Mining Digest 411 – Oct 4, 2019: 5G Rollout, Agricultural Trends, American Association of Individual Investors, Bitcoin in Latin America, Broadband in Arkansas, Brown Fat, Burning Man, Childhood Mortality, Code for America, Cutting Edge Technologies, Democracy and Capitalism at Risk, Detention Centers, Economic Middleman, Financial Future Discussion, Food Technology, Health Care Technology, Homeless Story, Hong Kong History, Impeachment Concerns, James Clapper, James Earl Ray, Jeffrey Epstein, Jumpstarting Creativity, Kenya Special, Left Behind Children, Libraries in Colleges, Mind-body Problem, Nerve Transfer Surgery, News Fatigue, Nudging People, Oil Trade Impact, Perverse Laws, Pipeline Rejection, Scams Against Lawyers, Self-Improvement, Social Signaling, Solzhenitsyn P1, Trump As the Joker, VR Impact

Exercise your ears: the 62 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 779 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (28,505) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

5G Rollout 30 mins – “Jonathan Adelstein, president of the Wireless Infrastructure Association (WIA), talked about 5G and small-cell technology. WIA builds the cell towers and other technologies needed for the next generation of mobile communications.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Agricultural Trends 61 mins – “Thousands of bears in New Jersey. Humpback whales near New York City. Acres devoted to farming stable or declining even as food production soars. Jesse Ausubel of the Rockefeller University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the return of nature. Ausubel shows how technology has reduced many of the dimensions of the human footprint even as population rises and why this trend is likely to continue into the future. The conversation concludes with Ausubel’s cautious optimism about the impact of climate change.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Airline CEO 73 mins – “How did the CEO of a real estate development company become chairman of an airline? How can a competent manager learn to trust his subordinates? Joel Peterson, Chairman of the Board at JetBlue Airways and author of The 10 Laws of Trust, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his career at Trammell Crow and JetBlue and how the concept of trust, outlined in his book, has helped his career. He closes the conversation with a discussion of how he overcame his personal weaknesses that would have handicapped his career–or as he puts it, how he “rewrote his operating system.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Association of Individual Investors 28 mins – “The AAII (American Association of Individual Investors) Conference was a treasure trove of investment history and advice for amateur investors.  In fact, Paul felt a lot of the information should be meaningful to professionals as well.  Paul was impressed with the presentations from Meb Faber, Larry Swedroe, Dr. Craig Israelsen and Mark Hulbert.  The one thing that all four experts agree on is  that investors’ emotions are their biggest enemies.  After listening to all these experts Paul is now  convinced what he believes is the biggest decision investors make—and most aren’t making it!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antitrust Discussion 16 mins – “This week, the US House Antitrust subcommittee announced a probe into the mainly-unchecked power of tech giants like Google, Facebook, Apple and Amazon. The investigation could include public hearings and subpoenas toward antitrust intervention into the businesses of Silicon Valley leviathans. The news came on the same day that The Wall Street Journal reported that the Federal Trade Commission and the Justice Department are expanding their oversight into Facebook and Google’s anti-competitive practices. Last November, Brooke spoke with Stacy Mitchell, co-director of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, about Amazon’s domination over industry after industry and where we stand in the arc of antitrust regulation. In 2018, Mitchell wrote an article for The Nation called “Amazon Doesn’t Just Want to Dominate the Market — It Wants to Become the Market.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atheism Types 96 mins – Philosopher and author John Gray talks about his latest book, Seven Types of Atheism, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Gray argues that progress is an illusion and that most atheisms inherit, unknowingly, a religious belief in progress that is not justified. While Gray concedes that technological know-how and scientific knowledge improve over time, he argues that morality and political systems are cyclical and that there is no reason to be optimistic about the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin in Latin America 60 mins – “Writer, reporter, and film producer Jim Epstein talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about mining Bitcoins in Venezuela as a way to import food. Venezuela is a tragicomic example of how policy can lead to strange and presumably unexpected outcomes. Epstein also discusses how Bitcoin is being used elsewhere in Latin America and the potential for the blockchain technology to lower the costs of owning and transferring property.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Association 28 mins – “Jonathan Spalter talked about broadband availability, 5G, net neutrality and internet security.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Broadband in Arkansas 21 mins – “It’s mid-May and while some states’ legislatures are still in session, other’s have already debated new legislation, voted, and adopted new laws. This week, we talk with one Senator from Arkansas who, along with her colleagues, are interested in bringing better broadband to rural areas of her state, Breanne Davis. During the 2019 session, she introduced SB 150, which was ultimately adopted. The bill makes slight changes in Arkansas law that prevent local communities from developing infrastructure to be used for broadband. She and Christopher discuss why she and her colleagues decided it was time to ask lawmakers for the change after years of depending on large ISPs who weren’t living up to promises to expand broadband in rural areas. Christopher and Senator Davis discuss some of the details of the bill and address the amendments that changed a broad piece of legislation to a targeted law that allows local communities to apply for federal grant funding. She explains some of the reasons for the amendments and how those changes fit into the vision she and her colleagues in the legislature have for the future of Arkansas.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Colorado 32 mins – “Summer is the time for the Mountain Connect Broadband Development Conference, one of the events that Christopher is sure to attend every year. This year, it was held in Dillon, Colorado, and while he was enjoying the scenery, he collected a series of interviews. This week we hear from Brian Worthen, CEO of Mammoth Networks. With its home base in Wyoming, Mammoth serves locations in eleven western states. They primarily provide wholesale middle mile service, but the company also offers last mile connectivity in select locations. Brian describes how, over time, Mammoth has developed a system of adopting combinations of technology to get the job done. They provide service in areas that are often sparsely populated, in areas where the geology varies, and Mammoth adjusts to the needs of their diverse customers. The company received an award at Mountain Connect for their work on Colorado’s Project THOR. In this interview, Brian describes their involvement with the project and with several other local projects in the state. Christopher and his guest talk about cooperatives and their expanding role in delivering high-quality Internet access. They consider which levels of government are best suited to offer financial assistance to broadband initiatives, especially in rural communities, and discuss the potential for Low Earth Orbit Satellites to contribute to universal broadband access.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brown Fat 27 mins – “Although the best exercises in the world haven’t changed in decades that doesn’t mean you can’t stay on the cutting edge of fat-burning… And, if you’ve never heard of BAT (brown adipose tissue) before you will absolutely want to check out the big benefits of increasing this form of fat… Yes, believe it or not, there is a beneficial form of body fat that actually helps you rev up your metabolism and keeps you lean! Tune into today’s #CabralConcept 1329 to find out 3 ways to stimulate brown fat to burn more calories – Enjoy the show! At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burning Man 72 minsMarian Goodell, CEO of the Burning Man Project, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Burning Man, the 8-day art and music festival in the Nevada Desert. Goodell explains how Burning Man has evolved over the years, the principles and rules that govern the experience today, and plans for expanding the Burning Man experience around the world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Catholic Activists 58 mins – “Filmmakers Joe Tropea and Skizz Cyzyk talked about their documentary, Hit & Stay: A History of Faith and Resistance, on the actions of the Catonsville 9 and other Catholic activists who protested the Vietnam War.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Childhood Mortality 63 mins – “Historian and author Janet Golden talks about her book, Babies Made Us Modern, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Golden chronicles the transformation of parenting in first half of the 20th century. It’s a fascinating story of how our knowledge of infant health and behavior grew dramatically but remains imperfect. At the same time, government, business, and private organizations responded to that imperfect knowledge.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Code for America 60 mins – “Jennifer Pahlka, founder of Code for America, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the organization she started. Code for America works with private sector tech people to bring technology to the provision of government services. Pahlka discusses some of the success Code for America has had with improving government and the challenges of citizenship and technology in the 21st century.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corporate Control 75 mins Bloomberg Opinion columnist and economist Noah Smith talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about corporate control, wages, and monopoly power. Smith discusses the costs and benefits of co-determination–the idea of putting workers on corporate boards. The conversation then moves to a lively discussion of wages and monopoly power and how the American worker has been doing in recent years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cutting Edge Technologies 70 mins – “Ecologist Kelly Weinersmith and cartoonist Zach Weinersmith–creator of Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal–talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about their new book, Soonish–a look at cutting-edge and not-quite cutting edge technologies. The Weinersmiths speculate about everything from asteroid mining to robotic house construction to the nasal cycle and how the human body and medicine might be transformed in the future. They discuss the likelihood of some really crazy stuff coming along and changing our lives as well as the possible downsides of innovation.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy and Capitalism at Risk 60 mins – “Syndicated columnist Jonah Goldberg argues that tribalism, populism, and nationalism are threatening American democracy. He’s interviewed by John Podhoretz, editor of [Commentary] magazine.” At the link find and right-click “(April 26, 2018) Jonah Goldberg, “Suicide of the West” then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Democracy and Capitalism at Risk 87 mins – “Jonah Goldberg of National Review talks about his latest book, Suicide of the West, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Goldberg argues that both capitalism and democracy are at risk in the current contentious political environment. He argues that we take for granted what he calls “the miracle”–the transformation of the standard of living in the democracies with market economies. Goldberg argues that unless we actively work to preserve our political and economic systems, the forces of populism, nationalism, and tribalism will work steadily to destroy them.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Detention Centers 49 mins – “Broken bathrooms. Expired food. Severe overcrowding. We look at conditions at U.S. detention centers.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Econometrics 64 mins – “Nobel Laureate James Heckman of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the state of econometrics and the challenges of measurement in assessing economic theories and public policy. Heckman gives us his take on natural experiments, selection bias, randomized control trials and the reliability of sophisticated statistical analysis. The conversation closes with Heckman reminiscing about his intellectual influences throughout his career.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Growth 63 mins – “How are those in favor of bigger government and those who want smaller government like a couple stuck in a bad marriage? Economist John Cochrane of Stanford University’s Hoover Institution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how to take a different approach to the standard policy arguments. Cochrane wants to get away from the stale big government/small government arguments which he likens to a couple who have gotten stuck in a rut making the same ineffective arguments over and over. Cochrane argues for a fresh approach to economic policy including applications to growth, taxes and financial regulation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics Middleman 63 mins – Why would anyone want to hire a middleman, like a wedding planner, especially if you have time to take care of the planning yourself? Marina Krakovsky, author of The Middleman Economy talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about middlemen in the modern economy. Despite predictions that the internet would destroy the need for middlemen, Krakovsky argues they’re more valuable than ever though their roles have changed. Krakovsky looks at the different roles middlemen play today and how their value added can justify their existence.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics Redefined 62 mins – “Maeve Cohen, Co-director of Rethinking Economics, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about her organization and its efforts to change economics education. Cohen, who co-founded the Post-Crash Economics Society, argues for a more human-centered approach to economics that would be less confident in its policy prescriptions and more honest about the significance of its underlying assumptions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Future Discussion 45 mins– “In this lively interview with Ken Roberts, of Ken’s Bulls and Bears, Paul and Ken discuss a range of important investor topics for every stage of life, including Millennials on “FIRE”,  Best-in-Class ETFs, maximizing returns while minimizing risk, and retirement distributions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Technology 67 mins – “How bad is pink slime? Are free-range chickens happier? Can robots cook? Jayson Lusk of Oklahoma State University and the author of Unnaturally Delicious talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about these questions and more from his new book. Lusk explores the wide-ranging application of technology to farming, cooking, protein production, and more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future Trends 63 mins – “Futurist, author, and visionary Kevin Kelly talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his latest book, The Inevitable, Kelly’s look at what the future might be like and the role of the human experience in a world increasingly filled with information, artificial intelligence, virtual reality, and the connecting of the planet’s population.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government and Innovation 68 mins- “Economist and author Mariana Mazzucato talks about her book The Value of Everything with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mazzucato argues that economists have mismeasured value and have failed to appreciate the role of government as innovator. She argues for a more active role for government in the innovation process and for government to share in revenue proportional to its role in the creation of new technology. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Technology 63 mins – “Technology and innovation usually mean higher quality and lower prices. Is health care different? Jonathan Skinner of Dartmouth College talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how technology and innovation affect the cost and efficacy of health care. The conversation concludes with a discussion of the rise in mortality among middle-age white males–a surprising reversal of trend–that has been linked to use of opioid painkillers.

Homeless Story 56 mins– “In 2005, Paul Kennedy made a documentary about Ken Lyotier, a man living on the margins in Vancouver who has spent 30 years helping his community. Paul meets up with Ken again to tour the Downtown Eastside together.” “I first encountered Ken, not on the street, but in an internet chatroom, where we initially had a political disagreement. We gradually switched to e-mail conversation. Then eventually we arranged to meet in person, at a bicycle shop on Hastings Street, in Vancouver’s struggling Downtown Eastside.  In fact, that’s exactly where Ken is standing in the photograph on this page. We rented bikes there, and then rode all the way around the Stanley Park seawall, talking about recycling, and discovering that we agreed on much more than we first thought.Ken was not your typical expert. So I was more excited than usual when a show we made together — The IDEAS of Ken Lyotier — first aired on January 31, 2005. No reaction was forthcoming, and I wasn’t certain that anybody had actually listened. Or maybe my interviewing was at fault? In any case, I definitely never forgot Ken himself.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Hong Kong History 74 mins – “Neil Monnery, author of Architect of Prosperity, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book–a biography of John Cowperthwaite, the man often credited with the economic success of Hong Kong. Monnery describes the policies that Cowperthwaite championed and the role they played in the evolution of Hong Kong’s economy. How much those policies mattered is the focus of the conversation. Other topics include the relationship between Hong Kong and China and the irony of the challenges Hong Kong faced from U.S. and British protectionism.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment Concerns 29 mins – “We have our hands full at Sea Change Radio just trying to cover important stories relating to the environment and social justice. But we also recognize that what’s happening in the broader political landscape has a profound ripple effect on environmental and social policies. So today on Sea Change Radio we are focusing on the presidency and the rule of law. Now that the Mueller report has been submitted to the Department of Justice, calls for impeachment of President Donald Trump have begun to reach a fever pitch. Our guest today is John Stoehr of the New Haven Register and The Editorial Board. We discuss the question of whether Democrats in Congress should be moving ahead with articles of impeachment. And for those who are eager to impeach, we ponder whether it is because it’s smart politics or because it’s the right thing to do?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

James Clapper 58 mins – “Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper talked about his book, Facts and Fears, and Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign. He also talked about the summit in Singapore between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un on June” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

James Earl Ray 57 mins – “James Swanson retraced events leading up to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. He is interviewed by Jesse Holland, author and race and ethnicity writer for the Associated Press.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Jason Zweig 64 mins – “Jason Zweig of the Wall Street Journal and author of The Devil’s Financial Dictionary talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about finance, financial journalism and Zweig’s new book. Zweig discusses rationality and the investor’s challenge of self-restraint, the repetitive nature of financial journalism, and the financial crisis of 2008.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jeffrey Epstein 27 mins – “How is it that a multimillionaire got a sweetheart deal for sex crimes? New charges are bringing up old questions about Jeffrey Epstein.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jim Acosta 59 mins – “Jim Acosta, CNN’s chief White House correspondent, talked about his book, The Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America, in which he offered his first-hand account of, covering the Trump administration. He was interviewed by Jay Rosen, founder of PressThink and a New York University journalism professor.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Jumpstarting Creativity 53 mins – “Our greatest breakthroughs and triumphs have one thing in common: creativity. But how do you ignite it? And how do you rekindle it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on jumpstarting creativity. Guests include economist Tim Harford, producer Helen Marriage, artificial intelligence researcher Steve Engels, and behavioral scientist Marily Oppezzo.” At the link find the title, “Jumpstarting Creativity,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kenya Special 47 mins – “Digital Planet re-visits the technology scene in Kenya, 10 years after the submarine broadband cable was connected. Presenter Gareth Mitchell and regular studio commentator Bill Thompson are in Nairobi to find out what has changed in the last decade and what can be expected in the future. High-speed broadband 10 years on; Tonny Tugee from SEACOM discusses the impact of the submarine communications cable, which was switched on in July 2009. Investment in African tech talent; Amrote Abdella from Microsoft 4 Afrika explains why Microsoft has launched its first Africa Development Centres in Kenya and Nigeria, investing in African tech talent to ensure global relevance. Nekewa Were, Managing Director of iHub is also on the programme. The techspace has helped more than 350 startups and raised $40m in investment since it opened in 2010. Future-proofing Kenya in the technological revolution; technologist Juliana Rotich explains why Kenya must learn from past mistakes in other countries when adopting emerging technologies and is working to ensure that data can benefit all elements of society.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Kids’ Clothing 27 mins – “Clothes are records of the bodies we’ve lived in. Think of the old sweater that you used to have that’s just not your style anymore, or the jeans that just aren’t your size anymore. We are like snakes who shed our skins and grow new ones as we age. And it all starts in the kids’ department….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Left Behind Children 53 mins – “This is the flipside of migration. Migrants make headlines all the time, but what about those they leave behind? The so-called ‘motherless villages’ of Indonesia; rural Senegal where not enough men are left to work the fields and the Guatemalan parents who risk their children’s lives, sending them on the perilous journey to the US. Stories of deserted families and communities, revealing the bigger picture of the country that has been abandoned.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Libraries in Colleges 60 mins – “Libraries have long been central to college campuses. In fact, one way colleges have measured their greatness has been to boast about the size of their library collections. (Harvard wins on that metric, with 18.9 million volumes.Yale is close behind at 15.2 million.) But now that so many materials are digital, is a book count the best way to measure a library’s impact? And how have libraries become central to new efforts to remake the college campus for the information age? These were some of the questions discussed this week during the latest installment of EdSurge Live, our series of online discussions about big topics in higher education. Our guests were: Steven Bell, associate university librarian for research and instructional services at Temple University, which recently opened a glitzy new $175-million library on its campus. Emily Drabinski, critical pedagogy librarian at the Mina Rees Library at the Graduate Center, CUNY Listen to the conversation below, or read a transcript of highlights, lightly edited for clarity.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” from the pop-up menu.

Library Funding 19 mins – “American libraries came out ahead in 2018, though it took work to get there, reports Andrew AlbanesePublishers Weekly senior writer. In a PW review of the year’s top stories from the library community, he found public support for libraries made the difference in holding back attempts to cut federal funding “In February of 2018, for the second year in a row, the Trump Administration called to permanently eliminate all federal library and arts funding. At the time ALA president Jim Neal blasted the proposal as ‘out of touch with the real needs of Americans,’ and he vowed that library supporters would make their voices heard. And that’s exactly what happened,” Albanese explains. >Indeed, lawmakers on Capitol Hill defied the White House and recommended reauthorizing – or in some cases increasing – the funding levels for many library-related programs, including a $2 million bump for the Institute of Museum and Library Services. In a separate “minibus” that passed in September, the Library of Congress also received a $26 million increase to its budget. “ALA officials are urging library supporters to stay engaged with their local lawmakers. As of this writing, a final FY2019 budget has not yet been passed,” Albanese tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “One of things that helps libraries is that the money spent on library programs is some of the best, most effective money spent by the government—it directly helps people in their communities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mind-Body Problem 76 mins – “Science journalist and author John Horgan talks about his book, Mind-Body Problems, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Horgan interviewed an array of scientists, philosophers, and others who have worked on consciousness, free-will, and what it means to be human. Horgan argues that no single solution to the problems in these areas is likely to be established by science and that our perspective on these questions is inevitably colored by our personal experiences rather than by scientific evidence. Horgan concludes by making the case for personal and intellectual freedom and the need to embrace subjective interpretations of mind-body issues in ways that bring meaning to our lives.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Nerve Transfer Surgery 15 mins – “The Lancet’s Senior Editor Jonathan Pimm talks with author Natasha van Zyl about the pioneering surgical procedure of transplanting nerves to restore function in the upper limbs.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

News Fatigue 49 mins – “Even some news junkies have had enough. More and more Americans are turning off their screens and unplugging their headphones because the news is too much. Nieman Lab‘s Joshua Benton, and former Chief Political Reporter at CNN, Candy Crowley,  and co-founder of the Solutions Journalism Network Tina Rosenberg, join us to discuss news avoidance.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

News Literacy 25 mins – “Today on the podcast we’re talking about news literacy, and the challenge of teaching students to navigate the relentless flow of information they get through social media and websites and YouTube and … podcasts. What are the stakes of making sure the next generation can sort fact from propaganda or spin? Here’s how a 10th grader in Southern California puts it: “If misinformation gets spread and if enough people believe it, it could cause problems and a lot of people will be confused about what’s true and what’s not true—it’s really important to know what facts are real.” That’s Valeria Luquin, a 15-year-old who has recently gone through a journalism course that went over the basics of news literacy. The course used materials created by a nonprofit called the News Literacy Project, which provides a set of online materials and offers professional development for teachers. Our guest today, Peter Adams, has years of experience working with students like Luquin, first as a classroom teacher, then as a college instructor, and currently as senior vice president for education at the News Literacy Project.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” from the pop-up menu.

Nudging People 36 mins – “Every day, each one of us is “nudged” by external factors and actors to change how we behave. Whether it’s the weather forecast, an advert on the train, or advice from a friend, we are all influenced by nudges. But what is a nudge? What is the human psychology behind their effectiveness? And when does a nudge become something more sinister – such as coercion or manipulation? To explore this and more, Ian Sample speaks to the Harvard Law School’s Professor Cass Sunstein about the psychology and history of nudging, as well as some of the ethical quandaries explored in his new book The Ethics of Influence: Government in the the Age of Behavioural Science. We also hear from head of the UK’s ‘nudge unit’ (aka the behavioural insights team), Dr David Halpern, about how nudges are helping governments with tax repayments, more effective approaches to job seeking and reducing further education dropout rates.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Trade Impact 64 mins – “Should the United States allow its citizens to buy oil from countries run by bad men? Is this a case where morality trumps the usual case for free trade? Leif Wenar, professor of philosophy at King’s College, London and author of Blood Oil, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the morality of buying resources from countries that use the resulting revenue to oppress their citizens. Based on the ideas in his book, Wenar argues that in many cases, importing oil is equivalent to buying stolen goods where the low prices cannot justify the purchase. The conversation discusses the possible outcomes from banning foreign oil from tyrannical regimes along with the resource curse and the case for fair trade.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Perverse Laws 75 mins – “Leo Katz, professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book, Why the Law Is So Perverse. Katz argues that certain seemingly inexplicable features of the law are the result of conflicts between multiple objectives that the law or the courts must trade off against each other. Katz also argues that structure of the law and how it is enforced are analogous to certain inevitable ambiguities of collective choice and voting theory.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pipeline Rejection 53 mins – “Paul Kennedy says goodbye as IDEAS host, returning to where he first began. In July 1977, Paul traveled to Fort Providence, Northwest Territories, where he put his canoe in the water, and started paddling 1,600 km all the way to the Arctic Ocean. He was making his very first documentary for IDEAS, the program he’d later host for 20 years. It was also the year that the Berger Inquiry report came out — on whether to construct an oil pipeline down the Mackenzie Valley.[Berger Inquiry] That trip and that inquiry taught both the nation and Paul himself the real value of listening. “I had no ‘idea’ that during that trip I’d discover what a river really is, and how much a river means, on this watery planet we insist on calling Earth,” Paul says. Paul’s first contribution to IDEAS was called The Fur Trade Revisited. In spring 2019, he returned to the region to talk to some of the people he met there, and to “take the temperature of the country” — and perhaps the world. Because what happens in Canada’s North captures what happens elsewhere, from climate change to politics.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Political Polarization 70 mins – “Political scientist Lilliana Mason of the University Maryland and author of Uncivil Agreement talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mason argues that political partisanship has become stronger in America in recent years because it aligns with other forms of community and identity. People are associating primarily with people who share their political views in their other social activities outside of politics. As a result, they encounter fewer people from the other side. The intensity of partisanship can even overcome ideology as partisans change their policy positions in their eagerness to be on the winning side. The conversation closes with a discussion of what might be done to improve political discourse in America.” At the link right-click download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Propaganda 28 mins – “Has this ever happened to you: You are talking with a friend or family member, and as the topic moves to politics, things start to get a little heated. You make what you think are excellent points, based on data, logic, and what you fervently believe to be the absolute truth. Yet, when the debate concludes, somehow neither of you has budged an inch, and no one leaves any wiser. Perhaps this is why we are instructed to “never discuss politics in polite company.” This week on Sea Change Radio, we are talking about bridging the divide, with James Hoggan, an author and the co-founder of Desmog Blog. Hopefully, the next time the subject of impeachment or the Democratic nominee of your choice arises, the debate can be spirited, productive, and maybe even polite.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quantum Mechanics 39 mins – “Ian Sample speaks to the theoretical physicist Sean Carroll about his mission to demystify quantum mechanics. It won’t be easy, though, as Carroll’s favoured interpretation of this fundamental theory – the ‘many worlds’ interpretation – results in a possibly infinite number of parallel universes…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scams Against Lawyers 26 mins – “In this edition of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway discuss check fraud with expert Dan Pinnington. Together, they reveal how lawyers are repeatedly falling into the trap of check fraudsters and what can be done to avoid it. Tune in for tips on how to spot a check fraudster in your practice or law firm. Pinnington is the Vice President of Claims Prevention and Stakeholder Relations at Lawyers’ Professional Indemnity Company (LAWPRO). He is a prolific writer, speaker, and blogger on topics including practice management, risk management, and legal technology. He is also a contributor to AvoidAClaim.com which is blog by LAWPRO that, among many things, helps attorneys prevent malpractice claims.” A 16 slide presentation is also at the link. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog.

Self-Improvement 76 mins – “Jordan Peterson, author of 12 Rules for Life, talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Topics covered include parenting, conversation, the role of literature in everyday life, and the relationship between sacrificial rites and trade.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Signaling 69 mins – “Judith Donath, author of The Social Machine, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in her book–an examination of signaling, online identity, and online community. Donath argues that design elements in technology play a key role in our interactions with one another. The conversation closes with a discussion of data collection by corporations and the government.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solzhenitsyn P1 79 mins – “Russian Literature Professor Kevin McKenna of the University of Vermont talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the life and times of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. This is the opening episode of the EconTalk Book Club for Solzhenitsyn’s masterpiece In the First Circle: The First Uncensored Edition. A subsequent episode to air in the next few weeks discusses the book itself.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solzhenitsyn P2 78 mins – “Russian Literature Professor Kevin McKenna of the University of Vermont talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the characters, plot, and themes of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s masterpiece, In the First Circle. This is the second episode of the EconTalk book club discussing the book. The first episode–a discussion of Solzhenitsyn’s life and times–is available on EconTalk at Kevin McKenna on Solzhenitsyn, the Soviet Union, and In the First Circle.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Statistical Studies 64 mins – “John Ioannidis of Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his research on the reliability of published research findings. They discuss Ioannidis’s recent study on bias in economics research, meta-analysis, the challenge of small sample analysis, and the reliability of statistical significance as a measure of success in empirical research.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Trump As the Joker 59 mins – “MSNBC’s Joy-Ann Reid talked about The Man Who Sold America: Trump and the Unravelling of the American Story, author and journalist Sophia Nelson. In her book, Ms. Reid argued that President Trump was damaging American democracy.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

VR Impact 30 mins – “Jeremy Bailenson, a Stanford University professor who runs the institution’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, talked about virtual reality and its potential impact on society.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 410 – Sep 27, 2019: Black Womanhood, CBD and THC, Central Park Five, Danger and Risk, Democracy Revival, Doctors Fight Bullies, Evictions, Fake News Industry, Foot and Mouth Disease, Girls Who Code, Hate Speech Online, Honor Killings, IGNITE talks, Impact Investing, Intolerance In Europe, Investing for Life, Investing in Target-Date Funds, Jobs and Technology, JUNO Jupiter Probe, Law and Technology, Lead Poisoning, Legal Chatbots, Presidential Stories, Racism Deconstructed, San Francisco Mayor, Senate Failure, Serial Killers, Trump Wealth, Undercover Stories, Vaccinations in China

Exercise your ears: the 51 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 660 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,028) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Aloha Shirts 32 mins – “There are a few ways to tell if you’re looking at an authentic, high-quality aloha shirt. If the pockets match the pattern, that’s a good sign, but it’s not everything. Much of understanding an aloha shirt is about paying attention to what is on the shirt itself. It’s about looking at the pattern to see the story it tells.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atheists Movement 54 mins – Perhaps the three best known atheists of the past couple of decades are Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins, and the late Christopher Hitchens. They’ve presented powerful arguments against religious belief, and urgent calls for an end to religion in public life.  But among contemporary atheist scholars and activists, the focus has shifted from criticism of religion toward the possibilities of an atheist ethics — goodness without God.  Christian Smith is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Notre Dame, and is the author of Atheist Overreach: What Atheism Can’t Deliver.  In the book, Smith addresses three main claims made by atheists: that science can determine whether God exists; that human beings are not naturally religious; and — the focus of this IDEAS episode —that human beings can be good without God. Not just good as individuals, but capable of a collective morality that can redress inequality and suffering, and lead to the betterment of all humanity.

Black Womanhood 47 mins – “Beauty. Politics. Inequality. Gender. Money. Familiar themes endlessly discussed. But are we hearing every essential voice? Rhetorical question, because the answer is obviously no. For example, not enough of us have heard the searing analysis from sociology professor and black feminist thinker Tressie McMillan Cottom. In her new collection of essays, Cottom says her work is animated by what’s still seen as a “radical idea … black women are rational and human.” From that assumption, she works her way analytically through politics, economics, history, sociology and culture.

Books in India 19 mins – “With thousands of publishers working in dozens of languages, India is the seventh-largest book publishing nation on Earth. The English-language book market alone is the world’s second-largest, after the US. In addition, the Indian smartphone market is the fastest-growing on the planet, with 300 million users. While Indian-language news and entertainment available on those devices may be leading a generation away from traditional print media, including books, the Association of Publishers in India (API) considers books to be essential to India’s future – as resources for educational ambitions and as outlets for creative expression.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Illinois 24 mins – “As part of our series of interviews conducted during the 2019 Broadband Communities Summit in Austin, Texas, earlier in April, we’re sharing Christopher’s interview with Angela Imming. Angela is the Director of Technology and Innovation for the city of Highland, Illinois, home to Highland Communication Services (HCS).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CBD and THC 33 mins – “What has convinced some researchers that the risks of heavy cannabis use now warrant public health campaigns to warn people of potential harm? How real is the risk of psychosis among vulnerable users of the drug? And why has the number of young people receiving treatment for cannabis-related problems seemingly been on the rise in the UK? Ian Sample is joined by Sir Robin Murray, professor of psychiatric research at King’s College London, Suzi Gage, senior research associate in the MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at Bristol University and Ian Hamilton, a mental health lecturer at the University of York.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Central Park Five 38 mins – “Millions of rent-burdened Americans face eviction filings and proceedings every year. On this week’s On the Media, what we think we know, and what we definitely don’t know, about America’s eviction crisis. Plus, how local journalists failed the Central Park Five.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dalai Lama Interview 27 mins – “In a wide ranging interview the Dalai Lama talks to the BBC’s Rajini Vaidyanathan about President Trump and his America First agenda, Brexit, the EU, and China’s relationship with the world. The interview also challenges some of the Buddhist spiritual leader’s more controversial statements and explores his views on the institution of the Dalai Lama. Coming just months after a recent health scare – the Dalai Lama shares his thoughts on the state of the world today. The interview also asks the Buddhist spiritual leader what did he mean when he said “Europe was for Europeans”, and why does a female successor have to be attractive?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Danger and Risk 66 mins – “When does the pursuit of safety lead us into danger? Greg Ip of the Wall Street Journal and author of Foolproof talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in his book–the way we publicly and privately try to cope with risk and danger and how those choices can create unintended consequences. While much of the conversation focuses on the financial crisis of 2008, there are also discussions of football injuries, damage from natural disasters such as hurricanes, car accidents, and Herbert Hoover. Along the way, Herman Melville’s insights into the mesmerizing nature of water make an appearance.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Revival 15 mins – “Civic evangelist Eric Liu shares a powerful way to rekindle the spirit of citizenship and the belief that democracy still works. Join him for a trip to “Civic Saturday” and learn more about how making civic engagement a weekly habit can help build communities based on shared values and a path to belonging.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the popup menu.

Doctors Fight Bullies 27 minsHalifax cardiologist Dr. Gabrielle Horne spent 14 years fighting to restore her reputation after she was bullied and bad-mouthed by supervisors when she was an up-and-coming researcher. She was eventually awarded the largest settlement in Canada for loss of reputation. While her story is extraordinary, it’s not isolated. Recent Canadian surveys reveal 60% of medical students and 75% of residents report being harassed, intimidated or personally mistreated by someone in authority. This week White Coat, Black Art explores why doctors bully and what it will take to change the culture that allows it to happen, with insights from both Dr. Horne and lawyer Valerie Wise, who represents both doctors and their employers in disputes” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Evictions P1 35 mins – “We hear the story of Jeffrey, a security guard whose hours were inconsistent, whose rent burden was beyond severe, and whose family now lives in a two-bed hotel room in Richmond, Virginia. And we meet our partner in this project, Matt Desmond — Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, and founder of the Eviction Lab at Princeton University. Brooke and Matt hash out what we know and what we only think we know about the forces that drive eviction.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy of it is included in this blog archive.

Fake News Industry 24 mins – “Instagram influencers might be the most mocked professionals on the internet. But look closer, and they’re not just a crucial part of online retail. They’re a symbol of the future of work—independent, passionate, and economically vulnerable. In the latest episode of Crazy/Genius, produced by Patricia Yacob and Jesse Brenneman, we speak to several influencers and consult two people who study them most closely— the Atlantic reporter Taylor Lorenz and the Cornell University professor Brooke Erin Duffy.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foot and Mouth Disease 27 mins – “When we think about the U.S.-Mexico border, it’s hard not to think about the current immigration conflict and the contentious idea to build a wall. But the concept of a border wall isn’t new: proposals for walls have been made for more than 100 years. Our story starts in 1947, when a group of Texas ranchers demanded a fence along their state’s border with Mexico. Their motivation, though, was to stop an outbreak of a disease that struck farm animals. The response to the crisis was complicated and often messy. But in the end two countries came together to solve a complex predicament—instead of building a wall.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Operations 33 mins – “How much of our genome is actually doing useful stuff? And what do our genes actually tell our cells to do? We guide you through the basics of genetics…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

George Will Interview 47 mins – “Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist George F. Will, on his new mediation on the state of American conservatism.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Girls Who Code 46 mins – “Girls Who Code CEO Reshma Saujani talks with Recode’s Kara Swisher about the challenges facing women in the tech industry and what everyone can do to make progress happen faster. In this episode: The 60 Minutes problem; what Girls Who Code does; how it compares to other diversity-in-coding groups; how much progress have we made so far?; the link between perfectionism and “fitting in”; the lousy excuses for homogeneous hiring; how Google and Microsoft could become the new Goldman Sachs; sexual harassment and the impact of #MeToo; bringing new investors into the ecosystem; what parents should tell their daughters; and where are the role models?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grace Kennan Warnecke 58 mins – :Grace Kennan Warnecke, daughter of American diplomat George Kennan, talked about her memoir, Daughter of the Cold War.” At the link you can listen and pay to download the podcast; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ham Radios After Cyclones 27 mins – “Ham Radio operators have been drafted in to keep communications open after Cyclone Fani devastated parts of India. HF and VHF will be used to communicate with the main disaster control room in Delhi. Operators have been deployed to areas where all other forms of communication have failed. Soft Robotics – Recent advances in 3D printing have led to significant progress in the field of soft robotics. Katia Bertoldi, professor of applied mechanics at Harvard, describes her work with soft robots – compliant robots, made from soft materials, usually rubber, which are suitable to interact with humans in a non-intrusive way. As these robots need to move in a complex way new materials are being developed to allow them to do that. Fighting Back Against Online Trolls in Colombia – In Colombia, an organisation called Fundacion Karisma is helping victims of online abuse fight back against misogynistic internet trolls by educating them on data security. The organisation recently won an award from the Index on Censorship, for their digital activism and work for freedom of expression on the internet. Our reporter Tom Stephens speaks to the head of the organisation about their work.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Hate Speech Online 27 mins – “…The latest episode of Crazy/Genius, produced by Patricia Yacob and Jesse Brenneman, analyzes the recent wave of internet-inspired violence—from Charlottesville to Christchurch—and asks why the web became such a fecund landscape for extremism. Hate is an ancient offline phenomenon. But something about the design of our social-media platforms—and perhaps something inherent to the internet itself—has amplified the worst angels of our nature. (Subscribe here.) The psychological roots of online hatred have three levels. At the bottom, there is group polarization and the natural tendency of moderate people to become extremist versions of themselves when they interact with like-minded peers. At the next level, there is what you might call Viral Screaming Syndrome—the natural tendency of web content to veer toward high-arousal emotions, such as outrage and paranoia, to attract attention and promote social sharing. “Video is really expensive to make, and reported video is really, really expensive to make,” says the Atlantic staff writer Alexis Madrigal. “You know what’s not expensive to make? A bunch of random, paranoid opinions to cut through the noise.” Finally, the largest social-media networks have built algorithms that exacerbate both group polarization and the Viral Screaming Effect. For example, YouTube executives knew that extreme and misleading videos were racking up tens of millions of views, but the company’s executives declined to intervene, because they were “focused on increasing viewing time and other measures of engagement,” according to a Bloomberg report in April….” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Insurance 48 mins – “High deductibles and medical bills are feeding resentment and political alienation of the middle class, reports the Los Angeles Times. We unpack. Noam Levey and Elana Schor join Meghna Chakrabarti.” At the link left-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Henry David Thoreau 53 mins – “This week, we have a lecture by Laura Walls, Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame.  Professor Wall’s lecture is titled “Henry David Thoreau’s Legacy of Resistance and Hope,” and is presented by the Boston University College of Arts and Sciences.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honor Killings 13 mins – “Film has the power to change the way we think about ourselves and our culture. Documentarian and TED Fellow Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy uses it to fight violence against women, turning her camera on the tradition of honor killings in Pakistan. In a stirring talk, she shares how she took her Oscar-winning film on the road in a mobile cinema, visiting small towns and villages across Pakistan — and shifting the dynamics between women, men and society, one screening at a time.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IBM’s Watson 46 mins – “In this episode, Jason Velez explains how he is using IBM’s Watson to empower 1Law, the small firm and affiliation of US lawyers he founded. He also explains how he went about building 1Law’s technology solutions, which prompts Sam and Aaron to address the question whether lawyers should learn to code.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the this blog archive.

IGNITE Talks 73 mins – “Berkman Klein community members share their research, passions, and musings in five minute Ignite Talks. Topics include the data economy in the European Union, maternal health around the world, youth and privacy online in Latin American, Ubuntu as an ethical framework for AI, collecting secrets, and more!” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impact Investing 47 mins – “Foundations and pension funds are under pressure to do more “impact investing,” focusing not just on the bottom line, but also on doing good for people and the planet. But is it effective? If so, why isn’t impact investing catching on more?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intolerance in Europe 34 mins – “Johny Pitts and Roger Robinson talk about Windrush, the rise of rightwing populism – and why they both feel still hope.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing for Life 70 mins – “We have a special guest on the podcast today, Paul Merriman. He emailed me out of the blue introducing himself. It is like Jack Bogle or Bill Bernstein calling you up and trying to tell you who they are. I replied back to him, “Paul I know very well who you are and it would be an honor to get you on the show.”  He is best known for his work educating the individual investor and here are the questions he answered for the WCI [WhiteCoatInvestor] community…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing in Bear Markets 60 mins – “In this conversation with Rob Berger of Doughroller.net, Paul discusses how to handle a bear market. How can we stick to our investment plan when our portfolios drop by 20% or more, and how should you be investing now? Among topics covered: My recent meeting with Vanguard founder John Bogle; Should one diversify beyond the S&P 500? What role does luck play in a person’s success? Should investors wait to invest until the market comes down?  What does it means to be a long-term investor? Paul‘s retirement portfolio; How to defend against a bear market; How to invest a large sum of money; The role PE ratios play in valuing the market; How to stick to your investment plan when the market drops; How to invest 5 years before retirement”

Investing in Target-Date Funds 74 mins – “Chris Pedersen joins Paul to talk about their latest research on getting better returns from Target-Date portfolios. The discussion includes the pros and cons of Target-Date Funds (TDFs), how to make the best use of TDFs, recommendations for D-I-Y investors at Vanguard, and the easy solutions they created at Motif for those following Paul’s work. To enable investors interested in exploring and/or implementing this approach, The Merriman Target Date Portfolios are available at Motif Investing. You can read Chris’ related article, Achieving Success with Target Date Funds”.  You can also dive deeper into Chris’ research and analysis at the Merriman Target Date Portfolio Glide Path Asset Allocations. For more about Motif and other portfolios recommended by Paul Merriman, click hereAt the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Is It Too Late 54 mins – “In Paul Kennedy’s final week at IDEAS, he looks back at his four decades with the program. We begin the series with an episode inspired by the Muskoka Summit on the Environment, an event Paul has moderated since 2010. For this episode, Paul invited three guests to join him onstage at the Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto to answer two basic questions about our collective future: are we doomed? And what inspires hope?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Jobs and Technology 64 mins– “Are workers being left behind when the economy grows? Is technology making the human workforce obsolete? James Bessen, author of Learning by Doing, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the role of learning on the job in the past and in the present. Bessen argues that during times of technological innovation, it often takes years before workers see higher wages from productivity increases. Bessen stresses the importance of the standardization of education on the job as workers adapt to new technology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

JUNO Jupiter Probe 20 mins – “Following the news this week that the spacecraft successfully dropped into Jupiter’s orbit, Ian Sample is joined by planetary scientists professor Fran Bagenal – a co-investigator on the mission – and Dr Adam Masters to discuss the probe.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Law and Technology 27 mins – “Over the past 100 years technology has made enormous leaps toward improving the ease of everyday living for the average citizen. This progress has also been reflected in the legal profession as tech becomes more integrated into the working lives of lawyers. However, in what ways has technology improved the profession and how can technological advancements aid us in the future? In this special centennial episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway sit down with ABA President-Elect Linda Klein to reflect on how technology has improved the practice of law throughout their careers. The hosts open by taking some time to reflect on the last 100 episodes of the podcast and Linda shares her memory of having the Digital Edge be the very first podcast she ever listened to. She then muses over being introduced to technology early in her career and how tech started to influence and improve the way she practiced law. Within these reflections, Linda provides some insight into why she thinks it is important for lawyers to give back to their communities and tips on how tech can help fit everything into one’s busy life. The group then focuses on ABA initiatives centered around positively influencing the rapid change happening in the legal profession spurred by globalization and technology. Linda then looks toward the future and discusses goals that she has for her presidency relating specifically to technology and the practice of law.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Lead Poisoning 30 mins – “In this, our first episode, we tell the story of how the lead industry fooled the public into thinking its products were safe. Thankfully, as you’ll hear, a number of activists, researchers and pediatricians developed the scientific evidence needed to prove the lead industry wrong. Our interaction and graphic designer, Clarisa Diaz, made this fantastic flowchart that shows how those battles were won:…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Legal Tech Trends 26 mins – “The legal industry is transforming—what does this mean for lawyers in the future? In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway welcome Stacey Caywood and Dean Sonderegger to discuss the Wolters Kluwer 2019 Future Ready Lawyer Survey. They discuss the trends and findings of the survey, highlighting the things leading organizations were doing that boosted their future-readiness. The survey found that law firms that lead in leveraging technology outperformed others across all categories and were also more profitable. They talk about how trailing organizations in the survey can catch up, offering strategies and encouraging them to invest in technology to better prepare their firms for the future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Netflix Impact 27 minsThe numbers are staggering: thousands of films and TV shows available to 160 million subscribers in 190 countries. Netflix has changed the entertainment business; that much is obvious. But how has it changed the meaning of video entertainment in our culture—and the way movies and television shows are made? In this episode of Crazy/Genius, the final installment of the third season, the host Derek Thompson talks with Matt Zoller Seitz, a television critic for New York magazine, about the downsides of too much technological convenience. Then he speaks with Franklin Leonard, the founder of the Black List, about data, diversity, and the Netflix effect for storytellers. This episode was produced by Patricia Yacob and Jesse Brenneman.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Stories 54 mins – “Harold Holzer and Amity Shlaes (54 min. 22 sec. – May 3, 2019) Harold Holzer and Amity Shlaes talk about C-SPAN’s latest book, [The Presidents: Noted Historians Rank America’s Best – and Worst – Chief Executives].” At the link find the title, “Harold Holzer and Amity Shlaes,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism Deconstructed 18 mins – “Baratunde Thurston explores the phenomenon of white Americans calling the police on black Americans who have committed the crimes of … eating, walking or generally “living while black.” In this profound, thought-provoking and often hilarious talk, he reveals the power of language to change stories of trauma into stories of healing — while challenging us all to level up.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

San Francisco Mayor 78 mins – “Breed’s shortlist of worries includes a homelessness epidemic, mental health care reform, public drug use, streets so dirty she had to convene a “poop patrol,” a shortage of affordable housing for middle-class workers, and policymakers who would be happy to see more housing built so long as it doesn’t cast a shadow on a public park. But as she approaches the end of her first year in her office, Breed also has a valuable card to play: San Francisco is a city with a low unemployment rate and many skilled workers, so Breed can pressure their prospective Big Tech employers to be part of the solution. “It wasn’t necessarily a tech company, but I had a company in my office who wanted to expand, and usually most mayors would be really excited about that,” she said. “But I said, ‘So where’s your workforce? Where are your additional 400 employees going to come from? Where are they going to live?’” “It’s not to say people aren’t invited, but it’s to say if you’re going to expand, there has to be some accountability,” Breed added. “How are you going to invest more in San Francisco?” On the new podcast, she also talked about a new initiative called Opportunities For All, which aims to place all San Francisco high school students in paid internships. She singled out Airbnb for its support of the initiative, indicating that despite some past “challenges,” the company is “rolling up their sleeves to be better community partners.” “I want them to invite internships in their businesses and not where the kids are kind of pushed to the side, I want these to be meaningful internships so that they learn about this industry, about what’s possible in engineering, HR, or anything,” Breed said. “I want them to be committed to really investing in our future in San Francisco.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Senate Failure 61 mins – “Former U.S. trade negotiator and senior Senate staffer Ira Shapiro argued that the U.S. Senate has lost its political center. He is interviewed by former Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle.” At the link you can purchase a download, or listen; however, a copy is also included in this blog archive.

Serial Killers 47 mins – “Ted Bundy is one of the country’s most notorious serial killers. His savage acts of murder — targeting young women across the country during the 1970s — belied the outward appearance of a clean-cut, charismatic and intelligent young man. Bundy is depicted in a new feature film on Netflix starring Zac Efron, “Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile.” It’s told through the eyes of his then-girlfriend Liz, who he charmed even as he went on trial for murder. We speak with director Joe Berlinger.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Small Presses 10 mins – “Dozens of independent standalone publishers continue to dot the literary landscape in the United States. They survive against all odds, building catalogs of works that range from experimental to controversial. Among the titles are occasional bestsellers, but that is hardly the point. Author JoeAnn Hart argues that these small presses make our bookshelves more diverse and our cultural existence more interesting. Stamford ’76 is her latest book, a mix of a memoir and a murder mystery, that was published in April by the University of Iowa Press. As an author and a reader, Hart champions the small presses for taking big risks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Successful Companies 63 mins – “In October 2001, Amazon was in trouble. The first dot-com bubble had popped a year earlier, and Amazon’s stock price was languishing in the single digits, less than half of where it was trading a year before. That’s when founder and CEO Jeff Bezos called Jim Collins, a former Stanford business professor who had written the widely-admired book Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap…and Others Don’t. Collins visited Amazon’s campus to talk about some ideas from the book, including a concept he called “turning the flywheel” — in essence, figuring out how to push your business so that it starts to gain momentum, growing faster and faster. “Now the wonderful thing about great students — and Jeff Bezos and company are really thoughtful, smart people — is they take an idea and then they took it even further,” Collins said on the latest episode of Recode Decode with Kara Swisher. “So they took the flywheel and they said, ‘We’re going to make the flywheel ours.’…” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the popup menu.

Systemic Racism 47 mins – “Milwaukee County declares racism a public health crisis and wants to push the plan nationwide.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Travel Tech Guide 12 mins – “The ASUS ZenScreen gives you a second monitor while on the go, IOGEAR has the perfect portable USB-C docking station for Windows, Mac, and Linux laptops, and Kingston has all the storage that a mobile geek needs. Fr. Robert Ballecer returns for part 2 of his Travel Tech Guide: Storage and Connectivity!” At the link right-click “Download options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Wealth 54 mins – “As we all learned this week, President Trump “lost more money than nearly other individual American taxpayer” between 1985 and 1994. It was during that decade of losses that Trump published The Art of the Deal and became a fixture on the Forbes 400 list of wealthiest Americans. But if his business failures and his debts were so immense, how did he get on the list to begin with? Jonathan Greenberg, now an investigative journalist, was then the Forbes reporter whose unenviable task it was to evaluate Trump’s fabulous claims. Bob spoke with him this week about the origin myth upon which a 37-year-long con was built.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Trumponomics 60 mins – “Famed economist and President Trump economic advisor, Stephen Moore, explains Trump’s economic philosophy. President Trump has embraced both traditional conservative ideas of tax cuts and deregulation, but has also adopted unorthodox positions of protectionism and tariffs. Moore discusses this and more in our interview about his new book, Trumponomics: Inside the America First Plan to Revive Our Economy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undercover Stories 54 mins – “Are deception and secrecy categorically wrong? Or can they be a necessary means to an end? This hour, TED speakers share stories of going undercover to explore unknown territory, and find the truth.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Vaccinations in China 27 mins – “Chinese vaccination rates are claimed to be a great success, but is that the whole picture? Every country has its own challenges to deal and China’s include the vast size of the country, mass migration into cities and the birth of 15 million children a year. Their goal is 90% vaccination coverage. Have they achieved it? Reporter Madeleine Finlay has just been to a symposium in London on vaccination programmes in China, and she reports back for Health Check. Thanks to a vigorous vaccination campaign that started in the 1960s, Taiwan has, like all but three countries in the world, succeeded in eradicating polio. There has been no polio infection there since 1983, but there are still survivors of polio who contracted the virus before that time. Some of them belong to the Chinese Taipei City Wheelchair Dance Sport Association and often get together to take part in wheelchair ballroom dancing. BBC’s Cindy Sui went to visit wheelchair dancers Vincent Kuo and Ivy Huang, who told her how dancing even helped them find love. What advice would you give your younger self? Psychologists at Clemson University in the US surveyed nearly 200 over 30 year olds asking this very question. Their answers fell into three main categories; things they wish they had done differently about the way they thought of themselves, choices concerning education and choices about relationships. Professor of Psychology Robin Kowalski was lead author of the study, which has just been published in the Journal of Social Psychology.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 409 – Sep 20, 2019: 5G Hype, Amazon and Robots, Ash Carter, ASMR, Brain Tumor Treatment, Broadband in Africa, Canadian Astronaut, Catalhoyuk Excavation, Chinese Famine, Chinese Railway Workers, Coal Mining in Germany, Digital Detoxing, Disinformation Menace, Doctor’s Face Time with Patients, ELIZA Program, Eugenics, False Memories, FCC Trends, Frozen Frontiers, Future Consequences, German Political Culture, Hayek and Neurology, Health Care, Holocaust Survivor, IBM 360 Computer, Infant Vision, IQ Tests, K-T Extinction Event, Lo Carb Hi Fat Diets, Measles in Ukraine, Mexico Boarder, Money Defined, Online Privacy Concerns, Pain Research, Pesticide Ban, President Andrew Johnson, Reading Importance, Reservation Life, Robots, Saudi Women Phone Tracking, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Tobacco Control, Trump Second Term Campaign

Exercise your ears: the 69 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 752 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,028) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

27th Amendment 62 mins – “The 27th Amendment is the most recent amendment to the Constitution, and its existence today can be traced to a college student who proposed the idea in a term paper and was given a C by his professor for the idea. Today marks the 27th anniversary of the amendment’s ratification in 1992, and it seems likely we won’t see a 28th amendment for some time. “No law, varying the compensation for the services of the Senators and Representatives, shall take effect, until an election of Representatives shall have intervened,” the 27th Amendment reads, as approved in 1992. In short, the amendment states that a sitting Congress can’t give itself a raise (or cut its pay) during its current session. Any pay raise or cut can only take effect for the Congress that follows a sitting Congress. It’s not a new idea. Founding Father James Madison first proposed this amendment back in 1789 along with several other amendments that became the Bill of Rights, but it took 203 years for it to become the law of the land. In 1982, a college undergraduate student, Gregory Watson, discovered that the proposed amendment could still be ratified and started a grassroots campaign. Watson was also an aide to Texas state senator Ric Williamson. Shortly after the amendment was ratified a decade later, New York Law School professor Richard B. Bernstein traced the journey from 1789 to 1992 in a Fordham Law Review article. Bernstein called Watson the “step-father” of the 27th Amendment. Watson was a sophomore at the University of Texas-Austin in 1982 and he needed a topic for a government course. Watson researched what became the 27th Amendment and found that six states had ratified it by 1792, and then there was little activity about it. Watson concluded that the amendment could still be ratified, because Congress had never stipulated a time limit for states to consider it for ratification. Watson’s professor gave him a C for the paper, calling the whole idea a “dead letter” issue and saying it would never become part of the Constitution. “The professor gave me a C on the paper. When I protested she said I had not convinced her the amendment was still pending,” Watson told USA Today back in 1992.Undeterred, Watson started a self-financed campaign to get the amendment ratified. He wrote letters to state officials, and the amendment was ratified in Maine in 1983 and Colorado in 1984. The story appeared in a magazine called State Legislatures and an official from Wyoming, reading the magazine, confirmed that his state had ratified the amendment, too, six years earlier.

5G Hype 32 mins – “Doug Dawson, President of CCG Consulting and author of the POTS and PANS blog, was willing to sit down with Christopher for episode 353 of the podcast this week. Christopher interviewed Doug in Austin, Texas, at the 2019 Broadband Communities Summit. They discussed all sorts of happenings in the telecommunications and municipal network space. In addition to 5G and the hype that has surrounded it for the past year, Doug and Christopher make some predictions about where they think the technology will go. They also talk about the involvement of Amazon in the satellite broadband industry and what they think that means for different folks from different walks of life. Other happenings that Doug and Christopher get into include different public-private partnerships that Doug has been watching and some new models that he’s seen this past year. He’s noticed that communities are more willing to work outside the box and that an increasing number of local communities are moving beyond feasibility studies to investment. Doug and Christopher talk a little about Erie County, New York, where the community is developing a middle mile network, and Cortez, Colorado, where the town has attracted several private sector companies because they worked hard to develop the right infrastructure.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon and Robots 39 mins – “In recent years Amazon has quietly become one of the leaders in automation, reshaping its workforce of nearly 600,000 workers, and the way humans work with robots. We fear robots taking over the world, but do we understand just how we as consumers are making that future happen?” At the you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Amazon and Wall Street 39 mins – “When Amazon became a publicly traded company  in 1997, it was losing money. And it wouldn’t turn a profit for years. So how did it convince Wall Street to do something unprecedented: Turn a blind eye to profit? And how did that help Amazon become one of the world’s most valuable companies today — and how did it change the way tech companies grow?” At the link right-click the rectangle with three dots, then select “Save Link As” from the “Download” option.

Amazon Trust Concern 30 mins – “In the final episode of our season on Amazon, NYU professor and “Pivot” podcast co-host Scott Galloway tells Jason Del Rey that Amazon needs to be broken up – and which parts of the company should be spun off first. They discuss Amazon’s ultimate impact on us as consumers, who are the companies left that can really compete with Amazon, and question the idea that we live in an era of innovation. Recorded live on September 9, 2019 at Code Commerce in New York City.” At the you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ash Carter 79 mins – “Former Defense Secretary Ash Carter at a Pentagon press conference on January 10, 2017. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images On the latest episode of Recode Decode with Kara Swisher, Harvard University’s Ash Carter joined Kara onstage for a live conversation about AI ethics, government surveillance, how to regulate Google and Facebook, and more. Carter, who was Secretary of Defense under President Obama from 2015 to 2017, said he’s concerned by the lack of transparency around algorithms that are being developed and marketed for the world, including the government. “If I were a customer in the Defense Department or any company that I am associated with, I’m not going to be a customer for something [for which] you can’t come in and explain to me how the hell this works, because I’m going to turn around and get sued or have to explain in my case to a mother whose child has been killed or something,” Carter said. “I can’t buy black boxes for national defense,” he added. “You can’t buy black boxes for policing. You can’t buy black boxes for picking which people have an opportunity to be employed. This isn’t games or something. These are serious human things.” He also argued that, even as AI becomes more prevalent in all our lives, the military and the defense industry should maintain their “extant guidance”: No AI should be able to take a human life on its own. “I don’t believe that human beings can cede their responsibility because I would certainly feel responsible, and I felt responsible every time we used lethal force,” Carter said. “I certainly felt responsible in the very fullest sense as a human being by it, and everybody in my chain of command did and the president did … But how do you locate human responsibility in an AI system?” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ASMR 47 mins – “’By now, you may have heard of the phenomenon of A.S.M.R., the soothing, static-like sensation that some people feel in response to certain triggers. These “brain tingles” are often said to pulsate on the scalp or back, putting people into a state of calm and pleasure so deep that it is often described as a ‘brain orgasm.’ “You may have even experienced the feeling yourself by accident, while getting a haircut or watching old videos of the PBS star Bob Ross paint. “But whether or not you have any idea what we’re talking about, trust us when we say that these private sensations have turned into a public sensation. “The abbreviation stands for autonomous sensory meridian response, a name that was coined in 2010, as videos intended to stimulate the response started to take off.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aviation Trends 45 mins – “Delta Air Lines CEO Ed Bastian talks with Recode’s Kara Swisher and Jason Del Rey at the 2019 Code Conference.In this episode: How the Boeing 737 Max crashes affect the aviation industry; innovations in airplanes in that Delta would like to see; using facial recognition to replace paper tickets; RFID bag tracking and changing the layout of airports and gates; Delta’s investments in alternative fuels and its impact on climate change; Georgia’s new abortion law and corporate activism; Delta’s controversial anti-union flyers; changing the math for frequent flyers and competing with JetBlue Mint; how the 1980s deregulation of the airline industry compares to tech; and how to create a better culture for employees.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in this blog archive.  

Book Trends 44 mins – “At last week’s BookExpo in New York City, a panel of journalists and industry analysts who cover books and the publishing markets in Europe and North America were featured in Covering Books Around the World. The group reassembled after a similar BookExpo appearance in 2018. Bestseller lists in 2019 may one week feature contemporary hacks – and another week showcase a literary giant out of the 19th century, Where the business stands depends on the latest headlines, noted CCC’s Chris Kenneally. Print is dead, then print has made a comeback. Bookstores are vanishing until they are thriving again. Business models and marketing strategies cycle and recycle; authors flirt with every new social media format; and a review in the New York Times remains the gold standard. A bestselling author in his own day as well as a great editor and the trusted friend of celebrated authors, Oliver Wendell Holmes observed that, “the great thing in this world is not so much where we stand, as in what direction we are moving.” Andrew Albanese, Porter Anderson, Javier Celaya, Fabrice Piault and Dana Beth Weinberg returned to the BookExpo stage with compass in hand and ready to sail the audience safely to the destination ahead.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Brain Tumor Treatment 25 mins – “Denis Raymond has the same aggressive and incurable brain cancer that killed Tragically Hip frontman Gord Downie, but so far he is defying the grim odds of survival. Doctors told him he likely wouldn’t live beyond a year with the invasive tumour. That was in 2013. Now, the Ottawa-born man recently completed his master’s degree, which he put on hold for treatment, and plans to help Indigenous youth in Northwest Territories as a social worker. “I’m taking my life back,” the 32-year-old said.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in this blog archive.

Broadband in Africa 27 mins – “Digital Planet re-visits the technology scene in Kenya, 10 years after the submarine broadband cable was connected. Presenter Gareth Mitchell and regular studio commentator Bill Thompson are in Nairobi to find out what has changed in the last decade and what can be expected in the future. High-speed broadband 10 years on; Tonny Tugee from SEACOM discusses the impact of the submarine communications cable, which was switched on in July 2009. Investment in African tech talent; Amrote Abdella from Microsoft 4 Afrika explains why Microsoft has launched its first Africa Development Centres in Kenya and Nigeria, investing in African tech talent to ensure global relevance. Nekewa Were, Managing Director of iHub is also on the programme. The techspace has helped more than 350 startups and raised $40m in investment since it opened in 2010. Future-proofing Kenya in the technological revolution; technologist Juliana Rotich explains why Kenya must learn from past mistakes in other countries when adopting emerging technologies and is working to ensure that data can benefit all elements of society.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in this blog archive.

Broadband in Virginia 39 mins – “The Central Virginia Electric Cooperative (CVEC) announced in January 2018 that they had solidified plans to deploy fiber across 14 counties for smart grid operations and to bring Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) to the region. The project, dubbed Firefly Fiber Broadband, is underway, and we’ve got President and CEO Gary Wood along with Communications and Member Services Manager Melissa Gay on the podcast this week to discuss the multi-year project. During this interview, we learn about the CVEC service territory, which is a mix of a few denser populated areas and very rural communities where poor Internet access, when it’s available, is a real problem. CVEC members have been dealing with unreliable connections, oversubscription, and outdated technologies for years. Those problems will be eliminated, however, with FTTH from the co-op that many have come to trust. By obtaining grants, working with local communities, and approaching the process in a strategic manner, CVEC plans on bringing gigabit connections to about 37,000 potential subscribers within five years. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Astronaut 27 mins – “ER doctor Dave Williams has seen a lot of success in his life.  In 1992, he was chosen out of 5,000 applicants to be a Canadian astronaut. He has flown into orbit twice aboard the space shuttles Columbia and Endeavour. He’s performed three space walks, totalling over seventeen hours — a Canadian record. He’s been the CEO of a major health organization, overseeing five hospitals.  But Williams says there have been many failures, too. He talked to White Coat, Black Art host Dr. Brian Goldman about rebounding after setbacks, and how success is impossible without failure.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a free copy of the podcast is included this blog archive.    

Çatalhöyük Excavation 4 mins – “…The people of Çatalhöyük made finely polished obsidian mirrors. They had an early cottage textile industry. They created elaborate burial sites. They used portable ladders to enter their uniform mud-brick houses through openings in the roofs. They managed their trash. They had a complex urban organization long before we would’ve expected it. An article in Science Magazine makes a startling suggestion as to where this social cohesion came from. The soil just under the marshes surrounding Çatalhöyük was rich with a chalky marl. It may be mixed into a clay-like mud, which we could call plaster. Plaster made its houses. Wall frescos were painted upon plaster. The people of Çatalhöyük appear to’ve been drawn to the artistic and technical possibilities of a new building material….” At the link right-click Click here for audio of Episode 1699.and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Famine 74 mins – “Historian Frank Dikötter of the University of Hong Kong and author of Mao’s Great Famine talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Dikötter chronicles the strategies Mao and the Chinese leadership implemented to increase grain and steel production in the late 1950s leading to a collapse in agricultural output and the deaths of millions by starvation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Chinese Railway Workers 52 mins – “Historian Gordon Chang joins us to tell the story of Chinese workers on the transcontinental railroad. Some 20,000 of them laid hundreds of miles of track, yet they’ve been left out of the history.Stanford historian Gordon Chang says most Americans know that Chinese laborers worked on the transcontinental railroad, but that’s all they know. Historians themselves haven’t been able to tell us much about the nearly 20,000 Chinese who built the Central Pacific line. So, Chang and his team have scoured the archives to reconstruct the lives, work, and legacy of Chinese railroad workers. He’s coming to Utah, and joins us to tell the story of one of the first big migrant labor forces in America.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Mining in Germany 26 mins – “The beautiful Hambacher Forest is disappearing. Over the past four decades, it has been slowly devoured by a voracious coalmine in the German Rhineland. The forest has become a powerful symbol of climate change resistance. Protesters have been staging a last stand to protect the trees. But they have arrived too late to prevent the demolition of two villages that also stand in the way of the mine’s relentless progress. Manheim has become a ghost village. Most of the 1600 residents have now moved out. Many of the houses have already been pulled down. But a few people still live there against a backdrop of diggers pulling their village apart. Some are sad that the kart track where local boy Michael Schumacher learned to drive is likely to fall victim to the excavators. And many felt threatened last year by the protesters, in hoodies and face masks, when they moved into to occupy empty houses. Yet the protesters seem to have the German government on their side. It recently commissioned a report, which recommended Germany stop burning coal by 2038 in order to meet emissions targets. That’s a problem for RWE, the company that owns the mine and nearby power stations. It’s going to keep digging for as long as it can. Tim Mansel joins the protesters for their monthly gathering on the forest edge; meets the villagers who simply want a quiet life, away from the front line; and asks RWE if it will ever stop mining.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Condoleezza Rice 31 mins – “Dr. Condoleezza Rice reveals herself as the woman behind the Washington power player in an intimate and surprising interview. Dr. Rice shares the lessons of her childhood in racially charged Birmingham, Alabama, and how her parents instilled in her a sense of strength and conviction to succeed. She also reveals her candid thoughts on her years in the Bush administration, and what the events of 9/11 and the war on terror have taught her. Dr. Rice reveals how her background, ideals and vision helped shape her and ultimately gave her a front row seat to witnessing history.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Depression Drug 47 mins – “Postpartum depression can be life-threatening. We look at a new drug just approved by the FDA and other efforts to help new mothers in distress.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diahann Carroll 33 mins – “Golden Globe-winning, and Oscar-, Grammy-, and Emmy-nominated actress Diahann Carroll has many firsts to her name, including the first African-American woman to win a Tony Award for a leading role and the first African American woman to star in her own primetime television sitcom, “Julia.” Diahann opens up about the prejudices she faced, how she helped create the role of Dominique Deveraux in the television soap opera “Dynasty,” and her battle with breast cancer. Diahann also explains how she learned to ignore the people who discouraged her passion for singing and instead began following her own internal compass.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Detoxing 29 mins – “One estimate claims the number of lawyers with digital addiction could be as high as 40%, and lawyers’ need to constantly engage with technology makes it difficult to set boundaries. What can they do to unplug? In this edition of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway talk to Roberta Tepper about digital addiction in the legal profession and her tips for spending less time on mobile devices. Together, they discuss the signs and symptoms of addiction, caution against “text neck”, and talk about ways lawyers can mindfully put their phones down and reduce dependence, step-by-step.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a free copy of the podcast is included this blog archive. .

Disinformation Menace 45 mins – “With the midterm elections around the corner, should internet users be on alert for fake news? As research director at New Knowledge, Renee DiResta investigates the spread of disinformation across social networks. Since the 2016 presidential election, tech companies like hers have taken “meaningful steps,” she says. In her conversation with Kashmir Hill, investigative reporter for Gizmodo Media, DiResta explains how she’s working to stop disinformation from going viral. The “Off Stage Series” goes into the issues that impact all of us. These conversations feature presenters at the Aspen Ideas Festival. Off Stage is part of the Aspen Ideas to Go podcast.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

DNA Origami Kills Cancer 29 mins – “Kids without religion are more altruistic, Election poll mathematics by Ian Woolf, Jasleen Singh designs nanotech devices to kill cancer. The Negative Association between Religiousness and Children’s Altruism across the World; Religious upbringing associated with less altruism, study finds; Study finds that children raised without religion show more empathy and kindness; The mathematics does not lie: why polling got the Australian election wrongAt the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doctor’s Face Time with Patients 68 mins – “Cardiologist and author Eric Topol talks about his book Deep Medicine with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Topol argues that doctors spend too little face-to-face time with patients, and the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning is a chance to emphasize the human side of medicine and to expand the power of human connection in healing. Topol surveys the current landscape of the application of technology to health care showing where its promise has been overstated and where it is having the most impact. The conversation includes a discussion of the placebo effect and the importance of the human touch in medicine.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Down Syndrome in Africa 27 mins – “The Tanzanian mothers forced to hide their children with Down syndrome due to stigma” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Einstein’s Brain 69 mins – “Albert Einstein asked that when he died, his body be cremated and his ashes be scattered in a secret location. He didn’t want his grave, or his body, becoming a shrine to his genius. When he passed away in the early morning hours of April, 18, 1955, his family knew his wishes. There was only one problem: the pathologist who did the autopsy had different plans. In the third episode of “G”, Radiolab’s miniseries on intelligence, we go on one of the strangest scavenger hunts for genius the world has ever seen. We follow Einstein’s stolen brain from that Princeton autopsy table, to a cider box in Wichita, Kansas, to labs all across the country. And eventually, beyond the brain itself entirely. All the while wondering, where exactly is the genius of a man who changed the way we view the world?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ELIZA Program 4 mins – “The program ELIZA was patterned after Rogerian psychotherapy, a form of treatment where the therapist seeks a personal connection with the patient. In part, this is achieved by drawing the patient out and listening. And that proves ideal for a computer. ELIZA makes no effort to actually “understand” the conversation. She doesn’t attempt to gather, categorize, and analyze information. Instead, the program merely captures the patient’s individual words or phrases and responds with relatively generic questions. When the patient says, “We’re always doing things [my boyfriend] wants to do,” ELIZA merely picks up on the word “always” and responds “Really, always?” When ELIZA is stumped, she asks the patient to keep talking: “Tell me more…” Weizenbaum’s program was amazing for a couple of reasons. For one, it actually worked. People who conversed with ELIZA were often convinced they were interacting with a human — even after being told ELIZA was a computer program. Anecdotes abound of human test subjects spending hours with ELIZA and asking to be left alone with her in private. Segments of the medical community hailed the coming of a new era in psychotherapy. Futurist Carl Sagan imagined a world of computerized booths in which “for a few dollars a session, we would be able to talk with an attentive, tested … psychotherapist.” To creator Weizenbaum, the response was stunning. He eventually went on to become a leading critic of artificial intelligence, worried that the purpose of his simple computational exercise was being misinterpreted. His aim wasn’t to show how intelligent computers could be, but to see if a simple program could feign human communication….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 2902,” and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

Encyclopedias 4 mins – “…Encyclopaedias are audacious books. They’re cyclic, in the sense that they try to close the circle of human knowledge. That can’t be done, of course. But it’s in the nature of our species to try to do it anyway. The earliest encyclopaedia we can trace was written by Plato’s nephew Speusippus in the fourth century BC. For two millennia encyclopaedia writers have tried every scheme for ordering knowledge. The familiar alphabetic form, with a cross-referenced index, is fairly recent. Encyclopaedias vary in size. Some are only one volume long. One fifteenth-century Chinese encyclopaedia ran to thirty thousand chapters. The parent of our modern encyclopaedias was Chambers’ Cyclopaedia, published in England in 1728. Chambers introduced the first proper system of cross-referencing. But, even more important, he picked up and developed the new idea that encyclopaedias should go beyond conventional scholastic learning. Chambers was an early soldier in the Industrial Revolution. He boldly emphasized current technology as well as well as the classics….” At the link right-click Click here for audio of Episode 1710.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethics and Genetics 37 mins – “In 2001, the journal Nature published the first sequenced human genome. Hailed by many as the greatest achievement of humankind, the Human Genome Project also caused its fair share of outrage – with many of the objections still being argued over today. But are these fears warranted? And with genetic technologies such as synthetic biology advancing rapidly, are we right to tinker with the book of life? To discuss this and more, Ian Sample is joined by a trio of bioethicists: Princeton University’s Professor Peter Singer, the University of Newcastle’s Professor Jackie Leach Scully, and the University of Oxford’s Professor Julian Savulescu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eugenics 54 mins – “When a law student named Mark Bold came across a Supreme Court decision from the 1920s that allowed for the forced sterilization of people deemed “unfit,” he was shocked to discover that it had never been overturned. His law professors told him the case, Buck v Bell, was nothing to worry about, that the ruling was in a kind of legal limbo and could never be used against people. But he didn’t buy it. In this episode we follow Mark on a journey to one of the darkest consequences of humanity’s attempts to measure the human mind and put people in boxes, following him through history, science fiction and a version of eugenics that’s still very much alive today, and watch as he crusades to restore a dash of moral order to the universe.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

False Memories 30 mins – “For decades now, we’ve known that our memories are not as infallible as we like to think. And with research now showing that researchers are able to plant entirely novel memories that never actually happened – the need for psychological research in the courtroom has never been more pressing. But as we find out, the world of false memory is a murky and uncertain one. Helping Ian Sample clear the way this week is London South Bank University Criminologist and Expert Witness Dr Julia Shaw, and – one of the field’s most prominent pioneers – Professor Elizabeth Loftus, who bravely used much of her expertise during the “Satanic Panic” of the 1980s.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FCC Trends 29 mins – “FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr talks about 5G, internet security, the possible T-Mobile/Sprint merger, robocalls and more.” At the link find the title, FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Frederick Forsyth 88 mins – “At a Guardian Live event in London, the author reveals how privileged access to the world of international spying and espionage provided rich inspiration for his 13 novels including The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Afghan and The Kill List. In conversation with Mark Lawson, Forsyth talks about his early days in the RAF, his battles with the BBC, dodging bullets in Biafra and Guinea-Bissau and being arrested by the Stasi.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Frozen Frontiers 21 mins – “Scientists are looking to Earth’s most extreme environments for clues about what alien lifeforms might look like. The data they gather could help future space explorers to understand the origins of life in the universe.” At the you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Future Consequences 49 mins – “From data collection to gene editing to AI, what we once considered science fiction is now becoming reality. This hour, TED speakers explore the future consequences of our present actions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

George Will 59 mins – “Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist George Will offered his thoughts on American conservatism. He was interviewed by Jonah Goldberg, National Review senior editor.” At the you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

German Political Culture 56 mins – “Our lecture this week is titled “German Political Culture: Changes and New Challenges.”  Our speaker is Karsten Voigt, Senior Associate Fellow and member of the Presidium of the German Council on Foreign Policy.  This lecture was presented by the Boston University Pardee School of Global Studies, and the Center for the Study of Europe.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hayek and Neurology 4 mins – “…Typically when scholars veer this far afield their reputation suffers. Hayek’s case was a bit different in that the work was largely ignored. But not forever. As time cemented Hayek’s economic legacy, scholars found themselves looking more seriously at his entire body of work. And what they found was surprisingly clairvoyant. Hayek put forth theories about the functioning of the brain and the philosophy of mind that hadn’t been explored until recently. History’s now giving him some credit, attaching his name to ongoing work in neuroscience and philosophy. Not bad for an economist….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 2900” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care 55 mins – “Christy Ford Chapin analyzes if we are rationing or over-providing health care by discussing the history of the American Medical Association.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Insurance Discussion 64 mins – “Economist Ed Dolan of the Niskanen Center talks about employer-based health insurance with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Dolan discusses how unusual it is relative to other countries that so many Americans get their health insurance through their employer and the implications of that phenomenon for the structure of the health insurance market. Dolan explores the drawbacks of this structure and makes the case for what he calls Universal Catastrophic Coverage.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Holocaust Survivor 38 mins – “Holocaust survivor, psychologist and author Dr. Edith Eva Eger discusses her international bestselling book, “The Choice: Embrace the Possible.” In a gripping discussion, Dr. Eger shares how her traumatic experiences at the Auschwitz Birkenau concentration camp shaped her life, and talks about her philosophies and her work as a clinical psychologist. At 91, she reminds us what courage looks like in the worst of times. Dr. Eger helps us to understand that our circumstances don’t define what makes us free and that being free is a choice we must make every day. Dr. Eger shares her healing process and explains how serving others in her work as a psychologist helped her to formulate a healthy relationship with her own trauma. She openly shares her grief and resilience in hopes that others begin to embrace what is possible for their own lives.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Hubert Reeves 54 mins – “Hubert Reeves is one of the world’s foremost experts on the Big Bang and the origins of time. He lives in France, where the acclaimed astrophysicist has the status of a rock star. In Quebec, where he was born, he is called their Einstein. And yet he’s largely unknown in the English-speaking world. Not only is he a brilliant cosmologist; he’s also a riveting storyteller and popularizer of science. Not to explain the complex, he says, is undemocratic. Hubert Reeves is now 86, and speaks with producer Mary Lynk at his country home in Burgundy, outdoors and under the stars….In 2001, Reeves won the prestigious Albert Einstein Prize for his earlier work which gave “the first indication of how much ordinary matter exists in the universe”.  The discovery came to him, not in a lab, but on a train in the Alps.  You search something for some time, and all of a sudden an idea comes. And you say: How did I not think of it before! – Hubert Reeves Not only is he a brilliant cosmologist; he’s also a riveting storyteller and popularizer of science. Not to explain the complex, he says, is undemocratic.” At the link you can listen, but not download’ however, a copy is included in this blog archive for Part 1. Part 2 is here.

IBM 360 Computer 4 mins – “1961: I’d just begun teaching at Washington State University. I’d done three engineering degrees and never even seen a computer. Only one student around me had, and he had to master machine language to use it. Washington State was ahead of the game. They already had a computing center. When I arrived, the main frame was an old IBM 709. It still used vacuum tubes, and integrated motherboards were no more than a gleam in a few visionary eyes. But transistors were now reaching the American scene like a tidal wave. Many versions of Sony’s new transistor radio were now on the market, and a few months after I arrived, the University replaced their 709 with IBM’s new transistor version, the 7090. I was slow to learn Fortran programming, but that computing center was a huge agent of change. Its card-fed machine was far slower than even a modest PC. Keyboard communication with computers was hardly known. Dealing with any computer meant subjecting yourself to pain; yet it still drew us like a distant magnet. Meanwhile, IBM engineers were locked in a death struggle over the next generation of computers. The rate of computer evolution was roughly the same then as it is now. But we’re accustomed to that evolution. We expect it. In the 1960s, we all thought we’d fallen into the maelstrom. IBM’s obvious course was to finish its next model, the 8000. But then, a frightening gamble surfaced in the company. Writer James Strothman tells about it. A battle raged between incremental improvement and putting all the eggs in one basket. In the end, the all-eggs strategy won out. IBM set out to create a wholly new machine with qualities unlike any previous one — a strategy that would make every other IBM computer obsolete. They even gave it a discontinuous number. They called it the 360. It was the first business computer with the huge advantage of being compatible with both smaller and larger computers. The IBM 360 finally reached the Palouse wheat fields of Eastern Washington. It cost the university two million dollars in 1966. I began using it and the world opened up. Right away, I solved a differential equation numerically and found myself staring at a Butterfly Effect. It’d be decades before that term entered our vocabulary. These new machines led us into a brave new world.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 1703.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infant Vision 31 mins – “…To celebrate the launch of the Guardian’s First Impressions: a virtual experience of the first year of life this week, Nicola Davis delves into infant vision and asks: what happens to our vision in the first six months of life? What capabilities are we born with? And what can insights into infant colour vision tell us about human cognition? To help explore all this and more, Nicola speaks to leader of the Sussex Baby Lab and professor of visual perception and cognition, Anna Franklin to find out exactly what it is an infant can see. We also hear from the University of York psychologist Professor Alex Wade about the development of acuity and stereoscopic vision. And finally, we hear from the Surrey Baby Lab’s Dr Ally Grandison and Professor Asifa Majid from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, about the categorisation of colour by infants, and what this might tell us about the development of human cognition….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IQ Tests 45 mins – “In the first episode of G, Radiolab’s miniseries on intelligence, we went back to the 1970s to meet a group of Black parents who put the IQ test on trial. The lawsuit, Larry P v Riles, ended with a ban on IQ tests for all Black students in the state of California, a ban that’s still in place today. This week, we meet the families in California dealing with that ban forty years later. Families the ban was designed to protect, but who now say it discriminates against their children. How much have IQ tests changed since the 70s? And can they be used for good? We talk to the people responsible for designing the most widely used modern IQ test, and along the way, we find out that at the very same moment the IQ test was being put on trial in California, on the other side of the country, it was being used to solve one of the biggest public health problems of the 20th century.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

K-T Extinction Event 46 mins – “Using high-powered ballistics experiments, fancy computer algorithms, and good old-fashioned ancient geology, scientists have woven together a theory about the extinction of the dinosaurs that is so precise, so hot, so instantaneous, as to seem unimaginable. Today, we bring you this story, first published on Radiolab in 2013, plus an update: a spot on planet Earth, newly discovered, that – if it holds true – has the potential to tell us about the first three hours after the dinos died. This update was reported by Molly Webster and was produced with help from Audrey Quinn.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Licensing Bottlenecks 75 mins – “Dick Carpenter of the Institute for Justice and author of Bottleneckers talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book–a look at how occupational licensing and other regulations protect existing job holders from competition.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lo Carb Hi Fat Diets 26 mins – Latest version of Canada Food Guide doubles down on whole grains, advises limiting saturated fat. When Dr. Carol Loffelmann wanted to lose her post-baby weight, she did what most of her colleagues suggest: she cut calories, ate a low-fat diet, and ramped up her exercise.  Instead of dropping pounds, she gained them.  “I was getting pretty frustrated,” Loffelmann, a Toronto anesthesiologist, told White Coat, Black Art host Dr. Brian Goldman. A colleague then suggested going ‘paleo’, a diet based on food supposedly eaten by early humans — meat, fish, vegetables and fruit, and excluding dairy, grains and processed food. Lofelmann was skeptical. “I thought, ‘All that saturated fat is going to kill you,'” she said — and, given her Dutch roots, she was not about to give up cheese. But she was curious about the science behind paleo and other similar diets. After reviewing studies, she tried cutting carbohydrates while at a five-day medical conference. So she ate only the ‘middles’ from her sandwiches and switched to salad instead of fries. “My trainer was at my home the next day, and I opened up the door to her and she looked at me and said, ‘What did you do?’ And the only thing I did was drop those carbs.”  It was enough to convince her to stay with a low-carb high fat (LCHF) diet, of which one version is the popular keto diet, championed by celebrities such as Halle Berry and Kourtney Kardashian.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Lo Carb Hi Fat Diets P2 26 mins – “Two doctors in rural Newfoundland are teaching locals what they need to know about switching to a plant based diet. It’s a win-win for their patients who ditch cod and salt beef in favour of tofu and broccoli. Not only are they losing excess pounds, they are also regaining their health.” At the you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Measles in Ukraine 27 mins – “Until recently, health authorities in developed countries appeared to be well on the way to wiping out measles – a highly contagious disease that’s one of the leading causes of vaccine-preventable deaths, particularly in children. But now measles is on the rise again, and Ukraine is worst-hit. More than 100,000 people have caught the disease since 2017, and 15 have died already this year. Parents who could have protected their children often failed to do so – mainly because of a mass mistrust of vaccine, spread partly by doctors, including leading medical specialists. Tim Whewell travels to Ukraine to meet bereaved parents and worried health chiefs – and find out why vaccination rates fell so abruptly in just a few years. It’s a story of lack of confidence in the state, inadequate medical training, government complacency and political manipulation that’s had deadly consequences.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Mexico Boarder 59 mins – “Authors Francisco Cantu, The Line Becomes a River; Greg Grandin, The End of Myth; and Scott Whiteford, The Shadow of the Wall spoke with former Representative Ron Barber (D-AZ) their books on the U.S.-Mexico border.” At the you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Money Defined 51 mins – “Ten autumns ago came two watershed moments in the history of money. In September 2008, the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers triggered a financial meltdown from which the world has yet to fully recover. The following month, someone using the name Satoshi Nakamoto introduced BitCoin, the first cryptocurrency. Before our eyes, the very architecture of money was evolving — potentially changing the world in the process. In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mueller Report Divisions 30 mins – “The latest chapter in the battle over the Mueller report unfolded this week. Attorney General William Barr refused to testify before a Congressional House committee after a contentious hearing in the Senate. A letter from special counsel Robert Mueller indicated his displeasure with Barr’s handling of his team’s conclusions. And House Democrats threaten to hold the Attorney General in contempt of Congress for refusing to hand over the unredacted report. What does the escalating show down between the executive and legislatives branches of government mean? A former U.S. Attorney gives his perspective.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Oil Discovery in Africa 27 mins – “Guyana, a country of just 750,000 people wedged between Venezuela and Suriname on the north-east coast of South America, has never had an oil industry. But a series of recent discoveries in its waters has revealed billions of barrels of oil beneath the ocean, potentially one of the world’s biggest reserves. Next year, the oil is due to start flowing and the impact on business is already being felt. A shoreside oil service industry has popped up; workers who previously struggled to get by are finding stable employment; and cafes and hotels are overflowing with foreign customers. But encounters with the Venezuelan Navy, huge environmental risks, and legal challenges mean this is a business that is far from straightforward.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Online Privacy 58 mins – “People don’t realize just how much they’re being tracked online, says DuckDuckGo CEO Gabe Weinberg — but he’s confident that once they learn how much tech companies like Google and Facebook are quietly slurping up their private data, they will demand a change. “They’re getting purchase history, location history, browsing history, search history,” Weinberg said on the latest episode of Recode Decode with Kara Swisher. “And then when you go to, now, a website that has advertising from one of these networks, there’s a real-time bidding against you, as a person. There’s an auction to sell you an ad based on all this creepy information you didn’t even realize people captured.” DuckDuckGo offers a privacy-minded search engine that has about 1 percent of the search market share in the US (Google’s share is more than 88 percent), as well as a free browser extension for Firefox and Google Chrome that blocks ad networks from tracking you. But rather than waiting for a comprehensive privacy bill to lurch through Congress over many years, he’s proposed a small, simple tweak to US regulations that might help: Make not being tracked by those networks the default, rather than something you have to opt into. “The fact that consumers have already adopted it and it’s in the browser is just an amazing legislative opportunity, just give it teeth,” he said. “It’s actually a better mechanism for privacy laws because once you have this setting and it works, you don’t have to deal with all the popups anymore. You just set it once, and then sites can’t track you.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Research 27 mins – “Pain, as we know, is highly personal. Some can cope with huge amounts, while others reel in agony over a seemingly minor injury. Though you might feel the stab of pain in your stubbed toe or sprained ankle, it is actually processed in the brain. That is where Irene Tracey, Nuffield Professor of Anaesthetic Science at Oxford University, has been focussing her attention. Known as the Queen of Pain, she has spent the past two decades unravelling the complexities of this puzzling sensation. She goes behind the scenes, as it were, of what happens when we feel pain – scanning the brains of her research subjects while subjecting them to a fair amount of burning, prodding and poking. Her work is transforming our understanding, revealing how our emotions influence our experience of pain, how chronic pain develops and even when consciousness is present in the brain.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pesticide Ban 47 mins – “The EPA is pulling a dozen products containing chemicals harmful to honeybees. It’s the end of a long legal battle, but not the end of the threat to bees.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

President Andrew Johnson 59 mins – “University of California, Irvine English Professor Brook Thomas delivered a talk titled, “The Politics of Popular Portrayals of Andrew Johnson’s Impeachment.” Professor Thomas discussed three examples: Thomas Dixon, Jr.’s 1905 novel The Clansman; the 1942 Hollywood film Tennessee Johnson; and the impeachment story as told by Senator John F. Kennedy in his 1957 Pulitzer Prize winning book Profiles in Courage.” At the link you can listen or purchase download, but a free copy of the podcast is included this blog archive.  

Reading Importance 63 mins – “Doug Lemov of Uncommon School and co-author of Reading Reconsidered talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about reading. Lemov makes the case for the educational importance of critical reading of challenging books and texts. Along the way, he gives listeners some ideas of how to read themselves and gives parents some ideas for how to educate their children.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reservation Life 27 mins – “Jacob Rosales, a 20-year-old student at Yale, takes a closer look at some of the varied challenges facing Native American young people today. With alarmingly high rates of alcohol abuse, suicide and unemployment, Jacob delves behind the stats to reveal human stories of both suffering and hope. The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota is a tough place to grow up, being one of the poorest and most underdeveloped places in the US. It is often likened to the developing world. Graduating from university remains nothing more than a dream for the thousands of young people like Rosales, who call it home. Indeed, only one in every 10 Native Americans in the country attain a bachelors degree. Yet Jacob was offered a place at seven of the eight Ivy league universities in the country when he finished high school. Returning home for break, Jacob meets Yvonne ‘Tiny’ DeCory, who comes face to face with the obstacles facing Native youth every day. A suicide epidemic has grabbed the headlines in recent years and Yvonne and her team at the Bear Project have helped many young people turn their lives around. Eighteen year old Sky opens up to Jacob on why he almost took his own life, before seeking Tiny’s help. As the Cheyenne River Youth Project are holding a celebration to honour their young people, Rosales reflects on the importance of his own Lakota culture, and Jeremy Fields from Oklahoma explains why he travels around the continent teaching Native students about historical trauma.” At the you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Robots 60 mins – “Are we on the verge of driverless cars and other forms of autonomous robots and artificial intelligence? David Mindell of MIT and the author of Our Robots, Ourselves talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the robotic revolution. Mindell argues that much of the optimism for autonomous robots ignores decades of experience with semi-autonomous robots in deep-sea operation, space, air, and the military. In all of these areas, the role of human supervision remains at a high level with little full autonomy. Mindell traces some of the history of the human interaction with robots and artificial intelligence and speculates on what the future might hold.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roomba Robot 4 mins – “…Roomba’s shaped like a large Frisbee, standing about three-and-a-half inches tall. Push a button and away it goes. Over lamp cords. Under beds. Roomba’s technology is much better than when first released in 2002. Now it’s able to navigate even the most challenging rooms. Roomba may not reach every nook and cranny, but it rarely gets stuck and it does a surprisingly good job. And, be honest, when was the last time you vacuumed in those hard to reach places? Roomba’s also, well, charming — a tiny David off to tangle with Goliath, armed only with sensors and algorithms. It was developed by iRobot, a company founded by three researchers out of MIT’s Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Roomba’s own intelligence is pretty simple. It doesn’t try to understand the layout of a room, but simply responds in predefined ways when it bumps into something. Sometimes it follows a wall or circles around the leg of a table. Other times it scurries off across the room for no apparent reason. But there’s mathematical method behind the madness. Trying to guess Roomba’s next move can be mesmerizing, and you can’t help but root for it to reach that annoyingly large fuzz ball hiding in the corner. And here’s an accessory you won’t find with most household appliances: an interface that allows you to input your own algorithms. If you don’t like Roomba’s, try your own. It takes a bit of work — you need a computer and the ability to program. But owners who purchase a Roomba are greeted with friendly wrapping encouraging them to give it a try….” At the link right-click Click here for audio of Episode 2919and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Women Phone Tracking 27 mins – “Cell phones used to track runaway Saudi women – Saudi Arabia is hunting down women who flee the country by tracking the IMEI number on their cellphones, according to an article on the website Business Insider. Reporter Bill Bostock is in the studio to explain how he was told by runaway women that the authorities IMEI numbers on mobile phones to try and find the. Sir Dermot Turing – who really did invent the first computer? Alan Turing is often credited as being the father of modern computing after designing the Bombe, an electromechanical machine used to speed up the decoding effort at Bletchley Park in WW2. His nephew, Dermot, in his book “x, y, z; The Real Story of How Enigma Was Broken” tells Digital Planet that his uncle’s efforts were significantly helped by the Polish mathematicians who broke the Enigma code and a little known Englishman, whose work paved the way for the technology of today. Poland’s IT development forging – So is Poland still pushing the boundaries in maths and engineering? Polish Minister of Entrepreneurship and Technology Jadwiga Emilewicz says the country has always shown strength in these areas. With a booming gaming industry – last week saw Keanu Reeves launch a new Polish game in LA – the country has now set its sights on AI. But with a missed target of delivering faster broadband, the road to top tech is not always easy. Can the promises of AI be delivered safely? – Another week and another shiny promotional event to stage the latest technology on the market. Last week it was the turn of the London Tech Summit and reporter Tom Stephens went to see how businesses are developing AI – the main theme of the event – but can the fears about AI be allayed by companies?” At the you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Sewing Machines 4 mins – “…The invention of the sewing machine had to occur after the Industrial Revolution. The production of fabric had suddenly been radically increased. We had more than we ever could’ve sewn. So in 1790 an Englishman named Thomas Saint patented the crude forebear of today’s machines. For the next fifty years, patent after patent chipped away at the problem of making a machine do the complicated things a human hand does when it sews. The strongest all-around patent was one filed by Elias Howe in 1846. It led to a spate of thinly-veiled copies and to a patent war. The major inventors finally had to form a sewing-machine trust that paid Howe a handsome royalty. The industrial giant that emerged from this trust was the Singer Company….” At the link right-click Click here for audio of Episode 1701.and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ta-Nehisi Coates 62 mins – “Ta-Nehisi Coates is the author of The Beautiful Struggle, We Were Eight Years in Power, and Between the World and Me. His new novel is The Water Dancer. Chris Jackson is Coates’s editor, and the publisher and editor-in-chief of One World.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tobacco Control 35 mins – “WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros recently said “Since it came into force 13 years ago, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control remains one of the world’s most powerful tools for promoting public health,”. But is it? That’s what a to studies just published on bmj.com try and investigate – one of which pulls together all the data we have on smoking rates, from 1970 to 2015, and then a quasi-experimental study which tries to model what the effect of the FCTC has had. Steven Hoffman, and Matthieu Poirier from the Global Strategy Lab at York University join us to explain what their research means, and why it’s time to double down on our attempts to reduce smoking.

Trump Employee 62 mins – “George Sorial talked about the book he co-authored, The Read Deal: My Decade Fighting Battles and Winning Wars with Trump, in which he discussed his time as an executive in the Trump organization. He was interviewed by John Avlon, CNN anchor and senior political analyst.” At the you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Trump Second Term Campaign 47 mins – “President Trump launches his reelection bid at a rally in Orlando. We look at his campaign strategy to get four more years in the White House.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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Mining Digest 408 – Sep 13, 2019: African Chickens, Broadband in Colorado, Cannabinoid Sensitivity, Chinese Surveillance App, Climate Crisis, Climate Pioneers, Cryogenic Preservation, Cuba Visit, Dark Matter Impact, Data Storage, Decision Making, Digital Minimalism, Ethical Perils for Lawyers, European Economic Trends, Food Banks, Great Recession, Homeless in San Francisco, Hospitalists Use, Internet Privacy, Jim Acosta and Trump, Ku Klux Klan Investigator, Liberty in America, Middlemen, Monopolies, Music and Emotions, Northwest Territory Pioneers, Obesity Research, Red Scare of the 40’s, Right to Repair Movement, Russian Political Interference, Stanford Archives, Sweatshops, Trade Trends, Tree Top Canopy, Trump and Putin

Exercise your ears: the 50 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 501 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,028) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

African Chickens 63 mins – “Chris Blattman of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about whether it’s better to give poor Africans cash or chickens and the role of experiments in helping us figure out the answer. Along the way he discusses the importance of growth vs. smaller interventions and the state of development economics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Banking Crisis 58 mins – “It’s quite a feat to write the “standard work” about an historical moment while that moment is still occurring, but that’s what the jury of the 2019 Lionel Gelber Prize believe Adam Tooze did with his book, Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World. Adam Tooze is an Anglo-German historian based in New York. That confluence of expertise and geography gives him particular insight into the 2008 financial crash. He argues against the prevailing “national American narrative” of excessive “pride and hubris” around the U.S. subprime mortgage crisis, and the idea that the U.S. crisis slammed into connected economies.  Instead of a broken relationship between the economies of nations, Tooze says that it was a precarious financing situation between banks worldwide, particularly those in America and North Atlantic Europe, that led to the meltdown. The effects of the crisis were felt everywhere: from the loss of peoples’ homes and savings in places like Ireland and the southern U.S., to years of political fallout in Ukraine and Eastern Europe. The fragilities of our financial system aren’t the result of any glitch, Adam Tooze maintains. They’re baked into global capitalism. Some international regulators, such as Indian economist Raghuram Rajan, tried to sound the alarm before 2008 — but to no avail. Even as things appear to stabilize, and economies grow, the 2008 crisis has led to profound changes around the world. Adam Tooze points to the 30 per cent unemployment rate for young people in Spain as an example of the crash’s impact on entire generations.  In the end, these enmeshed global structures seem outside of individual control. But that does not mean people are powerless.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in this blog archive.

Broadband in Colorado 28 mins – “This week, we’re bringing another podcast interview that Christopher conducted while at Mountain Connect in Colorado. David Young, former Fiber Infrastructure and Right-of-Way Manager for the city of Lincoln, Nebraska, sat down to reminisce about the city’s network that began as conduit and has evolved into citywide Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH). David has moved on to Kansas City in Kansas, but he was deeply involved in the advancement of Lincoln’s network that has done so much for competition and better connectivity in Lincoln. In addition to all the direct benefits that the city is enjoying from a gigabit fiber network, there’s a long list of indirect benefits that David and Christopher discuss that affect sectors such as education, economic development, and public safety. Along with sharing the many ways the fiber infrastructure has helped the city and it’s people, David shares words of wisdom for other communities who may be considering similar investments. He offers some technical advice on deployment, important factors for communities working in a state with restrictions, and thoughts on their decision to choose a public-private partnership model.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cannabinoid Sensitivity 18 mins – “Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome is a relatively newly recognised condition – but, according to one study, can account for up to 6% of patients presenting to emergency departments. The causal mechanism is as yet unclear – but currently the only known way to prevent the syndrome is for the patient to stop their cannabis use. Yaniv Chocron, chief resident at Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland talks us through spotting the condition, and what we think might be the mechanism of action.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Chinese Surveillance App 41 mins – “Travellers to China through Kyrgyzstan are being forced to install a surveillance app on their phones. Professor Thorsten Holt is on the programme to explain, with the help of investigative journalists, how he has hacked into and analysed this surveillance app. He says the app compiles a report on your phone contacts, text messages and even your social media accounts, as well as searching for over 73,000 specific files.; Robotic Endoscopy – Endoscopies are medical procedures that involve threading a camera through the body to see inside. Anyone who has had one will know how uncomfortable they can be. But, they are also challenging for the doctor – taking on average 100 to 250 procedures to be able to perform well. Reporter Madeleine Finlay met Dr Joe Norton, who is part of an international team developing an intelligent robotic system that could make it a lot less painful for both the patient and clinician.; Game Designing: Mentoring the Next Generation – Mathew Applegate works with over 300 young people in Suffolk on game design, and has just won the BAFTA Young Game Designers Mentor Award. Having been a hacker and spent time working for the government, Mathew then set up his Creative Computing Club in 2012, which delivers courses on game design, robotics, AI, VR and much more. He spoke to us on why he believes game design is so beneficial for the young people of Suffolk.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change and Trump 41 mins – “The Trump administration has ordered federal agencies to stop publishing worst-case scenario projections of climate change. This week, On the Media examines the administration’s pattern of attacks on climate science. Plus, a look at the dark money behind environmental deregulation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Issues 36 mins – “We revisit the archive as Ian Sample looks at why some people continue to deny anthropogenic global heating, despite the scientific evidence. Could better communication be the key? And what tips can scientists and journalists take from political campaigns?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Crisis 48 mins – “There’s no greater threat to humanity than climate change. What can we do to stop the worst consequences? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can save our planet and whether we can do it in time.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Listen to full show” but not download; however, a copy is includeed in this blog archive.

Climate Pioneers 28 mins– “Since 1973, the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement has been bestowed upon people who have made a significant impact in the fight for a sustainable planet. Last week on Sea Change Radio, we spoke with noted activist climate scientist Michael Mann, who was one of two recipients of this year’s Tyler Prize. This week, we are honored to speak with the other Tyler Prize Laureate, Warren Washington, to learn about the beginnings of his groundbreaking career as an atmospheric scientist. Dr. Washington was the second African American to receive a PhD in meteorology. He’s a former chair of the National Science Board, and currently a senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. After our conversation with Dr. Washington, we chat with this year’s Tyler Prize panel moderator Kelly Sims-Gallagher, a professor at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, about the evolving intersection of global affairs and climate science.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cryogenic Preservation 30 mins – “Last year, around 3,500 organs were transplanted into patients in the UK alone. That said, a large number of organs were also discarded because the moment a donor dies, doctors have only eight or so hours to find a patient on the organ register who is a match and can be almost immediately ready for surgery. One recent estimate suggested that as many as 60% of the hearts and lungs donated for transplantation are discarded each year. But a new technology could be about to change this: whole-organ cryopreservation. This week, Hannah Devlin looks at the past, present, and future of these technologies with University College London’s Professor Barry Fuller. We also hear from Newcastle University bioethicist Dr Simon Woods about some of the ethical issues that arise with any biotechnology, including cryopreservation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuba Visit 62 mins – “Casey Mulligan of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about life in Cuba. Mulligan, who recently returned from a trip to Cuba, discusses the economy, the standard of living and some of the peculiarities of communist control.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dark Matter Impact 31 mins – “Of all the scientific advances of the last century, few are more impressive than the discovery that the matter familiar to us on Earth is quite different from the stuff that makes up most of the universe. A whacking 85% of the universe is made of something astronomers called “dark matter”. Its existence was first proposed only in the 1930s: as Lady Bracknell might have said, to have been unaware of a little of the matter in the universe would be unfortunate, to be ignorant of 85% of it looks like sheer carelessness. Dark matter has proved to be a headache for scientists. Even after decades of careful study, there is still plenty of room for theoretical speculation about how the matter behaves, as Lisa Randall demonstrates. In her book, she sets out a new idea about its behaviour and then uses it to offer an explanation as to why the dinosaurs were wiped out 65m years ago. This might sound outlandish, but Randall’s impressive record as an imaginative scientist entitles her to a fair hearing. She is a theoretical physicist at Harvard University, and has conceived several radical ideas that have become mainstream thinking. Most famously, she co-authored a theory that implies the possible existence of dimensions in addition to the three we are all familiar with, and that these extra dimensions may be observable by means of the Large Hadron Collider at the Cern laboratory. If they were to be detected, she would be a shoo-in for a Nobel prize.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Storage 27 mins – “If data is the new oil, are data centres the new oil rigs? Far into the north of Europe, under half a year of darkness, where the landscape has inspired folklore and legend, are some of the biggest data centres in the world. The frozen mountains and deep fjords under the aurora hide the “dark fibre“ for the modern internet to function in the way we all want it to – instantly and reliably. Ninety percent of the world’s data has been created in the last few years, and as a more internet enabled future, with AI and the internet of things, becomes reality – data more than ever needs a physical home. This requires energy, and by 2020 some estimate around 20% of the world’s energy supply will be used to process data. This can be hugely costly, and damaging for the environment. Norway – which became so rich from oil and gas thinks data mines might be part of a new economic future away from fossil fuels. Abundant renewable energy means it’s cheap to cool the hot whirring servers – the cold landscape itself also lends itself to housing data. We visit a huge data mine in a former mineral mine, next to a deep fjord, and hear how the data is pinged back and forth across the globe. But it’s not as simple as that, as the Sami, the traditional people of the region have found traditional lands in some parts spoiled by huge hydroelectric dams. Modernity and tradition go hand in hand in the far north of Europe, where legends of trolls in mountain caves sit alongside some of the most high tech companies in the world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Decision Making 83 mins – “Psychologist Charlan Nemeth of the University of California, Berkeley and author of In Defense of Troublemakers talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in the book–the power of groupthink, the power of conviction, and the opportunity for an authentic, persistent dissenter to have an impact on a group’s decision. The conversation concludes with a discussion of the challenges of doing careful research in modern times.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Threat 67 mins – “Author and legal scholar Cass Sunstein of Harvard University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his latest book, #Republic. Sunstein argues that the internet has encouraged people to frequent informational echo chambers where their views are reinforced and rarely challenged. In addition, there is a loss of public space where people might have to encounter dissonant ideas or causes they might wish to champion. Sunstein considers this a threat to democracy and discusses a variety of ways the situation might improve.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Minimalism 30 mins – “Georgetown University’s Cal Newport discusses his book, “Digital Minimalism,” in which he questions the value of being digitally connected all the time.” At the link find the title, “Cal Newport, “Digital Minimalism” in the Communicators section, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethical Perils for Lawyers 24 mins – “Of the 46% of judges using social media, 80% are on Facebook and over 30% are on LinkedIn, but activity on social media presents a number of ethical dilemmas for judges, attorneys, jurors, and litigants. In a recent case in Georgia, a judge stepped down after being scrutinized for sending a friend request to a litigant on his upcoming trial calendar and later releasing her on a personal recognizance bond. Similar activities from other judges and attorneys have resulted in violations of both the Code of Professional Conduct and the Code of Judicial Conduct, from unauthorized practice of law across state lines and breaching attorney-client privilege to posting inappropriate comments and sending friend requests to litigants and related attorneys. These ethical perils extend to jurors, who must be reminded of their own limitations in social media use with regard to pending trials. On this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview Judge Herbert B. Dixon, Jr., discussing stories of collateral damage associated with inappropriate social media use and ways legal professionals can avoid ethical missteps. Stay tuned at the end for Judge Dixon’s 4 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Posting on Social Media.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

European Economic Trends 63 mins – “What is the future of the European economy? What are the challenges facing Europe? What are the implications of Brexit for the United Kingdom and the rest of the Europe? Nicholas Crafts of the University of Warwick, Luis Garicano of the London School of Economics, and Luigi Zingales of the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about these questions and more in front of a live audience at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evernote Value 27 mins – “Many people, including lawyers, are using an organizational tool called Evernote and are singing its praises. They are enthusiastic about its capacity to capture all types of information in many formats, to organize information into useful notebooks, and to enable access to that information across multiple platforms. In a time when almost everything is done online, Evernote is a user-friendly web service that can help lawyers stay organized, freeing up time for marketing and taking on new clients.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Banks 63 mins – “If you have 250 million tons of food to give away every year to local food banks how should you do it? Canice Prendergast of the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how he and a team of economists created an artificial currency and a daily auction for the national food bank Feeding America so that local food banks could bid on the types of food that were the most valuable to them. Prendergast explains the results of the new system and the cultural and practical challenges of bringing prices, even artificial ones, to a world accustomed to giving things away.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Great Recession 66 mins – “Was the Financial Crisis of 2008 caused by a crisis in the housing market? Or did the Federal Reserve turn a garden-variety recession into the Great Recession? David Beckworth of Western Kentucky University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the Fed’s response to the recession that began in December of 2007 and worsened in 2008. Beckworth argues that the Fed failed to respond adequately to the drop in nominal GDP by keeping interest rates too high for too long. Beckworth describes what he thinks the Fed should have done and the lessons we should learn going forward to reduce the severity of future downturns.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Healthcare in U.S. 66 mins – “Historian Christy Ford Chapin of University of Maryland Baltimore County and Johns Hopkins and author of Ensuring America’s Health talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about her book–a history of how America’s health care system came to be dominated by insurance companies or government agencies paying doctors per procedure. Chapin explains how this system emerged from efforts by the American Medical Association to stop various reform efforts over the decades. Chapin argues that different models might have emerged that would lead to a more effective health care system.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Historical Perspectives 63 mins – “Chuck Klosterman, author of But What If We’re Wrong, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the possibility that things we hold to be undeniably true may turn out to be totally false in the future. This wide-ranging conversation covers music and literary reputations, fundamentals of science, and issues of self-deception and illusion.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in San Francisco 58 mins – “Podcaster and writer Erica Sandberg talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about homelessness in San Francisco. Sandberg talks about what the city can do about homelessness and her experience with Downtown Streets Team, which gives homeless people in the Bay Area the chance to work in exchange for gift cards that let them buy food and other basics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hospitalists Use 69 mins – “Physician David Meltzer of the University of Chicago talks about the power of the doctor-patient relationship with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Meltzer, who also has a Ph.D. in economics, discusses a controlled experiment he has been running to measure the importance of maintaining the continuity of doctor-patient relationships. Meltzer argues that the increasing use of hospitalists–specialists who take over a patient from the patient’s regular doctor once the patient is hospitalized–has raised costs and hurt patients. The initial results from his study show that patients who stay with their doctors have fewer subsequent hospitalizations and have better mental health. The conversation closes with a discussion of the challenges facing the current medical system to adopt cost-saving or life-improving technology or techniques.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Information Growth 63 mins – “Cesar Hidalgo of MIT and the author of Why Information Grows talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the growth of knowledge and know-how in the modern economy. Hidalgo emphasizes the importance of networks among innovators and creators and the role of trust in sustaining those networks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Privacy 27 mins – “C-SPAN conducts interviews with digital activists and thinkers at the State of Net Conference. This week’s guests, Daniel Weitzner of MIT, and Mary Stone Ross, co-author of the California Privacy Act, discuss digital privacy.” At the link in the Communications section, find the title, “Daniel Weitzner & Mary Stone Ross on privacy” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Growth versus Value 33 mins – ““When I see a title that addresses the value vs. growth issue, you’ve got my attention,” says Paul. “A new article by Dr. Craig L. Israelsen titled, This piece of evidence could derail the growth vs. value debate, opened my eyes to the huge differences similar indices earn over similar periods of time. From his findings, it is easy to see how two investors – theoretically in the same index fund – could have substantially different returns.” For those interested in other research from Dr. Israelsen, check out his website. To review the SPIVA tables and report, click here.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jim Acosta and Trump 39 mins – “Few journalists have been as visible during the Trump administration as CNN’s Jim Acosta. Over the last few years he has become known for his aggressive questioning of the president. While some applaud Acosta’s tenacity, he has also received accusations of grandstanding, and the president, himself, has lashed out, calling Acosta “the enemy of the people.” It is a term President Trump has used to describe the media, in general, at least 30 times on Twitter since taking office. And, now, it is also the title of Jim Acosta’s new book, “Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ku Klux Klan Investigator 58 mins – “Daryl Davis talked about his efforts over the past 30 years to befriend members of the Ku Klux Klan to try to understand their hatred and to convince them that they are wrong. He also spoke at length about his love of and the influence on his life of rock and roll pioneer Chuck Berry, describing the time he played piano with Mr. Berry on the “Late Show with David Letterman.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Liberty in America 64 mins – “What is the state of liberty in America? Is liberty increasing or decreasing? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic about the future? This week EconTalk features David Boaz, P. J. O’Rourke, and George Will discussing these questions and more with EconTalk host Russ Roberts in front of a live audience at the Cato Institute.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Library Day 52 mins – “As National Libraries Day approaches, we salute these temples of learning with the writers Ali Smith, Jackie Kay and Tom Holland, and head across the Channel to find out what’s on the shelves of the library in Calais’ Jungle More than just a stack of books, libraries are cultural powerhouses that fuel intellectual life. We hear about the central part they play in the life of the writer Ali Smith, and how a decommissioned library was the spark for her latest collection of short stories. Next we head for Calais, where Susannah Tresilian found how a volunteer-run library is offering hope to those in the most desperate straits. Back in the studio, Tom Holland explains the intricacies of the Public Lending Right, and we finish with Jackie Kay, who reads from her poem Dear Library.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memory Formats 45 mins – “How can we construct a sense of self from the fragments of life we can recall? We dissect how science and fiction shed light on the mysteries of memoryScience and the humanities are too often poles apart, so two of the UK’s most distinguished institutions decided to do something about it. At a special event hosted at the Royal Society in London, and co-presented by the Royal Society of Literature, travel writer and novelist Colin Thubron took to the stage with neuroscientist Jon Aggleton. They discussed issues of memory, emotion and brain structure raised by Thubron’s latest book, a tale of six tenants and a landlord whose innermost thoughts and values are illuminated by a conflagration in the house where they all live.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Middlemen 72 mins – “Mike Munger of Duke University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the often-vilified middleman–someone who buys cheap, sells dear and does nothing to improve the product. Munger explains the economic function of arbitrage using a classic article about how prices emerged in a POW camp during World War II. Munger then applies the analysis to the financial crisis.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monopolies 28 mins – “Carl Szabo of NetChoice and Gene Kimmelman, president and CEO of Public Knowledge, debated the pros and cons of breaking up big tech firms like Apple, Google, Amazon, and Facebook.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Music and Emotions 30 mins – “In the fourth instalment of Brain waves, Dr Kevin Fong and Nathalie Nahai explore the power that music has to trigger our emotions, and ask if there’s an evolutionary function behind it all. Plus, why do sad songs say so much?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neil deGrasse Tyson 33 mins – “Visiting the Hayden Planetarium as a young boy, Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson immediately fell in love with the world of astronomy. Fast forward a couple of decades, and Neil continues to inspire people from all generations. Through his role as the director at the very planetarium that first sparked his interest, and as an author, presenter, and communicator, Neil’s enthusiasm for the subject he loves is truly unrivalled. This week, he sat down with Nicola Davis to discuss his own journey, the importance of his role models, and the benefits of sceptical thought, both in science and further afield. He also discusses chapters from his new book Welcome to the Universe, including his thoughts on why Pluto is not a planet, and whether intelligent civilisations might exist elsewhere.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Northwest Territory Pioneers 58 mins – “Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David McCullough recounted the pioneers who settled the Northwest Territory. He spoke at the 19th annual National Book Festival in Washington, DC.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Obesity Research 26 mins – “Why do some of us pile on the pounds, while others seem to get away with it? Hannah Devlin speaks to Dr Giles Yeo about some of the latest findings from the field of obesity research – from the role of our genes and how heritable our weight is, to how, as a society, we’ve become overweight and what we can do about it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Primatologist 28 mins – ‘What can we learn from chimps when it comes to politics and power? Ian Sample meets the leading primatologist Prof Frans de Waal of Emory University to discuss good leadership and what we can learn from our closest living relatives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Red Scare of the 40’s 59 mins – “Journalist and author David Maraniss discussed his book A Good American Family: The Red Scare and My Father.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Right to Repair Movement 47 mins – “The companies that build our smartphones, our cars and our appliances don’t want you or your repairman to be able to fix them. And the “right-to-repair” movement is fighting back.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Political Interference 47 mins -”With or without collusion, Russia’s threat to American elections is real and ongoing. We explore vulnerabilities and fixes with top cybersecurity experts.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stanford Archives 64 mins – “What does an x-ray of Hitler’s skull have in common with a jar of Ronald Reagan’s jelly beans? They are both part of the Hoover Institution archives. Eric Wakin, Director of the Library and Archives of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about what it’s like to be an archivist and the importance of archival materials for research, culture, and memory.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sweatshops 76 mins – “If you were a poor person in a poor country, would you prefer steady work in a factory or to be your own boss, buying and selling in the local market? Economist Chris Blattman of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about experimental evidence on how poor people choose in the labor market and the consequences for their income, health, and satisfaction.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trade Trends 74 mins – “David Autor of MIT talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the fundamentals of trade and his research on the impact on workers and communities from trade with China. Autor’s research finds large and persistent effects on manufacturing jobs and communities where those jobs once were. Autor and Roberts discuss whether these results capture the full impact of increased trade with China and what the policy response might be that could help workers hurt by trade.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tree Top Canopy 54 mins – “Trees and forests may just be key to the survival of life on our planet. As a pioneering scientist and explorer of the world’s “eighth continent” — its tree canopy — Dr. Meg Lowman knows that trees can be a lifesaver — both professionally, and personally. As a painfully shy girl in upstate New York, tree houses were Meg’s refuge from hostile primary school classmates, envious of her good marks. Her studies in forest science led to a career as “the Einstein of Trees.” To help others learn, she’s created a system of canopy walkways that draw visitors, and preserve forests, around the world.  Dr. Meg Lowman is the Director of Global Initiatives, Lindsay Chair of Botany and Senior Scientist in Plant Conservation California Academy of Sciences. Paul Kennedy visited this self-described “arbournaut” in Florida’s Myakka River State Park.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Trump and Putin 50 mins – “Journalists Michael Isikoff and David Corn discuss Russia’s long simmering plan to undermine American democracy, and how the U.S. Intelligence Community failed to see the warning signs in 2016.  They delve into a rogue’s gallery of Russia enablers from Paul Manafort to Carter Paige and analyze why the Trump campaign and Russian cyberattackers seemed to be so suspiciously in sync.  They talk about President Donald Trump’s strange infatuation with Vladimir Putin, why President Obama didn’t do more to stop Russian interference before it was too late, and what was Donald Trump up to in that infamous Moscow hotel room in 2013.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Trumpocracy 47 mins – “We’re talking with The Atlantic’s David Frum about his new book about President Trump, called “Trumpocracy: The Corruption of The American Republic.” Frum’s argument: Trump is undermining American institutions.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 407 – Sep 6, 2019: Aging Process, Amateur Radios, Apollo 11 Computer, Artilect Discussion, Asset Allocation and Market Timing, Billy Bob Thornton, Bioarcheology, Bioengineering Challenge, Bolivia’s Mennonites, Car Future, Climate Change Solutions, Community Fiber on Reservations, Court Packing, Culture and Morality, Dark Matter Discussion, DNA and CRISPR Cures, Domestic Abuse, Education Opposition, Income Inequality, IntechOpen, Irish Viewpoint, Life Beginnings, Mankind’s Future, Presidents Going to War, Protein Substitutes, Reproducibility Project, Syrian Refugees, Tech Transfer, Tribalism, Video Games Appeal, Wisdom, Yaba Addiction

Exercise your ears: the 43 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 559 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,028) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Ageing 34 mins – “With advances in medicine, science, and technology allowing humans to live longer than ever, can we finally crack the code of ageing and stop it altogether? On 4th August 1997, Jeanne Louise Calment died in a French nursing home. Born 122 years and 164 days earlier, Jeanne currently holds the record for the greatest fully authenticated age to which any human has ever lived. And with the ever-growing average life expectancy for humans showing no sign of slowing down, how close are we to cracking the code of longevity? Helping Nicola Davis delve into the age-old problem of ageing this week, prominent biomedical gerontologist Dr Aubrey De Grey reveals his unique, seven-step approach to the problem of ageing. We ask Harvard University’s Dr Justin Werfel why programmed death might be a good thing. And we hear how the University of Kent’s Dr Jenny Tullet is using roundworms to reveal clues about the genetics of ageing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Process 56 mins – “Barbara Ehrenreich explores the science behind how the body ages. She is interviewed by New York Times science reporter Natalie Angier.” At the link you can purchase a MP3 download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Amateur Radios 75 mins – “George visits with the Crew at Icom America for a fascinating tour of their new facilities. Up close interviews with different departments. Find out how they do what they do.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apollo 11 Computer 48 mins – “The computer that got us to the moon. The size of a briefcase, there had never been anything like it. Apollo 11 was “the first time software ran on the moon”. This is the story of the world’s first digital portable general purpose computer. The work of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, helped give rise to the digital age. With Kevin Fong.” At the link left-click “Download” then left-click “Lower quality,” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Artilect Discussion 29 mins – “Ian Woolf reports the 2010 Ig Nobel prizes, Ian Woolf concludes his interview with Hugo De Garis about his vision of the impending war between those who would build massively intelligent machines and those who would stop them at all costs, at the Singularity Summit Australia, in Melbourne. Artilect Discussion with Marc West. [artilect A biological intelligence augmented artificially, having super-biological mental capability.]” At the link right-click “MP3 Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asset Allocation and Market Timing 36 mins – “This podcast covers three topics which are the source of many questions. Asset allocation starts with a recent interview from Vanguard titled, “Strategies for constructing globally diversified portfolios.”  In the other two topics, Paul addresses a number of popular alternative investments. He references a recent study on long-term returns for private equity funds (1984-2016) and compares them to the S&P 500, small cap value, commodities and U.S. T-Bills and Government Bonds. Click to read, “ How Do Private Equity Investments Perform Compared to Public Equity?” Based on his 50 years experience, Paul discusses market timing, another way to invest defensively. If interested in how the Leveraged Global Opportunity Fund works, you can read about it on page 21 in the following pdf:  https://www.merriman.com/Disclosures/ADV.pdf At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronaut Selection 29 mins – “Tim Peake is a 43-year-old former army officer and test pilot, who – in 2009 – became the first British citizen to be selected as an astronaut by the European Space Agency (ESA). Tim beat over 8,000 applicants to be selected for one of only six places on ESA’s new astronaut training programme, meaning he’ll be the first Briton to fly into space without a private contract or having taken American citizenship. Ian Sample met up with Tim at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Billy Bob Thornton 34 mins – “Oscar- and Golden Globe-winning actor, director, screenwriter and musician Billy Bob Thornton opens up about his family, relationships and success, and shares his advice on how to keep the artist inside of you alive. Billy Bob explains how he dreams about the movies he wants to write, even if he knows they might fail. He says it’s more important for him to create films that satisfy the artist inside than to generate an impressive weekend box office. Billy Bob also describes the sadness that has never gone away since his younger brother Jimmy died suddenly of a heart condition. Billy Bob says he’s come to accept that he’ll only ever be “50 percent happy.” He also shares his poignant advice for anyone who has lost a loved one.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bioarcheology 30 mins – “In 2014, the United Nations estimated that 54% of the world’s population lives in urban areas, a figure expected to increase to 66% by 2050. But life for Homo sapiens wasn’t always like this. Rewind 200,000 years and our early human ancestors were fully or semi-nomadic hunter-gatherers, often living in small communities. But what happened between then and now? Why did humans choose to move to villages and then cities? And what has this dramatic change in lifestyle done to our health and our relationships with others? This week, Ian Sample is joined in the studio by Brenna Hassett, bioarchaeologist and author of Built on Bones: 15,000 Years of Urban Life and Death, to explore the shift our ancestors took from hunter gatherers to city-dwellers, and the clues they left behind.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bioengineering Challenge 2019 29 mins – “Bioengineering Innovation Outreach Challenge 2019 prize winners by Ian Woolf, Professor Hala Zrieqat talks about the ARC Bioengineering Innovation Centre, Dr Gavinda Singh talks about his research in cancer cures and his mentorship, Team Team from Sydney Girls High School talk about their Epilepsy brainwave monitoring solution, Team Biochis from Mount Carmel Catholic School talk about their nutritional deficiency detecting watch, Team Discovery Channel from Fort St High School talk about implanting an epinephrine dispensor for allergic shock, PhD students Mathilde Longfield and Ben Ferguson talk about mentoring the high school students, Team Exothermics from Sydney Girls High School talks about making scorpion antivenom cheaper and easier to access, Team Tissue Box from Sydney Girls High School talks about her team’s water-proof hearing aid.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Holes 27 mins – “Using a global network of telescopes, scientists have managed to capture an image of a black hole for the first time. Hannah Devlin investigates why it’s more than just a pretty picture” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Prisoners 19 mins – “Blind and visually impaired prisoners in the US state of Maryland have been awarded $1.4 million by the correctional service for discrimination. They successfully claimed they were not given access to information, jobs and courses to give them equality within the prison or during rehabilitation. Eve Hill, representing the group, says some have had to pay for sighted guide assistance, and others to perform sex acts to have information read to them. Tyrell lost his sight through a gunshot wound and says life was lonely and tough for him as a visually impaired prisoner. Benjamin Burrows, from Leigh Day solicitors, says he has represented visually impaired people in a number of cases here in the UK, and the picture is similar.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bolivia’s Mennonites 27 mins – “In 2009, Mennonite women in a far-flung Bolivian colony reported mass rape. Now leaders of this insular, Christian community with its roots in Europe are campaigning to free the convicted men. More than 100 women and children were attacked in the colony of Manitoba, and their courage in telling their stories secured penalties of 25 years for the rapists. But within Mennonite circles, doubts continue to be aired about the imprisonment of the men. They too protest their innocence, claiming their initial confessions in Manitoba were forced under threat of torture. The culture of abuse in the old colonies – physical and sexual – has often been commented on. And it’s partly this that gave the impetus for the foundation of one of Bolivia’s newest Mennonite communities. Hacienda Verde has been hacked out of virgin forest, and is home to 45 families. These are people who were ex-communicated in their old colony homes, often because they would not live by the harsh rules of conservative Mennonites – rules that govern every facet of life, from the clothes and hairstyles that are allowed, to the rejection of any kind of technology.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Car Future 68 mins – “Benedict Evans of Andreessen Horowitz talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about two important trends for the future of personal travel–the increasing number of electric cars and a world of autonomous vehicles. Evans talks about how these two trends are likely to continue and the implications for the economy, urban design, and how we live.” At the link right click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Solutions 69 mins – “Bjorn Lomborg, President of the Copenhagen Consensus Center, talks about the costs and benefits of attacking climate change with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Lomborg argues that we should always be aware of tradeoffs and effectiveness when assessing policies to reduce global warming. He advocates for realistic solutions that consider the potential to improve human life in other ways. He is skeptical of the potential to move away from fossil fuels and argues that geo-engineering and adaptation may be the most effective ways to cope with climate change.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Community Fiber on Reservations 34 mins – “Matt Rantanen, director of technology at the Southern California Tribal Chairmen’s Association and director of the Tribal Digital Village Network, has been working for years to get tribal communities connected to broadband. In his conversation with Christopher, he talks about his experience with creative wireless solutions, the potential of the Educational Broadband Service (EBS) to get folks connected, and shifting attitudes around the importance of broadband. “We’re trying to help solve that rural connectivity problem. America’s got a lot of talented people that live outside the city centers, and they just don’t have access to the resources that they need — and a lot of those people are on reservations. So it’s really important to get those people connected.” Matt’s newest venture, Arcadian InfraCom, is creating new, diverse fiber paths thanks to innovative partnerships with tribal communities. Phase 1 of their plan, scheduled to be completed in 2022, will connect Salt Lake City to Phoenix and Phoenix to Denver, with add/drop locations within the Navajo Nation and throughout Utah, Colorado, and Arizona.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Court Packing 67 mins – “Court packing is becoming a rather unexpected litmus test in the Democratic primary. This is an idea that would not have dared speak its own name in any earlier election that I can think of, and is now resoundingly on the table. And that’s in no small part because, by any construction of constitutional norms or rules, Neil Gorsuch now sits in a seat at the Supreme Court that was actually stolen from Merrick Garland. For years, Democrats that I know tended mostly to just stew about that, but more and more they’re talking about taking some kind of action. Aaron Belkin is a scholar and advocate who designed and implemented much of the public education campaign responsible for helping end the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy in 2011. Then he launched an advocacy group called Pack the Courts this past October. Now Aaron, I want to be clear that you come to this as you came to “don’t ask, don’t tell” and the trans ban—as a political scientist and advocate, not as a constitutional lawyer, right?At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Culture and Morality 67 mins – “Economist and author Arnold Kling talks about the economic impact of culture and morality with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Drawing on a recent essay on the importance of social interactions, Kling explores the role of culture and norms and their broad impact on economic life. At the end of the conversation, Roberts discusses the implications of human sociality for the way economics is taught and the way economists think about public policy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dark Matter Discussion 31 mins – “In 1933, Swiss astronomer Fritz Zwicky published a paper inferring the existence of what he called “dunkle Materie”, or dark matter. It was decades before this theory was taken seriously by the scientific community, but today the idea that the universe is filled with vast quantities of mysterious stuff that we can’t see and have never detected directly is considered mainstream science. But how has the world of science progressed in recent times? And does dark matter represent anything more than a proxy for our misinterpretation of the laws of gravity? To help reveal what we do know about dark matter, Hannah Devlin is joined in the studio by University College London astrophysicist Dr Andrew Pontzen. We also hear from Dr Peter Capak of the Nasa/JPL Spitzer Science Center at the California Institute of Technology, who is part of a consortium hoping to probe the nature of dark matter by mapping 30 billion galaxies in 2019. And finally, from Dr Sarah Malik of Imperial College London, who is a part of a team at the Large Hadron Collider hoping to detect the undetectable.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Transformation 45 mins – “In a recent Copyright Clearance Center webinar, Kiren Shoman, Vice President, Editorial at SAGE Publishing, outlined her vision of the evolutionary nature of digital transformation in academic publishing. Digital transformation isn’t a switch, Shoman observes, but an evolutionary, incremental process – a journey shaped both by strategic goals and customer need and demand. It was precisely customer demand that led SAGE Publishing to develop their SAGE Video series, which is marketed alongside textbooks to support diverse research and learning needs of students and researchers across disciplines, course levels and geographical location. “We have videos that are tutorials.  They’re very simple.  The faculty member is giving a tutorial, and they’re keeping it short and focused.  And there are slides that they have alongside them, but they’re also speaking to the camera as if to the student,” Shoman explains. “And then we have what we call in practice, where we’re going into the field and where the job of that video is to try and enable a student to understand the environment, which is often a big part of a learning objective. “Being able to understand how as video is used [or whether it is] resonating particularly well in some subject areas, reinforces what we should be doing in the future,” she tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. Kiren Shoman is responsible for SAGE London’s pedagogical publishing, covering textbooks, reference and video. As part of SAGE’s leadership, she is actively involved in SAGE’s Diversity and Inclusion agenda.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA and CRISPR Cures 16 mins – “In a story of scientific discovery, chemical biologist David R. Liu shares a breakthrough: his lab’s development of base editors that can rewrite DNA. This crucial step in genome editing takes the promise of CRISPR to the next level: if CRISPR proteins are molecular scissors, programmed to cut specific DNA sequences, then base editors are pencils, capable of directly rewriting one DNA letter into another. Learn more about how these molecular machines work — and their potential to treat or even cure genetic diseases.” At the link left-click “Share” then right- click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Domestic Abuse 36 mins – “Domestic abuse accounts for 15% of all violent crime in the United States. Yet, it is rarely discussed in public. This silence, argues journalist Rachel Louise Snyder, has been a major obstacle in creating effective interventions for both victims and abusers. And the consequences, she says, can be deadly. For decades, researchers estimated that three women a day were killed as a result of domestic violence. New data shows that number has risen to four. Over the last 10 years Snyder has reported on the issue of domestic abuse, interviewing victims, abusers, law enforcement and researchers. She shares what she learned in a new book, “No Visible Bruises: What We Don’t Know about Domestic Violence Can Kill Us.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archhive.

Economics for 21st Century 64 mins – “Economist, blogger, and author Arnold Kling talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the state of economics in the 21st century. Kling argues that economics would be more useful if it took account of intangibles like culture, incorporated the role of financial intermediation in the economy, and modeled some of the the subtleties of the labor market–how wages are set and the role of team production.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Opposition 72 mins – “Bryan Caplan of George Mason University and the author of The Case Against Education talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Caplan argues that very little learning takes place in formal education and that very little of the return to college comes from skills or knowledge that is acquired in the classroom. Schooling, he concludes, as it is currently conducted is mostly a waste of time and money. Caplan bring a great deal of evidence to support his dramatic claim and much of the conversation focuses on the challenge of measuring and observing what students actually learn.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Functional MRI 68 mins – “This month’s episode of Brain Science is an interview with Stanford psychologist Russell A Poldrack, author of The New Mind Readers: What Neuroimaging Can and Cannot Reveal about Our Thoughts. We talk about the principles of how fMRI works and how new methods are overcoming some of the problems from the early days in the field. Because Dr. Poldrack has been in the field since its infancy, he is uniquely placed to give us both an overview of the history and an analysis of its progress. We emphasize several important principles that must be honored in order to get results that are reliable and reproducible.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Income Inequality 69 mins – “Brink Lindsey of the Niskanen Center and Steven Teles of the Niskanen Center and Johns Hopkins University talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about their book, The Captured Economy. Lindsey and Teles argue that inequality has been worsened by special interests who steer policy to benefit themselves. They also argue that the influence of the politically powerful has lowered the overall growth of the American economy.

IntechOpen 19 mins – “IntechOpen, founded in 2004, is a scientific community of authors and editors built by scientists for scientists to provide a collaborative environment for peer-reviewed academic research, according to Dr. Anke Beck who became CEO in August 2018. In its role as an Open Access publisher of books and anthologies, she says, IntechOpen seeks to level the research playing field and promoting an environment that is democratic and inclusive. “We focus on books where we believe there’s a greater space for ideas to flourish, and for collections of ideas to come together,” Beck tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “In a talk in Berlin at Academic Publishing in Europe conference, I referred to open access book publishing as the Cinderella of publishing because it opens that space where scientists can shed light on a given scientific problem in more detail,” she explains. “Book publishing, I think, serves much, much better the scientific discussion than scattered articles in a journal.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet History 26 mins – “Brian McCullough, host of the Internet History Podcast, talked about his book, How the Internet Happened: From Netscape to the iPhone.” At the link you can listen, but have to pay for download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Irish Viewpoint 58 mins – “Caitriona Perry, former Washington Correspondent for RTE, Ireland’s public service broadcaster, talked about her book, In America, which chronicles her encounters with Donald Trump campaign supporters during the 2016 presidential election campaign.” At the link you can listen or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Life Beginnings 39 mins – “The question of how life began here on Earth has been one at the forefront of scientific endeavour for millennia. And whilst huge advances – both theoretically and experimentally – have been able to bring pieces of this mysterious puzzle to light, the quest to understand where we came from, what we’re doing here, and whether life could exist elsewhere in the universe, is as elusive as ever. Joining Nicola Davies in the studio this week to delve into this and more is University College London’s Dr Nick Lane, who favours deep-sea vents as the birthplace of life. We also hear from panspermia advocate Professor Milton Wainwright, who favours more interstellar origins. And finally, we’re joined by chemist Professor Donna Blackmond, who probes a strange phenomenon of nucleic acids in the hope it might reveal clues about how life on earth began.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mankind’s Future 32 mins – “One of our most treasured traits, our ability to plan for the future, is a key factor in the success story of Homo sapiens. And because of this, we are fascinated with what the future might hold. Indeed, we may even be programmed to look forward in this way. That said, when it comes to complex beings, such as humans, predicting what might happen in the months and years ahead becomes an increasingly difficult task. But are there any certainties? And what can we do to try and keep them under our control? These are some of the questions we to put to the Future of Humanity Institute’s Dr Anders Sandberg, child psychologist and AI enthusiast Professor Alison Gopnik and geneticist Professor Robin Lovell-Badge.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memory Operations 78 mins – “This month’s episode of Brain Science features Dr. Donald MacKay, author of Remembering: What 50 Years of Research with Famous Amnesia Patient H.M. Can Teach Us about Memory and How It Works. H.M. may have been the most studied patient in history, but MacKay’s work uncovers some surprising discoveries about the role of the hippocampus in language, as well as important implications for the aging brain.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosaic Browser Creation 41 mins – “A young Marc Andreessen and a team of programmers at the NCSA on the campus of the University of Illinois create and publish the Mosaic browser, thereby creating the world wide web’s first killer app. Mosaic enjoys meteoric, overnight discuss. But the higher ups at the NCSA take the project away from the “kids” who created it. Examining Mosaic as the “trial run” for the product that would eventually be called Netscape Navigator. A young Marc Andreessen and a team of programmers at the NCSA on the campus of the University of Illinois create and publish the Mosaic browser, thereby creating the world wide web’s first killer app. Mosaic enjoys meteoric, overnight discuss. But the higher ups at the NCSA take the project away from the “kids” who created it. Examining Mosaic as the “trial run” for the product that would eventually be called Netscape Navigator.” At the link right-click “Download here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidents Going to War 75 mins – “There is a fascinating and depressing positive correlation between the reputation of an American president and the number of people dying in wars while that president is in office. Political scientist Bruce Bueno de Mesquita of NYU and co-author of The Spoils of War talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how presidents go to war. Bueno de Mesquita argues that the decision of how and when to go to war is made in self-interested ways rather than in consideration of what is best for the nation. The discussion includes a revisionist perspective on the presidencies of George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and others as Bueno de Mesquita tries to make the case that the reputations of these men are over-inflated.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protein Substitutes 31 mins – “Are alternative meats the key to a healthier life and planet? – Science Weekly podcast How do protein substitutes compare with the real deal? Graihagh Jackson investigates by speaking to dietician Priya Tew, the Guardian’s Fiona Harvey and author Isabella Tree. This podcast was amended on 18 May 2019. An earlier version incorrectly claimed that Vitamin B12 is also known as Folate or Folic Acid. Whilst Folate/Folic Acid is also a B Vitamin, it is not Vitamin B12.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reproducibility Project 67 mins – “Brian Nosek of the University of Virginia and the Center for Open Science talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the Reproducibility Project–an effort to reproduce the findings of 100 articles in three top psychology journals. Nosek talks about the findings and the implications for academic publishing and the reliability of published results.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugees P1 52 mins – “The Syrian war has created one of the largest human displacements in history – with millions of people on the move seeking safety. For over five years, British-Lebanese journalist Zahra Mackaoui has been following the stories of a group of Syrians, who have scattered across the world in search of safety. She hears about the challenges they have faced, the choices they have made and how they have managed to survive and on occasion, to thrive.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugees P2 51 mins – “For over five years, British-Lebanese journalist Zahra Mackaoui has been following the stories of a group of Syrians, who have scattered across the world in search of safety. She originally met and interviewed them in the early years of the long-running civil war in Syria. Zahra travels to rural Sweden to meet Doaa Al-Zamel, who survived the sinking of a boat in the Mediterranean by floating on an inflatable ring. Her story has now been optioned for a film by Steven Spielberg. Also in Europe, Fewaz and his family have found refuge near Bremen – and though he is grateful for Germany’s hospitality, he is finding it difficult to integrate. She ends the series with Faysal, who escaped to Turkey before returning to his home city of Kobani in Syria. The war there has finished but danger remains – and he himself was critically wounded.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tech Transfer 30 mins – “Politico reporters Cory Bennett and Bryan Bender discussed their investigation piece “How China Acquires ‘The Crown Jewels’ of U.S. Technology” and congressional efforts to tighten controls through the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS).” At the link you can listen or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Tribalism 31 mins – “In 2014, the United Nations estimated that 54% of the world’s population lives in urban areas, a figure expected to increase to 66% by 2050. But life for Homo sapiens wasn’t always like this. Rewind 200,000 years and our early human ancestors were fully or semi-nomadic hunter-gatherers, often living in small communities. But what happened between then and now? Why did humans choose to move to villages and then cities? And what has this dramatic change in lifestyle done to our health and our relationships with others? This week, Ian Sample is joined in the studio by Brenna Hassett, bioarchaeologist and author of Built on Bones: 15,000 Years of Urban Life and Death, to explore the shift our ancestors took from hunter gatherers to city-dwellers, and the clues they left behind.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Video Games Appeal 74 mins – “Books and Ideas 68 is an interview with psychologist Dr Pete Etchells about his new book Lost in a Good Game: Why we play video games and what they can do for us. We explore both the myths and the science behind video games and consider why the effects of video games are actually quite difficult to study. It seems strange that many people in this field don’t play games themselves. Most of the bad things you have heard about video games do not stand up to the basic standards of good science. Whether or not you enjoy video games yourself this is a fascinating interview.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wisdom 48 mins – “We usually get wiser with age, but that doesn’t mean we have to grow up to wise up. This hour, TED speakers explore what it means to find wisdom at every stage of life.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Listen to full show”; however, a copy is also included in this blog archive.

Yaba Addiction 27 mins- “[Yaba, otherwise known as the madness drug or Nazi speed, is a combination of a number of stimulants. The two main substances that make up the drug are caffeine and methamphetamine, otherwise known as crystal meth. Yaba is a drug in tablet form, and it is most often red in color with the letters WY imprinted on it.] Thousands of Bangladeshi addicts are hooked on Yaba – a mix of methamphetamine and caffeine. It’s a powerful drug that gives big bangs for small bucks. The Yaba epidemic has ripped through the population of Bangladesh, urban and rural, poor, middle-class and rich. This is a drug that’s manufactured in industrial quantities in the jungles of neighbouring Myanmar. As the economy of Bangladesh has boomed, drug lords have worked to create new markets for their product. And the Rohingya crisis – when nearly a million fled Myanmar for Bangladesh – has created further opportunities for the traffickers, as desperate refugees have been employed as drug mules. The Bangladeshi Prime Minister, Sheikh Hasina, declared a ‘war on drugs’ last May. Thousands have been arrested. But critics see a disturbing trend – hundreds of suspected Yaba dealers have been killed by law enforcement.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 406 – Aug 30, 2019: Afghanistan War, AI and Morality, Audacious Project, Audiobooks Increase, Austerity Measures, Authors and Algorithms, Billionaire Contributions, Blockchain Technology, Climate Crisis, Concentration Camp History, Deep Learner, Drug Stories, Empathic World, Europe’s Destiny, Fake News Detection, Fentanyl, Huawei, Immigration Impact, Impeachment, Invention Process, Kidnap Incidents, Medical Reversals, Memory Storage, Music and Technology (P1-9), Napalm Survivor, Nuclear Power, Prison Abolition, Quroa Project, Robin Hood Principle, Sierra Leone President, Sustainable Development Goals, Trump Campaign, Women in Saudi Arabia

Exercise your ears: the 64 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 554 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,028) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Afghanistan War 47 mins – “There’s been blowback following almost every Western engagement with Afghanistan. What are the lessons of history as the U.S. considers pulling troops out this time?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI and Morality 32 mins – “This week, Observer Magazine columnist and neuroscientist Dr Daniel Glaser visits old friend and former colleague John Morton – emeritus professor at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London – to discuss his modelling approach to the human brain. What can it tell us about the developing mind? Could it ever be replicated in silicon? And is true Artificial Intelligence (AI) even possible without crucial stages of development in early life?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alan Bennett 56 mins – “Much loved playwright, diarist, screenwriter, essayist and short-story author, Alan Bennett has beguiled audiences for more than 50 years since he first became an unlikely comedy star in Beyond the Fringe. His latest volume of diaries, Keeping On Keeping On, covers 10 years from 2005-2015 – a decade in which he premiered four shows at the National Theatre, published a bestselling novella and released film adaptations of The History Boys and The Lady in the Van. When Bennett came to the West Yorkshire Playhouse to talk to Charlotte Higgins at a Guardian Live event, he read from Keeping On Keeping On, chronicling the indignities of receiving treatment for cancer. He also discussed how he often takes his inspiration from moments recorded in his diaries, and why Brexit and Boris Johnson have made him bare his political teeth again.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amandla Stenberg 20 mins – “In a live appearance at UCLA’s Royce Hall, actress, social media disrupter and feminist Amandla Stenberg talks about the importance of vulnerability and finding strength in your identity. She shares her journey of becoming comfortable with her authentic self and loving who she was born to be. Amandla—who portrayed Rue in The Hunger Games, Madeline in Everything, Everything and Starr in The Hate U Give—was declared “one of the most incendiary voices of her generation” by Dazed magazine. The Ms. Foundation for Women also named Amandla the Feminist Celebrity of the Year in 2015.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Audacious Project 6 mins – “Island and coastal nations need to protect their waters to keep the oceans healthy. But they often have lots of debt and aren’t able to prioritize ocean conservation over other needs. Mark Tercek and his team at The Nature Conservancy see a way to solve both problems at once: restructuring a nation’s debt in exchange for its government’s commitment to protect coastal areas. Learn more about how “Blue Bonds for Conservation” work — and how you can help unlock billions of dollars for the oceans. This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change. (Voiced by Ladan Wise)” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Audiobooks Increase 19 mins – “What are the chances you’ve listened to an audiobook lately? According to a new survey, about 50-50. The mainstreaming of audiobooks means important new business growth for book publishers. Smartphones, smart speakers and Bluetooth connections in cars are all helping drive the sound sensation for the book business. According to the Infinite Dial survey of consumer use of media and technology, 50 percent of Americans over the age of 12 said they listened to an audiobook in 2018, says Michele Cobb, APA executive director. That’s the highest share since the annual survey began in 1998, she tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. And for the first time, more listening is now taking place in automobiles than in homes. “We have really been in a period of amazing growth and amazing pickup of the format for such a long time that it’s very exciting,” Cobb says. “We spent so long really fighting for our place in publishing, it’s been a nice change that we are being recognized for the amount of growth and the amount of excitement that we are generating.” At the link right-click “Download: and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Austerity Measures 63 mins – “Alberto Alesina of Harvard University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his research on fiscal policy and austerity. Alesina’s research shows that spending cuts to reduce budget deficits are less harmful than tax increases. Alesina discusses the intuition behind this empirical finding and discusses other issues such as Greece’s financial situation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Authors and Algorithms 16 mins – “Agents and publishers want to find authors. Authors want to find readers. And readers, they want to find books. Helping make these discoveries happen is a powerful digital tool that evaluates writing styles and matches a work with books just like it. Inkubate is a data analytics platform expressly designed for authors to reach audiences with pinpoint accurate marketing. Research has shown that readers respond more to writing style than either genre or subject matter. The digital service at Inkubate “reads” a manuscript to find writing characteristics it has in common with other works. On social media platforms, authors then match their books with readers already inclined to like them. “We use very powerful algorithms to look for patterns within a manuscript,” explains Inkubate cofounder Jay Gale. “This allows us to hone on how an individual author uses the underpinnings of the construction of language. We then compare this to the pre-computed ‘fingerprints’ of thousands of manuscripts previously published in the marketplace, and we are able to measure the similarities to find the closest matches.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism and Vasopressin 29 mins – “A randomized placebo-controlled pilot trial shows that intranasal vasopressin improves social deficits in children with autism; A phase 2 clinical trial of a vasopressin V1a receptor antagonist shows improved adaptive behaviors in men with autism spectrum disorder; Can manipulating a ‘social’ hormone’s activity treat autism? A role for central vasopressin in pair bonding in monogamous prairie voles. UN Report: Nature’s Dangerous Decline ‘Unprecedented’; Species Extinction Rates ‘Accelerating’ Landmark UN report calls for ‘transformative change’ as a million species risk extinction ‘Not adequate’: experts rate Australian political response to extinction crisis” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Billionaire Contributions 58 mins – “Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates, and other billionaires have figured out a pretty sweet deal, Anand Giridharadas says: They make gigantic piles of money, and have tricked politicians and the media into giving them an exceptionally loud voice in policy discussions. What’s their secret? Just give away a little bit of that money through philanthropic organizations that they control. “This is a refeudalization,” Giridharadas said. “If you watch Downton Abbey, you understand the idea. There’s a guy in a castle, and then no one else owns land in the show. “[Zuckerberg is] trying to get rid of all the world’s diseases, as if public education wasn’t a hard enough problem,” he added. “We have doctors. We have an entire public health infrastructure. We have the Centers for Disease Control. We have the NIH. But no, Mark is going to get rid of all the diseases, even though his own company is a plague, by any stretch of the imagination.” On the new podcast, Giridharadas characterized the power of Zuckerberg and his peers in policy discussions as the result of a “40-year war on the idea of government.” It’s fine for billionaires to have opinions on things like medicine and education — but, he asked, why should they be treated as sagacious experts when they come from a completely different arena?…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Blindness and Depression 19 mins – William Phillips is a visually impaired cognitive behavioural therapy specialist who works to make CBT accessible to others with sight loss. He lays out how blind people can go about getting mental health support that suits them. There was a huge response to last week’s programme with Ashley Cox’s story about struggling to find a counsellor. We read a selection of your emails. Visually impaired actor Karina Jones stars in the Royal Shakespeare Company’s current productions of As You Like It and Measure For Measure. She describes how they gave one of her characters a white cane, what reasonable adjustments are in place for her at the RSC and why she’s excited that blind people will see themselves represented on stage in the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Technology 19 mins -”Blockchain technology can be defined as an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties in a verifiable and permanent way. In Toronto, an innovation laboratory called Prescient expects to use blockchain so that writers, artists, and other creators can identify, control, and monetize their works. Roanie Levy serves as CEO and president of Access Copyright, a collective that distributes millions of dollars annually in licensing royalties to creator and publisher affiliates across Canada. She also leads Prescient, Access Copyright’s creator-focused innovation lab dedicated to exploring the future of rights management and content monetization through blockchain and other technologies. At Prescient, digital tools are in development to establish a reliable and authoritative connection for works of art and expression with their content creators and audiences. “Our deep understanding and experience in rights management really bring a unique perspective to the developing blockchain economy and what creators and rightsholders need from it. We see the opportunity to change the digital landscape for creators,” Roanie Levy says. “With the internet, creators and publishers were the recipients of the technology. We want to create a world where rightsholders are the architects of the emerging technologies and ensure that they can optimize the monetization of their content when it’s used in a digital space,” she tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Technology 18 mins – “What if the next big thing turned out to be the next everything? It would need to be a technology so powerful yet so pliable that it could find a place in every industry, any activity, and all manner of creativity. Blockchain is “The Next Everything” asserts Stephen P. Williams. His latest book offers an explanation in layman’s terms of how the technology works and even suggests reasons why so many people struggle to understand it. “What I find most exciting is that blockchain is a distributed technology, which is a new way of looking at the world,” Williams tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “We generally respond very well to top-down, hierarchical systems– president, father, mother, teacher, each telling us what to do,” he explains. “Blockchain technology allows for a distributed system where everyone who participates in the system has an equal say in how that system works. This presents huge potential for designing new ways of doing business, of creating, of communicating.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. odcasts |

Book History 22 mins – “What is a book? For centuries, books have existed in a form that has come to be universally recognized. Few of us ever bothered to give the book, either as object or idea, very much thought, any more than we might ask, ‘what is a chair? ‘What is a book? The answer just seems so obvious. Yet poet, scholar, and book artist Amaranth Borsuk has taken up the challenge to offer much more than a simple definition. Her latest book, The Book from MIT Press, is a thoughtful interrogation of the book as object and idea. An Assistant Professor in the School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington Bothell, Amaranth Borsuk concentrates her focus on what she calls ‘textual materiality,’ the surface of the printed page as well as the surface of language. “When we hear the word book, the object that we are all picturing, we imagine it to be universal. It’s a stack of pages that has been bound along one edge and enclosed between covers. We can picture that on our bookshelves, we can picture it on bookstore shelves when we go into physical brick and mortar bookstore. We have this object that has been so much a part of our lives that it seems to be the only thing that could answer to the name of book,” she explains. “But if you look at the history of how information has been distributed in different portable forms, there have been myriad other shapes the book has taken over time,” Borsuk tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “Our weddedness to that one form is a form that arises after about 2000 years of text proliferating in other media. So that book shape, which is known as ‘the codex’ to book artists and scholars of book history, is actually only one of many.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Crisis 62 mins – “Is it too late for us? Scientists have spent decades sounding the alarm on the devastating effects of climate change. And for decades, society decided to do pretty much nothing about it. In fact, over the past 30 years, we’ve done more damage to the climate than in all of human history! Now, there’s a real chance we may have waited too long to avoid widespread tragedy and suffering. In his book “The Uninhabitable Earth”, David Wallace-Wells depicts a catastrophic future far worse than we ever imagined…and far sooner than we thought. It is undoubtedly a brutal truth to face, as you will hear in this episode, but if there’s any hope to avert the worst case scenarios, we have to start now. Wells” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Climate Crisis 63 mins -”Gov. Jay Inslee is running a presidential campaign unlike any other. The Washington governor is basing his run on the fundamental organizing premise that the climate crisis is more important than anything else. It’s a unique strategy that comes at a time when more and more people are recognizing the urgency of the climate crisis. But while climate is moving up on the list of issues voters care about, Gov. Inslee is making the case that it’s not just ‘an issue – it’s ‘the issue’.

Concentration Camp History 59 mins – “There’s been a heated national debate over what to call some of the migrant detention centers along the southern border. Are these facilities deserving of the label “concentration camps”? Andrea Pitzer has a uniquely deep perspective on this, having written a global history of concentration camps titled “One Long Night”. This conversation details the lineage of concentration camps, from the late 1800s in Cuba to the death camps of WWII to their most modern iterations we are witnessing today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Deep Learning 42 mins – “Jal Mehta (@jal_mehta) grew up in Baltimore the son of a school administrator and college professor. Now as an Assistant Professor at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, Mehta is a leading advocate for deeper learning. Mehta observed that his mentor Richard Elmore was always the most knowledgeable person in the room in large part because he spent time in schools every week. Mehta followed suit and visited the best high schools in the country and co-authored a new book about his tours, In Search of Deeper Learning: The Quest to Remake the American High School. In his frequent school visits, Mehta often finds a lack of powerful learning in the core curriculum. He observes that many of the structures of school work against deeper, more powerful engagement in core classes–the blocks are short and rushed, inauthentic and not relevant–and as a result, there is little critical thinking in most classrooms even in schools that come recommended. Mehta often finds the most powerful learning outside the core–in world languages, choir, theatre and extracurriculars. There, he frequently finds aligned, purposeful learning with a clear arch driven by performance feedback. A sociologist by training, Mehta said, “The best part of visiting schools and meeting with students is our opportunity to be anthropological observers.” When Mehta and his co-author Sarah Fine from High Tech High GSE visit a school, they request the opportunity to follow two students, one upper track learner and one lower track learner. (He regrets that those exist but because they do, they want to get the full picture). After polite chit chat and a few classes, Mehta said the tour guides open up about the school and begin to gain a real sense of what’s happening…. About your own search for deeper learning, Mehta urges, “Think of your students as apprentices,” try more whole-game learning. Make room for depth over breadth. And, give up some control.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then click “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Data Use 61 mins – “You might think your tweets on Twitter belong to you. But in 2010, the Library of Congress acquired the entire archive of Twitter. Why would such a majestic library acquire such seemingly ephemeral material? Historian Abby Smith Rumsey, author of When We Are No More, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about this decision of the Library of Congress and the general challenge of how to cope with a world when so much of what we write and read is digital. Subjects discussed include what we can learn from the past, the power of collective memory, what is worth saving, and how we might archive our electronic lives so that we and those who come after us can find what we might be looking for.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Drug Stories 52 mins – “In a new book, science writer Thomas Hager recounts the fascinating backstories of ten drugs that have changed the way we live. Behind the search for new and better medicines there’s always been this hope for an effective drug without any risk.” At the -up menu. link right-click the play buttona nd select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Empathic World 34 mins – “This week, Observer Magazine columnist and neuroscientist Dr Daniel Glaser takes a look at the world of empathy, mirror neurons and Theory of Mind. Meeting King’s College London’s Professor Francesca Happé at the school gates, Daniel explores when and how children develop empathy, whether it can be taught, and how we can create a more empathetic society.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Europe’s Destiny 27 mins – “From a US president who is turning the world upside down – with a relish for dismantling global agreements – the message is clear: it’s America first. But where does that leave old European allies? Few expect the transatlantic relationship to go back to where it was before Trump. Europe, says Angela Merkel, now has to shape its own destiny. James Naughtie explores the uncertain future for America’s friends.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News Detection 34 mins – “This week, Observer Magazine columnist and neuroscientist Dr Daniel Glaser speaks to University College London’s Professor Nilli Lavie about perception. How do we perceive our visual world? Can this be affected by higher cognitive processes? And what can this all tell us about the phenomena of ‘fake news’?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fentanyl Overdoses 52 mins [2 parts] – “More than 10,300 Canadians lost their lives to an apparent opioid-related overdose between January 2016 to September 2018, according to the latest data released by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). A record 3,286 of those deaths occurred in the first nine months of 2018 alone. Fentanyl and fentanyl-related substances were involved in 73 per cent of apparent opioid-related accidental deaths. British Columbia has been the hardest hit, with almost 1,500 suspected drug overdose deaths in 2018. Fentanyl was blamed for almost 90 per cent of those deaths by the province’s chief coroner, and B.C. declared the overdose crisis a public health emergency in 2016. Dorscheid said he began to see a wave of fentanyl-related overdose cases starting about four to five years ago. Patients admitted to the emergency room either took much longer to recover than those who overdosed on other drugs — or didn’t fully recover at all….” At the link two parts can be heard, but not downloaded; however, both parts are included in this blog archive.

Fiber Optics in Minneapolis 33 mins – “We regularly share stories about new fiber optic networks from local communities, cooperatives, and even local independent Internet access companies. Once in a while, we like to get an idea of what practical matters affect deployment and this week, we brought Travis Carter on the show to share his experiences. Travis, CEO of US Internet, has been working within the city of Minneapolis as the company deploys a fiber optic network to serve residents, businesses, and other premises. Travis explains the way the company has changed and describes what it’s been like to go from an ISP that offered fixed wireless to one that also provides fiber optic in a large city. He offers some firsthand knowledge on the permitting process and shares the lessons he city staff have learned in working with a municipal structure. Travis explains how being part of the city’s long term vision for better connectivity has helped cut through some red tape that used to slow down the process. In addition to working with the city to deploy their infrastructure, Travis and his colleagues at US Internet need to achieve a balance of revenue and investment that keeps the company growing and viable. Christopher and Travis discuss some of the types of decisions that all private firms make, including customer service, hiring practices, and taking on debt.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guide Dog Training 19 mins – “Two guide dog trainers from the Liverpool Guide Dogs Centre, Nina Swindells and Jan Johnston, tell presenter Lee Kumutat about Positive Reinforcement Training, which the Guide Dogs for the Blind Association is in the process of introducing across its twenty training schools. Lee also speaks to David Grice, GDBA’s Head of Canine Behaviour and Training, about the rationale for the new methodology. Finally, we hear from visually impaired organist, David Aprahamian Liddle. In 2002, David got the opportunity to play the organ at Notre Dame Cathedral. David tells us about how he made a braille chart to remember the organ’s layout, the rehearsal and how he felt when he had finished his recital” At the link double-click “Download,” select “Lower Quality” then right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Huawei 28 mins – “Huawei’s chief security officer talks about 5G, discusses U.S. efforts to persuade other nations to not use Huawei equipment, and allegations that Huawei will be used to spy on Americans.” At the link find the title, “Andy Purdy, Huawei (28 min. 24 sec. – May 13, 2019),” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Impact 66 mins – “Alberto Alesina of Harvard University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how people in the US and five European countries perceive the population and characteristics of legal immigrants. Reporting on research with Armando Miano and Stefanie Stantcheva, Alesina finds that individuals systematically overestimate the number of immigrants while underestimating their standard of living. His research also finds that support for welfare payments to the poor is related to the perception people have of the size of the immigrant population and their economic status. The conversation concludes with a discussion of why people’s perceptions are so inaccurate and the implications of perception for public policy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment 60 mins – “Got impeachment on the mind? If you do, odds are there are two recent examples of the impeachment process you might be drawing from – Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton. But what do you know about the first ever presidential impeachment? There is no better time to revisit the case of Andrew Johnson, the white supremacist President whose impeachment reveals a wild truth about the history of this country. Brenda Wineapple spent the last six years uncovering the details of an erratic and power hungry President thrust into power after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Hear her tell the story of how Johnson’s dangerous actions during Reconstruction presented an extraordinary moral dilemma for the nation and its leaders.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Invention Process 20 mins – “When you hear the word “invention,” what comes to mind? The lightbulb? Telephone? Maybe the airplane? These were groundbreaking inventions that fundamentally changed the way we live and communicate and travel—so much so that 100 years later, their creators are still household names: Thomas Edison, Alexander Graham Bell, the Wright brothers. But today, there are plenty of young inventors whose names you haven’t heard of—not yet, anyway. These are middle and high school students who have developed solutions to major economic and social challenges, ranging from health care and transportation to agriculture and the environment. This week’s guest on the EdSurge On Air podcast is someone who works with these students every day, helping each of them identify a problem and refine a solution—an invention. Leigh Estabrooks has seen students in New York City invent a tool that will prevent fires from igniting on the city’s subway tracks and students in North Carolina create a system that helps farmers identify disabilities in their livestock. Estabrooks is the invention education officer at the Lemelson-MIT program, which encourages young people to create and invent through two grant initiatives. But she says what’s even better than seeing all the inventions that come through each year is realizing that it’s not just the most gifted students who are getting patents for their work. All students—no matter their GPAs or ZIP codes or learning challenges—can be inventors. She knows, because she’s seen it.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing in Small Cap Value Funds 43 mins – “For many years I’ve sung the praises of small-cap value for all investors. Of course, that would be a relatively small percentage for retirees and a lot for first-time investors. I have used this table of 1-, 15- and 40-year returns for large-cap blend, large-cap value, small-cap blend and small-cap value so investors can easily compare the best and worst of times for these asset classes. Jeff Mattice, one of our readers, took a very interesting approach to comparing these asset classes. In this Table, he uses 8 periods, from 1 to 40 years, to compare a single accomplishment: What percentage of the time was each asset class number one for each period of time? I think most of you are also interested in how investments do in the worst of time.  Jeff did the same analysis but focused on the percentage of time each asset class produced the worst returns. Join me and find out why I think this is the way it will likely be in the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kidnap Incidents 76 mins – “Anja Shortland of King’s College London talks about her book Kidnap with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Kidnapping is relatively common in parts of the world where government authority is weak. Shortland explores this strange, frightening, but surprisingly orderly world. She shows how the interaction between kidnappers, victims, and insurance companies creates a somewhat predictable set of prices for ransom and creates a relatively high chance of the safe return of those who are kidnapped.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lawyer Mental Wellness 36 mins – “Is practicing law bad for your mental health? In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway talk to Len Heath about lawyer mental wellness and why it’s an issue worthy of attention in today’s legal industry. They discuss what both the ABA and Virginia Bar Association are doing to address lawyer wellness and, as the president of the Virginia Bar, what wellness goals Len hopes to achieve while in office.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Library Detective 12 mins – “As a librarian, Marcy Phelps was trained to find, manage and share information. As a detective, she is also after the facts – and on a mission to prevent fraud. A licensed private eye who earned Master of Library and Information Science degree from the University of Denver, Phelps works for asset management firms, commodity pool operators, M&A professionals, and others. While combing through databases and other online data dumps, she helps build a definitive dossier, documenting any litigation, bankruptcies and regulatory actions that could raise unpleasant questions for investors and even uncover unsavory characters. Her detective work isn’t all digital, though. “Most investigations involve online work.  Even with surveillance, you can bet the investigator is doing some sort of online research beforehand.  But there’s a limit to what you can find online, and in investigative work, what’s missing is where your risk is.  You have to be very careful about that,” she explains. “That’s why we also may have to do courthouse record searching, because online is so incomplete, or we may have to do in-person or phone interviews for the human touch, the things you can’t find online,” she tellCCC’s Chris Kenneally. Online investigations are often just the starting point or maybe the first phase of a more complex investigation.” At the link right-click “Download: and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Reversals 64 mins – “Why do so many medical practices that begin with such promise and confidence turn out to be either ineffective at best or harmful at worst? Adam Cifu of the University of Chicago’s School of Medicine and co-author (Vinayak Prasad) of Ending Medical Reversal explores this question with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Cifu shows that medical reversal–the discovery that prescribed medical practices are ineffective or harmful–is distressingly common. He contrasts the different types of evidence that support or discourage various medical practices and discusses the cultural challenges doctors face in turning away from techniques they have used for many years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Memory Storage 34 mins – “This week, Observer Magazine columnist and neuroscientist Dr Daniel Glaser delves into the complex world of episodic memory. With King’s College London neuropsychologist Dr Charlotte Russell as his guide, Daniel explores how and where memories are stored, how reliable these memories are and whether computers – like our brains – show ‘graceful degradation’ of memory.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MRI Explained 48 mins – “This week, Observer Magazine columnist and neuroscientist Dr Daniel Glaser delves into the world of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). How does it work? Where did it come from? And what can it tell us about the intricacies of the human brain? Visiting Dr Martina Callaghan at University College London’s Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, producer Max also finds out first hand what an MRI scan entails.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Music and Technology, Sound Recordings 50 mins – “Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason tells the story of how we first captured sound, giving birth to a global recording industry. While music has advanced in its complexity over the millennia, the means of recording it remained the same: it had to be written down. It took until the back-half of the 19th Century before credible attempts were made to bottle sound for the first time, and in 1877 Thomas Edison produced the Phonograph. Over the next century, major advances were made in recording formats, recording duration, and sound quality, from the Gramophone record to the cassette tape to the compact disc. But as this programme reveals, cost and convenience played a major role in this progress, rather than the quality of technology – sometimes the best inventions didn’t win out.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music and Technology, Electronic Pioneers 51 mins – “For centuries music was made by strumming strings, blowing horns and banging drums – but at the turn of the 20th Century, the harnessing of electricity meant artists and inventors could create all-new tones and timbres. In this programme, Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason tells the story of some of electronic music’s pioneers – from the eerie sound of the Theremin, to German avant-garde experimentation and the automatic music-making machines of Raymond Scott. While electronic music might be deemed to be a thoroughly modern genre, we remember its history goes back over a hundred years. The series is produced in association with the Open University.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Music and Technology, Sound Recording 50 mins – “Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason tells the story of how we first captured sound, giving birth to a global recording industry. While music has advanced in its complexity over the millennia, the means of recording it remained the same: it had to be written down. It took until the back-half of the 19th Century before credible attempts were made to bottle sound for the first time, and in 1877 Thomas Edison produced the Phonograph. Over the next century, major advances were made in recording formats, recording duration, and sound quality, from the Gramophone record to the cassette tape to the compact disc. But as this programme reveals, cost and convenience played a major role in this progress, rather than the quality of technology – sometimes the best inventions didn’t win out. The series is produced in association with the Open University.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Music and Technology, The Future 50 mins – “In this final episode of A History of Music and Technology, Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason discovers how rapid digital innovation is shaping the way we make, listen and interact with music. He reveals how artificial intelligence is taking human input out of musical composition and how virtual reality is reshaping the recording studios of tomorrow.But in an age where everyone can have access to music-making technology, how do you stand out? And has the internet made it too easy to copy what has come before us, rather than create something which is completely brand-new? The series is produced in association with the Open University.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Music and Technology, The Synthesizer 53 mins – “The first synthesizer was so big, it filled an entire room, but during the 1960s inventors built downsized machines which would go on to revolutionise pop music. Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason charts the work of synth pioneers Bob Moog, Don Buchla and Dave Smith in the story of the most influential electronic instrument of all time. We learn how the synth came to sing with multiple voices, and how Japanese giants came to dominate the market – but arguably at a cost to creativity. The series is produced in association with the Open University.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Music Technology, Electric Guitar 50 mins – “Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason tells the story of the electric guitar, revealing how a frying pan, a railroad track and the paradise island of Hawaii all played a role in its evolution. He charts how the desire to get louder fundamentally altered the instrument’s sound – and while it has a reputation for turning men into semi-mythical figures, the programme reveals how women are now playing the lead when it comes to the electric guitar today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Music Technology, Hammond Organ 50 mins – “Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason tells the story of Laurens Hammond and the musical legacy of the instrument which bears his name. The Hammond Organ is arguably the first mass-market electronic instrument and in this episode we head to the heart of the Hammond Organ story: Chicago. One of the most familiar and versatile instruments to emerge in the 20th Century, the Hammond Organ’s reach ranges from the gospel of African-American churches, to jazz and reggae, to the swirling sound of progressive rock.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Music Technology, Samplers and Drum Machines 50 mins – “Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason explores how samplers and drum machines created new musical genres. During the 1980s, samplers and drum machines fuelled a new wave of music from hip hop to house to techno. In this programme we hear from the inventors behind this landmark technology and reveal how it first found traction with millionaire rock stars, rather than hip young DJs, due to its huge expense. We learn how cheaper Japanese products – first deemed a commercial flop – were then re-discovered, re-used and abused by dance floor innovators who created new musical genres which could never have existed without this technology. The series is produced in association with the Open University.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Music Technology, Studio P1 51 mins – “The recording studio has changed dramatically since the advent of sound recording – as has our understanding of the ‘perfect take’.In the first of two programmes about the history of the studio, Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason explores the limitations of the acoustic era, and how the switch to electrical recording ushered in the age of more intimate recording, giving rise to the superstar crooner.We look at the how, after World War 2, a boom in independent recording studios run by army-trained communications engineers helped to drive the birth of rock n roll, and how technology developed during the war made it possible for musicians to start recording music that was physically impossible to play, using techniques pioneered by a man better known for his guitars – Les Paul.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Music Technology, Studio P2 50 mins – “Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason continues the story of the recording studio, exploring how bands such as The Beatles and The Beach Boys brought avant-garde production techniques into the mainstream during the 1960s. The programme also charts the role jazz and dub reggae played in advancing studio production, and how increasingly sophisticated studio technology slowed down the recording process. But the advent of portable tape recorders – and then digital technology – saw the studio begin to shrink in size, while at the same time expanding access to the recording process. With it came a boom in in alternative music which was previously ignored by the major record labels, and bedroom producers making music on home computers kick-started an explosion in electronic dance music. Today, digital studio technology has become so sophisticated that it can help even the shakiest of singers deliver the perfect performance. The series is produced in association with the Open University.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Napalm Survivor 50 mins – “He was known as “the little boy who lost everything”. In 1991, Amar Kanim’s disfigured face was shown on newspaper front pages around the world, an innocent young victim of Saddam Hussein’s brutal regime. His entire family, it was reported, had died in a napalm attack. The British politician Emma Nicholson found him “alone in the world” during a visit to an aid camp. She took him to the UK. He was, the world assumed, an orphan. So who was the woman claiming he is her son?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nigerian Prostitutes 27 mins – “During the Migrant Crisis thousands of Nigerian women were trafficked into Italy for sexual exploitation. In 2016 alone 11,000 made the perilous journey through lawless Libya and then in flimsy boats across the Mediterranean. Naomi Grimley asks what became of them when they got to Europe? Before these women left home, they were made to take part in a juju ceremony which might involve burning pieces of their clothing or public hair. Traffickers use this as a way of controlling their victims by telling them that if they don’t pay back their debts, terrible things will befall them. The psychological effects of these curses are huge, even for those who escape exploitation. Naomi Grimley speaks to some of the Nigerians who arrived in Sicily between 2015 and 2016. She also speaks to a clinical psychiatrist who helps bring them back to emotional stability. She visits a drop-in centre which encourages the women to integrate into everyday life in Palermo. And she hears from a tough-talking female prosecutor on a mission to “save lives.” Some of the stories are uplifting, such as Gloria who learns Italian in a local college. But others – like Pamela – are still on the streets, plying her trade on a country road outside Catania. And for the final part of this programme she heads north to Antwerp – a city with one of the highest proportions of Nigerian prostitutes in Europe. How are the authorities there trying to help these women and, crucially, stop the traffickers?

Nuclear Power 27 mins – “If you had a million dollars what would you do with it? OK, now what if it were $100 billion? Today on Sea Change Radio, we are talking with Amy Harder, environment and climate reporter for Axios, about where some titans of industry are investing their money and the environmental impact it might have. You might be surprised to learn, for example, that Bill Gates has been pouring some of his considerable wealth into the nuclear energy sector. Harder recently interviewed Gates about his estimated half a billion dollar investment into TerraPower. She tells us about that as well as the big bets that companies like Exxon Mobil are making on ethane, a petrochemical by-product that is used to produce plastic.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Abolition 62 mins- “What if we just got rid of prisons? The United States is the epicenter of mass incarceration – but exactly what is it we hope to get out of putting people in prisons? And whatever your answer is to that – is it working? It’s worthwhile to stop and interrogate our intentions about incarceration and whether it enacts justice or instead satisfies some urge to punish. Prison abolitionist Mariame Kaba wants us to explore some truly radical notions that force us to inspect those instincts towards punishment. Hear her dismantle what she calls the current “criminal punishment system” and instead employ the ideology of restorative justice.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Puerto Rico Crisis 56 mins – “Last week the Governor of Puerto Rico resigned after hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets in two weeks of sustained protest. Leaked inappropriate texts between Gov. Ricardo Rosselló and his inner circle provided the spark, but corruption and deeper frustrations on the U.S territory kindled the fury of citizens into mass mobilization. This week journalist Julio Ricardo Varela explains the political history and dynamics of Puerto Rico and what pushed people to take to the streets and demand a change in leadership.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.  

Quora Project 66 mins – “…Quora is a knowledge-sharing platform. And we basically want to connect people who have knowledge with other people who need it. And the product takes the format of questions and answers. So, anyone can come and ask a question, and then we try to show those questions to people who are going to be especially qualified to answer them; and then those people can write answers. And over time we try to build up this big data base of high-quality answers to questions that can be useful to everyone….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race Riots 56 mins – “”This was a war. This was meant to deter a certain group of people and to harm people.” Dhati Kennedy is a local historian and activist, and he’s referring to an anti-black uprising in early July, 1917 in East St. Louis, IL. Members of Kennedy’s family, including his father, survived the violence.  No one knows how many African-Americans died in that uprising, but some believe the number is close to 100. Many more became refugees, their homes and businesses destroyed. The violence in East St. Louis wasn’t the first time this kind of insurrection took place in the U.S. — it also wouldn’t be the last. Between the abolition of slavery in 1865, and the civil rights movement in the 1950s, racist violence erupted in many other cities, including Colfax, LA (1873), Wilmington, NC (1898) and Tulsa, OK (1921). Often referred to as “race riots,” the conflicts amounted to a series of civic coups d’etat. They were, according to historians and community leaders, attempts by angry and embittered white residents to annihilate black political and economic gains and, in some cases, to overthrow elected officials….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Restaurant Operations 64 mins – “Alex Guarnaschelli, Food Channel star and chef at Butter in midtown Manhattan, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about what it’s like to run a restaurant, the challenges of a career in cooking, her favorite dishes, her least favorite dishes, and what she cooked to beat Bobby Flay.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robin Hood Principle 64 mins – “Nobel Laureate in Economics Angus Deaton of Princeton University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the economics of trade and aid. Deaton wonders if economists should re-think the widely-held view that redistribution from rich nations to poor nations makes the world a better place. The conversation focuses on the challenges facing poor Americans including the rising mortality rate for white Americans ages 45-54.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sample Size 68 mins – “Statistician, blogger, and author Andrew Gelman of Columbia University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the challenges facing psychologists and economists when using small samples. On the surface, finding statistically significant results in a small sample would seem to be extremely impressive and would make one even more confident that a larger sample would find even stronger evidence. Yet, larger samples often fail to lead to replication. Gelman discusses how this phenomenon is rooted in the incentives built into human nature and the publication process. The conversation closes with a general discussion of the nature of empirical work in the social sciences.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sierra Leone President 16 mins – “When Julius Maada Bio first seized political power in Sierra Leone in 1996, he did so to improve the lives of its citizens. But he soon realized that for democracy to flourish, its foundation needs to be built on the will of the people. After arranging an election, he voluntarily gave up power and left Africa. Twenty years later, after being democratically elected president of Sierra Leone, he reflects on the slow path to democracy, the importance of education for all and his focus on helping young Sierra Leoneans thrive.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Download audio” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainable Development Goals 10 mins – “In 2015, the United Nations General Assembly set out a collection of Sustainable Development Goals – known as “SDGs” – for reaching by the year 2030, The list begins with “No Poverty” and includes Gender Equality, Clean Water and Sanitation, and Affordable and Clean Energy. As Kolman tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally creation of the global children’s book club even supports the SDG of Quality Education. “You can imagine you’re a young boy in Peru and you can read in Spanish about clean water and sanitation, or you’re a young girl in China and you can read in Chinese about gender equality,” he explains. “Every month we will announce books for the book club around one of the SDGs. We started in April and will finish next year in September, 2020, which is actually the fifth anniversary of the SDGs.” In 2030, the Earth is expected to be home to 8.5 billion inhabitants – a population rise of more than one billion from 2019. According to World Bank figures, more than a billion people have lifted themselves out of extreme poverty over the past 25 years, and the global poverty rate is now lower than it has ever been in recorded history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tariffs and Publishers 12 mins – “As Andrew AlbanesePublishers Weekly senior writer, explains, longtime ALA head Keith Michael Fiels retired nearly two years ago, after the 2017 Annual Conference. Mary Ghikas has led the organization since Fiels’s departure, but after more than two decades working at ALA, Ghikas herself is looking to retire in January 2020. “Ghikas is hoping to leave as her legacy a modernized, revamped organization,” Albanese tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. According to Albanese, ALA officials expect a strong showing of librarians for the conference, and if history is any guide, they have good reason to. The 2007 conference in Washington still holds the ALA attendance record, drawing 28,635 attendees and more than 950 exhibitors. Three years later, the 2010 show in Washington drew nearly 27,000, the third-most-attended ALA conference.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Campaign 58 mins – “On Friday, former Trump adviser Roger Stone was arrested & indicted on charges of making false statements to Special Counsel Robert Mueller, obstruction of justice, and witness tampering. In this 2017 interview, Stone discusses the 2016 election.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Roger Stone,” right-click it, and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban Planning 77 mins – “Urbanist and author Alain Bertaud of NYU talks about his book Order without Design with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Bertaud explores the role of zoning and planning alongside the emergent factors that affect the growth of cities. He emphasizes the importance of cities as places for people to work and looks at how preferences and choices shape cities. Bertaud also reflects upon the differing perspectives of urban planners and economists.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Weather Forecasting 47 mins – “What does it take to predict tomorrow’s weather today? We take a look at the fascinating story behind the history and science of the weather forecast.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Saudi Arabia 47 mins – A Saudi teen who fled her allegedly abusive family is granted asylum in Canada. We’ll look at what’s changing and what’s not for women in Saudi Arabia.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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