Mining Digest 420 – Dec 6, 2019: African Electrification, AI Arms Race, AI in Law, Artificial Meat, Autistic Security Analyst, Billionaires Bite Back, Biohacking Techniques, Bitcoin Politics, CIA Hacking Tools, Computer Security, Crazy Ideas, Cyber Security Summit, Data and Goliath News, Democracy Future, DNA Evidence Reliability, DNA Meets AI, Equifax Data Breech, Foods and Climate Change, Fungi Impact, Immigrants in the US, Internet Health Report, IoT Testimony, Iraq Shuts Down Internet, Lies in 2017, Low Energy Electronics, Martian Chronicles, Metabolites, NSA and CIA Secrets, Parkinson’s Discussion, Poland, Presidential Purchase Question, Productive Conflict, Propaganda Affects, Rabies Control, Resveratrol and Synthetic Biology, Sexual Harassment, Simple Rules, STEM Cells in Teeth, Web Evidence Authentication, Workplace Jerks

Exercise your ears: the 49 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 600 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

African Electrification 13 mins – “Energy poverty, or the lack of access to electricity and other basic energy services, affects nearly two-thirds of Sub-Saharan Africa. As the region’s population continues to increase, so will the need to build a new energy system to grow with it, says Rose M. Mutiso. In a bold talk, she discusses how a balanced mix of solutions like solar, wind farms, geothermal power and modern grids could create a high-energy future for Africa — providing reliable electricity, creating jobs and raising incomes….As the Research Director of the Energy for Growth Hub, Rose M. Mutiso works with a global network of experts finding solutions for energy deficits across Africa and Asia. She is also cofounder of the Mawazo Institute, helping African women to become scholars and thought leaders.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

African Smartphone Company 40 mins – “Africa’s first smartphone factory has officially opened in Rwanda. Also a new super fast robotic tuna; technology help for people with dementia, and Ushahidi visits Hacktoberfest.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Arms Race 21 mins – “In this issue: Data, Surveillance, and the AI Arms Race, and Fake News and Pandemics” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-07.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Defenses 8 mins – “In this issue: Artificial Intelligence and the Attack/Defense Balance, Can Consumers’ Online Data Be Protected?” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-18-03.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI in Law 44 mins – “Lawyers are excited by the potential of new tech tools using AI, but how can they be sure they’re legal and ethical? This lack of clarity has led the ABA to call for a deeper look at these tools and their use in the profession. In this Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek are joined by Ed Walters to discuss the recently passed resolution urging the study of issues surrounding artificial intelligence. They discuss the importance of moving forward with technology in the profession while still ensuring that new tech is held accountable through audits and product transparency. They also review some of the positive and negative things going on in the AI space and give their take on its future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Artificial Meat 60 mins – “Make beef out of plants instead of cows and you can begin to save the planet. That’s what inspired award-winning scientist Patrick Brown to leave his professorship at Stanford University and found Impossible Foods. In conversation with Stanford Professor of the Practice Tina Seelig, Brown describes how his singular passion for impact prompted him to leave academia and become a food-tech entrepreneur.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Austistic Security Analyst 39 mins- Interview with a security analyst who has Asperger’s Syndrome and works with a new startup company dealing with security and operations (Secops) – “...strengthen your secops team by leveraging neurodiversityAt the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Billionaires Bite Back 21 mins – “Are we in a “billionaire moment”? Three are running for president — if you can count Trump. Two progressive candidates are running on ambitious policies that would require hefty taxes on billionaires. And with the threat of those taxes hanging in the balance, several billionaires have recently begun lobbying the American people through the media. Speaking with Bob, former Labor Secretary Robert Reich argues that we’re well into a second gilded age. Much like the economy in the late 1800’s, a small group of monopolists, old money heirs, and Wall Street executives have amassed more money than the bottom 50% of Americans. In lieu of paying more taxes, our richest citizens have rebuffed populist anger by donating to charities and do-good foundations. But, is that a fair trade off? In his new book, Goliath: The 100-Year War Between Monopoly Power and Democracy, Matt Stoller argues that “philanthropy capitalism” and lax antitrust enforcement are doing fatal damage to our society. He and Bob dig into the forgotten history of Microsoft’s antitrust trial, to demonstrate how many of today’s most generous philanthropists have often bullied and manipulated their way to wield power.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biohacking Techniques (87m)- episode 114 outtakes on the road to hacker summer camp At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biotech Companies 49 mins- “Pam Marrone, founder of AgraQuest, relates the challenges and rewards she experienced in building a successful biotechnology company that specializes in ecologically friendly agricultural products.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin Politics 56 mins – “I’m delighted to post another 2017 show, # 261, my May 31, 2017 interview with Prof. David Golumbia of Virginia Commonwealth University, author of The Politics of Bitcoin: Software as Right-Wing Extremism In his book, David examines the connections between cryptocurrencies and the United States’ far right. Specifically, David identifies the underlying theories that animate both cryptocurrency enthusiasm and far right thinking today. While our wider US political context plays an important role in understanding David’s critique, cryptocurrency structure and stated goals stand at the center of David’s focus. I enjoyed discussing this challenging and timely topic with David, and fully expect that his scholarship will help us understand where we are headed as commerce becomes increasingly decentralized.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA Hacking Tools 28 mins – “In this issue: WikiLeaks Releases CIA Hacking Tools; Botnets; Defense Against Doxing; Buzzword Watch: Prosilience; The CIA’s “Development Tradecraft DOs and DON’Ts” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-17-03.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Infections 12 mins – “In this issue: Spectre and Meltdown Attacks Against Microprocessors, Susan Landau’s New Book: “Listening In”, New Book Coming in September: “Click Here to Kill Everybody”, Daniel Miessler on My Writings about IoT Security” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-18-01.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Security 10 mins – “In this issue: Security in a World of Physically Capable Computers” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-18-10.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crazy Ideas 27 mins – “What if you removed failure from your vocabulary? Patricia Ryan Madson, Improv pioneer and retired Stanford University lecturer, sees improvisation – and the art of “yes, and” – as a route to innovation. In this episode of Stanford Innovation Lab, Tina Seelig meets with Patricia to discuss re-framing experiences as experiments and practicing attentiveness.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security Summit 27 mins – “In this issue: Admiral Rogers Speaking at the Joint Service Academy Cyber Security Summit; The Further Democratization of QUANTUM; The Further Democratization of Stingray; Eighth Movie-Plot Threat Contest Semifinalists; Hacking Airplanes; Counting the US Intelligence Community Leakers; “Hinky” in Action” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-15-05.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data and Goliath News 16 mins – “In this issue: More “Data and Goliath” News; The Eighth Movie-Plot Threat Contest; Metal Detectors at Sports Stadiums; Cisco Shipping Equipment to Fake Addresses to Foil NSA Interception; New Zealand’s XKEYSCORE Use ; Australia Outlaws Warrant Canaries” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-15-04.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Future 56 mins – “I’m pleased to post Show # 262, May 31, 2017, my interview with Prof. Al Roberts, Director of the School of Public Policy at University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and author of Four Crises of American Democracy: Representation, Mastery, Discipline, Anticipation. Al is one of the nation’s leading scholars on government secrecy, and his recent work has focused on the broad functional challenges faced by governmental institutions today. In our wide ranging discussion, we examined the state of government today, its capacity to withstand the pressures exerted on it by outside forces, and what we can reasonably expect government to do and not do in response. Obviously pressing and critical issues, I always enjoy my discussions with Al, and hope that you do as well!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Evidence Reliability 18 mins – “How reliable is DNA evidence in 2019? What about DNA that was collected 20 or more years ago? Is it possible for you to leave DNA in a place you’ve never been? We ask those questions as the case against alleged Claremont serial killer Bradley Robert Edwards is before the court, police and the victim’s families hoping to finally get closure on the deaths of Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Meets AI 51 mins – “Midway through a M.D./Ph.D program at UCLA, Alice Zhang made a discovery that she felt could reverberate far beyond the halls of academia. So she shifted directions, leaving her Ph.D program to found Verge Genomics, a biomedical firm that aims to unite genetic research and artificial intelligence in service of drug discovery. She describes how AI can revolutionize the drug discovery process, and reframes risk-taking as a simple series of optimistic next steps. Workplace Jerks.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNC Hacks 26 mins – “In this issue: Attributing the DNC Hacks to Russia , Are We Becoming More Moral Faster Than We’re Becoming More Dangerous? Security Risks of TSA PreCheck, Law Enforcement Access to IoT Data, Class Breaks, A Comment on the Trump Dossier” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-17-01.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equifax Data Breach 7 mins – “In this issue: On the Equifax Data Breach, iPhone Changes to Frustrate the Police” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-17-09.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foods and Climate Change 60 mins – “Make beef out of plants instead of cows and you can begin to save the planet. That’s what inspired award-winning scientist Patrick Brown to leave his professorship at Stanford University and found Impossible Foods. In conversation with Stanford Professor of the Practice Tina Seelig, Brown describes how his singular passion for impact prompted him to leave academia and become a food-tech entrepreneur.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fungi Impact 16 mins – “Resource inequality is one of our greatest challenges, but it’s not unique to humans. Like us, mycorrhizal fungi that live in plant and tree roots strategically trade, steal and withhold resources, displaying remarkable parallels to humans in their capacity to be opportunistic (and sometimes ruthless) — all in the absence of cognition. In a mind-blowing talk, evolutionary biologist Toby Kiers shares what fungi networks and relationships reveal about human economies, and what they can tell us about inequality.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Immigrants in the US 32 mins – “America has long sold itself as “the nation of immigrants.” But when you look at our history — even the halcyon Ellis Island days — that branding has always come with an asterisk. Give us your tired, your poor, your huddled masses… especially if they’ll work for cheap. Our guests on this episode are Hiroshi Motomura of the University of California and Andre Perry of the Brookings Institution.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Internet Cleanliness 15 mins – “Millions of images and videos are uploaded to the internet each day, yet we rarely see shocking and disturbing content in our social media feeds. Who’s keeping the internet “clean” for us? In this eye-opening talk, documentarians Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck take us inside the shadowy world of online content moderators — the people contracted by major platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Google to rid the internet of toxic material. Learn more about the psychological impact of this kind of work — and how “digital cleaning” influences what all of us see and think.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Internet Report 39 mins – “Mozilla launches new approach to the Health of the Internet; multipurpose drones in Malawi; Nam June Paik The Future is Now exhibition at Tate Modern Art Gallery.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IoT Testimony 33 mins – “It’s been estimated that about 8 billion “things” are connected to the Internet, and that the number of connected “things” could exceed 20 billion by the end of 2020. Sharon Nelson and John Simek are joined by Gail Gottehrer to explore the scope of the Internet of Things. It is critical to understand what data these devices collect, the privacy and security issues associated with them, and how IoT data can be, and has been, used as evidence in court. They also discuss recent legislative efforts to regulate the IoT at the state and federal level and the litigation that may result from them.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Iraq Shuts Down Internet 43 mins – “Iraq’s internet is shut down; technologists and designers challenged to be more inclusive; an environmental protest song linked to 800,000 years of CO2 data; a solar-powered car.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lies in 2017 26 mins – “Our friends at PolitiFact have sorted through a year of lies, fibs, exaggerations, fabrications and outright falsehoods to find the worst of the worst. PolitiFact’s Editor Angie Drobnic Holan joins us to reveal the 2017 lie of the year.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Low Energy Electronics 29 mins – “The 2019 Nobel Prizes for Chemistry and Physics by Ian Woolf, Samuel Bladwell explains Future Low Energy Electronic Technologies…” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martian Chronicles P1 and 2 150 mins total – “Martian Chronicles – by Cory Doctorow: They say you can’t smell anything through a launch-hood, but I still smelled the pove in the next seat as the space-attendants strapped us into our acceleration couches and shone lights in our eyes and triple-checked the medical readouts on our wristlets to make sure our hearts wouldn’t explode when the rocket boosted us into orbit for transfer to the Eagle and the long, long trip to Mars. He was skinny, but not normal-skinny, the kind of skinny you get from playing a lot of sports and taking the metabolism pills your parents got for you so you wouldn’t get teased at school. He was kind of pot-bellied with scrawny arms and sunken cheeks and he was brown-brown, like the brown Mom used to slather on after a day at the beach covered in factor-500 sunblock. Only he was the kind of all-over-even brown that you only got by being born brown. He gave me a holy-crap-I’m-going-to-MARS smile and a brave thumbs-up and I couldn’t bring myself to snub him because he looked so damned happy about it. So I gave him the same thumbs up, rotating my wrist in the strap that held it onto the arm-rest so that I didn’t accidentally break my nose with my own hand when we “clawed our way out of the gravity well” (this was a phrase from the briefing seminars that they liked to repeat a lot. It had a lot of macho going for it)….” At the link right-click “Download” to get P1; do the same here for P2.

Metabolites 5 mins – “Many diseases are driven by metabolites — small molecules in your body like fat, glucose and cholesterol — but we don’t know exactly what they are or how they work. Biotech entrepreneur and TED Fellow Leila Pirhaji shares her plan to build an AI-based network to characterize metabolite patterns, better understand how disease develops — and discover more effective treatments.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

NSA and CIA Secrets 24 mins – “In this issue: Who is Publishing NSA and CIA Secrets, and Why? The Quick vs. the Strong: Commentary on Cory Doctorow’s “Walkaway”; Securing Elections; Surveillance and our Insecure Infrastructure” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-17-05.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parkinson’s Discussion P1 27 mins – “BBC newsreader Jane Hill knows all about Parkinson’s. Her father was diagnosed in t1980s and lived with the condition for ten years — her uncle had it, too. She’s spoken about the dreadful experience of watching helplessly as the two men were engulfed by the degenerative disease, losing their independence and the ability to do the things that they once enjoyed. “I remember feeling how cruel Parkinson’s is. The number of people living with Parkinson’s disease is set to double over the next few decades as we all live longer; it is the only long-term neurological condition that is increasing globally. In this series Jane Hill looks at what it means to be given a diagnosis of Parkinson’s and the reality of living with the condition. She and her cousin Steve remember how their fathers adopted a British stiff upper lip at a time when there was little awareness. In contrast she meets highly successful comedy writer Paul Mayhew Archer, whose reaction to his diagnosis was to create a one-man show exploring the lighter side of living with Parkinson’s. Actors Michael J Fox and Alan Alda both discuss the early symptoms of the disease and their diagnosis. Most people are diagnosed in their sixties but Dutch blogger Mariette Robijn talks about accepting a life changing diagnosis in her forties.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poland 54 mins – “With the US deep in questions of impeachment, what lessons can we learn from divided societies abroad? This week, On the Media travels to Poland, where conspiracy, xenophobia and the rise of illiberalism have the country in an existential fight for its future. On the Media producer Leah Feder reports.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Election Hacking 12 mins – “In this issue: My Priorities for the Next Four Years, Hacking and the 2016 Presidential Election, Dumb Security Survey Questions” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-16-12.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Purchase Question 16 mins – “Michael Bloomberg is one of the world’s richest men, and he’s taking a wildly long shot at becoming the next US President. The problem is, he’s very late to the race, and a long way back in the polls. On the other hand, he’s expected to spend more money on his campaign than the other Democratic candidates combined. Today, who exactly is Michael Bloomberg, and is it possible to buy the presidency?” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productive Conflict 7 mins – “Got an idea to make your workplace better? Labor organizer and TED Fellow Jess Kutch can show you how to put it into action. In this quick talk, she explains how “productive conflict” — when people organize to challenge and change their work lives for the better — can be beneficial for employees and employers alike.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Propaganda Affects 31 mins – “In this issue: Information Attacks against Democracies, How Surveillance Inhibits Freedom of Expression. Propaganda and the Weakening of Trust in Government” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-18-12.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rabies Control 16 mins – “Could we anticipate the next big disease outbreak, stopping a virus like Ebola before it ever strikes? In this talk about frontline scientific research, ecologist Daniel Streicker takes us to the Amazon rainforest in Peru where he tracks the movement of vampire bats in order to forecast and prevent rabies outbreaks. By studying these disease patterns, Streicker shows how we could learn to cut off the next pandemic at its source.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Religious Freedom and Discrimination 43 mins – “The clash of two American values — religious freedom and freedom from discrimination –- didn’t seem so huge when a broad coalition of religious and civil rights representatives got together in a room in 1993. While starting from different ends of the political spectrum, this group came together to push for a new law, The Religious Freedom Restoration Act, meant to protect the religious practice of all faiths, no matter how small. RFRA became the law of the land.  But just a few years and a huge cultural shift later, the law was found to be only applicable at the federal level, and the coalition could not find a way to balance religious freedom with the civil rights of LGBT persons and women. That rift continues today as we continue to ask what does it mean to be free to exercise one’s religion? We hear from the people who were in that room in 1993 – and now are living with the consequences of their efforts.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Resveratrol and Synthetic Biology 29 mins – “Nano-capsules for lower weight and longer life by Ian Woolf, Claudia Vickers talks about synthetic biology and the CSIRO future science platform…” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment 30 mins – “Congress is considering changes to the way it handles sexual harassment complaints after its current rules have been called onerous by critics. We take stock of what might change with Patrick Terpstra of the Scripps Washington Bureau, and we speak with the lawmaker who helped shape the system, retired Rep. Chris Shays, who says it’s imperfect but is a vast improvement over what came before.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Simple Rules 23 mins – “Rules get an unfairly bad rap. In this episode, Stanford Engineering Professor Kathleen Eisenhardt, author of Simple Rules: How to Thrive in a Complex World, and Stanford Professor Bob Sutton discuss the virtues of structure and guidelines. As long as your rules are clear and customized to your organization, Eisenhardt says, they won’t get in your way. In fact, the right set of rules—everything from Michael Pollan’s “eat food, not too much, mostly plants” to “no emails on the weekend”—can keep teams focused, productive, and harmonious.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

STEM Cells in Teeth 29 mins – “Baby teeth worth more by Chris Stewart, Baby teeth update by Ian Woolf, Amanda Hamilton spoke with Professor Malcom Simons about his patent of the “junk” DNA that makes up ninety-five percent of our genetic inheritence, The impact of extreme weather on human history by Tim Baynes, Aphasia by Ian Woolf…” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Web Evidence Authentication 30 mins – “The collection of critical web-based evidence could make or break a case, but many lawyers aren’t quite sure how to go about it. Digital DetectivesSharon Nelson and John Simek get expert advice from Brett Burney on best practices for collection and authentication of online evidence. They discuss several real-world examples of major collection mistakes lawyers have made and offer suggestions for tools that can preserve and produce evidence properly.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Workplace Jerks 57 mins – “Even as adults, we still have to deal with bullies, at work and otherwise. Stanford Professor Bob Sutton has devoted his career to studying organizational behavior and dysfunction, and of late, figuring out how we all can avoid or deal with people who demean, disrespect and drain their peers. The professor of management science and engineering draws on academic research and anecdotal evidence included in his new book, “The Asshole Survival Guide: How to Deal with People Who Treat You Like Dirt.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 419 – Nov 29, 2019: Aging Concepts, AI Arms Race and Fake News, Amazon Rain Forest, American Dollar, Battery Storage Research, Body Dysmorphia, Chinese Quantum Lead, Computer Threats, Cybercrime, Death Zone Wildlife, Doris Kearns Goodwin on Leadership, Edward Snowden Challenge, Energy in Great Britain, Energy Use Changes, Environmental DNA, Face Surgeons, Farming Small Scale, Forensic Cyber Thoughts, Influence Operations, Paris Agreement, Plastic Gardens, Podcast History, Political Violence, Risky Decisions, Teaching 3D Aids, Teaching Aids, Terrorism, Throuple Secrets, Transportation Planning, Witness Depositions

Exercise your ears: the 31 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 421 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Aging Concepts 54 mins – “Recently retired ABC newsreader Ian Henderson sets out on a quest to find the secrets of ageing healthily. He discovers that a new understanding of how the trillions of cells in our bodies age could keep us all younger for longer. He meets Australian scientists working at the cutting edge of ageing biology and learns that their research isn’t just about making us live longer, but also about keeping us healthier into old age — improving our ‘healthspan’. They reveal that we can all improve our healthspan by making simple changes to the way we live our lives.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Concepts 58 mins – “In Australia, one in 40 of us born today will live until we are 100, yet many of us will live our later years in poor health. Neuroscientist Dr Sarah McKay uncovers the extraordinary new science about how to keep our brains healthy into old age. By understanding the biological processes at work throughout our bodies and how they drive ageing, we now know the most effective ways to improve our health and wellbeing as we get older.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.  

AI Arms Race and Fake News 21 mins – “In this issue: Data, Surveillance, and the AI Arms Race, Fake News and Pandemics” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-07.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon Rain Forest 29 mins – “Over the past fifty years, around 17% of the Amazon rainforest has been destroyed, according to the World Wildlife Fund, but as this week’s guest on Sea Change Radio explains, with fires and deforestation out of control, the situation could get even worse before we see any significant improvement. We speak to Christian Poirier of Amazon Watch to get a clearer picture of this largely man-made disaster in Brazil. While some steps to control the fires have been made recently by the Brazilian government, rampant deforestation continues unabated. Poirier gives us a closer glimpse into the agribusiness giants that are involved in the devastation, what his organization is doing to help stop it, and tells listeners what they can do to get involved in the struggle. Then, we take a peek into the Sea Change Radio archives and hear Kevin Walker talk about what he calls our grand food bargain.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Dollar 29 mins – “What is the American dollar based on? It was based on the gold standard until 1971 when it transitioned to a floating monetary system. This week’s guest on Sea Change Radio believes US currency now rests unofficially on the price of oil. What will a successful Green New Deal will look like if the underlying currency upon which the US economy rests is based on fossil fuels? We speak to James Quilligan, the Managing Director of Economic Democracy Advocates and longtime policy analyst in the international development space. Quilligan explains the history of the commons and monetary policy, points out some of the shortcomings of capitalism, and lays out how to ensure the survival of democracy. He argues that understanding the complexities of our global economic system is the first step in fixing it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battery Storage Research 14 mins – “Stationary storage takes the stage in the November edition of S&P Global Platts Battery Metals podcast. Senior pricing specialist Emmanuel Latham is joined by Felix Maire, lead analyst on US and European Power Storage markets at Platts Analytics, to discuss the major drivers on this growing industry, the similarities and differences to the electric vehicle market and what lies ahead for this interesting technology.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Body Dysmorphia 54 mins – “Body dysmorphia is an overwhelming obsession with body image and now affects millions of Australians. Yet these mental illnesses often remain hidden, undiagnosed, and even unrecognised by the people who have them. In this programme, investigative reporter Ruby Jones meets men and women who have experienced serious body image issues and she discovers that far from vanity, these disorders are crippling people’s lives.  Ruby also visits scientists at the forefront of research into what causes them and learns of promising new treatments.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.  

Chinese Quantum Lead 67 mins – “Our interview is with Sultan Meghji, CEO of Neocova. We cover the large Chinese investment in quantum technology and what it means for the United States. It’s possible that Chinese physicists are even better than American physicists at extracting funding from their government. Indeed, it looks as though some quantum tech, such as the use of entangled particles to identify eavesdropping, may turn out to have dubious military value. But not all. Sultan thinks the threat of special purpose quantum computing to break encryption poses a real, near-term threat to U.S. financial institutions’ security. In the News Roundup, we cover the new California Consumer Privacy Act regulations, which devote a surprising amount of their 24 pages to fixing problems caused by the Act’s feel-good promise that consumers can access and delete the information companies have on them. Speaking of feel-good laws that are full of liability land mines for companies, the Supreme Court has let stand a Ninth Circuit ruling that allows blind people to sue under the Americans with Disabilities Act if websites don’t accommodate their needs. Nick Weaver and I explore the risks of making law by retroactively imposing liability.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Threats 15 mins – “-clicks issue: First American Financial Corp. Data Records Leak, Fraudulent Academic Papers, Chinese Military Wants to Develop Custom OS, Computers and Video Surveillance. “ At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-06.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cybercrime 82 mins – “In our 283rd episode of The Cyberlaw Podcast, Stewart Baker interviews Alex Joel, the former Chief of the Office of Civil Liberties, Privacy, and Transparency at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and currently scholar-in-residence and adjunct professor at the American University Washington College of Law. Stewart and Alex are joined by Gus Hurwitz (@GusHurwitz), Dave Aitel (@daveaitel), and Dan Podair to discuss: The Ninth Circuit reversed a district court’s decision on a case involving Section 230 and anticompetitive behavior. Business takeaways from the recently announced regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act. The US launched a cyber operation against Iran following the attacks against Saudi oil facilities. Avast was attacked and compromised, but maybe not fatally. APT group Turla appears to have taken over the attack infrastructure of the APT group OilRig. Some of Equifax’s embarrassing security failings were exposed. FireEye issued a report on APT41’s espionage and cybercrime activities. CrowdStrike issued a report on Chinese efforts to steal aircraft intellectual property. The British government dropped its plan to require identification to view online pornography.” At the link right-click “Download the 284th Episode (mp3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death Zone Wildlife 28 mins – “The Iron Curtain was an accidental wildlife haven. 30 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall, Tom Heap walks the borderlands to see how nature has continued to thrive. Before the fall of the wall naturalists in West Germany had noticed that some bird and mammal species favoured life in the deathzone with its lack of human disturbance. When the Soviet bloc crumbled they joined friends and colleagues in the East to declare a Greenbelt through Europe, from Trieste on the Adriatic to Lubeck on the Baltic. Against the odds their campaign has met with great success, creating new migration routes for some of Europe’s biggest mammals whilst keeping developers away from most of the old border between East and West.” At the link left-click “Download” then right-click the type of download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doris Kearns Goodwin on Leadership 29 mins – “What makes a great leader? This week on Sea Change Radio, we are honored to have Pulitzer Prize-winning presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin here to give us her take on that question. Goodwin’s book, Leadership in Turbulent Times, just released in paperback, re-examines four US presidents she has studied in the past: Abe Lincoln, Teddy and Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson. She discusses the contrast between these presidents’ leadership and the behavior of the current grifter-in-chief, puts today’s impeachment proceedings in historical context, and hypothesize about how past presidents might have addressed momentous issues like climate change and election tampering. Then, we dig into the Sea Change Radio archives and listen to Rebecca Vallas, a Vice President at the Center for American Progress, talk about the Trump administration’s absurd claims that poverty and hunger are now things of the past in this country.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Edward Snowden Challenge 66 mins – “In this episode I cross swords with John Samples of the Cato Institute on Silicon Valley’s efforts to disadvantage conservative speech and what to do about it. I accuse him of Panglossian libertarianism; he challenges me to identify any way in which bringing government into the dispute will make things better. I say government is already in it, citing TikTok’s People’s Republic of China-friendly “community standards” and Silicon Valley’s obeisance to European standards on hate speech and terror incitement. Disagreeing on how deep the Valley’s bias runs, we agree to put our money where our mouths are: I bet John $50 that Donald J. Trump will be suspended or banned from Twitter by the end of the year in which he leaves office. There’s a lot of news in the Roundup. David Kris explains the background of the first CLOUD Act agreement that may be signed this year with the UK.” At the link right-click “Download the 284th Episode (mp3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy in Great Britain 28 mins – “Britain urgently needs a zero carbon source of reliable energy for our homes, industry and the new generation of electric vehicles. This summer’s electricity blackouts suggest that we’re a long way from achieving the goal. Tom Heap and a panel of power experts offer their solutions. Tom is joined by Jillian Ambrose, Energy Correspondent of The Guardian, the Chief Executive of the Committee on Climate Change, Chris Stark and CEO of power company Good Energy, Juliet Davenport.” At the link left-click “Download” then right-click the type of download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Use Changes 28 mins – “Orkney’s strong winds and powerful tides have attracted renewable energy pioneers for decades. For much of the year the islands produce more energy than they can use. Turbines are shut down and green energy goes to waste. The UK government has spotted an opportunity, funding the REFLEX project which aims to use that excess energy to develop new ways to power a community. Tom Heap visits Orkney to see how hydrogen storage, huge batteries and electric ferries and cars can be lashed together with clever software to remove fossil fuels from an entire energy system.” At the link left-click “Download” then right-click the type of download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental DNA 28 mins – “From the Loch Ness Monster and mammoths to the Amazon river and uncharted river flies – ‘environmental DNA’ is revolutionising how we tell what species are present in a certain landscape. Traces of skin, mucus or gametes can be left by creatures in their environment and scientists can use samples from the water, air or soil and sequence the DNA found within to test for a specific species or to get a broader picture of what is there. It can help monitor for invasive species and even look back to ancient history. Samples can be taken by non-experts, in remote locations, quicker than some traditional methods and it’s non invasive. Scientists say this can speed up and revolutionise how we chart our living world….which in some cases might flag up the most urgent need to intervene where species are threatened. The technique has been used recently by Prof Neil Gemmell from University of Otago working with experts from the Loch Ness Centre – to search for evidence of what is and isn’t present in the depths but it’s also being used in more applications around the world. Jheni Osman explores why scientists are so excited about this modern technique, how long the traces last and what it might reveal in the future.” At the link left-click “Download” then right-click the type of download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Face Surgeons 59 mins – “With unprecedented access to the Australian Craniofacial Unit in Adelaide and following some of most delicate and specialised craniofacial surgery in the world, this documentary is an intimate look at what lies behind the face and skull, and the surgeons trusted to make it whole again.  We join head of the unit Dr Mark Moore and his multidisciplinary team as they perform life changing surgeries on a 11-month-old baby who needs to have her skull remodelled to make room for her growing brain, a teenager hoping for a final fix for her cleft palate, and a young man whose facial deformity is affecting his ability to see, speak and smell. The programme also looks at the unique role the unit has in managing the ongoing non-surgical treatment of patients with genetic syndromes and their associated symptoms, including pioneering research into drug treatments that could help reduce the need for invasive surgeries.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.  

Farming Small Scale 42 mins – “This episode is mostly listener questions that we answer about our hoop house, construction methods, and gardening inside the hoop house.  We also touch on garden planning and winter beekeeping.” At the link right-click “Direct download: CoopCast_160.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Cyber Thoughts 15 mins – “In this issue: Palantir’s Surveillance Service for Law Enforcement, Zoom Vulnerability, Attorney General William Barr on Encryption Policy, How Privacy Laws Hurt Defendants, Brazilian Cell Phone Hack” At the link “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-08.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Influence Operations 36 mins – “In this issue: Influence Operations Kill Chain, The Myth of Consumer-Grade Security, Massive iPhone Hack Targets Uyghurs, When Biology Becomes Software” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-09.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paris Agreement 29 mins – “For years, climate denialists put forth the narrative that it would cripple the US economy to sign on to international climate agreements like the Kyoto Protocol. They said that other major carbon emitting countries like India and China needed to be on board in order for the US to join. It’s clear now, however, that this narrative was always just a smokescreen. The Trump Administration is pulling the US out of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, which notably does include India and China, and is an historic accord representing more than 87% of global greenhouse gas emitters. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Helen Mountford the Vice President for Climate and Economics at the World Resource Institute. She breaks down what the US withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement means. We look at when this withdrawal would actually go into effect, examine some Trumpian lies about the Agreement itself, and discuss the impact it will have on the US and the planet moving forward.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plastic Gardens 28 mins – “The last decade has seen a huge rise in the number of people opting for artificial turf in their gardens. Meanwhile businesses and corporations are making more use of plastic plants in both indoor and outdoor spaces. What effect does choosing fake over real plants have on the environment? Peter Gibbs investigates.” At the link left-click “Download” then right-click the type of download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcast History 33 mins – “In the latest episode of Books and Ideas (BI 71) I share an adapted version of the talk I gave last week at the first annual She Podcasts Live event, which was held in Atlanta, Georgia Oct 10-13, 2019. My talk is about my podcasting journey with some reflections on how podcasting has changed over the last 13 years. This talk was originally given to aspiring women podcasters but I have adapted for a broader audience. I look forward to sharing a bit of my journey with you. You don’t have to be interested in podcasting to enjoy this episode, but if you think you might want to give it a try some day, this episode is for you.” At the link right-click “Click to play MP3” and select “Save Link As” to download the podcast.

Political Violence 63 mins – “cswdcd16 The Day of the Dove (Politically-related violence in the U.S. heats up as talk of “Civil War” goes mainstream. What would a “Civil War” in the U.S. even look like? Dan has some thoughts on this and ways to potentially avoid such a fate.)At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Risky Decisions 60 mins – “We’ve all heard the phrase ‘no risk, no reward’ – but how do you assess how risky a decision or situation really is? And why are some people more likely to risk everything, while other consistently play it too safe? Lily Serna sets out to answer these questions by understanding some of the maths of chance. But for her this means getting stuck into some nail-biting situations like power sliding a supercar and learning how to trapeze. She investigates how the latest work in psychology and brain science helps explain why some us are risk avoiders and learns from an Australian woman, who’s climbed Everest twice, the surprising truth about what really goes on inside the mind of someone deciding whether to risk it.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Teaching 3D Aids 66 mins – 3D asset links for teachers. At the link you can access links to aids, but not the podcast; however, the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Teaching Aids 43 mins – “We decided to need to … instead of get off the pot. So here we are! Hopefully we still have a few listeners… Mom? Dad? Anyone?” Maker Space and other teacher link aids. At the link you can access links to aids, but not the podcast; however, the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Terrorism  46 mins  – “The Day of the Dove (Politically-related violence in the U.S. heats up as talk of “Civil War” goes mainstream. What would a “Civil War” in the U.S. even look like? Dan has some thoughts on this and ways to potentially avoid such a fate.)” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Throuple Secrets 46 mins – “You knew we’d go there. I talk about Congresswoman Katie Hill’s “throuple” pics and whether the rush to portray her as a victim of revenge porn raises questions about revenge porn laws themselves. Paul Rosenzweig, emboldened by twin tweets – from President Trump calling Never-Trumpers like him “human scum” and from Mark Hamill welcoming him to the Rebel Scum Alliance – takes issue with me. In a more serious vein, Brian Egan, Paul, and I dig deep into the roots of the battle over how to keep “emerging technology” out of Chinese hands. Paul explains a Georgia Supreme Court ruling that cops need a warrant to access automobile data after an accident.” At the link right-click “Download the 284th Episode (mp3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transportation Planning 29 mins – “Do you ever find yourself driving down a familiar street and suddenly encounter an unfamiliar right turn only sign that diverts all traffic off your intended route? The changing landscape of your city’s streets may be disconcerting and inconvenient, but there’s usually a fair amount of thought and intentional planning behind those changes. This week on Sea Change Radio, we learn about how transportation planning can limit car traffic and even improve socioeconomic equity. We speak with Carter Rubin, a mobility and climate advocate for the NRDC, who discusses various efforts to make cities like Barcelona, San Francisco and New York more livable for mass transit users, cyclists and pedestrians. Take a listen and maybe the next time you’re unceremoniously diverted from a main thoroughfare, your annoyance will be mitigated by a pinch of appreciation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Witness Depositions 30 mins – “Ambiguities under current rules often lead to a variety of problems with 30(b)(6) witness depositions. Sharon and John talk with nationally known litigation consultant Tom O’Connor about the scope of these issues and his tips for avoiding common pitfalls on both sides of the deposition process. Tom offers colorful examples from his many years as a consultant, addressing matters surrounding witness qualification, hostile witnesses, preservation, and more! Check out Tom’s blog series on this topic: The Dos and Don’ts of a 30(b)(6) Witness Deposition” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 418 – Nov 22, 2019: Aviation Jobs, Blockchain and Clinical Trials, Blockchain, Discussion, Broadband in Missouri, Broadband in North Carolina, Broadband Speed Production, Bronzeville Music Creation, Bronzeville Podcast Production, Cotton Seed Food, Educational Tips, Farm Aid, Farming in Canada, Farming in Iowa, Gates Getting Richer, Genetic Test Questions, Hong Kong Demonstration, Fentanyl Exposure, Insect Vectors, Insects Impact on History, Jolly Rabbit Movie, Malware Analyst, Mosquito Control, Pilot Re-training, Scary Stories, Slavery Emancipation, Slavery in America and Medicine, Slavery in America Overview, Statin Questions, Underground Railroad Operation, Video Game Uses

Exercise your ears: the 24 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 332 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Aviation Jobs 44 mins – “At AviationCareersPodcast.com, you can find the Scholarships Guide, Career Coaching, and various courses online.  Don’t forget to use the coupon code “payitforward”, all one word. Through the generosity of others, you may receive the scholarships guide for free. In This Episode We Discuss: As a military pilot can I take the FAA dispatchers test and waive the practical exam? Is it worth sitting for that test when I take my ATP written? What are some aviation jobs for those with very low flying time? I would like to start flying for hire as soon as possible after I obtain my commercial license, and before I get my flight instructor rating.  One of my biggest concerns with being a pilot would be having a family emergency arise while at work. With Mandatory retirements coming up over the next decade or so-do you think this will drastically change how senior/junior some bases get? The Regional airline model.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain and Clinical Trials 22 mins – “Blockchain is the digital technology that underpins cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin, and has been proposed as the digital panacea of our times. But Leeza Osipenko, from the London School of Economics, has thought about how it could actually be used in clinical trials, and what else would need to change in our regulatory environment to make that…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Discussion 42 mins – “Kevin Wang is a co-founder of Nervos, a public blockchain designed by a former Ethereum core developer and backed by Sequoia, Polychain, and others. As one of China’s top projects, Nervos recently partnered with crypto exchange Huobi to build a new public chain for banks and financial institutions. Kevin was responsible for Nervos’ unique token economics design where users will eventually pay “rent” to store assets and smart contracts on the network. He believes this type of model is critical if blockchains are to scale. Same goes for the layered design, which splits the public consensus layer from the transactional layer to increase a blockchain’s performance while balancing security and trust.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cotton Seed Food 45 mins – “Cotton production is massive, but mostly used for fiber. The cotton seed is a tremendous potential resource as it contains high amounts of oil and high-quality protein.  However, the seeds are not directly edible by most mammals because they contain a toxic chemical called gossypol.  Gossypol is a terpenoid that the plant produces as a natural insecticide.  A team led by Dr. Keerti Rathore at Texas A&M University has worked for decades to produce cottonseed without gossypol. The plants have now been approved for production by USDA-APHIS and the FDA.  The technology may now be used to produce new cotton lines that generate massive amounts of high-protein seed, leading to new human food and animal feed, ultimately benefitting farmers, the environment and the food insecure.” At the link right-click “Download” and Select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Tips 45 mins – “Thank you all for ten YEARS of podcasting! Maybe we’ll go ten more! In this anniversary episode, we share 10 Bytes of Wisdom for our 10 Years of Podcasting.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Farm Aid 33 mins – “The Farm Babe Michelle Miller is a farmer, speaker, columnist and blogger that advocates for agricultural producers, and seeks to better connect consumers to agricultural reality.  She recently attended Farm Aid, the annual concert event that originally was held to provide funding to struggling farmers in the 1980’s.  Since then farming has become even more challenging, but Farm Aid has seemed to shift its focus to more political causes than direct farmer assistance. Michelle reports what she experienced at a recent Farm Aid concert and its associated press conference. It is clear that they have minimal interest in supporting large “factory” producers and are focusing on practices and production techniques that are more compatible with a specific agenda about food.” At the link right-click “Download” and Select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in Canada 75 mins – “Jean-Martin Fortier is most famous for his book, “The Market Gardener,” based on the high-output systems he developed at Quebec’s Les Jardens de la Grelinette, where his wife, Maude Helen, currently produces over $150,000 of produce on an acre and a half of production ground. He currently farms at La Ferme de Quatre Temps, an enlarged version of the same model on six acres of production ground. We dig into the foundations of JM’s production model, from high fertility to an emphasis on weed prevention, and how that model has translated to more acres on his new project. JM reflects on the changed constraints with his new farm, and we discuss the lessons that JM has learned about personnel with a much larger crew and a different role for himself.” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in Iowa 72 mins – “Jan Libbey raises three acres of vegetables with her husband, Tim Landgraf, at One Step at a Time Gardens in North Central Iowa. With sales through their CSA and the North Iowa Fresh Food Hub, the market farm makes up one of multiple streams of income that include cash rent and CRP income on their 132 acre farm. We dig into how Jan and Tim have made One Step at a Time Gardens work in rural Iowa, with an emphasis on their marketing efforts. Jan shares the story of growing the market farm operation, and then choosing to shrink it again as the business matured. We discuss how they’ve chosen their investments on the farm so that they are mechanizing where it counts. We take a deep dive into their carrot production and the crop rotation they follow on their hilly farm, as well as the landscape and habitat restoration efforts…” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fentanyl Exposure 15 mins – “Today’s episode of the podcast is a myth busting on all the media reports about first responders overdosing by being exposed to fentanyl in the field by incidental contact. This is physically impossible and the misinformation out there has scared a lot of people, cost us lots of money in the form of hazmat responses and shutting down hospitals, and prevented overdose patients from getting the timely care they need in an emergency. This episode will systematically go through every argument why fentanyl is NOT harmful via incidental exposure and debunk these myths to give first responders one less thing to worry about while they do their frequently dangerous yet vital work.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Gates Getting Richer 31 mins – “Amplifying the giving pledge” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Genetic Test Questions 36 mins – “Direct-to-consumer genetic tests are sold online and in shops as a way to “find out what your DNA says”. They insights into ancestry or disease risks; others claim to provide information on personality, athletic ability, and child talent. However, interpretation of genetic data is complex and context dependent, and DTC genetic tests may produce false positive and false negative results. Rachel Horton, clinical training fellow, Anneke Lucassen, chair of British Society of Genetic Medicine, and Jude Hayward the RCGP clinical champion for genomics join us to discuss how this deluge of genetic data is affecting patients, GPs and clinical geneticists in the NHS.” At the link find the title, “Ancestry DNA tests can over or under estimate genetic disease risk,” where you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Hong Kong Demonstrations 73 mins – “For over 100 days now, protesters in Hong Kong have taken to the streets every weekend. What it’s like to live through that. When our producers were in Hong Kong, they often asked people, “What will Hong Kong look like in 2047?” That will be fifty years after the city’s return to Chinese sovereignty. We asked three illustrators — Noble Wong, Tse Sai Pei, and Yu — to consider the same question.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Insect Vectors 38 mins – “In today’s episode Mike meets up with Dr. Erika Machtinger to discuss the intersection of arthropod vectors and wildlife! Learn about how the health of humans, wildlife, and the environment are all intertwined with an emphasis on vector borne disease.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Insects Impact on History 55 mins – “Howdy, howdy bug lovers! On today’s episode, the Arthro-Pod gang discuss how insects have shaped human history in war, trade, and even drinking! If you have ever wanted to know more about insects impacted invasions, how cochineal insects changed the world, or how mosquitoes helped make gin and tonics, this is the episode for you!” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Jojo Rabbit Movie 36 mins – “An imaginary friend can inspire you, make you laugh and even keep you company when you feel alone. But I’m guessing your imaginary friend was not Adolf Hitler. In the new satirical film “Jojo Rabbit,” 10-year-old Jojo Betzler is training in the Nazi Youth during the Third Reich, near the end of World War II, with his imaginary friend Adolf Hitler by his side. Making fun of Nazis is not easy to do: satisfying, perhaps, but tricky. Does “Jojo Rabbit” strike the right balance? And what else does this movie do well, besides mocking Nazis? To answer these questions, we spoke to John Horn, vice president of the 1A Movie Club and host of “The Frame” — a daily arts and entertainment program from KPCC in Los Angeles; Tasha Robinson, the film and TV editor for The Verge; and Steven Luckert, the senior curator for Holocaust education at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malware Analyst 36 mins – “Today we talk with Lauren Pearce – a member of the IR team and a malware analyst for Los Alamos National Labs.  Lauren shares with us her journey to become a malware analyst and talks about the importance of flailing and mentorship.” At the link right-click “Direct download: HNS_Podcast_2_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosquito Control 50 mins – “The tiny mosquito is a nuisance in the industrialized world, yet around the world it is a ruthless killer, spreading blood-borne diseases that bring about pain and suffering, particularly in developing nations.  In many regions these are invasive species with little to no ecological role. For years scientists have used “sterile insect technique” to control them, a process that treats sexually compatible insects with radiation, rendering them infertile.  The low-fertility insects are released into the wild and crash problematic populations. The Oxitec company has a genetic solution.  Mosquitoes have been genetically engineered to contain a lethal gene that can be turned off in the laboratory with a simple chemical.  Upon release, these mosquitoes breed against target populations, spreading the lethal gene, and leaving the next generation inviable.  The process creates a reproductive dead end.  While amazingly successful, these trials have suffered from a lack of public acceptance.  This week an article in Scientific Reports from a credible lab introduced language that bred fear, uncertainty and doubt in the Oxitec approach.  This unwarranted speculation was then amplified and exaggerated by the credulous anti-biotech media, further eroding public perception.  In this episode I spoke with Dr. Kelly Matsen, Research and Development and Operations lead at Oxitech.  She described the experiments in question, the actual results, the published paper, and how Oxitech’s technology actually has worked in field releases.” At the link right-click “Download” and Select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New Orleans 69 mins – “Katrina bus tours go all over New Orleans, but it’s illegal for them to go into the Lower 9th Ward, the area that’s been the slowest to rebuild. This week we go around talking to residents there about what matters the most to them (and what doesn’t) ten years after the hurricane. The episode we did in 2005 the week of the storm is here.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pilot Re-Training 33 mins – “How to survive your first recurrent training. Welcome to the inspirational, informational, and transparent aviation careers podcast. If you have questions, comments, inspirational stories, or announcements please write us at feedback@aviationcareerspodcast.com.“ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scary Stories 60 mins – “For the week leading up to Halloween, scary stories that are all true. Kidnappings, zombie raccoons, haunted houses—real haunted houses!—and things that go “EEEEK!!!” in the night. Plus, a story by David Sedaris, in which he walks among the dead.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery Emancipation 60 mins – “In Episode 9, the finale episode of the inaugural Slate Academy, the History of American Slavery, hosts Rebecca Onion and Jamelle Bouie discuss emancipation. They examine how emancipation was more a process than an overnight change, and they compare the different ways it was enacted in the South and throughout the United States. They also discuss how people sought to rebuild their lives and reunite their families once they had achieved freedom from slavery. They begin the episode by remembering the life of Rose Herera (1835–unknown)….” At the link you can purchase access; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Slavery in American Medicine 50 mins – A discussion of medicine for slaves in America in this 9 episode podcast by This American life about Slavery in America. At the link you can purchase access; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Slavery in American Overview 97 mins – An overview of a 9 episode podcast by This American Life about Slavery in America. At the link you can purchase access; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Statin Questions  21 mins – “Statins are now the most commonly used drug in the UK and one of the most commonly used medicines in the world, but debate remains about their use for primary prevention for people without cardiovascular disease. Paula Byrne from the National University of Ireland Galway, joins us to talk about the evidence of benefit for low risk individuals, and what needs to be done to finally answer the questions about efficacy and harms.

Underground Railroad Operation 56 mins – “In Episode 8 of The History of American Slavery, a Slate Academy, hosts Rebecca Onion and Jamelle Bouie discuss the small minority of people who escaped slavery during the 1850s and 1860s and the people who helped them along the way. They examine our evolving and sometimes selective historical memory of the Underground Railroad. They also explore the legal environment that confronted fugitives and their helpers and how it changed after the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. Jamelle and Rebecca begin the episode by looking at the life of John Parker (1827–1900)….” At the link you can purchase access; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Video Game Uses 74 mins – “This episode of Books and Ideas is an interview with psychologist Dr Pete Etchells about his new book Lost in a Good Game: Why we play video games and what they can do for us. We explore both the myths and the science behind video games and consider why the effects of video games are actually quite difficult to study. It seems strange that many people in this field don’t play games themselves. Most of the bad things you have heard about video games do not stand up to the basic standards of good science. Whether or not you enjoy video games yourself this is a fascinating interview. At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 416 – Nov 8, 2019: Aging Study, Animal Emotions, Arctic Sea Ice Crisis, Artificial Human Construction, Biology of Extremes, Blindness Stories, China-Foe or Ally, Chronic Pain Control, Climate Change Fight, Death Camp, Democracy Under Threat, Dissident Doctor, Dyatlov Pass Mystery, Economic Growth, Enlightenment Period, Evicted, Fake Videos, Fifty Key Inventions, Future Trends, Gates Interview, Gene Research, Girlhood Stories, HIV Fight, Human Embryos Lab Grown, Illiberal Reformers, Immigrant Crossings, Innovation in the NHS, Intelligence Discussion, Investment Mutual Funds, Investment Questions, Language Learning, Leadership Crisis, Legal Profession Future, Luddite Lawyers, Meat Alternatives, Monica Lewinsky, Mueller Report, Multilingual Societies, Open Access Books, O’Reilly and Technology, Parkinson’s Research, Plastic Eating Bugs, Psychology of Money, Radiation Facts, Theranos Story, Trump Tariffs, Tylenol Murders, Undercover Migrant, Urban-Rural Political Divide, Weavers

Exercise your ears: the 74 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 801 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Aaron Copland 26 mins – “There are many Americas. Nowadays they barely speak to each other. But during the most perilous years of the last century, one young composer went in search of a sound that melded many of the nation’s strains into something singular and new. He was a man of the left, though of no political party: gay, but neither closeted nor out; Jewish, but agnostic, unless you count music as a religion. His name was Aaron Copland. On this July 4th weekend, WNYC’s Sara Fishko tells his story.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Aging Study 33 mins – “As the first batch of the best studied humans on the planet turn 70, we speak to Helen Pearson, whose book The Life Project explores this huge birth-cohort study. Seventy years ago, in 1946, the world’s longest running major study of human development began in Britain. The analysis of the lives of thousands of people was so successful that researchers repeated the exercise, following thousands more babies born in 1958, 1970, the early 1990s, and at the turn of the millennium. Six generations of children were followed: over 70,000 people. The studies have become the envy of scientists around the world, but beyond the research team, remarkably few people know they even exist.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alexander von Humboldt 42 mins – “On this week’s show, we’re talking about two books that encourage us to look anew at nature. Claire sits down in Cartegena with Andrea Wulf, who won the Royal Society prize in 2016 for The Invention of Nature, her biography of Alexander von Humboldt. They discuss her latest take on the polymath explorer’s life: graphic novel The Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt. We also discover how you can find food growing wild – even in the city – as Richard tries to collect his dinner with professional forager John Wright, the author of The Forager’s Calendar.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Emotions 33 mins – “In 2016, a video of an aging chimp named Mama went viral. In the scene, Mama, on her deathbed, greets a biologist, Jan van Hooff, who she had known for decades. Her emotion is clear. The video is heartbreaking – and also so human, which helps explains why millions of people watched it. For primatologist and psychologist Frans de Waal, the encounter perfectly illustrates the idea that animals have emotions – and that they often closely resemble our own. He explores this idea in his new book, “Mama’s Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us About Ourselves.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Arctic Sea Ice Crisis 32 mins – “In his latest book A Farewell to Ice, Peter Wadhams, professor of ocean physics at Cambridge University, explores the current crisis faced by Arctic sea ice, and in doing so makes some alarming predictions. But how accurate are these? And do they even matter, when the potential ramifications of the total disappearance of Arctic sea ice are considered? Joining Ian Sample in the studio this week alongside Professor Wadhams, are Dr David Schroeder, at the Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling at Reading University, Jonathan Bamber, professor of physical geography at the University of Bristol, and the Guardian’s own environment site editor, Adam Vaughan.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Human Construction 26 mins – “As tech giants embrace voice-enabled AI assistants to power purchases, play songs and deliver the weather report, hear the latest on Mica, Magic Leap’s AI-powered virtual human, who wants to help you do more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Astrophysics 12 mins – “Humans have been studying the stars for thousands of years, but astrophysicist Juna Kollmeier is on a special mission: creating the most detailed 3-D maps of the universe ever made. Journey across the cosmos as she shares her team’s work on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, imaging millions of stars, black holes and galaxies in unprecedented detail. If we maintain our pace, she says, we can map every large galaxy in the observable universe by 2060. “We’ve gone from arranging clamshells to general relativity in a few thousand years,” she says. “If we hang on 40 more, we can map all the galaxies.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asylum Seekers 12 mins – “Refugee and immigrants rights attorney Melanie Nezer shares an urgently needed historical perspective on the crisis at the southern US border, showing how citizens can hold their governments accountable for protecting the vulnerable. “A country shows strength through compassion and pragmatism, not through force and through fear,” she says.” At the link right-click “Share” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biology of Extremes 51 mins – “…Utah writer Matthew LaPlante joins us to talk about the biggest, fastest, tiniest and deadliest creatures in the world. There’s a lot scientists are learning by studying extreme evolution. They’re finding out new things about immunity, cellular regeneration and the biology of the planet to name a few. LaPlante says the take-away for him though was a sense of awe about the world and he hopes that readers come away seeing things differently than they had before. His book is called Superlative.” At the link left-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blindness Stories 19 mins – “Dave Steele was diagnosed with the hereditary condition retinitis pigmentosa five years ago. He found translating his grief and loss into poetry was cathartic for him, and quickly discovered that it helped others who were also coming to terms with visual impairment. The Colorado Center for the Blind in the United States, run by the National Federation for the Blind, offers a nine month course to people who want to learn skills for living life as a visually impaired person. At the end of the course, they must pass a final assessment. It’s called ‘The Drop’ and involves being driven to an unknown location, handed a phone on which they can only make emergency calls and told to find their way back to the Centre. Danielle Montour completed ‘The Drop’ back in September. She tells us how it helped her to become more comfortable with her blindness. And Chris Fisher went from being fully sighted and studying for his pilot’s licence to, four weeks later, being totally blind. Chris, always good with maintenance and building things, turned back to what he knew before losing his sight, and has built a commercially viable business as a wood turner. Chris shows Tom Walker around his workshop.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Production 50 mins – “This week the books podcast takes a physical turn, shifting away from the intangible business of writing to consider the hunks of wood we haul around for our reading pleasure. With sales of printed books on the rise, there’s little sign the reading experience will go entirely digital any time soon. So how does a novel make the jump from manuscript to bookshop, and what happens next? We start our story at Hodder & Stoughton, where director of production Joanna Seaton gives us a whistlestop tour of the editorial process. Next we head to Suffolk, where Chris Impey takes us from printing plate to bound copy at one of the UK’s biggest printers, Clays. Waterstones fiction buyer Chris White tells us how they decide which titles make it on to the shelves, while Book Industry Communication’s Karina Luke and Book Aid International’s Simon Mercer explain what happens to the books that never get sold.

Brexit Fate 47 mins – “The make-or-break vote on the Brexit deal with Britain’s future hanging in the balance. We’ll turn to London for reaction and what’s next.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China, Foe or Ally 54 mins – “Two prominent names in U.S. foreign policy argue that China is now a foe to the liberal international order. They say Beijing’s vision of the world just doesn’t work with the values of a country such as Canada. The disagreements on rule-of-law, press freedom, and open debate are wide—and now getting wider. On the flip side, a one-time president of the UN Security Council joins the head of a major Chinese think-tank to paint Beijing as an ally to liberal internationalism, especially as the U.S. tacks toward an isolationist stance to the world. Be it resolved, China is a threat to the liberal international order. So goes the most recent edition of the Munk Debates, featuring H.R. McMaster and Michael Pillsbury competing for audience votes against Kishore Mahbubani and Huiyao Wang at Toronto’s Roy Thomson Hall.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Chronic Pain Control 31 mins – “Scientists at University College London have made a discovery which makes mice pain-free, and have reversed painlessness in a woman with a rare condition. What do we know about the way we experience pain? What purpose does it serve, and could we be close to dealing with the kind of chronic pain not yet treatable with medicine? Scientists at University College London have made a discovery which makes mice pain-free, and have reversed painlessness in a woman with a rare condition. Nicola Davis is joined by Dr Natasha Curran, Consultant in Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine at University College London Hospitals, and by Professor John Wood, lead author of the study and a neuroscientist at UCL.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Pain Prevention 30 mins – “What do we know about the way we experience pain? What purpose does it serve, and could we be close to dealing with the kind of chronic pain not yet treatable with medicine? Scientists at University College London have made a discovery which makes mice pain-free, and have reversed painlessness in a woman with a rare condition. Nicola Davis is joined by Dr Natasha Curran, Consultant in Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine at University College London Hospitals, and by Professor John Wood, lead author of the study and a neuroscientist at UCL.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Fight 29 mins – “Whether or not we use the name Green New Deal to describe a set of aggressive long-term policies that will help humanity in the fight against climate change, most rational people agree that the status quo is completely unacceptable. The potential of a Green New Deal is that it could pave the way for some great minds to devise concrete proposals for reducing greenhouse gases in our atmosphere. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with one of those great minds, Ramez Naam, a futurist and technologist who’s crafted his own sort of Green New Deal. We delve into the nuts and bolts of Naam’s proposal and the problems it’s trying to solve, as he makes the case for why we may actually see bipartisan support for such a proposal.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cloud Computing Ethics 30 mins – “No lawyer should assume their firm’s technology is secure. In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway talk to Lucian Pera about the ethics of lawyers using the cloud and how they can use it with confidence. They break down the different cloud providers, the dangers that can potentially crop up when using the cloud, and the importance of having a technology mentor that lawyers can turn to with questions whenever they need it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Coffee History 54 mins – “An ordinary cup of Joe just won’t do anymore. It’s now gourmet, fair trade and organic. Whether the method is pour over, French press, or vacuum pumps, coffee is now described with terms like “mouthfeel”, just as fine wines are. Contributing producer Marilyn Powell brings us her documentary, The Coffee Chronicles about the cultural history behind the world’s most popular drink.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Complacent Americans 66 mins – “In his latest book, Tyler Cowen documents trends of increased risk aversion, resistance to change, and reluctance to interact with people outside of our familiar groups. He speculates on many plausible causes of these trends, but he does not focus on any single factor. Indeed, in the passage quoted above, “They” refers not to any group or institution, but instead to “people making decisions,” meaning everyone.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Contradictions or Not 19 mins – “Hannah Gadsby’s groundbreaking special “Nanette” broke comedy. In a talk about truth and purpose, she shares three ideas and three contradictions. Or not.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data-Driven Ethics Initiative 29 mins – “The Data-Driven Ethics Initiative is a research project that aims to use legal services data to modernize legal rules for professional conduct. In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway talk to Erin Gerstenzang about the initiative and the current landscape of ethics reform including lawyer regulations. Additionally, Erin delves into the challenges of ethics reform and how design-thinking can help.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Death Camp 54 mins – “In 2015, a strange discovery was made near the site of the former Stutthof concentration camp in Poland. Poet-musician Grzegorz Kwiatkowski and a friend walked into a pine forest and found “a lot of shoes.” “Not a lot like a hundred, but a lot like thousands of hundreds, hundreds of thousands,”  Kwiatkowski said. The two kept digging up more and more shoes from the ground. Children’s shoes. Women’s shoes. Shoes likely surrendered by Jews when they arrived at the death camp. The Stutthof concentration camp operated from September 1939 to May 1945. It housed 110,000 prisoners from 25 countries and 27 nationalities — 65,000 of them perished there. The camp supplied slave labour to the Nazi war machine, and was also the laboratory for making soap from the fat of thousands of victims.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Democracy Under Threat 54 mins – “In this episode, Harvard historian James Kloppenberg traces the long and tortuous tradition of American liberal democracy. He argues that the United States has arrived at such a precarious place in its political evolution, that the very conditions that make democracy possible are under threat. Professor Kloppenberg says unless Americans are willing to move away from widespread destructive tendencies like self-righteousness and dogmatism, then democracy itself may never recover.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Digestion 15 mins – “Ever wonder how we poop? Learn about the gut — the system where digestion (and a whole lot more) happens — as doctor and author Giulia Enders takes us inside the complex, fascinating science behind it, including its connection to mental health. It turns out, looking closer at something we might shy away from can leave us feeling more fearless and appreciative of ourselves.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dissent Doctor 27 mins – “You may not know Dr. Michael Klein’s name, but if you’ve had a child in the past 30 years, he may have played a key role in how that baby came into the world. Klein was a pioneer in pushing the medical system to put the needs of mothers and babies first — including exposing the fact that the episiotomy, a once-routine procedure performed on mothers giving birth was doing more harm than good. Brian speaks to him about his new memoir: Dissident Doctor: Catching Babies and Challenging the Medical Status Quo, and finds out how Klein’s past as a Vietnam draft deserter whose father was blacklisted in the McCarthy era, led him to a revolutionary career in medicine. (Perhaps you’ve heard of his daughter…Naomi?)” At the link find the title, “The dissident doctor who put women and children first,” right-click “Download The dissident doctor who put women and children firstand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dyatlov Pass Mystery 50 mins – “In 1959, a group of nine Russian students met a mysterious death in the Ural mountains. Experienced cross-country skiers, their bodies were found scattered around a campsite, their tent cut from the inside, as they seemingly panicked to escape from someone – or something. Sixty years on, Lucy Ash traces their footsteps to try to find out what happened.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Growth 62 mins– “Tyler Cowen of George Mason University and the co-host of the blog Marginal Revolution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Stubborn Attachments, his book-length treatment of how to think about public policy. Cowen argues that economic growth–properly defined–is the moral key to maintaining civilization and promoting human well-being. Along the way, the conversation also deals with inequality, environmental issues, and education.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Enlightenment Period P1 54 mins – “French philosopher Denis Diderot was one of a small group of 18th-century thinkers who began to explore a radical new way of thinking about all knowledge. Fear of prison kept Diderot from publishing much in his own lifetime, apart from his magisterial Encyclopédie, which proposed a new way of organizing everything we know and experience. Part one of a two-part series: producer Philip Coulter goes on a walk around Diderot’s Paris with philosophy professor and historian, Sophie Audidière.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Enlightenment Period P2 54 mins – “French philosopher Denis Diderot was one of a small group of 18th-century thinkers who began to explore a radical new way of thinking about the totality of human knowledge. In his magisterial Encyclopédie, he proposed a new way of organizing everything we know and experience. In part 2 of his series, producer Philip Coulter takes a walk around Diderot’s Paris.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Evicted P1 37 mins – “We have a problem as a country, a problem made up of small inadequacies and inequalities that compound and intersect. There is and always has been an eviction crisis. American renters endure nearly a million evictions a year and they defend themselves from roughly three times as many eviction filings. The problem, broadly and historically speaking, is putting people in homes and ensuring that they can stay put. It’s a problem we’ve had for a very long time — long enough to have solved it, long enough to at least comprehend it. But we haven’t, and we don’t. Not yet.  Within the past several months On the Media has traveled to Richmond, Chicago, Indianapolis, Camden and Atlanta in search of the symptoms, and perhaps a cure, to this particular plague. We did so with the help of Matthew Desmond, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City and founder of The Eviction Lab. He’s our partner in this project, and so we start the series with a conversation between him and Brooke. We also hear the story of Jeffrey, a security guard in Richmond, Virginia whose ongoing housing troubles teach us a lot about our eviction crisis.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evicted P2 37 mins – “Home is in your heart and in your head, but mostly home is on land — acreage parceled out, clawed at, stolen, denied for decades and decades. First, there was Field Order No. 15, the Union Army’s plan to distribute 40-acre plots to the newly emancipated. That was a promise broken almost immediately. Later, there was the Great Migration, in which millions of African Americans fled north, where governments, lenders, and white neighbors would never let them own their land and build their own wealth. And now a system, purpose-built, extracts what it can, turning black and brown renters into debtors and evictees. In this second episode of our series The Scarlet E: Unmasking America’s Eviction Crisis, we catalog the thefts and the schemes — most of which were perfectly legal — and we ask how long this debt will fester forever.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evicted P3 37 mins – “This is episode three in our series, “The Scarlet E: Unmasking America’s Eviction Crisis.” It’s the dollars-and-cents episode, in which we account for what we know and don’t know about those who own and those who rent. We digest some new data — compiled and analyzed, in part, by our collaborator, Matthew Desmond — that demonstrate the extent to which landlords often profit in impoverished communities. We speak with the founder of a massive online eviction platform, who defends his company’s “standardized process.” In Camden, New Jersey we hear the story of Destiny, a social worker whose corporate landlord showed no reluctance to bring her to housing court, month after month. In Indianapolis we meet a mom-and-pop landlord who doesn’t deny her profits in the low-income market — she’s a businesswoman, after all — but who also has often given delinquent tenants the chance to get caught up. And in Richmond, Virginia we learn the hard truth about landlords’ comfortable place in the American legal system — even in spite of unmistakable neglect.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evicted P4 37 mins – “We have an eviction crisis, which is really just one part of a broader housing affordability crisis. Incomes are too low for rents. Rents are too high for incomes. The barriers to home-buying are growing, especially for younger Americans. The wealth gap between black and white Americans is spreading, driven largely by inequalities in housing. The shockwaves from the foreclosure crisis continue. And in some cities, gentrification drives up costs and drives away low-income families. Luckily enough, there are solutions — quite a few of them, in fact. In this fourth and final episode of The Scarlet E: Unmasking America’s Eviction Crisis, we evaluate the proposals, which range from subtle to significant. First, a look back on a solution that worked in some places and was allowed to fail in many others. We visit Atlanta, home to the nation’s first public housing projects. We learn how the city has since destroyed or converted all of its public housing. And with the help of Lawrence Vale, author of Purging the Poorest: Public Housing and the Design Politics of Twice-Cleared Communities, we look at one public housing project, in Boston, that continues to thrive. And then we look at solutions, both proposed and in-play. Again in Atlanta, we meet landlord Marjy Stagmeier, whose unique model improves nearby schools’ performance — and still turns a profit. We speak with sociologist Matt Desmond about the need to fully fund our Section 8 housing voucher program, and to encourage, or compel, landlords to accept voucher-holders. And we touch on the housing proposals from several Democratic candidates for president. Matt wonders whether our federal housing policies — for instance, the mortgage interest deduction — are subsidizing those most in need. We also ask New York City Councilmember Mark Levine and South Carolina legislator Marvin Pendarvis about possible reforms in our housing courts. We hear from Marty Wegbreit, director of litigation for the Central Virginia Legal Aid Society, about how Richmond turned its shame over its high eviction rates into policy. And we consider ways that some cities might increase their affordable housing supply by doing away with restrictive, exclusionary zoning policies.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Fake Videos 46 mins – “Those doctored videos of Nancy Pelosi and Mark Zuckerberg highlight the growing threat of deepfake technology. It’s getting harder to know what’s real and what isn’t. How can they be stopped?”” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fifty Key Inventions 69 mins – “Financial Times columnist and author Tim Harford talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Harford’s latest book, Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy. Highlights include how elevators are an important form of mass transit, why washing machines didn’t save quite as much time as you’d think, and the glorious illuminating aspects of light throughout history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future Trends 63 mins – “Author Tim O’Reilly, founder of O’Reilly Media and long-time observer and commenter on the internet and technology, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his new book, WTF? What’s the Future and Why It’s Up to Us. O’Reilly surveys the evolution of the internet, the key companies that have prospered from it, and how the products of those companies have changed our lives. He then turns to the future and explains why he is an optimist and what can be done to make that optimism accurate.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gates Interview 66 mins – “Microsoft founder Bill Gates takes us deep into his remarkable history and propels us into the future of technology and philanthropy.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gene Research 31 mins – “How does our genetic makeup help or hinder our chances in life? And as our ability to unravel DNA becomes more powerful, what are the implications? Scientists are finding ways to alter the genetic makeup of children with harmful mutations such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. Will we soon see more complex disorders such as cancers and heart disease being tackled in this way, by altering or replacing entire groups of genes? To tackle these questions and more, Ian Sample is joined in the studio by Siddharta Mukherjee, whose new book spans the history of genetics, from Gregor Mendl’s 19th century experiments to modern gene-editing techniques.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Girlhood Stories 52 mins – “In this hour, moxie, grit, and growing up. Stories of the strength, both physical and mental, of young women. Hosted by The Moth’s Executive Producer Sarah Austin Jenness. The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media. Sandra Kimokoti feels conflicted over her physical strength. Wanjiru Kibera goes off the path in the Kenyan wilderness. Gabrielle Shelton tries to find work as a welder. Catherine Smyka and her male friend have the same taste in women. Christal Brown finds a connection to her father through dance” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gutenberg Bible 51 mins – “Only 49 of original editions of the Gutenberg Bible are known to survive. Margaret Leslie Davis joins Wednesday to tell the 500-year odyssey of obsession and tragedy of one extremely rare and beautiful copy of a book that sparked a revolution.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV Fight 26 mins – “Earlier this year, the UK government announced it wanted to end new HIV transmissions in England by 2030. Hannah Devlin looks at the history of the epidemic, including its impact on the gay community, recent promising drug trials and whether Britain can meet its target…”” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Embryos Lab Grown 36 mins – “Researchers in the US and UK recently broke the record for culturing human embryos in the lab, keeping them alive for up to 13 days – that’s beyond the point at which they would normally implant in a mother’s womb. This has prompted some to ask whether we should allow scientists to grow human embryos for longer? Or is the 14 day rule a line in the sand that should not be moved? Ian Sample is joined by embryologist Sue Avery, James Lawford Davies, a solicitor specialising in assisted reproduction, embryo and stem cell research and bioethicist and philosopher John Harris.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Illiberal Reformers 69 mins – “Were the first professional economists racists? Thomas Leonard of Princeton University and author of Illiberal Reformers talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book–a portrait of the progressive movement and its early advocates at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th. The economists of that time were eager to champion the power of the state and its ability to regulate capitalism successfully. Leonard exposes the racist origins of these ideas and the role eugenics played in the early days of professional economics. Woodrow Wilson takes a beating as well.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Crossings 27 mins – “It is over two years since the authorities in France closed down the Jungle, the large migrant camp in Calais on the French coast. At its height more than 9,000 people from around the world lived in the camp while attempting to make it across to the UK, often hiding in the back of lorries or packed into small boats. It was hoped the camp’s closure would stem the number of people risking their lives to try to get to Britain. But has it worked? In December, Britain’s Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, declared the number of migrants attempting to cross the English Channel in boats a ‘major incident’ and since then more than 100 people have been picked up in 2019. For Assignment, Paul Kenyon investigates the British gangs making big money and risking migrants’ lives smuggling them across the Channel and reports on the attempts to break up their networks.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Immigration Crisis 26 mins – “Just like in 2016, President Trump is making immigration a key part of his re-election campaign. Starting this weekend, he has directed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to conduct a mass roundup of families that have received deportation orders. This means Trump’s Democratic opponent, whoever he or she ends up being, will have to talk about immigration as well. But regardless of Trump’s rhetoric and actions on immigration, we do indeed have a crisis at the border: thousands of Central American families are coming across the southern border each day seeking asylum. Millions of people are living in the U.S. without authorization. So what should be done? Diane speaks with Angela Kelley of Open Society Foundations to talk about the immigration challenges we’re facing and solutions she hopes Democratic candidates and leaders will offer.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Individual Liberty 66 mins – “Author and historian Thomas Ricks talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book, Churchill and Orwell. Ricks makes the case that the odd couple of Winston Churchill and George Orwell played and play an important role in preserving individual liberty. Ricks reviews the contributions of these two giants whose lives overlapped and whose legacy remains vibrant.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation in the National Health Service 36 mins – “We look at the innovations that are changing the NHS today and asks what science on the horizon will transform the health service in the next decade It employs 1.6 million people, spends more than £4,000 a second, and performed 10m operations last year in England alone. Millions more visit emergency units, have outpatient care, and receive help for mental health problems. This week we’re focusing on the NHS and how science and technology underpin the care doctors can give to patients. Ian Sample talks to Professor Sir Bruce Keogh, NHS England’s Medical Director and professional lead for NHS doctors. Bruce is responsible for promoting clinical leadership, quality and innovation, having previously been a surgeon and physician who specialised in cardiac surgery.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Discussion 30 mins – “In his latest book, Are we smart enough to know how smart animals are?, legendary ethologist Professor Frans de Waal questions the boundaries that have historically existed between the minds of humans and other animals. Here Waal joins Hannah Devlin in the studio – alongside psychologist Professor Wendy Johnson – and they discuss the nature of intelligence and intelligence in nature, throwing light on an age-old debate that challenges just how special we humans are.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Mutual Funds 54 mins – “This podcast is the audio-only version of the video, Target Date Funds: America’s #1 Retirement Investment, in which Paul illuminates why Target Date Funds are America’s best retirement investment, and how to maximize that investment with his 2-Funds-For-Life Strategy. While this strategy is ideal for young and first-time investors, it can be effectively used by investors at any stage who want to both simplify and get the most from their investments. Since the introduction of the modern mutual fund in 1924, no other investment product has been as important to investors as the target date fund (TDF).  Paul explains how TDFs work, 10 reasons TDFs are likely to make investors more money, 6 reasons many TDFs make investors less than they should and how to select the best-performing TDFs.  For investors willing to add a second fund, to work along side their TDF, Paul shows how to substantially increase the expected lifetime return with a “2 Funds For Life” strategy. Theoretically, the TDF only requires an investor to make two major investment decisions. Investors in their working and saving years only need select the year they expect to retire, and the TDF takes care of all investment decisions.  The second decision, which likely happens at retirement, is a bit more complex, as the investor needs to decide how to invest during retirement, while providing regular income to meet their cost of living.  Paul discusses four possible investment strategies that can be used by investors through the end of their life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Questions 42 mins – “Paul addresses the 4 most common questions he receives from readers and listeners: Will indexing work as well in the future as in the past? Will small cap and value asset classes produce higher than S&P 500 returns in the future? How often should I rebalance? How do I best put my money into the market at these historically high prices? He also discusses an important lesson learned from a meeting with Dr. Hendrick Bessembinder.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language Learning 27 mins – “Simon Calder asks how to go about acquiring a new tongue. He gets tips from those who know – innovative teachers and polyglots. The answers are surprising. At school, it is repetitive drills, shouted out loud by the whole class, that seem to lodge the grammar and pronunciation in the pupils’ brains. But if you are an adult learning by yourself, then, on the contrary, don’t stress about grammar and pronunciation, there are better, and more fun things to focus on. Simon has a go at learning Slovenian, can he order coffee and cake after just one lesson?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Leadership Crisis 14 mins – “What should modern leadership look like? Entrepreneur and former Icelandic presidential candidate Halla Tómasdóttir thinks global leaders need to change their ways — or risk becoming irrelevant. In a conversation with curator Bryn Freedman, she shows how anybody can step up and make a difference, even if you don’t yet have power. “There’s a leader inside every single one of us,” she says, “and our most important work in life is to release that leader.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Legal Profession Future 40 mins – “After years of writing and thinking about the future of the legal profession, Richard Susskind began to run into legal professionals whose careers are being affected by technology. In addition to lawyers, those in the medical, architecture, financial, and other fields have begun to notice a shift in the provision of professional services. Richard got together with his son, Daniel Susskind, at the time working in justice policy, education policy, and health policy for the British Prime Minister, to examine how technology is increasingly playing a fundamental role in how all service-based professions work. They recently published a book on the subject called “The Future of the Professions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Luddite Lawyers 24 mins – “Luddite: a person opposed to increased industrialization or new technology. As we’ve heard time and time again, many lawyers are averse to becoming knowledgeable about modern technology. Older attorneys often do not want to learn a computer-based management tool and feel as though they can hire someone to manage the security and encryption of their sensitive information. Often, even having a young lawyer in the firm can seem like a solution since they will most likely have grown up with a certain level of technology knowledge. But none of these are valid excuses to a proper level of technological education. The luddite lawyers need to face the ethical implications of their ignorance.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Meat Alternatives 6 mins – “Conventional meat production causes harm to our environment and presents risks to global health, but people aren’t going to eat less meat unless we give them alternatives that cost the same (or less) and that taste the same (or better). In an eye-opening talk, food innovator and TED Fellow Bruce Friedrich shows the plant- and cell-based products that could soon transform the global meat industry — and your dinner plate.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monica Lewinsky 22 mins – “In 1998, says Monica Lewinsky, “I was Patient Zero of losing a personal reputation on a global scale almost instantaneously.” Today, the kind of online public shaming she went through has become a constant. In a brave talk, she takes a look at our “culture of humiliation,” in which online shame equals dollar signs — and demands a different way.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mueller Report 47 mins – “Attorney General William Barr’s summary of the Mueller report says there was no conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russia to affect the outcome of the 2016 election. We dig in.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Multilingual Societies 27 mins – “What is it like to live in a place where you have to speak several languages to get by? Simon Calder travels to India, where a top university only teaches in English, the one language that the students from all over the country have in common. And he meets people who use four different languages with their friends and family, depending on whom they are talking to. In Luxembourg, it is not so much family, but other situations that require four languages, such as going shopping, watching TV, or school lessons. Simon hears that in secondary school, maths is taught in French, history in German, casual chat in Luxembourgish, and English is compulsory too, so that no one leaves school without being multilingual.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

O’Reilly and Technology 63 mins – “Tim O’Reilly of O’Reilly Media talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his career in technology and media and the challenges facing low-wage workers as technology advances. Topics include the early days of the Internet, the efficacy of regulation to protect workers, and the poetry of Elizabeth Bishop.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Access Books 19 mins – “Open access is transforming scholarly journal publishing, yet the looming size of the journal ecosystem has thrown into deep shadow an equally remarkable transformation in scholarly books. In recent years, e-book acquisition rates and usage have soared. E-books offer multiple advantages, from acquisition models to accessibility and researcher engagement metrics. In parallel with research coming out of the UK, an ongoing study by the US-based Book Industry Study Group is identifying the challenges in understanding the usage of OA e-books. This research will provide much needed documentation on e-book impact levels, especially for funders of open access publishing programs. At the recent 2018 Frankfurt Book Fair, CCC’s Carl Robinson moderated a panel discussion on the viability of business models and the unique needs of OA books compared to OA journals. Guests were Brian O’Leary, executive director of the New York City-based Book Industry Study Group (BISG),and David Worlock, a longtime independent publishing analyst and co-chair of Outsell’s leadership programs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parkinson’s Research 10 mins- “Arjan Kortholt is Associate Professor at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. Arjan’s original work was studying chemotaxis; the movement of cells up or down substance concentration gradients, for example when white blood cells are chasing pathogens. However, whilst studying the proteins involved in chemotaxis, he found they are related to Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s has traditionally been studied by medical doctors, but now Arjan is studying the disease from a new, microbiological angle; using techniques and tools from microbiology to help find a cure.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Plastic Eating Bugs 10 mins – “Humans produce 300 million tons of new plastic each year — yet, despite our best efforts, less than 10 percent of it ends up being recycled. Is there a better way to deal with all this waste? Morgan Vague describes her research with microbiologist Jay Mellies on bacteria that have evolved the unexpected ability to eat plastic — and how they could help us solve our growing pollution problem.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychology of Money 32 mins – “How does money change our thinking, feelings and behaviour? Claudia Hammond joins the podcast team to teach us how to take control of our cash…”” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radiation Facts 30 mins – “Timothy Jorgensen, associate professor of radiation medicine at Georgetown University, Washington DC and author of Strange Glow, joins Nicola Davis to discuss the story of radiation, exploring the varied ways it exists, and dispelling some of the myths surrounding it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reconstruction 52 mins – “Our lecture this week is given by Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University, and is titled “The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Forged a Constitutional Revolution.”  The event was presented by the Boston University Alumni Association.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Theory of Everything 32 mins – “In the race for a unifying ‘theory of everything’ two frontrunners are miles ahead. But what will win? String theory? Loop quantum gravity? Or something else entirely?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Theranos Story 48 mins – “Academy Award-winning director Alex Gibney on his HBO documentary “The Inventor” — a tale about Silicon Valley, Elizabeth Holmes and the collapse of her blood-testing company Theranos.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Tariffs 32 mins – “President Trump has said he views tariffs as an important tool in his efforts to reshape the landscape of global trade. And has used them repeatedly in America’s escalating trade war with China. This week, however, the president threatened to use tariffs in a way that caught most people off guard — as a bargaining chip to pressure the Mexican government to crack down on migrants heading to the U.S. Whether or not the 5 percent tariff actually goes into effect on Monday, Trump’s threats have spooked markets, rattled the business community and sparked a backlash from Republican lawmakers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Tylenol Murders P1 48 mins – “On one terrible day in Chicago in 1982, seven people died suddenly and mysteriously. In just a matter of hours, it becomes clear, someone has poisoned bottles of Extra-Strength Tylenol, one of the most trusted and widely-used products in America.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Tylenol Murders P2 48 mins – “The panic that began in Chicago spreads and begins to change the world. The investigation into the murders turns up leads and suspects, but still no one has ever been charged with the murders. It remains unsolved to this day.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Undercover Migrant 27 mins – “The extraordinary story of an undercover migrant and his ‘secret spectacles’. When Azeteng, a young man from rural Ghana, heard stories on the radio of West African migrants dying on their way to Europe, he felt compelled to act. He took what little savings he had and bought glasses with a hidden camera – his ‘secret spectacles.’ Then he put himself in the hands of people smugglers and travelled 3,000 miles on the desert migrant trail north, aiming to document the crimes of the traffickers. Along the way he saw extortion, slavery, and death in the vast stretches of the Sahara. For Assignment, reporter Joel Gunter tells the story of his journey – a journey that thousands of young Africans like him attempt each year.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Union Pacific Railroad Movie 51 mins – “We’re marking the 150th anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad by showing Cecil B. DeMille’s epic Western Union Pacific. Film historian James D’Arc joins us to talk about the film and how the railroads united a divided country. Here’s how we’re observing the 150th anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad: By showing a movie! Cecil B. DeMille’s 1939 epic Western Union Pacific is the only modern feature film to dramatize the building of the railroads and the driving of the golden spike. Most of it was shot here in Utah. The film historian James D’Arc says it’s one of DeMille’s very best films, and he made a lot of movies. D’Arc joins us to talk about the film and how the railroads united a divided country.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban-Rural Political Divide 31 mins – “The political divide between urban and rural America: why it is bad news for cities … and Democrats.” At the link left-click the circle with dots, then right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wearable Technology for Lawyers 26 mins – “In this episode of The Digital EdgeSharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview legal technology expert Richard Georges about wearable technology, how smartwatches enhances his ability to be productive, and what lawyers need to consider when adopting this new technology. Having a smartwatch, Georges explains, actually decreases court disruptions and car distractions while making him accessible to clients at all times. Most of the issues concerning data security are due to human error rather than technology. As long as lawyers learn how to properly embrace wearable technology, he says, it can improve any practice from big law to a solo firm. The risks are not greater, they are simply different. Judges may already discourage smart phones in court and many clients worry about a decrease in information security. But if used properly, a smartwatch can actually increase the productivity, availability, and even safety of any lawyer’s practice with fewer disruptions. What are the best practices for using wearable technology to benefit your practice?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Weavers 15 mins – “Our society is in the midst of a social crisis, says op-ed columnist and author David Brooks: we’re trapped in a valley of isolation and fragmentation. How do we find our way out? Based on his travels across the United States — and his meetings with a range of exceptional people known as “weavers” — Brooks lays out his vision for a cultural revolution that empowers us all to lead lives of greater meaning, purpose and joy.”” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 415 – Nov 1, 2019: Baseball Salaries, Bataan Survivor, Chiobani CEO Talk, Constitution Convention, D-Day Story, Dementia Story, Educating Black Students, Food Production, Gorilla in Room, Immigration Crisis, Inactivity, IT Stories, Jad Abumrad, Legal Education Technology, Meat or Not, Mobile Connectivity in Africa, National Health Service and Technology, Native American Economics, Noise in Cities, , Rape Investigation, Solzhenitsyn, South Africa at 25 Years, Stephen Hawking, TB Testing, Technology in Law, Trumpnomics

Exercise your ears: the 35 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 665 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Baseball Salaries 21 mins – “Baseball is a winner-take-all career. There is a very small chance of making massive amounts of money. But more importantly, there is a very big chance of making almost no money. Some minor leaguers earn $8,000 dollars per year. To have more chances at winning the baseball lottery, some players are deciding to get together and face the odds as a group. They are joining “income pools,” which could change the way baseball players, and lots of professionals, think about how we get paid.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bataan Survivor 52 mins – “In 1942 the Japanese army forced 70,000 prisoners to march across the Bataan Peninsula. Gene Jacobsen was among them, and he tells his story of three and a half years as a prisoner of war. This episode picked by Doug Fabrizio.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chiobani CEO Talk 17 mins – “Profit, money, shareholders: these are the priorities of most companies today. But at what cost? In an appeal to corporate leaders worldwide, Chobani founder Hamdi Ulukaya calls for an end to the business playbook of the past — and shares his vision for a new, “anti-CEO playbook” that prioritizes people over profits. “This is the difference between profit and true wealth,” he says.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constitution Convention 62 mins – “Are there many Americans today who wish the President of the United States had more power relative to the other branches of Congress? Terry Moe is one of them. In this week’s EconTalk episode, Moe–a professor of political science at Stanford University and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution–talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his new book (co-authored with William Howell), Relic. Moe wants to give the President the power to propose legislation that Congress would have to approve or reject free of amendments. Moe argues this would improve legislation and reduce the cronyism and special interest influence on Congress.” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crowdfunding Music 14 mins – “Don’t make people pay for music, says Amanda Palmer: Let them. In a passionate talk that begins in her days as a street performer (drop a dollar in the hat for the Eight-Foot Bride!), she examines the new relationship between artist and fan.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

D-Day Story 15 mins – “In honor of the 75th anniversary of D-Day, “Unknown History” podcast, author and historian Giles Milton takes listeners through the perilous 24 hours of D-Day, sharing the tales of the men and women who risked their lives by land, sea, and air. For more from “Unknown History” visit https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/unknown-history.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Dementia Interview 50 mins – “In 2010, Gerda Saunders learned that she has dementia. So she started writing what she calls field notes on the progress of her condition. The result is her memoir, Memory’s Last Breath. This episode was picked by KUER’s newsroom managing editor Elaine Clark” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Story 53 mins – “In 2010, Gerda Saunders learned that she has dementia. She was 61 years old at the time, and soon had to leave her post teaching at the University of Utah. So Gerda started writing what she calls her field notes on dementia. The result is a new memoir due out this week. We’ve been following Gerda over the last year with a series of short films documenting her journey, and Monday, Doug sits down to talk to her about her book. It’s called Memory’s Last Breath. Saunders served as Associate Director for the University of Utah’s Gender Studies Program. She’s the author of a collection of short stories called Blessings on the Sheep Dog…and her new memoir is called Memory’s Last Breath: Field Notes on my Dementia…” At the link right-click the Play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educating Black Students 44 mins – “New York Times best-selling author Tara Westover discusses her memoir, “Educated.” Tara describes what it was like growing up in the remote Idaho mountains as the daughter of survivalist Mormons. She explains her family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education, and no one to intervene when Tara’s older brother became violent. Tara did not attend school or see doctors, and had minimal interaction with the outside world for 17 years. Despite this unorthodox upbringing, Tara taught herself enough mathematics and grammar to earn acceptance into Brigham Young University. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her to Cambridge University, where she earned her Ph.D. in history. This coming-of-age story of courage serves as an inspiring reminder to anyone looking to find their own, unique voice. This conversation was recorded in front of an audience aboard the O Magazine Holland America Girls Getaway Cruise.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive and can be downloaded there.

Exercise Less 44 mins – “Biomechanist Katy Bowman and her family don’t own couches or recliners or even chairs at the kitchen table. That’s so they have every possible opportunity for physical movement, which is a central idea of Bowman’s fitness philosophy. This episode picked by producer Benjamin Bombard.” At the link right-click the Play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Production 62 mins – “Tamar Haspel, who writes “Unearthed,” a column on food and agriculture at the Washington Post, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about a wide variety of issues related to the cost of food and how it’s produced. Topics discussed include why technology helps make some foods inexpensive, how animals are treated, the health of the honey bee, and whether eggs from your backyard taste any better than eggs at the grocery.

Gorilla in Room 65 mins – “Teppo Felin of the University of Oxford talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about perception, cognition, and rationality. Felin argues that some of the standard experimental critiques of human rationality assume an omniscience that misleads us in thinking about social science and human capability. The conversation includes a discussion of the implications of different understandings of rationality for economics, entrepreneurship, and innovation.” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Crisis 66 mins- “Michelle Malkin is a nationally recognized syndicated columnist who made her name through sharp humor to become an unapologetic conservative voice in America’s political discourse. A popular Fox News Channel contributor, Malkin has more than 2 million Twitter followers. Adding to her collection of four no. 1 best sellers, Malkin’s new book, Open Borders, Inc., is her exposé about what happens at America’s borders. Beginning with a thorough reexamination of the southern border’s history of immigration to its current state of crisis, Malkin argues that powerful special interest groups are working behind the scenes to keep America’s borders open for an influx of cheap labor in order to enrich the nation’s elite and create new generations of Democratic voters. Unafraid to challenge the status quo, Malkin offers her insight and confrontational approach on a variety of issues, from identity politics to social matters. Join us for an engaging conversation with one of the most outspoken voices of the American Right, and be sure to bring your questions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Inactivity 50 mins – “Chances are good you’re sitting down as you read these words. After hearing what Dr. James Levine has to say about the dangers of inactivity, you might find yourself standing a lot more.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Basics 52 mins – “Paul discusses the annual update of Callan’s colorful “Periodic Table of Investment Returns 1999-2017” and suggests you view the table while listening.  Paul also addresses the changes to his 401k recommendations from 50/50 U.S/international equities to 70/30 U.S./international, and small cap value from Guggenheim SmallCap 600 Pure Value (RZV) to SPDR Small Cap Value (SLYV); and he compares the return and risk of his buy-and-hold and market-timing accounts.” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Basics 58 mins – “Paul Merriman answers questions about a wide variety of investor concerns: profitable focus funds, using a pension as a substitute for bonds, moving DFA funds to Vanguard, the impact of higher taxes on the market, performance of major asset classes besides the S&P 500, defensive investment strategies for a bear market, popular sector funds, the impact of saving an extra percentage or more a year, the Ultimate Buy and Hold, and an inter-generational conversation about sound investing:” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IT Stories 81 mins – “Technology Veterans weekly podcast with Carey Holzman and Mike Smith” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jad Abumrad 41 mins – “Radiolab co-host Jad Abumrad is a genius. Back in 2011, he was certified when the MacArthur Foundation awarded him a “genius grant.” Jad thinks public radio should be more chaotic, more joyous and more lifelike. This episode was picked by Doug.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Legal Education Technology 20 mins – “Introducing technology to legal education could be the key to inspiring innovation in the legal industry. In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway talk to Darin Fox about how he sees technology functioning in legal education. They discuss the program Darin oversees at the University of Oklahoma, how the recession affected the use of legal technology, and potential future uses of courtroom technology. Darin Fox is an associate dean at the University of Oklahoma College of Law. He oversees the law library, information technology, and the school’s law practice technology training program, called the Digital Initiative Project.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Leonardo Da Vinci 30 mins – “On the eve of a major new Science Museum exhibition, we look at Leonardo’s designs, and consider his influence on modern robotics and aeronautics Leonardo Da Vinci was an incredible polymath: one of the most diversely talented people ever known. The Science Museum’s new exhibition takes the machines that Leonardo drew and exquisitely reinterprets them in three-dimensional form, alongside games and multimedia installations. Nicola Davis is joined by Claudio Giorgione, curator at the Leonardo Da Vinci National Science and Technology museum in Milan, and by Professor Jim Bennett, Keeper Emeritus for the Science Museum.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meat or Not 19 mins – “To meat or not to meat? That is the question. Recent innovations in lab-grown meats seem to be making non-meat burgers and tacos a tastier option than they have ever been. But are these products too good to be true? And are non-meat alternatives always more ecologically responsible than actual meat? This week’s guests on Sea Change Radio have some thoughts on the matter. We speak with the co-founders of Soil4Climate, Seth Itzkan and Karl Thidemann, about the mission of their organization. They lay out the benefits of regenerative farming and grazing practices, as well as a lifestyle that includes eating plenty of meat. They also explain why they hope companies like Impossible Foods ultimately fulfill the promise in their name, and cease to be possible.” At thelinkr ight-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mobile Connectivity in Africa 28 mins – “By the end of this year, 386 million Africans will hold mobile technology in their hands. Clár Ní Chonghaile discusses what this could mean for development, and the problems investors face – from the difficulties over power supplies to the lack of educational opportunities in computing. Viola Llewellyn is a co-founder of Ovamba, which offers financing to small- and medium-sized businesses through a web-based platform with a mobile app. She says there needs to be a shift from traditional learning to education in technological subjects, which will be vital to the continent’s development. Tomi Davies, a Nigerian angel investor, explains the difficulties of trying to put money into tech startups in Africa, as there are no clear policies on taxation or local investing. For Stephen Haggard, the cost of data is one of the biggest issues. He chairs Nairobi-based technology company Eneza Education, and says the cost of airtime is one of the biggest barriers for people wanting to learn. He also discusses the frustration of relying on SMS text messaging, as only 23% of mobile subscribers in Africa have smartphones.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Health Service and Technology – “The NHS is about caring for people, free at the point of care, creating a safety net which catches the most vulnerable. Tech has been defined by the facebook maxim “move fast, break things” – looking to disrupt a sector, get investment and move on. We want to be able to harness the potential utility of digital tech in the NHS – but how can those two cultures be reconciled, and what salutary lessons should we learn from other industries (pharmaceuticals, devices) before we embark on these new ventures. In this podcast we hear from; Neil Sebire, Chief Research Information Officer and Director, Great Ormond Street Hospital Digital Research, Informatics and Virtual Environments (DRIVE) Unit Dr Ramani Moonesinghe, Professor and Head of Centre for Perioperative Medicine, University College London Indra Joshi, Digital Health and Artificial Intelligence Clinical Lead…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the archive of this blog.

Noise in Cities – “Is our blaring modern soundscape harming our health? Cities are noisy places and while people are pretty good at tuning it out on a day-to-day basis our sonic environments have serious, long-term impacts on our mental and physical health. This is part one in a two-part series supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation about how sound can be designed to reduce harm and even improve wellbeing. Many of the sounds we hear are created with very little thought for how they interact with each other. Some of these are byproducts of modern technologies, like engine sounds or the hums of computers. Others are made intentionally, like alarms or cellphone rings. There are the sounds of overhead planes, air conditioning units, stores pumping out music, sirens and then people talking loudly to be heard over the rest of the noise. Then there are cars, which may be the biggest culprit.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Noise in Hospitals – “Sounds can have serious impacts on our wellbeing, even (or especially) in places focused on health like hospitals. This is the second episode in a two-part series supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation about how sound can be designed to reduce harm and even improve wellbeing. “Hospitals are horrible places to get better,” believes Joel Beckerman, sound designer and composer at Man Made Music, who has serious concerns about noise in hospital settings. Joe Schlesinger, a musician and anesthesiologist at Vanderbilt Medical Center, has experiened some of this caucophy firsthand while at work. “As I walk in, there’s the hubbub of people talking,” says Schlesinger. There are clinicians and families talking, and big metal carts rolling down the halls. In the middle of all of this, he also hears alarms coming from various patient rooms. Worse, he says, these “are difficult to localize, so I’m not sure which rooms they’re coming from.” Joel Beckerman has experienced the same thing in hospitals he has worked in. “There is a heart monitor,” he explains, which “makes 86 different alarms … there’s no way that that can be meaningful to anybody.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rape Investigations 48 mins – “A major investigation by The Atlantic finds that the police are still skeptical of women who report a rape. The reporter says a “subterranean river of chauvinism” is to blame.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the this blog archive.

Solzhenitsyn 60 mins – “Historian and author Stephen Kotkin of Princeton University and Stanford University’s Hoover Institution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the historical significance of the life and work of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of Solzhenitsyn’s birth.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Africa at 25 Years 27 mins – “There is a generation in South Africa who are known as the Born Frees. They were born in 1994, the year of the elections in which black citizens were allowed to vote for the first time. The Born Frees are 25 years old now – graduating from universities, getting established in their careers, or still living in enduring poverty, which has reduced since 1994 but is still profound. The government estimates that 13 million South Africans still live in what they call ‘extreme poverty.’ This is a major disappointment to many who queued for hours to vote in the 1994 election which brought Nelson Mandela to power. Despite spending 27 years in an Apartheid jail, Mandela was dedicated to creating a ‘rainbow nation’, with dignity and opportunity for everyone, regardless of race. BBC correspondent Hugh Sykes has visited South Africa regularly since 1994, and in this programme he tells us about the politics of the country, education, corruption and poverty. He finds some young South Africans who have never heard the word ‘Apartheid’ and don’t know what it means. Hugh also examines the unresolved issue of the ownership of South Africa’s farms – which are still mostly in the hands of the small white minority. More than 2000 white farmers have been murdered since 1994. Is this land-grab politics, or random violent crime?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Stephen Hawkin 36 mins – “On 8 January 1942, Frank and Isobel Hawking celebrated the birth of their son, Stephen. 75 years later and Professor Stephen Hawking is one of the most prominent scientists of all time. In a career spanning half a century, the cosmologist has notched up more than 150 scientific papers, a dozen or so books, and a string of TV and film appearances. It’s an achievement made all the more remarkable given his diagnosis with motor neurone disease at the age of 21. In this special edition of Science Weekly, we ask a handful of physicists about his contributions to science and the wider world. Speaking to Ian Sample this week are long-time friend and collaborator Professor Sir Roger Penrose, former student Professor Marika Taylor, Professor Sabine Hossenfelder, and Professor Max Tegmark.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

TB Testing – “A TB infection can take two forms, active and latent. Active disease is transmissible, and causes the damage to the lungs which makes TB one of the biggest killers in the world. In the latent form, the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis is quiescent and can stay that way for years until it becomes active and causes those clinical signs.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology in Law 21 mins – “Ten years ago, dictation and speech recognition were clunky, inefficient, and inaccurate softwares. As the technology emerged, lawyers tried programs like Dragon Dictation, but most decided that speech solutions were not practical or worth using. Today, these softwares are much more accurate and useful for many lawyers, but maintain a similar reputation. How have dictation and speech recognition changed from the past and who can benefit most from them now? Will they work with the programs lawyers are already using in their law firms?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Technology Pros and Cons – “According to the Marist Poll, 49 percent of Americans think technology makes people dumber, while 46 percent say it makes people smarter. So we’re about an even split on this topic. We have immediate access to knowledge and to each other, making us more productive now than ever before. But are we getting any smarter as a result? Experts disagree, and so do the intelligence test results. While non-verbal IQ tests results are rising, Verbal IQ, the Flynn Effect and others are decreasing. There are varying opinions as to why this is happening. Some believe that humans have reached their genetic potential and are now on the decline. Others believe it’s because we let technology do the “thinking” for us. Still, others say it’s just plain laziness. To further complicate the issue, consider the many types of intelligence. There’s social intelligence, emotional intelligence, problem-solving, spatial relations, language, musical, kinesthetic, existential, mathematical, logical … and all of them contain both learned and unlearned aspects.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select the “Save File” option from the pop-up menu.

Trumpnomics 60 mins – “Economist Stephen Moore discusses the economic policies of the Trump administration. He’s interviewed by Veronique de Rugy, senior research fellow at George Mason University Mercatus Center.”At the link you can listen and purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Winnipeg Strike of 1919 54 mins – “It was the biggest labour action in Canadian history: on May 15, 1919, over 35,000 workers took to the streets of Winnipeg for six weeks. It began peacefully and passionately and ended in lethal violence and disagreement over what it  meant.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 414 – Oct 25, 2019: AI in Law, Brain Bleed Stroke Treatment, Broadband in California, Cory Booker, Critical Zone, Double Jeopardy Discussion, Drug Wars, Dying Process, Environmental Justice, European Technology, Knowledge Limits, Liposome Research, Machine Learning, MIT President Interview, Philanthropy, Pitanga Fruit Value, Powerful Companies, Recession Recovery, Recreational Drugs, Robots on the Road, Sleep Needs, Solar Cells and Fusion, Tribalism, TV Ratings, Venture Capitalist, White Coat Uprising in Sudan

Exercise your ears: the 37 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 659 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,300) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Printing Overview 8 mins – “3D printing has grown in sophistication since the late 1970s; TED Fellow Skylar Tibbits is shaping the next development, which he calls 4D printing, where the fourth dimension is time. This emerging technology will allow us to print objects that then reshape themselves or self-assemble over time. Think: a printed cube that folds before your eyes, or a printed pipe able to sense the need to expand or contract.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Download Audio” or “Download Video” from the pop-up menu.

AI in Law 19 mins – “In the latest episode of Crazy/Genius, produced by Patricia Yacob and Jesse Brenneman, we take a long look at the use of AI in the legal system. Algorithms pervade our lives. They determine the news we see and the products we buy. The presence of these tools is relatively obvious: Most people using Netflix or Amazon understand that their experience is mediated by technology. But algorithms also play a quiet and often devastating role in almost every element of the criminal-justice system—from policing and bail to sentencing and parole. By turning to computers, many states and cities are putting Americans’ fates in the hands of algorithms that may be nothing more than mathematical expressions of underlying bias. Perhaps no journalist has done more to uncover this shadowy world of criminal-justice AI than Julia Angwin, a longtime investigative reporter. In 2016, Angwin and a team at ProPublica published a detailed report on COMPAS, a risk-assessment tool created by the company Equivant, then called Northpointe. (After corresponding over several emails, Equivant declined to comment for our story.)” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Batteries 17 mins – “The electric car is making headway, some 100 years after Henry Ford popularized the automobile and some 40 or so since the lithium ion breakthrough. But to better power these growing industries, it’s crucial to create a battery without a risk of explosion (something several device providers know a thing or two about). The major breakthrough could come from the polymer industry. If we’re able to replace an unstable liquid electrolyte with an indestructible piece of plastic, we can make the battery cheaper, safer, lighter and better suited for the auto industry. Better still: replacing lithium with cheaper and more stable magnesium, or using renewables like solar or wind, could increase wide-scale adoption on and off the road. And that could be the most powerful disruption of all.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Blind Ironers 13 mins – “Should blind people bother with the ironing? Blind mum Emma Williams and blind dad Allan Tweddle explain why and when you should bother and give our presenter Lee Kumatat a lesson and tips for getting it right. While some visually impaired people need a first aid certificate to move forward with education or work, some have found it hard to gain the necessary accreditation. Johny Cassidy meets Alan North, a partially sighted trainer who’s helping them to qualify.

Brain Bleed Stroke Treatment 27 mins – “The results of a medical trial called RESTART may be a game changer when it comes to the treatment of patients after a brain haemorrhage. More than a third of these patients take regular blood thinning medication such as aspirin after having had a heart attack or stroke in the past. And after a brain haemorrhage this leaves doctors with a dilemma. Should the antiplatelet medicines be restarted to prevent future heart attacks or could that increase the chances of another brain haemorrhage? Often doctors are reluctant to take the risk. Researchers led by a team at the University of Edinburgh have conducted a randomised controlled trial comparing patients who were restarted on their medication after a brain haemorrhage with those that were not. The surprising results have just been published in the journal Lancet, and lead author professor Rustam al-Shahi Salman tells Claudia what they found. About 12 to 15% of the world’s gold comes from artisanal mining where people work with whatever tools they have to hand. In some countries, such as Kenya, mercury is used to separate the gold from the rock; workers burn the amalgam, sluice it by hand or even put it between their teeth to squeeze out the gold. But touching, inhaling or ingesting mercury has long been known to cause serious health issues such as neurological problems, cancers, miscarriage or damage to a pregnant women’s foetus. Hannah McNeish visited Migori County in Kenya to look at attempts to prevent poisoning from becoming a major public health problem. Every day more than 7,000 people are bitten by snakes, and even though anti-venoms are effective, approximately 300 of those die. As well as people dying, many others are left with serious disabilities, which can leave whole families destitute. This week the World Health Organisation, or WHO, launched a new road map to try to tackle the problem once and for all. And the Wellcome Trust has also just announced that they are investing more than 100 million dollars in scientific research looking at anti-venoms. Dr Bernadette Abela-Ridder is team leader for neglected zoonotic diseases in the Department for the Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases of the WHO.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Broadband in California 25 mins – “This spring, SiFi Networks and Fullerton, California, announced that they will be working together to deploy an open access Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) network across the city of 140,000 people. SiFi will fund and build the network and has already signed up two providers to offer Internet access service to the public. This week, Christopher speaks with Ban Bawtree-Johnson, CEO of SiFi Networks.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cory Booker 32 mins – “Presidential candidate Sen. Cory Booker joins to discuss the first round of debates and why he should be the Democratic nominee. He speaks with Jane Clayson. Plus, we look at the growing threat of ransomware attacks with Frances Robles and Tyler Moore.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Critical Zone 27 mins – “Dr. Pannell sits down the Dr. Sue Brantley, distinguished Professor of Geosciences at Penn State. She is particularly interested in the critical zone – the zone from the top of vegetation canopy to groundwater.At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Donner Party 27 mins – “Did they or didn’t they? There is plenty of written evidence that the ill-fated Donner Party resorted to cannibalism – except there are no bones. Learn the details of one of the worst disasters of the early West in this classic episode of Stuff You Should Know.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Double Jeopardy Rule 33 mins – “The Supreme Court upholds the double jeopardy rule that allows states and the federal government to prosecute for the same crime. The ruling could blunt President Trump’s pardon powers.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Wars 44 mins – “Robin Feldman of the University of California Hastings College of Law and author of Drug Wars talks about her book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Feldman explores the various ways that pharmaceutical companies try to reduce competition from generic drugs. The conversation includes a discussion of the Hatch-Waxman Act and the sometimes crazy world of patent protection.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dying Process 45 mins – “Chuck and Josh have covered just about every aspect of death except dying itself. Here, they fulfill the death suite of podcasts with an in-depth look at just how people die, what happens to the body during the dying process and how people accept death — and what they regret not having done while they lived.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Economic Development Regulation 75 mins – “Simeon Djankov, creator of the World Bank’s Doing Business Report, and Matt Warner, Chief Operating Officer of Atlas Network talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the role regulation plays in economic development and the challenges of measuring regulatory barriers to new business creation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Justice 18 mins – “Dr. Pannell welcomes Dr. Robert Figueroa of Oregon State University co -author of Science and other cultures for a compelling talk on Environmental justice, DDT, the philosophy of science and many other topics. …Over the past decade, Rob has edited the special issue of the Journal of Environmental Philosophy on Ecotourism and Environmental Justice (fall 2010).  He has published widely on environmental justice studies working to extend both the applications of environmental justice in multiple disciplines and to rethink justice theory through grassroots experiences. One example of this has involved cultural geographer Gordon Waitt from the University of Wollongong, Australia.  Rob and Gordon have been studying ecotourism and environmental justice at Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park in the Northern Territory of Australia since 2005.  Their Uluru Project has produced several publications combining philosophy and geography in an affective, qualitative methodology that has shaped thought in tourism studies, environmental justice, critical geography, and restorative justice for indigenous peoples.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

European Technology 28 mins – “Syed Kamall, a member of the European Parliament, talked about European Union (EU) technology policy issues. Topics included the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) privacy regulations of concern to some U.S.-based companies, and the impact of the U.K.’s exit from the EU (also known as “Brexit” on technology developments.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Financial Guidance 48 mins – “My recent opportunities to educate investors have been extremely satisfying, including a presentation to teenagers and their parents on Bainbridge Island, mostly-retired investors at the AAII chapter in Portland, OR and to 200 students at Western Washington University. The following are questions that came rolling in from the groups, as well as emails from our readers and listeners….” At the link right-click “Download’ an dselect “Save Link as from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Trends 19 mins – “Although fingerprint identification has been in use for centuries, it wasn’t until the 19th Century that criminal investigators used it as protocol for prosecution or exoneration. The dawn of the fingerprint era occurred in Argentina, as fingerprints left by a mother at the scene of the crime freed authorities’ prime suspect and convicted the mother. From there, forensic disciplines would later proliferate to include footprints, tire tracks, hair samples and – the gold standard – DNA.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Geologist 19 mins – “Dr. Pannell sits down with Dr. Bin Chen an Assistant Researcher in Mineral Physics and Experimental Petrology at Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawaii at Manoa. The focus of my research is to understand the physics and chemistry of Earth and planetary interiors through direct examination of material properties under high pressure-temperature conditions using a wide spectrum of techniques available in synchrotron and neutron facilities and in-house laboratories.At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Knowledge Limits 25 mins – “Why do ideas discarded for centuries, like electric cars, return to the cutting edge of science and technology?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liposome Research 18 mins – “Dr. Pannell sits down with Dr. Keelung Hong, Ph.D., who founded Taiwan Liposome Company, Ltd. (TLC) in 1997 and serves as its Chairman and Chief Executive Officer.Dr.Hong has a very distinctive connection with UTEP.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Machine Learning 41 mins – “Can machine learning improve the use of data and evidence for understanding economics and public policy? Susan Athey of Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how machine learning can be used in conjunction with traditional econometric techniques to measure the impact of say, the minimum wage or the effectiveness of a new drug. The last part of the conversation looks at the experimental techniques being used by firms like Google and Amazon.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MIT President Interview 38 mins – “If an asteroid were spotted hurtling toward Earth, we wouldn’t be arguing over whether asteroids exist. But that’s basically what the politicization of science has done to the public discussion about climate change, says former MIT president Susan Hockfield. “I understand that people might debate the fine points of climate change, but the fact is that the best science indicates that we’re in trouble,” Hockfield said on the latest episode of Recode Decode with Kara Swisher, adding, “It’s simply folly to my mind not to step up and invent the technologies that are going to prevent us from the ravages of climate change that we’re inflicting on the planet, or frankly whether it’s us or anyone or some other natural operation.” …Hockfield’s latest book, which she discusses at length in the new podcast with Swisher, is The Age of Living Machines: How Biology Will Build the Next Technology Revolution.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Moon and Saturn 47 mins – “3,2,1 … liftoff. We celebrate the moon mission at 50 and look at the future of space exploration.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nanoparticles and Twitter 32 mins – “Nanoparticles and twitter peer review” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Philanthropy 45 mins – “’We live in extremely unequal and frankly inequitable times,’ says Rockefeller Foundation president Raj Shah. But Shah, who previously worked with US Aid and Bill and Melinda Gates, says he’s optimistic about the long-term future. “I am an optimist today because I believe most people in Washington and around this country want to live in a more fair and more just world, are willing to work together to get there, and they need leaders who will honor that and bring out those tendencies as opposed to the tendencies that tend to tear us apart,” he said on the latest episode of Recode Decode. Speaking with Recode’s Teddy Schleifer at the 2019 Code Conference, Shah said that to do the most good, private philanthropies like Rockefeller should be working hand-in-hand with politicians who are “conscientious, more informed, and more evidence- and data-based” than today’s trendy right-wing populists. “We believe in public-private partnerships,” Shah said. “The greatest hits of the Rockefeller Foundation, and frankly of all of philanthropy, have been efforts to create human progress with the public sector and with the private sector, not trying to replace it.”” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Pitanga Fruit Value 45 mins – “Pitanga extends life in worms, Smart dust has shrunk by Ian Woolf, David Hinwood designs robots to recycle old clothing.” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pope Francis Encyclical 39 mins – “Is capitalism part of the poverty problem facing the world or part of the solution? Are human beings doing a good job preserving the earth for future generations? To improve the world, should we improve capitalism or ourselves? Robert Whaples of Wake Forest University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about “Laudato Si’,” Pope Francis’s encyclical on capitalism, poverty, and environmental issues.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Powerful Companies 41 mins – “New York University Professor Scott Galloway talks about his book The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google. He discussed what he calls the four most powerful companies in the world and their impact on our lives.” At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Public Health Service 28 mins – “Dr. Keith Panell sits down with Brett P. Giroir (born November 4, 1960 in Marrero, Louisiana) is an American physician-scientist who is the current Assistant Secretary for Health[1] and a four-star admiral in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps. He concurrently serves as the Senior Advisor for Mental Health and Opioid Policy.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recession Recovery 46 mins – “Economist Robert Hall of Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the current state of the U.S. economy and what we know and don’t know about the recovery from the Great Recession. Much of the conversation focuses on the choices facing the Federal Reserve and the policy instruments the Fed has available. The conversation includes a discussion of Hall’s experience as chair of the National Bureau of Economic Research Committee on Business Cycle Dating.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recreational Drugs 47 mins – “How did heroin spread beyond big cities in America? What’s the connection between heroin and America’s opioid problem? Sam Quinones, author of Dreamland, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the explosion in heroin use and how one small Mexican town changed how heroin was produced and sold in America. That in turn became entangled with the growth in the use of pain-killers as recreational drugs. Drawing on the investigative reporting that culminated in his book, Quinones lays out the recent history and economics of the growth in heroin and pain-killer usage and the lost lives along the way.” At the link right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Robots 35 mins – “At SXSW, we brought together leading experts in the field of AI for a special live panel discussion on the future of robots – in our homes, at work, and anywhere else they can go. We gathered all the highlights here for you in this episode. Meet Kuri: Your new adorable robot friend who takes pictures, videos and can make you feel a little less lonely inside. What else might homeward-bound bots be able to accomplish someday? And how did we get all the way here? We’ve come quite a way from Leonardo da Vinci’s early animatronic designs, and Ada Lovelace’s algorithmic acrobatics. By the 1950s, we forged the first robot arm, and soon after, the earliest of artificial intelligence – foreshadowing the army of roombas entertaining your cat (and cleaning your floors) at home today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Robots on the Road 18 mins – “The world’s biggest car makers and technology companies are investing billions of dollars in autonomous vehicles. They believe it’s just a few years before computers with high-tech sensors do the driving for us, filling our roads with robot cars ferrying human passengers from A to B. But is a driverless future really just around the corner? The BBC’s technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones travels to Arizona in the US – a hotbed for autonomous vehicle testing – to try out the robot taxi service developed by Google that’s already ferrying paying passengers around the suburbs of Phoenix, and discovers that robots still have a lot of learning to do when it comes to the tough driving conditions on busy American freeways. He also hears how Arizona locals have responded to sharing their roads with robots, and visits the Phoenix suburb that saw the first fatal accident involving a driverless car to ask if autonomous technology will ever be safe enough to gain public acceptance. Despite those challenges, we hear from car-maker Ford about its plans for a driverless car service in the next two years as car makers race to keep up with tech firms like Google and Uber in the autonomous driving space, and critics of the technology discuss how robot cars might change the dynamic between cars, pedestrians and other road users forever.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Sleep Needs 19 mins – “Sleep is your life-support system and Mother Nature’s best effort yet at immortality, says sleep scientist Matt Walker. In this deep dive into the science of slumber, Walker shares the wonderfully good things that happen when you get sleep — and the alarmingly bad things that happen when you don’t, for both your brain and body. Learn more about sleep’s impact on your learning, memory, immune system and even your genetic code — as well as some helpful tips for getting some shut-eye.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Cells and Fusion 18 mins – “Dr. Pannell sits down with Dr. David Strubbe of the University of California at Merced for a compelling dicussion on solar cells & nuclear fusion. His interests  vary from theoretical condensed-matter physics to thermoelectrics. [The list of UC Merced’s research strengths is long and includes climate change and ecology; solar and renewable energy; water quality and resources; artificial intelligence; cognitive science; stem-cell, diabetes and cancer research; air quality; big-data analysis; computer science; mechanical, environmental and materials engineering; political science; and much, much more.]” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supermarket Trends 32 mins – “For 100 years, the supermarket has been the place to go to purchase groceries –but that’s rapidly changing and will almost certainly not be the case in the coming decade. Here, we look back on its reign at the top, and look ahead to its very precarious future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Tectonic Science 28 mins – “Dr. Pannell welcomes Professor Frances Cooper from the University of Bristol in England. Her research is focused on understanding the mechanics of large-scale continental deformation and the evolution of orogenic systems.At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tribalism 62 mins – “EconTalk host Russ Roberts does a monologue on how political discourse seems to have deteriorated in recent years and the growth in outrage, tribalism, and intolerance for those with different views from one’s own. Roberts suggests that part of the problem is the revolution of the market for information caused by the internet that allows people to customize what they see to fit their own political narratives and worldview. In short, the market for news works to make us feel good rather than to help us to discover the truth. The monologue closes with some suggestions for how we might improve the way we consume information and interact with those we disagree with.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tribalism 76 mins – “Journalist and author Sebastian Junger talks about his book Tribe with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Junger explores the human need to be needed and the challenges facing many individuals in modern society who struggle to connect with others. His studies of communal connection include soldiers in a small combat unit and American Indian society in the nineteenth century.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

TV Ratings 30 mins – “Ever wonder why some great shows go off the air after a season or less? Blame it on the Nielsen company, which has for more than 60 years been the almost exclusive decider of what goes and what stays on TV.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Venture Capitalist 30 mins – “Scott Kupor, managing partner at the venture capital firm Andreesen Horowitz, talks about the role that venture capitalists play in silicon valley and the process that start-ups go through to acquire funding.” At the link find the title, “Scott Kupor,” in the C-Span Communicators, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vertical Farming 30 mins- “How are we going to feed everybody on Earth? It’s not just a common question – it’s one that’s been asked for centuries. As the population keeps growing exponentially (10 billion by 2050), leading thinkers, farmers, inventors and governments keep coming back to this question. The agricultural revolution that introduced high-yield crops like wheat and barley won’t be the same one that powers us into the future. We’ll need ever-more fresh fruits and vegetables – well beyond the scope of what John Deere’s famed steel plow and Cyrus McCormick’s mechanical reaper can handle.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

White Coat Uprising in Sudan 27 mins – “When ongoing street protests finally pushed Sudan’s repressive president from power last month, it was the country’s doctors many thanked. Ever since Omar al-Bashir’s successful coup in 1989 they had defied him. Staging strikes, organising demonstrations, and campaigning for human rights, the country’s white-coated men and women opposed all he stood for. In the last few months alone scores of them were jailed, beaten, tortured and some deliberately gunned down. Through the eyes of a murdered medic’s family, Mike Thomson looks at the extraordinary role these unlikely revolutionaries have played in Sudan’s uprising.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 413 – Oct 18, 2019: 5G Defined, Africa’s Place in the World, AI and Law, Black and Armed, Cherokee Slaves, Chronic Kidney Disease, Cyberattacks, Death from Infection, Economic Puzzles, Ego Control, Eugenics, Financial Management for Lawyers, Food Waste, Free Speech on Campus, Fuel Theft in Mexico, Holocaust Activities, Information Age Impact, Investment Fundamental, Jackson vs Trump, Jean Vanier, John Delaney, Kibbutz Discussion, Krauthammer, LGBT Life, Library of Congress Librarian, Live Aid Concert, Medical Risks, Michael Ramierez, Mobile Devices and Health, Motif Investing, Ocasio-Cortez, POW Churchill, Preet Bharara, Prenatal Care, President Coolidge, Public Housing in NYC, RA21 Intiative, Race Relations, Racism and Politics, RAICES Immigration Activists, Rare Earth Minerals in China, Religious Identity and Politics, Revolutionary, Ro Khanna, Supreme Court Cases, Transhumanism

Exercise your ears: the 61 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 709 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,300) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

5G Defined 20 mins “The 5G network of the future will manage super-complex tasks quickly, and both China and the United States want to control it.” At the link find the title, “What is 5G — and why are the US and China fighting over it?” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included on this blog archive.

Afghanistan Elvis 53 mins – “Ahmad Zahir with his dark shock of hair, sultry voice and overwhelming stage presence more than earned the nickname “The Afghan Elvis” but he was so much more. He remains Afghanistan’s most beloved musician even though he died at the age of 33 after a short, dazzling career. Ahmad Zahir was killed in a mysterious car crash in the terrible year of 1979, when violence and mayhem were sweeping the country following Soviet invasion. The aching love songs of Ahmad Zahir are the mix tape for generations of exiles and Afghans who stayed on through the Taliban era and beyond, binding together millions of people despite their differences. His grave remains a site of pilgrimage and has been rebuilt since the Taliban blew it up, intending to blast away pop music for ever. To hear Ahmad Zahir on his legendary live performances on Radio Kabul or on any of his 22 albums is to understand an Afghanistan beyond its politics. He fused Western musical styles with Indian classical forms and the tender poetry of the ancient Persian classics like Rumi, Hafiz, Maulana Jami and the Afghan poet Khalilullah Khalili…whilst also belting out Elvis’s ‘It’s Now or Never’ or playing around with other Western pop hits like ‘Que Sera, Sera’. Monica Whitlock hears a new generation of musicians interpret some Ahmad Zahir classics and explores the life and lasting impact of the “Afghan Elvis”.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Africa’s Place in the World 45 mins – “In this week’s podcast we look at two novels which explore west Africa’s place in the world. Yaa Gyasi’s award-winning debut, Homegoing, follows three generations from the start of the slave trade on the 18th century Gold Coast to modern day America. She discusses the bitter legacy of slavery and the importance of reclaiming your own history. Chibundu Onuzo’s second novel trains a comic eye on the excesses of modern-day Lagos through the eyes of five fugitives who become unlikely housemates with a mission to redistribute the wealth of a corrupt society. She explains why humour is such an essential tool in the examination of her country’s ills.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

African Novels 52 mins – “This week we have a lecture titled “New Perspectives on the African Novel” by Mukoma Wa Ngugi, Associate Professor of Africana Studies and English at Cornell University.  This weeks’ lecture is presented by the Boston University African American Studies Program, and the African Studies Center.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI and Law 29 mins – “You don’t actually need to worry about a robot taking your job. In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Jim Calloway and Sharon Nelson talk to Andrew Arruda, CEO of ROSS Intelligence, about how artificial intelligence assists lawyers, not replaces them. Their conversation includes what ROSS is, the biggest misconceptions surrounding AI, and the biggest challenges facing legal technology adoption in larger firms. Andrew Arruda is Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder of the artificial intelligence company ROSS Intelligence, a leader in the legal technology industry.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Black and Armed 47 mins – “African-Americans and gun ownership. In his new memoir, RJ Young writes about what he calls a “literal arms race … ramped up by racialized fear.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cherokee Slaves 29 mins – “In Oklahoma, Tayo Popoola discovers the story of the slaves owned by the Cherokee Indian tribe. Since the emancipation of the slaves in the 19th Century, there has been an often uneasy relationship between the so called “Freedmen” and their former masters, both racial minorities with long histories of persecution in the US. In 2017 the Freedmen won a long battle to be admitted as full members of the Cherokee tribe.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Kidney Disease 13 mins – “With a rising death toll from chronic kidney disease of unknown origin (CKDu) — also known in Central America as Mesoamerican nephropathy — and with greenhouse gas emissions driving global temperature increases, we are woefully short of early screening tools and treatment options for tens of thousands of patients. CKDu was first described in El Salvador in the 1990s, when unusually large numbers of agricultural workers began dying from irreversible renal failure.1 It quickly became evident that the phenomenon was pervasive among innumerable agricultural communities in hot, humid regions of Central America. CKDu’s presence is now potentially global, with similar disease patterns observed in North America, South America, the Middle East, Africa, and India. In Central America, CKD has become a leading cause of hospitalization and death, owing in large part to CKDu. Over the past decade, the death toll from CKD rose 83% in Guatemala, and CKD is now the second leading cause of death in both Nicaragua and El Salvador. Though these statistics are alarming, the true global burden of disease is unknown, because affected areas tend to have a poor health care infrastructure, which leaves cases undetected or underreported….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Congressional Historians 59 mins – “Congressional historians Richard Baker, Ray Smock, and Donald Ritchie talked about American history and the U.S. Congress.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cyberattacks 21 mins – “Cyberattacks are on the rise. And more and more, artificial intelligence is helping both the attackers and the people combating them.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included on this blog archive.

Death from Infection 24 mins – “April 15 to 30, 2019. Bugs move north. Best treatment for MRSA? Half assed antibiotics work great for arthritis. Knowing what you are doing improves Candidemia outcomes. And more.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death from Infection 23 mins – “April 15 to 30, 2019. Bugs move north. Best treatment for MRSA? Half assed antibiotics work great for arthritis. Knowing what you are doing improves Candidemia outcomes. And more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Disease Prevention 48 mins – :We often know how to plan for the future, but find it hard to take the necessary steps. This hour, TED speakers challenge the inevitable and explore what to do today to prepare ourselves for tomorrow.” At the link you can listen, ubt not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Economic Puzzles 58 mins -”How can you learn to think like an economist? One way is to think about what might be called dinner table economics–puzzles or patterns that arise in everyday life that would be good to understand. Robert Frank of Cornell University and author of The Economic Naturalist talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about a number of these puzzles including why grooms typically rent tuxedos but the bride usually buys her gown, why bicycles can be more expensive to rent than cars, the effects of the price of corn on the price of pork, and why scammers who invoke Nigeria keep using the same old story.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ego Control 66 mins – “How does our attitude toward ourselves affect our success or failure in the world of business or in friendship? Ryan Holiday, author of Ego Is the Enemy, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the role of ego in business, our personal lives, and world history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eugenics 53 mins – “When a law student named Mark Bold came across a Supreme Court decision from the 1920s that allowed for the forced sterilization of people deemed “unfit,” he was shocked to discover that it had never been overturned. His law professors told him the case, Buck v Bell, was nothing to worry about, that the ruling was in a kind of legal limbo and could never be used against people. But he didn’t buy it. In this episode we follow Mark on a journey to one of the darkest consequences of humanity’s attempts to measure the human mind and put people in boxes, following him through history, science fiction and a version of eugenics that’s still very much alive today, and watch as he crusades to restore a dash of moral order to the universe.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Management for Lawyers 24 mins – “Due to the changing landscape of legal services, small to medium sized law firms need to consistently update their financial management processes. Essentially, these firms need to provide affordable services to their clients while ensuring the owners get the compensation they believe they deserve. But without necessarily having an in-house financial manager, how do they…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Financial Services 64 mins – “Journalist and author Rana Foroohar of the Financial Times talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about her book, Makers and Takers. Foroohar argues that finance has become an increasingly powerful part of the U.S. economy and has handicapped the growth and effectiveness of manufacturing and the rest of the economy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food History 67 mins – “Rachel Laudan, visiting scholar at the University of Texas and author of Cuisine and Empire, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the history of food. Topics covered include the importance of grain, the spread of various styles of cooking, why French cooking has elite status, and the reach of McDonald’s. The conversation concludes with a discussion of the appeal of local food and other recent food passions.” At the link right-click “Download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Waste 62 mins – “Historian Rachel Laudan talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about food waste. Laudan argues that there are tradeoffs in preventing food waste–in reduced time for example, or a reduction in food security, and that these tradeoffs need to be measured carefully when considering policy or giving advice to individuals or organizations. She also discusses the role of food taboos and moralizing about food. Along the way, Laudan defends the virtue of individual choice and freedom in deciding what to eat.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Speech on Campus 59 mins – “University of Pennsylvania Law School Professor Amy Wax talked about the limits of free expression on U.S. college campuses.” At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is also included in this blog podcast archive.

Fuel Theft in Mexico 53 mins – “In a country infamous for its drug cartels, Mexico has another booming black market – petrol. Starting out as just a few individuals tapping lines to sell to their local communities, petrol theft has now attracted the heavyweights of organised crime who see the appeal in peddling a product that is used by more of the population, and that does not even need to cross a border to be sold. Yet, as the government and gas company Pemex race to find a way to stop the fuel thieves, known throughout Mexico as huachicoleros, there is more evolving than confrontation. Through film, song and prayer, are we also witnessing the first blooms of a burgeoning culture? Juan Paullier visits Mexico’s ‘Red Triangle’, a region of central Puebla where dozens of pipelines intersect, to discover how the activities of the huachicoleros are already becoming immortalised in folklore. Visiting a local market, Juan speaks to a woman who sells costumes for the baby Jesus dolls that get blessed at the important religious festival, Dia De Candelaria. In recent years, she has had an influx of requests for the garments of El Santo Niño Huachicol, the patron saint of petrol thieves. But who are these people choosing to pray for petrol? Next, he meets musician Tamara Alcantara, who performs original songs about the huachicoleros at family celebrations, and Edgar Nito, who is making the first ever feature film on the topic. Juan also asks Mexican Culture Expert, Miguel Cabanas, how these developing activities compare to the start of narco culture, and whether we can use the culture around petrol to help us predict the future impact of the huachicoleros.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Group Dynamics 33 mins – “Are we biologically primed to fear outsiders? And can science help us bridge the divide when conflicts arise?In this rebroadcast from earlier in the year, Ian Sample is joined in the studio by social psychologist Professor Miles Hewstone and primatologist Dr Kit Opie to discuss group behaviour and the divisions that define us as human. In light of everything that’s happened in 2016, the topics covered are as pertinent now as they were when we originally recorded them.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Holocaust Activities 53 mins – “Our lecture this week is titled “Protectors of Pluralism: Religious Minorities and the Rescue of Jews in the Low Countries During the Holocaust.”  Our speaker is Robert Braun, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley.  This weeks’ lecture is presented by the Boston University Pardee School of Global Studies, and the Center for the Study of Europe, and is co-sponsored by the Elie Wiesel Center for Jewish Studies and the minor in Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Studies.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-u menu.

Information Age Impact 62 mins – “EconTalk host Russ Roberts does a monologue on how political discourse seems to have deteriorated in recent years and the growth in outrage, tribalism, and intolerance for those with different views from one’s own. Roberts suggests that part of the problem is the revolution of the market for information caused by the internet that allows people to customize what they see to fit their own political narratives and worldview. In short, the market for news works to make us feel good rather than to help us to discover the truth. The monologue closes with some suggestions for how we might improve the way we consume information and interact with those we disagree with.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

International Publishers Association 24 mins – “Publisher Voices Raised for CopyrightRecord at Frankfurt Book Fair 2018WithMichiel Kolman, president, International Publishers Association&Michael Healy, Copyright Clearance CenterHEALY: Good afternoon, everyone, and welcome. Thank you very much for joining us on the stage this afternoon. My name is Michael Healy. I’m the executive director of international relations at CCC. I’m thrilled to welcome an old friend, Michiel Kolman, the current president of the International Publishers Association.I say old friend because we were reminiscing behind the stage here about how many years we’ve known one another, and it’s so long ago that neither of us can remember.KOLMAN: Exactly. Decades.HEALY:Thetopic of conversation, as you all know, is copyright, and I can see in the audience people far better qualified than myself to conduct an interview of this kind. (laughter) But we’re delighted to have you here. Thank you so much for joining.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy of it is included in this blog archive.

Investment Fundamentals 44 mins – “Paul speaks with Ken Roberts in this episode of “Ken’s Bulls and Bears,” as they answer listeners’ questions: 7:55- How important are the expenses I pay on my investment portfolio? 10:06- Is diversifying really that important? What about loading up on winning stocks like Facebook and Apple? 19:54- What can investors do to manage risk in their fixed-income investments if interest rates start rising? 25:50- I’m in my early 30’s and for the last five years I have been putting all of my 401k into an S&P index fund; it has been doing very well. I want to add some international funds this year. What the best percentages? 30:00- I attended a seminar by an investment advisor who said he can use technical analysis to determine whether to be fully invested or sit in cash and be defensive during market downturns. Wouldn’t a strategy like that be better than buy-and-hold? 39:45 I recently retired and am invested in 60% stock funds and 40% bonds. How often should I re-adjust my allocation?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jackson vs Trump 58 mins – “Cumberland University history professor Mark Cheathem discusses his book, [Andrew Jackson, Southerner], and talks about the comparisons made between President Jackson and President Trump.” At the link under the Q&A section find the title, “Q&A with Mark Cheathem,” which can be heard, but not downloaded; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Jean Vanier P1 and 2 108 mins – “”Community is a sign that love is possible in a materialistic world.” Jean Vanier, who founded the L’Arche movement in 1963 for people with profound disabilities, quickly learned that “normal” people have much to learn about being human by watching those we perceive as weak. Jean Vanier died on May 7 in France at the age of 91. In memory of, and in tribute to, one of the most influential people of our time, we present this rebroadcast of Philip Coulter’s series The Rabbit and the Giraffe, recorded in 2016.” At the link P1 can be heard but not downloaded, and here for P2; however, both podcasts are included in this blog archive.

John Delaney 64 mins – “Representative John Delaney (D-MD), the first Democrat to declare for president in 2020, offers his vision for America. He was interviewed by Donna Brazile, former chair of the Democratic National Committee.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Kibbutz Discussion 67 mins – “Economist and author Ran Abramitzky of Stanford University talks about his book, The Mystery of the Kibbutz, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Abramitzky traces the evolution of the kibbutz movement in Israel and how the kibbutz structure changed to cope with the modernization and development of the Israeli economy. The conversation includes a discussion of how the history of the kibbutz might help us to understand the appeal and challenges of the socialism and freedom.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Krauthammer 59 mins – “Charles Krauthammer was interviewed about his syndicated column in the Washington Post and the policies of President Bush in his second term. He also talked about his life and career, political philosophy, and observations about American politics and culture.” At the link under the Q&A section find the title, “Q&A with Charles Krauthammer,” which can be heard, but not downloaded; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Law Office Management 24 mins – “Due to the changing landscape of legal services, small to medium sized law firms need to consistently update their financial management processes. Essentially, these firms need to provide affordable services to their clients while ensuring the owners get the compensation they believe they deserve. But without necessarily having an in-house financial manager, how do they maintain the right balance? In this episode of The Digital Edge, Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview John Iezzi, author of “Results-Oriented Financial Management: A Step-by-Step Guide to Law Firm Profitability,” which is a book about compensation issues in small and mid-sized firms, what successful financial management looks like, and changes small firm lawyers need to make.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

LGBT Life 29 mins – “This week, we have a special edition of The Moth Podcast, celebrating Pride Month and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. We wanted to include a broad range of voices and perspectives for this episode, so we have two Moth stories from LGBTQ storytellers, Richard Cardillo and Sonia Audi, and two interviews, one with Stonewall Veteran Martin Boyce, and one with poet and activist Kay Ulanday Barrett.” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Library of Congress Librarian 59 mins – “James Billington talked about his experiences during his 20 years as the head of the Library of Congress. Other topics included the library’s future, the explosion of digital material, and the role of libraries in our culture. Mr. Billington was sworn in on September 14, 1987, and is the 13th person to hold the position since the Library of Congress was established in 1800. He was interviewed on the stage before an audience in the Coolidge Auditorium at the library’s Thomas Jefferson Building as part of the American Library Association’s annual conference.” At the link under the Q&A Section find the title, “Q&A with James Billington,” which can be heard, but not downloaded; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Live Aid Concert 55 mins – “Live Aid was a revolutionary concert event in two countries in 1985 that spanned the world via satellite. The brainchild of musician Bob Geldof, it really did help change the world in many ways, but its direct impact on Ethiopian famine relief remains in question. Listen and learn today!” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Luck and Success 72 mins – “Is your success in life your own doing? Robert Frank of Cornell University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his latest book, Success and Luck. Frank argues that we underestimate the role that luck plays in our success and makes the case for a progressive consumption tax as a way to improve even the welfare of the wealthy.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Risks 71 mins – “Should women get routine mammograms? Should men get regular PSA exams? Robert Aronowitz of the University of Pennsylvania and the author of Risky Medicine talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the increasing focus on risk reduction rather than health itself as a goal. Aronowitz discusses the social and political forces that push us toward more preventive testing even when those tests have not been shown to be effective. Aronowitz’s perspective is a provocative look at the opportunity cost of risk-reduction.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Michael Ramirez 59 mins – “Michael Ramirez talked about his career as an editorial cartoonist and his book, Give Me Liberty or Give Me Obamacare.” At the link under the Q&A Section find the title, “Q&A with Michael Ramirez,” which can be heard, but not downloaded; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mobile Devices and Health 14 mins – “Mobile health involves sensors, mobile apps, social media, and location-tracking technology used in disease diagnosis, prevention, and management. This article provides an overview of key functional and regulatory aspects…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Motif Investing 60 mins – “The Motif Investing and M1 Finance companies allow investors to create a customized portfolio of individual securities and ETFs.  Paul and Chris Pedersen compare these two low cost ways to create do-it-yourself robo portfolios.  In both cases there are great advantages and important limitations.  Chris recently compared the important differences in a table that may be useful as you listen to their discussion of these innovative trading platforms, which covers fees, minimum investments, rebalancing limits, reinvesting dividends, tax management, portfolio construction, and how investors can build portfolios using the recommended portfolios on the Merriman website.  For those who want to learn more, here are links to M1 and Motif.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocasio-Cortez 47 mins – “Radical? Or the right thing to do? We’ll analyze the numbers behind Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s proposal to push the top tax rate to 70 percent.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Perception Differences 80 mins – “Neurologist and author Robert Burton talks about his book, On Being Certain, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Burton explores our need for certainty and the challenge of being skeptical about what our brain tells us must be true. Where does what Burton calls “the feeling of knowing” come from? Why can memory lead us astray? Burton claims that our reaction to events emerges from competition among different parts of the brain operating below our level of awareness. The conversation includes a discussion of the experience of transcendence and the different ways humans come to that experience.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

POW Churchill 59 mins – “Candice Millard talked about her book, Hero of the Empire: The Boer War, a Daring Escape, and the Making of Winston Churchill, in which she recalls the actions of future British Prime Minister Winston Churchill during the Boer War.” At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is also included in this blog podcast archive.

Preet Bharara 69 mins – “Preet Bharara, the former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York and host of the podcast Stay Tuned With Preet, talks with Recode’s Kara Swisher. In this episode: Bharara’s background; digital crime and the “ticking time bomb” of hacking threats; why Bharara was fired by President Trump; what he did post-firing; his Twitter fatigue; the public’s newfound interest in the law; his new book, “Doing Justice”; the “first principles” of law that the entire country could benefit from; the Mueller report; how the Southern District of New York thinks about its work; Nancy Pelosi’s declaration of a “constitutional crisis”; did social media undermine the Mueller report?; the problem with tech and whether companies will be held criminally liable; how tech will change the practice of law; and should we be optimistic about the future?” At the link left-click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” file and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prenatal Care 26 mins – “Crockett ended up deciding pretty early: She wanted to be a doctor who worked with pregnant women. She went through medical school and residency, and kept learning about other cool technologies. “A lot of things I was seeing in training were like, in utero surgery for spinal cord defects and lasers to treat Twin-Twin transfusion,” she remembers. When Crockett first started her job running a women’s clinic here in the mid-2000s, South Carolina was one of the most dangerous places for a baby to be born. It had the 49th worst infant mortality rate in the United States in 2005, doing better than only Mississippi. Rural counties had infant mortality rates similar to Third World countries. Crockett began running an experiment to try to fix this problem. But her solution wasn’t driven by a new technology or innovation. It was much simpler than that: She had women in her clinic do their prenatal care visits in big, group appointments. The visits last two hours, and look a lot more like a support group than a traditional doctor visit.” At the link left-click share, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

President Coolidge Biographer 58 mins – “Bloomberg correspondent and author Amity Shlaes talked about her biography of the 30th President of the United States, Coolidge, in which she traces the life of Calvin Coolidge from his early days in Plymouth Notch, Vermont through his presidency and ultimate return to New England where he died at the age of 60. She said that Coolidge should be remembered for the fact that when he left office in 1929, the federal budget was lower than when he took office in 1923. She told the story of Coolidge’s rise through local and state politics in Vermont and Massachusetts, and describes Coolidge’s involvement as governor of Massachusetts with the Boston Police strike in 1919. She suggested that his actions gave him a national reputation as a decisive leader. She also reviewed the years of Coolidge’s presidency which were marked by the introduction of electricity in the country, the widespread use of automobiles, and the reversal of the federal budget deficit into a surplus.” At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is also included in this blog podcast archive.

Public Housing in NYC 48 minsA study conducted as part of a lawsuit in the City of New York found part of its affordable housing policy might deepen segregation. Policy advocates say that it can also prevent displacement. J. David Gooman, Vicki Been, Ed Goetz and Christie McCravy join Meghna Chakrabarti.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

RA21 Initiative 43 mins – “For years, many corporations and academic institutions have relied on Internet Protocol (IP) addresses – numerical labels assigned to devices when connected to a computer network – to provide access to their enterprise subscriptions. In today’s distributed network environment, however, IP authentication has outlived its useful life. When attempting to access subscribed content and other resources while off-site or on off-network mobile devices, many end-users can find themselves shut out. On Thursday, November 15, Copyright Clearance Center welcomed Helen Malone of GlaxoSmithKline and Ralph Youngen of the American Chemical Society to learn about the findings from a corporate pilot by the Resource Access for the 21st Century initiative (RA21) that focused on best practices for adopting federated identity to streamline the user experience for access.” At the link right-click “Download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism and Politics 47 mins – “From President Trump’s “go back” tweets to the dispute between the “squad” and House Speaker Pelosi. We take a look at race and racism in Washington.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

RAICES Immigration Activists 41 mins – “Jonathan Ryan and Erika Andiola, the CEO and chief advocacy officer at RAICES, talk with Vox.com’s Ezra Klein at the 2019 Code Conference. In this episode: The current situation at the US-Mexico border; the increasing power of the executive branch of the US government as you approach the border; how tech companies like Palantir, Amazon, Microsoft, and Dell are working with ICE; the history of corporations enabling unconstitutional behavior; alternatives for the government; what would be a non-tyrannical way of handling immigration?; the “political football” of immigration reform; and the role of sanctuary cities.” At the link left-click the square with three dots and “More” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rare Earth Elements P1 and 2 58 mins – “The 17 rare earth elements are often called the spices or vitamins of industry. While we don’t need much of them, they’re sprinkled in small amounts through our most powerful, futuristic, and dare we say it, magical tools. They power our iPhones and computers; they’re in wind turbines and hybrid cars. They’re in dental implants, X-ray machines, and life-saving cancer drugs. They have unusual magnetic and electrical properties that make our gadgets faster, stronger, and lighter. And we’ve all been coasting along enjoying their magic for a while now. In fact, we’ve come to expect magic. But magic comes at a cost, and in the case of mining and processing rare earths, that cost is environmental devastation. Most of us in the Western world aren’t aware of the destruction because most rare earths are mined elsewhere. But some scientists are trying to find a more environmentally sound way to get them.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Rare Earth Minerals in China 46 mins – “Rare earth minerals are essential to everything from cellphones to hybrid cars. China’s got them and could use them as leverage in the trade war with the U.S.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Religious Identity and Politics 53 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Pardee School of Global Studies, and the Center for the Study of Europe.  Our speaker is Dimitar Bechev, Fellow at the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.  Dr. Bechev’s lecture is titled “Religious Identity and Foreign Policy: Russia and Turkey in Southeast Europe.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Revolutionary 34 mins – “Paris circa. 1789 saw the first lightning conductor, the first flight, the first estimate of the speed of light, and the invention of the tin can and the stethoscope. The metre replaced the yard and the theory of evolution came into being. In his new book No Need For Geniuses, Steve Jones explores the discoveries that were made over 200 years ago and brings them bang up to date.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ro Khanna 29 mins – “Congressman Ro Khanna (D-CA), who represents Silicon Valley, talks about the big issues facing the tech industry and the oversight role of Congress.” At the link find the title, “Rep. Ro Khanna (D-CA),” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Cases 53 mins – “This term, the Supreme Court will decide landmark cases involving partisan gerrymandering, the census, abortion, voting rights, and free speech. With Chief Justice John Roberts as the new swing vote, and Justice Brett Kavanagh’s first full year on the court, the justices will signal their views on issues ranging from the future of Roe v. Wade to their willingness to confront President Trump. Join America’s leading legal experts for a discussion about how this term will affect the issues at the core of American life.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Supreme Court Discussion 55 mins – “Last week Amy Howe and John Elwood joined Jeffrey Rosen on the National Constitution Center’s podcast “We the People” to preview the Supreme Court term that began this morning. The three discuss cases involving LGBT employment discrimination, DACA, public funding for private religious schools, gun rights and abortion.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive

Transhumanism 62 mins – “Will our brains ever be uploaded into a computer? Will we live forever? Richard Jones, physicist at the University of Sheffield and author of Against Transhumanism, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about transhumanism–the effort to radically transform human existence via technology. Jones argues that the grandest visions of the potential of technology–uploading of brains and the ability to rearrange matter via nanotechnology are much more limited and unlikely than proponents of these technologies suggest. The conversation closes with the role of government in innovation and developing technology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Warren Miller 21 mins – “This week, we’re celebrating the legacy of legendary filmmaker, Warren Miller, and host Dan Kennedy shares his personal connection to Warren.” At the link right-click the “Download Episode” arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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