solution to climate change out of thin air? An oft-forgotten but hugely important scientific technique from the early 20th century suggests the idea isn’t crazy.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crypto AG 18 mins – “For more than half a century, governments all over the world trusted a single company to keep the communications of their spies, soldiers and diplomats secret. The company, Crypto AG, got its first break with a contract to build code-making machines for U.S. troops during World War II. Flush with cash, it became a dominant maker of encryption devices for decades, navigating waves of technology from mechanical gears to electronic circuits and, finally, silicon chips and software. The Swiss firm made millions of dollars selling equipment to more than 120 countries well into the 21st century. Its clients included Iran, military juntas in Latin America, nuclear rivals India and Pakistan, and even the Vatican.” At the link you can listen, but not download; hwoever, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Dark Matter Dispute 18 mins – “For 80 years, scientists have puzzled over the way galaxies and other cosmic structures appear to gravitate toward something they cannot see. This hypothetical “dark matter” seems to outweigh all visible matter by a startling ratio of five to one, suggesting that we barely know our own universe. Thousands of physicists are doggedly searching for these invisible particles. But the dark matter hypothesis assumes scientists know how matter in the sky ought to move in the first place. This month, a series of developments has revived a long-disfavored argument that dark matter doesn’t exist after all. In this view, no missing matter is needed to explain the errant motions of the heavenly bodies; rather, on cosmic scales, gravity itself works in a different way than either Isaac Newton or Albert Einstein predicted.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Evidence Faults 29 mins – “In the early 20th century, a new forensic technique, fingerprinting, displaced a cruder form of identification based on body measurements. Hailed as modern, scientific, and infallible, fingerprinting was adopted around the world. But in recent years, doubts have been cast on its reliability, and a new technique, DNA profiling, has emerged as the forensic gold standard. In assuming it is infallible, are we making the same mistake again?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Driverless Cars 34 mins – “The first pedestrian killed by a car in the Western Hemisphere was on New York’s Upper West Side in 1899. One newspaper warned that “the automobile has tasted blood.” Today, driverless cars present their own mix of technological promise and potential danger. Can the reaction to that 1899 pedestrian tragedy help us navigate current arguments about safety, blame, commerce, and public space?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Purchases in Louisiana 131 mins – “The high cost of prescription drugs has become an increasingly pressing concern for policymakers, insurers, and families. New drugs—like those now available for hepatitis C— offer tremendous medical benefits, but at a cost that puts them out of reach for many patients. In an effort to address the affordability dilemma, the Louisiana Department of Health has recently introduced a novel “subscription” model under which Asegua Therapeutics, a subsidiary of Gilead Sciences, will supply, for a negotiated sum, enough hepatitis C drugs to cure virtually all incarcerated and Medicaid patients suffering from hepatitis C in Louisiana over the next five years.” At the link right-click “audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Future 26 mins – “I had a great discussion today with David Cohen, Founder, and Chairman of E7 Ventures. Our topic was the future of energy and his belief that we are rapidly heading towards an Energy Internet. Like most other areas of science and technology, energy is experiencing an exponential progression that likely changes the energy paradigm in the coming decade. In his book titled The Zero Marginal Cost Society, Economist Jeremy Rifkin describes how Internet technology and renewable energies are merging to create an energy Internet that changes the way power is generated and distributed in society – a paradigm shift in energy similar to what occurred in computing. He describes an emergent system with synergies between Five Pillars that drive this paradigm shift: Shifting to renewable energy; Transforming buildings into micro–power plants to collect renewable energies on-site; Deploying hydrogen and other storage technologies to store intermittent energies ; Using Internet technology to transform the power grid into an energy Internet; Transitioning the transport fleet to electric plug-in and fuel cell vehicles that can buy and sell green electricity on a smart, continental, interactive power grid” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Energy Future 54 mins – “The buzz: “Energy is the new new Internet” (Brian Lakamp techcrunch.com/2017/01/22/energy-is-the-new-new-internet). The dynamic, distributed, and multi-participant Energy Internet – aka Enernet – is positioned to transform our lives – perhaps on a larger scale than the Internet before it. It is built around clean energy generation, storage and delivery. With a long list of innovators emerging, the resulting innovation will drive massive change, including how we think about cities, municipal services, transportation, insurance, real estate, financial services and more. The experts speak. Frank Diana, TCS: “You’ve got to think about big things while you’re doing small things, so that all the small things go in the right direction” (Alvin Toffler). Gray Scott, Futurist: “It always seems impossible until it is done” (Nelson Mandela). Tom Franklin, TCS: “Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage” (Anais Nin). Join us for Exploring The Future of Energy: Welcome to the Enernet.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Explosive Networks 21 mins – “Last week, United Airlines grounded nearly 5,000 flights when its computer system crashed. The culprit: a faulty network router. Later on the same morning, another computer glitch halted trading on the New York Stock Exchange for over three hours. Some saw the sinister hand of a hacker in these outages, but they are far more likely to be a coincidence, an intrinsic feature of the system rather than a bug. Networks go down all the time, a consequence of unprecedented levels of interconnection. Disruptions can occur even in the most robust networks, whether these are power grids, global financial markets, or your favorite social network. As the former Atlantic reporter Alexis Madrigal observed when a computer error shut down the Nasdaq stock exchange in 2013, “When things work in new ways, they break in new ways.” A fresh new understanding of such systems — the way they grow, and how they break — has arisen from the physics of coffee. Researchers usually think of network connectivity as happening in a slow, continuous manner, similar to the way water moves through freshly ground coffee beans, slowly saturating all the granules to become coffee in the container below. However, over the past few years, researchers have discovered that in special cases, connectivity might emerge with a bang, not a whimper, via a phenomenon they have dubbed “explosive percolation” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. .”

Fake Content 36 mins – “What will fake content look like in five years? In 10?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio is included in this blog archive.

Financial Crisis of 2008 66 mins – “Anat Admati of Stanford’s Graduate School of Business talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the financial crisis of 2008, the lessons she has learned, and how it has changed her view of economics, finance, and her career.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gene Location Impact 15 mins – “The nucleus of a cell has something in common with a cardboard box full of kittens: People get so fascinated by the contents that they overlook the container. The nucleus itself is often treated as no more than a featureless membranous bag for holding the vitally dynamic genetic material. Yet in fact it has specialized parts and an internal architecture of its own, and scientists have long speculated that precisely how the DNA positions itself with respect to those parts might matter a great deal. Now a team of researchers is finding credible evidence that this is true and possibly an important influence on gene expression. Using a new technique based on the genome-editing tool CRISPR, they artificially pinned parts of a cell’s DNA to different regions in the nucleus and observed what happened. The work, published last month in Cell, has begun to yield intriguing insights into how various nuclear neighborhoods may relate to gene expression, as either cause or facilitator…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gerrymandering 17 mins – “Partisan gerrymandering — the practice of drawing voting districts to give one political party an unfair edge — is one of the few political issues that voters of all stripes find common cause in condemning. Voters should choose their elected officials, the thinking goes, rather than elected officials choosing their voters. The Supreme Court agrees, at least in theory: In 1986 it ruled that partisan gerrymandering, if extreme enough, is unconstitutional. Yet in that same ruling, the court declined to strike down two Indiana maps under consideration, even though both “used every trick in the book,” according to a paper in the University of Chicago Law Review. And in the decades since then, the court has failed to throw out a single map as an unconstitutional partisan gerrymander. “If you’re never going to declare a partisan gerrymander, what is it that’s unconstitutional?” said Wendy K. Tam Cho, a political scientist and statistician at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Technology 88 mins – “As Congress currently works toward a national data privacy law, how will existing and emerging innovations be impacted, including connected devices, applications, and the cloud? What will be the effects of stronger transparency and disclosure requirements on consumer-facing technologies and companies? What will privacy compliance look like for companies who offer online or cloud-based products and services? How can we protect consumer rights in the emerging world of around-the-clock digital connections? On September 16, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings hosted a public discussion on how federal legislation should account for a variety of nuanced verticals, including health care, commerce, and education. Panelists discussed how pending legislation should allow for innovation, while still ensuring greater consumer transparency. The event also examined the context and application of any new data law and its effect on various online, behavioral activities managed by consumers.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heredity Science 43 mins – “We talk to Carl Zimmer, New York Times columnist and author of 13 books about science about his latest book She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Housing Experiment 207 mins – “In 1992, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development partnered with five public housing authorities to launch Moving to Opportunity ⁠— a 10-year fair housing experiment to help low income families find housing in low-poverty areas. They hoped to test what many people already suspected: different neighborhoods affect opportunity in different ways. The results and subsequent projects have illustrated that while some neighborhoods expand opportunities, others decrease them, highlighting important policy solutions for fair housing. Rising housing costs, increasing economic inequality, and new research from a team led by Raj Chetty on work done with the Seattle and King County Housing Authorities makes Moving to Opportunity more relevant than ever. On September 19, Brookings’s Future of the Middle Class Initiative hosted an event presenting new results on Moving to Opportunity from Jens Ludwig, professor at the University of Chicago, Jeffrey Kling from the Congressional Budget Office, and Nathaniel Hendren of Opportunity Insights and Harvard University. Their presentations were followed by two panels discussing the research in the field as well as the work on the ground by practitioners.

Information and Communications Trends 57 mins – “The digital economy has a profound influence on the world’s trajectory and the societal well-being of ordinary citizens. It affects everything from resource allocation to income distribution and growth. The information and communications technology (ICT) industry stands at the center of the digital economy, serving as a reliable yardstick of its performance. The ICT industry unites labor policy, economic growth, and the current heated immigration policy discourse and poses both profound challenges and exciting opportunities for a broad cross-section of policymakers. On July 24, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted a discussion on trends in the information technology sector featuring experts in the field. Panelists spoke about the opportunities and challenges brought on by digital trends that are simultaneously fueling economic productivity and producing undesirable social outcomes, such as increasing inequality and stagnant social mobility. The panel also discussed a recently released Brookings paper on the impact of the ICT sector on growth, job creation in the U.S. economy, and systematic challenges, including privacy, trade, and immigration.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and

Information Privacy 140 mins – “Recent congressional hearings and data breaches have prompted legislators, advocacy groups, and business leaders to call for broad federal privacy legislation. Furthermore, congressional leaders in both parties have expressed an interest in taking up privacy legislation and various Members of Congress have released drafts of bills intended to spark discussion. As Congress returns to session in September, legislators will face continuing questions about how to develop federal legislation to protect personal information. On September 11, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings hosted a public discussion on the status of federal privacy legislation. This event, part of Brookings’ ongoing focus on the privacy debate, examined expected legislation through the eyes of keynote speakers and two expert panels. The first panel, which will be a live taping of the Lawfare Podcast, looked through the broad lens of competing visions of what legislation should accomplish and the impact on businesses and individuals. The second panel delved into specific issues presented by proposals for legislation, the path forward to passage, and the prospects.” At the link right-click “Audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kibbutz 44 mins – “Economist and author Ran Abramitzky of Stanford University talks about his book, The Mystery of the Kibbutz, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Abramitzky traces the evolution of the kibbutz movement in Israel and how the kibbutz structure changed to cope with the modernization and development of the Israeli economy. The conversation includes a discussion of how the history of the kibbutz might help us to understand the appeal and challenges of the socialism and freedom.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

LED Upgrade 13 mins – “…In particular, LED lights — or light-emitting diodes — depend on the phenomenon of localization. They light up when electrons in a semiconducting material, having started out in a position of higher energy, get trapped (or “localize”) in a position of lower energy and emit the difference as a photon of light. LEDs are still a work in progress: Engineers need to build LEDs that more efficiently convert electrons into light, if the devices are to become the future of artificial lighting, as many expect they will. If physicists can gain a better understanding of the mathematics of localization, engineers can build better LEDs — and with the help of Mayboroda’s mathematics, that effort is already under way.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Libyan Conflicts 63 mins – “The past year has seen no end to the turbulence plaguing Libya since the ouster of Moammar al-Gadhafi in 2011, with armed factions vying for control of the country’s strategic assets and United Nations-facilitated negotiations leading nowhere. While the self-styled Libyan National Army of General Khalifa Haftar continues, unsuccessfully, to try to take over the country militarily, the internationally-recognized government of Prime Minister Fayez Serraj in Tripoli, propped up by militias opposed to Haftar, retains control over major institutions and sources of national wealth. Weapons of increasing sophistication and lethality are flowing to the opposing sides, in violation of U.N. sanctions and pitting foreign powers against each other, with the UAE, Saudi Arabia, and Egypt (with French support) backing Haftar, and Turkey and Qatar backing Serraj. Meanwhile, facing a stagnant economy and constant threats to infrastructure, the Libyan people are caught in the crossfire of this protracted jockeying. Unchecked migration and the threat of extremist groups taking hold in the country’s contested spaces likewise make Libya’s internal situation a security concern for Europe and the United States. Solving the civil war in Libya would restore needed stability to a strategically vital part of northern Africa while laying the groundwork for the prosperity of the Libyan people.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memories That Hide 16 mins – “Susumu Tonegawa’s presence announces itself as soon as you walk through the door of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory. A three-foot-high framed photograph of Tonegawa stands front and center in the high-ceilinged lobby, flanked by a screen playing a looping rainbow-hued clip of recent research highlights. The man in the portrait, however, is anything but a spotlight-seeker. Most days, he’s ensconced in the impenetrable warren of labs and offices that make up Picower’s fifth floor. His hair, thick and dark in the photo, is now a subdued silver, and today, a loosely draped blue cardigan replaces the impeccable suit jacket. His accommodating, soft-spoken manner belies his reputation as a smasher of established dogma, or at least as a poker of deep and abiding holes. Along with his MIT neuroscientist colleague Dheeraj Roy and others, Tonegawa is upending basic assumptions in brain science. Early this year, he reported that memory storage and retrieval happen on two different brain circuits, not on the same one as was long thought. His team also showed that memories of an event form at the same time in the brain’s short-term and long-term storage areas, rather than moving to long-term storage later on. Most recently (and tantalizingly), his lab demonstrated what could someday be a way to bring currently irretrievable memories back into conscious awareness.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Militia Group Conflicts 87 mins – “On September 10, 2014, the United States announced the formation of the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS. Since then, ISIS has lost nearly all the territory it once claimed authority over, simultaneously losing most of its sources of revenue. Even as the caliphate’s power has significantly waned, the fight continues in an effort rout out the remnants of the group. Today Coalition partners are dealing with the challenges of returning foreign fighters, securing and rebuilding territory formerly held by ISIS, and addressing the humanitarian challenges in communities who experienced ISIS’s brutality. On September 10, the Brookings Institution and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace hosted an event commemorating the fifth anniversary of the founding of the Coalition, discussing the early days of the diplomatic and military efforts to bring together a diverse coalition of partner nations, how their efforts were organized, and recommendations on where the Coalition can go from here.” At the link right-click “Download the audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Natures Warning System 33 mins – “Scientists are homing in on a warning signal that arises in complex systems like ecological food webs, the brain and the Earth’s climate. Could it help prevent future catastrophes?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Network Security 29 mins – “The French telegraph system was hacked in 1834. What does the incident teach us about modern-day network security?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neural Networks 16 mins – “When we design a skyscraper we expect it will perform to specification: that the tower will support so much weight and be able to withstand an earthquake of a certain strength. But with one of the most important technologies of the modern world, we’re effectively building blind. We play with different designs, tinker with different setups, but until we take it out for a test run, we don’t really know what it can do or where it will fail. This technology is the neural network, which underpins today’s most advanced artificial intelligence systems. Increasingly, neural networks are moving into the core areas of society: They determine what we learn of the world through our social media feeds, they help doctors diagnose illnesses, and they even influence whether a person convicted of a crime will spend time in jail.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nigerian Schoolgirl Abductions 56 mins – “Five years ago, on April 14, 2014, Boko Haram terrorists entered the Nigerian town of Chibok and kidnapped 276 schoolgirls. Already stand-outs due to their pursuit of education, these girls were exemplary in their ambition and work ethic, dreaming of a brighter future for themselves and their families. Five years later, over 100 of the young women are still missing. Those who have returned are haunted by the nightmare they lived through and, too often, face discrimination and ostracism. Their story is not only one of personal resilience, but also of the failure of national and international institutions and the media to respond in an appropriate and timely way. On July 31, journalist Isha Sesay joined the Brookings Africa Growth Initiative for a discussion on her recent book, “Beneath the Tamarind Tree: A Story of Courage, Family, and the Lost Schoolgirls of Boko Haram,” which shares the personal stories of some of the Chibok girls, emphasizes the global necessity of girls’ education, scrutinizes the role of the media during such tragedies, investigates the governance challenges that persist in Nigeria, and imparts broader lessons for national security.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Podcasting Evolution 39 mins – “What can new forms of media (like podcasting!) learn from the evolution of radio in the early 20th century? ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Privacy Laws 139 mins – “Recent congressional hearings and data breaches have prompted legislators, advocacy groups, and business leaders to call for broad federal privacy legislation. Furthermore, congressional leaders in both parties have expressed an interest in taking up privacy legislation and various Members of Congress have released drafts of bills intended to spark discussion. As Congress returns to session in September, legislators will face continuing questions about how to develop federal legislation to protect personal information. On September 11, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings hosted a public discussion on the status of federal privacy legislation. This event, part of Brookings’ ongoing focus on the privacy debate, examined expected legislation through the eyes of keynote speakers and two expert panels. The first panel, which will be a live taping of the Lawfare Podcast, looked through the broad lens of competing visions of what legislation should accomplish and the impact on businesses and individuals. The second panel delved into specific issues presented by proposals for legislation, the path forward to passage, and the prospects.” At the link right-click “audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robots and AI P1 15 mins – “Robots are already changing jobs as an endless array of robots enter our everyday lives. From trucking to service work to high-end jobs like doctors and lawyers, this documentary explores how robotics and artificial intelligence are changing the workplace.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio is included in this blog archive.

Robots and AI Transform America P2 15 mins – “Automation is already reshaping cities, just as the manufacturing collapse hollowed out America’s heartland. This is a tale of two cities, comparing the Rust Belt to Las Vegas, the city that is expected to be hit the hardest by job displacement due to robotics, artificial intelligence, 3D printing and other technologies in this fourth industrial revolution. AJ+’s [Al Jazeera] documentary series on automation explores how advancements in artificial intelligence, robotics, machine learning and automated vehicles will affect jobs, cities and inequality. From trucking to radiology, new technology is already changing white collar and blue collar occupations, reshaping cities and concentrating wealth in the hands of the few. Robots are taking over the world as companies like Tesla, Amazon, Uber and Google are using robots to automate.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio is included in this blog archive.

Science and Math Trends 66 mins – “Why doesn’t our universe make sense? What is time? What is life? On Friday, more than 200 readers joined writers and editors from Quanta Magazine at the Simons Foundation for a wide-ranging panel discussion that examined the newest ideas in fundamental physics, biology and mathematics research, including the questions of whether our universe is “natural,” the nature of time, the origin and evolution of life, whether mathematics is invented or discovered and what role it plays in science and society. These are just some of the topics presented in Quanta’s two new books published by The MIT Press: Alice and Bob Meet the Wall of Fire and The Prime Number Conspiracy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shared Prosperity 66 mins – “Economist and author Daron Acemoglu of MIT discusses with EconTalk host Russ Roberts the challenge of shared prosperity and the policies that could bring about a more inclusive economy. Acemoglu argues for the importance of good jobs over redistribution and makes the case for the policies that could lead to jobs and opportunities across skill levels.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spiderwebs 13 mins – “Millions of years ago, a few spiders abandoned the kind of round webs that the word “spiderweb” calls to mind and started to focus on a new strategy. Before, they would wait for prey to become ensnared in their webs and then walk out to retrieve it. Then they began building horizontal nets to use as a fishing platform. Now their modern descendants, the cobweb spiders, dangle sticky threads below, wait until insects walk by and get snagged, and reel their unlucky victims in. In 2008, the researcher Hilton Japyassú prompted 12 species of orb spiders collected from all over Brazil to go through this transition again. He waited until the spiders wove an ordinary web. Then he snipped its threads so that the silk drooped to where crickets wandered below. When a cricket got hooked, not all the orb spiders could fully pull it up, as a cobweb spider does. But some could, and all at least began to reel it in with their two front legs.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transportation Trends 60 mins – “New advances in transportation are affecting the manner in which people move, services are rendered, and packages are delivered. Developments from autonomous vehicles and remote sensors to unmanned aerial systems are altering transportation and service delivery around the world. Autonomous systems are being deployed in law enforcement, agriculture, fire-fighting, and disaster relief, among other areas. Because of the growing deployment of these systems, there are important issues of privacy, security, regulation, and human safety that need to be resolved.” At the link right-click “Download the audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US – China Relations 126 mins – “Throughout the United States, local leaders are stepping onto the world stage. Governors and mayors have expanded their international portfolios, including by launching initiatives to attract investment and jointly address transnational challenges like climate change. While economic interests previously guided much of sub-national outreach, cultural exchange and scientific partnership are also becoming important forces of attraction. The U.S.-China relationship is no exception to this trend. Despite the shift in Washington toward viewing China as a strategic competitor, many state and local leaders continue to explore ways to seize opportunities for closer collaboration with Chinese counterparts. What are the key motivations for this outreach at the sub-national level? Are such efforts generating positive benefits? What effect, if any, are deepening relations between local governments in the United States and China having on the overall bilateral relationship? Are there risks from deepening sub-national U.S.-China relations that deserve greater scrutiny? On July 29, the John L. Thornton China Center at Brookings hosted a public event to explore the costs, benefits, and impacts of sub-national exchanges between the United States and China. Oregon Governor Kate Brown and Former Missouri Governor Bob Holden joined a keynote conversation moderated by award-winning journalist and author James Fallows. A high-level panel of experts and practitioners then convened to discuss the potential promises and pitfalls of sub-national connections within the U.S.-China relationship.”At the link right-click “Audio Only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US – Asia Relations 90 mins – “Under the “America First” banner, President Trump has promised a reset of U.S. trade policy, focusing heavily on negotiating a string of bilateral trade agreements. For trade-dependent economies in Asia with close ties to the United States, like Japan and Taiwan, this moment of disruption in international trade presents both risks and opportunities. The U.S.-China trade war and the increasing bifurcation of high-tech platforms present major challenges for the Japanese and Taiwanese economies, both at the center of global supply chains and with advanced technological capabilities. On the other hand, a bilateral trade agreement with the United States offers a chance to leave behind market access irritants and deepen bilateral ties. Japan and Taiwan, however, are not starting at the same place. Japan has concluded two mega trade agreements and has just come to a preliminary agreement on a trade deal with the U.S., while Taiwan is interested in launching negotiations to ameliorate its economic and diplomatic isolation. What challenges must be overcome to forge a trade agreement? Can the U.S. articulate an effective bilateral trade strategy in Asia? On Tuesday, September 17, the Center for East Asia Policy Studies at Brookings, the U.S.-Japan Research Institute, and the Global Taiwan Institute co-hosted a panel of experts to discuss these issues. Panelists also examined how Japan and Taiwan have weathered the tariff trade war and how they can prepare themselves for a protracted U.S.-China economic conflict.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Viral Swarms 28 mins – “Sometime in late 2013, a mosquito-borne virus called chikungunya appeared for the first time in the Western Hemisphere. Chikungunya, or “chik,” as it’s called, rarely kills its human hosts. But it can cause fever, rash and debilitating joint pain. In the two years since it first arrived in the Caribbean, chik has spread wildly across the Americas. It is now suspected of having infected over 1 million people in 44 countries and territories, creating a hemisphere-wide horde of mosquito-borne suffering. The same biological quirks that have contributed to chik’s success are showing researchers how to fight it — and other viruses like it. Chik is an RNA virus, just like influenza, West Nile virus, hepatitis and Ebola, among others. Unlike DNA viruses, which contain two copies of their genetic information, RNA viruses are single-stranded. When they replicate, any errors in the single strand get passed on. As a result, copying is sloppy, and so each new generation of RNA viruses tends to have lots of errors. In only a few generations, a single virus can become a mutant swarm of closely related viruses….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

VR to Preserve Evidence 30 mins – “In the Victorian era, plaster casts became a way to preserve important artifacts in 3D. Now, virtual reality promises to preserve places and experiences. But who decides what gets preserved? And is the technology an accurate re-creation of the experience, or does it fool us into thinking we’ve encountered the real thing when we’ve done nothing of the sort? Guests include Jaron Lanier, VR pioneer; Nonny de la Peña, VR artist; and Tristram Hunt, director of the Victoria and Albert Museum.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wind-powered Ships 30 mins – “For thousands of years, we sailed our cargo across oceans using zero-emission, 100 percent renewable wind. Then we switched to ships that run on oil, creating a global maritime fleet that pumps greenhouse gases into the sky. Could we go back to wind-powered ships by rediscovering a clever nautical innovation that we abandoned a century ago?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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