Media Mining Digest 246 – Jul 29, 2016: Addiction Story, Aged Care, Algorithms to Live By, Antibiotic Quantum Dots, Arm Fractures, Autism History, Bacterial Resistance, Barcelona Tourism Problem, Battle of Reading, Battle of the Somme, Benghazi Report, Big Breakthroughs, Blind Help Rules, Blind People on Stage, Body on the Moor, Border Patrol Crimes, Brexit, Cancer, Chef Thing, Childhood Neurology, China in Africa, Chinese Economic Bubble, CIA Trends, Clothing Crutches, Coastal Flooding, College Trends, Conservation Movement, Constipation, Coyotes, Creativity, Cult Leader, Deep Canvassing, Depression Treatment, Desert Storm Legacy, Disability Discrimination, Disabled Devices, Disaster Equipment, Disaster Medicine, Donald Trump, Drug Abuse Issues, Educational Issues, Electric Grids, Energy Poverty, Eyes-On-Cops, Fact Checking, Fitness History, Food Waste Control, Four Seasons Restaurant, Future Possibilities, Gender Medicine, Haptic Conference, Health Workers Communication, Indian Publishing, Internet History, Internet Sale Locations, Jules Feiffer, Manufacturing Globally, Marijuana Impact, Mark Twain, Math Rant, Medical Team Performance, Middle Class Finances, Minimum Wage, Mississippi Pioneer Woman, Mississippi Scale Model, Mobile Phone Videos, MOOC on Cancer, Narcissism Effect, National Parks, Nitrogen Conservation, Noncomplementary Behaviors, PACE Trial Controversy, Panama Papers, Performance Enhancing Drugs, Personal Learning Network, Photonic Chips, Picric Acid, Police Incidents, Police PR, Police Torture in Chicago, Police Viewpoint, Policing in America, Population Growth, Price Fixing, Psychosis, Racism Panel, Renewable Energy, Robert Scoble, School of Life, Shark Conservation, Student Debt, Syrian Refugees, Test Pilot, Textbook Publishing, Tin Ears, Universal Basic Income, Veterans Affairs Modernization, Vulcanology, Welfare Programs

The best 106 podcasts from a larger group of 302 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 1o,000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least welve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded.

Addiction Story  18 mins – “Scoring a fix is cheap and today’s heroin is strong. But that’s just part of the reason why America got hooked. Today on the show, we trace the roots of America’s heroin epidemic with a dealer, a user, and a DEA agent.” At the link find the title, “#711: Hooked on Heroin, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160713_pmoney_podcast071316.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aged Care  57 mins – “The National Press Club hosts an Aged Care Forum on the topic ‘The Aged Care Conundrum: Meeting The Care Needs of an Ageing Population Without Blowing the Budget’. Featuring Paul Sadler, Lee Thomas and Ian Yates.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Aged Care Forum, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_AgedCare_1307_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Algorithms to Live By  65 mins – “Brian Christian, Author, The Most Human Human; Co-author, Algorithms to Live By: The Computer Science of Human Decisions Tom Griffiths, Professor of Psychology and Cognitive Science, UC Berkeley; Co-author, Algorithms to Live By: The Computer Science of Human Decisions All our lives are constrained by limited space and time, limits that give rise to a particular set of problems. What should we do, or leave undone, in a day or a lifetime? How much messiness should we accept? What balance of new activities and familiar favorites is the most fulfilling? These might seem like uniquely human quandaries, but they are not. Computers, too, face the same constraints, so computer scientists have been grappling with their version of such issues for decades. The solutions they’ve found have much to teach us. In this interdisciplinary work, author Brian Christian and cognitive scientist Tom Griffiths show how the algorithms used by computers can also untangle very human questions. They explain how to have better hunches and when to leave things to chance, how to deal with overwhelming choices and how best to connect with others. From finding a spouse to finding a parking spot, from organizing one’s inbox to understanding the workings of memory, Algorithms to Live By transforms the wisdom of computer science into strategies for human living.” At the link right-click Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Quantum Dots  26 mins – (starts 1:00) This programmable antibiotic might keep pace with quickly evolving superbugs. Unlike most drugs – it’s not derived from biological sources. It’s a tiny version of the semiconductors in everything from TVs to iphones to solar panels. This “antibiotic” is made of nanoparticles, known as quantum dots. CU Biofrontiers scientists Prashant Nagpal and Anushree Chatterjee explain their new invention. Shrinking Ozone Hole – (starts 15:24) The ozone hole is finally growing smaller – we’ll find out why and how long it will take to completely “heal” the ozone hole from Birgit Hassler, a researcher with the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), a partnership between the University of Colorado Boulder and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arm Fractures  87 mins – “Take a look at some of most common bone and joint injuries. Dr. Utku Kandemir explores the shoulder and elbow and Dr. Nicole Schroeder looks at the wrist. Recorded on 05/24/2016. (#30989)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism History  49 mins – “A big fresh take on autism that begins with Patient Zero.” At the link find the title, “Autism: A History, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_486149845.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bacterial Resistance  27 mins – “Claudia Hammond focusses on the attempts to discover new antibiotics, and alternative therapies for combating bacterial infection. Most of the antibiotics we use were discovered in the mid-20th century, but as the threat of drug resistant infections increases, the race is on to find new organisms that make novel medicines. We have only identified a tiny fraction of the microbes living on Earth and are “bioprospecting” for useful ones in wildly different locations. Antibiotics are not the only weapon in the war against bacteria. A hundred years ago, a class of virus that infect and destroy bacteria were discovered. They’re called bacteriophages. Phage therapies were used throughout the era of Soviet Russia, and still are in some countries, including Georgia. Phage researcher Prof Martha Clokie told us whether phage therapy might be coming to the UK. With expert comment from James Gallagher, BBC News health reporter. “ At the link find the title, “Fighting Antimicrobrial Resistance, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0422f38.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Barcelona Tourism Problem 27 mins – “Barcelona is one of the most visited cities in Europe, but has it become a victim of its own tourism success? Millions of tourists visit every year, crowding the narrow streets and public spaces, bringing noise and anti-social behaviour to once peaceful residential neighbourhoods. Local businesses have given way to tourist tat and multinational chains, and some residents are being driven out as apartments are rented to tourists. Tourism is a huge economic boost for Barcelona, but as well as those who are benefiting, Pascale Harter meets locals who are taking to the streets in noisy protests about the impact on their neighbourhood. Are they right to blame home-sharing websites like Airbnb? And all eyes are on Barcelona’s mayor Ada Colau, a former activist and one of the key representatives of the so-called “new politics” in Spain. Can she resolve a tension being felt by cities around the world – between the economic opportunities of tourism and keeping the soul and character of the city that its residents cherish.” At the link find the title, “The Battle for Barcelona, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p041cf12.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battle of Reading  20 mins – “When we left off, the Danes had occupied Reading, fortified it for several days, and then sent a detachment West along the river Kennet… In response, Ealdorman AEthelwulf of Berkshire had raised the local Fyrd, killed one of the Danish lords, and for the first time in a very long time, at Englefield, the West Saxons defeated the Danes in the field of battle.” At the link right-click “Download” from the pop-up menu.

Battle of the Somme  32 mins – “This week, a special issue on conflict. The psychological toll of war, how to count the dead, and predicting conflict in the 21st century.” At the link find the title, “Nature Podcast: 14 July 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Benghazi Report  58 mins – “Republican members of the House Select Committee on Benghazi release their report on the September 2012 attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, in which four Americans died, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens.” At the link find the title, “House Benghazi Committee Republicans Release Report on 2012 Attack, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.447191.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Breakthroughs  11 mins – “Throughout history, speculation has spurred beautiful, revolutionary science — opening our eyes to entirely new universes. “I’m not talking about science that takes baby steps,” says Eric Haseltine. “I’m talking about science that takes enormous leaps.” In this talk, Haseltine passionately takes us to the edges of intellectual pursuit with two ideas — one that’s already made history, and the other that’s digging into one of humanity’s biggest questions with admirable ambition (and a healthy dose of skepticism from many).” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Help Rules  19 mins – “In response to a recent programme discussion on how blind people should accept and then dispense with help, sighted listeners contacted In Touch asking for information on the best techniques and tips when giving help. Should you open doors or count steps? And how should you guide? Amie Slavin, blind since the age of 23, and Julie Smethurst give their views on the best ways sighted people can offer help, and some practical do’s and don’ts.” At the linkr ight-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind People on Stage  20 mins – “Notes on Blindness, a new film based on the true story of an academic losing his sight has just come out in the UK. So In Touch uses the film’s release to discuss the portrayal of blind people in film, TV and on the stage. Peter White is joined by Emily Davison, Kevin Mulhern and Red Szell, and they swap good and bad examples, and talk about problems and solutions.” At the link right-click Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Body on the Moor  27 min – “On 12 December 2015, a man’s body was found by a moorland track on Saddleworth Moor in northern England. He had nothing on him showing his identity. No-one knew who he was. And he had died from a rare kind of poisoning. Who was this man? Where did he come from? Why has nobody reported him missing? Their biggest lead was brought to the mortuary within the body itself. It was inside his left leg. And it’s a clue which took the inquiry to Pakistan. Police believe he took his own life but did he travel nearly 4000 miles to die in this particular place?” At the link find the title “The Body on the Moor, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0417qqd.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Border Patrol Crimes  54 mins – “The scenes of violence caught on video recently have been a painful reminder of the strained relations between the public and the police in our country. This friction is not new. What is new is the technology: cameras and smart phones that record and transmit the violence live or within minutes. In Minnesota, the person who captured the aftermath of an officer-involved shooting was in the car with the victim. In Baton Rouge, the videos were made by bystanders. And in Dallas, the first images we saw of the sniper shootings came from people on the ground, in the crowd. But there’s also an organized movement of people who consider it their jobs to police the police and they, too, are recording. Some people call them “cop watchers.” In light of recent events we’re revisiting a story we brought to you last year. It’s a look at the cop watching movement in Texas – including in a suburb of Dallas where tensions over the practice already were on the rise.” At the link find the title, “Update: Eyes on Cops, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files Eyes-on-cops.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit 19 mins – “Brexit is like a breakup. So today, a divorce story in two acts. We hear from both sides: The people who voted to leave, and the Europeans being left.” At the link find the title, “#711: Hooked on Heroin, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160708_pmoney_podcast070816.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit  45 mins – “On this episode of Slate Money, hosts Felix Salmon of Fusion, Cathy O’Neil of mathbabe.org, and Slate’s Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann. Topics discussed on today’s show include: -UK Property funds are in trouble post-Brexit -What it means for interest rates to be negative. -Italian banks are in crisis.” At the link find the title, “The Fallout Edition, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM7860674935.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Explained  67 mins – “The United Kingdom’s vote to exit the European Union has given new momentum to euroskeptic, nationalist, and anti-immigration movements elsewhere in Europe. While many of the policy impacts of the referendum will not be known for a while yet, the vote has pointed, in stunning fashion, to the rising public anxiety over immigration levels and concerns over governments’ ability to manage flows and foster successful immigrant integration. On this webinar, MPI Europe President Demetrios Papademetriou, who is also President emeritus of MPI, and experts associated with MPI’s Transatlantic Council on Migration discuss the political and policy lessons that can be learned from Brexit and applied to debatesin both Europe and North America, including how to address concerns over immigration, identity, and immigrant integration while managing migration in a globalized economy. The discussion will also touched on a Transatlantic Council report, Understanding and Addressing Public Anxiety About Immigration.” At the link right-click “Download(loading)and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Case  22 mins – “One of our first guests on the show last fall was the young poet Max Ritvo. Ritvo, 25, has spent years living with Ewing’s Sarcoma, an incurable cancer. Meanwhile he’s gotten married, taught at Columbia University, and performed in an improv comedy group. His first book of poetry, Four Reincarnations, comes out this fall. One work from that book, “Poem to My Litter,” was just published in the New Yorker. But Ritvo is more than his accomplishments. He’s someone who reminded us that there are many different ways to look at death, and dying, and some of them make you actually laugh at loud. He came back to visit us a few weeks ago on what he called his “farewell tour.” Even in his final days, Max says he keeps his sense of humor alive. “When you laugh at something horrible, you’re just illuminating a different side of it that was already there. If you make something sad funny you’re much more likely to remember it. It’s a mnemonic device that makes our suffering rhyme with joy.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Case  59 mins – “Mary Elizabeth Williams, Journalist; Author, A Series of Catastrophes and Miracles: A True Story of Love, Science, and Cancer In conversation with Peggy Orenstein, Author This program is part of our Good Lit series, underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation. Journalist Mary Elizabeth Williams was one of the first people in the world to get a new form of treatment for her stage 4 cancer diagnosis that’s revolutionizing cancer care: immunotherapy. In October of 2015, her treatment protocol became the first immunotherapy combination approved by the FDA; it’s the same treatment that former President Jimmy Carter underwent. In her witty, wry, and deeply moving new memoir, A Series of Catastrophes and Miracles: A True Story of Love, Science, and Cancer, Williams shares her personal journey with malignant melanoma in her early forties and how—thanks to cutting-edge science—she was restored back to health with no signs of disease.” At the link right-click Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Treatment  29 mins – “Advances in genomic medicine indicate that pediatric cancers may be quite different from their adult counterparts. Hear from experts on why this might be and what scientists are doing to understand it better.” At the link find the title, “Understanding the Biological Basis of Pediatric Cancer, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 160721_cancer.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Treatment  56 mins – “The second in our two-part series on Cancer in the Granite State. President Obama announced “a cancer moonshot” in his State of the Union address earlier this year, with increased funding for research and treatment in the hopes of accelerating the search for a cure. We look at advances in cancer treatment recently, including promising methods such as immunotherapy. We also examine the latest research and developments in the search for a cure. Plus, we delve into the financial and emotional stresses of dealing with the disease.” (4 guests) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chef Thing  166 mins– “Chris Young is an obsessive tinkerer, inventor, and innovator. His areas of expertise range from extreme aviation (world-record goals) to mathematics and apocalyptic-scale BBQs. Above all, he is one of the clearest thinkers I know. In this interview, we discuss a great many things, including his wild story and lessons learned from rainmakers like Bill Gates, Gabe Newell, Neal Stephenson, and many more. More topics we tackle: How he managed to get jobs working for the best in the world…despite having no credentials. Advice — and incredible questions — from self-made billionaires. Why raw foodism isn’t always what it’s cracked up to be. How geniuses show disappointment and ensure you correct yourself. The “emoji egg” breakfast. And much more…If you only have 5 minutes, I highly recommend listening to Chris’s secret to working with hard-to-reach people….” At the link find the title, “#173: Lessons from Geniuses, Billionaires, and Tinkerers,” right-click “Media filesChris_Young.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood Neurology  28 mins – “Self-taught Professor of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Faraneh Vargha-Khadem has spent decades studying children with developmental amnesia. Her mission: to understand how we form memories of the events in our past, from things we’ve experienced to places we’ve visited and people we’ve met. She talks to Jim about the memories we lay down during our lives and the autobiographies stored in our brains that define us as individuals. Faraneh was also part of the team that identified the FoxP2 gene, the so called ‘speech gene’, that may explain why humans talk and chimps don’t. Plus Faraneh discusses how her Baha’i faith informs her scientific thinking.” /at the link find the title, “Faraneh Vargha-Khadem, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03zw168.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China in Africa  88 mins – “Throughout the 2000s, Chinese demand for primary goods like oil, iron, copper, and zinc helped Africa reduce poverty more than it had in decades. Even so, China’s total investment in the continent’s natural resources has been smaller than many imagine, and, with growth shifting away from manufacturing and toward consumption, China’s appetite for raw materials will continue to diminish. China’s shifting economic growth model aligns with sub-Saharan Africa’s imminent labor force boom, presenting a significant opportunity for both sides. Maximizing mutual gain will depend on China and Africa cooperating to address a host of challenges: Can African countries limit the flow of Chinese migrants and foster domestic industries? Will Chinese investors adopt global norms of social and environmental responsibility? Where does the West fit in? On July 13, 2016, the John L. Thornton China Center and the Africa Growth Initiative (AGI) at Brookings launched Senior Fellow David Dollar’s new report, “China’s Engagement in Africa: From Natural Resources to Human Resources.” Dollar presented key findings from the study, and AGI Director Amadou Sy moderated a discussion with Dollar, Ambassador Oliver Wonekha of Uganda, and Wenjie Chen of the International Monetary Fund on the larger issues of China’s trade and investment in Africa, how it has benefited the continent, what could make it more effective, and lessons for the next phase of engagement.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Economic Bubble  75 mins – “China’s economy has achieved astonishing growth over the past three decades, but it may be undergoing its most serious test of the reform era. In his newly published book, “China’s Guaranteed Bubble,” Ning Zhu argues that implicit Chinese government guarantees, which have helped drive economic investment and expansion, are also largely responsible for the challenges the country now faces. As growth slows, corporate earnings decline, and lending tightens for small and medium-sized businesses, the leverage ratios of China’s government and its corporations and households all have increased in recent years. How desperate is China’s debt situation, and what can be done to avert a major crisis? On July 11, the John L. Thornton China Center at Brookings hosted Ning Zhu, deputy dean and professor of finance at the Shanghai Advanced Institute of Finance, Shanghai Jiaotong University. Zhu presented key findings from his research into Chinese sovereign, corporate, and household debt, and also introduced potential remedies to return China to the path of long-term sustainable growth. Following the presentation, Senior Fellow David Dollar moderated a discussion with Zhu before taking questions from the audience.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA Trends  63 mins – “Whether in Asia, the Middle East, Europe, or Latin America, the United States faces security threats on a number of fronts and by an array of actors, including extremist networks, rogue states, and emerging powers. The Central Intelligence Agency is charged with understanding these ongoing security challenges to the United States while also identifying emerging issues that will affect the nation’s security in the future. CIA has to evolve and innovate in order to effectively address today’s pressing problems without losing sight of those over-the-horizon issues. On July 13, the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence hosted the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency John O. Brennan for an address on the emerging threats facing the United States and the CIA’s strategy for meeting those challenges. Brookings Senior Fellow and Co-Director of the Center on 21st Century Security and Intelligence Gen. John Allen (USMC, Ret.) introduced Director Brennan, and Senior Fellow and Director of The Intelligence Project Bruce Riedel moderated a discussion following the director’s remarks.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clothing Crutches 61 mins – “Do clothes have the power to transform us? Lulu and Hanna bring us seven stories that explore how clothes can change us in quiet but surprising ways. We have help from Yowei Shaw, Chenjerai Kumanyika and Colin Dwyer. At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coastal Flooding  57 mins – “Crumbling flood control infrastructure, rising sea levels and lack of natural barriers leave the Bay Area open to devastating flood events. Many critical elements of the Bay Area’s infrastructure, including airports, hospitals, water treatment plants, and the headquarters of major employers are built at or below sea level. That means a severe storm or major flood could knock out huge parts of the regional economy, causing long-term damage to the Bay Area’s economic health. Failure to act presents potentially devastating consequences to the businesses and individuals that call the Bay Area home, as well as to California’s economy. Today we’ll talk about solutions to these problems with Jeremy Lowe, a coastal geomorphologist with 30 years of experience in tidal wetland restoration and sea-level-rise adaptation planning, and John Bourgeois, Executive Project Manager, CA Coastal Conservancy. Both gentlemen are feature in a new mini-documentary, The Water At Bay.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Trends  56 mins – “Nationwide, many smaller institutions are struggling to survive due to dwindling enrollment, rural locations, and doubt about the inherent value of a liberal education. We talk with two New Hampshire college presidents to find out how they’re facing these new economic realities and an uncertain future.” (3 guests) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conservation Movement  28 mins – “Despite decades of conservation work, in zoos and in the field, the rate at which species are going extinct is speeding up. Georgina Mace has devoted her Life Scientific to trying to limit the damage to our planet’s bio-diversity from this alarming loss. For ten years she worked on the Red List of Threatened Species, developing a robust set of scientific criteria for assessing the threat of extinction facing every species on the planet. When the list was first published, she expected resistance from big business; but not the vicious negative reaction she received from many wildlife NGOS. Her careful quantitative analysis revealed that charismatic animals, like the panda and the polar bear, are not necessarily the most at risk.” At the link find the title, “Georgina Mace, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p040hcxr.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constipation  17 mins – “In this episode, we discuss self-care of constipation including bulk-forming laxatives, hyperosmotic laxatives, emollient laxatives, lubricant laxatives, saline laxatives, and stimulant laxatives.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 046-OTC_constipation.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coyotes  55 mins – “One of nature’s success stories, coyotes have expanded from the Great Plains to most of North America, even living happily in urban parks. IDEAS producer Dave Redel reflects on the science and mythology of the wily coyote.” At the link find the title, “Coyotl’s Song,Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160713_82373.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity  22 mins – “…how (or if) humans can discover our greatest creative potential. Someone might be a brilliant novelist if they could find the time to write. In the right societal context and presented with good opportunities, a given person might change the course of modern dance, or unlock mysteries of particle physics, or become a great general. Today, there are thousands of self-help books, websites, counselors and consultants all promising to help people find their creative essence. These resources claim to offer insights about successful, effective and creative people and about how we can apply them in our own lives. Still, back in the middle of the 20th Century this idea that someone could even study or learn about something as elusive as creativity was as far-fetched as the pearly gates tale. At the time, creativity was seen as nebulous and unconscious, perhaps not accessible at all to scientific inquiry. Then, in the early 1950s, the Institute of Personality Assessment and Research (IPAR) at the University of California, Berkeley began developing new and different ways to analyze personalities. The scientists at IPAR attempted what many thought was impossible: to study creativity in a methodical and scientific way, working to determine what specific personality traits make certain people creative. IPAR invited creative people of all kinds to come to Berkeley and be studied, from authors of fantasy novels to research scientists and female mathematicians. They attracted literary stars including Truman Capote and William Carlos Williams. One of their biggest and most successful studies, however, involved an array of famous architects….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cult Leader  55 mins – “The story about Edward Wilson, better known as the infamous religious cult leader Brother XII, a wayward 1920s Theosophist at the centre of one of the most bizarre interludes in Canadian history.” At the link find the title,”The Dream of Brother XII, Tue, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160712_15632.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep Canvasing  63 mins – “Oddly enough, we don’t actually know very much about how to change people’s minds, not scientifically, that’s why the work of the a group of LGBT activists in Los Angeles is offering something valuable to psychology and political science – uncharted scientific territory. The Leadership Lab has been developing a technique for the last eight years that can change a person’s mind about a contentious social issue after a 20-minute conversation. This episode is about that group’s redemption after their reputation was threatened by a researcher who, in studying their persuasion technique, committed scientific fraud and forced the retraction of his paper. That research and the retraction got a lot of media attention in 2015, but the story didn’t end there. In the show, you will meet the scientists who uncovered that researcher’s fraud and then decided to go ahead and start over, do the research themselves, and see if the technique actually worked.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 080-Deep Canvassing.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Depression Treatment  55 mins – “What’s it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit’s end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there’s stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.” At the link find the title, “Wit’s End, Part 2, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160627_88772.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Desert Storm Legacy  119 mins – “By most metrics, the 1991 Gulf War, also known as Operation Desert Storm, was a huge and rapid success for the United States and its allies. The mission of defeating Iraq’s army, which invaded Kuwait the year prior, was done swiftly and decisively. However, the war’s impact on soldiers who fought in it was lasting. Over 650,000 American men and women served in the conflict, and many came home with symptoms including insomnia, respiratory disorders, memory issues and others attributed to a variety of exposures – “Gulf War Illness.” On June 16, the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence at Brookings and Georgetown University Medical Center co-hosted a discussion on Desert Storm, its veterans, and how they are faring today. Representative Mike Coffman (R-Col.), the only member of Congress to serve in both Gulf wars, delivered an opening address before joining Michael O’Hanlon, senior fellow at Brookings, for a moderated discussion. Joel Kupersmith, former head of the Office of Research and Development of the Department of Veterans Affairs, convened a follow-on panel with Carolyn Clancy, deputy under secretary for health for organizational excellence at the Department of Veterans Affairs; Adrian Atizado, deputy national legislative director at Disabled American Veterans; and James Baraniuk, professor of medicine at Georgetown University Medical Center.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disability Discrimination  58 mins – “Age and and Disability Discrimination Commissioner Susan Ryan addresses the National Press Club in Canberra.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Susan Ryan, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_SusanRyan_0607_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Devices  44 mins – “The manufacturers of Whill Model M, a new high-tech, compact wheelchair, boast that its tight turning radius and ability to handle any terrain will allow users to go anywhere you want. The only thing limiting accessibility? The price tag. Today we’re looking at the widening gap between innovation and affordability in the mobility device market. Then, it’s a lifesaving medication for millions of people – so why are so many trying to find alternatives to the effective, easy to use EpiPen?” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Equipment  45 mins – “This is part one of a special double episode on wilderness EMS is full of great tips and discussion on what austere wilderness medicine has to teach every responder… Host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and his co-host Sam Bradley are joined by a group of wilderness EMS experts to talk about this topic.This week on the show we have a group of excellent panelists on the subject of wilderness EMS as it relates to what the Urban medic can take from it. We have Kevin Reiter from WildSafety.com, Dr. Seth Hawkins from Hawk Ventures which supports a wide range of Wilderness EMS programs, including the flagship Carolina Wilderness EMS Externship program. also joining us is Dr. Ben Abo, DO, MPH an ER Doc and Wilderness EMS specialist, and paramedic David Fifer, NRP who is a wilderness search and rescue specialist with RedSTAR Wilderness Response Team, which lives online at redstarmedical.org. . We also have the regular Disaster podcast guest USAR doc, Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group.” At the link right-click “Download” ndselect”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Medicine 32 mins – “In this episode of the Disaster Podcast hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and Sam Bradley are joined by Dr. Andi Tenner, MD, MPH, FACEP, from UCSF Medical Center’s ER. She is on the faculty as well at UCSF Medical School and is an experienced emergency room physician and world medical responder. Andi comes on the show to talk with us about ER preparedness and how the docs and nurses in Orlando dealt with the tragic nightclub shooting patients brought to Orlando Regional Medical Center (ORMC). Any hospital ER could have been struck by this patient overload situation if the incident happened close to their doors. Find out Andi’s thoughts on how every ER and facility needs to prepare now for these types of disaster situations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Donald Trump  51 mins – “In 1996, New Yorker staff writer Mark Singer was assigned a profile of Manhattan businessman Donald Trump, and it wasn’t long before Singer realized this was no ordinary subject. The piece has been called one of the best pre-campaign portraits of Trump there is, but Trump wasn’t impressed. He wrote Singer a note to call him A TOTAL LOSER whose WRITING SUCKS! Well, Singer’s at it again with a book that revisits his deeply reported, psychological portrait, and he joins us Tuesday to talk about it. Mark Singer has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1974. His books include Funny Money and Somewhere in America. His latest is called Trump and Me At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Abuse Issues  41 mins – “Today we travel to a future where all drugs are legal. In this episode we discuss the history of drug laws, why some drugs are legal and others aren’t, and what would happen if we just let everybody lose to do whatever they want.” At the link find the title, The Altered State, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Issues  58 mins – “The American Enterprise Institute’s Gerard Robinson, who formerly served as Florida education commissioner and Virginia education secretary, discusses his career and education policy in the U.S.” At the eink find the title, “Q&A with Gerard Robinson, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.444499.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Grids  20 mins – “How does power get to the people who use it? In this episode we talk about one of the greatest engineering accomplishments of the 20th century — something we use every day, but often take for granted: the electric grid. We talk to an expert about how power travels to our electric sockets, and hear about how one city — hit with major power outages during Superstorm Sandy in 2012 — is preparing for the next storm with something called a microgrid. You can find lots more information, graphics and videos on our blog for this episode. How does power get to the people who use it? In this episode we talk about one of the greatest engineering accomplishments of the 20th century — something we use every day, but often take for granted: the electric grid. We talk to an expert about how power travels to our electric sockets, and hear about how one city — hit with major power outages during Superstorm Sandy in 2012 — is preparing for the next storm with something called a microgrid.” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Poverty  87 mins – “Energy is necessary for essential services ranging from heating and cooking to transportation, education, and healthcare. Today, an estimated 1.2 billion people around the world lack any access to electricity, and another 2.7 billion rely on the traditional use of biomass for cooking. Pollution from traditional sources such as biomass not only contributes to global warming but also causes respiratory diseases that kill over 3.5 million people each year, more than double the annual deaths attributed to malaria. Addressing global poverty requires taking steps to address energy poverty, but the best model for doing so is widely debated. Is centralized distribution the best way forward, or should energy projects focus on distributed generation? Can large-scale deployment of wind turbines and solar panels meet the needs of rural communities in the developing world? What role should nuclear power and fossil fuels play in expanding grid access? On May 24, the Energy Security and Climate Initiative (ESCI) at Brookings hosted a debate on solutions to increase energy access between Daniel Kammen, Class of 1935 distinguished professor of energy at the University of California, Berkeley, and Ted Nordhaus, co-founder and research director of the Breakthrough Institute. ClimateWire Editor Lisa Friedman moderated the discussion and audience Q&A.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eyes on Cops  18 mins – “The scenes of violence caught on video recently have been a painful reminder of the strained relations between the public and the police in our country. This friction is not new. What is new is the technology: cameras and smart phones that record and transmit the violence live or within minutes. In Minnesota, the person who captured the aftermath of an officer-involved shooting was in the car with the victim. In Baton Rouge, the videos were made by bystanders. And in Dallas, the first images we saw of the sniper shootings came from people on the ground, in the crowd. But there’s also an organized movement of people who consider it their jobs to police the police and they, too, are recording. Some people call them “cop watchers.” In light of recent events we’re revisiting a story we brought to you last year. It’s a look at the cop watching movement in Texas – including in a suburb of Dallas where tensions over the practice already were on the rise.” At the link find the link “Update: Eyes on Cops, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files Eyes-on-cops.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fact Checking  45 mins – “If you’re on Facebook, chances are tragic shootings and a hotly contested political climate have turned your social media feed into a forum for emotions, a place for sharing support, airing opinions and spreading lots and lots of misinformation. On today’s show, how Buzzfeed aims to combat internet hoaxes and fake news through their own tried and true method – an online quiz. And this summer’s hottest filming location – Nantucket?  We’ll speak with New England director Jay Craven about shooting a historical film off the cape on a shoestring budget and college students as crew.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fitness History  52 mins – “For years, Daniel Kunitz lived the life of the mind. His body though “became a trash depot.” Then he started running, which led to swimming, weightlifting, and eventually CrossFit. His health and his life steadily improved. Kunitz’s personal quest got him wondering how fitness culture has changed through the years. Why were the Greeks so buff? Why do guys do dumbbell curls? How have women changed exercise as we know it? Kunitz joins us to share what he’s learned about the evolution of fitness. Daniel Kunitz has served as editor in chief of Modern Painter, as well as an editor at the Paris Review and Details. His writing has appeared in Vanity Fair, Harper’s, and New York magazine. His new book is Lift: Fitness Culture, from Naked Greeks and Acrobats to Jazzercise and Ninja WarriorAt the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Waste Control  4 mins – “As the world’s population increases, so does the demand for food. One way to keep up with demand would be, logically, to just produce more food. Some argue that a better strategy would be to simply stop wasting so much food. Granite Geek David Brooks writes about food waste for his column this week in The Concord Monitor and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss his findings….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Four Seasons Restaurant  22 mins – “For two decades, the Four Seasons was the epicenter of culture in America. Jackie Onassis, Henry Kissinger, and Nora Ephron were just some of the regulars at the New York City restaurant, but the real stars were the creative power brokers in publishing, fashion, architecture, and advertising who convened in the massive, elegant bar room to make the decisions about what books we read, wine we drank, and clothes we wore. In his 1979 feature on the Four Seasons, former Esquire editor in chief Lee Eisenberg coined the phrase “power lunch”—to the everlasting envy of food critics. One such critic, the acclaimed Alan Richman, joins podcast host David Brancaccio this week to discuss the closing of what Richman considers the greatest restaurant in American history, what made it unique, and why it belonged to a vanishing world.” At the link find the title, “America’s Most Powerful Lunch, by Lee Eisenberg, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13153/3848240/Americas-Most-Powerful-Lunch-by-Lee-Eisenberg.mp3and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future Possibilities  55 mins – “How does the inner science of ourselves intersect with the outer science of the universe? A Stratford Festival Forum on the theme of discovery with Janice Gross Stein, Dr. Joe MacInnis, and Jay Ingram.” At the link find the title, “The Discovery of Other Worlds, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160707_87060.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Medicine  39 mins – “We talk to Marek Glezerman, professor emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology and currently chairman of the Ethics Committee at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University about his book Gender Medicine: The Groundbreaking New Science of Gender- and Sex-Based Diagnosis and Treatment.” At the link find the title, “141 Marek Glezerman – The Science of Gender Medicine, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 5836c8d1-b1fd-427b-8fca-d27801b78d5b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Haptic Conference  21 mins – “We get a feel for how the latest advances in haptic technologies are bringing us all closer together With the annual Eurohaptics conference as a backdrop, Nicola Davis delves into the world of ‘touch’ and haptic technology. Guided by the tech-savvy Timandra Harkness and UCL’s Dr Helge Wurdemann, we discuss how these technologies will change the worlds – both real and virtual – we all live in. We also hear from Professor Blake Hannaford, Dr Fernando Bello, Professor Hiroyuki Kajimoto, and Professor Stephen Brewster.” At the link right-click “Download MP3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Workers Communication 37 mins – “Dr Louise Aronson is Professor of Medicine at University of California San Francisco and directs the Northern California Geriatrics Education Centre and UCSFs Medical Humanities. Having graduated from Harvard Medical School and completed her residency at UCSF she has gone on to become a multi award wining writer and has contributed to a variety of outlets including The New York Times, JAMA and the New England Journal of Medicine. This is an fantastic conversation with someone who is truly changing how we communicate as physicians.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Publishing  54 mins – “Ganesh V is the Author of the book The Underage CEOs, which traces the stories of 11 entrepreneurs from small towns and Tier II cities of India. Ganesh is an engineer who worked in the area of marketing communication, and now is a writer with interest in travel, music, culture, lifestyle, health, communities, parenting and entrepreneurship.In this interview, we talk about Ganesh’s writing, his journey as an author, the process he followed to write the manuscript, experiences with publishing and finally, the feedback from readers and his upcoming book….” At the link find the link “Ganesh V Author of The Underage CEOs, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 4814284-ganesh-v-author-of-the-underage-ceos.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet History  47 mins – “It’s a remarkable ecosystem that allows each of us to exercise control over our lives. But how much control do we truly have? How many of our decisions are really being made by Google and Facebook and Apple? And, perhaps most importantly: is the Internet’s true potential being squandered?” At the link click the circle with the dots, rightclick “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Sale Location  5 mins –Jim Luty joins J.D. Dhein to discuss Internet Purchase Exchange Locations. When you purchase something online and you need to meet the seller, why not go to your local police station?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jules Feiffer  48 mins – “Jules Feiffer has been drawing and writing—comic strips, children’s books, plays—since the 1940s. His illustrations brought “The Phantom Tollbooth” to life, and his satirical cartoons for The Village Voice ran for more than four decades. Now in his 80s, Feiffer says he is doing some of his best work—in a totally new genre for the artist: graphic novels. His newest is a noir thriller titled “Cousin Joseph,” the prequel to 2014’s “Kill My Mother.” Cartoonist Jules Feiffer joins Diane to talk about his late turn to graphic novels, what satire can mean for the nation and feeling like a kid at 87.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Manufacturing Globally  177 mins – “Now the world’s second largest manufacturing economy since falling behind China in 2010, the United States relies on a robust manufacturing sector, which accounts for almost nine percent of American jobs. But manufacturing is constantly evolving as a result of changing technological capabilities, leadership approaches, and policy incentives. With the world economy more interconnected than ever before, solutions to the challenges facing the manufacturing industry take on an increasingly global perspective. On July 7, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted expert panelists for a half-day conference on the global context of modern manufacturing. Which innovations in leadership and workforce development have been successful around the world? How can effective policy initiatives foster manufacturing growth? What lessons can America learn from abroad? The conference marks the fifth annual John Hazen White Forum on Public Policy, which convenes leaders from academia, business, and government to discuss and identify solutions to the United States’ most pressing challenges.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Impact  106 mins – “Four states and D.C. have legalized recreational marijuana, and more may do so this fall. But legalization is just the beginning of policy development. After legalization come commercialization and regulation—processes sure to be influenced by corporations and interest groups. How will lobbying and corporatization affect the structure and regulation of the licit marijuana market? And how should policymakers respond? On June 16, the Center for Effective Public Management at Brookings released two papers examining these issues. Authors and Brookings Senior Fellows John Hudak, Jonathan Rauch, and Philip Wallach were joined by experts from government, private industry, the non-profit sector, and academia to assess the papers’ findings that state-level regulation can help rein in special interests and that big corporations can bring benefits as well as risks.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mark Twain  52 mins – “Monday, we’re telling the story of what author Richard Zacks calls Mark Twain’s “raucous and redemptive round-the-world comedy tour.” Twain was once America’s highest paid writer, but he was also a remarkably bad businessman. In 1895, with his career on the rocks and with what today would be millions in debt, Twain embarked on a 5-continent speaking tour he hoped would save him. Zacks joins Doug to talk about Twain’s wildly popular humor, his missteps, and what drove his quest for redemption. Richard Zacks is a journalist and author. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, and Harper’s Magazine among many others. His books include Island of Vice: Theodore Roosevelt’s Quest to Clean Up Sin-Loving New York and Pirate Coast: Thomas Jefferson, the First Marines, and the Secret Mission of 1805. His new book is called Chasing the Last Laugh: Mark Twain’s Raucous and Redemptive Round-the-World Comedy Tour At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Math Rant  66 mins – “Only one actually caller, but lots of great audience questions in this “call in” episode! We discussed power supplies, formal EE education, IC die photos, old calculators, math and more!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Team Performance  49 mins – “My friend, Chris Hicks, is an emergency physician and trauma team leader in Toronto, Canada. His niche and research work revolves around human factors, team performance, and stress management for individuals and teams. We brought him down to give a grand rounds lecture; this is a recording of that lecture.” At the link right-click “Download” for the lecture and select “Save Link As” from the pop up menu.

Middle Class Finances  30 mins – “Neal Gabler’s cover story about the hidden financial struggles of the middle class sparked a firestorm of attention. Here, we talk with him about the personal story behind his revolutionary confessional, and how it feels to live the truth.” At the link find the title, “Redefining Success: Neal Gabler on the Secret Shame of the Middle Class, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files PNC3277711169.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minimum Wage  10 mins – Discussion about minimum wage debates in many countries. At the link find the title, “Money talks: Minimum-wage mania, Jul, 2015,” right-click “Media files money_talks__minimum-wage_mania.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mississippi Pioneer Woman  47 mins – “A woman’s life on the American Frontier: we’ll open an old memoir of homesteading on the Mississippi Delta.” At the linkf ind the title, “One Pioneer Woman’s Story Of Life On The Mississippi Delta, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_486064589.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mississippi Scale Model  20 mins – Early in 1927, it began to rain in the Midwest. It kept raining all spring, and the Mississippi River became the collection point for this rainfall and the previous winter’s snowpack. As early as February, levees were strained, and started to give way. Over the course of the next three months, 145 levees would fail, and 27,000 square miles across ten states were put underwateThe total number of dead from this tragic event is unknown, but likely upwards of a thousand. In April, then Secretary of Commerce (and future President) Herbert Hoover, spoke to the American people by radio, calling the event “the most dangerous flood our country has ever known.”The following year, Congress took the first important step in regulating the Mississippi River and its tributaries by passing the Flood Control Act of 1928, which empowered the Army Corps of Engineers to study and alter the nation’s river systems—the Mississippi especially. The Army Corps would build infrastructure to corral and maneuver the river in order to control it. This was a task of enormous scale—much bigger than anything the Corps had undertaken before—and so they wanted a way to test out their building projects to make sure that they would work. The Army Corps began constructing crude models, mere ditches cut in the dirt with water flowing through them. These showed promise in their ability to predict flooding, and the effects of proposed dams. So the Army Corps of Engineers began building more sophisticated models….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow just under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mobile Phone Videos  14 mins -.”The deaths of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minnesota, were both captured on video. So were the deaths of Walter Scott, Eric Garner, and so many others. That’s not new. But technology has become more and more sophisticated, and so have the bystanders using it, primed by grim history to turn the camera on, and, increasingly, involve an audience. We explore the role of Facebook Live in the events of the last week and offer you our Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook: Bearing Witness Edition, for guidance on how to film the police, wisely and within your rights. Brooke speaks with journalist Carlos Miller of Photography is Not A Crime, former police officer and current law professor Seth Stoughton, and Jennifer Carnig, former communications director for the New York Civil Liberties Union. Find the ACLU’s apps for recording police action here.” At the link find the title, “Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook: Bearing Witness Edition, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files otm071116podextra.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MOOC on Cancer  52 mins – “Dr Momna Hejmadi, Dr Andrew Chalmers and Dr Lorenzo Caggiano summarise some of the latest developments in cancer research. This lecture was delivered as part of our MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), ‘Inside Cancer: how genes influence cancer development’. https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/inside-cancer.” (Over 200 free courses with many topics are also available at that link.) At the link find the title, “Inside Cancer, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 273805869-uniofbath-inside-cancer.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Narcissism Effect 26 mins – “It doesn’t take a psychologist to see narcissism in our culture of selfies. But we decided to talk to one anyway. Jean Twenge is a researcher and author of the books The Narcissism Epidemic, and Generation Me.” At the link find the title, “Episode 38: Me, Me, Me, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160708_hiddenbrain_podcast38.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Parks  48 mins – “On Aug. 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the act that created the National Park Service. One hundred years later, it protects more than 400 parks and monuments, from Yellowstone to Gettysburg and the Stonewall Inn, the first national landmark honoring the fight for gay rights. Still, there are challenges, like a $12 billion maintenance backlog and an ongoing ethics scandal. And some say a lack of funding could threaten America’s rich conservation legacy. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell talks with Diane about her vision for preserving green spaces for the next generation. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Nitrogen Conservation  26 mins – “Sustainable Agriculture (starts 3:06): We couldn’t feed the planet without nitrogen, a vital nutrient for crops. But most soils don’t produce enough of it to feed anywhere near our 7 billion-plus humans on the planet. So, for nearly a century we’ve been applying synthetic fertilizer—mainly nitrogen and phosphorus — to grow crops for animals and people. But we have overindulged, creating vast amounts of waste, in the form of nitrogen pollution of waterways and the atmosphere. State and federal regulations have pressured growers to dramatically reduce fertilizer runoff from their fields. But it’s not been enough. Another approach – call it the carrot versus the stick – is also taking hold. Major food retailers, wholesalers, and producers, such as Walmart, United Suppliers and Unilever are transforming their whole supply chains, making food production less carbon- and nitrogen-intensive. Suzy Friedman, a sustainable agriculture expert with the Environmental Defense Fund, discusses with host Susan Moran how programs such as SUSTAIN help large food companies shrink their environmental footprint.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Noncomplementary Behavior  60 mins – “Psychology has a golden rule: If I am warm, you are usually warm. If I am hostile, you are too. But what happens if you flip the script and meet hostility with warmth? It’s called “noncomplementary behavior” — a mouthful, but a powerful concept, and very hard to execute. Alix and Hanna examine three attempts to pull it off: during a robbery, a terrorism crisis and a dating dry spell.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PACE Trial Controversy  93 mins – “Host: Vincent Racaniello Guest: David Tuller Vincent speaks with David Tuller about flaws in the U.K’s $8 million PACE trial for chronic fatigue syndrome, and efforts to have the trial data released.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 397” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panama Papers  36 mins – “Frederik Obermaier explains how his German newspaper came to initiate the biggest data leak in the history of investigative journalism.” At the link find the title, “Journalist central to breaking Panama Papers reveals story behind the massive leak, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160715_32225.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Performance Enhancing Drugs  33 mins – “In this episode we talk to Chris Hoyte from RMPDC [Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center] about Lance Armstrong, blood doping, and the biological passport. This is the second part of a two part interview.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Personal Learning Network 34 mins – “Thank you all for ten YEARS of [TechChickTips] podcasting! Maybe we’ll go ten more! In this anniversary episode, we share 10 Bytes of Wisdom for our 10 Years of Podcasting.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photonic Chips  12 mins – “Just 13 years ago, photonic chips were a dream. These chips use light instead of electricity. Today photonic chips are found in the world’s major data centres and allow vast amounts of data to be processed. As a result, networks are faster and more energy efficient. As Ben Eggleton explains, the next frontier is getting photonic chips into smart phones. They bring with them the promise of greatly improved capability, such as the measuring and analysis of blood and saliva, and even the levels of pollution in the air. Photonics are estimated as the basis of a $7 trillion industry in Australia, being 10% of the economy.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Picric Acid  7 mins – “Once you start studying chemistry, you see the world differently. Entirely unrelated things can trigger a series of chemical questions, and some won’t rest until they’ve got to the bottom of them. And so it was that a dress once worn by a famous author set Michael Freemantle digging into the history of picric acid….” At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Picric_acid.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Incidents  49 mins – “Thousands of protesters took to the streets over the weekend nationwide after three days of fatal gun violence between African-American men and police. In the space of two days, two black men in Louisiana and Minnesota were killed by police. The shootings were caught on video and seen by millions. Then, a day later, a black war veteran killed five officers in a retaliatory sniper attack. Diane and a panel of guests discuss the latest on the shooting investigations, and look at continuing tensions over deadly police force against black Americans and the movement for justice.” (5 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Police PR  31 mins – “The Current hosts a panel discussion on how to best address long-standing tensions between police and minority communities in our country.” At the link find the title, “‘This mistrust is deep’: how to improve relations between minorities and Canadian police, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160714_30822.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Torture in Chicago  27 mins – “A tale of violence, payback, and how to make things right.” At the link find the title, “#713: Paying for the Crime, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160720_pmoney_podcast072016a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Viewpoint  15 mins – “Marc Rainford says growing polarization between law enforcement and those they are intended to serve compromised his ability to effectively police.” At the link find the title, “Toronto police constable quits, says tension with community contributes to decision, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160714_31340.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Policing in America  58 mins – “Manhattan Institute Senior Fellow Heather Mac Donald discusses her book [The War on Cops], in which she looks at policing in America. She is interviewed by John Jay College professor Delores Jones-Brown.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Heather Mac Donald, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.445446.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Population Growth  40 mins – “Roger Martin, Chair of Population Matters, delivers a lecture for the Institute for our Institute for Sustainable Energy & the Environment considering population growth and the environment.” At the link find the title, “It’s no use reducing your footprint if you keep increasing the number of feet, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 273805685-uniofbath-its-no-use-reducing-your-footprint-if-you-keep-increasing-the-number-of-feet.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Price Fixing  58 mins – “There are all sorts of situations in which we suspect the fix is in, but we almost never find out for certain. On today’s show, for once, we find out. The whole program is devoted to one story, in which we go inside the back rooms of one multinational corporation and hear the intricate workings—recorded on tape—of how they put the fix in.” At the link find the title, “#168: The Fix Is In,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychosis  54 mins – “What’s it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit’s end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there’s stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.” At the link find the title, “Wit’s End, Part 1, Jun, 2016, right-click “Media files ideas_20160620_74679.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism Panel  67 mins – “Libby Schaaf, Mayor of Oakland James Bell, Civil Rights Leader; Executive Director, W. Hayward Burns Institute for Juvenile Justice, Fairness and Equality Manuel Pastor, Demographer and Professor of Sociology, American Studies and Ethnicity, The University of Southern California Joshua Johnson, Creator/Host, Rockit Fuel Radio Podcast; Lecturer, U.C. Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism—Moderator This program is part of our special series focused on people, place and power in the Bay Area, sponsored by the San Francisco Foundation. The Bay Area is at a crossroads. We live in one of the most industrious, exciting places anywhere. We know that our vitality, ingenuity and broad array of cultural identities make the region special. Yet we also know that we have significant challenges. People are worried about jobs, housing, transportation, and about making sure that everybody has the chance to participate, prosper and reach their full potential, regardless of their race or the neighborhood in which they live. Is it possible to provide true opportunity for all residents of our region, or is the notion of Bay Area exceptionalism just a myth?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Renewable Energy  29 mins – “This week on Sea Change Radio, host Alex Wise chats with Daniel Kirk-Davidoff, a climate scientist at the University of Maryland and at MDA Information Systems. First, Kirk-Davidoff tells us about how the science of predicting changes in climate and weather influences how utility companies and futures markets behave. Then, we hear about the challenges the developing world faces to keep carbon emissions low even as populations expand. Last, he talks about how different the electric grid of tomorrow may look in a few decades.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robert Scoble  83 mins – “Leo Laporte talks with Robert Scoble, a heavy virtual reality and mixed reality enthusiast. He is also an entrepreneur in residence at uploadvr.comAt the link click “Download options,”right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School of life  42 mins – “We are bring back one of our all time most downloaded guests this week, Roman Krznaric. In this episode we discuss Roman’s most recent book, How Should We Live?: Great Ideas from the Past for Everyday Life. There are many ways to try to improve our lives—we can turn to the wisdom of philosophers, the teachings of spiritual guides, or the latest experiments of psychologists. But we rarely look to history for inspiration—and when we do, it can be surprisingly powerful. In this episode, the cultural historian Roman Krznaric explores twelve universal topics—including love, family, and empathy; work, time, and money—by illuminating the past and revealing the wisdom we have been missing. Roman is a cultural thinker, writer, and founding faculty member of The School of Life in London. He has taught sociology and politics at Cambridge University and City University, London, and advises organizations including Oxfam and the United Nations on using empathy and conversation to create social change. He has been named by The Observer as one of Britain’s leading lifestyle philosophers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shark Conservation  47 mins – “Marine ecologist Dr. Neil Hammerschlag has looked inside the mouth of a wild tiger shark and lived to tell the tale. He says that sharks pose only a small risk to people: “Humans are not on the shark’s menu.” Also, opera percussionist Patti Niemi talks about her journey from Juilliard to the orchestra pit, and her struggles with anxiety and OCD.” At the link find the title, “July 14, 2016,”Swimming With Sharks & What ‘Jaws’ Got Wrong,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Debt Crisis  53 mins – “Just about everyone involved in the student loan industry these days – banks, private investors and even the federal government – makes money off the borrowers. On this episode of Reveal, we explore how this happened and who’s profiting from student debt.” At the link find the title, “Who’s getting rich off your student debt? Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files Whos-getting-rich-off-your-student-debt_podcast.mp3and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Loan Dissection  34 mins – “Our Spotlight on Magazine series continues with a recent story by [Boston Globe] Magazine Staff Writer Neil Swidey about the amount of student loan debt tripling to $1.23 trillion.” At the link find the title, “Washington Journal: Spotlight on Student Debt, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.444257.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Lone Crisis  49 mins – “Forty-two million Americans owe $1.3 trillion in student debt. We’ll look at who made money on all that debt.” At the link find the title, “Why Student Loan Debt Exploded, Jul, 2016 ,” right-click “Media files npr_486053959.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugees  174 mins – “On Tuesday, June 14, the Foreign Policy Program at Brookings and its Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World hosted a panel discussion on “The Politics of Rescue,” which explored the current conflicts in the Middle East, the resulting refugee crisis, the international community’s response, and the political, social, and economic hurdles to addressing this global crisis. The discussion also explored how these issues are being addressed by the United States and how they are playing into the 2016 presidential election. Panelists included Senator John McCain (R-Arizona), David Miliband, CEO of the International Rescue Committee, and Leon Wieseltier, the Isaiah Berlin Senior Fellow in Culture and Policy at The Brookings Institution. Washington Post columnist David Ignatius moderated the discussion. This panel discussion was part of the larger conference, “Refuge and Responsibility: The Syrian Refugee Crisis in 2016.” The objective of the conference is to generate meaningful discussion and mobilize real steps among international government and non-government actors to respond to the ongoing Syrian refugee crisis. The conflict in Syria and the flight of millions of traumatized Syrian citizens have placed enormous stress on Syria’s neighbors, Europe, and more broadly on the international refugee and humanitarian systems. An effective response must recognize the distinct circumstances facing the international community and Europe’s cities specifically, which are at the frontline of the crisis, absorbing massive numbers of refugees. The Refuge and Responsibility conference will focus on the political, economic, social, and cultural implications as countries grapple with this crisis. Conference participants, which include Syria refugees now residing in the United states, will seek to generate new ideas and mobilize effective international action.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Test Pilot  125 mins – “This is the first of several episodes from my trip to Airbus Toulouse: we cover flight testing of the A350. We have two guests. First, we speak with Peter Chandler, a test pilot at Airbus, about envelope expansion, the relationship between simulation and the real airplane, and test flying in general. Our second guest is Pascal Verneau, a test flight engineer. We discuss his role in flight testing, as well as some special equipment installed in (some of) the testing aircraft.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 File Directly” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Textbook Publishing  17 mins – “…Over his career advising clients in a wide variety of publishing and entertainment transactions and disputes, Steve Gillen has explored the dark corners of contractual law and sheds light on what he found there in a new publication from the Textbook & Academic Authors Association, “Guide to Textbook Publishing Contracts.” …“But it may not be about money for a lot of textbook authors. Some of them – they’re at universities where publishing a textbook, particularly a market-leading textbook, would be considered in advancement and promotion and tenure considerations,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “If that’s the case, if this is a publication that they need for promotion or for tenure, then the focus ought to be not so much money, perhaps, but making sure that the book actually sees the light of day. So your attention is going to be focused on things like the manuscript acceptability clause and making sure that you maintain as much control over the content and the message that the book ends up delivering as is possible…. The Textbook & Academic Authors Association (TAA) provides professional development resources, events, and networking opportunities for textbook authors and authors of scholarly journal articles and books. TAA is the only national, nonprofit membership association dedicated solely to assisting textbook and academic authors. Steve Gillen is a long-time member of the TAA Council.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tin Ears  55 mins – “Many of us love to sing, but we’re not all good at it. Some of us can’t even carry a tune and are told not to sing. Tim Falconer dives into neuroscience, psychology — and music itself — to find out why he’s a bad singer.” At the link find the title, “The Ballad of Tin Ears, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160712_11940.mp3 The Ballad of Tin Ears” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universal Basic Income  49 mins – “The idea of a universal basic income has been around for centuries. Thomas Paine, one of this country’s founding fathers, was an early proponent. Later, it was taken up by progressives like Martin Luther King Jr., but conservatives and libertarians have been interested in the idea, too. Today, a leading voice in support of the concept is Andy Stern, who spent 14 years as president of the Service Employees International Union, a tenure that led some to call him the country’s most influential labor leader at the time. Diane talks with Andy Stern about technology, the future of work and why he is making a case for a universal basic income.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Veterans Affairs Modernization  60 mins – “With the demand for its services constantly evolving, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) faces complex challenges in providing accessible care to America’s veterans. Amidst a history of long patient wait times, cost overruns, and management concerns, the VA recently conducted a sweeping internal review of its operations.  The result was the new MyVA program. How will MyVA improve the VA’s care of veterans? What will it do restore public confidence in its efforts? What changes is the VA undergoing to address both internal concerns and modern challenges in veteran care?On June 20, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted VA Secretary Robert McDonald. Secretary McDonald described the VA’s transformation strategy and explained how the reforms within MyVA will impact veterans, taxpayers and other stakeholders. He addressed lessons learned not just for the VA but for all government agencies that strive to achieve transformation and improve service delivery.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vulcanology  60 mins – “UK Geo-hazards expert Dr. Bill McGuire (“Waking the Giants”) on recent quakes & links to climate change. Oregon Professor Robert Yeats new book “Earthquake Time Bombs” – most cities at risk from quakes or mega-tsunamis. About 12,000 years ago there was a period of “volcanic storms”, so many erupted. The Earth was unstable, rocking and rolling with Earthquakes. Geologists know climate change destabilized the Earth’s crust. Bill McGuire wrote an influential article in the Guardian newspaper about this in 2012. Does that sound too fantastic? The weight of ice miles thick poured into the sea as that latest ice age ended. Released from that weight, land rose. Long-standing pressure points reacted, and the world shook. As the article in Live Science says: “McGuire conducted a study that was published in the journal Nature in 1997 that looked at the connection between the change in the rate of sea level rise and volcanic activity in the Mediterranean for the past 80,000 years and found that when sea level rose quickly, more volcanic eruptions occurred, increasing by a whopping 300 percent.“ …Even if that time of extra volcanoes and quakes is farther into our future, the threat of everyday earthquakes and tsunamis is larger now. That is because so much of the doubled and tripled human population lives near the sea. We’ve built our mega-cities – and nuclear power plants – within tsunami range. Eight thousand years ago, an earthquake caused an undersea land-slide off Norway. The tsunami raced around the whole North Atlantic, reaching up to 30 meters high – that’s well over 90 feet. …We’ll talk about what happened the last time Tokyo was nearly levelled, and the next time, which Japanese scientists say is over 90% likely within the next couple of decades. The aftershocks would be in the world’s shaky financial system. Would a big quake in Los Angeles, Vancouver, or Tokyo be the trigger for a massive collapse in the global economy? That’s why our second guest, Dr. Robert Yeats from Oregon wrote his book “Earthquake Time Bombs”. We’ll go into that risk in depth.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Welfare Programs  53 mins – “Twenty years ago, President Bill Clinton vowed to end welfare as we know it. And he did. Today, only a quarter of welfare dollars actually goes toward basic assistance – housing, transportation or essential household items. On this hour of Reveal, we take a road trip with Marketplace’s new podcast “The Uncertain Hour” and find out the surprising ways different states use this money, for things such as relationship counseling and college tuition for well-off kids.” At the link find the title, “A welfare check, Jul, 2016,”right-click “Media files A-welfare-check.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 245 – Jul 22, 2016: 5G Communications, Abortion Bans, Addiction Treatment, Adventures of Eleanore Amplified, Alcoholism Management, America’s Future, Anatomy Class, Arms Dealer, Artificial Intelligence, Atul Gawande, Australian Ticks, Bangladesh Gay Love, Big Data and Privacy, Black Holes, Blind Astronomer, Cancer Overview, Chaos Theory, Child Welfare in Norway, Constitutional Law, Deaf Lawyer, Dionne Warwick, Douglas MacArthur, Drag Queen Wrestler, Drug Types, Dry Needling, Education Reform, Employment Trends, Entomologist, Eubie Blake Sound, Eurovision Explained, Fake Foods, Fearless Women, Federal Land Management, Fourier Math, Gaddafis Gold Gun, Gaming, Gender Identity, Genetics, Genius Prediction, Globilization Criticism, GMO Researcher, Gun Industry, Hearing Difficulties, Helium Resource, Hip Arthritis, Homeless in America, Honduras Activists, HPV Vaccine, Infectious Disease Specialist, Internet Future, Iraq’s Kurds, ISIS, Juno Probe, Ketamine for Depression, Kolkata Stories, Lead Belly Sound, Listening Better, Los Angeles Mayor, Malaria Research, Manto Pakistani Author, Mental Illness in Africa, Mental Illness, National Parks, Nerve Injuries, Neurology and Addiction, Neuroscientist, New York Stories, Nonviolent Resistance, Obesity Research, Pathology Researcher, Personality Changes, Perspectives, Photography History, Podcasting Ideas, Police Shootings, Poverty Goals of UN, Racism in Canada, Relax with Night Vale, Robert Kennedy, Rocket Girls, Romanian Sheep Protection, Rosemary Kennedy, Rosewood Smuggling, Rule of Law, Satellite Design, Sebastian Younger, Startup Problems, Stroke Prevention, Stutter Story, Supreme Court, Synthetic Biologist, Syrian Refugee Stories, Taxidermy, Telemedicine, Tesla Auto Death, Tornado Survivors, Transgender Judge, Virologist Peter Palese

The best 115 podcasts from a larger group of 281 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

5G Communications 29 mins – “Verizon Senior Vice President Kathy Grillo discusses issues that the company is focusing on with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and Congress, including net neutrality, privacy regulations, 5G, and the need for more spectrum.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Kathy Grillo, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.447210.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Abortion Bans 11 mins – “This week, the Supreme Court upheld constitutional protections for abortion rights. To mark the occasion we have a story about the history of abortion in the US that first aired last winter, when the spread of Zika and the resulting deformities in newborns was causing panic across South and Central America. Abortion is illegal in those traditionally Catholic countries, but so many women were giving birth to babies with microcephaly and the brain damage associated with it, that the UN high commissioner for human rights urged a widespread repeal of abortion bans. You may be surprised to know this wasn’t the first time an epidemic influenced the abortion debate. Leslie Reagan of the University of Illinois says it happened in the US, 50 years ago — and the epidemic was Rubella, or German measles.” At the link right-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Addiction Treatment 47 mins – “Tough love, interventions and 12-step programs are some of the most common methods of treating drug addiction, but journalist Maia Szalavitz says they’re often counterproductive. In her new book, ‘Unbroken Brain,’ Szalavitz argues against the notion of “addictive personalities” and instead makes the case that addiction is similar to a learning disorder. Her book is based on research as well as personal experience; Szalavitz was addicted to cocaine and heroin from the age of 17 until she was 23. Also book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews ‘Underground Airlines,’ a new novel of alternate history by Ben H. Winters that imagines the Civil War never happened, and that slavery still exists in a few states.” At the link find the title, “Jul, 2016, Why ‘Tough’ Treatment Doesn’t Help Drug Addicts,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Adventures of Eleanor Amplified 24 mins – “’The Radio Adventures of Eleanor Amplified’ is a new family-friendly podcast about an intrepid reporter (and radio host!) who foils devious plots and matches wits with cunning villains. It was created by Fresh Air producer John Sheehan. Find it at: http://eleanoramplified.com “ At the link find the title, “July 6, 2016, BONUS: Terry Gross Introduces ‘The Radio Adventures of Eleanor Amplified’ click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcoholism Management 27 mins – “The conventional treatment for chronic alcoholics is abstinence. Not in Ottawa. At the Oaks, a residence for those who were once homeless, occupants are given a measure of white wine at hourly intervals throughout the day. The ‘Managed Alcohol Program’ has improved the health of its participants, reduced their alcohol intake, and in some cases enabled them to stop drinking altogether. It’s also saved the city of Ottawa millions of dollars in public services – one man was hospitalised 191 times in the six months before joining the programme. Hours and hours of police time have been clawed back too – this is a population used to stealing to feed addiction, but the hourly ‘pour’ enables them to refrain from criminal activity. The Ottawa programme has been introduced in other Canadian cities, and it’s now attracting international attention. Linda Pressly spends time at the Oaks to find out how it works.” At the link find the link, “The City Giving Wine to Alcoholics, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p040n075.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America’s Future 61 mins – “Yuval Levin, author and editor of National Affairs, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in his latest book, The Fractured Republic. Levin argues that both major political parties suffer from a misplaced nostalgia–a yearning for a time when things were better even though the policies that created those good times are no longer as relevant to today. Levin argues for a strengthening of the intermediate institutions–institutions between the individual and the government such as religious communities and other non-profits as a way toward a better life for Americans.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anatomy Class 30 mins – “When the first-year medical students at Table 4 met their male cadaver, they weren’t pleased. The group was in the home stretch of anatomy class at NYU School of Medicine, and the final exam was a couple weeks away. They had dozens of vessels, nerves, and organ components to memorize. And this cadaver was an interloper. They had grown attached to the first body they were dissecting — an elderly woman whose chest cavity was nice and neat, but whose intestines were so ravaged by cancer there was no point in working on her anymore. But this new body on Table 4 proved more challenging, they said. “Now we can’t see anything in our new body [in the chest], and we can’t refer back to that first work we did,” said student Samantha Ayoub, expressing the frustration of her six-person group. Medical school instructors often refer to the cadavers as the students’ “first patient.” There are about 20,000 of them donated to U.S. medical schools each year, according to the Harvard Business School. The schools encourage students to be grateful and respectful to these bodies, but with rare exceptions, schools don’t encourage students to think too hard about the lives of these “patients” prior to the dissection table. And as it turns out, the body on Table 4 was far more than a collection of vessels and valves. Literally and figuratively, he was an instructor, guide and teacher. His name was Haig Manoukian, and he and his wife, Michele Piso Manoukian, decided to donate his body to NYU so he could continue being an educator….” At the link find the title, “Every (Dead) Body Has A Story, March 29, 2016,” right-click “Media files onlyhuman032916_cms588669_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arms Dealer 22 mins – “A young massage therapist in Miami beach gets the business offer of a lifetime. So he shakes hands with the devil and hopes for the best. Read the whole story in Guy Lawson’s Arms and the Dudes at guylawson.com.” At the link click the circle with the three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence 26 mins – “Should machines have a concrete Mr Spock-like regard for logic or are there times when the best decision is a more human one? Ian Sample takes a look at the future of machines – not the dystopian nightmares of science fiction but the real challenges and big wins that might come with ever-smarter robots. He’s joined by Paul Newman, professor of Information Engineering and head of Oxford University’s Mobile Robotics Group, and Joanna Bryson, who studies natural intelligence and robot ethics at the University of Bath.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atul Gawande P1 42 mins – “Surgeon and writer Atul Gawande explores the nature of fallibility and suggests that preventing avoidable mistakes is a key challenge for the future of medicine. Through the story of a life-threatening condition which affected his own baby son, Dr. Gawande suggests that the medical profession needs to understand how best to deploy the enormous arsenal of knowledge which it has acquired. And his challenge for global health is to address the inequalities in access to resources and expertise both within and between countries. This first of four lectures was recorded before an audience at the John F Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Dr. Gawande’s home town of Boston in Massachusetts. The other lectures are recorded in London, Edinburgh and Delhi.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atul Gawande P2 42 mins – “The surgeon and writer Atul Gawande argues that better systems can transform global healthcare by radically reducing the chance of mistakes and increasing the chance of successful outcomes. He tells the story of how a little-known hospital in Austria managed to develop a complex yet highly effective system for dealing with victims of drowning. He says that the lesson from this dramatic narrative is that effective systems can provide major improvements in success rates for surgery and other medical procedures. Even a simple checklist – of the kind routinely used in the aviation industry – can be remarkably effective. And he argues that these systems have the power to transform care from the richest parts of the world to the poorest. The programme was recorded at The Wellcome Collection in London before an audience.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atul Gawande P3 42 mins – “Surgeon and writer Atul Gawande calls for a new approach to the two great unfixable problems in life and healthcare – ageing and death. He tells the story of how his daughter’s piano teacher faced up to terminal cancer and the crucial choices she made about how to spend her final days. He says the teacher was only able to do this because of an essential honesty from her physicians and the people around her. Dr. Gawande argues that the common reluctance of society and medical institutions to recognise the limits of what professionals can do can end up increasing the suffering of patients towards the end of life. He proposes that both doctors and individuals ask a series of simple but penetrating questions to decide what kind of treatment is appropriate – or whether treatment is appropriate at all. And he praises the values of the hospice movement, in putting quality of life before prolonging life. The programme was recorded at The Royal Society in Edinburgh in front of an audience.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atul Gawande P4 42 mins – “The surgeon and writer Atul Gawande calls for a new focus on medical systems to ensure doctors work more effectively, alongside far greater transparency about their performance. Speaking to an audience at the India International Centre in Delhi, he describes the story of medicine over the last century through the prism of his own family. From a grandmother who died in rural India from malaria – a preventable disease – to the high-tech medicine of today. He argues that despite its scientific advances, medicine has failed to exploit its knowledge successfully. In both the developed and developing world doctors do not carry out basic procedures effectively and often do not act in the best interests of their patients. He calls for wide-ranging research into the systems by which medical care is delivered, alongside far greater transparency about performance.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Ticks 30 mins – “Do Australian ticks pose a greater health risk than we thought? For people suffering from Lyme-like disease, it’s a controversial mystery that science has so far been unable to resolve. For the first time, microbes inside native Aussie ticks are being probed, leading to new discoveries which may reveal the causes of unexplained illnesses in the future.” At the link right-click “download video mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bangladesh Gay Love 27 mins – “Lipika Pelham investigates a marriage between two Bengali women, and asks what this extraordinary love story says about attitudes to sexuality in this conservative nation.” At the link find the title, “Women in Love in Bangladesh, Jan, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03gqhhs.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Data and Privacy 56 mins -”IDEAS, CBC RADIO ONE in partnership with the MUNK School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto weighs the opportunities, the risks — and the trade-offs — as the world of Big Data relentlessly changes our lives.” At the link find the title, “Big Data, Part 2, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160630_94562.mp3” and select “Save LINK As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Holes 60 mins – “Janna Levin, Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College; Author, Black Hole Blues and Other Songs from Outer Space If black holes collide in outer space and no one can see it, does it make a sound? A black hole collision is an event more powerful than any since the origin of the universe. But when black holes collide, they will do so unilluminated—emanating only gravitational waves. The only evidence would be the sound of spacetime ringing. Levin shares the obsessions, the aspirations, and the trials of the scientists who embarked on an arduous, 50-year endeavor to capture these elusive waves and record the soundtrack of the universe.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Holes-Hawking P1 30 mins – “The Cambridge cosmologist Professor Stephen Hawking delivers the second of his BBC Reith Lectures on black holes. Professor Hawking examines scientific thinking about black holes and challenges the idea that all matter and information is destroyed irretrievably within them. He explains his own hypothesis that black holes may emit a form of radiation, now known as Hawking Radiation. He discusses the search for mini black holes, noting that so far “no-one has found any, which is a pity because if they had, I would have got a Nobel Prize.” And he advances a theory that information may remain stored within black holes in a scrambled form. The programmes are recorded in front of an audience of Radio 4 listeners and some of the country’s leading scientists at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London. Sue Lawley introduces the evening and chairs a question-and-answer session with Professor Hawking. Radio 4 listeners submitted questions in their hundreds, of which a selection were invited to attend the event to put their questions in person to Professor.” At the link find the title, “Black holes ain’t as black as they are painted, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03gnm5d.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Holes-Hawking P2 30 mins – “Professor Stephen Hawking delivers the first of his two BBC Reith Lectures on black holes. These collapsed stars challenge the very nature of space and time, as they contain a singularity – a phenomenon where the normal rules of the universe break down. They have held an enduring fascination for Professor Hawking throughout his life. Rather than see them as a scary, destructive and dark he says if properly understood, they could unlock the deepest secrets of the cosmos. Professor Hawking describes the history of scientific thinking about black holes, and explains how they have posed tough challenges to conventional understanding of the laws which govern the universe. The programmes are recorded in front of an audience of Radio 4 listeners and some of the country’s leading scientists at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London. Sue Lawley introduces the evening and chairs a question-and-answer session with Professor Hawking. Radio 4 listeners submitted questions in their hundreds, of which a selection were invited to attend the event to put their questions in person to Professor Hawking.” At the link find the title, “Do black holes have no hair? Jan, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03gnl47.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Astronomer 11 mins – “Wanda Diaz Merced studies the light emitted by gamma-ray bursts, the most energetic events in the universe. When she lost her sight and was left without a way to do her science, she had a revelatory insight: the light curves she could no longer see could be translated into sound. Through sonification, she regained mastery over her work, and now she’s advocating for a more inclusive scientific community. “Science is for everyone,” she says. “It has to be available to everyone, because we are all natural explorers.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Overview 56 mins – “In the first of a two-part series, we’ll delve into the most prevalent cancers in New Hampshire – bladder, breast and lung. We’ll also examine who appears to be most susceptible to these cancers and how genetics, lifestyle, or environmental causes might be contributing factors in the incidence of cancer in the state.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chaos Theory 15 mins – “This ten part history of mathematics from Newton to the present day, reveals the personalities behind the calculations: the passions and rivalries of mathematicians struggling to get their ideas heard. Professor Marcus du Sautoy shows how these masters of abstraction find a role in the real world and proves that mathematics is the driving force behind modern science. Today Henri Poincare, the man who proved there are certain problems that mathematics will never be able to answer: a mathematical insight that gave rise to chaos theory.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Welfare in Norway 27 mins – “Norway’s widely regarded as one of the world’s most progressive societies, yet it’s at the centre of an international storm over its child protection policies. Campaigners accuse its social workers of removing children – some from immigrant backgrounds – from their parents without justification, and permanently erasing family bonds. Tim Whewell meets parents who say they’ve lost their children because of misunderstood remarks or “insufficient eye contact” – and Norwegian professionals who call the system monstrous and dysfunctional. Is a service designed to put children first now out of control?” At the link find the title, “Norway: Parents Against the State, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03qylz6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constitutional Law 48 mins – “In 2015, the Supreme Court ruled that same sex couples have a right to marry under the Constitution, something that would have been unthinkable decades earlier. When the Supreme Court justices decided in 2010 that individuals have the right to bear arms, it again was a major departure for the court. In a new book, constitutional scholar David Cole says the decisions were the results of campaigns by citizens and civil society groups who used deliberate strategies, often outside the courts, to effect constitutional change. David Cole joins Diane to discuss his new book “Engines of Liberty: The Power of Citizen Activists to Make Constitutional Law.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Deaf Lawyer 13 mins – ““I believe that losing my hearing was one of the greatest gifts I’ve ever received,” says Elise Roy. As a disability rights lawyer and design thinker, she knows that being Deaf gives her a unique way of experiencing and reframing the world — a perspective that could solve some of our largest problems. As she says: “When we design for disability first, you often stumble upon solutions that are better than those when we design for the norm.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dionne Warwick 52 mins – “For the latest installment in our Through the Lens series, we’re trying something different and talking about an in-the-works documentary. Director Ellen Goosenberg-Kent is working on a film called Don’t Make Me Over about the life and career of famed singer Dionne Warwick. Recognized at an early age for her vocal talent, Warwick was one the greatest female voices of her generation and an outspoken advocate for social and political change. Warwick and others will join us to talk about her inspiring journey.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Douglas MacArthur 59 mins – “Hudson Institute Senior Fellow Arthur Herman discusses his book, [Douglas MacArthur: American Warrior].” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Arthur Herman, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.443773.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drag Queen Wrestler 27 mins – “Cassandro is no ordinary Mexican wrestler. He is an exotico – or drag queen – who wears long Liberace gowns, sequins and flamboyant make-up. Over an extraordinary 27-year-career, Cassandro has won two championship belts and pioneered the idea that a Mexican wrestler can be openly gay.” At the link find the title, “Cassandro – Queen of Lucha Libre, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03j17dh.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Types 35 mins – “In this episode, we discuss six pivotal drug classes that have been FDA approved within the past 20 years. This is part 2 of a 2 part episode.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 027-Six pivotal classes_II.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dry Needling 18 mins – “Dry Needling sure isn’t acupuncture. Nope. Not at all.” At the link right-click “Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Reform 14 mins – “Seema Bansal forged a path to public education reform for 15,000 schools in Haryana, India, by setting an ambitious goal: by 2020, 80 percent of children should have grade-level knowledge. She’s looking to meet this goal by seeking reforms that will work in every school without additional resources. Bansal and her team have found success using creative, straightforward techniques such as communicating with teachers using SMS group chats, and they have already measurably improved learning and engagement in Haryana’s schools.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Employment Trends 56 mins – “A roundup of Granite State economic headlines: It’s all about the labor force, according to a midyear economic review — businesses have plenty of job openings but there aren’t enough workers to fill them. Commercial real estate gets a makeover, with old shopping malls and a race-track finding new life. And reaction to a national study on manufacturing, which says a strong education system is the key to success. At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Entomologist 61 mins – “Dr. Matt O’Neal is an Associate Professor of Entomology at Iowa State University. He received his B.S. in Biology and M.S. in Entomology from the University of Illinois. Matt served as a Peace Corps Volunteer between those two degrees. After his masters he went on to receive his PhD in Entomology from Michigan State University. Next, Matt conducted postdoctoral research at Michigan State before joining the Faculty at the Iowa State where he is today. Matt’s honors and awards include the Team Achievement Award for the Crop Advantage Series from Iowa State University Extension, the National Excellence In Multistate Research Award from the American Public Land-Grant Universities, and the Integrated Pest Management Team Award from the Entomological Foundation. He has also received various awards from the Entomological Society of America, the American Society of Agronomy, and the Board Certified Entomologists of Mid-America for his educational and outreach efforts. In addition, Matt is co-host of the Soybean Pest Podcast with his colleague Erin Hodgson. Matt is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “341: Understanding Pollinators and Pests to Promote Optimal Crop Management – Dr. Matt O’Neal,” right-click “Media files 341_Matt Oneal_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eubie Blake Sound 47 mins – “Blake’s songs are back on Broadway, in the adaptation of his 1921 show ‘Shuffle Along.’ It was an influential musical that was written and produced by African Americans and had an all African American cast. Our tribute features live performances of his songs and interviews with singer Vernel Bagneris, pianist Dick Hyman, theater historian Robert Kimball and historian David Levering Lewis. Originally broadcast in 1998.” At the link find the title, “Jul, 2016, A Tribute To Composer Eubie Blake,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eurovision Explained 50 mins – “The Eurovision Song Contest is the most watched entertainment show on the planet with 200 million people tuning in to see singers compete under their national flags. But backstage, it is as much about politics as pop. Ahead of this year’s competition in Stockholm, the Swedish Ambassador to London, Nicola Clase, explains why diplomats take it seriously.” At the link find the title, “The Swedish Ambassador’s Guide to Eurovision, May, 2016,” right-click “Media filesp03tt194.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Fake Foods 49 mins – “When we try to be mindful about what we eat, we choose healthy fats like olive oil, lean proteins like seafood, and maybe we occasionally splurge on some fancy Japanese steak or a glass of champagne. But according to food and travel writer Larry Olmsted, too often such foods are not actually what we think they are. In fact, they are cheap substitutes. It’s not just a question of getting what you pay for: in some instances, these fake foods might be bad for your health. The author of the new book “Real Food, Fake Food” joins Diane to talk about how to sniff out those imposters and make sure you’re getting the real deal.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Fearless Women 65 mins – “Amanda Kahlow, Founder & CEO, 6sense Arum Kang, Founder and CEO, Coffee Meets Bagel Mada Seghete, Co-Founder, Branch Metrics Caitlin MacDonald, CEO, cred—Moderator According to a 2015 North American study by McKinsey & Company, women are almost four times more likely than men to think they have fewer opportunities to advance because of their gender. How can we change this? During this candid discussion, you’ll join three leading women in tech as they share their experiences of being a woman in the technology industry, what challenges they’ve faced along the way, how they overcame them and ways to encourage more women to pursue careers in tech.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Land Management 27 mins – “It’s high noon in the American high desert, and the cowboys are gearing up for the fight of their lives. The armed occupation of a wildlife refuge in the far western state of Oregon has highlighted a long and deepening land dispute between rural communities and the federal government in Washington DC, which owns vast tracts of isolated and scenic territory. Ranchers and farmers say the land should be kept available for their cattle to graze; they say their historic way of life will be doomed otherwise. But other Americans, especially those in cities, want to see federal land conserved and protected from overuse. For Assignment, Neal Razzell travels to Oregon to see how these differences are fuelling a cultural battle over what it means to be American.” At the link find the title, “America’s Angry Cowboys, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03l9mfj.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fourier Math 15 mins –This ten part history of mathematics from Newton to the present day, reveals the personalities behind the calculations: the passions and rivalries of mathematicians struggling to get their ideas heard. Professor Marcus du Sautoy shows how these masters of abstraction find a role in the real world and proves that mathematics is the driving force behind modern science. Today, the mathematics of Joseph Fourier. It’s thanks to his mathematical insight that you can hear Marcus on the radio and that Brian Eno can create sounds that have never been heard before.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gaddafi’s Golden Gun 27 mins – “Gabriel Gatehouse returns to Libya in search of Colonel Gaddafi’s golden gun, which was seized by rebels when the dictator was captured and killed more than four years ago.” At the link find the title, “Gaddafi and the Man with the Golden Gun, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03hfsw8.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gaming 64 mins – “Nick Earl, Vice President and General Manager of Electronic Arts shares his thoughts on the future of the gaming market. He discusses the changing global market space, the latest generation of consoles, mobile game distribution, user generated content, social networks and EA’s strategy in the online gaming space.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Identity 48 mins – “In 2004, journalist and author Susan Faludi received an email from her father. The two had been estranged for years. He had been a volatile figure in her life and as an older man he moved back to Budapest, the city he had fled under the Nazis. The content of the email was that Stephen Faludi was now Stefanie Faludi. Her father had undergone gender reassignment surgery. For Susan Faludi, who has spent her career writing about feminism, the news presented many new questions about gender. But her search to understand her complicated father ultimately became a bigger quest about the meaning of identity. Susan Faludi joins Diane in studio to discuss her new book “In the Darkroom.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Genetics 28 mins – “Charles Darwin described the eye as an ‘organ of extreme perfection and complication’. How this engineering marvel of nature forms out of a few cells in the developing embryo has been the big question for Veronica van Heyningen, emeritus professor at the MRC’s Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine at the University of Edinburgh. Veronica is a world lead in the genetics of the development of the eye. She tells Jim Al Khalili about her part in the discovery of a gene called Pax-6 which turned to be a master builder gene for the eye, in all animals which have eyes – from humans to fruit flies. As she explains, further research on this gene may eventually help people with the genetic vision impairment, Aniridia. It was Veronica’s research on patients with this condition which led to the gene’s final discovery. She tells Jim about why it’s important for scientists to engage in public discussion on the ethical implications of their work. Veronica also talks about her arrival in Britain as an 11 year old. Her family escaped from communist Hungary in 1958. Both of her Jewish parents had been sent to Nazi concentration camps during the Second World War.” At the link find the title, Veronica van Heyningen, Mar, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qglby.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genius Prediction 24 mins – “Travel writer Eric Weiner says if you want to predict genius, stop looking at the stars and find a map because genius is more about place than parentage.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Genius linked to geography more than genes, says author Eric Weiner, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160704_11429.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Globalization Criticism 47 mins – “Economist Jeffrey Sachs sees big problems with globalization as we’ve done it. Says we need to rethink our approach. He’s with us.” At the link find the title, “Economist Jeffrey Sachs On Globalization’s Risks, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_484976939.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Researcher 61 mins – “Dr. Richard Jefferson is the Chief Executive Officer of an independent, non-profit institute called Cambia. He is also Professor of Science, Technology & Law at Queensland University of Technology and Director of an open, public innovation resource called The Lens. In addition, Richard is a founder of the biological open-source initiative called Biological Innovation for Open Society. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Molecular Genetics from the College of Creative Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara and went on to complete his PhD in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Richard completed postdoctoral research at the Plant Breeding Institute in Cambridge and then worked as a Molecular Biologist for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations before founding Cambia. Richard has received many awards and honors during his career, and just to name a few, he was named an Outstanding Social Entrepreneur by the Schwab Foundation, he was among Scientific American’s List of the World’s 50 Most Influential Technologists and World Research Leader for Economic Development in 2003, he received the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) Leadership in Science Public Service Award, and Medalist of the Center for Science and Policy Outcomes. Richard is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “259: Developing The Lens for Transparency in Innovation – Dr. Richard Jefferson,” right-click “Media files 259_Richard_Jefferson_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Industry 57 mins – “Historian Pamela Haag traces the history of guns and examines when and how they became a part of American culture. She is interviewed by author William Doyle” At the link find the title, “After Words with Pamela Haag, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436670.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hearing Difficulties 21 mins – “When Rose* was growing up, she knew something wasn’t quite right about how she heard the world. She says it felt like she was isolated by an invisible wall. But when she got typical hearing tests at an audiologist’s office? She aced them, every time. Rose’s problem was particularly bad in noisy places. “It doesn’t take much,” she says. “It could be five computers in a room and a bunch of shuffling around — you lose me at that point.” It took Rose years, and plenty of doctors’ visits, to figure out what was happening. And when she did find out, it was thanks to the persistence of Professor Nina Kraus. Kraus runs an auditory neuroscience laboratory at Northwestern University. For decades, Kraus has been conducting research on Rose and other patients like her to learn just how vital our brains are to understanding sound. And she discovered how hearing difficulties can be a marker for all types of neurological issues — autism, dyslexia, learning delays — that have nothing to do with our ears.” At the link find the title, “Your Brain On Sound (Rebroadcast), Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files onlyhuman070516_cms635028_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Helium Resource 21 mins – “Interest in helium has been rising over the scarcity of the resource. Some even think kids’ helium balloons are now just too frivolous a use for a gas that’s necessary to make MRIs work. Prepare to burst your pre-conceived notions of helium.” At the link find the title, “Helium a finite resource, does much more than fill balloons, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160707_75924.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hip Arthritis 24 mins – “2.46 million people in England have osteoarthritis of the hip, and many of those go on to eventually have a hip replacement – which is now widely considered one of the most commonly performed and successful operations in the world. Jessamy Bagenal, clinical fellow with The BMJ, talks to Nick Aresti, a specialist registrar in trauma and orthopaedic surgery and one of the authors of a clinical update on hip osteoarthritis, recently published on thebmj.com. In a linked podcast, Nick Nicholas, a patient who has hip OA gives us his perspective.” At the link find the title, “Having hip osteoarthritis, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 272759006-bmjgroup-having-hip-osteoarthritis.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in America 48 mins – “Are you seeing the homeless as summer deepens? We’ll look at a big new San Francisco push to tackle homelessness.” At the link find the title, “Tackling Homelessness, In San Francisco And Beyond, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_485121654.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honduras Activists 27 mins – “In March the award-winning Honduran environmentalist, Berta Caceres, was gunned down at home. Of indigenous Lenca origin, for years she was a prominent critic of the government, and campaigned against the Agua Zarca hydro-electric project in the western highlands. Honduras is the most unequal nation in the Americas, but it is rich in minerals with an enormous capacity for the development of hydro-electric power. Since a coup in 2009 removed the left-leaning President, a business-driven government has granted dozens of concessions for the exploitation of precious national resources. But the race for development is creating bitter – and murderous – disharmony: Honduras has become the most deadly nation on earth to be a land or environmental activist. For Assignment, Linda Pressly, explores how the murder of Berta Caceres is emblematic of profound divisions in Honduras.” At the link find the title, “Honduras: After Berta, , Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03yfq3x.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HPV Vaccine 47 mins – “Cancer experts agree that getting the HPV vaccine – which fights some sexually transmitted infections – could help prevent tens of thousands of cancer cases. Yet just 40 percent of teenage girls and 22 percent of boys have been fully inoculated, according to the latest statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Oncologists blame pediatricians and family physicians for not recommending the vaccine to patients. Diane and a panel of guests discuss the new push by cancer experts to re-brand the vaccine as a crucial way to prevent cancer.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Infectious Disease Specialist 26 mins – “Dengue makes Zika worse. A fungi I never heard of. Worst UTI prevention study ever. And more.“ At the link find the title, “Puscast: June 15 to 31, 2016,” right-click “Media files junb16.m4a” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Future 34 mins – “The future of the internet is at risk if we do not act now says experts from the Global Commission on Internet Governance. Their report entitled One Internet contains recommendations to ensure secure, accessible and affordable online freedom for years to come. The two-year project by the Centre for International Governance Innovation and Chatham House has brought together almost 70 advisers from around the world to develop this strategy for internet governance. Wonderlab at the Science Museum – A new interactive permanent gallery is soon to open at London’s Science Museum. Its aim is to make visitors, and particularly young people, think like a scientists. LJ Rich has been for a sneak preview at the technology on show. Silicon Valley Oscars – Talk of revolution was in the air in Silicon Valley last week at SVForum’s Visionary Awards. With past recipients like Bill Gates, Elon Musk, and Esther Dyson, these awards have earned a reputation as the Oscars of SV. Reporter Alison van Diggelen speaks to some of the winners and how they see their innovations impacting on people’s lives – for the good. VR Conservation – A new virtual reality film called Valen’s Reef has been launched this week at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. The title comes from eight-year-old Valen, the son of a west Papuan fisherman who has become a coral reef scientist. The film shows you the variety of life on the reef and then the colourful thriving reef gives way to an underwater wasteland of bleached, dead coral. The team behind the work hope it will highlight the risks corals in the region are facing.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Irak’s Kurds 50 mins- “Twenty-five years ago, thousands of Iraqi Kurds lost their lives as they fled the forces of Saddam Hussein into the Zagros and Taurus mountains of northern Iraq, towards Iran and Turkey. Massively outgunned, many were killed by the helicopter gunship fire and tanks at the command of Saddam’s well trained and brutal troops. BBC Middle East correspondent Jim Muir revisits the exodus.” At the link find the title, “Iraq’s Kurds: From Flight to Freedom, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03vrbrw.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Activities 47 mins – “Is ISIS training from building a caliphate to spreading terror worldwide? We’ll look at the latest surge of far-flung attacks.” At the link find the title, “With Spate Of Attacks, ISIS Shifts To Global Terror Network, Jul, 2016” right-click “Media files npr_484973825.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Isis Analysis 48 mins – “On July 4[ 2016], bombings rocked three cities in Saudi Arabia. Two days earlier the deadliest car bomb this year exploded in Baghdad. On July 1 in Dhaka, Bangladesh gunmen held hostages at a bakery killing 22. Just over a week ago, three suicide attackers killed 41 people at Istanbul’s airport. ISIS claimed responsibility for some of these attacks. For others, they did not — but officials suspect the terrorist group’s involvement. ISIS had vowed to make the holy month of Ramadan deadly and as it came to a close, they have done just that. Diane and her guests discuss new attacks from ISIS and security questions for the U.S.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

ISIS Opposition 27 mins – “Chloe Hadjimatheou tells the astonishing story of a group of young men from Raqqa in Syria who chose to resist the so-called ‘Islamic State’, which occupied their city in 2014 and made it the capital of their ‘Caliphate’. These extraordinary activists have risked everything to oppose ISIS; several have been killed, or had family members murdered. IS has put a bounty on the resistance leaders’ heads forcing them to go into hiding. But the group continues its work, under the banner ‘Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently’. Chloe meets the group’s founders, who are now organising undercover activists in Raqqa from the relative safety of other countries.” At the link find the title, “‘Islamic State’s’ Most Wanted, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03rndlv.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Juno Probe 20 mins – “After five years and 1.4bn miles, the Nasa spacecraft has arrived at its final destination, but what is this plucky little probe hoping to find? Following the news this week that the spacecraft successfully dropped into Jupiter’s orbit, Ian Sample is joined by planetary scientists professor Fran Bagenal – a co-investigator on the mission – and Dr Adam Masters to discuss the probe.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Juno Probe to Jupiter 47 mins – “After a 1.7 billion mile journey, NASA’s Juno spacecraft is now safely in orbit around Jupiter. We’ll look at what’s coming from the massive planet.” At the link find the title, “Juno Probes The Secrets Of Jupiter, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_485276708.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ketamine for Depression 39 mins – “Ketamine has quite the reputation as a club drug. But research is showing its promising potential as a treatment for severe cases of depression.” At the link find the title, “Treating Depression with Ketamine, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files SDS135.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kolkata Stories 27 mins – “In the chaotic city of Kolkata in India, Catherine Carr hears from the feminist Shakespeare enthusiast to the man dying of AIDS and the woman still a little bit in love with her colleague; from the father and son begging by the roadside to the teenager dreaming of Olympic success. The brief portraits have been woven together with the sounds of the city, to create an unpredictable and poetic experience of Kolkata. This series, part of the Identity series, invites strangers to pause on their way from A to B and asks them one simple question: ‘Where Are You Going?’ The encounters reveal funny, moving, poignant and sometimes astonishing details about the lives of others. Image: Ayushi, a student at Kolkata’s Presidence University. “ At the link find the title, “Where Are You Going? – Kolkata, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03r1w5l.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lead Belly Sound 48 mins – “Going back to Lead Belly. The blues legend is back. His influences, as big as ever.” At the link find the title, “Tuning In To The Lead Belly Sound, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_484634655.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Listening Better 15 mins – “Tim Harford (the Financial Times’ ‘Undercover Economist’ and presenter of Radio 4’s More or Less) is joined by Malcolm Gladwell, David Kilcullen and Gillian Tett for a new series, ‘Pop-up Ideas’…Malcolm Gladwell, staff writer at the New Yorker and best-selling author of books such as The Tipping Point and Outliers, tells an extraordinarily powerful story about how listening more carefully might have shortened the Vietnam War. One of the world’s most influential counter-insurgency experts, David Killcullen, whose ideas were described by the Washington Post as ‘revolutionizing military thinking throughout the West’, talks about how future instability will emanate from rapidly-growing coastal megacities. The financial journalist Gillian Tett describes how her background in anthropology led her to predict the financial crisis in 2008. Tim Harford explores the concept of ‘The Tragedy of the Commons’ – a term coined by the American ecologist Garrett Hardin in a hugely influential 1968 essay. Tim compares Hardin’s work to that of the American political economist Elinor Ostrom, to reflect on the impact of mankind on the world around us.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Los Angeles Mayor 43 mins – “Eric Garcetti, the mayor of Los Angeles, has big ambitions but knows he must first master the small stuff. He’s also a polymath who relies heavily on data and new technologies. Could this be what modern politics is supposed to look like?” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malaria Research 28 mins – “Janet Hemingway, the youngest woman to ever to become a full professor in the UK, talks about her career at the frontline of the war on malaria. Whilst many researchers look for vaccines and treatments to this global killer, Janet’s approach, as a trained entomologist, has been to fight the mosquitoes – the vector – which transmits the malaria parasite.” At the link find the title, “Janet Hemingway, Jun, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qh1zn.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Manto, Pakistani Author 27 mins – “Sa’adat Hassan Manto was a writer who confronted social taboos in Indio-Pakistani society. Even though he died in 1955, an alcoholic and penniless, his work still speaks to 21st Century Pakistan. As a film and radio script writer, a journalist and most significantly as short story writer in Urdu, Manto chronicled the chaos that prevailed in the run up to, during and after the Partition of India in 1947.” At the link find the title, “Manto: Uncovering Pakistan, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03z21n8.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Illness in Africa 27 mins – “Gregoire is an ex garage mechanic whose mission in life is to help people in Benin, West Africa, with mental health problems who may otherwise be chained up in the spare room. With family approval he takes patients to his treatment centres, he cuts off their chains allowing them space and giving them help. Gregoire’s story and the attitudes that coalesce around it unfold against a backdrop of traditional healers, Western trained psychiatrists, ethnopsychiatry, Evangelical missionary work, Western attitudes to Africa and African attitudes to the West, and government ministries for whom mental health is a low and cash strapped priority.” At the link find the title, “The Mechanic and the Mission, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03jsfs5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Illness P1 55 mins – “What’s it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit’s end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there’s stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.” At the link find the title, “ Wit’s End, Part 1, Jun, 2016,” right-click “ Media files ideas_20160620_74679.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Illness P2 55 mins – “What’s it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit’s end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there’s stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.” At the link find the title, “Wit’s End, Part 2, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160627_88772.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Park Service 29 mins – “As we celebrate the Fourth of July, it’s fitting that we also recognize the centennial of the National Park Service. Today on Sea Change Radio we speak with author and environmentalist Jason Mark about the challenges that the national parks face moving forward. Mark is the editor of Sierra Magazine and author of a new book, Satellites in The High Country, which focuses on the state of wilderness in the U.S. We talk about the hidden wild gems that Mark encountered while researching the book, and discuss how environmental groups like the Sierra Club are approaching the issue of climate change which looms over the entire conservation landscape.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Parks 46 mins – “Ready, set, summer. New ways to get lost inside America’s National Parks with the writers of Outside Magazine.” At the link find the title, “Beyond The Scenic Drive: New Ways To Explore National Parks, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_484634640.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nerve Injuries 5 mins – “Dr. Herbert Geller is a Senior Investigator in the Developmental Neurobiology Section and Head of the Office of Education at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. He received his PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University and conducted postdoctoral research afterward at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. Herbert served on the faculty at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School for over 30 years before joining the NIH. He is a member of the Society for Neuroscience and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and he is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “209: Growing Excitement for Research in Potential Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury – Dr. Herbert Geller, Jan, 2015,” right-click “Media files 209_Herb_Geller_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurology and Addiction 29 mins – “Dr. Julie Kauer is a Professor of Medical Science and Professor of Neuroscience at Brown University. She received her PhD from Yale University completed a postdoctoral fellowships at the University of California San Francisco and at Stanford University… Julie is a leader in the field of synaptic function, over the years having discovered basic synaptic mechanisms that underlie synaptic strength changes in the hippocampus, ventral tegmental area and most recently, the dorsal horn. Over the years, Julie has made a major contribution to understanding synaptic plasticity at inhibitory synapses. For many years, inhibitory synapses were thought to act only as modulators of excitatory brain circuits, while excitatory synapses were thought to represent the major networks capable of synaptic strength alterations. The Kauer lab thoroughly characterized synaptic plasticity in the reward circuit at inhibitory synapses, and showed that this plasticity can be entirely blocked by a single exposure to any of a number of addictive drugs. They have recently added to this finding that a brief stressful stimulus also entirely blocks this form of LTP. The group has made strides in linking this neuroadaptation to stress-triggered reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in rodents. Most recently they discovered that kappa opioid receptor antagonists are highly effective at preventing reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in a rodent model of relapse, even given well after a stressful stimulus. Most recently Kauer’s group has begun working on inhibitory synapses in the dorsal horn, the part of the spinal cord that processes sensory and pain information. Although glycine is a major neurotransmitter in the CNS, relatively little is known about glycinergic synapses and plasticity in native tissues. They have now identified the first example of synaptic plasticity at glycinergic synapses in the mammalian nervous system. Moreover, this glycinergic plasticity is altered by the experience of peripheral inflammation, suggesting a role in the heightened pain responses that follow peripheral injury….” At the link find the title, “066: Working Out the Details of Synaptic Strengthening – Dr. Julie Kauer,” right-click “Media files 066_Julie_Kauer_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuroscientist 40 mins – “Dr. Brock Grill is an Associate Professor in the Department of Neuroscience at the Scripps Research Institute in Florida. He received his B.Sc. in Microbiology from the University of Alberta and was awarded his Ph.D. in Experimental Medicine from the University of British Columbia. Brock conducted postdoctoral research at the University of California Santa Cruz and at Stanford University. He served on the faculty at the University of Minnesota Medical School before joining the faculty at Scripps – Florida. Brock is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “298: A Scientist Who Acts On Guidance and Ingenuity to Extend Our Understanding of Neural Development – Dr. Brock Grill,” right-click “Media files 298_Brock Grill_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New York City Stories 27 mins – “One question – Where are you going? – yields countless surprises about the lives of strangers. We hear from a pigeon-catching drug addict, a woman who is married to her cat, a man dicing with death in his day job and a mother who is travelling to see her daughter who has cancer. “It’s not supposed to be that way round” she says. These unpredictable encounters come together to create a unique and fascinating audio portrait of New York City.” At the link find the title, “Where Are You Going? – New York, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03q2y65.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nonviolent Resistance 9 mins – “We’re not going to end violence by telling people that it’s morally wrong, says Jamila Raqib, executive director of the Albert Einstein Institution. Instead, we must find alternative ways to conduct conflict that are equally powerful and effective. Raqib promotes nonviolent resistance to people living under tyranny — and there’s a lot more to it than street protests. She shares encouraging examples of creative strategies that have led to change around the world and a message of hope for a future without armed conflict. “The greatest hope for humanity lies not in condemning violence but in making violence obsolete,” Raqib says.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obesity Research 28 mins – “Fat, sugar, salt – we all know we should eat less of them, and take more exercise, but as a nation with an ever expanding waistline we are becoming increasingly overweight. Jim al-Khalili talks to Professor Susan Jebb, the UK’s authority on obesity, who has spent much of her career trying to help us put those good intentions into practice. Her challenge is not for the faint hearted. When she first got interested in obesity, as a research scientist, rates were already on the rise. Yet no one took the problem seriously. Today, with over sixty percent of adults overweight or obese, Susan remains unwavering in her commitment to ensuring we do. As Professor of Diet and Population Health at Oxford University and Chair of the government’s Responsibility Deal Food Network, she wants all of us and the food industry to improve the nation’s health by translating the science of what we eat into practice. And health is what it’s all about. Obesity now poses such a danger that it’s been dubbed the ‘new smoking’.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pathology Researcher 38 mins – “Dr. Oliver Smithies is the Weatherspoon Eminent Distinguished Professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of North Caronlina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine. He received his PhD in Biochemistry at Oxford University and spent some time on the faculty at the University of Toronto, as well as the University of Wisconsin, Madison, before joining the faculty at UNC, Chapel Hill where he is today. Oliver is a distinguished scientist, and in 2007, he was a co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Among many other accomplishments, he is the recipient of the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research, the Wolf Prize in Medicine, the Massry Prize, and the University of North Carolina’s O. Max Gardner Award. Oliver is also a Member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, a Member of the U.S. Institute of Medicine, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Foreign Member of the Royal Society. Oliver is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “250: A Pathologist’s Path to Paramount Discoveries in Protein Separation and Genetic Recombination – Dr. Oliver Smithies,” right-click “Media files 250_Oliver_Smithies_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Personality Changes 15 mins – “What makes you, you? Psychologists like to talk about our traits, or defined characteristics that make us who we are. But Brian Little is more interested in moments when we transcend those traits — sometimes because our culture demands it of us, and sometimes because we demand it of ourselves. Join Little as he dissects the surprising differences between introverts and extroverts and explains why your personality may be more malleable than you think.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Perspectives 11 mins – “Perspective is everything, especially when it comes to examining your beliefs. Are you a soldier, prone to defending your viewpoint at all costs — or a scout, spurred by curiosity? Julia Galef examines the motivations behind these two mindsets and how they shape the way we interpret information, interweaved with a compelling history lesson from 19th-century France. When your steadfast opinions are tested, Galef asks: “What do you most yearn for? Do you yearn to defend your own beliefs or do you yearn to see the world as clearly as you possibly can?” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photography History 43 mins “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the development of photography in the 1830s, when techniques for ‘drawing with light’ evolved to the stage where, in 1839, both Louis Daguerre and William Henry Fox Talbot made claims for its invention. These followed the development of the camera obscura, and experiments by such as Thomas Wedgwood and Nicéphore Niépce, and led to rapid changes in the 1840s as more people captured images with the daguerreotype and calotype. These new techniques changed the aesthetics of the age and, before long, inspired claims that painting was now dead.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasting Ideas 70 mins – “Is this the last Podcasters’ Studio? No. But staying motivated after years of talking about the same subject will be a challenge every podcaster faces if you do it long enough. How do you stay motivated? In most cases, listener feedback and a love for the topic will keep the show going for as long as you want. However, other platforms such as YouTube, twitter, etc., have some built in capabilities that can help podcasters stay motivated through easy engagement with the audience. Easy of commenting and “liking” are just two ways in which these platforms and many like them help your audience engage with your content and as a result, provide an extra level of motivation to keep you producing content. I’d love to see a few more tools built into iTunes that gave podcast listeners an easier way to connect with the podcaster. More access to stats, a “like” button in the Podcasts App, email notifications for new subscriptions are a few things that YouTube provides its creators. And in some cases, YouTube works directly with creators to improve their channels. All of these are great for the platform as well as the creator, keeping eyes and ears on their platform while providing that extra fuel that could be the difference between a creator producing content or stopping. PodcastsConnect is now how you submit podcasts to Apple. Login and check out the new tools available to you as a podcaster on iTunes. Libsyn now helps make the process of posting a podcast a little easier. ID3 tags, metadata that lives inside each podcast file (mp3) can now be added to your file when you upload to Libsyn. Blubby has had this feature for long time and I’m glad to see it now come to Libsyn users as well. If you want the best podcast media hosting, these are the two services I recommend. You can use *promo code: podcasthelper on checkout to get your first month free. I found out about an interesting quirk of the Behringer Q802USB which doesn’t allow you to monitor your audio in both directions when using the USB in/out only. Here’s how to “fix” the Q802USB to monitor in and out via USB. On this episode I explain the process you see in the above video but you’ll also hear how well this sub $100 mixer handles gain hungry dynamic microphones, in this case the Heil PR40. I also cover the Mackie Mix8 mixer and you can watch that review as well: Take note of the added Google Play Music buttons in the subscribe sections (below and top right) of this website. If your show is in the GPM store, make sure to update your site to include an easy link to your show on GPM!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Shooting in Minnesota 20 mins – “Philando Castile and Alton Sterling were both fatally shot by police just this week. As people demand justice, what will it take for things finally to change?” At the link find the title, “Another victim shot to death by U.S. police spark calls for justice, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160707_33613.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Shootings 49 mins – “Last night, an African-American Minnesota man was shot to death in a car by police. This just a day after a black man died at the hands of police in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Parts of both incidents were captured on video. According to data from the Washington Post, these represent two of the 123 fatal shootings of African-Americans by police so far this year. About two years after the deaths of Eric Garner and Michael Brown, many are asking why more progress has not been made. The latest on the Baton Rouge and Minnesota shootings, and what they mean for race and policing in America.” (5 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Police Shootings in Dallas 21 mins – “A sniper turns a peaceful demonstration against police violence into a backdrop where police are the targets. Twelve Dallas police officers were hit, five are dead. The Current looks at the danger this recent shooting presents for race relations.” At the link find the title, “We are at a crossroads’: Police targeted at Dallas protest, 5 killed, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160708_31174.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Shootings in St Paul 47 mins – “A black man down and shot by white police officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. We study the tape and what it means.” At the link find the title, “The Shooting Deaths Of Philando Castile And Alton Sterling, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_485121640.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty Goals of UN 50 mins – “As the Sustainable Development Goals replace the Millennium Development Goals in January, Mike Wooldridge asks what are the realistic prospects for eradicating poverty by 2030? Can such strategies really “leave no one behind”?” At the link find the title, “The New Face of Development, Jan, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03gj9ct.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quarks and Gluons 27 mins – “Keith & Russ talk with Vladimir Skokov, a research associate with the Brookhaven National Laboratory.  Skokov talks particle physics, specifically quarks and gluons.  He also touches on plasma and String Theory. http://www.bnl.gov/physics/NTG/people/skokov.phpAt the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in Canada 21 mins – “With anti-immigrant sentiment being stirred up in the U.K. and in America, we explore racism in our own country and how some Canadians are challenging it.” At the link find the title, “Canadians challenge racism on their streets, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160704_72646.mp3

Relax with Nightvale 23 mins – “Anxiety, Stomach.” At the link find the title, “Within the Wires: Relaxation Cassette #2, Jul, 2016,” right-click “ “Media files 0220Within20the20Wires 20Relaxation20Cassette20232.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robert Kennedy 49 mins – “Robert Kennedy’s political transformation is the focus of a new biography by journalist Larry Tye. Kennedy began his career as an assistant counsel on Senator Joe McCarthy’s sub-committee investigating communists. When Bobby Kennedy was assassinated in 1968, he was the liberal hopeful in the Democratic presidential primary. Larry Tye was given access to 58 boxes of private Kennedy papers, and interviewed 400 people, including Robert Kennedy’s widow, Ethel Kennedy.” At the link find the title, “July 5, 2016, From ‘Cold Warrior’ To ‘Liberal Icon,’ The Story Of Robert Kennedy,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rocket Girls 56 mins – “Science writer Nathalia Holt discusses her book [Rise of the Rocket Girls], in which she chronicles an elite group of women’s contributions to rocket design, space exploration, and the first American satellite. She is interviewed by Lisa Rand.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Nathalia Holt, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.438295.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Romania Sheep Protection 27 mins – “Lucy Ash meets the sheep farmers who took on the government because of what they claim is a threat to their traditional way of life.” At the link find the title, “Romania: The Shepherds’ Revolt, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03ntwv4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rosemary Kennedy 52 min – “…biographer Kate Clifford Larson is with us to talk about the life of Rosemary Kennedy. She was a sister of John F. Kennedy, a vivacious beauty, and also intellectually challenged. As the Kennedy family’s power grew, her parents were anxious to keep her from the public eye. So at 23, she was lobotomized and institutionalized. Larson joins us to explain what Rosemary’s story reveals about the way we once dealt with disabilities, and how her life eventually inspired the Kennedys’ activism.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rosewood Smuggling 28 mins – “Peter Hadfield travels to Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam to investigate the illegal trade in Siamese Rosewood. Rosewood is a hard wood that is highly prized because it can be carved into ornate items of furniture, but the appetite for the wood is so voracious that Siamese Rosewood is now becoming critically endangered. The wood is traded on the black market and now the Siamese Rosewood tree is close to being totally eradicated. Not only that, those responsible for the smuggling are leaving a trail of death and environmental destruction in their wake. Peter Hadfield goes in search of the tree. He’s on the trail of the smugglers and discovers the measures being taken to try and safeguard the surviving trees.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rule of Law 42 mins – “The eminent economic historian Professor Niall Ferguson argues that institutions determine the success or failure of nations. In a lecture delivered at the London School of Economics and Political Science, he says that a society governed by abstract, impersonal rules will become richer than one ruled by personal relationships. The rule of law is crucial to the creation of a modern economy and its early adoption is the reason why Western nations grew so powerful in the modern age. But are the institutions of the West now degenerating? Professor Ferguson asks whether the democratic system has a fatal flaw at its heart. In the West young people are confronting the fact that they must live with the huge financial debt generated by their parents, something they had no control over despite the fact that they were born into a democracy. Is there a way of restoring the compact between different generations?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Satellite Design 163 mins – “In this episode we get a peek into how OHB System AG in Bremen develops satellites — mostly based on the Galileo navigation satellites. We speak with Christian Pauly about systems engineering, with Mathias Tausche about manufacturing and integration, with Andreas Wortmann about the software on the satellites, and with Ingo Engeln about the company as a whole. As a background, you may want to listen to omega tau 26 about satellite buses. omega tau 204 on Planet Labs’ small satellites may be interesting as a contrast.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 File Directly,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sebastian Junger 53 mins – “The journalist Sebastian Junger has noticed that for many veterans, and even some civilians, war feels better than peace, and he has a theory about why that might be. War, he says, compels us to band together and support one another in pursuit of a clear goal. But under the normal conditions of modern culture, we lose those connections, and we feel lonely and lost. Thursday, Junger joins us to discuss why we’re stronger when we come together and what tribal societies can teach us about leading meaningful lives. Sebastian Junger is a contributing editor to Vanity Fair and the author of a number of books, including The Perfect Storm, War, and A Death in Belmont. Together with Tim Hetherington, he directed the documentary film Restrepo. His latest book is called Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging … Junger recommends the book Sapiens…by Yuval Noah Harari if you’d like to learn more about the history of human cultural evolution from savannah-dwelling primates to earth’s lone surviving hominid species.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup Problems 44 mins – “Edgar Diaz has dedicated his life to dairy. He sees an incredible beauty in milk and the things that can come from it: soft cheese, rich dulce de leche, and creamy yogurt. He knows that to produce a really good yogurt, the conditions are just as important as the ingredients. You can use the freshest milk, but if your temperature is off or the timing inexact you risk ruining the whole batch. Edgar has a lot in common with some of the world’s most successful founders: intense passion, a deep knowledge of his product, and awards and acclaim from peers in his field. He seems to have all the ingredients for success, and the conditions seem right, so why is he so far from it?” At the link find the title, “Up in Flames (Season 3, Episode 9), Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT8206555017.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stroke Prevention 11 mins – “Professor Valery Feigin discusses an Article on the global burden of stroke and risk factors from 1990–2013.” At the link find the title, “Global burden of stroke: The Lancet Neurology: Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files laneur_160622.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stutter Story 11 mins – “Artist Safwat Saleem grew up with a stutter — but as an independent animator, he decided to do his own voiceovers to give life to his characters. When YouTube commenters started mocking his Pakistani accent, it crushed him, and his voice began to leave his work. Hear how this TED Fellow reclaimed his voice and confidence in this charming, thoughtful talk.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court 8 56 mins – “The Supreme Court ended it’s term June 30th, issuing a slew of decisions. We look at three rulings:  one involving gun ownership and domestic violence cases, another on affirmative action in college admissions and a third on political corruption. A look at how this unusual eight member court ruled and what ramifications these three particular decisions might have for New Hampshire.” At the link right-click th eplay button beside “Listen” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Decisions 49 mins – “It’s the last day of the Supreme Court’s current term. The biggest decisions are often announced in the final weeks. Last week the court handed down decisions on affirmative action and immigration. Today the court weighs in on what’s been called the most significant abortion rights case in a generation. The eight justices also issue opinions on the public corruption conviction of former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and a case involving the Second Amendment. We discuss these cases and how the court has been affected by a vacancy on the bench since the death of Antonin Scalia last winter.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Supreme Court Direction 35 mins – “…One of the things at stake in this presidential election is the future direction of the Supreme Court. Since the death of Justice Scalia, the court has had only eight justices and has sometimes been stalemated 4-4. Assuming Congress continues to block President Obama’s appointment of Merrick Garland, the next president will have at least one justice to appoint to the court, and that is likely to tip the balance. You can see the influence one president can have on the court by looking at Richard Nixon who appointed four justices. His first appointment, Warren Burger, in 1969, was also chosen by Nixon to be the chief justice. Nixon’s final appointment, William Rehnquist, became the next chief justice after Burger retired in 1986. The Burger Court has often been described as playing a transitional role between the liberal Warren Court and the conservative Rehnquist Court. But my guest Linda Greenhouse says that the Burger Court played a crucial role in establishing the conservative legal foundation for the even more conservative courts that followed. She co-wrote the new book, “The Burger Court And The Rise Of The Judicial Right” with Michael Graetz, a law professor at Columbia Law School and Yale University. Greenhouse covered the Supreme Court for The New York Times for nearly 30 years and now writes a biweekly column for The Times website. She also teaches at Yale Law School….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Synthetic Biologist 39 mins – “Dr. Karmella Haynes is an Assistant Professor in the Ira A. Fulton School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering at Arizona State University. She is also a senior judge for the International Genetically Engineered Machine Competition. She received her Ph.D. in Molecular Genetics from Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to joining the faculty at ASU, Karmella was awarded a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Teaching and Research fellowship at Davidson College, followed by an NIH postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School. Karmella is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “314: Expressing Her Creativity Making Epigenetic Machinery and Designing Biological Devices – Dr. Karmella Haynes,” right-click “Media files 314 Karmella Haynes_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugee Stories 27 mins – “Life as a refugee after fleeing the war in Syria to make a new life in Lebanon” At the link find the title, “The Listening Project in Lebanon, Jan, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03dnk1m.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taxidermy 26 mins – “Have you noticed any antlered rabbits mounted on the wall of your local coffee shop? Or maybe some geese with butterfly wings? That’s because taxidermy has made a comeback. Our producer, Mariel Carr, wanted to know why, so she spent a few months exploring the alternative—or rogue—taxidermy scene in Philadelphia. Rogue taxidermy takes an artistic approach to the traditional craft. It combines materials, and even animals, in unconventional ways. And it seems to involve a fair amount of glitter. Meet Beth Beverly, a young taxidermist; John Whitenight, an eccentric collector of Victorian taxidermy; and the polar bears and gorillas at the Academy of Natural Sciences. Together they explain taxidermy’s long history of combining art and science, and describe the role arsenic played in taxidermy’s rise to prominence in the 19th century.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Telemedicine 48 mins – “The doctor’s appointment goes digital. Virtual visits, high-tech self-monitoring are here. We’ll look at Telemedicine.” At the link find the title, “Digital Doctors And Virtual Medicine, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_484834298.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tesla Auto Death 21 mins – “Self-driving car technology has come so far, so fast, many don’t realize these cars are already on the road. Now that a man has died after using Tesla’s autopilot feature, some question if it all happened too fast without proper safeguards in place?” At the link find the title, “Death of Tesla driver tests future of driverless car, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160705_32780.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tornado Survivors 20 mins – “What happens when 24 people shut themselves in a beer cooler to wait out one of the strongest tornadoes in recorded history? Take a listen, because they recorded it.” At the link click the circle with the three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender Judge 25 mins – “When Phyllis Frye was in her 20s, a decision to come out as transgender cost her … her family, children and profession. Phyllis Frye shares her journey from being a trans law student in the 70s, to becoming the first openly transgender U.S. judge.” At the link find the title, “ENCORE: Transgender judge Phyllis Frye helped put the ‘T’ in LGBTQ, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160705_45407.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virologist Peter Palese 74 mins – “Host: Vincent Racaniello Guest: Peter PaleseVincent speaks with Peter Palese about his illustrious career in virology, from early work on neuraminidases to universal influenza virus vaccines.” At the link right-click “Download TWIV 396” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virology Researcher 39 mins – “Dr. James Pipas is the Herbert W. and Grace boyer Chair in Molecular Biology and Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. He received his PhD in Molecular Biophysics from Florida State University and completed his postdoctoral training at Baylor College and the John Hopkins School of Medicine. Jim has been a faculty member in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh now for over 30 years. Jim is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “221: Making Valuable Contributions to the Proliferation of Exciting Discoveries in Virology – Dr. James Pipas,” right-click “Media files 221_James_Pipas_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wahls Protocal 39 mins – “Dr. Terry Wahls talks functional medicine, ketosis, and implementing the Wahls Protocol in practice.” At the link find the title, “The Wahls Protocol: Fighting Fatigue With a Fork, Jul, 2016,” right-click “ “Media files SDS136.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 244 – Jul 15, 2016: Anger in America, Astrophysics, Auto Recalls, Bengazi Attack Report, Bernie Sanders Programs, Biological Engineer, Biology and Innovation, Biomedical Engineering, Black American Concerns, Black Lives Matter, Bone Cancer Specialist, Bone fractures, Boomer Retirements, Brain Aging and Circulation, Brexit, British Comedy, Campaign Finances, Cell Biology Researcher, China Water Concerns, Chinese Solar King, Clean Energy Geek Squad, Commons Overview, Community Power, Computational Innovator, Corruption in South Africa, Coyotes America, Crazy Artist, Creativity, Crisis Communications, Crystallography, Data Breach Reports, Decision Making, Discrimination Laws, Disease Research, Dust Bowl Recollections, Entomologist, Environment Researcher, Environmental Engineering, Eton Scholarships, Explosives Researcher, Fasting, Feminist Professor, Food Allergies, Food Waste Fix, Frames of Reference, Government IT Upgrades, Greenpeace Willcox Interview, Grunt Book, Gun Violence Control, Hamilton Play, Hearing Researcher, Hip Replacement, Informationist, Innovate Long and Short, Islam Overview, Ketogenic Diet, Land Fill Mining, Learning Researcher, Market Forces, Mass Spectrometry Expert, Medical Crusaders, Medical Simulation, Memory Researcher, Migrant Student Education, Multitasking Researcher, Music and Race, Neurologist with Dyslexia, Neuroscientist, North Korea Documentary, Open Data, Pain Control, Physical Therapy Researcher, Planetary Systems, Plant Evolution Researcher, Prebiotics Researcher, Referendums, Ribosome, Rust Belt Boy, Social Psychologist, Somalia Recovery, South Africa LGBTI, Speech Researcher, Startup Failures, Sustainability, Terrorist Identification, Thiomersal, Tissue Engineering, Toilet Upgrades, Treatment Options, Turkish Airport Attack, Ultrasound Researcher, Unpleasant Designs, Video Tracking, Vincent Racaniello Virologist

The best 100 podcasts from a larger group of 268 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Africa Solar Lights 30 mins – “Micro-solar lamps are now lighting parts of Africa that the grid cannot reach. Tom Heap investigates how the solar spread is emulating the wide reach of mobile phones in Africa. There are currently over 100 million kerosene lamps across Africa that are the main source of light in parts of the continent that are either off-grid or where people cannot afford to hook-up to the electricity grid. These lights are polluting, dangerous and expensive. Burning a kerosene light in a small room produces the same detrimental effect as smoking two packets of cigarettes. They are a fire hazard and they can cost as much as 15% of an average salary to fuel in some parts of the continent. Tom heap sets out to discover if a small desktop solar lamp that costs a fraction of the running expenses of a kerosene lamp can improve the health of millions of people and help to lift Africa out of poverty. This week’s programme is produced in conjunction with BBC Newsnight and BBC World’s ‘Our World’ programme. To watch the films made to accompany the programme visit the Newsnight and Our World websites.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Immigrant Stories 72 mins – “This fall, Beyond the Book marks its tenth year as podcast series. On the occasion of the Independence Day holiday in the United States, we reach into the BTB archives for a 2006 Miami Book Fair panel discussion, “Family Secrets, Family Truths: American Immigrant Stories.” Speaking with CCC’s Chris Kenneally ten years ago were Michael Patrick MacDonald, author of All Souls and Easter Rising: An Irish American Coming Up from Under; Maria Elena Salinas, Univision TV news anchor and author of the memoir, I Am My Father’s Daughter: Living A Life Without Secrets; and Sasha Su-Ling Welland, author of the memoir, A Thousand Miles of Dreams.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anger in America 46 mins – “How To Strike A Balance Between ‘Anger and Forgiveness’4 -Philosopher Martha Nussbaum with a deep meditation on anger and forgiveness. She join us.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astrophysics 54 mins – “Today we present a discussion from The World Science Festival in Brisbane held in March 2016 which saw four of the world’s top astrophysicists come together to chew over some big questions… and possible answers regarding the universe, its origin, where it’s going, and its possible future. Gravity waves, cosmic microwave radiation, dark matter and dark energy flow freely in this entertaining discussion.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Auto Recalls 46 mins – “Auto recalls. Volkswagen and Takata airbags are just the biggest in a long list. Recalls are on the rise. Millions affected. We look at why and what’s going.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bengazi Attack Report 46 min – “The long-awaited House Benghazi Report finds no new evidence of wrongdoing by Hillary Clinton. We’ll read the fine print and look at the big picture.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bernie Sanders Programs 60 mins -”In an exclusive interview with C-SPAN, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders talks about the presidential campaign and his plans to take his progressive message to the convention in Philadelphia and beyond November.” At the link find the title, “Bernie Sanders Discusses the Presidential Campaign, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.446561.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biological Engineer 35 mins – “Dr. Celeste Nelson is an Associate Professor in Chemical and Biological Engineering, as well as Molecular Biology at Princeton University. She is also a Member of the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and the Breast Cancer Research and Cancer Metabolism and Growth Programs. Celeste received her PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University and conducted postdoctoral research at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory before joining the faculty at Princeton. Celeste is the recipient of many awards and honors during her career. She has received the Princeton School of Engineering and Applied Science Distinguished Teacher Award, the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, the Allan P. Colburn Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Technology Review TR35 Young Innovator Award, and an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship in Molecular Biology. She is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “322: Creating 3D Structures in Culture to Study Tissues and Organ Development – Dr. Celeste Nelson,” right-click “Media files 322_Celeste Nelson_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biology and Innovation 61 mins – “Dr. Richard Jefferson is the Chief Executive Officer of an independent, non-profit institute called Cambia. He is also Professor of Science, Technology & Law at Queensland University of Technology and Director of an open, public innovation resource called The Lens. In addition, Richard is a founder of the biological open-source initiative called Biological Innovation for Open Society. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Molecular Genetics from the College of Creative Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara and went on to complete his PhD in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Richard completed postdoctoral research at the Plant Breeding Institute in Cambridge and then worked as a Molecular Biologist for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations before founding Cambia. Richard has received many awards and honors during his career, and just to name a few, he was named an Outstanding Social Entrepreneur by the Schwab Foundation, he was among Scientific American’s List of the World’s 50 Most Influential Technologists and World Research Leader for Economic Development in 2003, he received the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) Leadership in Science Public Service Award, and Medalist of the Center for Science and Policy Outcomes. Richard is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “259: Developing The Lens for Transparency in Innovation – Dr. Richard Jefferson,” right-click “Media files 259_Richard_Jefferson_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biomedical Engineering 28 mins – “European Inventor of the Year, Chris Toumazou, reveals how his personal life and early research lie at the heart of his inventions. As Chief Scientist at the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at Imperial College London, Chris inspires engineers, doctors and other scientists to create medical devices for the 21st century. Applying silicon chip technology, more commonly found inside mobile phones, he tackles seemingly insurmountable problems in medicine to create devices that bridge the electronic and biological worlds – from a digital plaster that monitors a patient’s vital signs to an artificial pancreas to treat diabetes. His latest creation, coined a ‘lab on a chip’, analyses a person’s DNA within minutes outside the laboratory. The hand-held device can identify genetic differences which dictate a person’s susceptibility to hereditary diseases and how they will react to a drug like warfarin, used to treat blood clots.” At the link find the title, “Chris Toumazou, Oct, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qg67b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black American Concerns 37 mins – “On Monday, June 27, I paid a visit to New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture to help a large gathering of the Schomburg’s devoted friends and visitors say goodbye — very reluctantly — to Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad. He’s been the beloved director of the Schomburg for the past five years and has done much to expand the reach and the influence of the Harlem institution that devotes itself to researching and disseminating the history of African-Americans. But Muhammad is also a scholar and he is now eager to evaluate everything he has gleaned about the contemporary concerns of black America from a new vantage point. He’s on his way to join Harvard University’s faculty as a professor of history, race and public policy at the Kennedy School of Government. This young historian is uniquely well suited to ponder the contradictions of the past, the present and the future. Muhammad grew up on Chicago’s Southside, he’s the great grandson of Elijah Muhammad, who led the Nation of Islam for decades and he’s the son of a Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalist and an educator. I first interviewed Muhammad in 2012 about the founding paradox of our country, that our constitution promised “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” despite the entrenched institution of slavery. In June, in front of a live audience at the Schomburg, Khalil Gibran Muhammad and I picked up where we left off, discussing how critical it is to know the past in order to challenge our turbulent times, and reshape our future.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Lives Matter 25 mins – “I’m holding in my hand what has been called “one of the most daring books of the 21st century,” a “book for the ages,” “bracing,” “unrelenting.” The title is Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul, and it breathes with prophetic fire. Its power comes because the author does not begin with “pristine principles or with assumptions about our inherent goodness.” Rather, its view of democracy, as he writes, “emerges out of an unflinching encounter with lynching trees, prison cells, foreclosed homes, young men and women gunned down by police and places where ‘hope, unborn, had died.’” Democracy in Black is rich in history and bold in opinion, and inconvenient truths leap from every page. For example, and I’m quoting the book again, “black people must lose their blackness if America is to be transformed. But of course, white people get to stay white.” The book opens in Ferguson, Missouri, with the author talking to three, dynamic young black women, newly born to activism, and it closes in the intimacy of the reader’s heart, where each of us wrestles with the question of whether we can indeed change the habits of racism and create together a new politics based on a revolution in values. The author is Eddie Glaude Jr. Glaude was raised in the Deep South, in Moss Point, Mississippi, and still remembers the Ku Klux Klan burning a cross at the fairground. He’s now a professor of religion and African-American studies at Princeton University, where he also chairs the Center for African-American Studies. This is his third book, and he’s a member in good standing of the black establishment, which he rigorously calls to account in Democracy in Black.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Lives Matter 50 mins – “Mukul Devichand and Mike Wendling travel around the United States, talking to Black Lives Matter activists, the parents of young black men shot by police, civil rights elders like the Rev. Jesse Jackson, and police officials. In an election year that will be crucial to the country’s future, can Black Lives Matter change America?” At the link find the title, “Black Lives Matter: The Story of a Slogan, Jan, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03gzyf1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bone Cancer 46 mins – “Dr. Wakenda Tyler is an Associate Professor in Orthopaedic Oncology and Metabolic Bone Disease and Adult Reconstruction at the University of Rochester Medical Center. She was awarded her M.D. And M.P.H. from John Hopkins University and completed residency in Orthopaedic Surgery at the Hospital for Special Surgery. Wakenda then completed a fellowship in musculoskeletal oncology at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center before joining the faculty at the University of Rochester where she is today. Wakenda is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “290: Treating Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors – Dr. Wakenda Tyler,” right-click “Media files 290_Wakenda_Tyler.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bone Fractures 88 mins – “The treatment of bone fractures has changed a great deal from the days of plaster casts. See what tools are available to doctors now to help bones mend. Recorded on 05/17/2016. (#30988)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boomer Retirements 64mins – “…This episode focuses on dealing with the loss of crucial information as seasoned engineers retire. Many baby boomers have not saved enough for retirement, and so are deciding to work longer. Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce published a 2011 study on STEM careers, noting that 10 years after graduation, 46 percent of STEM graduates have left the field. While the clamor for more engineering graduates continues, a number of authorities claim there is no engineering labor shortage. A 2013 article from National Defense Magazine explained that the “engineering shortage” is not a myth, although the engineers who commented on the article seemed to feel otherwise. The concern over retiring baby boomers dates back a while, with a July 2000 article (pdf) from Monthly Labor Review discussing the substantial effects to be felt by U.S. employers. Jeff references a white paper (pdf) from The Integrity Group that discusses the effect of Baby Boomer retirement on the energy industry. Harvard Business Review published a 2014 article examining the costs associated with retiring experts. A Bloomberg article from earlier this year discussed steps taken by defense and aerospace company BAE to prepare for upcoming retirements within their engineering ranks. Paying workers more money can overcome their reluctance to assume jobs they would not otherwise consider, suggests a Twin Cities Pioneer Press article. Jeff notes that many Baby Boomers are in no hurry to leave the job market. Many companies cope with the loss of retiring engineers by hiring them back on a part-time or flex-time basis. An infographic (pdf) from Kelly Services forecasts engineering job growth through 2023. Interested listeners can look up forecasts for engineering employment offered by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Aging and Circulation 45 mins – “Dr. Jeff Iliff is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine at Oregon Health and Science University, as well as an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Center for Translational Neuromedicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Jeff received his PhD in Physiology and Pharmacology from Oregon Health and Science University. Afterward, he conducted postdoctoral research, and later served on faculty, at the University of Rochester Medical Center before returning to OHSU where he is today. Jeff is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “268: Clearing Out Brain Clutter: A Glimpse into the Glymphatic System – Dr. Jeff Iliff,” right-click “Media files 268_Jeff_Iliff_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit 76 mins – “The UK has made the momentous decision to leave the EU. Intelligence Squared staged an emergency event to discuss the ramifications. A panel including Douglas Carswell, Jonathan Freedland, Josef Janning, Liz Kendall, Anand Menon and Adair Turner will examined: Who will be the next prime minister to steer us through the rocky negotiations with the EU that lie ahead? What kind of deal can we expect to get? Will the EU play tough with us in order to stop anti-EU contagion spreading to other member states? Or will Brexit be the wake-up call Europe needs to achieve real reform? Will the Brexit camp be able to deliver on its promises – on immigration, NHS spending etc? If not, will there be a backlash from the voters? Will we lose Scotland? Will George Osborne’s dire warnings about the economy be borne out? Is the second referendum which some Remainers are petitioning for a real possibility?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Discussion 48 mins – “Global financial markets show some signs of steadying this morning following Britain’s vote to leave the European Union. The vote last Thursday sparked a global market drop of $3 trillion. Yesterday U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew offered assurances that although the U.K. and the EU is in uncharted waters economically and politically, the U.S. is not facing a related financial crisis of its own. Still, it’s clear that Britain’s likely more distant relationship with European Union countries leaves the U.S. more removed as well – as least temporarily….” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Brexit Meaning 50 mins – “This show has a “chickens coming home to roost” feel to it, but maybe in a positive way. It was supposed to be about the recent British vote to leave the EU, but evolved into something larger. Surprise, surprise.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Comedy 30 mins – “The Frequency of Laughter is a six-part history of radio comedy, covering 1975-2005, presented by journalist and radio fan Grace Dent. In each episode she brings together two figures who were making significant radio comedy at the same time, and asks them about their experiences. This is a conversational history that focuses on the people who were there and the atmosphere within the BBC and the wider comedy world that allowed them to make great radio – or not. This final edition features Justin Edwards and Jan Ravens looking at radio comedy in the early 2000s. Justin is now known for his work on In And Out Of The Kitchen and Radio 4 Extra’s Newsjack, but got his first series in 2003 as part of the sketch team The Consultants. Jan’s association with radio comedy dates back to the early 1980s when she became the first-ever female radio comedy producer, but became beloved of the Radio 4 audience for her work on Dead Ringers, which started in 2000. Grace asks them about the atmosphere within the Radio Comedy department and within the BBC; they discuss the difference between topical comedy and satire, and whether the Radio 4 audience necessarily wants either; and they discuss the contribution a good sound engineer can make to a programme.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campaign Finances 27 mins – “The road to the White House requires stamina and plenty of money. Economist and US Citizen, Linda Yueh, makes a hypothetical run for Congress in the 5th district of Virgina, to find out why it costs so much money to run for office and the increasing importance of the internet in a campaign. On the way she gathers a campaign team, meets her voters and learns about the importance of pizza in politics.” At the link find the title, “Linda For Congress, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03hc9n2.mp3”and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cell Biology Researcher 46 mins – “Dr. Patrick Lusk is an Assistant Professor of Cell Biology at Yale University. He received his B.S. and Ph.D. in Cell Biology from the University of Alberta and went on to conduct postdoctoral research at The Rockefeller University before accepting his current position at Yale. Patrick is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, ”312: Having Fun Studying the Fundamental Mechanisms of Nuclear Transport in Cells – Dr. Patrick Lusk,” right-click “Media files 312_Patrick Lusk_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China Water Concerns 30 mins – “China has powered its development with water. When it needed energy for industry it built the largest hydro-electric dams in the world. When the farmland and factories of northern China were threatened with drought an enormous canal was built to pipe supplies from the south. China has the engineering skill, the capital and the will to challenge the limits that nature sets on development. But the exploitation of China’s water resources has come at a great cost, forcing millions from their homes, polluting natural lakes and rivers and pushing rare animal species to the brink of extinction. Isabel Hilton, editor of the China Dialogue website, assesses the progress of China’s water revolution and asks where its water will come from in the future. Can large-scale engineering continue to provide the answers or must government teach industry and the public to live within their means?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Solar King 27 mins – “Meet Huang Ming, the Chinese inventor who describes himself as, ‘the number one crazy solar guy in the world’. One of the prize exhibits of his museum in northern China is a vintage solar panel. It’s a water heater, installed by President Jimmy Carter on the roof of the West Wing of the White House. Back in 1979 the installation was meant to symbolise a new solar-powered future for America. Instead, oil prices fell and Ronald Reagan removed the White House panels. 37 years on and it’s China, not the US that’s embracing the idea of a solar-powered economy. Huang Ming, an engineer, prominent political figure and businessman is leading the way with his foundation of Solar Valley. In 800 acres of land south of Beijing he employs 3000 people in solar research, development and manufacture. Peter Hadfield visits Solar Valley to see the fruits of the sun, from a solar-powered yurt to the world’s biggest solar-powered building. He asks if Huang Ming can persuade his nation to turn its back on coal and oil and angle its face toward the sun. Producer: Alasdair Cross.” At the link find the title, “The Sun King of China, May 2016,” right-click “Media files p03t1tkw.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clean Energy Geek Squad 31 mins – “When you have a computer problem, you call tech support. When you have a ghost problem you call Ghostbusters. But who do you call when you have a clean energy problem? In this episode of Direct Current – An Energy.gov Podcast, Matt calls up the Clean Energy Solutions Center, a “help desk” that provides free expert advice on clean energy policy to governments all over the world. Allison talks to Nicky Phear, a professor who cycles hundreds of miles across Montana to teach her students about climate change. Nicky just received a big award at the C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium for her education work, and she’s basically an all-around awesome person. And Dan tries to convince Paul that there is a better way to measure energy — starting with the humble burrito.” At the link right-click “Download file” andselect”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Commons Overview 28 mins – “Tim Harford presents the last in the series, ‘Pop-up Ideas’. Tim explores the concept of ‘The Tragedy of the Commons’ – a term coined by the American ecologist Garrett Hardin in a hugely influential 1968 essay. He compares Hardin’s work to that of the American political economist Elinor Ostrom, to reflect on the impact of mankind on the world around us.” At the link find the title, “Common Tragedy, Jul, 2013,” right-click “Media files p02r7nqx.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Community Power 30 mins – “There’s no doubt that ‘People Power’ can transform a community, when keen volunteers come together to collectively improve their lot. But what happens when People Power can be measured in watts and volts? Communities up and down the country are taking the power back – literally – from the Big 6, and starting a variety of schemes to generate their own energy. They’re reducing their bills, strengthening community spirit – and helping the UK towards its renewable energy targets at the same time. And in January of this year, the government got fully on board with the movement too, publishing the first ever UK Community Energy Strategy. But just how easy is it to do? Can philanthropic locals really compete with the might of the UK Energy industry? And how does the money stack up? Tom Heap investigates.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computational Innovator 54 mins – “Dr. Stephen Wolfram is the Founder and CEO of Wolfram Research. In addition, he is the creator of the Wolfram Language, the computational platform Mathematica, and the computational knowledge engine Wolfram Alpha, as well as the author of the bestselling book A New Kind of Science. Stephen attended Oxford University and he received his PhD in Theoretical Physics from the California Institute of Technology. Afterward, he joined the faculty at Caltech and became the youngest recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship. Later, he founded the Center for Complex Systems Research and joined the faculty at the University of Illinois. Shortly afterwards, he founded his current company Wolfram Research and has made substantial advances in mathematics, physics, and computation. Stephen is here with us today to tell us all about his experiences along the way in life and science.” At the link find the title, “283: Strategic Scientist Creating Computation Automation and Innovation – Dr. Stephen Wolfram,” right-click “Media files 283_Stephen_Wolfram_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in South Africa 27 mins – “South Africa’s President Zuma is in deep trouble. Accusations of corruption and unexplained ministerial appointments have fuelled widespread suspicions that the South African state has been “captured”. At the heart of this accusation are the Gupta brothers – a secretive family of Indian-born entrepreneurs. From modest beginnings in the 1990s, the Guptas’ South African business empire grew dramatically. Boosted, it is said, by their alleged influence over state contracts, political appointments and President Zuma himself. In this edition of Assignment, Michael Robinson tells the story of “Guptagate” – how one of the fiercest political storms since the ending of apartheid has swept South Africa and its increasingly embattled President.” At the link find the title, “Capturing South Africa, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03w82hm.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coyotes America 53 mins – “Wednesday we’re talking about a homegrown American success: coyotes. The country has been at war with the iconic species since white settlers first reached the heartland plains. But coyotes, according to biologist Dan Flores, not only survived our assault on them, they simultaneously expanded their range across the continent and into our cities. Flores joins us Wednesday to explore the coyote’s fascinating story of resilience and adaptability and how it parallels our own version of Manifest Destiny. Dan Flores is the A.B. Hammond Professor Emeritus of Western History at the University of Montana and the author of ten books on aspects of Western US history. His new book is called Coyote America: A Natural and Supernatural History….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crazy Artist 13 mins – “These days you can find William Kitt in a small, bright solarium on the corner of 150th Street and Edgecombe Avenue in Manhattan, where he lives. Most hours on any day he sits here, sketching over a desk cluttered with colored pencils and pastels. What you could not know from looking at Kitt, a slender, laughing man who wears a beret and surrounds himself with drawings, is that he spent decades living on the streets. Kitt says he spent 34 years of his life being homeless and maddened by drug-induced hallucinations. Now he lives in an apartment owned by a housing nonprofit called Broadway Housing Communities, which was founded in 1983 and owns seven buildings housing over 600 tenants. Like most supportive housing projects, Broadway Housing Communities provides apartments and medical, psychiatric or other services to people who, like William Kitt, have physical or mental health problems or are low income. Kitt, now 65, has leased a room from this Broadway Housing property on Edgecombe Avenue for the past 13 years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity 28 mins – “A talk for the online lecture series TED in 2006 launched Sir Ken Robinson’s ideas to a global audience. He spoke about creativity in schools for 20 minutes, and the video has been watched more than any other TED Talk, with 27 million views so far. In conversation with Sarah Montague, he argues that modern teaching is a product of industrialisation, putting children through a factory model that prepares them for working life. But if we truly value innovation and creativity, why isn’t it taught? For the programme, Sir Ken returns to the former Margaret Beavan Special School in Liverpool, where he spent his primary school years in the 1950s, after contracting polio at four years old. He’s since advised governments and businesses around the world on how to harness creativity, and believes if schools were radically different, giving creative subjects equal status, children would find their true talents.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crisis Communications 14 mins – “On October 22, 2014 shots rang out downtown Ottawa, killing Corporal Nathan Cirillo as he stood guard at the National War Memorial. This unthinkable act devastated and sparked fear in citizens’ minds, causing a frenzy of conversations and rumours. Where did the assailant flee and where was he headed? Was there also an active shooter at the Rideau Centre? As these very questions and numerous other claims flooded the Internet, Ottawa Police Service (OPS) had already undertaken a number of crisis communications measures, with public safety as its number one priority. Anat Cohn, corporate communications specialist at Ottawa Police Service, recently sat down with our producer Ashlea McGrath at MARCOM Professional Development Annual Forum to discuss her experience in crisis communications on that tragic day in 2014, and the vital role social media played in helping OPS communicate with the public at such a crucial moment.” At the link right-click “Direct download: MarComm_ep.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crystallography 28 mins – “Jim al-Khalili talks to Professor Elspeth Garman about a technique that’s led to 28 Nobel Prizes in the last century. X- ray crystallography, now celebrating its 100th anniversary, is used to study the internal structure of matter. It may sound rather arcane but it’s the reason we now know the structure of hugely important molecules, like penicillin, insulin and DNA. But while other scientists scoop up prizes for cracking chemical structures, Elspeth works away behind the scenes, (more cameraman than Hollywood star), improving the methods and techniques used by everybody working in the field. If only it was as simple as putting a crystal in the machine and printing off the results. Growing a single crystal of an enzyme that gives TB its longevity took Elspeth’s team no less than fifteen years. No pressure there then when harvesting that precious commodity.” At the link find the title, “Elspeth Garman, Oct, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qhl4d.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Breach Reports 23 mins – “In the aftermath of the Panama Papers data breach many law firms have become hyper aware of their digital security risks. With the number of breaches on the rise what can lawyers do to keep informed of the most pertinent risks facing legal practitioners? In this episode of the Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek speak with Clark Hill PLC Of Counsel David G. Ries about data security, Mandiant’s M-Trends, and Verizon’s Data Breach Investigation Reports. David opens the interview with an explanation of what these reports are (summaries developed by security service providers on data breach trends during the past year) and talks about how they help to organize collected information for ease of use. He then analyzes the subtle differences between the two reports, like the way they define terms like data breach and security incident, and gives some insight into the ways each company acquires their data. David also covers the top three key findings provided by each report and gives examples of how this information can be invaluable to law firms seeking to shore up their security shortcomings. He closes the interview with his major takeaways from this year’s’ reports and tips for law firms on how this research can aid in strengthening your comprehensive cybersecurity program….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Decision Making 59 mins – “Dr. Simon DeDeo is external faculty at the Santa Fe Institute and Assistant Professor at Indiana University in Complex Systems and in Cognitive Science. He completed his undergraduate studies in Astrophysics at Harvard University and received a Master’s Degree in Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics from Cambridge University. Simon went on to receive his PhD in Astrophysical Sciences from Princeton University and conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Tokyo, the University of Chicago as a Kavli Fellow, and also at the Santa Fe Institute as an Omidyar Fellow. Simon is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “307: The Science Behind the Formation and Future of Human Societies – Dr. Simon DeDeo,” right-click “Media files 307_Simon_DeDeo_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Discrimination Laws 66 mins – “Last week, the court decided one of this term’s blockbuster cases — a case that could affect the future of affirmative action in this country. The plaintiff was Abigail Fisher, a white woman, who said she was rejected from the University of Texas because the university unfairly considered race as one of many factors when evaluating applicants. And while Fisher’s claims were the focus of the case, the story behind how she ended up in front of the Supreme Court is a lot more complicated.On this episode, we visit Edward Blum, a 64-year-old “legal entrepreneur” and former stockbroker who has become something of a Supreme Court matchmaker — He takes an issue, finds the perfect plaintiff, matches them with lawyers, and works his way to the highest court in the land. He’s had remarkable success, with 6 cases heard before the Supreme Court, including that of Abigail Fisher. We also head to Houston, Texas, where in 1998, an unusual 911 call led to one of the most important LGBT rights decisions in the Supreme Court’s history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disease Research 28 mins – “In October 2013, Jeremy Farrar was appointed Director of the Wellcome Trust – UK’s largest medical research funding charity. The Trust funded £750 million’s worth of health-related research – about the same as the government’s Medical Research Council. This means Jeremy Farrar is a major figure in British science. Since 1996, the doctor and clinical scientist had run the Wellcome-funded Oxford University Clinical Research Unit in Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam – a British-Vietnamese collaboration specialising in infectious diseases such as malaria, HIV, TB and avian flu. He lost close friends and colleagues when the SARS pandemic took off in East Asia in 2003, and dealt with the first cases of the dangerous H5N1 bird flu when it arrived in Vietnam the following here. In conversation with Jim Al-Khalili, Dr Farrar talks about the personal and professional impact of those experiences and of his feelings of impotence as a doctor treating HIV/AIDS patients as a junior doctor in London in 1980s. With his international perspective and his hands-on experience of the deadly potential of infectious diseases, he talks to Jim about the great health challenges faced by the world in the coming decades.” At the link find the title, “Jeremy Farrar, Jul, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qjl4g.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dust Bowl Recollections 27 mins – “A fierce drought in Oklahoma’s ‘No Man’s Land’ – a region that was the heart of the 1930s Dust Bowl – stirs up dust storms, memories and myths. In this parched terrain of ghost towns and abandoned ranches, the wells are running dr” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. , but the stories continue to flow.” At the link find the title, “Dust Bowl Ballads, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p040f864.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Entomologist 42 mins – “Dr. Erin Hodgson is an Associate Professor and Extension Entomologist at Iowa State University. She received her undergraduate training in Biology and Botany and her M.S. in Entomology from North Dakota State University. Erin was awarded her Ph.D. in Entomology from the University of Minnesota, followed by a postdoctoral research position also at the University of Minnesota. Erin served on the faculty at Utah State University before joining the faculty at Iowa State where she is today. Erin has received many awards and honors in her career, including the Editor’s Choice Award from the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation, the Iowa State University Outreach and Extension New Professional Award, and multiple awards from the Entomological Society of America for her educational and outreach efforts. In addition, Erin is co-host of the “Soybean Pest Podcast” with her colleague Matt O’Neal. Erin is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “333: Investigating Insidious Insects in the Field of Agricultural Pest Management – Dr. Erin Hodgson,” right-click “Media files 333_Erin_Hodgson_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environment Researcher 36 mins – “Dr. Benjamin Zaitchik is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Johns Hopkins University. Ben received his undergraduate training in Biology at Harvard University and went on to receive his M.S. in Crop and Soil Sciences from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in Geology and Geophysics from Yale University. Afterward, Ben conducted postdoctoral research as a Research Associate with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Hydrological Sciences Branch and the University of Maryland. He served as an American Association for the Advancement of Science Diplomacy fellow in the U.S. Department of State Office of Global Change before joining the faculty at Johns Hopkins. Ben has received the Meritorious Service and Superior Honor Awards from the U.S. State Department, the Peer Award for outstanding Research Associate from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and has been named a PopTech Science Fellow. Ben is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “296: Forecasting Climate Variability to Improve How We Cope with Change – Dr. Benjamin Zaitchik,” right-click “Media files 296_Ben_Zaitchik_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Engineering 82 mins – “…Environmental engineers plan, design and manage projects associated with environmental protection or remediation. Our guest for this episode is Bronwyn Bell, an environmental engineer from Western Australia with extensive experience in the Mining & Resources economic sector. An unfortunate early experience with Super Glue, while building a popsicle stick bridge, convinced Brownyn that she’d rather not be a civil engineer. Subsectors within the environmental engineering field include wastewater treatment, air pollution control, waste disposal, recyling, and public health management. Bronwyn managed to make spending time at a nearby beer brewery an integral part of her engineering studies. Our guest has worked in coal mines, iron mines, and diamond mines… and has also visited a number of gold mines. Kimberlite is an igneous rock that may contain diamonds. Alluvial diamond mining is usually associated with smaller-scale mining operations. Browyn has done a lot of work in the Pilbara region of Australia, which contains some of the Earth’s oldest rock formations. Tailings are the materials that remain after ore is processed to remove its more valuable components… Bronwyn notes that a good environmental solution is often a good financial solution, as waste reduction aids both. One of our guest’s projects received financial relief due to the presence of Asian green mussels.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from pop-up menu.

Eton Scholarships 27 mins – “Each year some of the poorest pupils in the country enter the hallowed corridors of Eton on full scholarships. Penny Marshall meets some of those applying for places and follows them and those they inspire as they prepare for exams that could change the course of their lives. Andrew Isama reflects on the move from one of Liverpool’s toughest comprehensives to the cobbled square, 15th century chapel and Olympic rowing lake at Eton. He says that preconceptions about the school get turned on their head when scholarship pupils like him arrive: far from being with boys who eat pate and listen to classical music he was surprised to find out just how normal his fellow pupils were: “People had the same interests as me.” The Headmaster at Eton, Simon Henderson, wants more bursaries for boys from disadvantaged backgrounds, so that anyone with the necessary talent can be financially supported at the £35,000-a-year school. Penny joins him and some of the pupils to find out what they hope to gain from the experience. The transition can be a difficult one and some struggle with the move to an institution which has educated 19 British prime ministers, including the present incumbent. But Andrew Isama believes that the influx of scholarship pupils like him also helps those who have come from privileged backgrounds – “A lot of them have never been exposed to anything else. They want to be successful but to do that they have to know how to get on with a range of people.” At the link find the title, “An Eton Experience, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03ly7ym.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Explosives Researcher 28 mins – “Jackie Akhavan, Professor of Explosive Chemistry, tells Jim al-Khalili all about the science of explosives. She explains exactly what explosives are and how to make them safer to handle. She started by working on how to make fireworks safer and has been involved in research with bees to see whether they can be used smell different types of explosives. Her current project involves testing the rocket fuel that will be used in Bloodhound, the British designed and built supersonic car that aims to reach a speed of 1,000mph. Her work involves finding out how to best detect explosives in airports and elsewhere, teaching security professionals how to differentiate between false alarms and the real thing. She also works on explosives used in warfare and discusses the ethical issues involved.” At the link find the title, “Jackie Akhavan, Sep, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qft7t.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fasting 35 mins – “Here are some things that the legendary bodybuilder Bernarr Macfadden believed in: Fasting to cure cancer. Fasting to cure asthma. Fasting to cure – here’s an interesting one – emaciation. “I mean, there’s the old idea of starve a fever, feed a cold,” said Mark Adams, who wrote a book about Macfadden called Mr. America. “For Macfadden it was starve a fever, starve a cold, starve a sore throat, starve cancer, starve kleptomania.” The alternative medicine enthusiast shook up the health scene in the early 1900s with his magazine, “Physical Culture.” He focused on exercise and cleanses and fasting, sometimes up to seven days, and brushed off modern medicine as “murderous science”.Macfadden’s ideas had a brief moment of popularity in the 20s and 30s but lost luster around World War II. Around the time penicillin started saving lives, alternative medicine – especially a starvation diet – didn’t seem as appealing a cure. Almost a century later, updated and repackaged as the “ketogenic diet”, one of Macfadden’s starvation cures is making waves again. “We know it works,” said Eric Kossoff, a pediatric neurologist at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center in Baltimore.“There are lots of different theories about how it works.” The ketogenic diet is not the same as fasting – instead it’s an extremely high-fat, low-carbohydrate regimen that essentially tricks the body into thinking it’s starving. And the diet has made inroads into the medical community for treating epilepsy in children.” At the link click the three dots in a circle, right-click “Download“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feminist Professor 19 mins – “Myra Strober became a feminist on the Bay Bridge, heading toward San Francisco. It is 1970. She has just been told by the chairman of Berkeley’s economics department that she can never get tenure. Driving home afterward, wondering if she got something out of the freezer for her family’s dinner, she realizes the truth: she is being denied a regular faculty position because she is a mother. Flooded with anger, she also finds her life’s work: to study and fight sexism, in the workplace, in academia, and at home. Strober’s generous memoir captures the spirit of a revolution lived fully, from her Brooklyn childhood (and her shock at age twelve when she’s banished to the women’s balcony at shul) to her groundbreaking Stanford seminar on women and work. Strober’s interest in women and work began when she saw her mother’s frustration at the limitations of her position as a secretary. Her consciousness of the unfairness of the usual distribution of household chores came when she unsuccessfully asked her husband for help with housework. Later, when a group of conservative white male professors sputtered at the idea of government-subsidized child care, Strober made the case for its economic benefits. In the 1970s, the term “sexual harassment” had not yet been coined. Occupational segregation, quantifying the value of work in the home, and the cost of discrimination were new ideas. Strober was a pioneer, helping to create a new academic field and founding institutions to establish it. But she wasn’t alone: she benefited from the women’s movement, institutional change, and new federal regulations that banned sex discrimination.” At the link find the title, “MIT Press Podcast- Sharing the Work, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files MITP_Strober.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Allergies 46 mins – “Auto recalls. Volkswagen and Takata airbags are just the biggest in a long list. Recalls are on the rise. Millions affected. We look at why and what’s going.we’re going to look at auto recalls. From airbags, to ignitions, to roll-away Jeep Grand Cherokees, automakers have racked up record recalls in recent years. One hundred million cars and trucks. And many – maybe yours – are still on the road, unrepaired.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Waste Fix 30 mins – In 2011 a major report involving 400 experts from 35 countries issued stark warnings about the future food supply. The Foresight report stressed in order to feed a growing world population there was an urgent need to produce more food sustainable but also to deal with waste. It claimed globally 30% of food is never eaten. So did anyone listen? The amount of food waste has often been raised but Kat Arney goes in search of the game changers , to find out who’s making effective changes to stop good food being binned while people are still hungry. She explores the widening gleaning movement – volunteers primed to hoover up the crops left in the farmer’s field – to those changing the food production chain. She hears how recent weather events, the economy and food scandals have forced changes in supply and use of food. So will that change stick for good?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Frames of Reference 60 mins – “What shapes the way we perceive the world around us? A lot of it has to do with invisible frames of reference that filter our experiences and determine how we feel. Alix Spiegel and Hanna Rosin interview a woman who gets a glimpse of what she’s been missing all her life – and then loses it. And they talk to Daily Show correspondent Hasan Minhaj about which frame of reference is better – his or his dad’s.” At the link find the title, “Frame of Reference, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160707_invsb_frame.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government IT Upgrades 29 mins – “Representative Will Hurd (R-TX), chair of the House Subcommittee on Information Technology, discusses cybersecurity and data security in federal government agencies, as well as a recent report card issued by his subcommittee on the subject.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Representative Will Hurd, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.446572.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greenpeace Wilcox Interview 55 mins – “We talk to Peter Willcox, Captain for Greenpeace for over 30 years and author of Greenpeace Captain: My Adventures in Protecting the Future of Our Planet.” At the link find the title, “139 Peter Willcox – Adventures in Protecting the Future of Our Planet,” right-click “Media files 1ea31114-7caa-4b84-9932-938fb2c0ff21.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Grunt Book 50 mins – “We welcome best-selling science writer Mary Roach back on the show to talk about her latest book Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.” At the link find the title, “138 Mary Roach – The Curious Science of Humans at War,” right-click “Media files 225dd023-9ed4-4516-bba8-2403d8562312.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence Control 50 mins – “Democrats in the House of Representatives staged a dramatic sit-in this week to protest inaction on gun legislation, but are they just preaching to the choir? This week, we look at bridging the gap over guns in America and how the media can better understand both sides. Plus, new algorithms claim to provide more accurate models for policing and sentencing, but they actually might be making things worse.” At the link click the three dots in a circle, right-click “Download“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hamilton Play 58 mins – “Author Ron Chernow discusses his 2004 book, [Alexander Hamilton], which has been adapted into the Broadway musical, “Hamilton.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Ron Chernow, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436397.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hearing Researcher 39 mins – “Dr. Fan-Gang Zeng is Director of the Center for Hearing Research and Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Biomedical Engineering, Cognitive Sciences and Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at the University of California Irvine. He received a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Science and Technology of China and his Master’s degree in Biomedical Engineering at the Institute of Physiology Academia Sinica in Shanghai. Fan-Gang then went on to earn his PhD in Hearing Science from Syracuse University. He served as a research Associate at the House Ear Institute and an Associate Professor at the University of Maryland before joining the faculty at UC, Irvine where he is today. Fan-Gang is a member of the Acoustical Society of America, The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Fan-Gang is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “254: Sound Science in Restoring Hearing with Cochlear Implants – Dr. Fan-Gang Zeng,” right-click “Media files 254_Fan-Gang_Zeng_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hip Replacement 13 mins – “2.46 million people in England have osteoarthritis of the hip, and many of those go on to eventually have a hip replacement – which is now widely considered one of the most commonly performed and successful operations in the world. Jessamy Bagenal, clinical fellow with The BMJ, talks to Nick Aresti, a specialist registrar in trauma and orthopaedic surgery and one of the authors of a clinical update on hip osteoarthritis, recently published on thebmj.com. At the link find the title, “Having hip osteoarthritis, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 272759006-bmjgroup-having-hip-osteoarthritis.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Informationist 48 mins – “On a recent Copyright Clearance Center webinar, an audience of researchers, data scientists and statisticians from the health care professions, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology across North America and Europe as well as in Israel, Korea, Russia and India, learned about a novel use-case of applying text mining tools – during and after patient rounds in a hospital. With a mobile tablet computer, Jonathan Hartmann of Georgetown University Medical Center employs an innovative approach to aid physicians’ decision-making on their daily visits to their patients’ bedsides. Hartmann text mines in real-time from MEDLINE and other sources to extract critical information. In his unusual role as “the Informationist,” Hartmann is bringing a traditional medical practice into the 21st century. Jonathan Hartmann is the Senior Clinical Informationist and Head of Data Management at Georgetown University Medical Center. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology from Kent State University and a Master of Library Science degree also from Kent State University.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovate Long and Short 28 mins – “Tim Harford weaves together economic ideas with remarkable personal histories in some unusual locations. The presenter of Radio 4’s More or Less speaks to an audience from a shop window on London’s Regent Street, and turns his attention to heated pants and the business of innovation. He tells the moving story of Mario Capecchi, whose struggle to get funding for his experiments tells us much about where new ideas come from, and how to foster them.” At the link find the title, “Tim Harford: Hotpants vs The Knockout Mouse, Jan, 2013,” right-click “Media files p02r6k9s.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islam Overview 54 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Institute for Philosophy and Religion, and the Boston University Center for the Humanities. Our speaker is Charles Kimball, Presidential Professor and Director of Religious Studies at the University of Oklahoma. Professor Kimball’s lecture is titled “Faith, Doubt, and the Future of Islam.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ketogenic Diet P2 117 mins – “Dr. Dominic “Dom” D’Agostino (@DominicDAgosti2) is an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, and a senior research scientist at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC). He has also deadlifted 500 pounds for 10 reps after a seven-day fast. Many of you sent enthusiastic follow-up questions after the last conversation we had, so Dom took the time to answer your most popular questions. In particular, he focused on ketosis, ketones, and the ketogenic diet — so you can consider it the ketosis master class (especially if you combine both episodes, though this one does stand alone). It takes a few minutes for Dom to warm up — so be patient! If you have an interest in these types of metabolic therapies, whether for performance enhancement, endurance, weight loss, or fighting cancer, diabetes, or any number of other maladies, you will find a gem within this episode.” At the link find the title, “#172: Dom D’Agostino — The Power of the Ketogenic Diet, Jul, 2016,” right-click “#172: Dom D’Agostino — The Power of the Ketogenic Diet, Dom_Dagostino_part_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Land Fill Mining 30 mins – “Tom Heap discovers landfill mining: finding value in what’s been thrown away. He visits Belgium to meet the first prospectors digging for treasure in trash. For years rubbish has been thrown away and sent to landfill sites, but now there are moves to look at what’s been discarded as a resource. Metals, plastics, ceramics and minerals are all buried under ground. As waste in landfill decomposes it emits gases. All are rich pickings and valuable to those looking to recycle and reuse the waste we’ve thrown away as scientists and engineers look to close the circle of waste” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Learning Researcher 44 mins – “Dr. Kay Tye is an Assistant Professor of Neuroscience in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She received her undergraduate degree from MIT in Brain and Cognitive Sciences and her PhD in Neuroscience from the University of California, San Francisco. Afterward Kay conducted postdoctoral research at Stanford University before joining the faculty at MIT. Kay has received many awards and honors during her career, including the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression Young Investigator Award, the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, and the MIT Whitehead Career Development Professorship, New York Stem Cell Foundation Robertson Investigator Award, and has just been named a McKnight Scholar, just to name a few. Kay is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “279: Rewarding Research on the Influence of Emotion and Motivation on Learning and Behavior – Dr. Kay Tye,” right-click “Media files 279_Kay_Tye_Final.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Listening Better 28 mins – “Tim Harford (the Financial Times’ ‘Undercover Economist’ and presenter of Radio 4’s More or Less) is joined by Malcolm Gladwell, David Kilcullen and Gillian Tett for a new series, ‘Pop-up Ideas’. Following on from his earlier Radio 4 series ‘Pop-up Economics’, Tim and the others use key ideas in anthropology and the social sciences to tell fascinating stories about how we – and the world – work. The talks are recorded in front of an audience at the Southbank Centre in London. Malcolm Gladwell, staff writer at the New Yorker and best-selling author of books such as The Tipping Point and Outliers, tells an extraordinarily powerful story about how listening more carefully might have shortened the Vietnam War. One of the world’s most influential counter-insurgency experts, David Killcullen, whose ideas were described by the Washington Post as ‘revolutionizing military thinking throughout the West’, talks about how future instability will emanate from rapidly-growing coastal megacities. The financial journalist Gillian Tett describes how her background in anthropology led her to predict the financial crisis in 2008. Tim Harford explores the concept of ‘The Tragedy of the Commons’ – a term coined by the American ecologist Garrett Hardin in a hugely influential 1968 essay. Tim compares Hardin’s work to that of the American political economist Elinor Ostrom, to reflect on the impact of mankind on the world around us.” At the link find the title, “Malcolm Gladwell: Listening in Vietnam, Jul, 2013,” right-click “Media files p02r6k3f.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Market Forces 58 mins – “The historian Niall Ferguson examines institutions outside the political, economic and legal realms, whose primary purpose is to preserve and transmit particular knowledge and values. In a lecture delivered at the Royal Society of Edinburgh, he asks if the modern state is quietly killing civil society in the Western world? And what can non-Western societies do to build a vibrant civil society?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Spectrometry 44 mins – “Charles is a Professor of Physics at Washington University in St. Louis. He received his PhD in Physics from the University of California, Berkeley and has been on the faculty at Washington University since 1970. Charles has received many awards and honors during his career, including election as Fellow of the Meteoritical Society and a Fellow of the St. Louis Academy of Science. He has been awarded the NASA Principal Investigators Award, the NASA Exceptional Achievement Award, and recently the James B. Eads Award honoring engineering or technology from the St. Louis Academy of Science. Charles is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “273: Tales of Ion Detection: The Making of a Mass Spectrometry Mastermind – Dr. Charles Hohenberg,” right-click “Media files 273_Charles_Hohenberg_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Crusader 26 mins – “The engineer who uncovered the lead crisis in Flint, Michigan – where the water was toxic enough to give kids brain damage – doesn’t even live in Michigan. His name is Marc Edwards, and he teaches engineering at Virginia Tech, more than 500 miles away. Marc started investigating water pollution in Flint last August. But he got his start more than a decade ago, in Washington, DC, when he discovered high levels of lead in that city’s water. In DC no one would listen to him. He lost lucrative contracts and spent thousands of dollars – of his own money – sampling the water to prove it was contaminated even when the government insisted it was safe. In the end, he prevailed and the water was cleaned up. But not before thousands of kids were exposed to dangerously high amounts of lead. This week, we talk to Edwards about his crusade to make our water safe. Getting the science right turned out to be just the beginning of a fight. The harder part was figuring out how to convince people he was right.” At the link click the three dots in a circle, right-click “Download“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Simulation 50 mins – “Dr. Roger Smith is the Chief Technology Officer for the Nicholson Center for Surgical Advancement at Florida Hospital. He is also Graduate Faculty at the University of Central Florida, and President of Simulation First. Roger received his B.S. in Applied Mathematics, a M.S. in Statistics, a Master’s and Ph.D. in Business Administration, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science. In addition to his current appointments, Roger has held a number of exciting positions in academia, industry, and government sectors, including serving as an Instructor at Texas Tech University, Senior Engineer at General Dynamics, Technical Director of Mystech Associates, Technical Director of STAC, Professor at Florida Institute of Technology, Vice President of BTG Corporation, Vice President and Group Chief Technology Officer of Titan Corporation, Professor at Full Sail University, Chief Engineer at SPARTA Inc., Chief Technology Officer for U.S. Army Simulation, Training, and Instrumentation, Research Scientist for Texas A and M University, and Professor at Adventist University of Health Sciences. He has received many awards and honors during his career, including being named one of the top academic researchers in the world in Technology and Innovation Management from the International Association for Management of Technology, the Des Cummings Innovation Award from Florida Hospital, the Swartz Innovation Award from the Orlando EDC, and the PEO STRI Commander’s Award for Public Service. Roger is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “332: Creating Cutting-Edge Surgical Simulations – Dr. Roger Smith,” right-click “Media files 332_Roger Smith_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memory Researcher 50 mins – “Dr. Henry “Roddy” Roediger is the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Psychology at Washington University in St. Louis as well as the Dean of Academic Planning in Arts and Sciences. He received his PhD in Psychology from Yale University. Roddy has served as a faculty member at Purdue University and Rice University as well as a visiting faculty member at the University of Toronto before joining Washington University in St. Louis. He has received many awards and distinctions, including the William James Fellow Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Psychological Science in 2012, the Howard Crosby Warren Medal from the Society of Experimental Psychologists in 2008, and the Arthur Holly Compton Faculty Achievement Award from Washington University in St. Louis in 2008, Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Science. He was also previously elected to serve as the President of the Association for Psychological Science, the Midwestern Psychological Association, and the Experimental Division of the American Psychological Association. Roddy is joining us today to tell us about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “061: Mastering Memory and Applying Findings to Improve Memory and Understand how Cultures Remember their Past – Dr. Henry Roediger, Jun, 2014,” right-click “Media files 061_Roddy_Roediger_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Student Education 67 mins – “The educational needs of immigrant students in primary and secondary schools pose a growing challenge for policymakers and educators, whether in countries such as the United States, where nearly 10 percent of students are learning English, or in Germany, which is dealing with record numbers of asylum seekers. Many local schools lack the resources and capacities to meet the needs of these students, particularly given that many have limited or interrupted formal education, coupled with low or no proficiency in the language of instruction. Speakers on this webinar discuss the need for supplementary funding to support the educational needs of migrant-background students and provide an overview of the mechanics of school funding for migrant-background students in the four focal countries examined in the report. They also discuss how schools use those funds to provide specialized services, and highlight the most salient choices facing policymakers who seek to use supplementary funding mechanisms to better support effective, high-quality educational services for children from immigrant and refugee families.” At the link right-click “Download(Loading)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Multitasking Researcher 45 mins – “Dr. David Strayer is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Utah and Director for the Center for the Prevention of Distracted Driving. He received his Masters degree in Experimental Psychology from Eastern Washington University and his PhD in Experimental Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Afterward, he completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and worked briefly as a Member of Technical Staff at GTE Laboratories before joining the faculty at the University of Utah. David has received many awards and honors during his career, including being named a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Sciences, receiving the Interdiscipliniary Teaching Grand Award from the Psychology of Traffic, and being awarded the University of Utah Distinguished Scolarly and Creative Research Award. David’s research has also been featured among Discover Magazine’s 100 Top Science Stories in 2003 and 2005. He has also giving briefings to the US House and Senate on distracted driving issues. David is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “190: Steering Our Attention Towards Issues in Distracted Driving – Dr. David Strayer,” right-click “Media files 190_David_Strayer_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music and Race 27 mins – “Britain’s music scene today is a rich, multi-cultural feast that draws on talent from all corners of society. Unless, that is, your passion is classical music. In Britain, and across Europe, performers, composers, teachers and institutions remain resolutely, predominantly white. Why should this be, and is this a concern?” At the link find the title, “Black, White and Beethoven, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03ybr0n.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurologist with Dyslexia 48 mins – “Dr. Kenneth Heilman is the James E. Rooks, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Neurology and Health Psychology at the University of Florida College of Medicine. He is also Director of the Memory Disorders Clinics, the Center for Neuropsychological Studies, and the Behavioral Neurology-Neuropsychiatry Fellowship Program at the University of Florida. Ken received his M.D. from the University of Virginia and continued his training in Internal Medicine at the Cornell University Medical Center. Afterward, he served as Captain in the Air Force and was Chief of Medicine at NATO Hospital in Izmir, Turkey during the Vietnam War. When Ken returned, he completed his Neurology Residency and Fellowship at Harvard University an then joined the faculty at the University of Florida. Ken is the recipient of a University of Florida Research Foundation Professorship, the Clinical Research Award from the University of Florida College of Medicine, and the Behavioral Neurology Society Outstanding Achievement Award. He has also authored multiple books including The Believer’s Brain which published last year. He is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “320: Dedicating His Attention to Cognitive Disorders in the Clinic, the Classroom, and through Conducting Research – Dr. Kenneth Heilman,” right-click “Media files 320_Ken_Heilman_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuroscientist 41 mins – “Dr. Heather Berlin is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Neuroscience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Visiting Scholar at the New York Psychoanalytic Society. She received her undergraduate education at the State University of New York, Stonybrook and her Master’s degree in Psychology from The New School in New York. Heather was awarded a PhD in Experimental Psychology and Neuropsychology from Magdalen College within the University of Oxford and an MPH from Harvard University. Afterward, she accepted a National Institute of Mental Health postdoctoral fellowship in Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine where she later joined the faculty. Heather has received many awards and honors during her career, including the Clifford Yorke Prize from the International Neuropsychoanalysis Society, the Phillip M. Rennick Award from the International Neuropsychological Society, and Young Investigator Awards from both the American Neuropsychiatric Association and the National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder. Heather is with us today to talk about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “286: Capturing Creativity and Investigating Improvisation in the Brain – Dr. Heather Berlin,” right-click “Media files 286_Heather_Berlin_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Documentary 21 mins – “Filmmaker Vitaly Mansky shot the documentary in North Korea with consent, but it still became an indictment of the regime — now the country is trying to suppress it.” At the link find the title, “North Korea documentary ‘Under the Sun’ reveals inner workings of propaganda machine, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160630_24175.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Data 28 mins – “Sir Nigel Shadbolt, Professor of Artificial Intelligence at Southampton University, believes in the power of open data. With Sir Tim Berners-Lee he persuaded two UK Prime Ministers of the importance of letting us all get our hands on information that’s been collected about us by the government and other organisations. But, this has brought him into conflict with people who think there’s money to be made from this data. And open data raises issues of privacy. Nigel Shadbolt talks to Jim al-Khalili about how a degree in psychology and philosophy lead to a career researching artificial intelligence and a passion for open data.” At the link find the title, “Nigel Shadbolt, Apr, 2015,” right-click “Media files p02qhmyk.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Control 87 mins – “Dr. Sanjay Reddy provides a brief introduction to acupuncture. He explores the “eastern” concepts of health and gives an overview of the applications of acupuncture to pain. He also looks at herbal supplements, exercise, mediation and other ways to help manage pain. Recorded on 03/03/2016.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Management 58 mins – “Americans constitute 4.6% of the world’s population and consume 80% of the world’s opioids and 99% of the world’s hydrocodone. There are five times more Americans with opioid substance use disorder than addicted to heroin. How did we get here and what can we do about it? Recorded on 03/17/2016. (#30801)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physical Therapy Researcher 32 mins – “Dr. Shirley Sahrmann is a retired Physical Therapist and Professor emeritis of Physical Therapy, Cell Biology and Physiology, and also of Neurology at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine….Dr. Sahrmann’s research interests are in development and validation of classification schemes for movement impairment syndromes as well as in exercise based interventions for these syndromes. Her books, Diagnosis and Treatment of Movement Impairment Syndromes and Movement System Impairment Syndromes of the Cervical and Thoracic Spines and the Extremities, describe the syndromes and methods of treatment. She maintained an active clinical practice specializing in patients with musculoskeletal pain syndromes until her retirement in July 2012. Shirley he has served on the APTA Board of Directors and as president of the Missouri Chapter. In addition to her numerous national and international presentations, Dr. Sahrmann has been a keynote speaker at the World Confederation of Physical Therapy, and at the Canadian, Australian, New Zealand and Danish national congresses.” At the link find the title, “071: Painstakingly Classifying and Treating Movement Impairment with Physical Therapy – Dr. Shirley Sahrmann,” right-click “Media files 071_Shirley Sahrman_Final.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Planetary Systems 32 mins – “Ian Sample talks to Stuart Clarke about his new book exploring exoplanets and alien worlds, and how to find another Earth. Many of the thousands of alien worlds discovered around distant stars are unlike anything in our solar system. Some face perpetual hurricane-force winds; others have not one, but two suns. But some of these planets do have striking similarities to those in our own cosmic neighbourhood. Could an Earth-like planet capable of harbouring life be one of our next discoveries? Stuart Clark’s new book, The Search For Earth’s Twin, explores these themes, and he joins me in the studio.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plant Evolution Researcher 58 mins – “Dr. Spencer Barrett is the University Professor, Canada Research Chair, and Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Toronto. He completed his Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Botany from the University of Reading in England and received his PhD in Botany from the University of California, Berkeley before joining the faculty at the University of Toronto. Spencer has received many awards and honors during his career, including being named a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, a Fellow of the Royal Society of London, a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and an Extraordinary Professor by the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa. He has also received the Lawson Medal from the Canadian Botanical Association, Premier’s Discovery Award for Life Sciences and Medicine from the Ontario Government, and the Sewall Wright Award from the American Society of Naturalists, among others. Spencer is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “281: Science with Style: Studying Plant Reproductive Biology – Dr. Spencer Barrett,” right-click “Media files 281_Spencer_Barrett_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prebiotic Researcher 36 mins – “Dr. Maria Marco is an Associate Professor in The Department of Food Science & Technology at The University of California, Davis. She received her BS at The Pennsylvania State University and her PhD in Microbiology at the University of California, Berkeley. She went on to work as a postdoc and then as a project scientist at NIZO food research and TI Food & Nutrition in The Netherlands before accepting a faculty position at UC, Davis where she is today. Maria is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “329: Feeding Our Understanding of the Benefits of Bacteria in Human Health – Dr. Maria Marco,” right-click “Media files 329_Maria_Marco_Final_copy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Referendums 21 mins – “A referendum may seem like grassroots in action. But detractors argue it lets elected officials off the hook. The Current looks at if referendums are a clumsy, dangerous tool for deciding complex issues or fundamentally respectful of the people’s will.” At the link find the title, “Post-Brexit results, is governing by referendum democratic? Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160629_15855.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ribosome 28 mins – “All the information that’s needed for life is written in our DNA. But how do we get from DNA code to biological reality? That’s the job of the ribosomes – those clever molecular machines that are found in every living cell. And in 2008 Venki Ramakrishnan was awarded the Nobel Prize for determining their structure. Jim talks to Venki about the frantic race to crack the structure of the ribosome, probably the most important biological molecule after DNA; why he thinks the Nobel Prize is a terrible thing for science; and his new job as President of the Royal Society.” At the link find the title, “Venki Ramakrishnan, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03lc21m.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rust Belt Boy 21 mins – “This week, The Bookshelf features Paul Hertneky, who grew up near Pittsburg, Pennsylvania at a time when the steel industry kept many families afloat. His town, Ambridge, was a place full of the working class people including immigrant families from all over Europe that found themselves down on their luck when the steel industry fell apart. In his new memoir, Rust Belt Boy, Hertneky writes about how this town left an indelible mark and still has a pull on him, even now as he lives hundreds of miles away in Hancock, New Hampshire. Scroll down to read Paul Hertneky’s top five reading recommendations and read the transcript of his conversation with All Things Considered host Peter Biello.” At the link right-click th eplay button beside ‘Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Psychologist 32 mins – “Dr. David Pizarro is an Associate Professor in Psychology at Cornell University and Chief Science Officer at BeWorks which applies scientific thinking to marketing and operational challenges in business. He also hosts the Very Bad Wizards podcast that explores human morality. David received his B.S. From Pacific Union college and his M.S., M.Phil, and Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Yale University. He completed postdoctoral training at the University of California, Irvine before joining the faculty at Cornell University where he is today. David is a Fellow of the American Psychological Society in Behavioral and Brain Sciences and served as the Nannerl Keohane Distinguished Visiting Professor at UNC, Chapel Hill and Duke University last spring. David is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “291: How and Why We Judge the World: The Science of Morality Discussed – Dr. David Pizarro,” right-click “Media files 291_David_Pizarro_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Somalia Recovery 28 mins – “One of the world’s most influential counter-insurgency experts, David Kilcullen, whose ideas were described by the Washington Post as “revolutionizing military thinking throughout the West”, talks about the time-bomb of rapidly-growing coastal mega-cities. “It took all of human history until 1960 for the world to get 3 billion people,” he says. “But the latest estimate is that we’re going to add the same number of people in just the next thirty years – and they’ll all be going into cities, on coastlines, in the developing world”. Through the story of a Somali commander he met in Mogadishu, David tells how the urban overstretch that tore Mogadishu apart in the 1990s, with frightening consequences, is happening in cities all over Africa, Asia and Latin America.” At the link find the title, “David Kilcullen: Feral Cities, Jul, 2013,” right-click “Media files p02r6q3q.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Africa LGBTI 27 mins – “In 1994 apartheid ended in South Africa and Nelson Mandela was elected president. He promised in his inauguration speech to “build a society in which all South Africans will be able to walk tall, without any fear in their hearts … a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world.” These promises were enshrined in South Africa’s post-apartheid constitution, the first in the world to outlaw all forms of discrimination. In 1994 Motshidisi Pascalina Melamu was born, making her one of the first of the so-called ‘born free generation’. Pasca, as she was known, dreamed of becoming a politician, and studied hard at school. She loved singing, dancing and football. And girls – Pasca was a lesbian. In December last year, Pasca’s body was found in a field. She had been beaten and mutilated. She was one of three LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or intersex) people murdered in a six-week period last year. Hate crimes against the LGBTI community have long been a problem in South Africa, and the government has tried to tackle them. But activists say these recent crimes are just one sign that things aren’t getting better. James Fletcher travels to the townships south of Johannesburg to speak with Pasca’s family and friends, and to ask whether the government is failing LGBTI South Africans.” At the link find the title, “Born Free, Killed by Hate in South Africa, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03sdkjh.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Speech Researcher 44 mins – “Dr. Rupal Patel is a Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders as well as the College of Computer and Information Science at Northeastern University. She is also Director of the Communication Analysis and Design Laboratory and a Co-Founder and Core Faculty member of the interdisciplinary doctoral program in Personal Health Informatics there. She received her B.Sc. in Neuropsychology from the University of Calgary and her M.H.Sc. and Ph.D. in Speech Language Pathology from the University of Toronto. Afterwards, Rupal completed postdoctoral research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and served as a faculty member at Columbia University before joining the faculty at Northeastern University where she is today. Rupal is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “289: Speaking Up About Important Topics in Speech Production and Computer-Assisted Communication – Dr. Rupal Patel,” right-click “Media files 289_Rupal_Patel_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup Failures 46 mins – “Something is amiss at 2680 Madison Road. In the thriving Cincinnati neighborhood of Hyde Park, the property is sandwiched between several decades-old Cincinnati staples, and a stone’s throw away from an upscale shopping center. The space is huge, the parking is ample. And yet, the building has been abandoned for five years. Seven different businesses have cycled through the address over the last thirty years. It seems that every business that inhabits its four walls is destined to fail. Alex Blumberg sends StartUp Senior Producer Kaitlin Roberts to his hometown to investigate this peculiar property. With a microphone in hand, she books a ticket to Cin City.” At the link find the title, “2680 Madison Road (Season 3, Episode 10), Jul, 2016” right-click “Media files GLT5501778439.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainability 58 mins – “Laura Knoy took NHPR’s flagship show on the road for a special live edition of The Exchange, featuring a conversation on business and sustainability. The forum took place on Tuesday, June 28th at Labelle Winery in Amherst, and tackled the tough questions facing many in New Hampshire around what’s real and what’s “greenwashing,” and what policies and economic factors stand in the way of more businesses embracing sustainable practices.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorist Identification 49 mins – “New York Times reporter Eric Lichtblau discusses the FBI’s investigation of shooter Omar Mateen prior to the Orlando attack, as well as the bureau’s broader efforts to pinpoint suspected terrorists. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews ‘They May Not Mean To, But They Do,’ by Cathleen Schine. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews Allen Toussaint’s final recording.” At the link find the title, “Jun, 2016, How The FBI’s Wiretaps & Sting Operation Failed To Stop The Orlando Shooter,” At the link click the three dots in a circle, right-click “Download“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thiomersal 6 mins – “Since a now retracted, refuted and discredited 1998 Lancet paper purported to show a link between the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, bowel disease and autism, vaccines have been under fire from an increasingly vocal movement. One target of their ire is a preservative found in some vaccines: Thiomersal.” At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Thiomersal.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tissue Engineering 28 mins – “Jim al-Khalili talks to a scientist who grows human bones in a test tube, Molly Stevens. Molly Stevens does geeky hard core science but her main aim is to help people. Twenty years ago, nobody thought it was possible to make human body parts in the laboratory, but today scientists are trying to create almost every bit of the body. Professor Molly Stevens grows bones. Towards the end of her PHD, a chance encounter with the founding father of tissue engineering and an image of a little boy with chronic liver failure, convinced her that this was what she wanted to do. Ten years on, she runs a highly successful lab at Imperial College London and has been photographed by Vogue.” At the link find the title, “Molly Stevens, Nov, 2011,” right-click “Media files p02qfcj6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Toilet Upgrades 30 mins – “There are 2.5 billion people living on the planet without access to basic sanitation. As a result hundreds of children die from diseases such as diarrhoea every day, and women and children risk personal safety when they perform the simplest of human functions. In this week’s Costing The Earth Dr Kat Arney looks at ways to allow everyone to have access to safe, clean, environmentally friendly toilets. She visits a toilet festival in London to find out about toilet designs that can be applied to every environmental condition across the globe: toilets that require no water, toilets that can turn waste into an asset in the form of fertiliser and toilets filled with waste-eating worms in a quest to design a toilet for the 21st Century.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Treatment Options 20 mins – “Guidelines usually assume a rational comprehensive decision model in which all values, means, and ends are known and considered. In clinical encounters, however, patients and doctors most often follow “the science of muddling through. Given that clinical knowledge does not follow the narrow rationality of “if-then” algorithms contained in guidelines, alternatives are desperately needed.” At the link find the title, “Can guidelines be reformulated to account for how doctors actually use information? Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 271742098 bmjgroup can guidelines be reformulated to account for how doctors actually use information.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkish Airport Attack 21 mins – “Suicide bombers attacked Istanbul’s airport on Tuesday, killing dozens and injuring hundreds. Turkey’s prime minister blames ISIS. How did Turkey go from being one of the safest countries in the region to this?” At the link find the title, “ISIS to blame for Istanbul airport bombing, says Turkish prime minister, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160629_86024.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ultrasound Researcher 58 mins – “Dr. Lawrence Crum is the Principal Physicist and Founder/Former Director of the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound in the Applied Physics Laboratory, and Research Professor of Bioengineering and Electrical Engineering at the University of Washington. He received his Masters and PhD in Physics from Ohio University and prior to joining the faculty at the University of Washington, Larry held positions at Harvard University, the U.S. Naval Academy, and the University of Mississippi. Larry has received many awards and honors during his career, including the Gold Medal of the Acoustical Society of America. He is Past President of the Acoustical Society of America, the Board of the International Commission for Acoustics, and the International Society for Therapeutic Ultrasound. He is preparing to begin as a senior Visiting Fellow at Magdalin College at Oxford University. Larry also has 11 patents and has served as co-founder of 3 medical device companies. Larry is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “230: Signaling the Wave of the Future with Ultrasound Research Applications – Dr. Larry Crum,” right-click “Media files 230_Larry_Crum_final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Unpleasant Designs 17 mins – “Benches in parks, train stations, bus shelters and other public places are meant to offer seating, but only for a limited duration. Many elements of such seats are subtly or overtly restrictive. Arm rests, for instance, indeed provide spaces to rest arms, but they also prevent people from lying down or sitting in anything but a prescribed position. This type of design strategy is sometimes classified as “hostile architecture,” or simply: “unpleasant design.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow just under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Tracking 5 mins – “If a video designed to recruit people into extremist groups pops up online, it stands to reason that you could just flag it to have it removed and the problem is solved. But that’s not so easy. These videos are easily replicated, so one video could suddenly appear on a variety of websites. It’s time-consuming to track down and try to remove each one. One professor at Dartmouth College has developed software that would help find all those copies. David Brooks is a reporter for The Concord Monitor and writer at granitegeek.org, and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk about this new technology.

Vincent Racaniello Virologist 43 mins – “Dr. Vincent Racaniello is the Higgins Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. He received his PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine of the City University of New York and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at MIT before joining the faculty at Columbia. In addition to his academic research career, Vincent is also a co-creator of BioCrowd (a social network for scientists), he runs the Virology Blog at virology.ws, and he hosts the fantastic “This Week in Virology”, “This Week in Parasitism”, and “This Week in Microbiology” podcasts. Vincent is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “170: Practicing Communicable Science Studying Viruses and Sharing Research with the World – Dr. Vincent Racaniello,” right-click “Media files 170_Vincent_Racaniello_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 243 – Jul 8, 2016: Back and Neck Pain, Bathroom History, Best Teachers, Bioengineering Trends, Bitcoin Control Problem,Black Distiller, Black Holes, Black Twitter, Bone Research, Book Celebration, Brazil, Brexit, Burglar Guide to City, Business Operation Changes, Character Lessons, Child Raising, Climate Change Panel, Coyotes, Criminal Record Disclosure, Demographic Imbalance, Desert Farming, Disabilities Act Convention, Dolly Project vs CRISPR, Drug Research, Dyslexia Story, Education In Finland, Educational Trends, Electric Eels, Engineer Dave Young, ER Lessons, Flooding Concerns, Food Packaging, Gandhi, Independent U.S. Voters, Indian Land Reform, Indira Gandhi, Investing for Kids, Jesus’s Wife, Juno Mission, Kids and Money, Learning Techniques, Legionnaire Disease Prevention, Male Contraception, Marvin Kaplan, Mental Illness Solution, Microbes and Electricity, Moral Decisions, Moselio Schaechter, Net Zero Energy Buildings, Neurosurgeon, Pakistan Founder, Paleovedic Diet, Plankton Changes, Podcast History, Podland, Police Aggressiveness, Prisons for Profit, Renewable Future, Researcher Carolyn Bertozzi, Researcher Eric Green, Ribosome Researcher, Robot Teachers, Rock Snot, Romance Novels, Sea Rise Business, Skinhead, Stonewall In Gay Riot, Sugar Research, Supreme Court and Politics, Syrian Conflict, Technology Future, Terrorism, Untouchables, Veterans Crisis Line, Viral Oncology, Water Initiative, Watts Riot, Women Founders, Work Future, World War One

The best 90 podcasts from a larger group of 294 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Back and Neck Pain 79 mins – “Dr. Mario De Pinto explores the sources and causes of neck and low back pain and the short and long term management to achieve adequate pain control. Recorded on 03/10/2016. (#30800)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bathroom History 42 mins – “Common sense used to dictate that men and women should only come together for breakfast and dinner. According to Victorian historian Kaythrn Hughes, people in the early 19th Century thought the outside world was dangerous and unclean and morally dubious and thus no place for a virtuous, fragile woman. The home was a paradise, while men went out into the world and got their hands dirty. By the mid 1800s, women were leaving home to work in factories and much more, and if you believed in preserving the separate spheres, the concept that men and women should only cross paths at breakfast and dinner, then as we approached the 20th century, this created a lot of anxiety for you. In this episode of the You Are Not So Smart Podcast, we explore how the separate spheres ideology is still affecting us today, and how some people are using it to scare people into voting down anti-discrimination legislation.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 079-Separate Spheres.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Best Teachers 28 mins – “Studies have shown that the most important thing in a child’s education is the quality of their teacher. A child at a bad school with a good teacher can learn more than someone at a good school getting bad tuition. Doug Lemov has trained thousands of teachers in the UK in how to use their classroom time effectively – keeping children focused with the most subtle of techniques and gestures. His work is based on identifying the most successful teachers in the world, filming them, and studying their methods. He believes that weak teachers can be turned into strong performers, and that the children who benefit most a well-run classroom are those from the most disadvantaged families.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bioengineering Trends 69 mins – “In conversation with Rodney W. Nichols, Consultant on Science and Technology Policy, Drew Endy, Associate Professor of Bioengineering at Stanford University, Laurie Garrett, CFR Senior Fellow for Global Health, and Julie Gerberding, Executive Vice President, Strategic Communications, Global Public Policy and Population Health, Merck & Co, Inc. discuss the latest developments in synthetic biology and biotechnology, their implications for U.S. national security over the next decade, and the policy prescriptions they have going forward.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin Control Problem 20 mins – “Bitcoin was supposed to revolutionize the way money works. But the thing people love about it may be destroying it.” At the link find the title, “#708: Bitcoin Divided, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160629_pmoney_podcast062916j.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Distiller 28 mins – “Jim al-Khalili talks to botanist Geoff Palmer, the UK’s only professor of brewing and distilling, about revolutionising the malting industry and his unusual scientific career after arriving from Jamaica in 1955 as a 14 year old boy. When he went for an interview for an MSc in 1964 the representative from the Ministry of Agriculture suggested he go back home and grow bananas. Why? Because he didn’t know the difference between wheat and barley. Undeterred he went on to become a world authority on barley, brewing and distilling and Scotland’s first black professor. His research on how malt could be made more quickly saved the brewing industry millions. But he says, it’s only through good luck and with the help of good Samaritans that his career took the course it did, helping him get to university and even to finish school. Now at the age of 75, he’s still fighting to make education and a scientific career available to everyone, regardless of their background.” At the link find the title, “Geoff Palmer, Aug, 2015,” right-click “Media files p02yt3kq.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Holes – Hawking P1 28 mins – “Professor Stephen Hawking delivers the first of his two BBC Reith Lectures on black holes. These collapsed stars challenge the very nature of space and time, as they contain a singularity – a phenomenon where the normal rules of the universe break down. They have held an enduring fascination for Professor Hawking throughout his life. Rather than see them as a scary, destructive and dark he says if properly understood, they could unlock the deepest secrets of the cosmos. Professor Hawking describes the history of scientific thinking about black holes, and explains how they have posed tough challenges to conventional understanding of the laws which govern the universe. The programmes are recorded in front of an audience of Radio 4 listeners and some of the country’s leading scientists at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London.“ At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Holes – Hawking P2 28 mins “The Cambridge cosmologist Professor Stephen Hawking delivers the second of his BBC Reith Lectures on black holes. Professor Hawking examines scientific thinking about black holes and challenges the idea that all matter and information is destroyed irretrievably within them. He explains his own hypothesis that black holes may emit a form of radiation, now known as Hawking Radiation. He discusses the search for mini black holes, noting that so far “no-one has found any, which is a pity because if they had, I would have got a Nobel Prize.” And he advances a theory that information may remain stored within black holes in a scrambled form.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Twitter 18 mins – “Sofiya Ballin joins us this week on The Remix. Ballin writes for The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philly.com and The Huffington Post. While much of her reporting for the Inquirer comprises features on arts and culture, she says that she sees the challenges of staying objective when covering police violence against ‘people who look like me.’” At the link find the title, “Walter Scott, Eric Harris, reporting while black, and death in the era of state-sanctioned murder, Apr, 2015” right-click “Walter Scott, Eric Harris, reporting while black, and death in the era of state-sanctioned murder, Apr, 2015,” right-click “Media files sofiya-web.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bone Research 87 mins – “Get an overview of how bones heal and research advances that may provide new solutions. Recorded on 05/10/2016. (#30987)” Includes stem cell definitions and research. At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Celebration 51 mins – “We’re trying something a little different today on the show. In nine short chapters, we present the life cycle of a book — the cliff notes version. You’ll hear tales, tips and anecdotes on all sorts of odd parts of the process – from pitching a publisher to crafting the perfect blurb, and everywhere in between. So whether you’re an aspiring writer, an avid reader, a constant procrastinator, or an audiobooks aficionado – there’s a little something for everybody.” At the link right-click the play button next to “Listen” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazil Racial Issues 52 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University African American Studies Program, with support from the Boston University Center for the Humanities, and the Latin American Studies Program. Our speaker is Dr. Kia Caldwell, Associate Professor of African, African American, and Diaspora studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.  Dr. Caldwell’s lecture is titled “The Alyne Case: An Intersectional Analysis of Gender, Race, and the Human Right to Health in Brazil.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow just under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit and Technology 146 mins – “Brexit fallout, Google’s machine learning revolution, Apple headphone jack controversy, and more” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Impact 15 mins – “We woke up this morning to news that the United Kingdom had voted to leave the European Union. The tabloid newspapers in London proclaimed Independence Day. The value of the British Pound dropped to the lowest point in the last 31 years. Stock markets dived around the world. Prime Minister David Cameron said he would resign later this year. Today on the show: What just happened? And what’s coming next?” At the link find the title, “#707: Brexit, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160624 pmoney_podcast062416.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Impact 59 mins – “Speakers discussed the results of the United Kingdom’s referendum on withdrawing from the European Union, including the political and economic consequences and what this will mean for the UK and Europe as a whole.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burglar’s Guide to City 50 mins – “To catch a thief, you have to think like one. To prevent a crime, you have to case a joint like a potential infiltrator and find the weak spots. On today’s show, a design critic gives us a burglar’s eye view of the built environment. Plus, canceling a wedding isn’t just emotionally traumatic – it can be a financial disaster. Now, websites are popping up to help unhappy couples sell their canceled weddings & give thrifty couples a chance to get hitched on the cheap.” At the link right-click the play button next to “Listen” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Business Operation Changes 60 mins – “David Burkus, Professor, Oral Roberts University; Founder and Host, “Radio Free Leader”; Author, Under New Management: How Leading Organizations Are Upending Business As Usual Should employees know each others’ salaries? Can companies win by putting their employees’ welfare first, and their clients second? Are annual performance reviews necessary? Burkus challenges the traditional and widely accepted principles of business management—proving that they’re outdated, outmoded and simply don’t work—and presents winning strategies using case studies and in-depth research. You’ll learn how the nature of work is changing—and what that means for business, society and your own career.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Character Lessons 28 mins – “The KIPP school movement began 20 years ago in the US. It stands for Knowledge Is Power Program, and the schools focus on two things; academic achievement and building strength of character. They work in the most disadvantaged districts of New York, Houston and Los Angeles, where children have less than a 1 in 10 chance of completing a college degree, but their focus on character skills like grit, empathy and determination, is seen as the reason why half of KIPP students will graduate from college. Sarah Montague speaks to KIPP co-founder Dave Levin about how character is taught alongside traditional subjects, visiting KIPP Infinity school in Harlem and hearing from Kings Langley Academy – one of many schools in the UK that are exploring character teaching.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Raising 50 mins – “Everyone wants to know the secret to raising amazing kids. Whether you want them to become the next great president, save the world, get straight A’s, or simply contribute to society, how to raise our children properly is a topic of much contention. So we decided to bring on NYT Bestselling author Paul Tough, to tell us exactly how we can help children succeed. In fact, his newest book is titled, Helping Children Succeed: What Works and Why.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Panel 59 mins – “Kate Brown, Governor, Oregon Jay Inslee, Governor, Washington Mary Polak, Minister of Energy, British Columbia Can California and other West Coast economies accelerate the global transition to clean energy technologies? The chief executives of Pacific Coast states and provinces say policies pushing clean power have boosted their economies and created jobs. Companies involved in solar power and electric vehicles agree. But some business groups say going green can hit consumers in the pocket book and hamper the economy. What can the West Coast of Canada and the United States do to advance the goals that countries and corporations outlined at the Paris climate summit last year?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coyotes 14mins – “…Our eastern coyote traces its roots to the western coyote, found west of the Mississippi. There are two primary differences between the two species, one is fairly apparent, the eastern is much larger than its western cousin; the other is DNA. As Schadler explains, “Western coyotes have a little tiny bit of wolf genetic material. Our eastern coyotes are much more invigorated. On average perhaps thirty percent of their DNA is wolf DNA.” As the coyote migrated back east via Canada it ran into a type of red wolf and interbred, producing our eastern coyote….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Criminal Record Disclosure 45 mins – “Last year, President Obama toured a federal prison in Oklahoma – an unprecedented move for a sitting president and a clear sign of the administration’s focus on criminal justice reform. Among its proposed reforms is a call to “ban the box” – which would move or remove questions about a job applicant’s criminal history. Today, should the box also be banned from college applications? Then, hip hop has been key to the runaway success of Hamilton…suddenly people are rapping about American history. Now, an educator and lyricist is applying that formula to the classroom.” At the link right-click the play button next to “Listen” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Demographic Imbalance 56 mins – “We’re talking with millennials from the state for an update on whether and why more young adults are leaving the New Hampshire than coming to it, and what it means for the economy.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Desert Farming 27 mins – “Keith talks with Francisco Molinar, District Conservationist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Molinar is an agricultural engineer, and he talks about water conservation in the desert. Some crops actually benefit from the hot, dry conditions in the Chihuahuan Desert, but specialized irrigation and land-leveling techniques will be crucial in conserving water in the future.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabilities Act Convention 53 mins – “In honor of the 26th anniversary of Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) this month, Joyce welcomes Judith Heumann, an internationally recognized leader in the disability community and a lifelong civil rights advocate. She has been appointed Special Advisor for International Disability Rights at the U.S. Department of State. Ms. Heumann will discuss her role in the State Department and the progress in ratifying the Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities (CRPD), and will reflect on what work remains to carry on the efforts of past leaders within the disability community.” At the link right-click “Download mP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dolly Project vs Crispr 27 mins – “This week, Dolly the sheep’s legacy, the trials of funding interdisciplinary research, and an ‘IPCC’ for social science.” At the link find the title, “Nature Podcast: 30 June 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Research 28 mins – “Patrick Vallance is something of a rare breed: a game-keeper turned poacher; an academic who’s moved over into industry. And not just any industry, but the pharmaceutical industry. At the time, Patrick Vallance was Professor of Clinical Pharmacology and Head of the Department of Medicine at University College London. A pioneer of research into some of the body’s key regulatory systems, he had also been publicly critical of BIG Pharma for “funding studies more helpful to marketing than to advancing clinical care”. So what made him go over to “the other side”? His involvement with the industry was limited until one evening in 2006 when he was asked a question over a dinner, a question that would be pivotal to his life and career. Today, Patrick is head of research and development at GlaxoSmithKline, one of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies with annual revenues in excess of 20 billion pounds and nearly a hundred thousand employees worldwide. Whilst GSK is no stranger to scandal, since he joined, Patrick has attempted to tackle the culture of secrecy that pervades the industry. He’s since reshaped the way GSK carries out its research and has been behind several radical initiatives in global healthcare, to produce a more collaborative approach to tackling major diseases like malaria.” At the link find the title, “Patrick Vallance, Nov, 2015,” right-click “Media files p036xg5z.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dyslexia Story 3 mins – ““A parrot flies along, the parrot lands on a car, the car explodes, and the smoke and feathers rise in a figure 8.” To many people, that may sound like a cartoon panel. To Sean Plasse, it was a tool for recalling the word “polycarbonate.” Plasse suffers from dyslexia. He is able to understand and recall concepts and ideas very well. But words are another matter. Trying to cope with his problem in college, Plasse says, he would “convert about 10,000 words into these pictures, every semester” — and live in fear that someone would realize that he had to work so hard to keep up. When Plasse entered the working world, with a job at a marketing company, things only got worse. In addition to working late nights, Plasse would come in on the weekends to pore over e-mails, circling problem words so he could understand what the notes were about. Speaking recently to his friend Blanche Podhajski, Plasse recalls the difficulty he had in keeping names straight, even after a year at the company — and even when the names were those of the company’s owners. His solution: He kept a stack of business cards on hand, referring to them when he needed to know someone’s name. “When you struggle with learning disability,” Plasse says, “it affects everything in your life.” But one day, Plasse came across an article about elite businessmen who had successfully coped with their own learning disabilities. The article, in Fortune magazine, sent Plasse to the phone book, looking for help. After a full day of tests at a learning-disorders center, Plasse received a stark summary of his abilities — and his challenges. “Your IQ is in the 99th percentile,” the people at the center told him. “But your ability to read and decode words is in the 14th percentile.” The news, Plasse says, changed his life. “I got in my pickup truck and cried all the way home. It was a turning point.” After working with Podhajski at the Stern Center, a literacy group in Williston, Vt., Plasse, 31, learned to overcome his fear of reading. And with a new set of learning tools, he now has his own business: Plasse Contracting.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education in Finland 28 mins – “Since the first international comparisons in 2000, Finland has been at or near the top of league tables for the abilities of its teenagers in reading, maths and science. Experts and politicians flocked to its schools to discover what was leading to its success, and came away with a picture of autonomous schools, children starting school much later than in the UK, and having no tests until their final year. What developed was seen by many as a myth surrounding Finnish education success, while the reality could be attributed to extensive teacher training, high quality lessons and a culture of literacy. But now, Finland is overhauling the way it teaches through ‘phenomenon learning’ – periods of the school year where learning isn’t confined to single subjects, but students take on a broad topic and decide what, and how, they will learn. From 2016, it will be compulsory for all schools to teach with phenomenon projects, but Helsinki has already adopted it in the capital’s schools. Sarah Montague interviews the city’s Education Manager Marjo Kyllonen and visits a Helsinki school, to see the changes being made to a world-leading education system.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Trends 8 mins – “We discuss the trends and issues we observed during the weeks of June 10-28 as we flipped resources into our Flipboard magazine (http://bit.ly/trendsandissues). We discuss three trends. The first is a continuing one virtual reality and augmented reality. An interesting element of the resources we flipped had to do with a distinction being made between VR and AR. The second trend was OER. There were several companies (e.g., Amazon, Google) coming out with OER resources for education. The third trend was online learning. There were a variety of resources we posted dealing with engaging students in online learning and the structure of online learning experiences.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Eels 14 mins – “Kenneth Catania of Vanderbilt University talks to Cynthia Graber about electric eel research that led him to accept 19th-century naturalist Alexander von Humboldt’s account of electric eels attacking horses.” At the link find the title, “Electric Eels versus Horses: Shocking but True, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineer Dave Young 71 mins – “…Dave does embedded + analog + whatever else needs to be done. Small teams means you’re in charge of everything! One project seeks to take the low cost of “hoverboards” (balancing wheeled devices that were starting on fire) and use them to build low cost motorized wheelchairs. They got a Google Grant to do so. Dave’s other major venture is Bluestamp Engineering (BSE). They introduce and mentor high school kids who are interested in engineering over the course of 6 weeks. The students have to apply and determine which project they want to do before arriving. There is a 3:1 student to staff ratio as well, so each student gets lots of attention… The tuition for BSE is $3500-$4000 (depending on location), but turns out to be $35/hour (cheaper than most/all tutoring). There are also scholarships for students, though everyone is required to pay something to have “skin in the game”. The students are high school age. Man update their profiles when applying to college because the experience looks good. Some students also come back as instructors! … If you’re interested in talking to some of the BSE students, let Dave know! Reach Dave on Twitter (@DaveYoungEE) or on his companies’ websites: Bluestamp Engineering and Young Circuit Designs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ER Lessons 35 mins – “John Hinds coined the term #resusWANKER at his amazing SMACC lecture on thoracotomy. I created this lecture on resusWANKERS in dedication to John and gave it at the Teaching Course in NYC with Rob Rogers. I gave it a second time at the Royal College of Emergency Medicine meeting in Manchester. This recording came from the third and final iteration in Glasgow, Scotland.” (Seven rules to live by.) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flooding Concerns 28 mins- “Barely a month goes by without news of another catastrophic flood somewhere in the world, like the Boxing Day tsunami in 2004 or the flooding of New Orleans with Hurricane Katrina a year later, and the role of climate change is often mooted. Here in the UK this winter, flood victims were once again caught in a cycle of despair and anger as they tried to make sense of why their homes were flooded and what could be done to prevent it happening again. Jim talks to environmental scientist, Professor Carolyn Roberts, who is pre-occupied by problems like this. She applies water science, in particular, to work out why such events occur and the role we humans play in them. Her passion for problem solving in watery places also takes her into the intriguing world of forensics where she assists the police when bodies are found floating in rivers and canals.” At the link find the title, “Carolyn Roberts, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03nhpf6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Packaging 45 mins – “The invention of food packaging is one of humanity’s greatest achievements. It may seem hard to imagine today, but the first clay pots made the great civilizations of the ancient world possible, while paper’s first use, long before it became a surface for writing, was to wrap food. But packaging’s proliferation, combined with the invention of plastics, has become one of our biggest environmental headaches. In this episode, we explore the surprising history of how our food got dressed—and why and how we might want to help it get naked again” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gandhi 15 mins – “Professor Sunil Khilnani explores the life and legacy of the Mahatma Gandhi: lawyer, politician and leader of the nationalist movement against British rule in India. He is generally admired outside India, but is the subject of heated debate and contention in his homeland. Some view him as an appeaser of Muslims, and blame him for India’s partition. Others regret Gandhi’s induction of Hindu rhetoric and symbols into Indian nationalism, revile him for his refusal to disavow caste, believe he betrayed the labouring classes, and are appalled at his views on women. “It’s unsurprising that Gandhi provokes such a barrage of attacks,” says Professor Khilnani. “His entire life was an argument – or rather, a series of arguments – with the world.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Independent U.S. Voters 27 mins – “What is motivating Ohio’s volatile ‘independent’ voters who are not Democrats or Republicans? Michael Goldfarb travels to the key state of Ohio to meet independent voters. He explores the anger that is motivating independents and places their views in the deeper historical context of changes in American society.” At the link find the title, “America’s Independent Voters, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0403yv8.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Land Reform 15 mins – “Professor Sunil Khilnani, from the King’s India Institute in London, explores the life and legacy of Charan Singh, the lawyer turned politician who championed the cause of India’s farmers. Singh is remembered today as the politician who took on Indira Gandhi in the Congress Party’s heartland state. Uttar Pradesh. He redistributed power and altered the social structure of Northwest India, non violently. And he helped the world see the potential of the Indian farmer a bit more clearly. He succeeded in becoming India’s first peasant prime minister but went from the highest office in a flash, replaced by his nemesis Indira Gandhi. Although today he is most often remembered for being a leader of his own caste, Professor Khilnani argues that Charan Singh has a unique status in Indian history.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indira Gandhi 15 mins – “Professor Sunil Khilnani, from the King’s India Institute in London, looks at the life of Indira Gandhi, India’s first woman prime minister, whose darkest moment was a two year period known as “the emergency”. Jails filled up with her critics while journalists and editors were detained alongside the political opposition. Those arrested could be held without trial and and she attempted to reduce the birth rate by offering men incentives to be sterilized. “Indira Gandhi in many ways issued the greatest threat to democracy in independent India’s history,” says Professor Khilnani, “weakening constitutional regularities established by her father. Yet the enduring effect of her rule was to open the state to a deeper and more accessible democracy”. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing for Kids P2 54 mins – “Paul responds to 10 comments and questions about the article, “How to turn $3000 into $50 million.” This article has produced more comments and questions than any other he has written for MarketWatch in more than three years. In some cases, Paul points out how short-sighted investors can be and, in others, he tries to find ways to make people comfortable with the risky nature of stocks. For more on this “Legacy” strategy, go to: http://paulmerriman.com/turn-3000-50-million/ “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jesus’s Wife 53 mins – “In 2012, Karen King, a respected scholar at Harvard Divinity School, presented a papyrus fragment bearing text that implied Jesus was married. King staked her reputation on the authenticity of what she called “The Gospel of Jesus’s Wife.” Test after test failed to prove the papyrus was a forgery, but the journalist Ariel Sabar still smelled something fishy. He put the fragment through a new test, one that examined its chain of ownership. Sabar joins us Tuesday to share the unbelievable tale he uncovered.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Juno Mission 56 mins – “We’re checking in with the Sky Guys this week for the latest news on the Juno mission to Jupiter, why eighty percent of Americans can no longer see the Milky Way, and gravitational ripples confirmed for a second time. Plus, what to look for in the stars for summer nights ahead.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kids and Money 28 mins – “Before it looms too large in their lives, kids spend a few years making sense out of money — its made-up symbolism, mysterious behavior, and larger than life power. They see it operating in their parents’ work, at the store, at school and in images of fame and fortune. At its heart, kids understand that money connotes worth, power and freedom — but that it can also empty our lives of meaning and connection. In this episode, we handed the mic over to kids from 5 to 9 years old to discuss the role of money in their lives, and in their imaginations.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save File” then “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Learning Techniques 41 mins – “In today’s episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Saundra McGuire, who used to teach Chemistry at Cornell University and Louisiana State University. Her passion for education also drove her to not only teach chemistry itself to her students but to also teach them how to learn chemistry. Most premed students are struggling with studying, studying tips, and time management. Saundra now goes around different schools across the country to teach both students and teachers on how to better study. Listen in As Dr. McGuire shares a ton of studying tips and strategies to help you improve your test scores and strengthen your learning skills….” At the link find the title, “Session 188,” right-click “Media files PMY188.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Legionnaire Disease Prevention 56 mins – “Recently, the CDC released new guidelines in the fight to prevent Legionnaires’ disease. With recent outbreaks of Legionnaire’s throughout the country in Flint, Michigan and Bronx, NY, the maintenance of a building’s water system is more important than ever. The guidelines are a huge step forward to help building owners control Legionella bacteria once it has entered their buildings from the public water supply and help prevent uncontrollable deaths from the disease. Today we will speak with Tonya Winders, President and CEO of the Allergy & Asthma Network, the leading nonprofit patient education and advocacy organization for people with asthma, allergies and related conditions. We will discuss what Legionnaires’ disease is; why the Allergy & Asthma Network supports the new guidelines; how Legionnaires’ disease can cause asthma and respiratory problems; and the importance of being aware of the disease to prevent hundreds of deaths each year.” At the link right-click “Download mP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Male Contraception 21 mins – “They said it couldn’t be done: The “male pill.” Actuality asks why men haven’t seen a new reversible contraceptive in centuries—and if we need one. We found out why Big Pharma gave up on a male pill, and meet people who want to make it happen anyway. Correction: In this episode we refer to “The Pill” by Jonathan Eig. The correct title of Eig’s book is “The Birth of the Pill.” At the link find the title, “Male Contraception, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files actuality20160629_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marvin Kaplan 69 mins – “Gilbert and Frank catch up with one of their favorite comedic actors and one of the last surviving cast members of “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World,” Marvin Kaplan, who’s worked with pretty much everyone in his 70-year career, including Charlie Chaplin, Katharine Hepburn, Clark Gable, Jack Lemmon, Paul Newman and Lon Chaney Jr. (to name a few). Also, Marvin praises Sam Jaffe, props up Broderick Crawford, remembers Zero Mostel and risks his life for Blake Edwards. PLUS: Fritz Feld! Strother Martin! Arnold Stang takes a fall! Stanley Kramer sacks Jackie Mason! And the return (once again) of Maria Ouspenskaya!” At the link find the title, “#109: Marvin Kaplan, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/3725812/e3554c9c-9c92-4945-8e69-5996923db09f.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Illness Solution 59 mins – “We are naturally drawn to finding solutions. But are there ever problems we shouldn’t try to solve? Lulu Miller visits a town in Belgium with a completely different approach to dealing with mental illness. Families in the town board people – strangers – with severe mental illnesses in their homes, sometimes for decades. And it works, because they are not looking to cure them.” At the link click the cirlce with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbes and Electricity 45 mins – “Gemma Reguera of Michigan State University in East Lansing and Geoffrey Gadd of the University of Dundee in Scotland talk with Jeff Fox about their efforts to probe some of the electrical properties of materials produced naturally by specific microorganisms. Thus, Geobacter bacteria make protein filaments, called pili, that act as nanowires, transporting 1 billion electrons per second, according to Reguera and her collaborators. Analytic evidence suggests that the electrons move along these proteins by a thermally activated, multistep hopping mechanism, enabling these bacteria to draw electrons from the extracellular milieu. Meanwhile, the fungus Neurospora crassa can transform manganese into a mineral composite with favorable electrochemical properties. The fungal cells produce filaments that take up manganese, which after heat treatment forms structures that have electrochemical properties that are suitable for use in supercapacitors or lithium-ion batteries. The carbonized fungal biomass-mineral composite has excellent cycling stability and retains more than 90% capacity after 200 cycles, according to Gadd and his collaborators.” At the link find the title, “MMP #14: A look at several microorganisms involved with electricity. Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files MMP014.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moral Decisions 23 mins – “Social psychologist Dr. Piercarlo Valdesolo discusses his work studying moral decision-making processes in the lab.” At the link find the title, “The Science of Moral Decisions,ept, 2013,” right-click “Media files science of moral decisions.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moselia Schaechter 40 mins – “Dr. Moselio Schaechter is a Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Tufts University School of Medicine, Adjunct Professor at San Diego State University, and an Adjuct Professor at the University of California, San Diego. In addition, he is author of the American Society for Microbiology Small Things Considered blog and co-host of the This Week in Microbiology podcast with Vincent Racaniello. Elio received his M.S. in Bacteriology from the University of Kansas and his Ph.D. in Microbiology from the University of Pennsylvania. He was drafted into the Army with the U.S. Army Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and conducted postdoctoral research at the State Serum Institute in Copenhagen. Elio served briefly on the faculty of the University of Florida Medical School and subsequently joined the faculty at Tufts University where he remained for 33 years. He was named a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, a Tufts University Distinguished Professor, an Honorary member of the American society for microbiology, Honorary Member of the Ecuadorian Society for Microbiology, and an Honorary Member of the Spanish Society for Microbiology. He is the recipient of the Tufts University Medical Students’ Teaching Award 11 times, is the Past President of the American Society for Microbiology, and has received many other honors. Elio is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “300: A Microbiologist Celebrating the Little Things in Life and Science – Dr. Moselio Schaechter, Aug, 2015,” right-click “Media files 300 Elio Schaechter Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Net Zero Energy Buildings 57 mins – “GreenerBuilder 2016 gathered hundreds of Northern California trade professionals to learn about key trends in the green building market; to hear what owners and developers are looking for; and to make important connections with fellow industry leaders. The daylong conference trained attendees to be at the forefront of greening the built environment. The event was held in the Net Zero Energy Center in San Leandro, CA where the IBEW, Local Union 595 and the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) create a world-class learning environment for apprentices to gain hands-on experience with cutting-edge technology and electrical systems. On today’s episode we will talk with Peter Rumsey, internationally renowned leader in Net Zero Energy building design; Bob Wallace, President of Energy ETC, whose company designed the energy management systems for the event venue; Byron Benton, training director at the Net Zero Energy Center; and Brenden McEneaney, Director of USGBC Nor Cal.” At the link right-click “Download mP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurosurgeon 28 mins – “Neurosurgeon Henry Marsh talks to Jim Al-Khalili about slicing through thoughts, hopes and memories. Brain surgery, he says, is straightforward. It’s deciding whether or not to operate that’s hard. The stakes are high and it’s never clear cut. He often dreads having to talk to patients and their families. Damage to healthy brain cells can result in a dramatic change to someone’s quality of life; but if a bit of a tumour remains, it’s likely to grow back. “How do you tell someone that the best option may be to go away and die?” Once, against his professional judgment, Henry went ahead with surgery because the patient wanted him to operate. The patient died and he blames himself for not being stronger. He talks openly about the cemetery that all doctors inevitably carry with them; and why he would rather be seen as a fallible human being, than either a superhero or villain. Perhaps it’s inevitable that doctors are put on a pedestal but it can be unhelpful. Despite a chronic lack of science at school and university, Henry decided to become a neurosurgeon, having found general surgery rather disgusting. Soon after, his three month old son had surgery for a brain tumour: an experience which, he says, helped him to appreciate the fog of anxiety and concern that descends on the people he treats. Getting the balance right between compassion and detachment is a constant challenge. And Henry admits, he pioneered brain surgery under local anaesthetic, in part as a way of confronting head on the almost ‘Jekyll and Hyde like split’ between being a surgeon in the operating theatre and a friendly consultant who talks to and cares for his patients. Producer: Anna Buckley.” At the link find the title, “Henry Marsh, Jun, 2015,” Media files p02vdr6c.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pakistan Founder 15 mins – “Professor Sunil Khilnani, from the King’s India Institute in London, looks at the life and legacy of Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan. Descriptions of his early life do not sound like someone who would go on to lead India’s Muslims: he spoke English, dressed impeccably in Western clothes from Savile Row, smoked cigarettes and, according to some accounts, consumed alcohol and ate pork. Yet it was Jinnah who, along with others, publicly assented to the partition of India which, carried out in haste, would give roughly half of India’s Muslims political autonomy, cause around a million deaths, displace some 14 million people and transform the geopolitics of the world.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paleovedic Diet 48 mins – “Today we have guest Dr. Akil Palanisamy, Harvard-trained physician, author, speaker, and holistic medicine expert in integrative and functional medicine. Dr. Palanisamy is the author of The Paleovedic Diet. Join us as we discuss Ayurvedic medicine, customizing diet and medicine to each individual, and more.” (Interesting comment about poor quality of modern apples.) At the link right-click “Download Episode Here” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plankton Changes 27 mins – “Basic life forms of the ocean are the source of most of the oxygen we breathe. Are they in deep trouble? Did you know plankton can affect the development of clouds, another surprise in the climate story. We’re talking about plankton and climate change, with Dr. Michael Behrenfeld. He’s is a Senior Research Scientist and Professor at Oregon State University. Mike specializes in marine algae research. Behrenfeld is also the principal investigator for a special 5-year NASA project called NAAMES – the North Atlantic Aerosols and Marine Ecosystems Study.At the link find and right-click “Behrenfeld Lo-Fi” for his part of this two-part file and click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcast History 28 mins – “Miranda Sawyer with the third episode of her series about the world of podcasts, rounding up some of the best from around the globe. This week: podcast pioneers, the agenda-setting podcasters who have broken new ground in the genre. Miranda hears from the creators of Welcome to Night Vale, who talk about their perhaps unlikely surrealist pod hit. The programme also features Wendy Zukerman’s Australian-based science podcast Science Vs, recently bought up by Gimlet Media, an increasingly powerful new media player in the burgeoning podcasting market. Ben Hammersley, internet technologist and journalist, and the man who invented the word “podcast” guests.” At the link right-click Download MP3” nd select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podland 28 mins – “Miranda Sawyer presents a new, stylish round-up of the best and most memorable podcasting from around the world. There’s been an explosion in the profusion and quality of podcasts, plus a new public awareness after the breakthrough moment in 2014 with Serial. Suddenly, podcasts have become cool. There are now more than 100,000 English speaking podcast feeds worldwide covering everything from science to sport to every conceivable niche. Last year, there were 165 million podcasts downloaded just from BBC Radio 4 programmes alone, and the trend is seemingly ever upwards. But is this a bubble or is podcasting set to take its place alongside TV and radio as a long-term media genre? British podcaster Helen Zaltzman guests in this first episode which explores the genre, plays some great podcasts and asks why it’s taken off in such a big way.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Aggressiveness 18 mins – “As the list of names of unarmed African-Americans killed or brutalized by police grows, questions around legal actions against law enforcement grow as well. Drexel University law professor Donald Tibbs joins The Remix to discuss police violence, viral videos, race, gender and how the criminal justice system is failing communities of color.” At the link find the title, “Race, gender and the politics of police violence,Jul, 2015,” right-click “Media files tibbs-webb.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prisons for Profit 52 mins – “Prisons are almost impossible for reporters to get inside, and few people know what life inside is like for inmates and guards. But one journalist cracked the shell of secrecy by getting a job as a prison guard. He witnessed cost-cutting measures and reported safety concerns affecting prisoners and staff. On this episode of Reveal, we take an unprecedented look inside the multibillion-dollar private prison industry.” At the link find the title, “The man inside: Four months as a prison guard, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files The-man-inside_Four-months-as-a-prison-guard_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Renewable Future 60 mins – “Author Richard Heinberg on new book “Our Renewable Future: Laying the Path for One Hundred Percent Clean Energy”. Plus plankton expert Dr. Michael Behrenfeld: is the foundation of ocean life in trouble?” At the link find and right-click “Heinberg Lo-Fi” for his part of this two-part file and click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Researcher Carolyn Bertozzi 54 mins – “Dr. Carolyn Bertozzi is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and Radiology at Stanford University. She is also an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Carolyn received her undergraduate training in Chemistry at Harvard University and was awarded her PhD in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. She went on to complete postdoctoral research at the University of California, San Francisco and then accepted a faculty position at UC, Berkeley. Carolyn just recently joined the faculty at Stanford in 2015. She is the recipient of the UCSF 150th Anniversary Alumni Excellence Award, the Hans Bloemendal Award from Radboud University, the Heinrich Wieland Prize, the Royal Society of Chemistry Organic Division Bioorganic Chemistry Award, the Lemelson-MIT Prize for Inventors, a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, and many other national and international awards and honors. In addition, Carolyn is an elected Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. Carolyn is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 326 Carolyn Bertozzi Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Researcher Eric Green 51 mins – “Dr. Eric Green is the Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health. He received his B.S. in Bacteriology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and his M.D. and Ph.D. in Cell Biology from Washington University in St. Louis. Afterward, Eric completed his residency at Washington University in Laboratory Medicine and as part of his residency he did a postdoctoral research in genetics. Eric served on the faculty and as co-investigator in the Human Genome Center at Washington University School of Medicine before accepting a position at the National Institutes of Health where he has been now for over 20 years. Eric has been the recipient of many awards and honors during his career, including the NIH Director’s Award (multiple times), the Alumni Achievement and the Distinguished Alumni Awards from Washington University School of Medicine, as well as a Ladue Horton Watkins High School Distinguished Alumni Award. He is also a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians. Eric is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link right-clickDirect download: 328 Eric Green Final copy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ribosome Researcher 28 mins – “All the information that’s needed for life is written in our DNA. But how do we get from DNA code to biological reality? That’s the job of the ribosomes – those clever molecular machines that are found in every living cell. And in 2008 Venki Ramakrishnan was awarded the Nobel Prize for determining their structure. Jim talks to Venki about the frantic race to crack the structure of the ribosome, probably the most important biological molecule after DNA; why he thinks the Nobel Prize is a terrible thing for science; and his new job as President of the Royal Society.” At the link find the title, “Venki Ramakrishnan, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03lc21m.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Teachers 41 mins – “Today a future without schools. Instead of gathering students into a room and teaching them, everybody learns on their own time, on tablets and guided by artificial intelligence. We talk to a computer scientist who developed an artificially intelligent TA, folks who build learning apps, and critics who wonder if all the promises being made are too good to be true. What do we gain when we let students choose their own paths? What do we lose when we get rid of schools?” At the link find the title, “Bot For Teacher, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rock Snot 6 mins – “Researchers say an algae called “rock snot” that was thought to be an invasive species in the Northeast is actually native to the northern United States. So if “rock snot” has been here for a long time, why haven’t we noticed it before? To answer this question we turn to Granite Geek David Brooks. He’s a reporter with The Concord Monitor and writer at Granitegeek.org, and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss the matter….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Romance Novels 53 mins – “Filmmaker Laurie Kahn calls romance fiction a story of pride and prejudice. The genre accounts for a billion dollars in annual sales, and the people who read and write these steamy books are a vast community of educated and savvy women. But despite its wild popularity and economic success, many see romance as nothing more than tawdry, throw-away pulp. Thursday, Kahn and Princeton University’s William Gleason join us to talk about romance’s literary strengths and the people who love the genre.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sea Rise Business 6 mins – “Adaptation and mitigation will cost the world billions, maybe trillions, of dollars. It’ll be a massive hit to the global economy. But at least some of that cost is also an economic opportunity, and everyone from snow-machine makers to agribusinesses are angling to make money off of climate change. Add to that list the city of Norfolk, Virginia. Norfolk businesses, universities, and even the local government itself in the low-lying coastal city are trying to re-frame the risk of sea-level rise as an opportunity….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Skinhead 14 mins – “Remix host James Peterson recently returned from a trip to Ghana. He talks about his emotional reaction to walking in the footsteps of enslaved ancestors at Elmina Castle. And reporter Katie Davis interviews Frank Meeink about his transition from neo-Nazi to racial tolerance speaker.” At the link find the title, “A neo-Nazi skinhead does a 180; James lives a moment of slave-trade history in Ghana, Jul, 2015,” right-click “Media files skinhead-web-.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stonewall Inn Gay Riot 29 mins – “Early on the morning of Saturday, June 28, 1969, officers from the New York City Police Department’s vice squad pulled up in front the Stonewall Inn—one of the city’s largest and most popular gay bars, located in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan. Throughout the 1950s and ’60s, there were few establishments that catered to members of the LGBTQ community. But the Stonewall Inn was a noted exception…. At the time, the NYPD vice squad routinely raided gay bars and patrons generally complied when they did, frightened by the possibility of being outed in the newspaper… But this particular night at the Stonewall Inn was different. Many of those dressed in drag refused to be escorted out by officers. Lots of patrons would not produce their IDs. A crowd began to grow outside the building, some posing and giving exaggerated salutes to the police. As officers tried to take several people into their police van, violence broke out. The authorities quickly lost control of the situation… Protests and demonstrations continued for several days. These protests sparked a revolution, and a hidden subculture became a vibrant political movement. Many people trace the roots of modern gay rights organizing to that night at the Stonewall Inn. Within a few years, new gay rights organizations were founded and spread across the country. The first gay pride marches took place exactly a year later, commemorating the one year anniversary of the riots.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sugar Research 28 mins – “The recent Public Health England report on sugar reduction recommended that we slash the amount of sugar we eat to just seven teaspoons a day. Diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity have all been linked to high sugar intake. Treating obesity and its consequences alone costs the NHS £5.1m per year. Jim Al-Khalili invites three scientific experts from different disciplines into the studio to present the evidence behind their strategy to reduce our sugar intake: – Dr Peter Scarborough, a mathematician from the Nuffield Department of Public Health at Oxford has been analysing sugar taxes – Prof Theresa Marteau, a behavioural psychologist from the University of Cambridge, studies the effects of portion sizes – Jenny Arthur, Director of Innovation and Nutrition at Leatherhead Food Research is experimenting with the microscopic structure of sugar particles” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court and Politics 51 mins – “As of June 2016, the Republican-controlled Senate is still refusing to consider President Obama’s nominee for the Supreme Court and fill the vacant seat – a reflection of the divisive atmosphere roiling Washington. Such conflict is hardly new to the high court. The Supreme Court and its decisions, nominations and justices have often–if not always–been instruments of political power. And politics have also shaped the Court in unanticipated ways. In this episode, the Guys will examine why the Supreme Court is regarded as an institution that remains above partisan squabbles. From Marbury v. Madison, the case that helped to form the court as we know it today to the failed nomination of conservative judge Robert Bork, we’ll look at the fascinating and often unexpected ways in which political ideologies inform judicial actions on the highest court in the land.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Conflict 50 mins – “The Syrian conflict has changed people’s lives irrevocably and, in this programme, we allow people to reflect on the situation in which they find themselves. We hear from Sam, who has stayed in his home city of Deraa. Alia lives in a rural area which is in the hands of rebel forces. Her son joined up to fight the regime, but was killed. And, Khadija Kamara came to Britain to escape civil war in Sierra Leone. Her son Ibrahim became the first British jihadi to be killed in Syria.” At the link find the title, “Syrian Voices, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03zchly.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Future 77 mins – “Kevin Kelly, one of our leading technology thinkers and writers, is the author of The Inevitable. He suggests everyone embrace these changes, including ubiquitous tracking, accessible artificial intelligence, constant sharing, getting paid to watch ads, VR in the home, etc.” At the link “Download options,” right-click “audio” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Impact 65 mins – “Mark Danner, Author, Former Staff Writer, The New Yorker; Chancellor’s Professor of Journalism and English, UC Berkeley – In his latest book, Spiral, Danner describes a nation altered in fundamental ways by 9/11. Fourteen years of armed conflict makes the War on Terror the longest war in U.S. history, even though only a tiny percentage of our citizens fight in actual combat. Now Al Qaeda has been replaced by multiple jihadist and terror organizations, including the most notorious: ISIS. Guantanamo, indefinite detention, drone warfare, enhanced interrogation, torture and warrantless wiretapping are all words that have become familiar and tolerated in the name of security. By defining the War on Terror as boundless, apocalyptic and unceasing, we have, Danner concludes, “let it define us as ideological crusaders caught in an endless war.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Prevention 44 mins – “Identifying potential terrorists is crucial to thwarting future attacks. The challenge is discerning real threats from bravado. Today on the show, how do security analysts survey thoughts? Then, we’ll learn about two young men who embarked on a bold crime spree, stealing thousands of dollars worth of gold and weapons right in front of their victims…the hitch? It all went down in a video game.” At the link right-click the play button next to “Listen” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Untouchables 14 mins – “Professor Sunil Khilnani, from the King’s India Institute, looks at the life of Bhimrao Ambedkar, champion of the community previously known as ‘untouchables’ whom he renamed as Dalits. Ambedkar, who was a Dalit himself and fought against caste discrimination. His face can be found on posters, paintings and coloured tiles in tens of millions of Dalit homes. To Indian schoolchildren, he is the man who wrote the country’s constitution; and to India’s politicians he is a public emblem of how far India has come in addressing the blight of caste. “Both readings simultaneously exaggerate and ghettoize Ambedkar’s contribution,” says Professor Khilnani. ‘He was a sophisticated, long-sighted Constitutional collaborator whose interests extended past caste to the very structure and psychology of Indian democracy.'” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Veterans Crisis Line 6 mins – “GAO found that the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) did not meet its call response time goals for the Veterans Crisis Line (VCL), although extended call wait times were not common. VA’s goal is to answer 90 percent of VCL calls at the VCL primary center within 30 seconds. Currently, calls not answered within 30 seconds route to VCL backup call centers; however, for 5 months of fiscal year 2015, calls were routed to VCL backup call centers after 60 seconds. VA officials told GAO that VA data show about 65 to 75 percent of VCL calls were answered at the VCL primary center in fiscal year 2015 within either 30 or 60 seconds. GAO’s covert testing in July and August 2015 confirms VA’s data. Specifically, 119 covert test calls show that an estimated 73 percent of calls made during this period were answered within 30 seconds. GAO also estimates that 99 percent of all VCL calls during this period were answered within 120 seconds. GAO also covertly tested the VCL’s text messaging services and found that 4 of 14 GAO test text messages did not receive responses. ..Without routinely testing its text messaging system or ensuring that its provider does so, VA cannot identify limitations to this service….A 65 page PDF is also available under “Learn More”. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Viral Oncology 60 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Guest: Stephen J. Russell From ASV [American Society for Virology]2016 at Virginia Tech, Vincent, Rich and Kathy speak with Stephen Russell about his career and his work on oncolytic virotherapy – using viruses to treat cancers.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 395” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Initiative 28 mins – “If you’re listening to this broadcast, the chances are you can get clean drinking water right from your kitchen sink. But much of the world’s population does not have that luxury. In rural sub-Saharan Africa, the World Health Organization estimates that only about half of the population has access to clean water, and only 23% have access to hygienic sanitation facilities. The burden of this problem falls disproportionately on women and girls who literally carry the water for their communities. Our guest this week on Sea Change Radio is Gemma Bulos, the Executive Director and co-founder of an organization that works to solve the problem by empowering women as technicians and community leaders who build and sustain water-access technology. Bulos explains how the Global Women’s Water Initiative builds capacity, the connection between water access and girls’ education, and the story of how she arrived at this world-changing work.” At the link right-click “download’ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Watts Riots 18 mins -”50 years ago this week an uprising that became known as the Watts Riots began in a black neighborhood in South Central Los Angeles. A white motorcycle officer pulled over a car with two black men, brothers, for reckless driving…. In the end 34 people were dead. An investigation found that 26 of the deaths were caused by Los Angeles police and the National Guard and ruled justifiable homicide by a Coroner’s inquest. A fireman, a deputy sheriff and police officer were killed in the line of duty. One death was ruled accidental….In the aftermath of the 1965 riots, Ted Watkins founded the Watts Labor Community Action Committee (WLCAC) with the sponsorship of more than a dozen labor unions in an effort to create housing, jobs and a better life for African Americans in South-Central Los Angeles. The group began operating small businesses and buying land to build low-cost housing. Founder Ted Watkins’ son, Timothy, is now the president and CEO of the WLCAC…. James Peterson interviews Timothy Watkins on how the organization has continued to work for social justice and promote fair housing in the neighborhood.” At the link find the title, “A look back at the Watts riots and how the community is looking ahead, Aug, 2015,” right-click “Media files watts-web.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women Founders 65 mins – “Amanda Kahlow, Founder & CEO, 6sense Arum Kang, Founder and CEO, Coffee Meets Bagel Mada Seghete, Co-Founder, Branch Metrics Caitlin MacDonald, CEO, cred—Moderator According to a 2015 North American study by McKinsey & Company, women are almost four times more likely than men to think they have fewer opportunities to advance because of their gender. How can we change this? During this candid discussion, you’ll join three leading women in tech as they share their experiences of being a woman in the technology industry, what challenges they’ve faced along the way, how they overcame them and ways to encourage more women to pursue careers in tech.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Work Future 60 mins – “This week, we’re thinking about how rapidly advancing technology will change our future, our work, and our well-being. We speak to Richard and Daniel Susskind about their book “The Future of Professions: How Technology Will Transform the Work of Human Experts” about the impacts technology may have on professional work. And Nicholas Agar comes on to talk about his book “The Sceptical Optimist” and the ways new technologies will affect our perceptions and well-being.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One at Gallipoli 15 mins – “Drawing on sound archive from the Imperial War Museums and the BBC, Dan Snow looks at the experiences of veterans of the First World War who took part in the landings at Anzac Cove and Cape Helles in April 1915. As the first assaults were made, soldiers landed in chaotic conditions, under heavy fire, and those who survived then faced extraordinarily difficult terrain to cross, and there were reports of the sea turning red.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One Battle of Loos 14 mins – “Before the last survivors of the First World War passed away, the memories of many of those who fought it were captured in sound recordings. Speakers recall in great detail as though it were yesterday the conditions of the trenches, the brutality of the battlefield, the experience of seeing their first casualty and hearing their first shell, their daily and nightly routines, and their psychological state in the face of so much trauma….” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One Battle of Verdun 15 mins – “…The first five programmes of this year’s series of Voices of the First World War explore the events of 1916 from the point of view of those who experienced them, from descriptions of the huge and costly battles that engulfed all Armies on the Western Front to the fall-out of the introduction of conscription in Britain, with Conscientious Objectors revealing the consequences of their decision not to fight. Dan Snow begins the week hearing the experiences of French soldiers who fought at the Battle of Verdun. In interviews recorded in 1964 for the BBC Great War series, they recall the hellish conditions for those who took part in the drawn-out battle.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One Gas 15 mins – “Drawing on the vivid recollections of veterans of the First World War in the sound archives of the Imperial War Museums and the BBC, Dan Snow looks at the first German chlorine gas attacks of the war. During the 2nd Battle of Ypres in April and May 1915, poison gas was released on unsuspecting troops, and had a more powerful effect than even the German were expecting. From those who had to run away and those who managed to stay put in the trenches and keep firing, we hear what it was like to be there, and experience this new weapon.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One Medicine 27 mins – “ …conflicts like World War I have driven technological innovation… On 1st July 1916 alone, there were 58,000 British casualties. The need for speedy and effective evacuation and treatment for the injured on the frontline was urgent. But the narrow trenches on the edges of the battlefields made it very difficult to carry the wounded to field hospitals… Paper tags were tied onto soldiers to record their injuries and whether medication had been given or a tourniquet applied to stem blood loss… Eddie Chaloner is a consultant vascular surgeon who’s served in the Royal Army Medical Corp in Rwanda, Bosnia, and Kosovo. He explains how blood transfusion was still in its early stages during the First World War. The ABO blood groups had only been discovered by Austrian physician, Karl Landsteiner in 1900 – and the Rh factor wasn’t identified until just before World War II. Direct transfusion – from the donor’s body into the recipient sitting next to them – could be carried out, but not on the large scale required by battlefield injuries… A number of gases were used as weapons – chlorine gas on its own or mixed with phosgene, and later mustard gas caused severe blistering to the body. Doctors used paraffin to treat the blisters. As well as the injuries inflicted by gas, many hundreds of thousands were shot and field hospitals tried to mend the gunshot wounds… In countries like Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of India and Latin America, so-called “celebratory” gunfire involves firing weapons up into the air in order to mark a positive event. They’re often considered to be a harmless show of strength or bravado, but Hugo Goodridge reports from the Lebanese capital Beirut, where a number of people have been killed or injured by guns fired in the city. It is illegal to discharge a gun in a public place in Lebanon and the police have used social media to try and change attitudes towards celebratory gunfire….” At the link find the title, “How War and Conflict Have Helped to Improve Medical Treatments, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03zx0vy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One Pals 27 mins – “The towns of east Lancashire in North-West England were among the worst hit by the massive loss of life on the first day of the Battle of the Somme 100 years ago. The Mayor of Accrington, a small textile town, had volunteered to form a battalion of 1,000 local men to help England’s war effort in 1914. Men from neighbouring Burnley and Chorley completed the new battalion, which became known as the Accrington Pals because friends, neighbours and workmates had all joined up to fight together.” At the link find the title, “The Accrington Pals, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03zsrq4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One U-Boats 27 mins – “…Presented by Dan Snow, the second five programmes to be broadcast this year look at the events of 1915, including veterans’ memories of their first trips home on leave, the rise of U-Boat attacks, the disastrous Battle of Loos, and the experiences of those fighting on the Eastern Front as the war expanded, in Salonika and Mesopotamia.In the second programme we hear the recollections of two German Officers who served on U-Boats, one of whom, Martin Niemoller, had become a Lutheran Pastor and leading voice in warning against the dangers of political apathy by the time of his contribution to the BBC Great War Series in 1964. And Alice Drury, a survivor of the Lusitania, vividly recalls its sinking by German torpedo in May 1915.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 241 – Jun 24, 2016: Africa Modernization, Alexander McCall Smith, Archive Value, Arctic Issues, Barbara Boxer, Bay of Fundy Power, Bhopal Disaster, Biofuel, Bird and Bees of Life, Body Part Fabrication, Bracero Program Lecture, Bronze Age Collapse, Bruce Bochy, Bullying Effects, Chronic Pain Management, Coroner History Lecture, Creative Paradigms, Drug Overdoses, Economic Competitiveness, Electric Rail History, European Disunion, Extinction Process, Facial Identification Database, Family Violence in Australia, Farm Equipment Auction, Fat and Sugar, Finance Industry Impact, Genetic Engineering, Gilded Age Lecture, Ginseng, GMO Trees, Gun Control Status, Hardware Hacker, Heart Overview, Higher Education, Historical Perspective, Information Overload, Intersex Issues, Investment Newsletters, Iran Sexual Issues, ISIS Kill Lists, Judicial Bias, Ketogenic Diets, Kids and Money, Life Extension Diet, Lithium Kidney Damage, Lynchings in the South, Male Empathy Training, Mass Incarcerations of 60s-70s, Mass Migrations of 1900s, Migration to Sweden, National Security Efforts, Nixon White House Recording System, Ocean Mapping, Performance Enhancing Drugs, Peter Bogdanovich, Police Reform History, Power Defined, Power Grid Defense, Power Trends-Australia, Productivity Mentor, Psych Ward Insights, Rat Control, Refugee Policy History, Relief Efforts by U.S., Sexual Health of Women, Sharing Economy, Stanford Sex Case, Startup Drug Business, Suicide Ethics, Supreme Court Role, Syria Murders, Syrian Hostages, Team Rubicon, Technology Trends, Terrorist Recruitment, Tiger Tracking, Torpedo Music, Wartime Families, Welfare Benefits, Welfare State, Women in the Workplace, World War One Myths

The best 83 podcasts from a larger group of 250 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Africa Modernization 62 mins – “Jake Bright, Writer; Author; Strategic Advisor Join us for a discussion of business, investment, technology and turnaround in Africa with Jake Bright, co-author of The Next Africa: An Emerging Continent Becomes a Global Powerhouse. The book won an Axiom Best Business Book award and was recently featured at TEDx. Bright, who also contributes on Africa for TechCrunch, will focus in particular on Sub-Saharan Africa’s emerging technology sector and its growing ties to Silicon Valley. Joining Bright for discussion and Q&A will be MallforAfrica.com CEO Chris Folayan, Uber’s Global Lead for International Relations Matt Devlin, and Toro Orero, managing partner for DraperDarkFlow, a Silicon Valley-based Africa focused venture capital firm.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alexander McCall Smith 51 mins – “Today on Word of Mouth it’s Writers on a New England Stage with Alexander McCall Smith, recorded live at The Music Hall in Portsmouth. Best known as the author of The No.1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series, McCall Smith made his living for many years as an esteemed lawyer, medical law professor, and international authority on medical ethics and bioethics. He was born in what is now Zimbabwe, and helped found a law school in neighboring Botswana. It is there that he set his first novel about Precious Ramotswe, who brought the innate curiosity and traditional wisdom honed as a child in the Kalahari desert to bear as Botswana’s first ever lady detective. Alexander McCall Smith joined us shortly after publication of The Woman Who Walked in Sunshine, the 16th novel in a series that’s sold more than 20 million books worldwide and been translated into 40 languages.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Archive Value 62 mins – “How will our memories be experienced by future generations? How much of our cultural memory is “owed” to them? And why on earth would the Library of Congress be interested in preserving years worth of tweets??? These were among the topics of conversations in this week’s episode in which EconTalk host Russ Roberts talked with archivist and historian Abby Smith Rumsey about how we experience memories of the past, and how we might preserve them for the future. This episode got me thinking a lot about what my grandchildren might make of EconTalk, among other memories and experiences I hold dear. Can I ensure that they will experience them? How do I know they will find any value in them? As always, we’d like to hear whay you took away from this week’s conversation. Let us know; we love to hear from you!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arctic Issues 56 mins – “Thank you for coming to the Council’s meeting on the Arctic. It’s really terrific, and a great honor, to have three of the country’s—our nation’s most important leaders on this subject: Admiral Papp, Ambassador Brzezinski, and Senator Murkowski. Their full bios are in your program, so I won’t repeat them for you here. Our plan, like most Council meetings, is to have a 30-minute conversation, and then we’ll open it up to the floor for members to ask questions….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Barbara Boxer 48 mins – “What’s at stake in the coming presidential election? “Everything,” says Senator Barbara Boxer. The lifelong democrat is retiring from the Senate after 34 years in Congress, but insists she won’t stop fighting for the causes she believes in, like environmental protection, women’s rights and healthcare. In a new memoir, Boxer chronicles her political career spanning four decades, and talks about honing what she calls “the art of tough.” She’ll share her views on the 2016 presidential race, give us a look inside her life as a senator and tell us what she thinks it takes to truly stand up for change at a critical time for our country.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Bay of Fundy Power 28 mins – “At the end point of Nova Scotia’s Bay of Fundy, in the Minas Basin, the tides can rise as high as 15 metres. Those hoping to harness that energy want to put giant turbines on the seabed but one very vocal lobster fisherman is already delaying the plan.” At the link find the title, “Bay of Fundy tidal turbines on hold over environmental concerns, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160615_61135.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bhopal Disaster 8 mins – “One December morning over thirty years ago, residents of the Indian city of Bhopal found themselves in the grip of what was to become the world’s worst industrial disaster, exposed to a cloud of toxic methyl isocyanate….” At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Methyl_isocyanate.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biofuel 28 mins – “Is the biofuel craze of a few years ago really dead? This week’s guest on Sea Change Radio, Pat Gruber, thinks not. While plummeting oil prices may have flattened the appeal of biofuel in the auto industry, the air travel industry’s interest appears to be just taking off. Gruber’s company, Gevo, provided the fuel for the first corn-powered commercial passenger flight in U.S. history this month. We discuss his company’s technology, the competitive bio jetfuel landscape, and what feedstocks are likely to be used to power future flights. Then we dig into the Sea Change Radio archives to hear from longtime airline industry analyst Bob McAdoo. He breaks down airline pricing models that often leave travelers flummoxed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bird and Bees of Life 62 mins – “Some information is so big and so complicated that it seems impossible to talk to kids about. This week, stories about the vague and not-so-vague ways to teach children about race, death and sex – including a story about colleges responding to sexual assault by trying to teach students how to ask for consent. Also, a story about how and when to teach kids about the horrors of slavery and oppression in America.” At the link you can listen online, but a download costs $.99; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Body Part Fabrication 7 mins – “TED Fellow Andrew Pelling is a biohacker, and nature is his hardware. His favorite materials are the simplest ones (and oftentimes he finds them in the garbage). Building on the cellulose structure that gives an apple its shape, he “grows” lifelike human ears, pioneering a process that might someday be used to repair body parts safely and cheaply. And he has some even wilder ideas to share … “What I’m really curious about is if one day it will be possible to repair, rebuild and augment our own bodies with stuff we make in the kitchen,” he says.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bracero Program Lecture 72 mins – “Mar, 2016,” University of Illinois professor Mireya Loza talks about Latino labor movements during the mid-20th century. She discusses the “bracero” program which brought thousands of Mexicans to the U.S. as guest workers.” At the link find the title, “Latino Labor Movements, Mar 2016,” right-click “Media files program.422471.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bronze Age Collapse 47 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss The Bronze Age Collapse, the name given by many historians to what appears to have been a sudden, uncontrolled destruction of dominant civilizations around 1200 BC in the Aegean, Eastern Mediterranean and Anatolia. Among other areas, there were great changes in Minoan Crete, Egypt, the Hittite Empire, Mycenaean Greece and Syria. The reasons for the changes, and the extent of those changes, are open to debate and include droughts, rebellions, the breakdown of trade as copper became less desirable, earthquakes, invasions, volcanoes and the mysterious Sea Peoples….” At the link find the title, “The Bronze Age Collapse, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03yhrs7.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bruce Bochy 64 mins – “San Francisco Giants CEO Larry Baer has stated that hiring Bruce Bochy was “probably the best move [Giants management] ever made.” Here’s a chance to get Bruce Bochy’s take on the Giants 2016 season and on his personal side as well. As a Major League manager, Bochy has one of the more stressful jobs imaginable. What does he do to relax? He goes for long walks as a way to clear his head, calm his soul and give his body a workout, all of which is the subject of his new book, A Book of Walks. Here’s a rare chance to meet Bruce Bochy off the field. Bring your questions.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bullying Effects 26 mins – “The Current has looked into bullying in schools and communities, even the effects of bullying on siblings. Now new research suggests the impact of bullying follows many into adulthood and creates what is being called Adult Post Bullying Syndrome.” At the link find the title, “Researcher says bullying ‘scars’ into adulthood should be classified as syndrome, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160613_19250.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Pain Management 59 mins – “Dr. Lawrence Poree looks at alternatives to opioid pain medication. Might technology hold the key to reducing opioid use? Recorded on 02/25/2016. (#30798) (Presents some advanced and proven approaches that are not well known.) At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coroner History Lecture 71 mins – “University of Georgia professor Stephen Berry teaches a class about coroners in the 19th century South. He discusses the role of a coroner as an agent of the state and talks about the records created from their inquests.” At the link find the title, “Coroners in the 19th Century South, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.440930.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creative Paradigms 37 mins – “Why do ideas discarded for centuries, like electric cars, return to the cutting edge of science and technology? Steven Poole’s new book Rethink shows what we can learn by considering obsolete ideas from a new perspective, drawing on examples from military strategy and psychotherapy to chess and morphic resonance. Ideas given a second chance include electric cars, panpsychism, and teleology.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Overdoses 32 mins – “Synthetic Opioids causing overdoses nationwide[5 – 15 min mark], and we’ll look at two high impact nurse leadership programs affecting patient outcomes for critical care patients. If that’s what you’re looking for, you found it. It’s the Nursing Show.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Competitiveness 60 mins – “In conversation with Mira Patel, Senior Advisor at U.S. Global Development Lab, U.S. Agency for International Development, John Engler, President of Business Roundtable, Steven L. Rattner, Chairman of Willett Advisors, LLC, and Jay C. Shambaugh, Member of the White House Council of Economic Advisors, discuss the role of the U.S. government in fortifying economic competitiveness in international markets. The experts consider the competitive challenges confronting U.S. manufacturing businesses, how trade policies influence global competitiveness, the need for change in federal spending priorities, and the potential impacts of corporate tax reform.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Rail History 49 mins – “Clemson University professor Roger Grant talks about the history of American transportation and the rise of interurban electric rail at the end of the 19th and early 20th century.” At the link find the title, “Interurban Electric Rail, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.443546.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

European Disunion 47 mins – “Recorded on January 25, 2016 Hoover Institution fellow Michael McFaul and John O’Sullivan discuss the many problems Europe is facing including an aggressive Russia, Brexit, NATO and the asylum crisis in Germany. McFaul and O’Sullivan give their analysis of these problems and what it means for the future of Europe.” At the link find the title, “European Disunion, Jan, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160613-mcfaul.mp3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Extinction Process 26 mins – “The Bramble Cay melomys lived on a small island in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, but their extinction is being looked at as a ‘canary in the coal mine’ moment.” At the link find the title, “First mammal extinction due to human-caused climate change, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160617_68473.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facial Identification Database 6 mins – “Audio interview by GAO staff with Diana Maurer, Director, Homeland Security and Justice” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Family Violence in Australia 56 mins – “Rosie Batty and Danny Blay speak at a family violence election forum at the National Press Club,Rosie Batty and Danny Blay speak at the National Press Club, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_BattyBlay_1506_512k.mp4” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Equipment Auction 50 mins – “Each month in a flat piece of English Fenland, a site the size of 40 football pitches, hosts the biggest second hand farm machinery auction in the world. It is both uniquely British and international – buyers from four continents arrive by truck, taxi, or hire car with their tractor shopping lists and hopes.” At the link find the title, “Follow That Tractor, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03y71yk.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fat and Sugar P1 54 mins – “Jill Eisen explores the complex, and sometimes contradictory, science of nutrition — and tries to find clarity amidst the thicket of studies and ambiguous research.” At the link find the title, “Fat and Sugar, Part 1, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160615_27588.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Finance Industry Impact 61 mins – “In conversation with Peter R. Fisher, Senior Fellow and Senior Lecturer at Tuck Business School, Dartmouth College, Rana A. Foroohaar, Managing Editor of Time Magazine, John P. Lipsky, Senior Fellow at Foreign Policy Institute, John Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, and Joseph E. Stiglitz, Professor at Columbia Business School, discuss the effects of the finance industry’s continued growth and assess whether it is helpful or hurtful to the U.S. economy overall. They consider how finance’s growth impacts business development, its effects on income inequality, and whether the financial regulations implemented after the Great Recession have been effective. The panel further reflects on the best ways to regulate and manage risk in the financial industry going forward.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Engineering 37 mins – “We talk to cancer physician and researcher Siddhartha Mukherjee about his latest book The Gene: An Intimate History.” At the link find the title, “136 Siddhartha Mukherjee – An Intimate History of the Gene,” right-click “Media files 93a65456-668a-4f87-a476-69a87c042b59.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gilded Age Lecture, 52 mins – “May, 2016 Robert Chiles of the University of Maryland talks about labor and social unrest during the Gilded Age, as well as the reforms that tried to combat this discontent.” At the link find the title, “Unrest and Reform in the Gilded Age, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.440170.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ginseng 37 mins – “Modern science is proving many traditional herbal medicines to be effective. In Episode 133, Dr. Andrew Scholey of the Swinburne Centre for Human Psychopharmacology is back to talk about the benefits of Ginseng (see our episode on Bacopa for another example of a traditional herb backed by science). Mood, Memory, and Mental Fatigue – Numerous studies have confirmed that Ginseng has cognition-enhancing properties, particularly when it comes to memory, mood, and mental fatigue…And Ginseng has benefits comparable to pharmaceutical heavy-hitters like Modafinil. In a study comparing the effects of Ginseng and Modafinil, the largest effect size (a measure of how much of an effect a compound has) for Modafinil was 0.77, while the largest for Ginseng was 0.86, meaning that Ginseng had more noticeable effects on certain measures of cognition than Modafinil. In the case of mental fatigue, Ginseng had double the effect of Modafinil!…”At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Trees 40 mins – “Dr. Steve Strauss is a Distinguished Professor of Forestry at Oregon State University. He has been at the forefront of forest biology and genetic engineering of trees, contributing greatly to the understanding of fundamental tree biology, as well as the development of techniques and tools to perform genetic engineering in tree species. We discuss the many opportunities in tree breeding, as well as the limitations and other challenges.” At the link find the title, “

Gun Control Status 20 mins – “As the U.S. once again debates gun control in the wake of the Orlando massacre, gun advocates are challenging the accepted wisdom the NRA is politically invincible. New research suggests the NRA is losing its grip to changing demographics.” At the link find the title, “NRA’s political influence on the wane, says gun control advocate, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160615_64931.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hardware Hacker 82 mins – “Dmitry Nedospasov is a full time hardware hacker and security researcher. He tells us about how to get into the silicon and learn all about what’s going on under the hood of devices….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Overview 64 mins – “This programme comes to you from the British Cardiovascular Society Conference in Manchester, where leaders in the field have been presenting their latest research on preventing heart disease: one of the leading causes of death. We explore the radioactive toothpaste that can help you predict heart attacks, listen in to a genuine heart transplant and ask whether running really keeps your heart healthy.” At the link right-click “Download as MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Higher Education 27 mins – “Dr. Bruce Johnstone is Professor Emeritus at the University of Buffalo and was named SUNY Chancellor Emeritus in 2014.  In this 2011 interview, we’ll hear Johnstone talk about the challenges facing higher education, including the increasing costs of a higher education and the job shortages facing college graduates. How can universities survive the current economy and state budget cuts?” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Historical Perspective 60 mins – “…We are living in a time of transition. Migration, religious fundamentalism and climate change leave many of us anxious about the future. So too does the rise of China, the re-emergence of Iran, the actions and posturing of Russia and a Middle East that seems fragile and volatile, where the dreams of the Arab Spring have turned to despair, as conflict rages across north Africa and the Middle East… how do we prepare for the new world that is emerging? [Peter Frankopan, the Oxford historian and author of the bestseller, ‘The Silk Roads’]…came to the Intelligence Squared stage to put these questions into an historical perspective. He was joined by the politician Kwasi Kwarteng, a rising star in Westminster, whose books on the history of empire and on finance have given him a rare perspective on global change and on the ways the West has engaged with other parts of the world, sometimes as he sees it with disastrous effect…. The globe has rotated towards the West for the last five hundred years. Now, as Frankopan will explain, it is turning east, towards the new Silk Roads, largely funded by China, that fan out in all directions across Asia. Is it closing time in the gardens of the west, as our old comfortable democratic assumptions – and our comfort – fall prey to a world order that is changing at terrifyingly quick pace?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Information Overload 39 mins – “This week we’re dredging the seas of memory, examining how identity is constructed out of what we choose to remember and what happens when we cannot use this faculty. According to the cultural historian Abby Smith Rumsey, the 21st century isn’t the first time human beings have found themselves drowning in data. She explains why it’s too easy to blame information overload on IT, how brains are designed to look for meaning instead of facts and where to build a library in a networked world. The artist Simon Bill joins us in the studio to tell us why he found himself putting down his brushes to write a novel, Artist in Residence. He explores how neuroscience challenges our basic preconceptions about originality and why artists struggle with the stuff of creation.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intersex Issues 24 mins – “What to do if your child is born with sexual anatomy that doesn’t fit the norm? For years, the answer has been gender assignment surgery, but The Current speaks to two intersex guests who want this to invasive practice to stop.” At the link find the title, “Stop medical intervention on the bodies of intersex children, says advocate, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160615_11079.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Newsletters 52 mins – “The Hulbert Financial Digest has been closed. HFD was to financial newsletters what Morningstar is to the mutual fund industry. HFD tracked the performance and risk of over 200 newsletter portfolios. Paul shares what he learned from subscribing to HFD for over 30 years. He discusses newsletters that recommend low-risk to very-high-risk PORTFOLIOS using individual stocks, mutual funds, market timing and buy and hold.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran Sexual Issues 27 mins – “In Iran, It is not just Ahmadinejad who slams homosexuals, many people also deny homosexuality or know very little about it. So how does one family cope when they realise their daughter is gay? This is the story of the collective struggle of a supportive and close-knit family, who are trying to find a solution for this “crisis”, each in their own way.” At the link find the title, “My Iranian Daughter, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03y72zv.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Kill List 20 mins – “Across the country, over a hundred Canadians are learning from police that they are on the ISIS ‘kill list’ — and most of them are women.” At the link find the title, “ISIS kill list targeting civilians is a game changer in terrorism, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160617_62060.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Judicial Bias 52 mins – “Dahlia sits down with Stanford Law School’s Deborah Rhode to discuss Donald Trump’s attack on the judge in the Trump University fraud lawsuits. And she talks with legal scholar Jeffrey Rosen about the astonishing legal mind of Justice Louis Brandeis.” At the link find the title, “What Would Brandeis Do? Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM9271746723.mp3” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ketogenic Diets 73 mins – “On this episode we have guest Luis Villasenor of KetoGains. We talk all about ketosis, ketogenic diets, building muscle, fueling in ketosis, weight and fat loss, electrolytes, and more.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kids and Money 28 mins – “In this episode, we handed the mic over to kids from 5 to 9 years old to discuss the role of money in their lives, and in their imaginations.” At the link find the title, “Get Schooled: Kids and Money, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files PNC5571652013.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Life Extension Diet 28 mins – “(Starts at 10 min mark) Solar panels reach world record high efficiency, but funding will be cut, Universe expanding faster than predicted by Ian Woolf, David LeCouteur talks about healthier ageing through a high carbohydrate diet.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lithium Kidney Damage 24 mins – “This week we’re revisiting the story of a woman making a very difficult decision. Jaime Lowe started taking lithium when she was 17, after a manic episode landed her in a psychiatric ward. She was diagnosed with bipolar disorder,and for more than 20 years, the drug has been her near-constant companion. She’s taken it for so long that she can’t say for sure where she ends and lithium begins. “It’s hard to know if lithium is actually — like, if it dampens my personality, or if it normalizes my personality, or if it allows me to just sort of be who I am,” she says. Jaime tried to go off of lithium only once, in her mid-20s, and the result was not good. She developed grand delusions. She would start an organization to defend the First Amendment. She would marry a friend she only recently met. She would change the world. She sent wild emails to would-be employers, adorned herself with glitter and stacks of necklaces, and barely slept. When she finally pulled herself back together again, Jaime made a resolution. She’d stick with lithium. And that worked — until she learned last year that her long-term lithium use has taken a physical toll. It’s damaged her kidneys. Now, she faces a choice that’s not much of choice at all: an eventual kidney transplant, or going off the drug that has kept her sane all these years.” At the link find the title, “Your Sanity or Your Kidneys, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files onlyhuman030116_cms579631_pod.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lynchings in the South 72 mins – “ University of Texas at Dallas professor Natalie Ring talks about the common practice of lynching black men as punishment for perceived crimes in the Jim Crow era South.” At the link find the title, “Punishment in the Jim Crow South, Mar, 2016,”right-click “Media files program.430202.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fromt ehpop-up menu.

Male Empathy Training 62 mins – “You probably don’t even notice them, but social norms determine so much of your behavior – how you dress, talk, eat and even what you allow yourself to feel. These norms are so entrenched we never imagine they can shift. But Alix Spiegel and new co-host, Hanna Rosin, examine two grand social experiments that attempt to do just that: teach McDonald’s employees in Russia to smile, and workers on an oil rig how to cry.” At the link find the title, “June 17, 2016, The New Norm,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Incarcerations of 60s–70s Lecture 72 mins – ”University of Washington, Bothell, history professor Dan Berger examines the rise of mass incarceration in the United States and the politics behind it.” At the link find the title, “Incarceration in the Late 20th Century, MY 2016,” right-click “Media files program.430012.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Migrations of 1900s Lecture 72 mins – ”Georgetown University professor Adam Rothman teaches a class on the impact of the advent of the Industrial Revolution on the flow of migrants from Europe to the Americas in the 19th century.” At the link find the title, “Mass Migration in the Industrial Atlantic, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436309.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migration to Sweden 82 mins – “More people than ever before are on the move, crossing international borders in search of safety, livelihoods, opportunity, or the chance to reunite their families. States are ill-prepared to deal with these mixed flows of refugees and other migrants, especially those who move without prior authorization from the countries they seek to enter. Much of the focus is on how best to address the immediate and urgent needs of refugees—and for good reason. But much less attention has been paid to protecting the human rights of other migrants, or to creating orderly processes and expanding opportunities for legal migration. Increased mobility is a fact of life in the 21st century, and cannot be continually dealt with as a crisis….” At the link right-click “Download(Loading)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Security Efforts 55 mins – “Amy Pope, U.S. deputy homeland security advisor and deputy assistant to the president at the White House National Security Council, joined CFR for a discussion on how the networks, talents, and perspectives of diverse populations help the United States to ensure the safety and security of its homeland against 21st century threats. Pope reflected on how women and civil society help to strengthen community resilience and combat radicalization, and what policies, strategies, and tactics the U.S. government can employ to best partner with them and address the risks that they face.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nixon White House Recording System and the White House Tapes, May, 2016,” 67 mins – “John Dean, former White House counsel to President Nixon and now Barry Goldwater Chair of American Institutions at Arizona State University, teaches a class on Watergate and the discovery of the Nixon White House taping system.”At the link find the title, “John Dean on Watergate and the White House Tapes, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.431129.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Mapping 26 mins – “We still know less than 95% of what the sea floor looks like. Even shallow coastal waters are poorly mapped… The weather system that creates the Indian monsoon is notoriously difficult to model, which leads to inaccurate forecasts of the start date and intensity that can lead to devastation for local residents and farmers. A team of oceanographers and scientists from the University of East Anglia are going to be out at sea during the monsoon and using underwater robots to map current flows and measure sea temperatures…- Gravitational Wave Detected Again The team at LIGO (The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) have done it again with a Christmas day detection of two black holes colliding…- Green Mining Wales in the UK has 1300 rivers with illegal levels of heavy metals. Toxic metals like lead, zinc and copper are a legacy left over from when the area was heavily mined. Natural Resources Wales and Innovate UK set a competition to look for technology that would clean up these rivers. One of the winners was Steve Skill from Swansea University, who has come up with some biotechnology that uses algae to suck the poison out of the rivers….” At the link find the title, “Mapping the Ocean Floor, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03yjjqs.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Performance Enhancing Drugs P1 42mins – “In this episode we talk to Chris Hoyte from RMPDC [Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center]about steroids, hormones, and other performance enhancing drugs. This is the first part of of a two part interview.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peter Bogdanovich 89 mins –Legendary director, critic and film historian Peter Bogdanovich joins Gilbert and Frank for a fascinating, in-depth conversation about “Citizen Kane,” John Ford, the influence of Howard Hawks, the B-movies of Roger Corman and the decline of the Hollywood studio system. Also, Peter befriends Cary Grant, Gilbert meets Richard Pryor, Jimmy Stewart recites a poem and Alfred Hitchcock orders a steak. PLUS: Samuel Fuller! Kenneth Mars! Orson Welles’ lost film! Peter remembers John Ritter! And the strange death of Thomas Ince!” At the link find the title, “#107: Peter Bogdanovich,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/3598900/6267b16d-9359-42aa-b65e-99c82bda6784.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Reform Historic 24 mins – “In 1968, the police department in Menlo Park, California hired a new police chief. His name was Victor Cizanckas and his main goal was to reform the department, which had a strained relationship with the community at the time. The 1960s had been a turbulent decade in Menlo Park, a small city with wide suburban streets and manicured lawns just south of San Francisco. There were big student-led, anti-war demonstrations at nearby Stanford University. Leaders in the African-American communities of Belle Haven and East Palo Alto were organizing to demand better treatment and services. After years of clashing with protesters, the police department didn’t have the best reputation. Cizanckas wanted to rebuild trust with the community — and he made a number of changes to improve the department’s image. One of the most ground-breaking and controversial was the new blazer-style uniform he implemented….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow just under the title, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power Defined 77 mins – “Dacher Keltner, Professor of Psychology, UC Berkeley; Co-Director, Greater Good Science Center; Author, The Power Paradox: How We Gain and Lose Influence Monday Night Philosophy investigates a revolutionary reconsideration of power. It is taken for granted that power corrupts. This is reinforced culturally by everything from Machiavelli to contemporary politics. But enduring power only comes from empathy and giving, because power is given to us by other people. This is the crux of the power paradox: by fundamentally misunderstanding the behaviors that helped us to gain power in the first place, we set ourselves up to fall from power. We can’t retain it because we’ve never understood it correctly. Dr. Keltner lays out exactly—in 20 original “Power Principles”—how to retain power, why power can be a demonstrably good thing, and the terrible consequences of letting those around us languish in powerlessness” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power Grid Defense 57 mins – “Ted Koppel’s new book, “Lights Out,” he asserts that a major cyberattack on America’s power grid is not only possible but likely, that it would be devastating, and that the United States is shockingly unprepared. Koppel warns that a well-designed attack on just one of the nation’s three electric power grids could cripple much of our infrastructure, and the federal government, while well prepared for natural disasters, has no plan for the aftermath of an attack on the power grid. On today’s episode of Go Green Radio, we’ll talk with Scott Aaronson, the Managing Director for Cyber and Physical Security for the Edison Electric Institute (EEI), and discuss what the electric power industry is doing to protect the nation’s power grid.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power Trends – Australia 54 mins – “There are big changes happening in the way we generate, buy and sell electricity. We’re seeing batteries, microgrids, and the possibility of self-sufficiency based on renewable energy, both for individual households, and in some cases, whole towns. In many places, the new options presented by technology and innovation are marching ahead of regulations, meaning some initiatives are being restrained by laws drafted for a different world. This discussion, recorded at WOMAD in March 2016 considers some of the new possibilities.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productivity Mentor 12 min – “We believe we should work hard in order to be happy, but could we be thinking about things backwards? In this fast-moving and very funny talk, psychologist Shawn Achor argues that, actually, happiness inspires us to be more productive.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psych Ward Insights 25 mins – “Kay Parley was a psychiatric patient turned psychiatric nurse. Now at the age of 93, she shares her reflections from both sides of the gurney from the then-called Weyburn Mental Institution and speaks to her experience with the therapeutic use of LSD.” At the link find the title, “93-year-old former psychiatric patient and nurse on lessons from LSD, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160614_43079.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rat Control 24 mins – “As a growing number of Canadian cities report increases in rat populations, The Current turns to a researcher and a rodentologist for their insight into the potential health risks to humans and how to get rid of rats. Yes, that’s right – a rodentologist.” At the link find the title, “Rising urban rat population pose health risks to humans, says researcher, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160614_40410.mp3 Rising urban rat population pose health risks to humans, says researcher” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Policy History 59 mins –” Cornell University professor Maria Cristina Garcia talks about the United States’ refugee policy since World War II.” At the link find the title, “U.S. Refugee Policy Since World War II, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.422219.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Relief Efforts by U.S. 59 mins – “Anne C. Richard, assistant secretary of state for population, refugees, and migration at the U.S. Department of State, discusses the scope of the global migration and refugee crisis, the humanitarian response, and policy options moving forward in this CFR National Program and Outreach Conference Call.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Health of Women 83 mins – “Dr. Tami Rowen discusses women’s sexual health as they age. Recorded on 03/23/2016. (#30692)” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharing Economy 54 mins – “Drawing on extensive research and numerous real-world examples — including Airbnb, Lyft, Uber, Etsy, TaskRabbit, France’s BlaBlaCar, China’s Didi Kuaidi, and India’s Ola, Arun explains the basics of what he’s coined “crowd-based capitalism” — a new way of organizing economic activity that will replace the traditional corporate-centered model. As peer-to-peer commercial exchange blurs the lines between the personal and the professional, The Sharing Economy: The End of Employment and the Rise of Crowd-Based Capitalism shows us how the economy, government regulation, employment, and our social fabric will change. Arun describes the intriguing mix of “gift” and “market” in its transactions, demystifies emerging blockchain technologies, and clearly defines the array of emerging on-demand platforms. Equally important, he puts forth policy choices and proposes possible new directions for self-regulatory organizations, labor law, and funding our social safety net.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stanford Sex Case 49 mins – “A California judge last week sentenced former Stanford university athlete Brock Turner to six months in jail for sexually assaulting an unconscious young woman on campus. The lenient sentence sparked widespread public outrage and efforts to recall the judge. Letters to the court by Turner and his father painting Turner as a victim of campus party culture fueled the outrage. The case has also called into question how colleges are addressing the growing number of allegations of sexual assault. We discuss the Brock Turner case, sexual assault on American campuses and the role of law enforcement and college administrators.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Startup Drug Business P2 42 mins – “A different kind of boom and bust.” Busted but very successful drug dealer starts a legitimate career after prison. At the link find the title, “From the Cell to the Sell (Season 3, Episode 8), Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT2039766347.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide Ethics 52 mins – “Questions surrounding suicide have been with us for at least as long as we’ve had written record, and the answers are as varied as the times and places where they were discussed. Friday, Doug sits down with philosophy scholar Margaret Battin. She’s spent her career collecting the works of religious and secular thinkers regarding suicide. It has been considered noble, immoral, heroic and cowardly, and we’ll talk about what all of those views teach us about end-of-life issues today. Margaret Battin is a Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and an Adjunct Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Utah. Her books include Ending Life: Ethics and the Way We Die and The Ethics of Suicide: Historical Sources At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Role 49 mins – “….the Court has shied away from the kinds of blockbuster decisions that marked the last term. Some celebrate this as newfound judicial restraint. Others say it is a sign of dysfunction. We take the long view with two Supreme Court scholars. Both have just released books that explain the historic role of the Court in society — and how that has changed over the years.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Syria Murders 25 mins – “In 1984, 20-year-old Emad Abdullah left his Beirut home to see friends and disappeared. It was the height of Lebanon’s civil war and Syria was known to be jailing Lebanese. Now many families are hoping those who disappeared might now come home.” At the link find the title, “Decades after Lebanon’s civil war thousands still unaccounted for, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160616_60525.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Hostages 50 mins – “Speaking together for the first time, four European hostages of so-called Islamic State talk to Lyse Doucet about their period of incarceration between March 2013 and June 2014. Aid worker Federico Motka, journalists Didier Francois and Daniel Rye, and blogger Pierre Torres were all held for between 10 and 14 months each.” At the link find the title, “Held Hostage in Syria, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03xy5qx.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Team Rubicon P1 32 mins – “This week on the Disaster Podcast, in part 1 of a two-part episode, we will be looking at one of the premier disaster response NGOs (non-governmental organizations) in the country and probably the world right now, Team Rubicon. Podcast co-hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and Sam Bradley are joined by long-time regular Dr. Joe Holley to chat with Dennis Clancy, Deputy Director of Response for Team Rubicon. Dennis is also a U.S. Army veteran. In this two-part episode, Dennis talks about the structure of Team Rubicon and how they work to respond to disasters. We also talk about the origins of the organization and what services they provide. Find out more about Team Rubicon at TeamRubiconUSA.org. Check out next week’s episode where we look at how the team training is effected and how deployments are arranged.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Trends 142 mins – “This Week in Tech 566…Hosted by Leo Laporte – Gawker bankruptcy, IoT job market, remote access trojans, cost of convenience, and more.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorist Recruitment 27 mins – “In the wake of the mass shooting in Orlando, we explore how groups such as the Islamic State explicitly try to capitalize on the grievances and individual frustrations of potential ‘recruits.’” At the link find the title “Encore of Episode 13: Terrorism, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160613_hiddenbrain_terrorism.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tiger Tracking 25 mins – “Wildlife Conservation Society researcher Ullas Karanth talks about his July, 2016, Scientific American article on state-of-the-art techniques for tracking tigers and estimating their populations and habitat health.” At the link find the title, “Tiger, Tiger, Being Tracked, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Torpedo Music 9 mins – “Who will sing the praises of the famous warrior who refused to fight.” At the link find the title, “Episode 21: The Coward of the Deep, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files The_Coward_of_the_Deep.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wartime Families 48 mins – “Philippe Sands is one of Britain’s most prominent human rights lawyers. He has been involved in high-profile cases against several dictators, including Chile’s Augusto Pinochet and Liberia’s Charles Taylor. Several years ago, Sands was asked to speak about human rights in Lviv, Ukraine. Sands was excited to go because the city was the birthplace of his Jewish grandfather. Sands had always wanted to know more about him and how he escaped from the Nazis. But when Sands researched his grandfather’s life, he uncovered family secrets and learned how his relatives were killed.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Welfare Benefits 60 mins – “…Right now there are some 4.5m people in the UK living in households where nobody has a job. Behind that figure lies a subsection of society mired in multi-generational unemployment. What was meant to be a safety net has become a poverty trap…. A 2012 survey showed that the unemployed in Britain are 3.6 times more likely than those with jobs to say they are seriously unhappy. If you want to help the poor, don’t just throw money at them. Incentivise and help them into work, and reform the system in which many people are actually better off not working at all than taking a job. Such an environment of worklessness simply makes it harder for the next generation to break out of the cycle. That’s the argument that was made by journalist James Bartholomew and social scientist Dr Adam Perkins, who has made a study of the adverse effect on personality of state benefits. Taking them on was Jess Phillips MP, dubbed Labour’s ‘future red queen’, and Matthew Taylor, chief executive of the RSA, who argued that benefits aren’t a handout but a hand-up….” At the link find the title, “The Benefits System Perpetuates Misery, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 268583003-intelligence2-the-benefits-system-perpetuates-misery.mp3 and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Welfare State 53 mins – “The Welfare State at Risk52:30 Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Center for the Study of Europe, and is titled “The Welfare State at Risk.” Our speaker is Patrick Sachweh, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Goethe University in Frankfort, Germany. At the link right-click the tiny cloud with down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Workplace 63 mins – “According to a new McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) report, advancing women’s equality could add $12 trillion to GDP by 2025. This seminal report, entitled “The Power of Parity,” is the product of research from ninety-five countries on the relationship between gender parity and economic growth. Kweilin Ellingrud, a lead researcher on the report, and Christopher Ruhm, whose research examines the economic effects of work/family policies, joined the Women and Foreign Policy program for a discussion about the economic imperative of promoting gender equality. This roundtable was generously sponsored by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One Myths, May, 2016, 84 mins –”Chapman University history professor Jennifer Keene looks at myths about America’s involvement in World War I.” At the link find the title, “Myths About America in World War I, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.438563.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 240 – Jun 17, 2016: Aircraft Careers, Airline Industry, Alcohol Blackouts, American Muslims, Antibiotic Crisis, Antonio Villaraigaso, Argentina Mass Executions, Arginine Patent Troll, Arms Control, Asteroid Threat, Audits by Publishers, Bataan Death March, Bathroom History, Being Human, Birch Trees, Bullying in School, California Water Regulation, Capitalism Declines, Cardboard Construction, Child Welfare Disparities, China and India, Climate Change, College Class Test Out, College Stresses, Computational Biology, Confidence Games, Corruption in Azerbaijan, Creativity Process, Decarbonization, Deobandis Islam, Diatoms, Dick Cavett, Digital Discrimination, Disaster Aftermaths, Do Gooders, E-book Decline, Educate Girls, Educational Electronics, Electric Vehicle Future, Federal Reserve, Food Safety Law, Freedom-embracing Humans, Geoengineering, Google at Work, Government Breakdowns, Gymnastics Training, Habit Losses, Hamilton, Hipcamp, Housing Price Bubble, India Book Podcast, Inequality in America, Iran-US Relations, Iran Arrests Canadian, IRS Commissioner Misconduct Hearing, James Meredith, Jordan, Justice Brandeis, Kevin Kelly-Futurist, Left-Hand Driving, Libertarian Convention Debate, Mattress Store Bubble, Medical Student Depression, Meditation, Military Medical Science, Muhammad Ali, New England Slavery, Pain Management, Patient Algorithm, Peak Oil-M. King Hubbert, Pelvic Floor Health, Penicillin History, Poverty, Precision Public Health, Privileged Communication Ethics, Productivity Hacks, Programmer Mitch Waite, Protest Music, Psychosis Detection, Queensland-Australia, Ransomware in Canada, Rape in Brazil, Rational Voters, Refugees in France, Roy Henry Vickers, Self-driving Car, Sharing Economy, Shikimic Acid, Social Awkwardness, Stanford Sex Assault, Startup Drug Business, Stereotypes, Student Job Training, Supreme Court Podcast, Sustainable Development, Syria, Terrorism, Think Tanks, Tobacco and Fuel Wars, Undocumented Employers, US Marine, Utopias, Venezuela Inflation, Water Issues, Whistleblowers, White Rage, Whitey Bulger, Wine and Paleo Diet, Wolf Control, Working Class Changes, Zika Virus by Virologists

The best 116 podcasts from a larger group of 244 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Aircraft Careers 58 mins – “Today we have a special guest who is transitioning from an Air Force loadmaster to professional pilot. Larry Unger is truly an inspiration. If you are considering transitioning from the military to a professional pilot you need to hear his story. Larry is an advocate for those considering serving their country through a career in the military. He explains how military service will enhanced your life and career. ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Airline Industry 43 mins – “Patrick Smith, the author of Cockpit Confidential, answers every question we can throw at him about what really happens up in the air. Just don’t get him started on pilotless planes — or whether the autopilot is actually doing the flying.” At the link left-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download File,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcohol Blackouts 48 mins – “Sarah Hepola once got so drunk that she gave a presentation to 300 people — and didn’t remember a thing the next day. She wrestles with her reasons for drinking in the memoir ‘Blackout,’ now out in paperback. Rock historian Ed Ward tells the story of Herman’s Hermits.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Muslims 47 mins – “It’s been a rough stretch for American Muslims. September 11th set the table. People tried to get back to normal. Working, living, studying, going for the American dream. But the headwinds in the headlines kept coming. The rise of ISIS cast a shadow. A trickle of radicalization got lots of attention. Then Donald Trump called for a ban on Muslim entry. San Bernardino took its terrible toll. Ramadan starts on Sunday. We want to hear from our fellow citizens. This hour On Point, American Muslims, 2016.” At the link find the title, “Muslim Americans At Ramadan, 2016, Jun,” right-click “Media files npr_480634831.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Antibiotic Crisis 47 mins – “A new superbug resistant to our antibiotic of last resort has shown up in the U.S. We look at the threat, and our dwindling antibiotic options. On Wednesday, May 26, 2016, U.S. military officials reported the first U.S. human case of bacteria resistant to an antibiotic used as a last resort drug. The 49-year-old woman has recovered from an infection of E. coli resistant to colistin. But officials fear that if the resistance spreads to other bacteria, the country may soon see germs impervious to all antibiotics. (Janice Carr/CDC via AP) We’ve heard for years that the effectiveness of antibiotics we use to fight everything from ear aches to urinary tract infections was at risk. Last week, bad news on that front. A new federal push to track down superbugs found one almost as soon as it started looking. In the United States. The first patient ever found here with a bacteria resistant to what is now our last line of antibiotic defense. This hour On Point, are we entering the post-antibiotic age? And what do we do about it?” (3 guests) At the link find the title, “Antibiotic Resistant Superbug Arrives In America, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_480159512.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antonio Villaraigaso 63 mins – “In 2013, Antonio Villaraigosa finished his two terms as mayor of Los Angeles, a city of nearly 4 million residents, after eight years of major strides in transportation, crime reduction, infrastructure, energy and resource sustainability, “right-sizing” government, business development and education reform. Before his time in the mayor’s office, he served as an L.A. city council member and speaker of the California Assembly. He has more than 20 years of leadership experience at the highest levels of state and municipal government, as well as in business, political, educational and nonprofit organizations.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Argentina Mass Executions P2 39 mins – “Valeria Perasso and Alejandro Millán travel to Colombia and witness the search for victims who vanished over the last decade in the country’s 50-year-long armed conflict, and hear the voices of families looking for missing young students in Mexico – all with the help of the Equipo Argentino de Antropología Forense, or EAAF as they are best known.” At the link find the title, “Listening to the Bones – Part Two, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03xhbst.mp3” and select “Save Link As” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arginine Patent Troll 21 mins – “Two bodybuilders go at it over a Stanford university patent. And we dive in to make sense of it.” At the link find the title, “#705: The Muscle Patents, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160610_pmoney podcast061016.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arms Control 14 mins – “In some parts of the world, it’s easier to get an automatic rifle than a glass of clean drinking water. Is this just the way it is? Samantha Nutt, doctor and founder of the international humanitarian organization War Child, explores the global arms trade — and suggests a bold, common sense solution for ending the cycle of violence. “War is ours,” she says. “We buy it, sell it, spread it and wage it. We are therefore not powerless to solve it.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asteroid Threat 24 mins – On June 2, 2016, NASA confirmed the bright burst of light over Arizona skies to be an asteroid exploding — a mere 90 kilometers above the earth. This came just a few days after another asteroid event in Mexico, where sonic booms and bright flashes marked an asteroid’s entry into the earth’s atmosphere. These recent close calls have brought attention to those scientific voices urging the world to pay more attention to asteroids, and the threat they pose. NASA aerospace engineer says we need to do more to stop killer asteroids There are 1700 “potentially hazardous” asteroids around Earth, says NASA aerospace engineer.” At the link find the title, “NASA aerospace engineer says we need to do more to stop killer asteroids,” right-click “Download NASA aerospace engineer says we need to do more to stop killer asteroids,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Audits by Publishers 59 mins – “If you’re a society publisher, have you ever heard yourself say?… “We need an increasing number of staff to keep the journal going.” “We have a new editor and his expectations are completely unreasonable.” “Our journal is losing money for us.” “I’m not sure if we are operating with industry best practice.” Then, it could be time for an audit.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bangladeshi Problems 27 mins – “Lipika Pelham travels to a remote part of south eastern Bangladesh to report on claims of human rights abuses against indigenous inhabitants of the area. The Chittagong Hill Tracts are home to thirteen indigenous groups with the Chakma, Marma, Chak and Mro mostly practicing Theravada Buddhism. Thousands were forced off their lands from the 1960s until the 1990s. An insurgency that started in the mid 1970s ended in a peace settlement in 1997 under which the army was supposed to withdraw but it continues to maintain a tight grip on the area. The resettlement of tens of thousands of Bengalis from other parts of the country has only added to tensions. Lipika is one of the few journalists from a foreign media organisation to report from there in recent years. She has returned with first-hand accounts of alleged rape and torture and hears claims that soldiers have been involved in evicting people from their homes. Her report carries details of attempts to forcibly convert young children to Islam as well as accusations of rape by Bengali settlers of girls as young as thirteen.” At the link find the title, “Bangladesh’s Hidden Shame, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03xq0fn.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Bataan Death March 52 mins – “In 1942 the Japanese army forced about 70,000 US and Philippine prisoners of war to march some 80 miles across the Bataan Peninsula on the way to a prison camp. More than 10,000 died or were summarily executed along the way. Among the survivors was Gene Jacobsen, who published a book about the ordeal. Jacobsen died in 2007 at the age of 85. Monday, we’re rebroadcasting his story of three and a half years as a prisoner of war…Gene Jacobsen died May 25, 2007 at the age of 85. Scroll to the bottom of this page in the University of Utah Alumni Association Newsletter to read more about his life. His book is called We Refused to Die‘” At the link right-click the play button beside Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bathroom History 51 mins – “In recent months, bathrooms have become a topic of heated debate. At issue is who should be allowed into which restroom. The Obama administration says public school students should be able to use facilities that correspond with their chosen gender identity. Opponents say they’re worried about the dangers of a gender free-for-all in the nation’s restrooms. Thursday, we’re talking about the clash over sex-segregated bathrooms. We’ll also ask how we came to have gendered lavatories in the first place.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Being Human 12 mins – “What are your dreams? Better yet, what are your broken dreams? Dan Pallotta dreams of a time when we are as excited, curious and scientific about the development of our humanity as we are about the development of our technology. “What we fear most is that we will be denied the opportunity to fulfill our true potential,” Pallotta says. “Imagine living in a world where we simply recognize that deep, existential fear in one another — and love one another boldly because we know that to be human is to live with that fear.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Birch Trees 4 mins – “…Birch is a hard wood, good for furniture and plywood. But it has to be well-cured or it warps. Hughes’ Spruce Goose was really made from a special plywood – layers of birch veneer. Hughes put teams of women to work ironing the veneer to stabilize it before they made it into plywood. You gaze up at that great gun-metal gray airplane and it’s hard to connect it with birch trees. But it is a true cousin of the Indian canoe. Same strength and buoyancy….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bullying in School 20 mins – “Experts say school anti-bullying programs can actually do more harm than good.” At the link find the title, “Teen suicides in Woodstock, Ont., spur discussion on effectiveness of bullying programs,” right-click “Download Teen suicides in Woodstock, Ont., spur discussion on effectiveness of bullying programs” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Water Regulation 59 mins – “Join Michael Carlin, COO of San Francisco PUC Water and Power, Patrick Koepele and Peter Drekmeier, executive director and policy director respectively of the Tuolumne River Trust, for an end-of-April 2016 report on what has happened with El Nino, the weather and the snow pack, as well as the continuing effects of the Yosemite Rim Fire to ease drought problems and bring water and growth cycles much needed in California at large and the Bay Area and the Central Valley specifically. Our speakers have extensive experience in the history and currency of California land, rivers, coastal areas and mountains as well as our urban areas, rivers and agriculture. What do we know from science, projected demands and expectations and forecasts for California water now and in the future?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capitalism Declines 65 mins – “Every 500 years or so, European civilization and now world civilization, has been rocked by fundamental shifts in its value regime, in which the rules of the game for acquiring wealth and livelihoods have dramatically changed. Following Benkler’s seminal Wealth of Networks, which first identifies peer production, the P2P Foundation has collated a vast amount of empirical evidence of newly emerging value practices, which exist in a uneasy relationship with the dominant political economy, and of which some authors claim, like Jeremy Rifkin and Paul Mason, that it augurs a fundamental shift. What would be the conditions for this new regime to become autonomous and even dominant, and what are the signs of it happening? As context, we will be using the Tribes, Institutions, Markets, Networks framework of David Ronfeldt, the Relational Grammar of Alan Page Fiske, and the evolution of modes of exchange as described by Kojin Karatini in The Structure of World History. We will argue that there is consistent evidence that the structural crises of the dominant political economy is leading to responses that are prefigurative of a new value regime, of which the seed forms can be clearly discerned.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cardboard Construction 54 mins – “Keeping Off The Rain With A Cardboard Roof, Arctic Fox Turns Stark Tundra Into Green Space, Squid and Octopus Thrive in Changing Oceans, The Antarctic Did Not Escape The Mass Extinction, Exercise Can Impair Your Eyesight, Moths Tell Bats They Taste Nasty.” At the link find the title, “Making A Cardboard House, plus, Squid and Octopus Get A Grip on Climate Change, Arctic Fox Are Good Gardeners, and more – 2016/06/04,” right-click “Media files quirksaio_20160604_68604.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Welfare Disparities 20 mins – “How does child welfare need to change to address the overrepresentation of black and Aboriginal children in care?” At the link find the title, “Ontario children’s aid will collect race data to address overrepresentation,” right-click “Download Ontario children’s aid will collect race data to address overrepresentation,”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China and India Contrasts 63 mins – “Anja Manuel, Co-founder and Partner, RiceHadleyGates LLC; Author, This Brave New World: India, China, and the United States; Twitter @AnjaManuel1 Lenny Mendonca, Director Emeritus, McKinsey & Company; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors—Moderator In the next decade and a half, China and India will become two of the world’s indispensable powers—whether they rise peacefully or not. During that time, Asia will surpass the combined strength of North America and Europe in economic might, population size, and military spending. India and China will have vetoes over many international decisions, from climate change to global trade, human rights, and business standards. From her front row view of this colossal shift, first at the State Department and now as an advisor to American business leaders, Anja Manuel will take us on an intimate tour of the corridors of power in Delhi and Beijing. We wring our hands about China, Manuel writes, while we underestimate India, which will be the most important country outside the West to shape China’s rise. Manuel shows us that a different path is possible: We can bring China and India along as partners rather than alienating one or both, and thus extend our own leadership in the world.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China Economic Growth 78 minsPanel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “China is Rattling the World’s Economy”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5114 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Climate Change Politics 79 minsPanel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “CLIMATE SERIES: Political Views on Climate Change: A Widening Gap”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5116 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Psychology 79 mins – “If climate change makes you feel anxious, depressed or powerless, psychologists say you’re not alone. Can talking it out help drive change? Joshua Freedman, CEO, Six Seconds; Author, Inside Change: Transforming Your Organization with Emotional Intelligence (Six Seconds, 2010); Renee Lertzman, Climate Engagement Strategist; Joan Blades, Co-founder, LivingRoomConversations.org” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Class Test Out 51 mins – “What do you do when you’re going into your 4th year of college – and then you school tells you the rest of your classes are unavailable? You test out of them, save thousands of dollars, and graduate a semester early – that’s what you do. Or, at least, that’s what my friend Jay Cross did. Jay found himself in this situation as he was readying to complete his senior year. His school had no idea when they’d offer the classes he needed again; they didn’t really make it seem like they cared either. Instead of waiting around, though, Jay started taking stock of his options – and found out about tons of opportunities for testing out of classes. By utilizing these opportunities, he finished his entire senior year in a single semester, and he saved thousands in the process. Now, Jay runs Do It Yourself Degree, a website that teaches other students how to do the same thing. So, if you’re looking to cut the time you spend in school, save money, and waste less hours sitting in class, give this episode a listen. Things mentioned in this episode: DSST Test; CLEP Exams; Jay’s Test Out of College: Graduate in 1 year with Degree-by-Examination article; Myth of the High-Paying Major….” At the link find the title, “How to Test out of College Courses (Ep. 49),” right-click “Media files 7235.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Stresses 109 mins – “…When I was high schooler trying to prepare for college, I basically equated “college-ready” to “becoming an adult.” As my senior year drew to a close, I spent a good amount of time trying to prepare myself for a life that would be largely independent from my parents and require a lot more responsibility. I made sure I was able to do my own taxes and generally manage my finances, set up time and task management systems, and created plans for getting involved and plugging into a community right as I entered college. In this episode, Martin and I try to give you a crash course on many of the things I tried to prepare for, in addition to many of the questions and uncertainties most students face….” At the link you can listen at up to 1.25x, or right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computational Biology 51 mins – Panel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Computational Biology: Using Biology & Computers to Model Artificial Life”. Sound is less than perfect. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5118 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Confidence Games 60 mins “This week we’re looking at the science — and art — of the con, from huge Ponzi schemes to small-time frauds. We speak to Maria Konnikova about her new book The Confidence Game: Why We Fall for It… Every Time” on the psychology of the con and why we keep falling for the same old tricks. This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pp-up menu.

Corruption in Azerbaijan 18 mins – “Released from jail, Azerbaijani investigative journalist shares her experience with power, corruption, sex tapes, blackmail and revenge.” At the link find the title, “Blackmailed and imprisoned by government, journalist tells her story, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160608_73449.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity Process 80 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Creativity: Breaking the Blocks & Keeping the Flow”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5314 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Decarbonization 59 mins – “Lord Nicholas Stern, Chair, Center for Climate Change Economics and Policy, London School of Economics Steve Westly, Founder and Managing Partner, The Westly Group Carbon pollution has recently dropped despite continued growth of the global economy. Supporters of clean energy cheered that news, and say it demonstrates that combatting climate change can be accomplished without massive economic pain. Was the decoupling of economic growth and carbon pollution just because of China’s slowing economy and temporary dip in coal use? What areas of the clean economy are most promising for investors and job-seekers? Lord Nicholas Stern is former chief economist of the World Bank and one of the foremost global experts on moving from fossil fuels to cleaner energy. When world leaders signed the historic Paris climate accord last year, Lord Stern was cheering in the front, row standing alongside Al Gore. Steve Westly leads a venture capital firm that made early investments in Tesla and the biofuel firm Anyris. It currently holds a position in Good Eggs, Planet Labs, Revolution Foods, RecycleBank, WaterSmart, and other companies pursuing more sustainable capitalism. Steve Westly was an early executive at eBay and is a former controller of the state of California.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deobandis Islam P2 27 mins – “The BBC’s former Pakistan correspondent Owen Bennett Jones continues his exploration of South Asia’s Deobandi Muslim movement. He heads across the border to Pakistan, where Deobandi ideology has provided spiritual guidance for both militant groups like the Taliban and a strictly non-violent missionary movement. So how can a single school of thought follow such different paths? Owen explores the role the Deobandi ideology has played in shaping Pakistan’s identity, and how the Pakistani state has tapped into the intolerant elements of Deobandi teachings to fuel state-sponsored jihad – be it fighting the Soviets in Afghanistan or the Indians in Kashmir. Empowered by a ready supply of cash and guns, a relatively small number of Deobandi militants have caused havoc across the country, in the form of sectarian violence, and anti-state violence, as violent groups turn their guns on their masters. Pakistan created a monster by endorsing Deobandi militancy – so how can it bring it under control?” At the link find the title, “The Deobandis: Pakistan, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03xlxwy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diatoms 28 mins – (Starts about the 8 min mark.)“Beth interviews Dr Sarah Spaulding, of the Institute for Arctic and Alpine Research here in Boulder. Sarah studies microscopic single celled algae, creatures that photosynthesize but aren’t plants. She discusses their ecological roles in numerous ecosystems as well as challenges in identifying them and her long term goals in studying these elusive but ubiquitous creatures. See more at https://westerndiatoms.colorado.edu/ “ At the link right-lick “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dick Cavett 76 mins – “Gilbert and Frank return to the NYC Podfest for a return engagement with their very first guest, legendary talk show host, comic and author Dick Cavett. In a lively (and LIVE) interview, Dick holds court on a host of topics, including World War II propaganda, John Cassavetes’ boozing, the lost “Tonight Show” episodes and the rapier wit of Pat McCormick. Also, Dick chats up Zeppo (and Gummo!), Groucho proposes to Truman Capote, Jack Benny gets the last word and a young Dick meets his idol, Bob Hope. PLUS: Robert Q. Lewis! Claude Rains trivia! Remembering Sig Ruman! Gilbert and Dick share a milkshake! And George Jessel weighs in on Uncle Miltie’s manhood!” At the link find the title, “#106: Dick Cavett LIVE @ 2016 NYC Podfest,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/3535111/e06bec69-051e-48a4-b939-125bf45235f2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” From the pop-up menu.

Digital Discrimination 27 mins – “Are we seeing digital discrimination in the sharing economy? A study from Harvard Business School in the US has found that the colour of your skin might affect the rents you can receive when you share your property on Airbnb. Benjamin Edelman, Associate Professor at Harvard Business School explains his findings. Airbnb told Click that they are dedicated to this topic, and they are carrying out a full review with experts to find out the best way to address these challenges….” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Aftermaths 39 mins – “Looking at triage mnemonic methods for disaster applications in this episode of the Disaster Podcast. Hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are joined again by Dr. Joe Holley to talk about the various triage methods that are used out there when you have multiple patients to managed in a disaster event. Whether it is START or SALT, all can show us some tricks to help us manage large numbers of patients….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Do Gooders 52 mins – “How far do you go to honor the Golden Rule, to “do unto others”? Chances are you don’t go nearly as far as the people profiled in journalist Larissa MacFarquhar’s new book. The donor who offers up his kidney to a complete stranger; the activist who abandons his normal life to care for lepers; the couple that gives most of their income to charity. These people truly live to help others. MacFarquhar joins us Tuesday to explore what extreme altruists can teach us about what it means to be human….Larissa MacFarquhar has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998. Previously she was a senior editor at Lingua Franca and an advisory editor at The Paris Review. Her new book is called Strangers Drowning: Grappling with Impossible Idealism, Drastic Choices, and the Overpowering Urge to HelpAt the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

E-book Decline 12 mins – “…The hope that books may stand where others have fallen lies in declining e-book sales; yet publishers are left pondering what is the underlying cause. This week, a respected industry analyst has put forth a theory that goes beyond the obvious suspects of pricing and access. According to Peter Hildick-Smith of the Codex Group, so-called “digital fatigue” is the hidden e-book killer. “Hildick-Smith’s conclusion is that e-book sales erosion is a combination of  ‘digital fatigue’ and the limitation of the reading device user experience,” reports Andrew Albanese, Publishers Weekly senior writer, on the curious diagnosis. “I’m tempted to say print is the vinyl of the book business—it is just a better experience. Moreover, Hildick-Smith believes that, based on the data he has seen, rather than rebounding anytime soon, e-books sales will likely continue to fall….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educate Girls 85 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Educate a Girl: Change the World”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5716 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Educational Electronics 107 mins – “Clint Cole, founder and president of Digilent, joins us to talk education, electronics, manufacturing, mobile test equipment, open source (or not) and how future engineers will learn.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Electric Vehicle Future 59 mins – “Today’s electric cars are more fun to drive than ever. And for many, they’re more affordable too. Will California reach its goal of a million EVs by 2020? Sherry Boschert, Co-founder, Plug In America; Author, Plug-in Hybrids: The Cars That Will Recharge America (New Society, 2006); Eileen Tutt, Executive Director, California Electric Transportation Coalition” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Reserve 66 mins – “Robert Heller, Former Governor of the Federal Reserve Board; Former President, VISA U.S.A.; Author, The Unlikely Governor This event is part of our Good Lit series, underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation. Robert Heller discusses policy issues facing the Federal Reserve: Should the Fed “normalize” monetary policy now? Was “quantitative easing” a success? Is the Fed’s chosen two-percent inflation target appropriate? What happens to the Fed as it pays ever more interest on bank reserves? These and many other important policy issues will be discussed by the author of The Unlikely Governor.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Safety Law 56 mins – “After many years of debate, the federal Food Safety Modernization Act is finally coming to local farms and producers. The goal is to reduce outbreaks of food-borne illnesses such as Salmonella or Listeria. We’ll find out how it aims to do that and what it might mean for farmers in New Hampshire.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freedom-embracing Humans 77 mins – “Continuing on Simone de Beauvoir’s The Ethics of Ambiguity (1947), parts I and II. We discuss all the various ways to fail to wholly will your own freedom, i.e., will it all the way to where you will the freedom of others. The first step is admitting that human consciousness is an ontological negative, i.e., it doesn’t have static being in the way a rock or tree or even an instinct-driven squirrel is, and some people just stop there, really willing nothing at all. These are the “sub-men.” Or maybe you sign on to some cause, some goal with all your being: you fill your negativity up with something external (like God, or wanting with all your heart to become an Olympic gymnast, or devotion to doing your job well) and thereby pretend to be determined just like a squirrel is. This is the “serious man,” and it’s a serious abrogation of your freedom! Or maybe you react against this seriousness and just deny that any such external thing has a hold on you, and actively will to have no values at all. This is nihilism, and it fails the existential test too. …And there are several more iterations before you’re really a fully freedom-embracing, authentic human being; in the process she ends up distinguishing herself from other existentialist atheists like Nietzsche (whom she thinks to be too solipsistic) and Camus (p. 129: “To declare that existence is absurd is to deny that it can ever be given a meaning; to say that it is ambiguous is to assert that its meaning is never fixed, that it must be constantly won.”).” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geoengineering 60 mins – “Geoengineering may sound like science fiction, but there are many who believe we can — and should — be taking drastic measures to cool our planet down. Oliver Morton, Briefings Editor, The Economist; Author, The Planet Remade: How Geoengineering Could Change the World (Princeton University Press, 2015); Kim Stanley Robinson, Author, 2312 (Orbit, 2012); Ken Caldeira, Climate Scientist, Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Global Ecology at Stanford University” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Google at Work 28 mins – “This week on Hidden Brain, Shankar talks to Google’s Laszlo Bock for insider tips and insights about what works — and what doesn’t work — in recruiting, motivating, and retaining a talented workforce.” At the link find the title, “Episode 34: Google at Work, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160603_hiddenbrain_google.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Breakdowns 53 mins – “On the next Reveal, we’re taking you to lawless lands. From Africa and the Middle East to places in Oregon and Texas, we explore what happens in the absence of government and find out who or what comes in to fill the void. Sometimes, it’s a strongman enforcing his will; other times, it’s just anarchy, and occasionally it’s something completely unexpected.” At the link find the title, “Lawless Lands, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files Lawless-Lands-1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gymnastic Training 69 mins – “It’s been a little while since we’ve done one of these, but we’re back with another “Best Of” episode of the podcast. Featuring guest Coach Christopher Sommer of Gymnastic Bodies. Hope everyone had a good time at PaleoFX!” At the link right-click “Download Episode Here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Habitat Losses 25 mins – “By documenting change over time in particular areas, Bernie Krause’s nature soundscapes offer insight into the effects of climate change, the California drought and other environmental problems.” At the link find the title, “Nature soundscapes reveal environmental devastation,” right-click “Download Nature soundscapes reveal environmental devastation” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hamilton 52 mins – “Alexander Hamilton is living large these days! Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hit musical about the Founding Father won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama and scored a record-breaking 16 Tony award nominations. In addition, Hamilton’s surge in popularity helped keep his face on the front of the $10 bill. Peter, Ed and Brian take apart the Hamilton phenomenon by considering who Alexander Hamilton was, his legacy (and how it was remade) and why a white migrant from the British West Indies appeals to so many Americans in 2016.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hipcamp 29 mins – “It’s summertime, time to make your camping reservations. Oops, should have done that three months ago! This week’s guest on Sea Change Radio, Alyssa Ravasio, noticed that there was a lot of private land that would be perfect for camping, while public campsites were consistently overbooked and too often unavailable. So she started something called Hipcamp which is sort of an Airbnb meets Expedia for campers. Ravasio tells us more about the company’s business model, how they hope to make it easier for more of us to appreciate nature and how her site can be a welcome new source of income for rural property owners.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Housing Price Bubble 47 mins – “The housing market is heating up. Home prices are reaching new highs across the country, even causing worries of a new housing bubble. Every region of the country has its own housing market, but stand back and you can see trends. The big trend: across the U.S., home prices are back near record highs. They were 30 percent down at the bottom, in 2012. Now, they’re high and higher. But it’s a split screen. A booming high end, where the money is. Tough for first-time buyers – to get the down payment, to get a mortgage. Gentrification, hot. And renters, paying big. This hour On Point, we dig in to the American housing market now.” (4 guests) At the link find the title, “American Housing Prices Going Big, Again, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_480458244.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Book Podcast 26 mins – “In this newscast, dated June 8, 2016; we talk about Four news stories related to Book Publishing in India, and also pricing of ebooks on Kobo India store. The news stories include: a. Children’s books in India and Tatas’ collaboration with Mumbai Lit Festival. b. Interview of Author Ashwin Sanghi, and Indian media’s fascination with comparing Indian icons with Icons of the west. c. SIze of the textbook printing market in the Southern Indian state of Telangana, and finally, d. Use of e-Textbooks by college students in India. In the analysis section, we talk about pricing of ebooks on the Kobo India store, and a dsicussion on the different genres that seem to be selling well.” At the link find the title, “NewsCast 8- How to Price Books on Kobo India, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 4668746-newscast-8-how-to-price-books-on-kobo-india.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inequality in America 35 mins – “Here’s what the 2016 election should be about: Winner-Take-All Politics — How Washington Made the Rich Richer and Turned Its Back on the Middle Class. It’s a groundbreaking account of how our political system was hijacked by the super rich and engineered to work for them at the expense of everyone else. Two of our top political scientists – Jacob Hacker and Paul Pierson – published it four years ago to wide acclaim. Robert Solow, winner of the Nobel Memorial Prize for Economics, said of it: “This book is a wake-up call. Read it and wake up.” Elizabeth Warren called it “must reading for anyone who wants to understand how Washington stopped working for the middle class.” I interviewed Hacker and Pierson at the time, and given how inequality has continued to grow and divide our country, what they wrote and said is more relevant than ever. Take a listen and let me know what you think can be done.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran – US Relations 79 mins – Panel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “US Policy Towards Iran”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5311 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Iran Arrests Canadian 10 mins – “Concordia professor Homa Hoodfar was arrested in Iran while researching the public role of women in that country. She has been moved to Evin prison, where another Canadian woman died in 2003.” At the link find the title, “Canadian professor detained in Iran prison, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160609_60045.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IRS Commissioner Misconduct 147 mins – “The House Judiciary hears testimony from Oversight Committee Chair Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) and Representative Ron DeSantis (R-FL) on the ongoing investigation into alleged targeting by the IRS of political groups seeking tax exempt status in 2014.” At the link find the title, “House Judiciary Committee Examines IRS Commissioner Misconduct, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.443691.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

James Meredith 55 mins – “On the 50th anniversary of the “March Against Fear,” Judy Meredith, wife of civil rights leader James Meredith, talks about the attempted assassination of her husband during the march. The panel discussion also features Sidna Brower Mitchell, who was editor-in-chief of the student newspaper The Daily Mississippian in 1962, and Henry Gallagher, the officer in charge of Meredith’s security detail in 1962 and author of “James Meredith and the Ole Miss Riot: A Soldier’s Story.” William Doyle, who co-authored James Meredith’s memoir “A Mission From God,” moderates.” At the link find the title, “James Meredith, the Integration of Ole Miss and the March Against Fear, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files IM_20160604.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jordan 63 mins – “Maher Kalaji, Ph.D.; Celia Menczel, Chair, Middle East Member-Led Forum -Jordan, a strong American ally, is one of the most historically and strategically important countries in the Middle East. It is also one of the most welcoming. However, tourists to Jordan were markedly fewer this March when Menczel toured Jordanian archeological sites, including Petra, one of the seven new wonders of the world. She will show images and discuss her enlightening and wonderful experience with Professor Kalaji, who was born and raised in Jordan.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Justice Brandeis 47 mins – “One hundred years ago, Brandeis became the first Jewish justice on the Supreme Court. Author Jeffrey Rosen says that Brandeis was also the most far-seeing progressive justice of the 20th century. His new book is ‘Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet.’ Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews ‘Homegoing’ by Yaa Gyasi.” At the link find the title, “Jun, 2016, The Legacy Of Justice Louis Brandeis, The ‘Jewish Jefferson’” left-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kevin Kelly – Futurist 106 mins – “Kevin Kelly (@kevin2kelly) is back again and, as I’ve said before, he might be the real-life “Most Interesting Man In The World.” Kevin is Senior Maverick at Wired Magazine, which he co-founded in 1993. He also co-founded the All Species Foundation, a non-profit aimed at cataloging and identifying every living species on earth. In his spare time, he writes bestselling books, co-founded the Rosetta Project, which is building an archive of all†documented human languages, and serves on the board of the Long Now Foundation. As part of the last, he’s investigating how to revive and restore endangered or extinct species, including the Wooly Mammoth. Kevin’s most recent project is The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future. The praise for the book is incredible, with Marc Andreessen saying it’s, “an automatic must-read.” In this conversation, we touch on all sorts of things, including: Stories about Jeff Bezos and his email management approach. Tech literacy. Why there are no “VR experts.” Artificial Intelligence (AI). Network effects. GMOs….” At the link find the title, “#166: Kevin Kelly – AI, Virtual Reality, and The Inevitable, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files The_Tim_Ferris_Show-Kevin_Kelly_and_The_Inevitable.mp3” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Left-Hand Driving 19 mins – “The Swedish Tourist Association recently announced a new service called The Swedish Number. People who dial +46 771 793 336 will be connected with a random participating Swede. We talked to about a dozen of those Swedes with one question in mind: What happened on September 3rd, 1967? Those who were alive and in-country during that time took little time to respond. That day was a national holiday of sorts: Dagen H (or “H-Day”), short for Högertrafikomläggningen (“the right-hand traffic diversion”). On that day, millions of Swedes switched from driving on the left side of the road to driving on the right. It was the most massive overhaul in driving infrastructure that the world had ever seen.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow title, “H-Day” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Libertarian Convention Debate 147 mins – “The Libertarian Party holds a presidential debate at its presidential nominating convention in Orlando, Florida.” At the link find the title, “Libertarian Party Holds Presidential Debate, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.443398.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mattress-Store Bubble 34 mins – “You’ve seen them — everywhere! — and often clustered together, as if central planners across America decided that what every city really needs is a Mattress District. There are now dozens of online rivals too. Why are there so many stores selling something we buy so rarely?” At the link left-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Student Depression 22 mins – “This is the second part of our series with NPR about mental health and generation gaps. When Giselle applied to medical school she decided to be completely open about her experience with mental health: depression, anxiety and a suicide attempt when she was 16 years old. She’s not alone—roughly 300 physicians in America commit suicide every year, and a higher percentage of doctors are depressed than the average person. But the intensity and prestige of the medical field doesn’t always lend itself to an open conversation about these issues. Giselle said hiding her mental health issues is not an option. The stakes are high for Giselle. Her mental health makes some people—from her school to future patients—uneasy. And sometimes her anxiety is so bad she can’t take her medical school exams. But as you’ll find out in the episode, these are not challenges that Giselle is about to shy away from. She says her challenges will make her a better doctor, and hopefully encourage other physicians find the help they need, too.” At the link find the title, “Part 2: Be the Doctor Your Mom Wanted You to Marry, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files onlyhuman053116 cms623495_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation 25 mins – “The Science of Meditation – can it really change you?
From infamous criminals, to powerful corporations, to some of the world’s most successful athletes, meditation has never been so popular. But can it really make you smarter, happier and healthier? New research shows that it can affect the body as well as the mind, slow down the aging process, and even alter the structure of the brain. Dr Graham Phillips embarks on an eight week meditation course and undergoes a raft of rigorous brain tests and scans, to find out if the ancient art lives up to the current hype.”
At the link right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Medical Science 48 mins – “Science writer Mary Roach explores the curious science of humans at war in her new book, ‘Grunt.’ She talks about traveler’s diarrhea, medical maggots, and stink bombs, and new scientific developments that help keep soldiers safe. Also, we hear an excerpt of our 1980 interview with G. Gordon Liddy, and jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews ‘Cuong Vu Trio Meets Pat Metheny.’” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muhammad Ali 48 mins – “Boxing legend Muhammad Ali dies at 74. We look back at the life and career of the whole Muhammad Ali.” At the link find the title, “Remembering Muhammad Ali, ‘The Greatest’, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_480977377.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muhammad Ali 49 mins – “(First 15 min segment) New Yorker editor David Remnick, who wrote a biography of Muhammad Ali, tells us how he became a champion boxer, a great showman, and how he took the country by surprise. He spoke to Terry Gross in 1998. Each year, Yellowstone attracts millions of visitors and provides a home to countless animal species. But National Geographic journalist David Quammen warns that balancing tourism and preservation can be tricky. Film critic David Edelstein reviews ‘Genius,’ about book editor Maxwell Perkins.” At the link find the title, “Jun, 2016, David Remnick On Muhammad Ali / Is Yellowstone In Trouble?” left click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New England Slavery 43 mins – “With its ‘lily-white’ reputation, the Granite State doesn’t often highlight the role that people of color have played throughout its history. A new documentary aims to reveal those hidden stories though, and their importance to the state’s history.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Management 78 mins – “People often think about chronic pain as only benefitting from medical treatment and interventions. Jessica Pullins focuses on an essential strategy for lowering pain-related distress: being “unsympathetic.” In this case, “unsympathetic” refers to the Sympathetic Nervous System, the part of the Autonomic Nervous System responsible for the Fight or Flight (or Freeze) Response. Recorded on 02/18/2016. (#30797)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patient Algorithm 38 mins – “Will Algorithms Replace Doctors? Dr Ravi Komatireddy On Software In Medicine. Dr Ravi Komatireddy is an Internal Medicine Physician and Digital Health Innovator with a deep knowledge of clinical decision support software and how technology will ultimately augment the clinical work flow. The issue of algorithms replacing physicians has become increasingly controversial but the question is not how to resist it, but rather embrace it so as to allow us to what we do best as physicians and augment our relationship with patients rather than take from it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peak Oil – M. King Hubbert 60 mins – “The man and the movement – is it dead? This week we’re going to look at a life that shaped energy expectations, a whole social movement, and American military policy in the Middle East. Finally, there is a biography of M. King Hubbert, the man who warned oil companies and the world about Peak Oil. We’ll ask author Mason Inman about the man, his legacy, and what it means now, in this brief time of oil glut. Then I’ll check in with Australian extreme weather specialist Lisa Alexander, to get her measure of the record-setting Indian heat wave now cooling to the monsoon rains.” At the link right-click “Ecoshock 160608 Lo-Fi” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pelvic Floor Health 79 mins – “Pelvic floor dysfunction refers to a wide range of conditions that can occur due to muscle weakness, hypertonicity or joint dysfunction and can be related to Incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse and pelvic pain. Recorded on 03/16/2016. (#30691)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Penicillin History 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss penicillin, discovered by Alexander Fleming in 1928. It is said he noticed some blue-green penicillium mould on an uncovered petri dish at his hospital laboratory, and that this mould had inhibited bacterial growth around it. After further work, Fleming filtered a broth of the mould and called that penicillin, hoping it would be useful as a disinfectant. Howard Florey and Ernst Chain later shared a Nobel Prize in Medicine with Fleming, for their role in developing a way of mass-producing the life-saving drug. Evolutionary theory predicted the risk of resistance from the start and, almost from the beginning of this ‘golden age’ of antibacterials, scientists have been looking for ways to extend the lifespan of antibiotics.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Poverty 80 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Tackling Global Poverty ”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5515 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Precision Public Health 14 mins – “Sue Desmond-Hellmann is using precision public health — an approach that incorporates big data, consumer monitoring, gene sequencing and other innovative tools — to solve the world’s most difficult medical problems. It’s already helped cut HIV transmission from mothers to babies by nearly half in sub-Saharan Africa, and now it’s being used to address alarming infant mortality rates all over the world. The goal: to save lives by bringing the right interventions to the right populations at the right time.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Privileged Communication Ethics 51 mins – “In 1973, a massive manhunt in New York’s Adirondack Mountains ended when police captured a man named Robert Garrow. And that’s when this story really gets started. This episode we consider a string of barbaric crimes by a hated man, and the attorney who, when called to defend him, also wound up defending a core principle of our legal system. When Frank Armani learned his client’s most gruesome secrets, he made a morally startling decision that stunned the world and goes to the heart of what it means to be a defense attorney – how far should lawyers go to provide the best defense to the worst people? NOTE: This episode contains graphic descriptions of sexual assault and violence.At the link right-click “Download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productivity Hacks 78 mins – “Mike Vardy of Productivityist is not a productivity guru. By his own definition, he’s a productivityist – a productivity enthusiast interested in trying and sharing new apps, strategies, and techniques for getting things done. He co-hosts Workflowing, a weekly discussion on how to live a better life, and do better work while avoiding pitfalls with playing around with your workflow. On his blog and podcasts, Mike shares how he structures his time and how it’s enabled him to spend more time with his family. “Your brain is meant to be a factory, not a warehouse.” -Mike Vardy In this episode, you’ll learn how to use contexts to keep your tasks manageable and to provide direction to be able to get things done. You’ll also learn how to use start dates alongside traditional due dates – with tasks in between – to boost the quality of the work you produce. Things mentioned in this episode:… Habit RPG & How To Use It To Build Strong Habits And Hack Your Motivation; Todoist; DashPlus; Haiku Deck; Freedom; FocalFilter; Coffeetivity.” At the link find the title, Productivity Hacks with My Friend Mike Vardy of Productivityist (Ep. 39,” right-click “Media files 5563.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Programmer Mitch Waite 86 mins – “Mitch Waite – Hosted by Leo Laporte : Mitch Waite is a former CEO, developer of iBird Explorer. He worked for a plethora of major tech companies writing various books on the up and coming programming languages of the time.” At the link left-click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protest Music 79 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Music for Social Change”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5714 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Psychosis Detection 12 mins – “Can the way you speak and write today predict your future mental state, even the onset of psychosis? In this fascinating talk, neuroscientist Mariano Sigman reflects on ancient Greece and the origins of introspection to investigate how our words hint at our inner lives and details a word-mapping algorithm that could predict the development of schizophrenia. “We may be seeing in the future a very different form of mental health,” Sigman says, “based on objective, quantitative and automated analysis of the words we write, of the words we say.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Queensland – Australia 63 mins – “Queensland is Australia’s second largest state and the third most populous, with more than 4.5 million inhabitants. The Hon. Annastacia Palaszczuk MP, premier of Queensland, is one of her country’s leading political figures. She will outline how her state is diversifying its economy from a traditional reliance on natural resources to innovation and ideas, and the potential that Queensland has as a launchpad for investment in the Asia-Pacific. She will also discuss the strategic importance of Australia to the world economy and international security.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ransomware in Canada 25 mins – “Often attacking through email, cyber thieves are racking millions of dollars with the rise of ransomware attacks.” At the link find the title, “Ransomware threat attacks hundreds of Canadians, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160609_91917.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rape in Brazil 11 mins – “A video revealing the rape of a Brazilian girl by 30 men leads to angry demonstrations across Brazil.Gang rape of 16-year-old Brazilian sparks protests, Jun, 2016,” “Media files current_20160609_99380.mp3

Rational Voters 79 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “The Myth of the Rational Voter ”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5512 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in France P2 55 mins – “Philip Coulter visits a refugee camp on the outskirts of Calais — city of dreams and lost hopes to ask the question: what do we owe our neighbour?” At the link find the title, “No Man’s Land, Part 2, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160609_56458.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roy Henry Vickers 25 mins – “The B.C. artist, carver, designer and storyteller, says he’s more keen than ever to create and share aboriginal stories.” At the link find the title, “Artist Roy Henry Vickers on making art, beating addiction and turning 70, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160609_61350.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self-driving Car 85 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Your Self-Driving Car Hit Mine!”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5315 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharing Economy 64 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “The Sharing Economy”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5513 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shikimic Acid 6 mins – “The Japanese star anise – Illicium anisatum, to give it its proper name, or shikimi as it’s known in Japan – is an elegant plant. Broad green leaves surround white many-petalled flowers, which in turn give rise to eight-pointed star-shaped seeds. It’s also the source of the chemical shikimic acid, first purified by Dutch chemist Johan Fredrik Eykman in 1885. Composed solely of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen, shikimic acid is an important starting ingredient in several multi-step biochemical manufacturing processes found in a wide range of lifeforms from bacteria and fungi to parasites and plants…Shikimic acid isn’t only an important ingredient feeding into the biological factories inside cells; it’s also used as a starting material by pharmaceutical factories making an anti-viral drug called oseltamivir – more commonly known by the brand name Tamiflu. It’s the world’s most widely-used antiviral drug for nasties such as swine flu, bird flu, and the regular (but still horrible) winter flu….” (Good photos of a star anise.) At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Shikimic_acid.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Awkwardness 80 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, ”Open Mouth, Remove Foot: Social Awkwardness & EQ”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5717 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Stanford Sex Assault 47 mins – “Outrage over the lenient sentence for a Stanford swimmer convicted of sexual assault. Feminist Jessica Valenti weighs in on the case and talks about her memoir, “Sex Object.” At the link find the title, “Jessica Valenti On The Stanford Sexual Assault Case And Feminism Now, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_481270987.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup Drug Business 39 mins – “A different kind of boom and bust.” Busted but very successful drug dealer starts a legitimate career after prison. At the link find the title, “Happy Ending (Season 3, Episode 7), Jun, 2016, right-click “Media files GLT5132895603.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stereotypes 80 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Moving Beyond StereotypesThe Age of Big Data”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5312 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Job Training 25 mins – “All post-secondary students should do internship or co-op, says employment and education group The Business Higher Education Round Table says too many students are entering the workforce without the practical skills that employers want, and believe mandatory workplace co-ops would assist all graduating students find the right job sooner.” At the link find the title, “All post-secondary students should do internship or co-op, says employment and education group,” right-click “Download All post-secondary students should do internship or co-op, says employment and education group,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Podcast 42 mins – “When Chief Justice Earl Warren was asked at the end of his career, “What was the most important case of your tenure?”, there were a lot of answers he could have given. After all, he had presided over some of the most important decisions in the court’s history — cases that dealt with segregation in schools, the right to an attorney, the right to remain silent, just to name a few. But his answer was a surprise: He said, “Baker v. Carr,” a 1962 redistricting case. On this episode of More Perfect, we talk about why this case was so important; important enough, in fact, that it pushed one Supreme Court justice to a nervous breakdown, brought a boiling feud to a head, put one justice in the hospital, and changed the course of the Supreme Court — and the nation — forever….” At the link left-click the circle with the dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainability Development 80 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Sustainable Development is Not a Pipe Dream”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5715 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Syria Journalism 48 mins – “Anne Barnard of The New York Times and Thanassis Cambanis from The Century Foundation fell in love when they were reporting on the war in Iraq. Now based in Beirut, they continue to cover the region. Also, Ken Tucker reviews Paul Simon’s new album, ‘Stranger to Stranger.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syria Warfare 25 mins “Ranging experiences of brutal torture, struggle and survival – di Giovanni’s new book “The Morning They Came for Us: Dispatches from Syria” chronicles everyday life of the Syrian war.” At the link find the title, “Journalist Janine di Giovanni on life in Syria,” right-click “Download Journalist Janine di Giovanni on life in Syria,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism 79 minsPanel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Terrorism in America: The New Normal”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5511 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism War Cost 41 mins – “In our “Spotlight on Magazines” series, [Reason] contributor James Bovard discusses his piece on the war on terror, which he says has cost the U.S. $4 trillion since it began in 2001.” At the link find the title, “Washington Journal: James Bovard on the Cost of the War on Terror, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.442913.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Think Tanks 78 minsPanel discussion with three guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Think Tanks Can’t Think Straight”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5115 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Tobacco and Fuel Wars 59 mins – “Lowell Bergman, Investigative Journalist Stanton Glantz, Director, Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, University of California San Francisco Kenneth Kimmell, President, Union of Concerned Scientists Bill Reilly, Former Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Senior Advisor, TPG Capital Oil companies have long used a page from tobacco companies’ playbook by vigorously denying evidence that using their product as directed causes societal harm. Now the tobacco and oil narratives are getting closer following news that ExxonMobil executives for decades suppressed internal reports about the negative impacts of burning fossil fuels. A former U.S. Department of Justice lawyer who won a huge racketeering case against tobacco companies says the federal government should investigate whether oil companies colluded to bury evidence of human-caused climate disruption. It’s easy to blame energy suppliers and that may be the right thing to do. But don’t individuals also share responsibility for driving and flying around knowing that we are emitting climate-killing gases? Aren’t we also culpable? A conversation on how oil might be the new tobacco. A conversation on how oil might be the new tobacco.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undocumented Employers 62 minsPanel discussion with Jose Antonio Vargas at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “THE MOLLY IVINS MEMORIAL PLENARY: Race, Immigration, Identity and Citizenship in a Multicultural America ”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5700 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Marine 18 mins – “Before he fought in the galactic battles of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Adam Driver was a United States Marine with 1/1 Weapons Company. He tells the story of how and why he became a Marine, the complex transition from soldier to civilian — and Arts in the Armed Forces, his nonprofit that brings theater to the military. Because, as he says: “Self-expression is just as valuable a tool as a rifle on your shoulder.” Followed by a spirited performance of Marco Ramirez’s “I am not Batman” by Jesse J. Perez and Matt Johnson. (Adult language)” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Utopias 52 mins – “What should the future look like? That’s the question posed by ambitious, sometimes delusional Americans in the early 1800s who dedicated themselves to creating new ways of living. You had Mother Ann Lee’s Shakers; the Oneida community in New York; New Harmony, Indiana; intentional communities inspired by French socialist Charles Fourier; and the roots of a communist paradise in Texas. Friday, the writer Chris Jennings joins us to explore the idealism and the lasting impact of these five utopian movements. Chris Jennings is the author of the book Paradise Now: The Story of American Utopianism” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela Inflation 47 mins – “New York Times reporter Nicholas Casey talks about life in Venezuela, where the collapse in oil prices has caused shortages of everything, including water, electricity, medicine, and cash.” At the link find the title, “Jun, 2016, Bust Times In Oil-Rich Venezuela,” left-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water issues 79 mins – Panel discussion with four guests at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Water, Water … Not Everywhere”. At the link find and right-click beside the number 5719 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Whistleblowers 5 mins – “In the US, the press has a right to publish secret information the public needs to know, protected by the First Amendment. Government surveillance has made it increasingly more dangerous for whistleblowers, the source of virtually every important story about national security since 9/11, to share information. In this concise, informative talk, Freedom of the Press Foundation co-founder and TED Fellow Trevor Timm traces the recent history of government action against individuals who expose crime and injustice and advocates for technology that can help them do it safely and anonymously.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White Rage 25 mins – “Carol Anderson explores U.S. racial past and present in her new book White Rage:The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide.” At the link find the title, “‘White rage’ causes racial unrest in U.S., says author, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160608_77886.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whitey Bulger 49 mins – “Boston Globe reporters Kevin Cullen and Shelley Murphy talk about their book “Whitey Bulger: America’s Most Wanted Gangster and the Manhunt That Brought Him to Justice.” Cullen and Murphy appeared at the Newseum nine days before Bulger’s federal trial began in Boston. He was apprehended in 2011 after a 16-year manhunt.” At the link find the title, “Whitey Bulger: America’s Most Wanted Gangster, Jun, 2013,” right-click “Media files IM_20130601.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wine and Paleo Diet 44 mins – “Today we have guest Todd White of Dry Farm Wines. Todd and I talk all about wine, and cover how it’s processed/made in the US, the wine industry, why drinking wine makes you feel bad, the difference in dry farming, sustainability, and how to get good wine that checks all the boxes. If you like wine at all, this is the episode for you.” At the link right-click “Download Episode Here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wolf Control 26 mins – “The rise of aggressive wolf attacks in Canadian parks due to visitors failing to respect boundaries.” At the link find the title,”Saving wolves by teaching fear: Parks Canada’s Bill Hunt explains shooting of wolf, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160610_40245.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Class Changes 58 mins – “Tamara Draut, vice president of policy and research at Demos, discusses America’s working class and the issue of income inequality. She is interviewed by Amy Goodman of Democracy Now!‘” At the link find the title, “After Words with Tamara Draut, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.433481.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus by Virologists 85 mins – “Host: Vincent Racaniello; Guests: Michael Diamond, Michaela Gack, Laura Kramer, and Charles RiceFour virologists discuss our current understanding of Zika virus biology, pathogenesis, transmission, and prevention, in this special live episode recorded at the American Society for Microbiology in Washington, DC.” At the link right-click “Download TWIV 392” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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