MMD448 Media Mining Digest: Abortion Activist, AI Book, AI Concerns, Anti-Semitic Violence, Bactria Domestication, Carl Sagan, Chernobyl Aftermath, Chinese Surveillance App, CIA Interrogations, Citrus Greening Update, Climate Science, Disability Technology, Disinformation, Emergency Medicine Doctor, Free Trade, Google Bug Hunters, Harry Houdini, Hate Speech Online, Homestead Prepping, Impeachment History, Internet Health Report, Iran Internet Shutdown, Iran Turmoil, Jane Hodgson, Marine Accident Investigation, Mosul Battle, Nazism in Germany, Plant Genetic Engineering, Presidential Special Counsel, PTSI(Injury), Rare Earth Elements, Regenerative Agriculture, Russian Skulduggery, Secondhand, Sewage History, South Africa Power Cuts, Syria Activities, Trump Presidency Impact

Exercise your ears: the 52 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 711 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Abortion Activist 34 mins – “The story of how abortion became legal in the United States isn’t as straightforward as many of us think. The common narrative is that feminist activism and the sexual liberation movement in the 1960s led to Roe v. Wade in 1973. But it turns out the path to Roe led over some unexpected and unsettling terrain, and involves a complicated story winding through culture, society, disease, and our prejudices and fears about disability. In the 1960s a rubella epidemic swept the United States and panicked every pregnant woman in the country. Rubella, also called German measles, is a disease we hardly remember anymore, but it’s the “R” in the MMR vaccine. Though the virus is relatively harmless for most people, when contracted during pregnancy, it can severely harm the developing fetus. During the epidemic many pregnant women who may have never identified as abortion-rights advocates suddenly found themselves seeking abortions and dismantling barriers to access. Though not everyone agreed with these women, people listened. And this historical moment, sparked by a virus, helped pave the way for the legalization of abortion.” Two podcasts are at the link. At the link for “Roe v.Wade v. Rubella” left click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to download. Do the same for “BONUS EPISODE: Jane Hodgson.”

AI Book 53 mins – “Computer Scientist and author Melanie Mitchell of Portland State University and the Santa Fe Institute talks about her book Artificial Intelligence with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mitchell explains where we are today in the world of artificial intelligence (AI) and where we might be going. Despite the hype and excitement surrounding AI, Mitchell argues that much of what is called “learning” and “intelligence” when done by machines is not analogous to human capabilities. The capabilities of machines are highly limited to explicit, narrow tasks with little transfer to similar but different challenges. Along the way, Mitchell explains some of the techniques used in AI and how progress has been made in many areas.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Concerns 25 mins – “Why is AI so far from perfect? A special episode looking at AI – why it still is far from perfect? We discuss what would happen if you took a driverless car from the streets of California and put it on roads in a developing country, why deep fakes are so difficult to detect and how the images that are used to teach machines to recognise things are biased against women and ethnic minorities.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Anti-Semitic Violence 26 mins – “Batya Ungar-Sargon on the Anti-Semitic Violence in New York Batya Ungar-Sargon is the opinion editor of The Forward, the Jewish newspaper published out of New York City. She has been among the chroniclers, both in print and on Twitter, of the recent spate of attacks against Orthodox communities in New York and New Jersey. She joined Benjamin Wittes by Skype to talk about the origins of these attacks, why it is so hard to respond to them, and why they don’t fit in with any of our political preconceptions.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_497.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Genetic Crops 20 mins – “Australia has welcomed the use of genetically engineered crops, and farmers have found particular benefit from broad acre canola and cotton cultivation. However, the benefits were not realized by some states because of local moratoriums imposed by state governments. Farmers in South Australia grow wheat, canola and pulses, along with wine grapes, olives and other horticultural crops.  They would like the option to grow GE canola, as it may offer some benefits. More importantly, new technologies in gene editing may permit rapid response to new threats as well as tackle current issues in drought, frost, and pathogens. Fortunately, a science-minded change in government has led to discussion of removing the ban.  I speak with four agricultural leaders from the Grain Producers SA, a non-profit organization coordinating grower advocacy and communications. With Tanya Morgan, Adrian McCabe (@AdrianMcCabe6), Wade Dabinette and Dion Woolford (@rudigermaxpower).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ayahuasca Tourism in Peru 18 mins – “Ayahuasca: Fear and healing in the Amazon – Increasing numbers of tourists are travelling to the Peruvian Amazon to drink Ayahuasca, a traditional plant medicine said to bring about a higher state of consciousness. Foreigners come looking for spiritual enlightenment or help with mental health problems like trauma, depression, and addiction. But not everyone is happy about Peru’s booming Ayahuasca tourism industry. A group of indigenous healers are fighting back against what they see as the exploitation and appropriation of their cultural heritage by foreigners – who run most of the Ayahuasca retreats popular with tourists. This coming together of cultures has thrown up another serious problem too – vulnerable women being sexually abused while under the influence of charismatic healers and this powerful psychedelic.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Bacteria Domestication 21 mins – “Bacteria  surround us and have specialized functions in adaptation and metabolism.  Could they be helpful as micro machines that catalyze key reactions?  Could teams of collaborating bacteria be combined to perform important industrial processes?  Dr. Sarah Richardson from MicroByre asks that question. She is in the business of bacterial discovery and domestication, bringing wild bacteria that perform important chemistry into human control.  Her company then uses collaborations of microbes to take on important production jobs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carl Sagan 47 mins.- “Science on TV: An Interview with Ingrid Ockert – Historian of science and media Ingrid Ockert discusses the exact moment Carl Sagan began wearing turtlenecks, how NOVA changed television, and the key to any successful show: respect the audience.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Chernobyl Aftermath 18 mins – “Belarus: The wild world of Chernobyl – Ninety year old Galina is one of the last witnesses to the wild natural world that preceded the Chernobyl zone in southern Belarus. ‘We lived with wolves’ she says ‘and moose, and elk and wild boars.’ Soviet development destroyed that ecosystem. Forests and marshland were tamed and laid to farmland and industrial use. But when the Chernobyl reactor exploded in 1986, the human population was evacuated; their villages were buried beneath the earth as though they had never existed. A generation on, it seems that the animals Galina knew are returning. But how are they are affected by their radioactive environment? And what can we infer about the state of the land? Monica Whitlock visits the strange new wilderness emerging in the heart of Europe.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Surveillance App 27 mins – “Travellers to China through Kyrgyzstan are being forced to install a surveillance app on their phones. Professor Thorsten Holt is on the programme to explain, with the help of investigative journalists, how he has hacked into and analysed this surveillance app. He says the app compiles a report on your phone contacts, text messages and even your social media accounts, as well as searching for over 73,000 specific files. Atmospheric Memory – A breath-taking new art environment where you can see, hear and even touch sound, has opened in Manchester. The exhibit is inspired by Charles Babbage, a pioneer of computing technology from 180 years ago. He once proposed that if all spoken words remain recorded in the air, a powerful computer could potentially ‘rewind’ the movement of all air molecules. So how has the ground-breaking ideas of Charles Babbage influenced art and technology today?. Robotic Endoscopy – Endoscopies are medical procedures that involve threading a camera through the body to see inside. Anyone who has had one will know how uncomfortable they can be. But, they are also challenging for the doctor – taking on average 100 to 250 procedures to be able to perform well. Reporter Madeleine Finlay met Dr Joe Norton, who is part of an international team developing an intelligent robotic system that could make it a lot less painful for both the patient and clinician. Game Designing: Mentoring the Next Generation – Mathew Applegate works with over 300 young people in Suffolk on game design, and has just won the BAFTA Young Game Designers Mentor Award. Having been a hacker and spent time working for the government, Mathew then set up his Creative Computing Club in 2012, which delivers courses on game design, robotics, AI, VR and much more. He spoke to us on why he believes game design is so beneficial for the young people of Suffolk.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA Interrogations 38 mins – ”Philip Mudd is currently a counterterrorism and national security analyst with CNN, but before that, Mudd spent 25 years working at the Central Intelligence Agency, on the NSC staff, and eventually at the FBI. His third book is “Black Site: The CIA in the Post-9/11 World.” David Priess sat down with Phil to talk about his career at CIA, the book, his research into the advanced interrogations and the interrogation program at CIA after 9/11, and the ethics of it all. Thanks to Grammarly for supporting The Lawfare Podcast. For 20% off a Grammarly premium account, go to Grammarly.com/lawfare.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_465.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Citrus Greening Update 27 mins – “What is the current state of the devastating citrus greening disease, Huanglongbing (HLB).  Dr. Jude Grosser from the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center discusses the current state of the disease, the current therapies and the future possibilities of leveraging genetics and nutrition to help keep citrus in production.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Science 55 mins – “An important consequence of the warming of the planet due to climate change is that the frequency and/or severity of extreme weather events will increase. But how can we tell whether a particular event can be attributed to the changing climate? Would it have happened in “normal” climate as well, and if so, how would the event have been different? This aspect of climate science is called attribution science, and the guest of this episode, Friederike Otto is a pioneer in the field.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 File Directly” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Expert 71 mins – “In this episode, we sit down with negotiation expert Misha Glouberman who explains how to talk to people about things — that is, how to avoid the pitfalls associated with debate when two or more people attempt to come to an agreement that will be mutually beneficial. Misha Glouberman teaches negotiation, both in the classroom and within organizations, and he also works as a professional facilitator, which means he helps people design and run conferences and meetings. He also lectures, hosts Trampoline Hall (which has a podcast) — where he interviews the speakers afterfield and fields questions from the audience — and he is the co-author of the book The Chairs Are Where the People Go, a collection of his dictated musings about life recorded and edited by author Sheila Heti. To put it simply, Misha is an expert on communication, and people pay him to help them communicate better. In our long, wide-ranging conversation, you’ll pick up a zillion nuggets of wisdom that will help you the next time you set out to negotiate, facilitate, or solve shared problems with people through conversation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Page As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep Fakes 34 mins – “Bobby Chesney and Danielle Citron on Deep Fakes – On this episode of the Arbiters of Truth series, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with law professors Bobby Chesney and Danielle Citron about deep fakes—that is, artificial audio and video that can be used to depict a person doing or saying something that they never did or said. They talked about the paper that Bobby and Danielle wrote in 2018 about how deep fakes pose a looming challenge for privacy, democracy, and national security. And with recently circulated, doctored video of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and presidential candidate Joe Biden, they talked about how the issue hasn’t gone away, as well as the distinction between deep fakes and other less sophisticated forms of editing.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_496.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disability Technology 32 mins – “The latest in disability tech – From fitting prosthetic limbs in a few hours to teaching blind children to code how technology is making a difference to everyday lives.” At the link left-click “Download, then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disinformation 25 mins – “This is the first episode in a new special series—”Arbiters of Truth”—about disinformation and online speech in the lead up to the 2020 election. From Russian election interference, to scandals over privacy and invasive ad targeting, to presidential tweets: it’s all happening in online spaces governed by private social media companies. And as the 2020 presidential election draws nearer, these conflicts are only going to grow in importance. In this series, Evelyn Douek, Kate Klonick, Alina Polyakova, and Quinta Jurecic will be talking to experts and practitioners about the major challenges our new information ecosystem poses for elections and democracy in general, and the dangers of finding cures that are worse than the disease. “Arbiters of Truth” is a reference to something Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said right after the 2016 election, when Facebook was still reeling from accusations that it hadn’t done enough to clamp down on disinformation during the presidential campaign. Zuckerberg wrote that social media platforms “must be extremely cautious about becoming arbiters of truth ourselves.” Well, if Facebook doesn’t want to be the arbiter of truth, we’re here to do it for them. In this episode, the group sat down to talk about their work on disinformation and the main questions that they hope to answer in this podcast over the coming months.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_466.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eggplants in Bangladesh 23 mins – “Bangladesh is a population dense country with relatively little farmland.  Subsistence farmers make a living by growing, harvesting and selling brinjal, or the fruit westerners know as the eggplant.  The biggest threat to production is the fruit and shoot borer, an insect larvae that digs into the fruit, leaving its waste, and inviting pathogens and decay.  To combat this, farmers traditionally use massive amounts of insecticides, upward of 80-100 sprays per season. It is their family’s livelihood, so sprays protect the crop, and protect the family. The Bt brinjal is genetically engineered to produce a natural protein that stops the fruit and shoot borer. The plants need minimal spray application and are more profitable for growers. Today co-hosts Modesta Abugu and Kevin Folta speak with Arif Hossein, leader of Farm the Future Bangladesh about the brinjal and its adoption by Bangladesh farmers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emergency Medicine Doctor 27 mins – “Today with visit with Dr. Sam Ni, a third year emergency medicine resident and USAR Doc in Training. Dr. Joe Holley connected us with Dr. Ni so we could get an understanding about what draws some ER docs to this unique calling. We chat with Dr. Ni about the process of her training. She shares what parts she enjoyed the most and what challenged her more than others. She also shares her understanding how this opportunity offers her a different look at emergency medicine and disaster medicine as two sides of the same coin. Dr. Ni will be returning to the show in the future as her training proceeds so we can follow up on the process with her. Also on the show were co-hosts Sam Bradley, and Jamie Davis.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Trade 46 mins – “Economist and author Kimberly Clausing of Reed College talks about her book Open with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Clausing, a self-described progressive, argues that the United States should continue to embrace free trade but she argues for other interventions to soften the impact of trade on workers and communities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Google Bug Hunters 27 mins – “Google’s offering up to $1.5m to anyone who can identify bugs in its new chip for Android smartphones. This is a especially high reward but Google’s just one of a host of big well-known companies running bug hunting programmes. But is this the best way for big business to protect its new tech? AI in Africa – Does Africa need a different approach to AI – yes according to Professor Alan Blackwell of the Computer Laboratory at Cambridge University in England. He’s just started a sabbatical year across Africa working with AI experts – we spoke to him on the first leg of his trip at the Bahir Institute of Technology (BIT) in the North West of Ethiopia. Wi-fi on the bus – Being online when travelling on the bus in parts of Kenya and Rwanda is not new, but now it is also possible in parts of South Africa as BRCK launch their public internet service there. Nanotech tracing stolen cars – Around 143,000 vehicles worldwide were reported as stolen in 2018 according to Interpol. In the UK, only half are recovered. Now nanosatellites could be a new tool in retrieving stolen cars. Digital Planet’s Izzie Clarke has more.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Harry Houdini 57 mins – “Journalist and author Joe Posnanski talks about his book, The Life and Afterlife of Harry Houdini, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Posnanski explores the enduring fame of Houdini who remains an iconic cultural figure almost a century after his death. Topics discussed include the nature of celebrity, the nature of ambition, parenting, magic, and the use of public relations to create and sustain reputation and celebrity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Speech Online 26 mins – “Ethiopia’s online hate speech law – Disseminating hate speech online in Ethiopia could now land you with a prison sentence of up to three years and a fine of $3000US, but the new law has proved controversial. Julie Owonp, Excutive Director of Internet without borders explains their concerns. Kivuwatt – Rwanda has an ambitious plan to go from half of the population having electricity at the moment to everyone within the next four years. Digital Planet has been given access to one project that aims to be a key part of that expansion. In the depths of Lake Kivu – one of East Africa’s great lakes – there’s methane and they’re burning the methane to generate electricity. Kivu is one of Africa’s so-called ‘killer lakes’, because the gases it harbours could be deadly for the thousands who live on shore. Burning some of the gas could help make it safer. Gareth Mitchell reports from the floating barge that is supplying 30% of the country’s electricity. Carnival 4.0 – It’s Carnival week in Rio and this year for the first time celebrations have gone fully hi-tech with augmented reality floats, QR Codes and RFID tags tracking costumes and smart bands monitoring the health of performers. But there have also been warnings about facial recognition. Brazil-based journalist Angelica Mari has been following proceedings. And joins us on the programme.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Homestead Prepping 46 mins – “Episode-2613- Why Homesteading is one of the best “Preps” you can Make” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Humanitarian Drone Corridor in Africa 31 mins -Sierra Leone has just launched West Africa’s first drone corridor – it’s a dedicated channel of airspace for medical delivery drones. UNICEF is part of the project and already has three other humanitarian corridors open globally. Wikipedia untagging of women – Dr. Jess Wade from Imperial College London is continuing her mission of getting more female scientists onto Wikipedia, however a few days ago many of her entries were marked as not notable enough to be included. This was done anonymously by another Wiki editor. We hear from Jess and Wikipedia’s Katherine Maher. Cats detecting earthquakes – Could cats detect earthquakes? Yes says Celeste Labedz a seismologist at Caltech – if they are fitted with a motion tracker device. It’s purely a theoretical idea as she explains on the programme. Smart tattoos – Smart ink that changes colour could lead to medical smart tattoos that monito conditions like diabetes. Harrison Lewis has been finding out more.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment 37 mins – “It’s January 2018. Paul Manafort and Rick Gates are in a whole lot of trouble. The past is catching up to them. Three months earlier, they’d both been indicted on multiple felony counts and now it looks like there might be even more charges coming. Gates is getting nervous–they’re facing many years in prison. Manafort tells Gates to relax. He’s talked to the president’s personal counsel. He says they’re going to “take care of us.” Manafort tells Gates he’d be stupid to plead guilty now, “just sit tight, we’ll be taken care of.” Gates wants to be crystal clear on what exactly Manafort’s getting at. So he asks: Is the president going to pardon them?” At the link right-click “Direct download: Ep_13-_Pardons_on_the_Table.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment History 26 mins – “The impeachment trial of President Donald Trump is set to begin on Jan. 21, and the question of what constitutes an impeachable offense is sure to feature in the trial itself and in the broader discussion of the president’s conduct. To answer that question, many commentators, lawmakers and experts may rely on what the Founders said at the time the Impeachment Clause was written into the Constitution. But there’s another way to think about an impeachable offense: by looking at the offenses for which Congress has actually impeached people. Hilary Hurd explored that sordid and unexpected history of impeachment in a recent article for Lawfare. In the latest edition of the Lawfare Podcast Shorts, you can listen to that article in-full, read by the author.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Internet Health Report 26 mins – “Solana Larsen, leader of the team at Mozilla that compiled the recent Health of the Internet report talks about the highlights, including openness, privacy and security, digital inclusion, web literacy and centralisation. Multi-purpose drones – A drone in Malawi in one flight dropped off medical supplies by parachute, was used by game rangers to monitor animal poaching and created a high resolution 3D mapping of an area. Daniel Ronen, co-founder of UAVAid explains how they have developed their multi-purpose drones. Nam June Paik – Nam June Paik embraced technology and digital developments in his art. Born in South Korea in 1932 his work has always been collaborative with musicians, poets and other artists using TV and sound in his often playful art. The Tate Modern gallery in London has brought together 50 years of his most innovative and influential art. Reporter Hannah Fisher, and regular studio commentator, Ghislaine Boddington, went along to explore.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran Internet Shutdown 26 mins – “Iran is now almost entirely offline as authorities try to stem the spread of protests that started last week. The government increased fuel prices by as much as 300% and since people took to the streets online access has been restricted. We find out the latest from online monitoring group NetBlocks. US Election emails unsafe – Agari was the company that uncovered and confirmed that the webserver the email that ‘hacked’ Hilary Clinton’s campaign came from Russia. They have now conducted a poll and found that only Elizabeth Warren out of all the potential presidential candidates has secure emails. This matters not only from a data security point of view but also from a voter and donor point – the company has found that voters are less likely to vote for a candidate with a data breach and that donors are less likely to give money. Hate speech control using tech – Hate speech that incites violence or hate against vulnerable groups has long been a problem in human societies but has more recently been weaponised by social media. The current system means the direct or indirect recipient needs to complain. The alternative approach is to develop artificial intelligence to identify potential hate speech and put the post in quarantine until either the direct recipient has agreed it should be deleted or has read it and agreed it should be allowed. Cargo Ship tech – Our reporter Snezana Curcic has travelled across the North Atlantic Ocean in a bit of an unusual and adventurous way – on a cargo ship. With only eight hours of Wi-Fi allowance per week, Snezana filed this story on her journey from Liverpool to New York on the Atlantic Star. She looks at the tech on board and how this hugely competitive and complex industry is adapting to the digital age to survive. Even e-commerce leaders, like Ali Baba and Amazon, are heavily investing in ocean cargo services and stepping up their game.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran Turmoil 51 mins – “Iran is in turmoil. Protests erupted across the country last month, sparked by the government’s decision to triple the price of gasoline. The Iranian government has responded with brute force, imposing a blackout of the internet and deploying security forces to crack down in the streets. The crackdown has left hundreds dead and thousands injured or detained. On December 18, the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution hosted a discussion on the unrest in Iran, what it means for the future of the country and the region, and how the United States and the international community should respond. Washington Post columnist David Ignatius led the conversation, which featured Brookings senior fellow Suzanne Maloney and film maker and journalist Maziar Bahari, who leads IranWire, a news site that conveys original information from Iran via citizen journalists.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_491.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iraq Shuts Down Internet 29 mins – “In response to anti-government protests the Iraq government shut down the internet six days ago. Coverage returned briefly before the president was due to give a televised address on Sunday allowing social media reports of violence at the demonstrations to be posted. Currently 75% of Iraq is covered by the ban. Kurdistan is unaffected. Mismatch – There’s no such thing as normal—so why are we all made to use devices, live in cities or travel in vehicles that are so uniform? Whether it’s a computer accessory that only works for right-handed people or airline seats that are unusable for taller people, we need more inclusive design. We discuss Kat Holmes’ new book Mismatch: How Inclusion Shapes Design. Beatie at the Barbican – Singer-songwriter and innovator Beatie Wolfe is showing a “teaser” of her new work at London’s Barbican gallery alongside the launch of a film about her. This environmental protest piece distils 800,000 years of historic data of carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere. It will become an interactive visualisation and soundtrack using gaming software. The Lightyear One: a self-charging electric car – The Lightyear One is a prototype solar-powered electric car. There are plans to take it into production by 2021. The manufacturer claims a range of 720km in sunny climates and even 400 km in cloudy, wet UK winter. Tom Stephens reports.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Jane Hodgson 8 mins – “BONUS EPISODE: Distillations | Science History Institute – She broke abortion law to try to change it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Marine Accident Investigation 25 mins – “Investigating marine accidents – sea tech latest – Digital Planet visits the UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch for learn more about the technology used to investigate incidents at sea. Gareth Mitchell and Dr. Leigh Marsh look at voyage data recorders recovered from ship wrecks, location beacons, CCTV footage through to simulators that can recreate incidents at sea.” At the link left-click “Download, then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosul Battle 30 mins – “In 2014, the precipitous fall of the ancient city of Mosul signaled the sudden rise to power of the Islamic State, a group that would soon declare a new caliphate from Mosul’s Great Mosque. Two years later, Mosul served as one of the group’s last major enclaves in Iraq and became the site of grinding, brutal urban warfare as Iraqi forces sought to reclaim control, block by block. Last week, Lawfare senior editor Scott R. Anderson sat down with two journalists who have produced new works documenting the battle for Mosul: veteran war correspondent James Verini, who is the author of the new book “They Will Have to Die Now,” and former CIA official Dan Gabriel, who recently directed the documentary film entitled Mosul. They discussed the pivotal role the city has played in recent Iraqi history—and what the struggle over it may be able to tell us about the future of the country and region” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_463.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nazism in Germany 34 mins – This year, 2020, sees the 75th anniversary of the end of World War Two. Its legacy remains. Nowhere more so than in Germany, where the rise of Nazism led to the war, and terrible crimes against humanity. Chris Bowlby explores how post-war Germans have faced this inheritance and discovers how a search for justice in relation to Nazi crimes has continued, despite heavy pressure to stop.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Plagiarism in Scientific Research 30 mins – “Dr. Elisabeth Bik is a hero. Classically trained with plenty of lab-bench expertise, today she patrols the best scientific literature in search for plagiarism and image manipulation.  Her expert eye identifies manipulated images in our best scientific publications, including the revered science weekly journals that present allegedly breakthrough work. Dr. Bik talks about her path to become a publication sleuth, a high-resolution machine with an eye for things that just don’t look right. She talks about her work, its repercussions and how pervasive plagiarism and image manipulation are in contemporary science.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plant Genetic Engineering 42 mins – “Today’s podcast marks five complete years of podcast episodes, and there’s no better guest than someone on the Mount Rushmore of plant genetic engineering.  We’re joined today by Dr. Robb Fraley, who was at ground zero of the first transformed plants.  He recalls the race to transform plants, his time as a leader in the Monsanto company, and his vision for the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Special Counsel 39 mins – “It’s May 17, 2017. White House Counsel Don McGahn is in the Oval Office with the president. McGahn’s job is to represent the office of the presidency, which isn’t quite the same as representing the president personally. It’s a delicate line to walk, and Trump hasn’t made the job any easier. McGahn is supposed to act as the point of contact between the White House and the Department of Justice, to ensure all the rules are being followed. But the president has made clear, he’s not interested in following the rules. Trump has already fired his FBI director. That’s why McGahn is in the Oval that morning, they need to interview a new nominee for the position. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is there too. Sessions interrupts the meeting. He has an urgent phone call from the Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, so he steps outside to take it. Sessions returns a moment later and relays the message: Rosenstein has appointed a Special Counsel to oversee the Russia investigation. It’s the former FBI director, Robert Mueller. Trump slumps back in his chair. He says, “Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my Presidency. I’m fucked.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Ep_11_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

PTSI(Injury) 48 mins – “We brought back Dan McGuire from CISM Perspectives to talk about updates to the ways work-related stress for first responders is handled. The biggest change Dan noted was a focus on building resiliency into initial first responder education and ongoing training before the critical incident occurs. One of the biggest changes Dan advocates for is to change the name from “Stress Disorder” to “Stress Injury.” This removes the stigma of a disorder and helps responders relate to the possibility of long-term injury in response to work-related stress.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rare Earth Elements P1 17 mins – “The 17 rare earth elements are often called the spices or vitamins of industry. While we don’t need much of them, they’re sprinkled in small amounts through our most powerful, futuristic, and dare we say it, magical tools. They power our iPhones and computers; they’re in wind turbines and hybrid cars. They’re in dental implants, X-ray machines, and life-saving cancer drugs. They have unusual magnetic and electrical properties that make our gadgets faster, stronger, and lighter. And we’ve all been coasting along enjoying their magic for a while now. In fact, we’ve come to expect magic. But magic comes at a cost, and in the case of mining and processing rare earths, that cost is environmental devastation. Most of us in the Western world aren’t aware of the destruction/ because most rare earths are mined elsewhere. But some scientists are trying to find a more environmentally sound way to get them.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Rare Earth Elements P2 21 mins – “The 17 rare earth elements are often called the spices or vitamins of industry. While we don’t need much of them, they’re sprinkled in small amounts through our most powerful, futuristic, and dare we say it, magical tools. They power our iPhones and computers; they’re in wind turbines and hybrid cars. They’re in dental implants, X-ray machines, and life-saving cancer drugs. They have unusual magnetic and electrical properties that make our gadgets faster, stronger, and lighter. And we’ve all been coasting along enjoying their magic for a while now. In fact, we’ve come to expect magic. But magic comes at a cost, and in the case of mining and processing rare earths, that cost is environmental devastation. Most of us in the Western world aren’t aware of the destruction/ because most rare earths are mined elsewhere. But some scientists are trying to find a more environmentally sound way to get them.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Regenerative Agriculture 63 mins – “One thing we know is the current food system works, ‘shocked that I said that?  Okay when is the last time you had money, wanted food and could not get any?  This is true in most of the world, people that go with out food do so from poverty not scarcity.  In fact billions of tons of good food it thrown away annually.  So when I say works, I mean the main stated goal of the managed Global Food System is produce enough food to feed the world.  It does that.  We must start there or no meaningful discussion about correcting the many problems in this system can be had. Yes it works…”At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Russian Skulduggery 34 mins – “Michael Schwirtz on Russia’s Lethal Actions in Europe The past few years have seen an uptick in Russian covert actions across Europe, including assassinations and attempted killings of people in Ukraine, Bulgaria, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Just this week, Bulgaria charged three Russian agents with the poisoning of a prominent Bulgarian arms manufacturer. Michael Schwirtz has been an investigative reporter with the New York Times for almost 15 years, and he’s been tracking this Russian skulduggery carefully in many of those countries for much of that time. Recently, he’s reported on how quite a bit of that activity is linked to one particular unit within the Russian GRU. David Priess sat down with Michael to work through this increasingly aggressive Russian action and what it all means going forward.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_500.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Secondhand 46 mins – “Journalist and author Adam Minter talks about his book Secondhand with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Minter explores the strange and fascinating world of secondhand stuff–the downsizing that the elderly do when they move to smaller quarters, the unseen side of Goodwill Industries, and the global market for rags.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sewage History 32 mins – “Philadelphia just had its wettest decade on record, and all that precipitation has wreaked havoc on the city’s waterways. Like most old cities, Philadelphia has a combined sewer system—that is, one pipe is used to carry both sewage and stormwater. When it rains a lot, the system gets overwhelmed, forcing the water department to send raw sewage into rivers and creeks. City officials and engineers knew this was going to be a problem when they built the sewer system in the 1800s. The reason they used a combined system anyway can be best explained by two forces: knowledge ceilings and path dependency. In this episode we explore how the city got to this point and how, in an interesting twist, it led to Philadelphia having one of the most innovative water systems in the country. Philadelphia is home of the Distillations podcast. For this episode we break down three centuries of water-pollution history in our backyard. It is a special collaboration with the Philadelphia Inquirer as part of their series From the Source: Stories of the Delaware River.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Sickle Cell Disease 15 mins – “Sickle cell disease is an inherited condition that predominantly affects people of African descent. The disease results in chronic pain and early death, and is caused by a misfolding of oxygen-toting hemoglobin, a central protein in red blood cells.  Vertex Pharmaceuticals and the CRISPR Therapeutics companies have combined to test a potential therapy.  A patients stem cells are gene edited using CRISPR/Cas9 so that they stop producing adult mutant hemoglobin, and produce a fetal version instead.  The engineered stem cells are returned to the patient, who then manufactures fetal hemoglobin in their own blood cells, potentially curing the disease. Clinical trials have just begun.  Dr. Brenda Eustace, Director of Discovery Research, takes us through the problem, its effects and the Vertex solution that could bring needed relief to millions worldwide.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Africa Power Cuts 29 mins – “South Africa Power Cuts – s South Africa facing a blackout? Power cuts across the country are now happening regularly as the country struggles with demand for electricity. There’s even an app that tells you if your lights are going to stay on today, or tomorrow. Professor Keith Bell from Strathclyde University explains why this is happening. Plasmonics – computing with light – Fancy computing with the speed of light? Well for the first time this is possible thanks to research at Oxford University. Scientists have managed use light to store, access and now process data on chip. The research could significantly increase processing speeds at data centres, not only making computing faster but saving significant amounts of energy. Land of Iron – A National Park is usually synonymous with nature and wildlife. Perhaps not the obvious place to find a technology story, but in North Yorkshire in the UK a project is underway that is using technology in many different forms to bring a forgotten history back to life. Our reporter Jack Meegan has been time-travelling for us. Jack finds out how the park’s industrial past can now be seen thanks to technology. World Wise Web – Digital Planet gets a sneak preview of a brand BBC new tech podcast. On World Wise Web, teenagers from around the world get the chance to talk to the technology pioneers who have shaped our digital world.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Sterile Insect Technique 21 mins – “The tiny mosquito is a nuisance in the industrialized world, yet around the world it is a ruthless killer, spreading blood-borne diseases that bring about pain and suffering, particularly in developing nations.  In many regions these are invasive species with little to no ecological role. For years scientists have used “sterile insect technique” to control them, a process that treats sexually compatible insects with radiation, rendering them infertile.  The low-fertility insects are released into the wild and crash problematic populations. The Oxitec company has a genetic solution.  Mosquitoes have been genetically engineered to contain a lethal gene that can be turned off in the laboratory with a simple chemical.  Upon release, these mosquitoes breed against target populations, spreading the lethal gene, and leaving the next generation inviable.  The process creates a reproductive dead end.  While amazingly successful, these trials have suffered from a lack of public acceptance.  This week an article in Scientific Reports from a credible lab introduced language that bred fear, uncertainty and doubt in the Oxitec approach.  This unwarranted speculation was then amplified and exaggerated by the credulous anti-biotech media, further eroding public perception.  In this episode I spoke with Dr. Kelly Matsen, Research and Development and Operations lead at Oxitech.  She described the experiments in question, the actual results, the published paper, and how Oxitech’s technology actually has worked in field releases.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syria Activities 38 mins – :It’s been a horrible week in northeastern Syria. The U.S. abandoned its Kurdish allies after the president had a conversation by phone with Turkish President Erdogan and pulled the plug on the stabilizing U.S. presence in the region. The Turkish government began a major incursion over the border, which has produced significant casualties and major questions about ISIS detainees in Kurdish custody. To talk through it all, we pulled together quite a group. In the first half of the podcast, Benjamin Wittes spoke with Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, an adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and Scott R. Anderson and Dan Byman, both of Brookings and Lawfare. In the second half, Ben sat down with Oula A. Alrifai, a fellow with the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and Leah West, a Lecturer of International Affairs at Carleton University in Canada.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_462.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Presidency Impact 37 mins – “It’s January 2018. Paul Manafort and Rick Gates are in a whole lot of trouble. The past is catching up to them. Three months earlier, they’d both been indicted on multiple felony counts and now it looks like there might be even more charges coming. Gates is getting nervous–they’re facing many years in prison. Manafort tells Gates to relax. He’s talked to the president’s personal counsel. He says they’re going to “take care of us.” Manafort tells Gates he’d be stupid to plead guilty now, “just sit tight, we’ll be taken care of.” Gates wants to be crystal clear on what exactly Manafort’s getting at. So he asks: Is the president going to pardon them?” At the link right-click “Direct download: Ep_13-_Pardons_on_the_Table.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Presidency Impact 59 mins – “”Unmaking the Presidency: Donald Trump’s War on the World’s Most Powerful Office,” by Susan Hennessey and Benjamin Wittes, was published today. The Brookings Institution hosted a launch event, moderated by Fred Hiatt, in which Susan and Ben discussed the book. “Unmaking the Presidency” is an attempt to explore the Trump presidency through the lens of the norms of the traditional presidency that he has violated. It’s a look at his vision of the presidency, a look at the range of presidential powers that vision affects, and a look at the history of how those norms developed.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_498.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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MMD445 Media Minding Digest: Aging Successfully, Altamont, Annise Parker, Brain Plasticity, California Wildfire, Chinese Exclusion Act, Climate Change, Climate Change Liability, Climate in the Media, College Dropouts, Cook Islands, Cosmos Exploration, Critical Thinking, Feminist Movements, Foreign Policy Ethics, Fremonts, Friendship, Ethical thinking, Cultural Strengths, Declaration of Independence, Democratic Presidential Nominee, Designing Babies, Dilbert Creator, Disabled Pride, Dugway Proving Ground, Eat Learn Play, Economic Forecast for 2020, EJ Dionne, End of Life Care, Environmental Issues, Facebook Discussion, Feminist Movements, Foreign Policy Ethics, Fremonts, Friendship, Health Optimization, Veterans Health Administration, Women Power Brokers, Conspicuous Consumption, Internet of Things, Israel Founding Jay-Z Discussion, Judicial Independence, Mental Health Issues, Mental Health Reform, Mental Illness, Modern Investing, Police Revision, Prison Reentry, Racial Segregation Origins, Sexual Harassment, Silicon Valley Women, Skinhead Reversal, Star Wars Final Episode, Stroke Recovery, Supreme Court Power Center, Technology and Society, Technology Risks to Humanity, Toni Morrison, Trump Opponent, Veterans Health Administration, Women Power Brokers

Exercise your ears: the 58 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 991 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Aging Successfully 44 mins – “As American society continues to have a growing older population, understanding all aspects of aging is a critical national priority. Perhaps no subject is more important than understanding what happens to our brains as they age and what people can do to enhance cognition as they get older. And there is, perhaps, no better person to explain this all than best-selling neuroscientist Daniel J. Levitin, author of the iconic best sellers This Is Your Brain on Music and The Organized Mind. In his latest book, Successful Aging, Levitin turns his keen insights to what happens in our brains as people get older and, based on a rigorous analysis of neuroscientific evidence, what people can do to make the most of their 70s, 80s and 90s. Successful Aging uses research from developmental neuroscience and the psychology of individual differences to show that 60+ years is a unique developmental stage that, like infancy or adolescence, has its own demands and distinct advantages. Levitin looks at the science behind what we all can learn from those who age joyously as well as how to adapt our culture to take full advantage of older people’s wisdom and experience.  Successful Aging inspires a powerful new approach to how readers think about our final decades and has the potential to revolutionize the way we plan for old age as individuals, family members and citizens within a society where the average life expectancy continues to rise.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Altamont 45 mins – “As 2019 draws to the close, the media tributes, commemorations, remembrances and explorations related to the 50th anniversary of the 1960s comes to an end. This special program will focus on the 50th anniversary of the Altamont Speedway Free Festival, the traumatic and deadly Rolling Stones concert in the East Bay of San Francisco that is often presented as the symbolic end of the 1960s counterculture. But was it? What is the legacy of Altamont? At the notorious December 6, 1969 concert—held several months after Woodstock took place across the country—one fan was knifed to death, three died in accidents, and many more were beaten and abused before a crowd of well over 300,000. Legendary Bay Area music writer Joel Selvin has written the definitive history of that day. His book Altamont: The Rolling Stones, the Hells Angels, and the Inside Story of Rock’s Darkest Day explores in-depth that dark day, what led to the mayhem and what that concert means half a century later. Nearly 50 years to the exact day of the Altamont concert, Selvin will sit down with photographer and music journalist Tabitha Soren for a discussion of Altamont and the final event of the 1960s that continues to divide and fascinate the public. Did the counterculture, formed in the Bay Area, end in the chaos of the Altamont concert? Is the mayhem associated with the concert the proper way to remember the 1960s ending? Why was the concert such a disaster and what responsibility did the Rolling Stones, Grateful Dead and others have? Why are we still talking about it? Please join us for a fascinating and timely discussion on a topic and time period that continues to shape the Bay Area’s consciousness. The event will be held in Mill Valley, the Marin County town that held the very first rock festival on Mount Tamalpais in June 1967.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

America Betrayal – “Malcolm Nance is one of the world’s renowned intelligence experts and a popular guest on NBC News and MSNBC. With over 33 years combating radical extremist terrorism, Nance is known for championing human rights, ethical responsibility and cultural awareness in intelligence practices. In his newest book, The Plot to Betray America: How Team Trump Embraced Our Enemies, Compromised Our Security, and How We Can Fix It, Nance argues that President Trump and his team have conspired to commit the greatest act of treason in the history of the United States: betrayal of the oath of office for personal gain. The Plot to Betray America contains in-depth interviews with insiders, analysis from intelligence experts, and substantial evidence of Trump’s deep financial ties to Russia. It also provides solutions on how to protect America’s compromised security. Join us for an essential conversation with intelligence and counterterrorism expert Malcolm Nance as he explains how we can still save America’s democracy, security and future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Annise Parker 43 mins – “In recent years, LGBT candidates have made major strides in being elected to office across the country. At the same time, protections have been weakened against discrimination in health care coverage, employment, military service, and access to public and private services. Former Houston Mayor Annise Parker—the first openly LGBT mayor of a major American city—will review the results of the recent November 2019 election and look ahead to the 2020 presidential election to highlight the issues of importance to LGBTQI Americans. LGBTQ Victory Fund and Victory Institute President and CEO Annise Parker is the first former elected official to lead the organizations, having served six years as a Houston City Council member, six years as city controller and six years as mayor of the city. She is one of only two women to have been elected mayor and is the only person in Houston history to have held the offices of council member, controller and mayor. In addition to her duties as mayor, Parker was a member of President Obama’s Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience, chaired the U.S. Conference of Mayors Criminal and Social Justice Committee, and served on the boards of the Texas Environmental Research Consortium and Houston Galveston Area Council. She is a past Fellow of the Institute of Politics at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. She also co-owned Inklings, a lesbian/feminist bookstore for 10 years.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Brain Plasticity 55 mins – “Until recently, it was widely believed that the brain was hardwired from childhood and resistant to any remodeling in adults. Breakthrough research and clinical practice has recently shown that our brains are remarkably plastic across the human life span. Neuroplasticity accounts for functional self-improvement at any age, often remarkable recoveries from brain injury or stroke, demonstrated impacts of brain exercise for sustaining our brain health, and for successful supportive therapies in patients facing age-related dementia. Strategies for employing neuroplasticity science for human benefit are rapidly emerging. One of the pioneers in this field is neuroscientist Michael Merzenich, a professor emeritus at UC San Francisco.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

California Wildfire 34 mins – “The 2018 Camp Fire was one of the most destructive in California’s history, resulting in over eighty deaths and destroying the town of Paradise. Dry weather and hot winds fanned the flames – but the spark that lit them came from a faulty transmission line. “This was literally a 98-year-old line that runs through a national forest,” says Russell Gold of The Wall Street Journal. “PG&E is not even 100% sure when the last time they inspected that tower was.  “They kept pushing it off, and pushing it off in year after year it sort of became something that they would do next year. And if memory serves correctly, they were planning to do it once again in 2019, until the fire happened in 2018.” After their aging infrastructure was blamed for a series of deadly wildfires over the past two years, Pacific Gas and Electric, known as PG&E, pulled the plug – literally. The planned power shutoffs were designed to prevent more fires during the state’s driest and most fire-prone months. The move may have prevented fires. But it also sparked anger and frustration, as millions sat in the dark and costs shifted from the company to its customers. “Definitely the people who are losing electricity are the ones that are bearing the cost,” says Catherine Wolfram of UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. “The people that are losing frozen foods, that are unable to run medical equipment…the costs of these outages have been borne by the customers.” According to former Public Utilities Commissioner Loretta Lynch, problems with the company go back for years. “No matter how many times we try to make PG&E do the right thing, its corporate culture is so broken and as a corporation it has been adjudged criminally negligent for failing to maintain a system,” says Lynch. “I’m concerned that the rot at PG&E is so thorough and pervasive it can’t be fixed.  So now we need to change it.” What’s next for the state’s biggest public utility? And how will California continue to power its future? Note: Climate One invited PG&E to participate in this program, but over the course of a month they declined to make a spokesperson available.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Chinese Exclusion Act 44 mins – “Watch the video referenced in the first half of this podcast at: https://vimeo.com/263167752/c555110813 For the 60 years, from 1882–1943, long before Muslim travel bans and family separations at the U.S.–Mexico border, the Chinese Exclusion Act prohibited Chinese laborers from entering the United States and denied persons of Chinese descent a path to U.S. citizenship. The act grew out of political pressure from labor unions and U.S. cities to which large numbers of immigrants had moved in the decades following the California Gold Rush. The act’s effects on the Chinese immigrant communities across the United States were lasting and dramatic. Join us for a screening of a 49-minute version of The Chinese Exclusion Act, a feature-length documentary made by award-winning documentary filmmakers Ric Burns and Li-Shin Yu and co-produced by the Center for Asian American Media in association with the New-York Historical Society and shown on the acclaimed PBS series “American Experience.”  Bay Area entrepreneur and cultural advocate David Lei, who provided much of the inspiration for the documentary, will be present to discuss his perspective and answer questions about the Exclusion Act’s relevance to the immigration debate today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Climate Change 34 mins – “When more than a thousand Amazon employees walked off the job last September, it wasn’t higher wages or better benefits they were demanding. “It was a really, really powerful moment to see such support for something as radical, I guess as climate change,” remembers Sarah Read, an Amazon User Experience Researcher. “That was a moment when I realized that we as employees could change what the company was doing,” agrees software designer Jacob Adamson. “Just the mere act of signing a letter could move the largest company, move the richest man in the world, to do something.” Read and Adamson are both members of Amazon Employees for Climate Justice (AECJ), the group that organized the walkout… (Amazon scored a “C” on the Greenpeace Click Clean Report; tech companies Facebook, Google and Youtube each scored an “A.” Bezos has since pledged to make the company carbon neutral, in line with the Paris Climate Agreement.)  Climate change is becoming a major risk factor for corporations – today, not far in the future. With groups like the Carbon Disclosure Project grading companies on environmental action, employees, consumers and investors are taking note — and woe to those CEOs who are slow to pick up the ball. “We’re gonna start to see some efforts where silence is complacency and it’s no longer acceptable,” says Joel Makower of Greenbiz.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Climate Change Liability 35 mins – “What do Big Pharma, Big Tobacco and Big Oil have in common? They’ve all been brought under fire, and into the courts, for knowingly causing public harm, and even death, with their products. You can include the gun industry in that list too. And, like the tobacco and pharmaceutical industries, evidence has shown that gas and oil companies have long known about the link between their product and increased greenhouse gases – and kept it to themselves. “But they did more than that,” says UCLA environmental professor Ann Carlson.  “It’s not just that they knew about it, it’s that then they actively campaigned to try to persuade the public that climate change was not connected to their product.  “So there’s really deceptive practices involved here.” Ted Boutrous, an attorney whose firm represents Chevron, disputes the characterization that the industry was covering anything up. Furthermore, he maintains that the fossil fuel companies aren’t entirely culpable in the climate crisis — they’re only giving the public the oil and gas they want, and need, to fuel their daily lives. “It’s not just the production; it’s the demand for it,” he says. “It’s something we need for hot water.  We need it for transportation, almost everything we do, the screens on our phones depend on fossil fuel products.  And so we are really all in this together.” Complicating the issue is the question of whether carbon emissions should be litigated or regulated. Scott Segal, of the lobbying firm Bracewell, sees it as a global issue, one that can’t be decided in state or federal courts, but is a matter for Congress to decide. “One molecule of carbon dioxide emitted anywhere in the world is literally around the world within seven days,” Segal points out. “Which both shows the incompatibility particularly of state court actions, but also shows the necessity of having a policy-based solution rather than a judicially concocted solution.” Should corporations be held liable for harmful outcomes like mass shootings, the opioid crisis, and climate change? How much responsibility falls on the product, and how much on the user?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Climate in the Media 34 mins – “Murder, love, and the human experience are the stuff of great stories, as podcasts like Serial and RadioLab have shown us. But climate change? Not so much. The story is overwhelming and the ending is predictable and depressing, say radio producers. But coverage in national newspapers has increased since President Trump took office. It’s also expanded from science and environmental beats to culture, health and finance. And as the conversation shifts further toward companies’ role confronting climate impacts, the story of business and climate is gaining prominence and ramping up pressure on corporations.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

College Dropouts 39 mins – “Higher education today faces a host of challenges, from quality to cost. But too little attention gets paid to a startling fact: Four out of ten students who start college drop out. The situation is particularly dire for black and Latino students, those from poor families, and those who are first in their families to attend college. David Kirp outlines the scale of the problem and shows that it’s fixable. We already have the tools to boost graduation rates and shrink the achievement gap. Many college administrators know what has to be done, but the dropout rate still hasn’t decreased for decades. Ironically, it’s schools like City University of New York and Long Beach State that are making the most progress at getting more students a better education and a diploma. Kirp relies on vivid, on-the-ground reporting, conversations with campus leaders, faculty and students as well as cogent overviews of cutting-edge research to identify institutional reforms. These reforms include using big data to quickly identify at-risk students, getting them the support they need, and applying behavioral strategies (from nudges to mindset changes) that have been proven to work.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cook Islands 44 mins – “The Cook Islands is a 15-island nation in the South Pacific, with political links to New Zealand. The islands were first settled around A.D. 1000 by Polynesian people who are thought to have migrated from Tahiti. Prime Minister Henry Puna assumed office in 2010 and previously served as secretary of the Ministry of Tourism and Transport. Prime Minister Puna has led the establishment of the world’s largest multipurpose marine reserve, Marae Moana, hailed as a major step forward for marine conservation. Additionally, on January 1, the Cook Islands will become the first South Pacific island nation to officially achieve developed nation status. It was under Prime Minister Puna’s premiership that the Cook Islands became, in November 2011, a founding member of the Polynesian Leaders Group, a regional grouping intended to cooperate on a variety of issues, including culture and language, education, responses to climate change, and trade and investment. Come for a rare behind-the-scenes look at this island nation.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cosmos Exploration 43 mins – “World-renowned physicist Brian Greene offers a captivating exploration of the cosmos and our ongoing quest to understand it. Greene takes us on a journey across time—from our most refined understanding of the universe’s beginning to the closest science can take us to the very end. He also explains the distinct but interwoven layers of reality—from quantum mechanics to consciousness to black holes. Greene is known for his groundbreaking discoveries in superstring theory. He provides a clearer sense of how we came to be, where we are now and where we are ultimately headed.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Critical Thinking 43 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy initiates the new decade by analyzing the worlds of Wall Street and investing, international relations, sports, and chess, and focuses on the power and the necessity of critical thinking skills in those worlds. Leland Faust and Richard Conn have been influential in those worlds and share an admiration for the ability of critical thinking to affect complex decision-making on the world stage. But they also share a lament about how rarely rational thinking dominates and how wishful thinking is so prevalent. Hear about Boris Yeltsin’s transformation of the Soviet Union, Garry Kasparov’s continuing influence on world chess, Wall Street’s tricks on and treats for the world economy. Plus acquire a clear idea of why the 2020s don’t have to repeat the 1920s, although they might be.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cultural Strengths 44 mins – “How does one react, watching our current political crisis form fissures in our underlying culture, which, according to poet Peter Dale Scott, is undermining even our most valuable cultural strengths? These strengths include living with diversity, tolerating and listening to other viewpoints, and reaching a shared consensus. Unfortunately, at the same time, these cultural strengths are ebbing; righteousness on all sides combined with contempt for others are increasingly destructive forces. This is happening at an inopportune time. Climate change and potentially unsustainable migrations will likely require radical political changes, which are certain to be unpopular yet may only be achievable by restoring our traditional culture of consensus-building. Scott has spent a lifetime commenting on the Vietnam War, JFK’s assassination and the deep state. If it is too much to ask us to love our enemies, he wonders whether it is possible to listen to them. Without this civilizing skill, American culture will not be strengthened by this political crisis, as it has by past crises, but wounded by it instead.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Declaration of Independence 55 mins – “On June 7, 1776, Richard Henry Lee of Virginia moved that the Second Continental Congress resolve “that these United Colonies are, and of right out to be, free and independent States…” The Second Continental Congress adopted Lee’s motion and on June 11, 1776, it appointed a committee to draft a declaration of independence. Today, Steve Pincus, the Bradford Durfee Professor of History at Yale University and author of The Heart of the Declaration: The Founders’ Case for an Activist Government, leads us on an investigation of the Declaration of Independence and the context in which the founders drafted it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Democratic Presidential Nominee 54 mins – “As California prepares to vote in a presidential primary with huge implications for the 2020 general election, we’re assembling a panel of LGBTQI leaders who will share their picks for the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee. Some of their choices might surprise you! Join us for a timely, lively and fun evening talking presidential politics and LGBTQI concerns in one of the most momentous elections in modern times.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Designing Babies 38 mins – “Since the first test-tube baby was born over 40 years ago, in vitro fertilization and other assisted reproductive technologies have advanced in extraordinary ways, producing millions of babies. An estimated 20 percent of American couples use infertility services to help them conceive, and that number is growing. Prospective parents routinely choose the sex of their future child, whether or not to have twins, or whether or not to pass on certain genes to the next generation, including those for chronic diseases, and probably soon, height and eye color. These rapidly developing technologies will require parents, doctors and policy makers to face critical questions about their use and possible misuse.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Dilbert Creator 48 mins – “Scott Adams has drawn nearly 9,000 cartoons since starting “Dilbert” 30 years ago. His cynical take on white-collar office workspaces propelled him to widespread success and acclaim, while his ongoing commentary on politics and President Trump have kept him in national news. In his newest book, Loserthink: How Untrained Brains Are Ruining America, Adams explores the epidemic of mental shortcuts that make us prone to believing in bad ideas. Adams explores how loserthink makes people stereotype all Trump supporters as racists, believe that gun control is equal to full confiscation and avoid personal reflection during a relationship’s end. Through Loserthink, Adams provides the tools for spotting, avoiding and fighting against loserthink. In doing so, Adams argues that logic and rationality, not emotion, is the most important part of any argument, political or not. Join us for a conversation with Scott Adams as he urges us to think deeper and more critically, breaking free from loserthink.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Disabled Pride 42 mins – ““Such a pretty girl.” It was a refrain Nadina LaSpina heard frequently in her native Sicily. What was sometimes added, and what was always implied, was that it’s a shame she was disabled. Having contracted polio as a baby, LaSpina was the frequent target of pity by those who dismissed her life as hopeless. She came to the United States at 13 and spent most of her adolescence in hospitals in a fruitless and painful quest for a cure. Against the political tumult of the 1960s, LaSpina rebelled both personally and politically. She refused to accept both the limitations placed on her by others and the dominant narrative surrounding disability. LaSpina also took to the streets with the then fledgling disability rights movement that has changed both law and perception in the United States. As an activist, LaSpina has been arrested numerous times. She was an important figure in some key struggles, including those that led to the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. LaSpina discusses why pity has been one of the most hurtful things she’s had to contend with in her life, that the problem was not her disability but the way she was treated because of it, and that the assumption that to be disabled is to be miserable is itself the most miserable part about being disabled.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Dugway Proving Ground 46 mins – “After more than a decade of inquiry, the artist David Maisel was granted access to photograph the terrain and testing facilities of Dugway Proving Ground, a classified military site covering nearly 800,000 acres in a remote region of Utah’s Great Salt Lake Desert. This is a site where chemical and biological weaponry and defense programs were developed, tested and implemented by the U.S. government. Maisel began by photographing at ground level before moving to an overhead and aerial perspective. The result is a remarkable series of photographs that addresses questions of power, secrecy and land use, all collected in a single volume and freighted with an abiding skepticism toward technology and human endeavor. Please join The Commonwealth Club and Maisel in conversation to discuss his work, the site and the larger issues of power and surveillance that his book, Proving Ground, brings to the fore at a very acute time in American democracy. David Maisel was named a Guggenheim Fellow in 2018 for the work he did on Proving Ground. His photographs are included in more than 40 public collections, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Maisel is represented by Haines Gallery (San Francisco) and Houk Gallery (New York). He lives in Mill Valley, California.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Eat Learn Play Foundation 46 mins – “Three-time NBA champion and two-time MVP Stephen Curry and entrepreneur, host and best-selling author Ayesha Curry want to make sure that everyone has a chance to succeed. That’s the mission of their new Eat. Learn. Play. Foundation, which focuses on youth in underserved communities and works to ensure every child has access to nutritious food, a quality education, and a healthy and active lifestyle. The Currys join us for a unique Equality Series program, in which they discuss their work, their lives, and their efforts to improve the lives of children in the Bay Area and beyond. Ayesha Curry is a renowned restaurateur, chef, New York Times best-selling author, television host and producer. She has been on Forbes‘ 30 Under 30 List, one of the faces of Covergirl cosmetics, a frequent guest on “The Rachael Ray Show” and “Good Morning America,” a columnist for Woman’s Day magazine, and a popular lifestyle expert in the media. This fall, Curry teamed up with Ellen DeGeneres for a new Ellentube digital series, “Fempire,” in which she uses her wisdom and business savvy to help female entrepreneurs of any age achieve the goal of building their own “fempire.”” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Economic Forecasts for 2020 46 mins- “With an election year looming, trade wars with China and other countries impeding economic progress, health care remaining in flux, housing problems and governmental gridlock continuing on, what does all of this mean for your business, your investments and the overall economy for 2020? Join us for a lively discussion on where the U.S. and global economies are headed and what should be done to keep them on track.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

End of Life Care 46 mins – “Dying is an unavoidable part of life, yet we all seem to find ways to dodge questions about death and how we’d like to die. Katy Butler, author of the new book The Art of Dying Well, wants to inspire us to meet this fear. Butler offers a practical guide for all aspects of life before dying, including: living with a chronic medical condition, choosing the right doctor, and even when not to call 911. Butler’s guide to living and dying is both reassuring and thoroughly researched. It offers both guides and testimonials to help us all cope and succeed in our last act.  Katy Butler is one of the leading advocates for medical reform. Her first book, Knocking on Heaven’s Door: The Path to a Better Way of Death, was a heartfelt and personal memoir of her own parents’ experience with dying. Butler believes that whether you have two weeks or two decades, it is never the wrong time to discuss how to forge a better path to the end of life. Join us as Katy Butler visits INFORUM and answers all of your questions about dying.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Environmental Issues 35 mins – “Our panel members will explore the depth of talent, expertise, learning, knowledge and experiences at City College in making important improvements to combat global environmental issues and problems. Environmental flexibility and plans for the college’s adjacent 17 acres that were graciously leased to City College by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission for many decades will help students, college and communities learn, address and implement important knowledge and advancements to enhance solar, wind, charging stations and sustainable learning opportunities now and in the future. Join us to discuss City College and the future of our environment.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Environmental Justice 34 mins – “Climate One honors Robert Bullard with the ninth annual Stephen Schneider Award for Outstanding Climate Science Communications. Often described as the father of environmental justice, Bullard has written several seminal books on the subject and is known for his work highlighting pollution on minority communities and speaking up against environmental racism in the 1970-1980s. Bullard spoke with Greg Dalton at a recent Climate One live event. “When you don’t protect the least in your society you place everybody at risk,” Bullard told the audience. “Justice will say, let’s do fairness, equity and justice to make sure that we do not somehow say just because you live in a low-income neighborhood that you don’t deserve to have a park, a grocery store and flood protection.”… “Every social movement that has been successful in this country has had a strong youth and student component,” Bullard states emphatically. “The environment justice movement, the civil rights movement, peace and justice, women’s movement and right now the climate movement.  You look at young people …they are owning these issues and they’re saying no, we don’t have to wait until we can vote to be mindful of the fact that we are destroying this earth and we are on the wrong direction, and we have to do something about climate crisis” Established in honor of Stephen H. Schneider, one of the founding fathers of climatology, the $15,000 Schneider Award recognizes a natural or social scientist who has made extraordinary scientific contributions and communicated that knowledge to a broad public in a clear, compelling fashion.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Facebook Discussion 44 mins – “In his sophomore year of college, Mark Zuckerberg created a simple website to serve as a campus social network. The site caught on like wildfire, and soon students nationwide were on it.  Today, the social network that Zuckerberg created in 2004 has grown far beyond its original iteration, larger and more powerful than anyone could have imagined. Facebook has grown into a tech giant, the largest social media platform and one of the most gargantuan companies in the world, with a valuation of more than $576 billion and almost 3 billion users across the globe. There is no denying the power and omnipresence of Facebook in American daily life. And in light of recent controversies surrounding election-influencing “fake news” accounts, the handling of its users’ personal data and growing discontent with the actions of its founder and CEO, never has the company been more central to the national conversation regarding the direction of the county’s politics, economy and how individuals communicate with each other. There is no one better to describe how Facebook has evolved and where it might be headed than renowned tech writer Steven Levy. In his new book, Facebook: The Inside Story, Levy provides the definitive history of one of America’s most powerful and controversial companies. Based on years of exclusive reporting and interviews with Facebook’s key executives and employees, including Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg, Levy’s sweeping narrative, already named as one of the most anticipated books of the year, digs deep into the whole story of the company that has changed the world and reaped the consequences….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Feminist Movements 42 mins – “Recent feminist movements such as #MeToo and #TimesUp have called out sexism. They have empowered women to become more aware and also raise more questions: How do we find common ground in the new world we are building? How do we keep the momentum going with individual power, structural power and the power of movements? How do we handle a real situation at work, which could affect our livelihoods? Join psychotherapist and professor Joanne Bagshaw, author of The Feminist Handbook, and Professor Kellie McElhaney, founder and executive director of the Center for Equity, Gender and Leadership, in a lively, engaging dialogue meant to educate, prompt inner reflection and inspire. Walk away with a plan to help change society for yourself, your community and future generations.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Foreign Policy Ethics 44 mins – “Joseph S. Nye Jr. provides a concise, penetrating analysis of the role of ethics in U.S. foreign policy after World War II. Nye works through each presidency from FDR to Trump and scores their foreign policy on three ethical dimensions: their intentions, the means they used and the consequences of their decisions. He also evaluates their leadership qualities, elaborating on which approaches worked and which did not. Nye shows that each president was not fully constrained by the structure of the system and actually had choices. He further notes the important ethical consequences of nonactions, such as Truman’s willingness to accept stalemate in Korea rather than use nuclear weapons. Most importantly, he points out that presidents need to factor in both the political context and the availability of resources when deciding how to implement an ethical policy and will need to do so even more in a future international system that presents not only great power competition from China and Russia but a host of transnational threats: the illegal drug trade, infectious diseases, terrorism, cybercrime and climate change.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Fremonts 43 mins – “John Frémont was born out of wedlock in 1813 in Charleston, South Carolina and went to work at 13 to help support his family. But, by the time he was 30, he had become a famous wilderness explorer, best-selling writer, gallant army officer and latter-day conquistador, who, in 1846, began the United States’ takeover of California from Mexico. He was a celebrity who personified the country’s westward expansion—mountains, towns, ships and streets were named after him. A vital factor in his success was his wife, Jessie Benton Frémont, the daughter of a U.S. senator. Not allowed to compete directly in a male world, Jessie Frémont threw her skill and passion into promoting her husband. When John Frémont returned from mapping the Oregon Trail for the Army, Jessie Frémont helped him dramatize his adventures in newspapers and books. And in 1856, John Frémont was chosen, in spite of his southern origins, to be the first-ever presidential nominee of the newly established Republican Party, founded in opposition to slavery. Inskeep tells the surprisingly modern story of a couple whose joint ambitions and talents intertwined with those of the nascent United States, linking the Frémonts with not one but three great social movements of the time—westward settlement, women’s rights and the opposition to slavery.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Friendship 41 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy warms you up for the holidays with Michel de Montaigne’s essay “On Friendship,” one of the most influential and insightful meditations on the topic ever written. Montaigne shows us how our attitudes toward friendship are deeply constitutive of both our emotional life and our moral being. Together we will discuss the themes raised by Montaigne and their implications for thinking about communal life, both during Montaigne’s age and in the present moment.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Health Optimization 43 mins – “By combining the latest scientific research and more than 20 years of medical practice, Rachel Carlton Abrams will give you a body roadmap for you to easily find greater health and joy within your body and your life. She will explain how to find and listen to your body’s “yes” as a guide to choosing a life your body will love. She will guide you through exercises that help you listen to your own innate body intelligence—the subtle and not-so-subtle signals that your body uses to communicate with you. When we listen to our body intelligence and enter into the right relationship with ourselves, she says, we have the foundation to cultivate the right relationship with others and with the natural world. Research shows that our personal relationships and our connection to nature have an enormous impact on our health. Lack of connection may increase many health risks, including all chronic diseases (heart disease, diabetes, depression, anxiety and even cancer). Abrams will teach you a method to find your way back to the right relationship with the important people in your life—whether finding the connections you crave or setting the boundaries that keep you safe. You will learn about your deep and abiding connection to the natural world and how you can reimmerse yourself in the healing and calming power of nature. She says we are not separate from nature, and its impact on us is physically and emotionally profound…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Inconspicuous Consumption 34 mins – “Everyday choices – like which shirt to buy or where to binge-watch shows – may impact the planet more than you think. But how far can individual choices take us, and when is it up to companies and producers to take the lead? “You can drive yourself crazy trying to make the most ethical choice,” says former New York Times science reporter Tatiana Schlossberg. “It’s almost impossible to make an impact free choice in our current system.” Schlossberg is the author of Inconspicuous Consumption: The Environmental Impact You Don’t Know You Have, in which she argues that everyday consumer choices may not change the carbon economy, but they’re an important part of being the kind of person who acts in more collective and impactful ways.  “I don’t think we should feel individually guilty necessarily for our consumption,” Schlossberg says, “but we should feel collectively responsible for fixing the systems and building a better world.” Among the choices we make where our carbon footprint may be hidden in plain sight is in what we wear. Rebecca Burgess, founder and director of Fibershed, a nonprofit that helps develop regional and regenerative fiber systems for clothing producers, believes that our clothing choices can be as significant as our food choices.  “If I eat local, can I wear local? If I eat organic, am I wearing organic?” she asks. “If I’m interested in climate smart agriculture, how am I wearing those values and the fibers that I’m wearing each day?” Burgess believes we need to re-think our relationship to our wardrobes. “Think about the timelessness of the piece,” she advocates, “think about wearing a garment or purchasing a garment that’s gonna be with you for the long haul. Love it. Really be a custodian not a consumer.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Internet of Things 47 mins – “Foresee the near future with panelists Shekar Ayyar, Joxel García, Paul Gupta and Mike Weber. The number of Internet of Things (IoT) connected devices is expected to increase from 20 billion to 55 billion over the next five years. What will that mean, in terms of new opportunities and new risks, in our businesses and our personal lives? Communications service providers are starting to roll out integrated platforms for 5G and IoT uses. Our panel will discuss the technological, social and legal implications, including selected case studies in communications, health care, automotive, smart cities and infrastructure.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Israel Founding 42 mins – “More than seven decades after the founding of Israel, the momentum to establish a Jewish state has led to remarkable achievements: stable structures in government, the military and the economy. At the same time, as the country faces a range of issues in how it deals with coexistence, it also faces significant challenges to its democratic processes. Particularly, Israel lacks a constitution to bind its democracy and a bill of rights to safeguard the freedoms of its citizens. No one knows these issues better than Arye Carmon, the founder of the Israel Democracy Institute. In his new book, Building Democracy on Sand: Israel without a Constitution, Carmon diagnoses the critical vulnerabilities at the heart of Israeli democracy and the obstacles to forming a sustainable national consciousness. In the book, the author merges touching narratives about his own life in Israel with insightful ruminations on the Jewish diaspora and the arc of Israel’s history, illuminating the conflicts between Jewish identities, democratic values and the collective body of Jewish religious laws. This struggle between a secular and a religious Jewish identity is especially critical now amid voices promoting ethnocentric nationalism, threatening to sever the ties that strengthen the country’s democracy. Carmon’s book and his important views on the state of the country’s democracy come at a critical time as Israel emerges from its second national election within a year and the two major parties negotiate how to govern the country.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Jay-Z Discussion 59 mins – “Michael Eric Dyson is known for his many talents. He is an outspoken academic and sociologist, social critic, best-selling author, a popular figure in political news media, an ordained Baptist minister and, in his own words, one of the country’s leading “hip-hop intellectuals.” Often in Dyson’s work, these concepts all intersect to reflect a well-rounded picture of black life in America. Now Dyson has set his analytical sights on someone who, he argues, is one of the greatest American poets of all time: Jay-Z. Join INFORUM and Dyson for an evening of all things Hova—from Jay-Z’s humble beginnings as a hustler in 1980s New York City to his meteoric rise to fame and his eventual recognition as one of the greatest rappers of all time. Dyson will explore how Jay-Z’s 30-year career has changed not just hip-hop but also the music industry, business, politics and social justice. Join us for an exploration of the life of a great literary figure and learn how he provided the blueprint.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Judicial Independence 46 mins – “Americans are generally familiar with the role courts play in protecting the public’s rights and resolving disputes with integrity. In recent years, state judges have been confronted by recalls and other challenges at the ballot box as well as political attacks that some observers believe could create a chilling effect on justice. What is the impact of elections on judicial independence? Do elections threaten justice, or are they a means by which to preserve it?  How responsive to the electorate should judges be? What is the impact of judicial elections and retention elections on judicial independence? What is the proper relationship of politics and the judiciary? Join us in an important discussion with high-level panelists who have studied—and experienced—these issues.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mental Health Issues 47 mins – “Critics argue that jails and prisons are the most visible evidence of the failing of America’s public mental health system and that the most heartbreaking failures are in the field of juvenile justice. Seventy percent of young people entering the juvenile justice system are said to have a diagnosable mental health need. Advocates argue that detention and correction facilities provide a unique opportunity to intervene and connect children to services and support systems before it is too late. Others argue that community-based, non-incarceration solutions are more effective. With facilities such as San Francisco’s juvenile hall closing by 2021, how can San Francisco and other communities address system-involved youth with mental health issues? What role should and must the justice system play? And how will their decisions impact society at large? Join us for an important panel discussion.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mental Health Reform 43 mins – “In 1940, Engla Schey, the daughter of Norwegian immigrants, took a job as a low-paid attendant at Anoka State Hospital, one of Minnesota’s seven asylums. She worked among the 12,000 Minnesotans who were called inmates and shamefully locked away under the label “insane.” Susan Bartlett Foote tells of Schey’s campaign to reform the deplorable conditions of mental institutions and of the politicians and other civic leaders who made her crusade for forgotten souls a success, breaking the stigma of shame and silence surrounding mental illness, publicizing the painful truth about asylums and building support among citizens. The result was the first modern mental health system, which catapulted Minnesota to national leadership and empowered families of the mentally ill and disabled. Though their vision met resistance, the accomplishments of these early advocates for compassionate care of the mentally ill hold many lessons that resonate to this day, when debates about what to do about the homeless and the mentally ill are chilling reminders of our shameful past.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mental Illness 38 mins – “NPR has called Susannah Cahalan “one of America’s most courageous young journalists.” Known for her memoir Brain on Fire, which details her experience with a rare autoimmune disease, Cahalan’s work has since been made into a feature film on Netflix. In her newest book, The Great Pretender: The Undercover Mission That Changed Our Understanding of Madness, Cahalan explores the centuries-old struggle to define, diagnose and treat mental illness. The Great Pretender details a 1970 experiment, led by Stanford psychologist David Rosenhan, in which he and seven other people went undercover into the asylums of America. Cahalan describes how Rosenhan and the others were forced to remain inside until they could prove they were sane, and as a result, all of those partaking in the experiment emerged with stories of mistreatment and newfound mental health issues. Following the dramatic study, institutions and mental health diagnoses were changed from then on. Cahalan’s research asks us to delve deeper into the Rosenhan experiment and ask important questions relating to what really happened. She argues that this episode’s implications on mental illness and treatment are worth discussing, as the effects of the study are still felt today.  Join us for a unique and important conversation with Cahalan as she asks us to delve deeper into our own understanding of mental health, diagnosis and treatment. ” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Modern Investing 42 mins – “Mac McQuown is known as one of the architects of the modern investing system. In the early 1970s, he departed from prevailing Wall Street practices by assembling a team of six future Nobel Laureates to create a new type of investment: the index fund. Join McQuown as he presents an insider’s view of the events that led to the creation of the index fund. Learn what he and his team have created since those early days, other advances that have occurred since and what might be coming next.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Money in Early America 37 mins – “We read and hear a lot about money. We read and hear about fluctuations in the value of the Dollar, Pound, and Euro, interest rates and who can and can’t get access to credit, and we also read and hear about new virtual currencies like Bitcoin and Facebook’s Libra. We talk a lot about money. But where did the idea of money come from? Did early Americans think about money a lot too? Jeffrey Sklansky is a Professor of History at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the author of Sovereign of the Market: The Money Question in Early America. Jeff is an expert in the intellectual and social history of capitalism in early America and he’s agreed to lead us on an investigation of the world of money in early America.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Plot to Betray America 47 mins – “Malcolm Nance is one of the world’s renowned intelligence experts and a popular guest on NBC News and MSNBC. With over 33 years combating radical extremist terrorism, Nance is known for championing human rights, ethical responsibility and cultural awareness in intelligence practices. In his newest book, The Plot to Betray America: How Team Trump Embraced Our Enemies, Compromised Our Security, and How We Can Fix It, Nance argues that President Trump and his team have conspired to commit the greatest act of treason in the history of the United States: betrayal of the oath of office for personal gain. The Plot to Betray America contains in-depth interviews with insiders, analysis from intelligence experts, and substantial evidence of Trump’s deep financial ties to Russia. It also provides solutions on how to protect America’s compromised security. Join us for an essential conversation with intelligence and counterterrorism expert Malcolm Nance as he explains how we can still save America’s democracy, security and future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Police Reform 41 mins – “Given recent events around George Floyd and far beyond, this special episode of the a16z Podcast features Shaka Senghor, a leading advocate for criminal justice reform (and bestselling author), and Terry Brown, a former police officer in East Palo Alto (who has since run his own security firms) — who, incidentally, both grew up in Detroit but ended up on different sides of the law — in conversation with a16z co-founder Ben Horowitz. The conversation goes deep and on the ground (please note that the discussion also includes details of violence, in case you have young children listening).” At the link right-click “Share” at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Reentry 47 mins – “It is often said that “reentry begins on the first day of incarceration,” but how can we ensure that people leave prison prepared to succeed in the free world? This conversation between Marc Morjé Howard and Stephanie McGencey will highlight recommendations from the Reentry Ready Project, which focuses on the tremendous benefits of education and positive programming for incarcerated people so that they can develop self-worth and critical reasoning skills; the program also focuses on making carceral facilities safer for both residents and staff. Howard will share examples from the innovative and groundbreaking Georgetown programs in Washington, D.C. McGencey will describe efforts planned to improve reentry outcomes nationwide. ” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Racial Segregation Origins 63 mins – “Ever wonder how the United States’ problem with race developed and why early American reformers didn’t find a way to fix it during the earliest days of the republic? Today, Nicholas Guyatt, author of Bind Us Apart: How Enlightened Americans Invented Racial Segregation, leads us on an exploration of how and why the idea of separate but equal developed in the early United States.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Sexual Harassment 43 mins- “Revelations about misconduct at the biggest startups and tech companies seem to saturate today’s news cycle—but it wasn’t always this way. In 2017, when penning her now famous 2,900-word blog post about the pervasive culture of sexual harassment at Uber, soon-to-be whistleblower Susan Fowler was stepping into uncharted territory. Her decision to share a blog post about her “very, very strange year at Uber” with the public would open the floodgates for women to share similar experiences of systematic sexual harassment in Silicon Valley and beyond. Fowler’s open letter not only led to the CEO’s ouster but it also caused a complete disruption of the status quo of workplaces, culminating in mass movements for women’s empowerment launched worldwide.  In her new memoir, Whistleblower: My Journey to Silicon Valley and Fight for Justice at Uber, Fowler details how this courageous act was entirely consistent with her life so far—a life characterized by extraordinary determination, a refusal to accept things as they are, and the desire to do what is good and right. Since taking her leave from Uber, Fowler, along with other “silence breakers,” was named Time’s 2017 Person of the Year and in 2018 was brought on as an opinion editor at The New York Times. Come with your questions and join Susan Fowler as she visits INFORUM to share her riveting story about breaking the silence and speaking truth to power.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Silicon Valley Women 41 mins – “Julian Guthrie shares the untold story of four dynamic women, Magdalena Yesil, Mary Jane Elmore, Theresia Gouw and Sonja Hoel Perkins, who helped shape the tech landscape of Silicon Valley. Through grit and ingenuity, these trailblazers rewrote the rules and conquered the challenges of working in a male-dominated venture capital industry. Hear more about their personal stories as we celebrate the achievements and relentless perseverance of these extraordinary women.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Skinhead Reversal 47 mins – “Is there an answer to the widespread—and increasingly public—rise of racial extremism? Come learn about the white nationalist movement from someone who was a leader in it until he renounced racism and devoted his life to helping others leave it behind.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Star Wars Final Episode 53 mins – “With the coming release (December 20) of the ninth installment of the Star Wars movie franchise, Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, perhaps the most significant element of the series, the lives and legacy of the Skywalker family come to an end. The end of the Skywalker saga brings closure on a 40+ year cinematic saga that has transformed moviemaking, retailing, mythmaking and global popular culture. It is also brings to an end a storyline that has its very roots in Marin County. Lucasfilm, the company founded by Star Wars creator George Lucas in the early 70s, was originally located in San Rafael, and the original Star Wars film was written in San Rafael and San Anselmo. Skywalker Ranch, of course, is located in western Marin. What better way, then, to bring the nine-film mega odyssey to a close than a lively conversation between two Star Wars experts in the very county where it all began? Please join us as Mashable’s Chris Taylor, author of How Star Wars Conquered the Universe, sits down with Starwars.com contributor, Bryan Young, as they discuss everything Star Wars: What has the film franchise meant to American culture? What can we expect with episode 9 and beyond? Why did the film franchise have such an impact? And what do the films say about our current political system, religion and technology?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Stroke Recovery 42 mins – “Acclaimed writer, best-selling author and founder of Salon magazine, David Talbot has brought us masterful and explosive headline-breaking stories for over 25 years with books such as The New York Times best sellers Brothers and The Devil’s Chessboard and nationally recognized Season of the Witch. But, over the past year, all of that took a back seat to Talbot’s own personal health struggle following a stroke. Join this renowned journalist and historian for intimate journey through the life-changing year following his stroke, a year that turned his life upside down and ultimately saved him, changing the way he looks at the world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Supreme Court Power Center 47 mins – “Harvard Law professor Lawrence Lessig is a celebrated academic and activist for constitutional theory and reform. A longtime advocate for campaign finance reform, Lessig founded political funding tracker MapLight, Creative Commons and the anti-corruption nonprofit Rootstrikers. With partisan gridlock in Congress, the Supreme Court has emerged in recent times as a new power center in Washington, D.C. But what are the consequences of this change? In his newest book, Fidelity & Constraint: How the Supreme Court Has Read the American Constitution, Lessig explains how our understanding of the U.S. Constitution has changed with each era of judicial interpretation. Lessig argues that with each era of Constitutional translation, the role of our judges has evolved. Join us for an enlightening conversation with Lessig as he teaches us about an often missed but critically important issue.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Technology and Society 45 mins – “As Microsoft’s president, Brad Smith leads a team of more than 1,400 business, legal and corporate affairs professionals working in 56 countries. He plays a key role in spearheading the company’s work on critical issues involving the intersection of technology and society, including cybersecurity, privacy, artificial intelligence, human rights, immigration, philanthropy and environmental sustainability. The Australian Financial Review has described Smith as “one of the technology industry’s most respected figures,” and The New York Times has called him “a de facto ambassador for the technology industry at large.” Smith operates by a simple core belief: When your technology changes the world, you bear a responsibility to help address the world you have helped create. This might seem uncontroversial, but it flies in the face of a tech sector long obsessed with rapid growth and sometimes on disruption as an end in itself. While sweeping digital transformation holds great promise, Smith says we have reached an inflection point, and the world has turned information technology into both a powerful tool and a formidable weapon…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Technology Risks to Humanity 96 mins – “This program will present the biological and health effects of both natural electromagnetic waves innate to the body and man-made electromagnetic waves from wireless technologies, including discussion about 4G/5G antenna densification. It will also address the mental health and relational impacts of tech overuse and addiction. Importantly, new scientific understanding will be shared by a former telecom industry director of research and development about what is driving the biological effects, that relates to our body being mostly comprised of water. We will learn how wireless radiation instantly changes biology, with system-wide effects. Join us for a provocative program about technology risks to humanity. Co-organized by ElectromagneticHealth.org; American Academy of Environmental Medicine; Moms Across America; Ecological Options Network; SafeG; the California Brain Tumor Association; UCOT (Unintended Consequences of Technology); Electromagnetic Safety Alliance; EMF Safety Network; My Street, My Choice!; California Health Coalition Advocacy; Electrosensitive Society; Manhattan Neighbors for Safer Telecommunications; International EMF Alliance” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Toni Morrison 40 mins – “Toni Morrison, who passed away in August, was one of the most celebrated writers of our time. She was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, the Pulitzer, National Book Critics Circle Award, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and more. Earlier this year, a new documentary film about Morrison, The Pieces I Am, premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. The film covers the life and impact of Morrison, and it includes interviews with Morrison, Angela Davis, Fran Lebowitz, Peter Sellars, Oprah Winfrey and others.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Trump Opponent 46 mins- “Rick Wilson built his career as a star Republican political strategist. But following Donald Trump’s ascendancy during the 2016 campaign, the lifelong conservative became a vocal critic of the new Republican Party. His Twitter feed and columns for The Daily Beast give his followers a hilarious and refreshing take on national politics. In his new book, Running Against the Devil: A Plot to Save America from Trump, Wilson gives Left-leaning and anti-Trump voters a guidebook to win again in 2020. As a conservative strategist against Trump, Wilson critiques what he sees as Democrats’ inability to run the campaign and candidate needed to beat Trump. Wilson analyzes the damage that Trump has done and predicts the prospective damage Trump could bring in the next four years. Drawing on his plethora of political experience, Wilson exposes the tactics that brought Trump to victory in 2016—and the tactics that he will use again in 2020. Throughout Running Against the Devil, Wilson gives Democrats the tools to avoid the impending catastrophe of Trump’s 2020 victory. In this way, Wilson provides essential and much-needed advice for progressives, conservatives and civic participants to change the course of America’s future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Veterans Health Administration 44 mins – “The Veterans Health Administration is the nation’s largest integrated health care system, yet almost 2 million veterans and 3.8 million of their family members are without health insurance today. David Shulkin was brought in by President Obama to clean up the Veterans Affairs’ (VA) troubled hospital network after a major scandal. His success led President Trump to name him VA secretary, making him the highest ranking official to serve both presidents and the only Trump cabinet secretary to earn unanimous Senate approval. Born on an Army base, Shulkin was the first nonveteran to hold the position. Shulkin introduced substantial changes to the VA system, with bold moves that dramatically reduced wait times, increased transparency, enhanced accountability and tackled veteran suicide rates. His efforts earned early praise from Republicans and Democrats alike. But Shulkin says he ran headlong into Trump associates intent on privatizing the VA and eventually was ousted. In his new book, Shulkin opens up about his time as VA secretary and the ruthless political appointees he says he encountered. Since leaving government in early 2018, Shulkin has continued to shed light on VA privatization and his concerns on how it will impact our ability to ensure health care for those who have fought to protect the nation.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Women Power Brokers 46 mins – “Much has been written about the groundbreaking number of women who were elected into Congress in the last election. What many people may not know, however, is that women in San Francisco and the Bay Area play a pivotal role in creating a narrative at the national level—influencing who runs, where money should go, and, ultimately, who gets elected. Meet the Bay Area’s ultimate power players: the Queenmakers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Thanks for stopping by.

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MMD444 Media Mining Digest: 2020 Election Economics, African Priorities, AI Future, Aida Calculus, Astronomer, Ben Franklins World, Brain Wiring, California Fires and Water Supply, C-Dubb Podcast, China 2049, Chinas Global Role, Climate Threats, Cognitive Gadgets, Co-Innovation, Computer Culture, Consciousness is Widespread, Conscious Brains, Consciousness, Cosmology, Defense Policy, Ethical Algorithms, Foxes, Innovation Techniques, Jane Austen books, Library Company of Philadelphia, Native Americans, Neuroscience of Magic, Open Access Books, Pandemic History, Pelosi Background, Playful Learning, Podcasting Retrospective, Radio Free Alcatraz, Religious Freedom, Sanctions, Taiwan Elections, Transgender Black Women Assaults, Trump Administration book, Video Games, Vision Prosthesis, Women in Workplace

Exercise your ears: the 43 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 991 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 28,745 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

2020 Election Economics 61 mins – “On Wednesday, February 26, Brookings launched the Ezra Zilkha Policy 2020 Event Series at Macomb Community College in Michigan with its first event, “The economy and the 2020 election: If the economy is doing so well, why are so many struggling?” According to recent polling, the economy is the top issue for Michigan voters in the upcoming presidential election. The event examined the dichotomy between America’s improving economy on paper—demonstrated by low unemployment rates and rising wages—and the financial distress felt by working- and middle-class people across the country as well as in Macomb County.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Priorities 77 mins – “The new year 2020 marks the beginning of a promising decade for Africa. Through at least the first half of the decade, economic growth across Africa will continue to outperform that of other regions, with the continent continuing to be home to seven of the world’s 10 fastest-growing economies. Collective action among African and global policymakers to improve the livelihoods of all under the blueprint of the sustainable development goals and the African Union’s Agenda 2063 is creating a shared energy and excitement around Africa’s potential. With business environments improving, regional integration centered around the African Continental Free Trade Agreement progressing, and the transformational technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution spreading, never before has the region been better primed for trade, investment, and mutually beneficial partnerships. The recent, unprecedented interest of an increasingly diversified group of external partners to engage with Africa highlights this potential. Despite the continent’s promise, though, obstacles to success linger, as job creation still has not caught up with the growing youth labor force, gaps in good and inclusive governance remain, and climate change as well as state fragility threaten to reverse the hard-won gains of past decades.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Future 37 mins – “This episode of Books and Ideas is an interview with Susan Schneider, author of a fascinating new book called Artificial You: AI and the Future of Your Mind. Schneider’s book goes beyond the question of whether AI might become conscious to issues that might affect us on a more personal level.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Aida Calculus 9 mins – Today in the United States, thousands of well-paying jobs go unfilled in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Educators are recognizing that a barrier to entry may be a basic STEM requirement, calculus. Nearly every STEM job requires at least one semester of the subject, but a third of calc students drop or fail the course. Now, an AI-powered tutor app from Pearson could help those students solve for success. Aida Calculus uses multiple artificial intelligence algorithms to tutor students, teaching them how to solve problems and demonstrating why calculus is a useful tool outside the classroom. The algorithms can analyze students’ homework, even reading handwritten solutions, and provide feedback in the forms of hints, extra practice problems, or videos showing how mathematical concepts apply in the real world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronomer 33 mins – “This episode of Books and Ideas features the return of Podcasting Hall of Famer, Dr. Pamela Gay. Dr. Gay is co-host of the long running show Astronomy Cast. As a professional astronomer she has dedicated her career to public outreach and she is very involved with the citizen science project Cosmos Quest. Her passion for science is contagious.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Ben Franklin’s World 26 mins – “This is an interview with historian Liz Covart about her highly respected podcast “Ben Franklin’s World.” We explore what it means to be an historian in the 21st Century and the challenges of sharing early American history via podcasting.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Wiring 46 mins – “Every parent knows that each child is born with an unique personality. In his new book Innate: How the Wiring of Our Brains Shapes Who We Are. Dr. Kevin Mitchell writes “We are different from each other in large part because of the way our brains get wired before we are born.” (page 7) A key idea is that much of much of our behavior is innate but this is only partly due to genetics. Events during brain development are equally important. Listen to BS 159 now to learn more about what science is revealing about this fascinating topic.” At the link right-click “audio mp3“ under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

C-Dubb Podcast 45 mins – “Join us for a free live taping of a special edition of “The C-Dubb Show” podcast at The Commonwealth Club with “The Michelle Meow Show.” In recent months, a big conversation in the tech community has been about claims that black voices are being censored on social media when speaking on issues of race. Facebook has been a particular focus in this conversation, as black users from across the world have complained about being censored and blocked regularly. One of those users was Carolyn Wysinger, who was featured in a USA Today article about those who have been “Zucked.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

California Fires and Water Supply 39 mins – “We have all inhaled a lot of wildfire smoke over the past few years in Northern California. Fueled by a rapidly warming climate, these catastrophic wildfires are burning down our communities, are hard on our physical and mental health, and can play havoc with our water supply. What are communities doing to protect their homes and their water supply? What are drinking water utilities and the state of California doing to address these terrible problems? During our program, we will discuss the actions a large Bay Area water utility is taking to protect the green and build infrastructure that delivers our water. We will hear from the state’s forest health lead on the focus of their work. Finally, we will present examples of steps other communities around the West are taking.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

China 2049 100 mins – “In 2012, the Chinese government announced two centennial goals. The first was to double the 2010 GDP and per capita income for both urban and rural residents by 2021. The second was to build China into a fully developed country by 2049, the year when the People’s Republic of China (PRC) celebrates its centenary. Indeed, China has ascended successfully from one of the world’s poorest economies in 1978 to a high middle-income economy in 2019. However, there are greater uncertainties surrounding the path to the second centennial goal. How might rising domestic challenges such as an aging population, automation and AI, and financial risks impact China’s growth and stability? How might escalating economic tensions at home and abroad and de-globalization affect the international environment for China’s development? What role might China be able to play in managing tensions, reforming the global economic order, and developing nodes of cooperation in the face of global challenges such as climate change and financial instability?” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinas Global Role 49 mins – “China’s increased assertiveness at home and abroad has significant implications for its relations with the world’s great powers. How these powers position themselves within the intensifying U.S.-China competition will influence the evolution of the international system in the years ahead. On February 25, a panel of experts examined the differing perspectives from Russia, Japan, India, and European countries in response to China’s rise as well as their distinctive approaches to managing their relationships. The event highlighted the next installment of papers published as part of the Global China paper series which focuses on China and the great powers.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.   

Climate Threats 57 mins – “On January 24, Foreign Policy at Brookings hosted former U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and former Irish President Mary Robinson for an Alan and Jane Batkin International Leaders Forum addressing the climate crisis and its implications. In their respective international leadership roles, Ban and Robinson have been prominent advocates of bringing climate change to the top of the global agenda, promoting sustainable development and highlighting how environmental degradation has disproportionately affected people in developing countries, especially women. Brookings Vice President and Director of Foreign Policy Bruce Jones provided introductory remarks. Following remarks by Ban and Robinson, Brookings Senior Fellow and the SK-Korea Foundation Chair in Korea Studies Jung H. Pak joined them on stage for a conversation on climate change, human rights, adaptation measures, and global leadership in the face of a climate emergency.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Co-Innovation 26 mins – “What is Co-Innovation?  Co-Innovation is two parties with unique expertise that come together in a 50/50 funding of resources.  The key component being they have complimentary interests. Think of it as a Venn diagram.  The goal of Co-Innovation is to find where the Venn diagrams overlap.” Left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Cognitive Gadgets 46 mins – “BS 168 is an interview with psychologist Cecilia Heyes from Oxford University in the UK. We talk about her fascinating book “Cognitive Gadgets: The Cultural Evolution of Thinking.” Our focus is on exploring the evidence that several cognitive skills that appear to be unique to humans are learned from other people rather than being inherited genetically as is often assumed. Her proposal that language is a cognitive gadget NOT a cognitive instinct is controversial and has very important implications. Cognitive Gadgets is written for an academic audience, but this interview makes the key ideas assessable to everyone.” At the link right-click “audio mp3“ under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conscious Brains 61 mins – “In his new book The Deep History of Ourselves: The Four-Billion-Year Story of How We Got Conscious Brains respected neuroscientist Joseph Ledoux reaches two controversial conclusions. He say that emotion evolved after consciousness and that emotions are not the product of natural selection. We explore these ideas and much more in this month’s episode of Brain Science (BS 161). This is the second in our four part series about the neuroscience of consciousness. We also discuss why the term “Limbic System” has become outdated and should be avoided. Whether or not you agree with his conclusions, I know you will find Dr. Ledoux’s ideas to be extremely interesting and thought provoking.” At the link right-click “audio mp3“ under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness 59 mins – “In this month’s episode of Brain Science (BS 160) we take a deep dive into the neuroscience of consciousness. Until recently, consciousness was considered outside the realm of science, but now it is a growing field of interest. I review several recent books with a cross-section of viewpoints, but there are several concepts that they all share: Consciousness requires a brain, Consciousness is a product of evolution, Consciousness is embodied” At the link right-click “audio mp3“ under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness is Widespread 40 mins – “Christof Koch returns to Brain Science for the 3rd time and in BS 163 he shares his new book The Feeling of Life Itself: Why Consciousness Is Widespread but Can’t Be Computed. He tells us why he doesn’t think the Neural Correlates of Consciousness (NCC) are enough to explain subjective experience and he gives us a brief overview of the Integrated Information Theory (IIT) of Consciousness.” At the link right-click “audio mp3“ under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cosmology 37 mins – “This month’s episode of Books and Ideas is an interview with astronomer Brian Keating about his memoir Losing the Nobel Prize: A Story of Cosmology, Ambition, and the Perils of Science’s Highest Honor. His book is a first hand look at the hard work behind the scientific effort to determine how the universe really began, but as the title implies, it also contains a candid account of how striving for the Nobel Prize can be both motivating, but strangely counterproductive.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Defense Policy 48 mins – “Foreign policy is the domain of the executive branch, but Congress plays a key constitutional role by passing budgets and conducting oversight. As the Department of Defense reorients its strategy and outlook to deterring, and if necessary, defeating near-peer great competitors, Congress must ensure that the department is building a force that will address the nation’s security challenges while also stewarding U.S. taxpayer resources. On March 2, Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, joined Senior Fellow Michael O’Hanlon in a conversation on defense policy. Now in his final term, Rep. Thornberry is the ranking member of the House Armed Services Committee and a distinguished former chairman. An advocate of on-time annual defense budgets, Rep. Thornberry was instrumental in realizing the Trump-era increases in defense spending, and in advancing the Obama-era “Third Offset” to enhance U.S. competitiveness before that. Their conversation spanned the defense budget, the role of Congress in overseeing the Defense Department, and the wide range of security challenges confronting the United States.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethical Algorithms 39 mins – “From education to employment, algorithms are increasingly augmenting human decisionmaking in important sectors. Despite widespread implementation to streamline processes, reduce human prejudice, and cut costs, algorithms are far from neutral. In fact, algorithmic bias can lead to systematically discriminatory outcomes that have significant impacts on people’s lives. Under most circumstances, algorithmic bias is an unintentional side effect of machine learning. Training these algorithms involves the collection and analysis of enormous quantities of historical data that is used to inform decisionmaking and optimization. However, any historical biases embedded in the data can be absorbed and reproduced. ” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foxes 27 mins – “This episode of Books and Ideas features Adele Brand, author of the new book The Hidden World of the Fox. Foxes are surprisingly widespread even in urban areas. This episode reveals their surprising story.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Techniques 21 mins – “Phillip was the co-founder of a web-multimedia resume company VisualCV and is currently CEO of cloud security company Fugue, igniting their own innovations. As a serial entrepreneur he is accustomed to creating and disrupting market spaces and has had a number of his companies acquired.  Phillip has been recognized for driving results including KPMG & Ernst and Young Entrepreneur of the Year, Washingtonian Magazine “Titan of Technology”, and CRN “Top 25 Executive” as well as Deloitte’s fastest-growing software company in North America over the period 1998 to 2002. In 2000, webMethods went public on the NASDAQ in the most successful software IPO to date….” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Jane Austen books 47 mins – “Author and professor Janine Barchas of the University of Texas talks about her book, The Lost Books of Jane Austen, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. The conversation explores Austen’s enduring reputation, how the cheap reprints of her work allowed that reputation to thrive, the links between Shakespeare and Austen, how Austen has thrived despite the old-fashioned nature of her content, Colin Firth’s shirt, and the virtue of studying literature.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Library Company of Philadelphia 1 27 mins – “Did you know that Ben Franklin founded the first successful lending library in North America? With James N. Green, Librarian at the Library Company of Philadelphia, we explores the role Franklin played in the founding of the Library Company of Philadelphia, the history of libraries in colonial North America, and the Junto, Franklin’s sociability and improvement club for Philadelphia tradesmen. Show Notes: http://www.benfranklinsworld.com/001” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Library Company of Philadelphia 2 15 mins – “Have you ever walked through a museum and wondered why its staff chose to feature the artifacts you saw? Cornelia King, Chief of Reference at the Library Company of Philadelphia shares her answer to that question in Part 2 of our 3-Part launch series of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Library Company of Philadelphia 3 16 mins – “Benjamin Franklin founded the Library Company of Philadelphia in 1731. Today, you can visit his library and its amazing collections, which begs the question: How has the Library Company managed to stay open, and remain relevant, for over 283 years? The 3-part “Ben Franklin’s World” launch special concludes with a conversation with Richard S. Newman, Director of the Library Company of Philadelphia. Rich discusses how the Library Company strives to remain relevant in our twenty-first-century digital age and its mission to increase our understanding of American history before 1900.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Native Americans 59 mins – “Fifty years ago this November, a group of Native Americans that came to be known as Indians of All Tribes began a 19-month occupation of Alcatraz Island. The takeover and occupation attracted a groundswell of interest from across the United States and the globe. The initial focus of the occupation was a protest against the U.S. government’s policies that took aboriginal land away from Native Americans. The Alcatraz occupation is recognized today as one of the most important events in contemporary Native American history and one of the most important public displays of the Red Power movement, a social movement that demanded self-determination for Native Americans in the United States. The occupation helped bring Native American activism to the forefront of the consciousness of the American people. The 50th anniversary of this important event is being recognized throughout the Bay Area in an effort led by the San Francisco Arts Commission. The takeover and occupation was led, in part, by Richard Oakes, a charismatic student from San Francisco State. The first biography of Oakes, A Journey to Freedom, was published late last year. Its author, Kent Blansett, will make a special visit to Marin County to discuss Oakes, the role the occupation played in the Red Power movement of the 1960s and the ongoing legacy of Native activism that was spurred by the 1969 takeover. Kent Blansett is a Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Shawnee and Potawatomi descendant. Blansett will also discuss the role that Marin County residents played in the start of the Alcatraz occupation, including the role of the Sausalito-Indian Navy, which helped Oakes launch the occupation late in the evening of November 20, 1969. Join us for this special event.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Neuroscience of Magic 26 mins – “BS 165 is an encore presentation of an interview with neuroscientists Stephen L. Macknik and Susana Martinez-Conde. We talk about their international bestseller “Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of Magic Reveals about Our Everyday Deceptions.”  Macknik and Martinez-Conde study vision, but several years ago they had the innovative idea of collaborating with magicians to explore how their use of both visual and cognitive illusions reveals secrets about how our brains work. This may sound esoteric, but it has practical consequences, especially for making sound decisions in our complex world.” At the link right-click “audio mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Access Books 13 mins – “IntechOpen, founded in 2004, is a scientific community of authors and editors built by scientists for scientists to provide a collaborative environment for peer-reviewed academic research, according to Dr. Anke Beck who became CEO in August 2018. In its role as an Open Access publisher of books and anthologies, she says, IntechOpen seeks to level the research playing field and promoting an environment that is democratic and inclusive. “We focus on books where we believe there’s a greater space for ideas to flourish, and for collections of ideas to come together,” Beck tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “In a talk in Berlin at Academic Publishing in Europe conference, I referred to open access book publishing as the Cinderella of publishing because it opens that space where scientists can shed light on a given scientific problem in more detail,” she explains. “Book publishing, I think, serves much, much better the scientific discussion than scattered articles in a journal.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pandemic History 19 mins – “What happens to the world after a pandemic? Lots of experts have been talking about what we may be able to expect after COVID-19 from the 1918 Spanish flu and The Black Death. But, as any historian will tell, history is often more complicated than people think. Ada Palmer is an associate professor of Early Modern European History at the University of Chicago and an expert on the Renaissance that followed the Black Death. But she says the “Golden Age” may not have been as golden as we think. On this episode, she clearly explains what lessons for coronavirus we can really learn from historic pandemics. At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pelosi Background 43 mins – “When Nancy Pelosi first ran for political office at the age of 47, she wasn’t new to politics. From the time she spent helping her father while he served as the mayor of Baltimore, working for Jerry Brown’s presidential campaign or serving as the Democratic Party chair of California, she developed skills that would propel her to the peak of American politics. As the speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, she is now the most powerful woman in the political history of the United States. In the first 100 days of the 116th Congress, Speaker Pelosi and House Democrats have worked on their “for the people” agenda, passing legislation to clean up corruption and restore ethics to Washington, D.C., a bipartisan background checks bill, and what many Democrats call a landmark paycheck fairness bill. House Democrats are also pursuing a bipartisan infrastructure deal, looking at ways to expand and protect the right to vote, tackling climate change, and lowering health care costs and prescription drug prices for all Americans. This progress comes as Democrats welcome the most diverse caucus in the history of Congress, including more than 100 women in the same Congress that America will mark 100 years since women won the right to vote. Speaker Pelosi says this diversity is a strength that enables Democrats to more fully represent the values and voices of the American people and deliver progress in their lives. How will the Democratic Party try to recreate the success it saw in the 2018 midterm elections? As America heads toward the presidential election in 2020, join us for a conversation with the iconic face of the Democratic Party, and bring your questions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Playful Learning 100 mins – “Playful Learning Landscapes lies at the intersection of developmental science and transformative placemaking to help urban leaders and practitioners advance and scale evidence-based approaches to create vibrant public spaces that promote learning and generate a sense of community ownership and pride. On Wednesday, February 26, the Center for Universal Education and the Bass Center for Transformative Placemaking at Brookings hosted an event introducing Playful Learning Landscapes, an interdisciplinary project aimed at transforming everyday places into learning experiences and bringing education into public spaces by reaching families in parks, supermarkets, and other places where they regularly go. The event convened community leaders, city planners, designers, and behavioral scientists that share a vision for creating family-friendly cities across the world.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasting Retrospective 22 mins – “This episode is an adapted version of the talk I gave last week at the first annual She Podcasts Live event, which was held October 10-13, 2019, in Atlanta, Georgia. I was asked to share my experience of podcasting “through life’s rollercoaster.” This gave me a chance to reflect on what I have learned over the last 13 years. Though the talk was originally aimed at podcasters, I have adapted it for a general audience.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Radio Free Alcatraz 11 mins – “This is an aircheck of one of the episodes of Radio Free Alcatraz, recorded during the Native American occupation of Alcatraz Island. This episode, as all episodes in the series, starts with a recording of Buffy Sainte-Marie singing “Now that the Buffalo’s Gone.” John Trudell, then talks of plans to start a university on the island. This is followed by an interview with Grace Thorpe about her job doing public relations for Alcatraz Island’s occupiers. Previously cataloged as “Aircheck Alcatraz”. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Religious Freedom 41 mins – “The right to practice religion free of fear is one of our nation’s most indelible rights. But over the last few years, the United States has experienced a significant increase in mass casualty attacks targeting houses of worship and their congregants. Following a string of attacks on synagogues, temples, churches, and mosques in 2019, the Department of Homeland Security launched a new task force to examine the threat posed by violent extremists, including those inspired by white supremacy ideologies. As a co-chair of the task force, Brookings Institution President John R. Allen worked with leaders from the Jewish, Muslim, Sikh, and Christian faith communities to issue a new report that offers recommendations for how law enforcement and communities of faith can work together to prevent and mitigate mass casualty attacks.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sanctions 60 mins – “On January 27, Foreign Policy at Brookings hosted a panel discussion on economic sanctions and their implications for advancing U.S. foreign policy objectives. Moderated by Robert Bosch Senior Visiting Fellow Jim Goldgeier, the panel included experts with a combined background on the use of sanctions in the Middle East, Latin America, and North Korea: Brookings Senior Fellows Suzanne Maloney, Ted Piccone, and Jung Pak. Since the 9/11 attacks, and particularly under the current administration, the United States has expanded its use of economic sanctions as a tool to address a broad range of national security and foreign policy objectives. With the increasing reliance on economic sanctions as a tool to achieve U.S. strategic objectives, our scholars gathered to discuss their long-term effectiveness and their potential to generate unfavorable consequences.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taiwan Elections 73 mins – “Taiwan held elections for the president and all the members of the Legislative Yuan on January 11. Although President Tsai Ing-wen had maintained a strong lead in the polls, there were questions about the reliability of some polls. Moreover, the outcome of the legislative elections was very uncertain. China, which has long made clear its dislike of the Tsai administration, had predictably intensified its pressure campaign against Tsai and Taiwan, hoping to impact these elections. In the end, Tsai Ing-wen was reelected, and the Democratic Progressive Party maintained its majority in the Legislative Yuan. On January 16, the Center for East Asia Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution hosted a panel of policy experts for a discussion on the results of the elections and their implications for domestic governance in Taiwan, relations between the two sides of the Taiwan Strait, U.S.-Taiwan relations, and other policy implications.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender Black Women Assaults 45 mins – “Join us for a memorable program exploring the struggles of African-American transgender women, who are the most frequent victims of anti-trans violence.  Toni Newman is the executive director of St. James Infirmary in San Francisco. St. James is a peer-based occupational health and safety clinic, offering free, compassionate and nonjudgmental health care and social services for former and current sex industry workers. With the many challenges facing the aforementioned—including but not limited to political climate, homelessness, violence and the overwhelming intricacies of the legal, public and social systems—St. James Infirmary offers an independent alternative, providing individuals with culturally competent and nonjudgmental services. Monica Roberts is the founding editor of the award-winning TransGriot blog and is an award-winning human rights advocate. She is a sought-after collegiate and conference speaker who has been advocating for the human rights of transgender people for more than 20 years, with a focus on the issues affecting black trans people. Her writing has appeared at Ebony.comThe Advocate, Black Girl Dangerous and OutSmart magazine. Roberts has also received the 2018 GLAAD Media Award, the Robert Coles “Call of Service” award from Harvard University’s Phillips Brooks House Association, the Virginia Prince Transgender Pioneer Award and the Barbara Jordan breaking barriers award from the Harris County Democratic Party.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Trump Administration book 59 mins – “The extraordinary authority of the U.S. presidency has no parallel in the democratic world. Today that authority resides in the hands of one man, Donald J. Trump. But rarely, if ever, has the nature of a president clashed more profoundly with the nature of the office. From the moment of his inauguration, Trump has challenged our deepest expectations of the presidency. But what are those expectations, where did they come from, and how great is the damage? In their new book, “Unmaking the Presidency: Donald Trump’s War on the World’s Most Powerful Office,” Brookings Senior Fellows Susan Hennessey and Benjamin Wittes tell the story of the confrontation between a person and the institution he almost wholly embodies. On January 21, Hennessey and Wittes debuted their new book at Brookings and were joined by journalist Fred Hiatt for a conversation. After the discussion, speakers answered questions from the audience.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Games 49 mins – “Books and Ideas 68 is an interview with psychologist Dr Pete Etchells about his new book Lost in a Good Game: Why we play video games and what they can do for us. We explore both the myths and the science behind video games and consider why the effects of video games are actually quite difficult to study. It seems strange that many people in this field don’t play games themselves. Most of the bad things you have heard about video games do not stand up to the basic standards of good science. Whether or not you enjoy video games yourself this is a fascinating interview.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Vision Prosthesis 43 mins – “This week neuroscientist Stephen Macknik returns on Brain Science 166 to discuss an exciting new approach to prosthetic vision. Unlike traditional approaches electrodes are not required. He explains how this work is based on recent discoveries in vision research along with techniques like optogenetics.” At the link right-click “audio mp3“ under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Workplace 41 mins – “Studies show that we are starting to see real results in the number of women represented in the c-suite, with nearly 45 percent of companies having three or more women in senior roles. While the bright spots are clear, women are still getting stuck, and it is happening even earlier in their careers, at the very first rung along the corporate ladder. The glass ceiling is cracking, but what else needs to be done to move progress forward for a majority of working women?  “Women in the Workplace” is an annual report conducted by McKinsey & Company and LeanIn.org, and with 329 companies, representing 13 million people surveyed, it is the largest data set of its kind for women in corporate America. Now in its fifth year, join Alexis Krivkovich, co-author and senior partner at McKinsey & Company, and other corporate leaders and experts as they discuss the 2019 findings. They’ll offer their insights, share key lessons learned along their journey and discuss what needs to be done to fix the broken rung and accelerate progress for all working women.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

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Media Mining Digest 443: AI and Machine Learning, Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment, Ankle Surgery and Recovery, Asylum Seekers, Blockchain Book, Bone Fractures, Brain Health, Cancer Prevention, CAR-T Cells, Cassava in Africa, Chronic Pain Treatment, Cotton Seed Edible, Dementia Impact, Drug Prohibition, European Central Bank, GE Crop Ban in Australia, George Will, Hip and Knee Replacement, HIV Prevention, Homeless Drug Deaths, Hong Kong Protests, Immune Functions, Insulin, Irelands Connections, Kidney Transplants, Knee and Cartilage Injuries, Mind-Machine Interfaces, Mosquito Control, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Nitrogen Fixation in Plants, Nitrogen Fixation in Soil, Opioid Crisis History, Opioids Heroin and Fentanyl, Paleontology, Precision Medicine, Pre-diabetes, Radical Markets, Recession Preparation, Small Things, Soonish Book, Tick-borne Diseases,

AI and Machine Learning 25 mins – “The genomics era has generated tremendous data sets, yet the information they reveal is limited by the human biases that search them.  Are there ways to examine complex data sets for hidden patterns that can unearth new perspectives in biology?  This is the role of machine learning, and the patterns form the basis of artificial intelligence that then executes new tasks.  While these concepts seem difficult to fathom, Dr. Gabe Musso makes them understandable, and describes the ways they may be applied in contemporary contexts.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’s Disease 58 mins – “Dr. Geroges Naasan explores the principal clinical syndromes of Alzheimer’s Disease: memory, visual, language and frontal/executive. He also discusses neuropathology, genetic factors and modern biomarkers with colleagues from the UCSF Memory and Aging Center. Recorded on 04/30/2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment 56 mins – “Dr. Julio Rojas-Martinez discusses the pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer’s disease now and what is in development. Current approaches pursue early intervention in the dementia phase. Novel emerging strategies will likely accompany anti-amyloid and anti-tau approaches in the future. Then Sarah Dulaney, RN, describe dementia education, support, and non-pharmacological treatment strategies. Recorded on 05/14/2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Alzheimer’s Therapeutics 37 mins “Dr. Aimee Kao looks at recent news in Alzheimer’s Disease therapeutics including drugs in development and the potential of stem cells and genome editing. Recorded on 10/24/2019. (#35238)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ankle Surgery and Recovery 37 mins – “Orthopedic surgeon Dr. Daniel Thuillier looks at the options to treat severe ankle pain from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to surgery including ankle replacement and ankle fusion. Recorded on 05/23/2019. (#34797)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Asylum Seekers 45 mins – “Reports from the frontlines of the Trump administration’s “Remain in Mexico” asylum policy. We hear from asylum seekers waiting across the border in Mexico, in a makeshift refugee camp,  and from the officers who sent them there to wait in the first place. This episode won the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for audio reporting, the first ever given for audio journalism.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Blockchain Book 11 mins – “What if the next big thing turned out to be the next everything? It would need to be a technology so powerful yet so pliable that it could find a place in every industry, any activity, and all manner of creativity. Blockchain is “The Next Everything” asserts Stephen P. Williams. His latest book offers an explanation in layman’s terms of how the technology works and even suggests reasons why so many people struggle to understand it. “What I find most exciting is that blockchain is a distributed technology, which is a new way of looking at the world,” Williams tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “We generally respond very well to top-down, hierarchical systems– president, father, mother, teacher, each telling us what to do,” he explains. “Blockchain technology allows for a distributed system where everyone who participates in the system has an equal say in how that system works. This presents huge potential for designing new ways of doing business, of creating, of communicating.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Bone Fractures 39 mins – “Fragility fractures occur in structurally weak bones due to aging and bone loss – osteoporosis. Dr. Anthony Ding explains what “fragility fractures” are, where they occur, what they mean to you, and how they are treated. Recorded on 05/02/2019. (#34795)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Brain Health 56 mins – “There are modifiable behaviors that may reduce the risk factor of Alzheimer’s: vascular disease, sedentary lifestyle, depression/stress, diet factors and alcohol. Kaitlin Casaletto talks about the benefits of an active lifestyle and proper nutrition. Then Dr. Joanna Hellmuth looks at how to decode direct-to-consumer interventions – dietary supplements – and the rise of pseudo-medicine for dementia. She explains that supplements may or may not be safe and that manufacturers can make broad claims without supporting evidence. Recorded on 05/21/2019. (#35136)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cancer and the Immune System 55 mins – “Interactive immune systems are at the center of cancer and other diseases. Dr. Matthew Krummel explores how the immune system can regulate cancer progression. Recorded on 10/31/2019. (#35239)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cancer Prevention 39 mins – “Worldwide there are 550,000 new cases of head and neck cancer a year. Dr. Jennifer Grandis explores prevention and an opportunity for chemo prevention, substances to stop cancer from developing. In particular, she looks at aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Recorded on 10/17/2019. (#35237)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

CAR-T Cells 20 mins – “Can we use genetic engineering to help the body’s immune system target cancer cells?  This is exactly what happens with CAR-T (chimeric antigen receptor) T-cell therapy.  CAR-T cells are T-cells, immune cells of the body that are reprogrammed to identify specific surface signatures that define specific types of cancer cells.  It allows these immune agents to seek and destroy cancer cells with great accuracy and with fewer side effects to traditional chemotherapy or radiation.  While in their infancy, these techniques show great promise for future therapies.  Today’s guest is Dr. Joe Fraietta, a leader in CAR-T cell solutions.  He explains how the technology works, describes its applications and future uses.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cassava in Africa 16 mins – “Cassava is a staple food crop in Africa and Asia, yet is widely unknown by the industrialized world.  While almost a billion people depend on this crop, production is limited by a series of diseases, and it also lacks critical nutrients that could help reverse local deficiencies. Dr. Chiedozie Egesi is a scientist dedicated to cassava improvement. He discusses the crop, the challenges to growth, and how biotechnology solutions could help facets of production.  They also discuss some of the recent momentum in biotech adoption in Africa.  Hosted by Modesta Abugu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Pain Treatment 50 mins – “Dr. Grace Dammann, medical director of the Pain Clinic at Laguna Honda Hospital, and seven of her colleagues talk about what does and does not work in the treatment of chronic pain. She talks as both a patient and a provider. There is also a discussion of various non-pharmacologic and complementary medicine modalities to treat pain. Recorded on 05/01/2019. (#34789)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cotton in Kenya 14 mins – “Kenya is an emerging economy and has significant investment in advanced technologies.  However, a 2013 ban on biotech crops has limited farmer access to the most needed technologies for the field.  That moratorium is finally being lifted, as biotech cotton has been approved and will be available to farmers in 2020.  Farmers recognize the potential for Bt cotton to reduce or eliminate dependence on the insecticides currently required for production.  Today’s guest is Daniel Magondu, Chairman of the Society of Biotech Farmers of Kenya.  The episode is hosted by Modesta Abugu, a graduate student studying tomato improvement.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cotton Seed Edible 29 mins – “Cotton production is massive, but mostly used for fiber. The cotton seed is a tremendous potential resource as it contains high amounts of oil and high-quality protein.  However, the seeds are not directly edible by most mammals because they contain a toxic chemical called gossypol.  Gossypol is a terpenoid that the plant produces as a natural insecticide.  A team led by Dr. Keerti Rathore at Texas A&M University has worked for decades to produce cottonseed without gossypol. The plants have now been approved for production by USDA-APHIS and the FDA.  The technology may now be used to produce new cotton lines that generate massive amounts of high-protein seed, leading to new human food and animal feed, ultimately benefitting farmers, the environment and the food insecure.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Impact 56 mins – “Worldwide 50 million people live with dementia. By 2040 over 70% of them will be living in the developing world. Dr. Shamiel McFarlane explores the social and economic cost of dementia around the world.
Recorded on 05/28/2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Drug Prohibition 39 mins – “The Drug Policy Alliance advances policies and attitudes that best reduce the harms of both drug use and drug prohibition, and promotes the sovereignty of individuals over their minds and bodies. California’s deputy director Laura Thomas talks about the history of drug prohibition, the consequences and a more effective path moving forward. Recorded on 05/22/2019. (#34792)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

European Central Bank 43 mins – “The European Central Bank (ECB) is facing significant challenges that are testing the potency of monetary policy. Confronting a slowing economy and an inflation rate persistently below its target of “close to but below 2 percent,” the ECB, over the objections of some of its top policymakers, recently cut a key interest rate to -0.5 percent and restarted its quantitative easing (QE) program of bond buying. Is monetary policy running out of ammunition in Europe? Is Europe heading for a recession? What will it take to get the Eurozone economy growing sustainably? What have we learned about the impact of negative interest rates and prolonged QE? How does the ECB respond to complaints from Germany about the impact of low rates on savers? What are the implications of Brexit for the Eurozone? On October 16, Philip Lane, a member of the ECB’s Executive Board and its chief economist, discussed these and other questions at a Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy event at Brookings. Before joining the ECB’s Executive Board in June 2019, Lane served four years as governor of the central bank of Ireland. A Ph.D. in economics from Harvard, he was previously on the faculty at Trinity College, Dublin.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up audio.

GE Crop Ban in Australia 25 mins – “While the country of Australia has been growing genetically-engineered crops for over 15 years, the state of South Australia has banned their use.  This moratorium has been in place since 2004, and requires farmers to shift to alternative crop protection strategies that often have a significant yield penalty. Recent changes in political representation in the region appeared to be more farmer friendly, and many felt that change was coming. Unfortunately, local activists connected to Green Party representatives in Parliament, were able to derail efforts to end the moratorium. Today’s podcast meets with Caroline Rhodes, CEO of Grain Producers South Australia.  She describes the rationale behind the ban, the effects, and next steps to ensure seed sovereignty. Ultimately this is a case of restricting farmer choice, and a look into the playbook of how to manipulate politicians with fear, uncertainty and doubt.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GE Crop Discussion 30 mins – “Dr. Stuart Smyth is no stranger to anyone that has watched social media.  As a leading ag economist he has consistently represented science and technology fairly and accurately, and tethered to his prolific publication of books and scholarly publication, he is a visible influencer in scientific and social media circles.  In today’s podcast we discuss his views on risks and benefits of GE crops, the rules of the EU and his home country of Canada.  We discuss the future of new technology, and made a few predictions about the next decade.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

George Will 52 mins – “George Will talks about his new book, The Conservative Sensibility, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Will argues for a conservative vision that embraces the dynamic nature of life. Topics discussed include the current political landscape, the American founding, James Madison’s vision of government vs. Woodrow Wilson’s, Friedrich Hayek, and of course, a little baseball.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hip and Knee Replacement 56 mins – “Orthopaedic surgeon Dr. Jeff Barry goes over the basics of hip and knee replacement and what’s improved over the last decade. Recorded on 05/30/2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

HIV Prevention 30 mins – “While HIV incidence has remained stable in the industrialized world, the virus is still transmitted in the Developing World.  The development of methods of prophylaxis are critical to disease containment, yet moving products into affected areas is not practical or affordable.  Dr. Evangelia Vamvaka was part of a team that placed anti-HIV proteins into rice.  The rice produced a transgenic protein that inhibited the virus, and did so with great efficacy in the presence of other compounds from the plant.  The rice can be ground to a powder and potentially be used as an HIV preventative wherever rice is grown. Co-hosted by Lethbridge Canada high school student Michelle Wu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless Drug Deaths 55 mins – “Dr. Barry Zevin is the medical director of Street Medicine and Shelter Health, San Francisco Department of Public Health. He describes programs to treat opioid use disorder in persons experiencing homelessness, safe consumption sites, and homeless deaths. Recorded on 04/17/2019. (#34787)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Hong Kong Protests 49 mins – “For over 100 days now, protesters in Hong Kong have taken to the streets every weekend. What it’s like to live through that.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Immune Functions 55 mins – “Microbiome expands the genetic and functional capacity of its human host. Susan Lynch explains that human microbiome develops early in life and that gut microbes shape immune function and relate to disease outcomes in childhood. She also explores next-generation microbiome therapeutics and research. Recorded on 11/07/2019. (#35240)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Insulin 4 mins – “Insulin is necessary to utilize the energy we obtain from carbohydrates. Diabetes is characterized by a relative or absolute lack of insulin production. Here, Dr. Sarah Kim briefly describes the crucial role insulin plays in the body. (#35068)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Irelands Connections 38 mins – “Brexit—the departure of the United Kingdom from the European Union, has been scheduled to occur on October 31. But will it still happen? As events continue to evolve in Britain and in the European Union–including Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s likely failed attempt to hold new elections in December–where do things stand? Amanda Sloat, the Robert Bosch Senior Fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe at Brookings, explains what’s been going on, and what to expect next in Brexit. Also on this episode, Joseph Parilla, fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, speaks to the issue of talent development as a component of city and regional economic development.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Kidney Transplants 37 mins – “The wait time for a kidney transplant from a deceased donor is many years. Dr. Brian Lee, Medical Director of the Living Kidney Donor Program at UCSF, discusses the risks and benefits of live donor kidney transplant, both for the donor and the recipient. He also talks about the importance of a crossmatch test and the National Kidney Registry and the Advanced Donor Program. Recorded on 10/23/2019. (#35232)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Knee and Cartilage Injuries 37 mins -“Orthopedic surgeon Dr. Drew Lansdown goes over the basic science of knee cartilage and looks at treatment options including injections, such as hyaluronic acid, and biologics, such as platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cell injections. He also looks at surgical knee preservation options. Recorded on 05/16/2019. (#34796)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mind-Machine Interfaces 38 mins – “Millions of Americans have difficulties with their physical functioning. Dr. Karunesh Ganguly explores the Brain-Computer Interface (BCI). The concept of bio-interactive neural interfaces sates to the early 20th century with successes like cochlear implants, deep brain stimulation and responsive stimulation. He is now working on neural interfaces for communication and movement by working to translate neural engineering based approaches into treatments for those with impaired function. Recorded on 11/21/2019. (#35242)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mosquito Control 21 mins – “The tiny mosquito is a nuisance in the industrialized world, yet around the world it is a ruthless killer, spreading blood-borne diseases that bring about pain and suffering, particularly in developing nations.  In many regions these are invasive species with little to no ecological role. For years scientists have used “sterile insect technique” to control them, a process that treats sexually compatible insects with radiation, rendering them infertile.  The low-fertility insects are released into the wild and crash problematic populations. The Oxitec company has a genetic solution.  Mosquitoes have been genetically engineered to contain a lethal gene that can be turned off in the laboratory with a simple chemical.  Upon release, these mosquitoes breed against target populations, spreading the lethal gene, and leaving the next generation inviable.  The process creates a reproductive dead end.  While amazingly successful, these trials have suffered from a lack of public acceptance….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurodegenerative Diseases 60 mins – “Alzheimer’s disease is the most common but not the only cause of dementia throughout the lifespan. Dr.Salvatore Spina discusses frontotemporal dementias and how they differ. Recorded on 05/07/2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Neurodegenerative Diseases of the Brain 60 mins – “Neurologist Dr. Serggio Lanata explores the neurodegenerative disease of the brain, what they have in common and how they differ. alzheimer’s is the most common neurodegenerative disease but there are several others including Parkinson’s, Huntington Disease and others. Recorded on 04/23/2019. (#34774)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Nigtrogen Fixation in Soil 34 mins – “Nitrogen is a reality of growing plants, and must be supplied to maximize crop yields.  At the same time our atmosphere is >70% nitrogen that is not usable by plants in its atmospheric form.  Humans have devised processes to “fix” nitrogen into plant usable forms, but they require energy and the products need to be transported, both leading to a substantial carbon footprint.  A number of microbes naturally fix nitrogen, yet do not form good associations with all plants.  Joyn Bio is a collaborative effort by a number of companies in chemistry and synthetic biology. Their CEO Dr. Michael Mille talks about efforts to engineer microbes that can form tight associations with crop plants and fix the nitrogen they need.  These strategies seek to lower the carbon footprint of farming, at the same time limiting nitrogen pollution by producing it directly in association with the plant that needs it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nitrogen Fixation in Plants 24 mins – “Nitrogen is essential for crop growth.  That reality has led to intensive crop fertilization using nitrogen fixed through the Haber-Bosch process, which has energy costs in production and transport.  At the same time there are well known examples of nitrogen-fixing bacteria associated with plants, as well as some that colonize within the plant itself.  Can these naturally occurring bacteria actually be used within the plant to assist in the nitrogen fixation process?  Nolan Berg joins the podcast from Azotics, a company with a pioneer product.  This bacterial strain lives within the plant, fixing nitrogen and limiting the need for exogenous application.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Crisis History 55 mins – “Dr. Phillip Coffin talks about the history of opioid crisis and available medical treatments. Coffin is the director of substance use research at the San Francisco Department of Public Health and assistant professor in the division of HIV/AIDS at the University of California, San Francisco Recorded on 05/08/2019. (#34790)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Opioid Overdose Treatment 39 mins – “In the U.S. 47,000 people died from opioid overdose in 2017 alone but most people who could benefit from medications for opioid use disorder (OUD) do not receive them. Dr. Scott Steiger argues that OUD is a treatable chronic brain disease and should be treated accordingly. Medications for OUD are effective and save lives but they are not available to many people who need them; denying access to them is denying appropriate medical treatment. Recorded on 04/24/2019. (#34788)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Opioids, Heroin and Fentanyl 39 mins – “Deaths from drug overdose are greater than from car accidents or guns. Dr. Daniel Ciccarone, talks about the triple wave: opioids, heroin and fentanyl. This epidemic is the worst in decades and a comprehensive response is needed. Recorded on 05/15/2019. (#34791)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Paleontology 39 mins – “There’s a lot that can be gained from unearthing the past — learning about oneself, learning about others. But, it doesn’t always go how you’d expect.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Pre-diabetes 3 mins – “UCSF endocrinologist Dr. Umesh Masharani explores what pre-diabetes means. (#35244)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Precision Medicine 25 mins – “There is a massive amount of human genomic DNA sequence data, and it is now possible to identify correlates with specific disease, drug sensitivity and physiological variation.  The concept of “genomic medicine” or “precision medicine” is that therapeutic interventions are guided by genetic information.  In today’s podcast we speak with Dr. Julie Johnson.  Dr. Johnson is a Dean and Distinguished Professor of Pharmacy at the University of Florida.  She outlines what precision medicine is, along with some of its strengths and limitations, as well as some predictions of new approaches on the horizon to improve delivery of specific therapies.  Co-hosted by Dr. Karla Claudio.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radical Markets 42 mins – “Economist Glen Weyl of Microsoft Research New England and Visiting Senior Research Scholar at Yale University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book (co-authored with Eric Posner) Radical Markets. Weyl urges a radical transformation of land and housing markets using a new federal real estate tax based on self-assessment. Owners would be required to sell their houses at the self-assessed price. Weyl argues this would eliminate the market power home owners have in the re-sale market and the revenue tax would could be used to reduce inequality. In the last part of the conversation, Weyl proposes an overhaul of U.S. immigration policy by having residents sponsor immigrants for a fee.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recession Preparation 77 mins – “During the Great Recession, cities and states saw revenue declines and expenditure increases. This led to record levels of fiscal stress resulting in service cuts, deferred maintenance of infrastructure, and reduced payments to pensions and other liabilities. This webinar will focus on how state and local governments can adopt best practices and strategies now in order to mitigate the impacts of any future recessions. This may include maintaining adequate cash balances, stress testing revenues and expenditures, and reviewing fees and benefits. To understand the practices and strategies firsthand, we will be joined by Michael Nadol, managing director of the PFM Group, and Laura Porter, managing director and head of U.S. public finance at Fitch Ratings, in conversation with the Hutchins Center’s David Wessel. The presentations will be followed by a discussion with webinar participants.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As”, then “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Recession Preparation 77 mins – “When the next recession comes, and it certainly will, how will policymakers respond? In a new volume of policy proposals from the Hamilton Project at Brookings and the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, a group of experts propose new and updated antirecession solutions to boost the economy and save jobs. These ideas center on the concept of automatic stabilizers, which are simply policy responses that trigger when a crisis is starting, and when policymakers may be too overwhelmed by the crisis to respond. On this episode, Jay Shambaugh—a senior fellow at Brookings and director of the Hamilton Project—and Heather Boushey—executive director and chief economist of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth—address these policy proposals. Also on today’s show, Senior Fellow Molly Reynolds discusses what steps the House of Representatives would have to take in any impeachment process, and also other business that Congress is pursuing, including a budget deal.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Small Things 41 mins – “Stories about being little. Secret writings in tiny letters. The power of a very small number. And a medication that’s supposed to cure shortness.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Soonish Book 47 mins – “Ecologist Kelly Weinersmith and cartoonist Zach Weinersmith–creator of Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal–talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about their new book, Soonish–a look at cutting-edge and not-quite cutting edge technologies. The Weinersmiths speculate about everything from asteroid mining to robotic house construction to the nasal cycle and how the human body and medicine might be transformed in the future. They discuss the likelihood of some really crazy stuff coming along and changing our lives as well as the possible downsides of innovation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tick-borne Diseases 39 mins – “Ticks are vectors for human disease, including Lyme disease. Semay Chou studies the vector–pathogen relationships at UCSF. Here she discusses strategies for blocking tick-borne diseases and what we can learn from ticks. Recorded on 11/14/2019. (#35241)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 442: Abortion and Measles, ALS Patient Story, Artificial Intelligence, Autism, Brain Research, Cancer Treatment, Carbon in Soil, Charlottesville One Year Later, Data Security for Lawyers, Data Storage in Norway, Deep Medicine, Dengue Virus, Enterovirus, Equine Encephalitis Outbreak, Food History in US, Grenfell Tower Fire, Immigrant Crossing, Impeachment Inquiry, Influenza Virus, Information Governance for Lawyers, Kurds-Turkey-Syria Conflict, Madness and Recovery, Math Education, Measles Outbreaks, Metadata, Microbiome, Mind Machine Interfaces, Minimum Wage Discussion, Nobel Prizes in Virology, Norman Maclean author, NSA Surveillance for Lawyers, Osama bin Laden Killer, Parenting, Photographic History, Presidential Campaigns, Ransomware Crisis in Law, Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Children, Sony Hack, Special Masters in Court, Ted Williams, Tick Borne Diseases, Trump and California Air Pollution Standards, Trumps Inaccurate Hurricane Forecast, Virology History, Virology Research at the Karolinska Institute, Virus Careers, Virus Infectivity, Virus Research, War and Terrorism in Cyberspace, Whales in America, Whistleblowers and Trump, Women in Congress, WWI Remembrance, Yaba in Bangladesh

Exercise your ears: the 66 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 765 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 28,844 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Abortion and Measles 34 mins – “The story of how abortion became legal in the United States isn’t as straightforward as many of us think. The common narrative is that feminist activism and the sexual liberation movement in the 1960s led to Roe v. Wade in 1973. But it turns out the path to Roe led over some unexpected and unsettling terrain, and involves a complicated story winding through culture, society, disease, and our prejudices and fears about disability. In the 1960s a rubella epidemic swept the United States and panicked every pregnant woman in the country. Rubella, also called German measles, is a disease we hardly remember anymore, but it’s the “R” in the MMR vaccine. Though the virus is relatively harmless for most people, when contracted during pregnancy, it can severely harm the developing fetus. During the epidemic many pregnant women who may have never identified as abortion-rights advocates suddenly found themselves seeking abortions and dismantling barriers to access. Though not everyone agreed with these women, people listened. And this historical moment, sparked by a virus, helped pave the way for the legalization of abortion.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar, select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

ALS Patient Story 18 mins – “Jay DesMazes is bedridden with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). extremely limited movement; Using only eye movement and an ipad, DesMazes assembles words one letter at a time. Through his tablet, Jay tells Dr Brian Goldman about his life and abuse he received at the hands of nurses and health care staff.” At the link find the title, “Jay’s tablet,” right-click “Download Jay’s tablet” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence 43 mins – “Futurist and author Amy Webb talks about her book, The Big Nine, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Webb observes that artificial intelligence is currently evolving in a handful of companies in the United States and China. She worries that innovation in the United States may lead to social changes that we may not ultimately like; in China, innovation may end up serving the geopolitical goals of the Chinese government with some uncomfortable foreign policy implications. Webb’s book is a reminder that artificial intelligence does not evolve in a vacuum–research and progress takes place in an institutional context. This is a wide-ranging conversation about the implications and possible futures of a world where artificial intelligence is increasingly part of our lives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Austin Kleon author 18 mins – “Artist and author Austin Kleon talks about what lasting success really means and how to achieve it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Autism 11 mins – “Vaccine scientist, pediatrician, and autism dad Peter Hotez talks about his new book, Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel’s Autism. Host: Vincent Racaniello Guest: Peter Hotez” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Research 12 mins – “In 1953, a twenty-seven-year old factory worker named Henry Molaison, cursed with severe epilepsy, underwent a radical new version of the lobotomy that targeted the most unexplored structures of the brain. The operation was performed by Dr. William Scoville whose brilliance as a surgeon was only tempered by an adventurousness that bordered on recklessness. It did not cure Molaison’s seizures but left him profoundly amnesiac. This tragic, if revelatory, accident opened the door to our understanding of how memory works and Molaison—better known as Patient H.M—was studied for over sixty years, becoming the most important research subject the field of neurology has ever seen. In 2003, Esquire contributor Luke Dittrich—Scoville’s grandson—set out to learn more about this seminal case in his feature, “The Brain that Changed Everything.” He joins host David Brancaccio to discuss the story and how it led to his seven-year journey to write a full-length book, Patient H.M.—published this summer—a fascinating journey about the history of neuroscience, his grandfather’s methods, and buried family secrets.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Cancer Treatment 55 mins – “Interactive immune systems are at the center of cancer and other diseases. Dr. Matthew Krummel explores how the immune system can regulate cancer progression. Recorded on 10/31/2019.” At the link you can watch, or right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon in Soil 37 mins – “Journalist and author Moises Velasquez-Manoff talks about the role of dirt in fighting climate change with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Velasquez-Manoff explains how changes in farming can allow dirt and plants to absorb carbon and potentially reduce climate change. At the end of the conversation he discusses the state of the science on hygiene, parasites, and auto-immune disorders that he discussed in his previous appearance on EconTalk in 2014.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charlottesville One Year Later 31 mins – “On August 11 & 12, 2017, a “Unite the Right” rally brought chaos, violence and death to the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia. To mark the anniversary, BackStory broadcasts an episode of “A12,” a new podcast series presented by historian, writer and podcaster Nicole Hemmer. “A12” looks at the legacy of August 12th in Charlottesville and beyond. In it Hemmer, who witnessed the rally and attack, brings together city leaders, activists, scholars, and witnesses to make sense of all the forces surrounding the events. It’s a sprawling story, covering everything from Confederate statues to white nationalists to questions of policing and law. But it’s also an intimate one: a story of trauma, loss and healing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Commander in Chief Trump 15 mins – “Where do a president’s powers begin and end when it comes to issuing a strike to kill? Can presidents decide how much force to use against an adversary? National security correspondent Karen DeYoung breaks down the administration’s decisions in Iran.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Data Security for Lawyers 17 mins – “From malware and hackers to BYOD and TYOD, the biggest threat to law firm data could be the attorneys themselves. On this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon D. Nelson and John W. Simek interview data expert Ben M. Schorr and discover complex new threats to data security and the simplest solutions to reduce them….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Data Storage in Norway 18 mins – “If data is the new oil, are data centres the new oil rigs? Far into the north of Europe, under half a year of darkness, where the landscape has inspired folklore and legend, are some of the biggest data centres in the world. The frozen mountains and deep fjords under the aurora hide the “dark fibre“ for the modern internet to function in the way we all want it to – instantly and reliably. Ninety percent of the world’s data has been created in the last few years, and as a more internet enabled future, with AI and the internet of things, becomes reality – data more than ever needs a physical home. This requires energy, and by 2020 some estimate around 20% of the world’s energy supply will be used to process data. This can be hugely costly, and damaging for the environment. Norway – which became so rich from oil and gas thinks data mines might be part of a new economic future away from fossil fuels. Abundant renewable energy means it’s cheap to cool the hot whirring servers – the cold landscape itself also lends itself to housing data. We visit a huge data mine in a former mineral mine, next to a deep fjord, and hear how the data is pinged back and forth across the globe. But it’s not as simple as that, as the Sami, the traditional people of the region have found traditional lands in some parts spoiled by huge hydroelectric dams. Modernity and tradition go hand in hand in the far north of Europe, where legends of trolls in mountain caves sit alongside some of the most high tech companies in the world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Deep Medicine 45 mins – “Cardiologist and author Eric Topol talks about his book Deep Medicine with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Topol argues that doctors spend too little face-to-face time with patients, and the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning is a chance to emphasize the human side of medicine and to expand the power of human connection in healing. Topol surveys the current landscape of the application of technology to health care showing where its promise has been overstated and where it is having the most impact. The conversation includes a discussion of the placebo effect and the importance of the human touch in medicine.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dengue Virus 73 mins – “The TWiV pro-vaxxers reveal viruses that infect endangered wild salmon, and how iron in host serum modulates dengue virus acquisition by mosquitoes. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, and Brianne Barker” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Treatments 62 mins – “The Autonomous CollecTWiVe reveal two effective treatments for Ebolavirus infection, how a virus in a fungus confers heat tolerance to a plant, and dampened inflammation as a mechanism for bat tolerance to viral infection. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, and Brianne Barker” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Enterovirus D68 81 mins – “Amy joins the TWiV team to review evidence that enterovirus D68 is an etiologic agent of childhood paralysis, and her finding that the ability of the virus to infect cells of the nervous system is not a recently acquired property. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Equine Encephalitis Outbreak 74 mins – “The TWiV team covers outbreaks of eastern equine encephalitis virus in the US and poliovirus in the Philippines, and explain how a chemokine induced by HIV-1 infection helps release more virus particles from cells. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Food History in US 49 mins – “It’s the holidays — that time of the year when food is everywhere. So, Brian, Joanne, and Nathan sit down to discuss some of America’s many homegrown culinary traditions and what the food we eat says about American identity. In this episode we talked to Pati Jinich of “Pati’s Mexican Kitchen.” Find her recipe for Chilorio Burritas (and more) on her website. We also talked about Maida Heatter’s “Best Damn Lemon Cake.” Learn more about Heatter and find her lemon cake recipe (as well as a few other desserts) in this 1982 story from the Washington Post.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select save file and OK to get the podcast.

Greenland Purchase 12 mins – “President Trump abruptly canceled a trip to Denmark because the country’s prime minister wouldn’t discuss the purchase of Greenland. Economic policy reporter Damien Paletta explains whether Trump’s effort to purchase Greenland is as unusual as it seems.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Grenfell Tower Fire 25 mins – “On 14 June 2017, a fire broke out in the 24-storey Grenfell Tower block of flats in West London; it caused 72 deaths and more than 70 others were injured and 223 people escaped. On the fourteenth floor of Grenfell Tower, firefighters moved eight residents into one flat – 113. Only four would survive. Piecing together evidence from phase one of the Grenfell Tower Public Inquiry, Katie Razzell tries to understand what went wrong that night in flat 113. The answer reveals a catalogue of errors which could help explain the wider disaster.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Immigrant Crossings 19 mins – “It’s over two years since the authorities in France closed down the Jungle, the large migrant camp in Calais on the French coast. At its height more than 9,000 people from around the world lived in the camp while attempting to make it across to the UK, often hiding in the back of lorries or packed into small boats. It was hoped the camp’s closure would stem the number of people risking their lives to try to get to Britain. But has it worked? In December, Britain’s Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, declared the number of migrants attempting to cross the English Channel in boats a ‘major incident’ and since then more than 100 people have been picked up in 2019. For Assignment, Paul Kenyon investigates the British gangs making big money and risking migrants’ lives smuggling them across the Channel and reports on the attempts to break up their networks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment Inquiry 10 mins – “House Democrats announced articles on abuse of power and obstruction of Congress against President Trump in its investigation of his conduct regarding Ukraine. Reporter Mike DeBonis explains what the articles mean, why they matter and what happens next.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Influenza Virus 61 mins – “The TWiVologists consider whether to receive an influenza vaccine in August (in the northern hemisphere), and mice implanted with human lung fragments for studying microbial pathogens. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Information Governance for Lawyers 24 mins – “In this edition of Digital Detectives hosts Sharon D. Nelson and John W. Simek invite Jason R. Baron, former director of litigation at the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration to discuss Information Governance as it relates to e-discovery, privacy, record keeping and security. Baron connects the dots between all these areas and helps lawyers understand they need to know about information governance and the current trends he is see in this area.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Kurds-Turkey-Syria 21 mins – “First, Pentagon reporter Dan Lamothe explains the complexities of the Turkey-Syria conflict. Then, political reporter Robert Costa explains how Trump’s decision to withdraw U.S. troops from the border area might be putting his political coalition at risk.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Love in Hong Kong 27 mins – “Unprecedented mass protests have caused chaos in Hong Kong’s public sphere – but what has it meant for private life? How have they affected the increasing number of couples who have married across the divide, with one partner from Hong Kong and another from the Chinese mainland? As part of Crossing Divides, bringing people together in a fragmented world, BBC World Affairs correspondent Paul Adams hears from one such couple, for whom the political has become personal. ‘Daniel’ is a native-born Hong Kong citizen, while his wife ‘Jane’ moved to the city from the Chinese mainland. They are happily married – but are living in a metropolis riven by discontent. How do they navigate the expectations of their friends, families and workplaces and most importantly their spouse – while staying true to their own beliefs? This single marriage reveals a great deal about the emerging, troubled identity of Hong Kong.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Madness and Recovery 14 mins – “Award-winning Irish author and playwright Arnold Thomas Fanning sits down with Dr. Brian Goldman to discuss his new book Mind on Fire: A Memoir of Madness and Recovery.” At the link find the title, “Mind on Fire: A Memoir of Madness and Recovery,” right-click “Download Mind on Fire: A Memoir of Madness and Recovery” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malaysia Air 370 22 mins – “The question is astonishingly simple: In the year 2015, with GPS and satellites and global surveillance everywhere all the time, how does a massive airplane simply go missing? To find the answer, writer Bucky McMahon boarded one of the vessels searching for Malaysia Air 370 in one of the most isolated and treacherous stretches of ocean on the planet. In telling the story of the search crew and the massive amounts of technology, money, and human capital being spent trying to find this airplane, McMahon tells a story of our time—of a world completely dependent on nets of redundant technology, yet completely lost and broken when those nets suddenly break. McMahon joins host David Brancaccio to discuss his October 2015 story, “The Plane at the Bottom of the Ocean.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Math Education 18 mins – “Dr. Pannell welcomes the Nomellini & Olivier Professor of Education at Stanford University to talk math and what is wrong with the way it’s being taught in America. Author of many books including Limitless Mind.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Measles Outbreaks 24 mins – “In this episode, we will be discussing the recent updates in measles outbreaks, where the vaccination recommendations stand, and other preventative strategies.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

MetaData 14 mins – “Many are hearing about metadata in articles and blogs, but secretly admit that they don’t fully understand what it is.  Digital Detectives co-hosts, Sharon D. Nelson, Esq., President of Sensei Enterprises, Inc. and John W. Simek, Vice President of Sensei Enterprises, join Karen Massand, the President of Litéra, to take a look at metadata, whether it takes an expert to find metadata in documents, leaking hidden data, and the new metadata problem caused by the “bring your own device movement”.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Michael Bey Director 10 mins – “In 2001, director Michael Bay was one of Hollywood’s most successful commercial filmmakers when he took on the daunting task of directing an epic about Pearl Harbor. How would his testosterone-laden, explosive-style adapt to a serious subject? (Hint: the critics hated it but the movie made $450 million at the box office.) Jeanne Marie Laskas joins host David Brancaccio this week to discuss her sympathetic but piercing—and often hilarious—profile of Bay, who rages at his critics, complains about his agents and studio executives, and attempts, often unsuccessfully, to conduct life at the top without becoming a total…jerk.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Microbiome 55 mins- “Microbiome expands the genetic and functional capacity of its human host. Susan Lynch explains that human microbiome develops early in life and that gut microbes shape immune function and relate to disease outcomes in childhood. She also explores next-generation microbiome therapeutics and research. Recorded on 11/07/2019.” At the link you can watch, or right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mind Machine Interfaces 38 mins – “Millions of Americans have difficulties with their physical functioning. Dr. Karunesh Ganguly explores the Brain-Computer Interface (BCI). The concept of bio-interactive neural interfaces sates to the early 20th century with successes like cochlear implants, deep brain stimulation and responsive stimulation. He is now working on neural interfaces for communication and movement by working to translate neural engineering based approaches into treatments for those with impaired function. Recorded on 11/21/2019.” At the link you can watch, or right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minimum Wage Discussion 38 mins – “Jacob Vigdor of the University of Washington talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the impact of Seattle’s minimum wage increases in recent years. Vigdor along with others from the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance have tried to measure the change in employment, hours worked, and wages for low-skilled workers in Seattle. He summarizes those results here arguing that while some workers earned higher wages, some or all of the gains were offset by reductions in hours worked and a reduction in the rate of job creation especially for low-skilled workers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nobel Prizes in Virology 49 mins – “From the 16th Smögen Summer Symposium on Virology, Vincent speaks with Erling Norrby about how he has used archival material to provide insight into early Nobel Prizes for research on viruses. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello Guest: Erling Norrby ” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Norman Maclean author 12 mins – “Norman Maclean published A River Runs Through It when he was seventy-three, and only after his children implored him to write down the stories about fly-fishing, brotherhood, and the wilds of Montana that he’d told them for years. The resulting novella—published forty years ago last month—is a classic of economy and clarity. A few years later, Pete Dexter visited Maclean in Montana and profiled him for Esquire in “The Old Man and the River.” Dexter, a National Book Award winner, joins host David Brancaccio to discuss the master class he got from Maclean in what truly matters most—in writing, nature, and life.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

NSA Surveillance for Lawyers 25 mins – “Edward Snowden’s leaks about NSA surveillance have been a hot topic in the media for the last few months. But what do lawyers, specifically, need to worry about? The answer is: a lot. On this edition of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon D. Nelson, Esq. and John W. Simek take the stage and examine NSA surveillance as it relates to lawyers. Tune in for an overview of Snowden and the NSA surveillance controversy, how effective (or ineffective) encrypting data is, whether the surveillance is having a chilling effect on lawyers, how to abide by the Model Rules of Professionalism 1.6, and an answer to the underlying question – has George Orwell’s dystopia, 1984, arrived a few decades late?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Osama bin Laden Killer 12 mins – “In March 2013, the man who shot and killed Osama bin Laden came forward to tell his story for the first time in “The Shooter,” by Phil Bronstein. It is a report of the celebrated mission by turns captivating, astonishing, and visceral, but also heart-breaking: The shooter decided to break his silence because, now a civilian, he feared for the safety of his family, was concerned about a life without a safety net, and he wanted to shine a light on a little-known and worrisome aspect of Special Forces service. Bronstein, the executive chair of the Center for Investigative Reporting, joins host David Brancaccio to discuss why the shooter decided to finally emerge and what he’s doing now.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Parenting 42 mins – “Obstetrician gynecologist Amy Tuteur and author of Push Back, talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Tuteur argues that natural parenting–the encouragement to women to give birth without epidurals or caesarians and to breastfeed–is bad for women’s health and has little or no benefit for their children.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photographic History 18 mins – “In the 21st century, we often assume that a picture captures what really happened in a given moment. But on this week’s show, Joanne and Brian look at the early days of photography – when Americans had to figure out how to ‘read’ images – and learn if photos should be trusted at all. Historian Martha Sandweiss explains how an unusual set of daguerreotypes changed the way she thinks about photography.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Populist Curtain in Poland and Hungary 14 mins – “In 1946, Winston Churchill coined a memorable phrase: “From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic an iron curtain has descended across the continent,” he said. Today the Soviet Union has gone, but populist parties are in government in every country along the route of the Iron Curtain, as defined by Churchill. In this series, political scientist Yascha Mounk travels that route, and finds out what is changing under these new governments in smaller cities, far away from the capitals. He speaks to supporters and opponents of the populist parties and builds up a complex picture of Europe in a time of flux. Yascha begins in the north in the Polish city of Szczecin (Stettin) – where Solidarity was originally created. Today the PIS party governs the country, with its appeal to traditional religious values and social conservatism. Critics say it is attacking independent institutions, especially the judiciary. Szczecin saw vigorous protest against a law restricting abortion. He stays on the former Eastern side of the curtain by travelling on to Sopron, Hungary – the site of the picnic which led to the first mass breach of the Iron Curtain, then to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Victor Orban’s Fidesz party is accused of attacking civil society and the freedom of the press in his pursuit of an “illiberal democracy” – but there are forces fighting back locally.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Presidential Campaigns 12 mins- “Published in 1992, Richard Ben Cramer’s What It Takes: The Way to the White House remains the richest and most unvarnished account of the personal price of running for president. The irony, as Cramer pointed out to C-SPAN shortly after the book came out, is that to become president a candidate must sacrifice the entire life that had prepared him or her for office in the first place. Earlier this year longtime Esquire political correspondent Charles P. Pierce joined host David Brancaccio to discuss how Cramer’s book—which was excerpted in three parts in Esquire—continues to shape how we understand presidential politics and the psyches of those with the hubris to seek the highest office.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Ransomware Crisisin Law 17 mins – “To those unfamiliar with ransomware, it is a malicious software that effectively holds your files hostage until you pay a ransom. For lawyers, this could mean losing or compromising the data that keeps your business running smoothly. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek discuss this malware with the CEO of LMG Security, Sherri Davidoff. Sherri divulges what we know about ransomware, what to do when it has infected your computer, and how to prevent data loss. While there are few ways to stop the infection when it has started, backing up your information and educating your team on malware countermeasures can significantly lessen ransomware’s impact on your business. Sherri Davidoff is the CEO of LMG Security, a cybersecurity and digital forensics company. She has more than a decade of experience as an information security professional, specializing in penetration testing, forensics, social engineering testing and web application assessments.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Children 17 mins – “Inuit babies ‘don’t have a lobby’: Doctor petitions to expand use of palivizumab against respiratory virus – A petition based on research by Dr. Anna Banerji is calling for Nunavut to expand the use of an antibody to all Inuit babies to protect them against a contagious respiratory virus. But the territory’s health department says it needs “conclusive evidence” to change its policy.” At the link find the title, “Download Inuit babies ‘don’t have a lobby’:….”, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robert Noyce 9 mins – “It was a meeting of two American masters: Robert Noyce, who, in inventing the integrated computer chip and founding Intel, willed Silicon Valley into being, and Tom Wolfe, who, in holding a magnifying glass over the social and class currents that shape America, rewrote the laws of what it meant to be a journalist. Their resulting Esquire story from 1983, “The Tinkerings of Robert Noyce,” remains one of the most revealing and entertaining portraits of early Silicon Valley and the personalities, imagination, and freewheeling moxie that triggered and continue to power the computer revolution. Kara Swisher, who spent two decades covering digital issues for The Wall Street Journal before cofounding the influential technology site Re/code, joins host David Brancaccio to discuss what both Noyce and Wolfe wrought, and how the influence of each—in computers and nonfiction writing, respectively—remains as powerful and mesmerizing as ever.” At the link find the title, “The Tinkerings of Robert Noyce, by Tom Wolfe,” – you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Sony Hack 19 mins – “In November of 2014, hackers infiltrated Sony’s computer network lifting terabytes of corporate data, human resources information, internal intel, films, corporate emails, and other valuable information. This led the corporate world to question how protected we really are from cyber attacks. In the 1990’s, the only computer issue was viruses, but the attack vectors have since changed. Companies and individuals are now subject to spear phishing, spyware attacks, malware, drive-by downloads, and browsers. What steps are now necessary to keep hackers from accessing your valuable data? And on a separate but equally interesting subject for lawyers, who really was behind the Sony attack?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Special Masters in Court 18 mins – “In this October edition of Digital Detectives, co-hosts Sharon D. Nelson, Esq., President of Sensei Enterprises, Inc. and John W. Simek, Vice President of Sensei Enterprises, join returning guest, attorney Craig Ball, to talk about special masters in e-discovery. Craig describes how an ESI special master gets involved in a case, what a special master does to fix broken discovery efforts and how to select an ESI special master.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ted Williams 8 mins – “Richard Ben Cramer’s masterful profile of Ted Williams from 1986 is often cited as one of the greatest magazine stories of all time. It’s about a sports idol who wanted fame but hated celebrity, who shouted louder than anyone but demanded privacy, who wanted to be the best at everything, always, and thus wanted to be immortal. Former Esquire editor David Hirshey joins host David Brancaccio to discuss the enigmatic and bigger-than-life Teddy Ballgame and the journalist who finally uncovered his essence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Tick Borne Diseases 39 mins – “Ticks are vectors for human disease, including Lyme disease. Semay Chou studies the vector–pathogen relationships at UCSF. Here she discusses strategies for blocking tick-borne diseases and what we can learn from ticks. Recorded on 11/14/2019.” At the link you can watch, or right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and California Air Pollution Standards 18 mins – “The latest move from the Trump administration threatens to set in motion a massive legal battle and plunge automakers into uncertainty. The Post’s Juliet Eilperin explains how much power a president has over national environmental policy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Trumps Inaccurate Hurricane Forecast 18 mins – “Weather editor Andrew Freedman explains how Trump’s inaccurate hurricane tweet led to worrying implications for NOAA and the NWS, and what happens when a president politicizes scientific institutions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Virology History 75 mins – “William Summers joins the TWiV team to discuss some virology history, including the ever-changing concept of ‘virus’ and the contribution of phage research to the study of animal viruses. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, and Rich Condit Guest: William Summers” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Virology Research at Karolinska Institute P2 57 mins – “In the second episode from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Vincent speaks with Jan Albert, Petter Brodin, and Anna Smed-Sörensen about their work on enterovirus D68, systems immunology, and human pulmonary viral infection and inflammation Hosts: Vincent Racaniello Guests: Jan Albert, Petter Brodin, and Anna Smed-Sörensen” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Virology Research at Karolinska Institute P1 47 mins – “From the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Vincent speaks with Niklas Björkström, Ali Mirazimi, and Matti Sällberg about their work on the impact of chronic hepatitis C virus infection on NK cells, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus vaccines, and immunotherapy to block entry of hepatitis B and D viruses. Host: Vincent Racaniello Guests: Niklas Björkström, Ali Mirazimi, and Matti Sällberg ” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Careers 85 mins – “TWiV travels to Rutgers University to speak with Brad, Kay, Siobain, and Kim about their careers and their work on viruses of plants, fungi, bacteria, diatoms, and coccolithophores. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, and Brianne Barker Guests: Brad Hillman, Kay Bidle, Siobain Duffy, and Kim Thamatrakoln” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Infectivity 74 mins – “The TWiV team reveals the protein corona that surrounds virus particles and influences infectivity and amyloid aggregation, and a proofreading-impaired herpesvirus that produces quasispecies-like populations. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, and Rich Condit Guest: Kiki Warren” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Research 67 mins – “At Aarhus University in Denmark, Vincent speaks with Trine Mogensen, Søren Paludan, Ole Søgaard, and Madalina Carter-Timofte about their careers and their work on sensing herpesviral DNA, immunodeficiencies that predispose to severe viral infections, and the path to a cure for HIV/AIDS.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Research 69 mins – “The League of Extraordinary Virologists celebrate the eradication of wild poliovirus type 3, and consider the effectiveness of an influenza vaccine produced in insect cells, and how small RNAs are protecting the Koala germline from retroviral invasion. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

War and Terrorism in Cyberspace 20 mins – “The phrase”data breach” now seems common, and looking at this infographic, data breaches are more common than we think. These days, we’re more inclined to wonder when we’ll be hacked, not if, and perhaps we wonder where, or what service we use, will be next. Then there is the issue or ransomware. Data breaches that are familiar, like the ones at Target, JP Morgan, and Home Depot, are usually organized by hackers working towards financial gain. All of that customer data is worth something, and though such data breaches make the news for the consumer angle, there is a cyber war happening with military and political objectives—with potentially far more damaging results. Cyber terrorists and militaries have already developed technologies that are able to hack into important data systems, destroy critical infrastructure, and take down crucial things like power grids and financial systems. If this does not scare you, you should know that there are almost no direct laws that deal with the ramifications of cyber attacks, the contractors who built the failing technology, or innocent bystanders. On this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview cybersecurity expert David Bodenheimer about the effects of cyber attacks, whether they are likely to proliferate, the connection between the private sector and government defense, and the legal risks to contractors and bystanders. Bodenheimer first explains how economic cyber crimes are different than cyber war, and gives some examples like the US cyber security threat in 2009, the 2007 cyberattacks on Estonia, and Stuxnet, a computer worm that destroyed many control systems in Iranian nuclear plants. He explains that there is a global cyber race and, in a few years, no self-respecting military will be without cyber attack capabilities. Unfortunately, there are no international treaties or laws that directly govern cyber weapons and war. Bodenheimer also discusses US laws that federal agencies and contractors could face to account for damages. These could include the DHS SAFETY Act, Public Law 85-804, and various legislative proposals, but there is no clean fit.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select save file and OK to get the podcast.

Whales in America P1 39 mins – “Whale deaths are reaching record numbers in 2019. According to the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Association, gray whale deaths are “notably greater than the average” and have led the NOAA to declare the occurrence an Unusual Mortality Event (UME). In addition, NOAA considers the death rates of North Atlantic right whales an urgent conservation crisis leading the U.S. to begin working with Canada this month to help protect the species. On this episode, Brian, Nathan and Joanne explore how Native American whalers faced stereotypes within the industry, how whaling went from boom to bust, and learn how a real white whale named Mocha Dick became the inspiration for Herman Melville’s novel.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whales in America P2 31 mins – “Whale deaths are reaching record numbers in 2019. According to the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Association, gray whale deaths are “notably greater than the average” and have led the NOAA to declare the occurrence an Unusual Mortality Event (UME). In addition, NOAA considers the death rates of North Atlantic right whales an urgent conservation crisis leading the U.S. to begin working with Canada this month to help protect the species. Brian, Nathan, Joanne and Ed uncover the story of Cabin Boys who were women in disguise, find out why a decomposing whale was turned away from a Midwestern Town, and learn all about the Black whaler and entrepreneur who became one of the wealthiest men in America.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whistleblowers and Trump 21 mins – “President Trump’s targeted effort to discredit, and reveal the name of, a government employee raises questions about legal protections for whistleblowers — and the repercussions for whoever might disclose his or her identity to the public.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Women in Congress 54 mins – “Today, 131 women serve in the House and Senate, making Congress the most female and most diverse it’s ever been. But women in politics continue to face an uphill battle. Even after their election, Congresswomen such as Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib have faced criticism for their choice of clothing and language. One radio commentator in Atlanta even suggested Lucy McBath should “go back to the kitchen.” We look at the history of “women in Congress,” how much progress we’ve made and how much work lies ahead.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWI Remembrance 49 mins – “On November 11, 1918, Germany formally surrendered to the Allied Powers, about 19 months after the United States entered the conflict. On this episode, Brian and Nathan reflect on how, 100 years later, “the war to end all wars” is still with Americans.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yaba in Bangladesh 19 mins – “Thousands of Bangladeshi addicts are hooked on Yaba – a mix of methamphetamine and caffeine. It’s a powerful drug that gives big bangs for small bucks. The Yaba epidemic has ripped through the population of Bangladesh, urban and rural, poor, middle-class and rich. This is a drug that’s manufactured in industrial quantities in the jungles of neighbouring Myanmar. As the economy of Bangladesh has boomed, drug lords have worked to create new markets for their product. And the Rohingya crisis – when nearly a million fled Myanmar for Bangladesh – has created further opportunities for the traffickers, as desperate refugees have been employed as drug mules. The Bangladeshi Prime Minister, Sheikh Hasina, declared a ‘war on drugs’ last May. Thousands have been arrested. But critics see a disturbing trend – hundreds of suspected Yaba dealers have been killed by law enforcement.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 441: Afghanistan Situation, AI Changes Science, Air Quality, Artificial Intelligence, Bill Browder, Blueberries for Health, Churchill, Congressional Investigation History, Covid19 Impact, Cryptocurrencies, C-Span Radio Anniversary, Cyber Security Threats, Declaration of Independence, Detroit Riots, Economic Status, Enlightenment, FBI and Trump, Federal Debt and Deficit, Flynn Effect, Gerrymandering, Information Control, Interviewing Error, Ketamine for Depression, Kidnapping, Korean War, LBJ Tapes, Lynching, Magnitsky Act, Mathematician Trevino, Melatonin, Middle Class Shrinks, Migrant Story, NATO, Neoliberalism, North Korea and US, North Korea Rulers, North Korean Sanctions, Poaching in Africa, Precision Medicine, Propaganda Control, Putin Background, Ransomeware Everywhere, Saudia Arabia, Surveillance Capitalism, Venezuelan Crisis, Wahls Protocol, Women in Congress, Women Swimming in US, Women’s History Month, WWI Remembering

Exercise your ears: the 52 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 666 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 28,844 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Afghanistan Situation 30 mins – “President Trump recently announced his plans for the War in Afghanistan, including the deployment of additional US troops to the country. This week we look at the political geography and the recent history of Afghanistan with Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad, who served as U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan (2003-2005) and Iraq (2005-2007). He also served as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations (2007-2009). Ambassador Khalilzad discussed the roots and resilience of the Taliban, Afghanistan’s drug trade, and the importance of re-building Afghan state institutions in order to secure long-term peace in the region.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

AI Changes Science 22 mins – “No human, or team of humans, could possibly keep up with the avalanche of information produced by many of today’s physics and astronomy experiments. Some of them record terabytes of data every day — and the torrent is only increasing. The Square Kilometer Array, a radio telescope slated to switch on in the mid-2020s, will generate about as much data traffic each year as the entire internet. The deluge has many scientists turning to artificial intelligence for help. With minimal human input, AI systems such as artificial neural networks — computer-simulated networks of neurons that mimic the function of brains — can plow through mountains of data, highlighting anomalies and detecting patterns that humans could never have spotted.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the podcast play bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Air Quality 29 mins – “Northern California’s now infamous Camp Fire was not only the largest, longest, and deadliest wildfire in the state’s history, it also produced record amounts of smoke. Schools closed, there was a run on protective masks, and people were fashioning do-it-yourself air purifiers because there were none left in stores. And it looks like we will only see an acceleration of wildfires in the future. This grim forecast has brought a surge in traffic to websites that monitor air quality like AirNowWeather Underground, and PurpleAir. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with the founder and CEO of PurpleAir, a company that sells laser air quality sensors for home use at a reasonable price, and posts all the results in real-time on its site. We discuss PurpleAir’s business model, its unique brand of crowd-sourcing technology, and examine the ways that it casts the world in a different, and sometimes frightening, light.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. (PurpleAir.com map is here)

Artificial Intelligence 64 mins – “Historian Jessica Riskin of Stanford University talks about her book The Restless Clock with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. What is the difference between human beings and machines? How has science thought about this distinction? When do we have agency and when are we constrained? Riskin discusses these issues and the implications for how we think about ourselves and the growth of artificial intelligence.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blueberries for Health 44 mins – “The Benefits of Blueberries – There’s been plenty of talk in the media about how blueberries are the new superfood.  We’re always hesitant to buy into this kind of hype (remember how margarine used to be “healthy” and eggs were horrible for you?).  But in the case of blueberries, the science backs up the hype. Blueberries improve long-term memory (retention of information over time), access to words and concepts (crucial for dementia or Alzheimer’s sufferers), and short-term memory (aka working memory). They reverse loss of balance and coordination in older rats. The benefits aren’t confined to older people, though.  One study found that blueberry juice improved memory and concentration in children. And if you’re worried about consuming too much sugar from fruit, blueberries even lower blood glucose levels. For more, check out Dr. Krikorian’s latest research on blueberries.At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

C-Span Radio Anniversary 43 mins – “C-SPAN Radio was launched on October 9th, 1997. To mark the 20th anniversary, we spoke with C-SPAN Co-Founder and Executive Chairman Brian Lamb about the creation of the radio station, the evolution of C-SPAN, and the importance of our mission.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Churchill 68 mins – “Historian Andrew Roberts talks about the life of Winston Churchill and the art of biography with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. How did Churchill deal with the mistakes he inevitably made in a long career? Was he prescient or just the right man in the right place at the right time? Was he an alcoholic? Did he suffer from depression? Drawing on his recent biography of Churchill, Andrew Roberts answers these and other questions in this wide-ranging conversation that includes a discussion of the mechanics of writing a 1000 page book on a man who has had over 1000 biographies written about him already.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Congressional Investigation History 29 mins – “Ray Smock discussed the history of congressional investigations. Ray Smock is the director of the Robert C. Byrd Center for Legislative Studies at Shepherd University and a former Historian of the House of Representatives.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 Impact 31 mins – “In this short extra episode, Jim talks to Dr. Ben Goertzel about the economic & cultural impacts we could expect after the peak of COVID-19, the end of the tech backlash, income inequality, homeostasis & hysteresis, business travel bets from Jim & Ben, in-person vs virtual events, potential opportunities, cryptocurrency & blockchain, answering the cultural wakeup call, dynamics of centralized responses in decentralized systems, and more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cryptocurrencies 43 mins – “In this Slate Money miniseries, Felix Salmon investigates SWAG—silver, wine, art, and gold—and other things people invest in. This week, Felix talks to Nathaniel Popper of the New York Times about whether cryptocurrency is a real investment asset or a total gamble. At the link left-click “Share” and the sound bar and select the down-pointing arrow to get the podcast.

Cyber Security Threats 22 mins – “Just because phishing is gradually becoming less of a threat does not mean you are safe from cyber criminals. Smishing is the use of cell phone texting software to lure victims into downloading malware or handing over personal information. In this episode, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek talk to Joe Hamblin, director of IT operations for Sprint, about what smishing is, why it’s growing, and how it could affect your legal business. They also discuss simple ways to identify and combat smishing both in your personal and professional life.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Declaration of Independence 24 mins – “Our guest this week is Jeffrey Rosen, President & CEO of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia. The Declaration of Independence is part of the framework of America’s democracy. He offers his perspective on the document that shapes our country 240 years later.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Detroit Riots 29 mins – “50 years ago this week, the 1967 Detroit Riots began. They lasted over five days in July, ignited by long-simmering racial tensions. This week on C-SPAN’s The Sidebar podcast we look back at the riots with Joseph Califano Jr. He who served as a principal domestic aide to President Lyndon B. Johnson and was with him during that tumultuous time.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Economic Status 88 mins – “Nobel Laureate Paul Romer of New York University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the nature of growth, the role of cities in the economy, and the state of economics. Romer also reflects on his time at the World Bank and why he left his position there as Chief Economist.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Enlightenment 66 mins – “Richard Reinsch, editor of Law and Liberty and the host of the podcast Liberty Law Talk, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the Enlightenment. Topics discussed include the search for meaning, the stability of liberalism, the rise of populism, and Solzhenitsyn’s indictment of Western values from his Harvard Commencement Address of 1978.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FBI and Trump 24 mins – “Tim Weiner, author of Enemies: A History of the FBI, discussed the history of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and President Donald Trump’s dismissal of now-former FBI Director James Comey.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Federal Debt and Deficit 29 mins – “Our guest this week is the Maya MacGuineas, She is the president of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget and the head of the Campaign to Fix the Debt. We talked with her about the differences between the $20 trillion debt and the year-to-year deficit and why failing to raise the debt ceiling could be catastrophic for the U.S. and global economies.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Flynn Effect – “The Flynn Effect is a strange-but-true revelation.  Over the course of the 20th century — and apparently continuing still — “average” people in countries around the world, as measured by standardized IQ tests, are getting smarter and smarter and smarter.  Dr. Roger Staff explains his findings from research into the cognitive health of the population of the city of Aberdeen over seven decades (and counting!).  In addition, we’ll learn the suspected reasons behind the generalized growth in smartness — and what we can expect for the continuation of the trend.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

Information Control – “EconTalk host Russ Roberts does a monologue on how political discourse seems to have deteriorated in recent years and the growth in outrage, tribalism, and intolerance for those with different views from one’s own. Roberts suggests that part of the problem is the revolution of the market for information caused by the internet that allows people to customize what they see to fit their own political narratives and worldview. In short, the market for news works to make us feel good rather than to help us to discover the truth. The monologue closes with some suggestions for how we might improve the way we consume information and interact with those we disagree with.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interviewing Errors – “To Err is Human – Good, we’ve got that part covered.  So remember – none of what follows should be taken personally. Some of the errors we make are “special little snowflake” errors, mistakes that only we could have made, with our personal brand of dumb-assery.  But other errors are more standard-issue.  And many of our hardest-to-spot goofs fall into categories that are so predictably human that we can organize them, give them taxonomic names, and formally study them…And what’s worse… we can expect them.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

Israeli-Arab Peace Process – “Robert Danin, a senior fellow for Middle East Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations and former Deputy Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs, talked about the history of the Israeli-Arab peace process.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ketamine and Depression – “Falling down the K-Hole.  Taking “Special K.”   Ketamine has quite the reputation as a recreational club drug.  But research is showing its promising potential as a treatment for severe cases of depression. Jesse talks to Dr. Panos Zanos, Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, (who has possibly the best name of any Smart Drug Smarts guest to date) about his research on ketamine and depression.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

KidnappingAnja Shortland of King’s College London talks about her book Kidnap with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Kidnapping is relatively common in parts of the world where government authority is weak. Shortland explores this strange, frightening, but surprisingly orderly world. She shows how the interaction between kidnappers, victims, and insurance companies creates a somewhat predictable set of prices for ransom and creates a relatively high chance of the safe return of those who are kidnapped.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Korean War – “This week author and journalist Blaine Harden joins us to discuss his book ‘King of Spies,’ and how the Korean Peninsula continues to be impacted by a war fought more than 50 years. It created the De-Militarized Zone along the 38th Parallel and tensions for every U.S. President since Harry Truman.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

LBJ Tapes – “This week: The LBJ tapes- President Lyndon Baines Johnson and the audio recordings made during his presidency. We spoke with presidential historian and author Michael Beschloss. He’s the author of two books examining the recordings, “Taking Charge: The Johnson White House Tapes, 1963-1964” and “Reaching for Glory: Lyndon Johnson’s Secret White House Tapes, 1964-1965.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Lynching – “On this week’s episode, Nathan, Brian, Joanne & Ed talk about how Americans remember and reckon with systematic violence, and how we keep this difficult history alive and in the public eye. Historian Kidada Williams reads letters from a man seeking justice for his son who was lynched, and Brian visits an exhibit at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington D.C.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Magnitsky Act – “Bill Browder was kicked out of Russia and labeled a national security threat by President Vladimir Putin. Mr Browder discussed Vladimir Putin’s Russia and the Magnitsky Act, which was named for his late lawyer, Sergei Magnitsky, who was imprisoned for 11 months before dying in prison.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mathematician Trevino – “Dr Keith Pannell sits down with Lake Forest College mathematician Enrique Trevino to discuss his fascination with numbers and his connections to the Southwest.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

Melatonin – “Quick — tell us everything you know about the pineal gland. It’s probably not much, right?  That’s ok, because until surprisingly recently, scientists didn’t know much either. But we now know quite a lot, including the pineal gland’s essential function producing melatonin.  Dr. Richard Wurtman, Cecil H. Green Distinguished Professor emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, talks to us about his work studying the pineal gland and melatonin.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

Middle Class Shrinks – “This week’s guest is Washington Post reporter Max Ehrenfreund. We spoke with him about a new report examining declining American wages and the shrinking middle class.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Migrant Story – “NPR reporter Aarti Shahani arrived in New York as a little girl in the 1980s. For years, her family lived without legal status. When the Shahanis eventually got green cards, they thought they had achieved their American dream. But when her father mistakenly got caught up in legal trouble, they learned that, for many immigrants, life in this country isn’t as secure as it seems. Aarti Shahani tells her family’s story in a new book, “Here We Are: American Dreams, American Nightmares.” In it, she asks the question who is a “deserving” immigrant? The answer, she says, is almost always more complicated than it seems.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

NATO – “Fabrice Pothier, the former Director of Policy Planning, talked about NATO’s history, mission, and budget.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neoliberalism – “Dani Rodrik of Harvard University talks about neoliberalism with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Rodrik argues that a dogmatic embrace of markets has increased inequality and limited who benefits from economic growth. He argues for a more interventionist approach to the economy with the goal of better-paying jobs and more widely shared prosperity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea and US – “Our guest this week is the former Governor of New Mexico, Bill Richardson. As a diplomat and Special Envoy, Gov. Richardson has received four Nobel Peace Prize nominations, and has successfully won the release of hostages and American servicemen in North Korea, Cuba, Iraq and Sudan. We talked with him the current state of tension between North Korea and the U.S. and why he thinks the U.S. needs to change its approach to engaging with what many describe as “the Hermit Kingdom.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Rulers – “As tensions with North Korea rise, this week we examine the history of that country’s ruling Kim family. We spoke to Jean H Lee, author of “Kings of Communism: Inside Kim Jong Un’s Bloody Scramble to Kill of His Family” in the September edition of Esquire Magazine. She also led the Associated Press’s coverage of the Korean Peninsula as bureau chief from 2008 to 2013 and opened the AP’s Pyongyang bureau in January 2012. We spoke with Ms. Lee about the Kim family’s rise to power, the idea of North Korea as an absolute monarchy, and the message Kim Jong Un sent with the assassination of his brother in February.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

North Korean Sanctions – “Robert Kahn discussed the North Korea sanctions policy and how America and other countries implement sanctions, how effective they are, and why China will be critical in determining the success of any new sanctions against North Korea.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Poaching in Africa – “Catherine Semcer of the Property and Environment Research Center (PERC) talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the role of incentives in preserving wildlife in Africa. The conversation discusses how allowing limited hunting of big game such as elephants and using revenue from hunting licenses to reward local communities for habitat stewardship has improved both habitat and wildlife populations while reducing poaching. Semcer draws on her experience as former Chief Operating Officer of Humanitarian Operations Protecting Elephants and also discusses recent efforts to re-locate lions in Mozambique.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

Precision Medicine – “Dr. Jill Hagenkord, Chief Medical Officer at Color Genomics discussed precision medicine and genetic testing for hereditary cancer and high cholesterol risks as well as preventative health services, including genetic counseling. She spoke about recent breakthroughs in cancer research and precision medicine, the benefits of testing for cancer-causing gene mutations, and what it means for patients, families, and medical providers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Propaganda Control – “Has this ever happened to you: You are talking with a friend or family member, and as the topic moves to politics, things start to get a little heated. You make what you think are excellent points, based on data, logic, and what you fervently believe to be the absolute truth. Yet, when the debate concludes, somehow neither of you has budged an inch, and no one leaves any wiser. Perhaps this is why we are instructed to “never discuss politics in polite company.” This week on Sea Change Radio, we are talking about bridging the divide, with James Hoggan, an author and the co-founder of Desmog Blog. Hopefully, the next time the subject of impeachment or the Democratic nominee of your choice arises, the debate can be spirited, productive, and maybe even polite.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Putin Background – “This week we look into the background of Russian President Vladimir Putin with Sam Greene, the Director of the Russia Institute at King`s College London. We spoke with him about how Putin’s time in the KGB shaped his political philosophy, his rise to power in Moscow, and how Putin views his role in the Russian Government. Follow C-SPAN Radio on Twitter and join the conversation using the hashtag “CSPANSidebar”. Like, rate, and review us wherever you listen to podcasts. Every C-SPAN podcast is available on the FREE C-SPAN Radio App for Apple and Android devices.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ransomeware Everywhere – “Google expands its bug bounty program; New bug bounty millionaires; Google’s Project Zero group dropped a bomb on iOS; Ransomware attacks on local governments and businesses are on the rise” At the link left-click “Download Options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudia Arabia – “This week we take a look at the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with Bruce Riedel. He is a senior fellow and director of the Brookings Intelligence Project at the Brookings Institution. He’s also the author of “Kings and Presidents: Saudi Arabia and the United States Since FDR.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Capitalism – “Shoshana Zuboff of Harvard University talks about her book Surveillance Capitalism with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Zuboff argues that the monetization of search engines and social networks by Google, Facebook, and other large tech firms threatens privacy and democracy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuelan Crisis – “Francisco Toro on the Crisis in Venezuela.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Wahls ProtocolDr. Terry Wahls is back for a third time to talk functional medicine, ketosis, and implementing the Wahls Protocol™. Who is Terry Wahls, M.D.? In case you missed her earlier episodes (Episode 15 and Episode 27), Dr. Wahls is a clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa and is also a patient with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. That diagnosis confined her to a wheelchair, prompting her research into functional medicine and the Paleo diet.  The research and subsequent experimentation paid off, as within a year she was out of the wheelchair and completing an 18-mile bicycle ride.  She wrote a book, Minding My Mitochondria, about her experience recovering from MS.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

Wahls Protocol – “Dr. Terry Wahls was given a diagnosis of MS and told she’d have to spend the rest of her life in a wheelchair. After radically transforming her diet, her outlook, and her medical care, she is now able to walk and ride a bicycle.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

Women in Congress – “Today, 131 women serve in the House and Senate, making Congress the most female and most diverse it’s ever been. But women in politics continue to face an uphill battle. Even after their election, Congresswomen such as Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib have faced criticism for their choice of clothing and language. One radio commentator in Atlanta even suggested Lucy McBath should “go back to the kitchen.” We look at the history of “women in Congress,” how much progress we’ve made and how much work lies ahead.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women Swimming in US – “In 1907, Australian competitive swimmer Annette Kellerman was arrested on an American beach for wearing a one-piece swimsuit that bared her legs. OR WAS SHE? Scholar Christine Schmidt tells us about Kellerman’s first six month long sojourn in the United States, and her attempts to popularize swimming.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women’s History Month – “In celebration of Women’s History Month, Brian showcases our favorite BackStory segments that highlight female achievement in American history. We’ll hear from a former switchboard operator about her experiences at New York Telephone in the 1970’s and learn how Ida B. Wells found her voice as an advocacy journalist. We’re also sharing a Radio Diaries story on Margaret Chase Smith, a Republican Senator from Maine whose 1964 presidential bid inspired a generation of women to enter politics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWI Remembering – “On November 11, 1918, Germany formally surrendered to the Allied Powers, about 19 months after the United States entered the conflict. On this episode, Brian and Nathan reflect on how, 100 years later, “the war to end all wars” is still with Americans.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 440: 1918 Influenza Pandemic, Abortion History, Cancer Drug Costs, Civil Rights Movement Women, Covid-19 Pandemic, Deindustrialization in US, End of Life Care, George Washington’s Life, Government Surveillance, Hacking by US Government, Holocaust Denial, Immigration Reform, Improvised Explosive Devices, Industrialization of US, Intelligence Under Kennedy, Malcolm X on Africa, Native American Displacement, Sexual Assault Kit Discussion, Sickle Cells Kill Prodigy, Slavery in US, Socialism in US, Southeast Asia Refugee Issues, Vietnam Politics, Waldenponding, WWII Equipment Development

Exercise your ears: the 47 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 451 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 28,745 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

1918 Influenza Pandemic 51 mins – “Stony Brook University Professor Nancy Tomes taught a class about the 1918 influenza pandemic and public information efforts in the United States to stop the spread of the disease. She described methods such as canceling public gatherings, social distancing, and propaganda about good hygiene, which are still implemented. This class was filmed on March 10, 2020, during the early stages of the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. Professor Toms compared the symptoms, economic impact, and national response between 1918 and today.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Abortion History in US 49 mins – “Tulane University Professor Karissa Haugeberg taught a class about the legal history of abortion in the United States from the 1840s through 2016. She discussed laws in the late 19th century that originally criminalized abortion as well Roe v. Wade in 1973 and the court cases and legislation that followed that landmark decision.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

August Wilson Playwright 48 mins – “Tulane University professor John “Ray” Proctor taught a class about playwright August Wilson, his contribution to African American theatre and his Pulitzer Prize-winning play, Fences.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Cancer Drug Costs 48 mins – “Can a life-saving drug be too expensive? What explains the high price of cancer drugs? Dr. Vincent Rajkumar of the Mayo Clinic talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the high price of cancer drugs–drugs that can cost an American with cancer $300,000 per year and require multiple years of treatment. Rajkumar explains how little a role market forces play in setting prices and what might be done to improve the situation.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil Rights Movement Women 48 mins – “African American Women and the Civil Rights Movement,University of Delaware professor Tiffany Gill taught a class about the role of African American women in the Civil Rights Movement. She described how beauty parlors, while often overlooked, functioned as a safe place for women to organize sit-ins, voter registration drives, and boycotts.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 Cases in NYC 47 mins – “I am in Karachi, Pakistan, on March 2, when I read the news: New York City has its first patient hospitalized with the coronavirus. Though I am more than 7,000 miles away — reporting on a different disease outbreak — I am already worried about what I will face when I return home in two days to my job as an emergency-room doctor in the city. Even in the best of circumstances, the E.R. can be swamped, with patients doubled up in rooms and too few monitors and beds to go around. Doctors and nurses are always multitasking at the edge of their limits. “Damage control,” we call it….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 Pandemic 35 mins – “Join Eric Verdin, live Wednesday, April 15th, as he shares his perspective on how to think about, deal with, and potentially treat the COVID-19 pandemic. President and CEO of the Buck since November 2016, Eric was previously associate director and senior investigator at the Gladstone Institute for Virology and Immunology and has held faculty positions at the University of Brussels, the National Institutes of Health, and the Picower Institute for Medical Research. Eric is also currently a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. A native of Belgium, he earned his MD from the University of Liege and completed additional training at Harvard Medical School. The Verdin lab focuses on how nutrition modulates immune system aging. In response to the current pandemic, the lab is now researching the over-active innate immune response implicated in many deaths from COVID-19. Eric is leading an international collaborative team which is investigating the role of metabolism and evaluating 69 potential drugs that act on molecular targets of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.” At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 Second Wave 14 mins – “China’s strict and interrelated clinical and social protocols played a key role in its dealing with the first phase of the Covid-19 pandemic. While many now are looking to colleagues for lessons as the novel coronavirus spreads globally, unanswered questions remain regarding long-term side effects, prospects for organ or tissue damage, identification of prognostic biomarkers, and development of therapeutics. Ewelina Biskup, MD, MPH, calls for robust data recording and the creation of a big data set to support analysis to improve care for the next waves.At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Deindustrialization in US 46 mins – “Loyola University Chicago Professor Michelle Nickerson taught a class on the deindustrialization of the U.S. in the 1970s and ’80s and how music and popular culture of the period reflected these economic changes.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

End of Life Care 41 mins – “Dickinson College professor Jim Hoefler taught a class about end of life care and perceptions of death in the United States since the 1800s. He explored how changes in medical practices and technology have extended life expectancy, but argued that in recent decades, Americans have become removed from death through hospitals and funeral homes.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Feminism 45 mins – “Gloria Steinem talked about the topic, “The Progression of Feminism: Where Are We Going?” Topics included individual rights, human experiences, masculine and feminine qualities, sexual harassment, sex trafficking, race and gender equality, and abortion. After her presentation she responded to audience members’ questions.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

George Washington’s Life 37 mins – “Gene Allen Smith, a Texas Christian University history professor, taught a class about George Washington’s character. He examined how the first president interacted with his contemporaries, how he viewed himself, and how he is remembered.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Golden State Killer Case 18 mins – “In the last episode of Just Science, Dr. Barbara Rae-Venter shared her techniques for creating family trees and discussed the resolution of her first cold case. In episode five of the DNA season, we continue that conversation. In February 2017, Forensic Magazine published an article detailing the Bear Brook Murders, an abandoned girl, and Rae-Venter’s involvement in the resolution of a cold case that tied them all together. One month later, she was contacted by investigator Paul Holes and was on the hunt yet again. Listen along as she discusses building a profile and explains how she used investigative genetic genealogy to identify the Golden State Killer. This season is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.nstitute hosted a day-long conference on government surveillance and privacy issues. The event began with a discussion focusing on oversight of the intelligence community. The panel consisted of law professors, security experts and former government officials.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Government Surveillance  32 mins – “American University lecturer Aaron Bell taught a class about privacy laws and federal surveillance of civil rights leaders. He described the mid-20th century creation of the Counter Intelligence Program, often called COINTELPRO, and their tracking and infiltrating of domestic political organizations.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Hacking by US Government 49 mins – “Privacy and Government Surveillance, Part 2 Panelists debated limitations of cyber hacking powers by the FBI and other law enforcement agencies. Recent rule changes to the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure allow federal agents to search millions of private computers across the country with a single search warrant. The panel “Government Hacking” was part of the day-long 2016 Cato Surveillance Conference with intelligence officials, security experts, and professors on government surveillance and privacy concerns.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Holocaust Denial 47 mins – “The authors talked about their book Denying History: Who Says the Holocaust Never Happened and Why Do They Say It?, published by the University of California Press. The book is an examination of “Holocaust deniers,” people who say the Holocaust never happened. Slides were shown during the presentation. Following their remarks they answered questions from the audience.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Immigration Demographics 49 mins – “Early 20th Century Nativism and Immigration University of North Florida Professor David Courtwright taught a class about changes in immigration demographics and the rise of nativism in the early 20th century.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Immigration Reform 65 mins – “Historians talked about U.S. immigration policy from the 1920s to the 1960s, including a Japanese guest worker program and Cuban immigrants during the Cold War. They also explored how the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act changed restrictions based on race and national origins. The Organization of American Historians hosted this session at their annual meeting in Philadelphia.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Improvised Explosive Devices 20 mins – “In episode six of the Identification season, Just Science interviews Hillary Daluz, an instructor for Tritech Forensics and author on latent print analysis. From soda cans and cigarette packs to animal carcasses and pressure cookers, an improvised explosive device is just that: improvised. One of the most difficult parts of I.E.D. identification after the explosion is figuring out what was part of the bomb itself. Hillary Daluz spent 14 months in Iraq as a latent print examiner working on the remains of improvised explosive devices. Listen along as she discusses contextual bias, the difficulty of identifying finger prints on improvised explosives, and the importance of partnering with other disciplines in this episode of Just Science. This season is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Industrialization of US 36 mins – “Late-20th Century Transformation of Work – Georgetown University Professor Joseph McCartin taught a class on the post-industrialization transformation of work, starting in the 1960s and continuing through the end of the 20th century. He described emerging technologies, such as bar codes and computers, which enabled global supply chains. He also talked about the move to shareholder capitalism, a decrease in union power, and an increase of wage inequalityAt the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Intelligence Under Kennedy 43 mins – “Catholic University professor and former CIA historian Nicholas Dujmovic teaches a class about national intelligence during President Kennedy’s administration.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Jazz Age of the 20’s 32 mins – “The 1920s – Karen Markoe of State University of New York Maritime College taught a class on the 1920s. She talked about politics, prohibition, and organized crime, as well as popular music and sports of the era.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Kentucky’s First Settlements 51 mins – “Western Lands Before and After the American Revolution – University of Utah Professor Eric Hinderaker taught a class about western settlement before, during and after the American Revolution. Using the Kentucky territory as an example, he described the conflicts and relationships between the new federal government, settlers and Native Americans.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Las Vegas Concert Shooting 29 mins – “In the fourth episode of our medicolegal death investigation special release season, Just Science interviews John Fudenberg, the Coroner for Clark County, where he discusses the tragic events of the 2017 concert shooting in Las Vegas, and the aftermath that followed. This episode will focus on lessons learned and how other coroner offices can prepare now for unforeseen incidents. John Fudenberg also stresses the importance of knowing who to contact and how critical a family assistance center can be for victims, families, responders and scene investigators during a mass casualty event. This season is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Licensing Trends 42 mins – “Economists often oppose the expansion of licensing in America in recent years because it makes it harder for people with low skills to get access to opportunity. Sociologist Beth Redbird of Northwestern University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about a different perspective. Redbird finds that licensing expands opportunity for women and minorities and has little impact on wages. She argues that licensing helps historically disadvantaged groups discover ways into various careers they otherwise would have trouble accessing. The discussion closes with a discussion of Redbird’s work on the economic situation of Native Americans.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malcolm X on Africa 39 mins – “Malcolm X’s Views on Africa – American University professor Ibram Kendi taught a class about Malcolm X’s views on Africa. Professor Kendi argued that through the 1960s, Africa had been associated with a lack of civilization and described how Malcolm X advocated for African Americans to have a more positive view of Africa in order to develop better self-esteem and combat racism.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Native American Displacement 48 mins – “Native Americans and Colonial-Era Power Struggles – Daniel Richter of the University of Pennsylvania taught a class on 18th century power struggles among Native Americans, colonial settlers and European empires. The class was part of a seminar for high school teachers hosted by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in partnership with the Library Company of Philadelphia.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Nuclear Weapons Testing 38 mins – “Colorado College Professor Amy Kohout taught a class on nuclear weapons testing in the continental U.S. in the 1950s and ’60s and how it impacted the environment. She described scientific tests done to measure the impact on humans, protests against nuclear testing, and current debates over where to store nuclear waste.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Public Lands in US 50 mins – “Public Lands and the Law in the Early Republic = Duke University professor Laura Edwards taught a class on public lands and the law in the early American Republic. She looked at competing visions for westward expansion among the Founders, particularly Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson. She also talked about the multiple federal laws aimed at controlling land distribution, and discussed the role of the law in usurping Native American lands.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Sexual Assault Kit Analysis 16 mins – “In episode seven of the DNA season, Just Science interviews Molly Hall, an examiner for the United States Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory, about their transition to a Direct-to-DNA approach to processing sexual assault kits. The United States Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory acts as the true crime lab for the entire Department of Defense and serves all branches of the military. With roughly 2,000 sexual assault kits being submitted per year, they needed to find a way to efficiently process these kits without being bogged down by screening or an influx in submissions. Listen along as Molly Hall discusses Sexual Assault Kit processing and why their lab made the switch to a Direct-to-DNA approach in this episode of Just Science.” At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Sexual Assault Kit Discussion 21 mins – “Just FORESIGHT on Sexual Assault Kits_Forensic… 31 MINS Nov 19, 2018In episode three of the forensic advancement season, Just Science interviews Dr. Paul Speaker from West Virginia University about THE JURISDICTIONAL RETURN ON investment for DNA Databases. With the help of FORESIGHT crime labs can have not only an emotional argument but also an economical argument for testing all sexual assault kits. Just Science explores questions in this episode such as, should labs test all sexual assault kits? Should labs prioritize by if it was a consent case? does this data have more than just a societal impact? Stay tuned as Dr. Speaker leads us through how individualized crime lab DNA data can aid crime labs competing for scarce resources. This month the FTCoE will be releasing a report written on Forensic DNA Unit Efficiency Improvement Program EIP. This episode as well as the report is available at http://www.forensicCOE.org. Follow the FTCOE on Facebook and twitter, or sign up for the newsletter to be notified when the report is released. This season is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Sexual Assault Kit Training 23 mins – “The National Sexual Assault Kit Initiative (SAKI), funded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance, aims to create a coordinated community response that ensures justice and resolution to sexual assault cases by utilizing a comprehensive and victim-centered approach. With 54 sites nationwide, SAKI has had a significant impact on policy and practice surrounding sexual assault kit processing. In honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Just Science met with Dr. Kevin Strom and Dr. Patricia Melton of the SAKI Training and Technical Assistance project. Listen in as they discuss the SAKI TTA program, its impact, and the support SAKI TTA provides the community.At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Sickle Cell and Prodigy 2 20 mins – “As a kid with sickle cell anemia, Prodigy was told he’d barely make it to adulthood. The work of doctors, athletes, Hollywood stars and The Black Panthers help transform his fate. But what kind of life would he lead?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sickle Cell and Prodigy 3 15 mins – “Someone is shot inside Def Jam. A rap star chases Mobb Deep through Lower Manhattan. And Prodigy convinces a hip hop mogul to sneak weapons into one of New York’s most decadent nightclubs. Mobb Deep came up in rap’s golden age. No other group defined the era quite like the duo from Queens.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sickle Cell and Prodigy 4 23 mins – “ When Prodigy goes on trial for violating probation, his lawyer files over 90 pages of P’s medical records in his defense. We find those records buried deep in a Brooklyn courthouse, and they open a window into how Prodigy’s body was at war with itself.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sickle Cell and Prodigy 5 21 mins – “It’s The Alchemist’s birthday, but thanks to the NYPD’s “Rap Intelligence Unit,” he and Prodigy are forced to celebrate in a jail cell, and soon after, P is headed upstate. But even Prodigy says prison changed him for the better.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sickle Cell and Prodigy 6 20 mins – “Prodigy is supposed to fly back home right after a show in Vegas, but he never gets on the plane. As the world of hip hop mourns, there are still questions surrounding his death. We try to find answers, and go inside Prodigy’s memorial service to say goodbye to a rap icon.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sickle Cell Kills Prodigy 1 20 mins – “Prodigy and Havoc begin laying down rhymes together in high school. When their first album flops, they come up with a new sound that’s directly influenced by P’s sickle cell, and it helps define a generation of hip hop. Plus: Big Twins talks about the sickle cell attack he’ll never forget.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery in US 35 mins – “University of Alabama Professor Joshua Rothman taught a class on abolition and pro-slavery movements in the early 1800s. He highlighted the way that both sides used printing presses and mailing literature to spread their ideas.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Socialism in US 40 mins – “More candidates for political office in America today identify themselves as socialists than ever before. But isn’t the idea of socialism anathema to American values of free enterprise and entrepreneurism? BackStory reveals the rich history of socialism in the USA.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Southeast Asia Refugee Issues 47 minsUniversity of Michigan professor Melissa Borjautaughtaclass about Southeast Asian migration to the United States and post-Vietnam War refugees. She examined how laws and public opinion have changed over the past five decades and emphasized the difference between immigrants and refugees.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

US-Soviet Relations Under Reagan 51 mins – “George Washington University Professor Chris Tudda taught a class about foreign relations between the United States and the Soviet Union during President Ronald Reagan’s administration. He began with the Iran-Contra affair but then examined the impact of changes in Soviet leadership during the 1980s on Cold War policies in both countries.At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Vietnam Conflict 1968 52 mins – “Arizona State University professor Kyle Longley taught a class on President Lyndon Johnson and the Vietnam War in 1968. He discussed LBJ’s reaction to the Tet Offensive in January, and talked about the reasons behind the president’s decision in March not to seek re-election. Professor Longley also described LBJ’s attempts to forge a peace agreement with the North Vietnamese, and the role the war played in the November presidential election.At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Vietnam Politics 35 mins – “Nixon, Kissinger and U.S. Withdrawal From Vietnam – U.S. Air Force Academy Professor Stephen Randolph taught a class about President Richard Nixon, his National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger, and their strategy for the U.S. withdrawal from Vietnam.At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Waldenponding 53 mins – “Writer and management consultant Venkatesh Rao talks about Waldenponding with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Rao coined the term Waldenponding to describe various levels of retreating from technology akin to how Thoreau extolled the virtues of retreating from social contact and leading a quieter life at Walden Pond. Rao argues that the value of Waldenponding is overrated and that extreme Waldenponding is even somewhat immoral. Rao sees online intellectual life as a form of supercomputer, an intellectual ecosystem that produces new knowledge and intellectual discourse. He encourages all of us to contribute to that intellectual ecosystem even when it can mean losing credit for some of our ideas and potentially some of our uniqueness.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII Equipment Development 47 mins – “Weber State University Professor Branden Little taught a class about military vehicle innovations and the role of American factories during World War II. He focused on types of amphibious vehicles used in the Pacific and described the process of testing, production and battle application.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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Media Mining Digest 439: Autism Scandal, Beatnik Culture, Daily Show Producer, Divorce and Money, E-Discovery, Farming Costs, Gambling Addiction, Georgia Civil Violence Cases, Impact Investing, Jet Blue Chairman, Kids and Money, Leon Panetta, Library of Congress, Low Income Housing in California, LSD History, Matter-Antimatter Rift, Meyers Leonard, Middle Class American Finances, Money and Couples, Native Americans in California, Olympian Brian Clay, Opium Addiction, Palestine Book, Panama Papers, Political Tribes, Poverty, Predictive Coding, Prisons in US, Processed Foods, Racism, Retirement Paths, Scott Explores Antarctica, Scott Goes Lunar, Scott Goes to Mars, Script Writer and Poet, Self Control, St Bernard Project, Undocumented Immigrant, Vietnam Conflict Project, Women and Money, WWI Myths

Exercise your ears: the 50 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 301 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 28,745 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 1 25 mins – “Aftereffect Ep 1: “Let me get this on camera” Only Human listeners, we’re here with a new podcast series that we think will be right up your alley. Aftereffect touches on the same themes of how health intersects with our lives everyday. Give it a shot. Let us know what you think. Just before 5pm on Monday July 18th, 2016, a 26-year old autistic man named Arnaldo Rios Soto walked out of his North Miami home. He had a silver toy truck in his hand. Hours later, his life would be changed forever. A passing motorist mistook Arnaldo’s toy for a gun and called 911. Police and SWAT arrived and the confrontation was captured in a cell phone video. The encounter left Arnaldo’s behavioral aide – a black man named Charles Kinsey — severely wounded, and it left Arnaldo in need of round-the-clock care. As a result, three police officers lost their jobs, including the now-former North Miami chief of police, Gary Eugene. In his words: “We blew it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 2 24 mins – “Aftereffect Ep2: “Suck it up, buttercup” The shooting left Arnaldo severely traumatized, unable to remain in the home where Charles Kinsey had taken care of him. The next day, he was involuntarily committed to a hospital psych ward, where days stretched into weeks into well over-a-month as the state of Florida struggled to find a new home for him. Eventually, Arnaldo finds himself in a new facility with a well-documented track record of abuse and neglect. It’s Halloween when we first meet Arnaldo face-to-face. Ironically, after everything he’s endured, the staff have dressed him in a police uniform costume.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 3 30 mins – “Aftereffect Ep3: “He was definitely a handful” Since the beginning, Arnaldo’s mother struggled to find adequate care for her autistic son. Her memories are often painful: the doctors who wouldn’t diagnose him; the staff who punched him, drugged him, tied his hands behind his back in a classroom chair. These early experiences shaped Arnaldo. In this episode, we talk with a number of people who’ve cared for him. They recount a sweet, affectionate young man who was also capable of violent outbursts and fits of rage. Hidden beneath Arnaldo’s story is a disability-services system starved of funding; facilities trying to squeeze every dollar out of their residents; and staff members willing to restrain their clients by any means necessary.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 4 19 mins – “Aftereffect Ep4: “I Baker Act you. You Baker Acted me.” The day of the shooting wasn’t Arnaldo’s first encounter with the police. In fact, they’d loomed large in his life for years before that. Even as he bounced from one group home to another, the people that consistently showed up for him, often in the worst way, were the cops.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 5 24 mins – “Aftereffect Ep5: “I need to believe” A year and a half after the shooting, there are signs of trouble at Arnaldo’s new home, Carlton Palms. The staff isn’t keeping an eye on him. There are unexplained injuries. His mother isn’t allowed to see his room and he’s being physically restrained in a full-body mat for getting out of bed at night. And yet, his family continues to hope that this is the right place for him.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 6 22 mins – “Aftereffect Ep6: “When they don’t behave” A cup of hot water thrown on a developmentally-disabled resident. Another kicked in the ribs. A tooth knocked out by a staff member. Carlton Palms had a dark history long before Arnaldo arrived. So why is the state of Florida so reluctant to close it?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 7 19 mins – “Aftereffect Ep7: “The man behind an empire” For decades, Carlton Palms’ elusive founder, Ken Mazik, has wielded his power and influence to sway members of Congress and state legislatures into bending the rules in his favor, from scuttling laws that would have limited the use of physical restraints, to securing leeway from the state of Florida in order to amass a fortune in Medicaid funding. As one of his former employees told us, “Ken Mazik made millions of dollars tying up little kids.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 8 23 mins – “Aftereffect Ep8: “They call him Cheese” One day in February, a group of staff packed up Arnaldo’s belongings, moved him out of Carlton Palms and into a three-bedroom house in a suburban neighborhood. On its face, it’s the type of setting disability advocates strive toward. Arnaldo has his own bedroom, more autonomy, a staff that looks after him. At the moment, Arnaldo is the only resident. He’ll eventually share the house with two other men, but just days before the first is slated to join Arnaldo, he dies – under suspicious circumstances in the care of Carlton Palms.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beatnik Culture 38 mins – “William Rorabaugh, who teaches a class on the counterculture of the 1950s and 1960s in America, talked about the literature, clothing, music and world view of the beats and beatniks of the ’50s and the hippies of the ’60s. He also talked about the spread of LSD and the prevalence of drugs in hippie culture.” At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Daily Show Producer 22 mins – “Bradley Paul’s words are money. He’s written for some of Hollywood’s best television studios, and his credits include AMC’s hit drama “Better Call Saul” and the upcoming “Lodge 49.” But is he getting paid what he’s worth? This is the question we pose to a poet and writer who went from a cash-strapped childhood in Baltimore to a career in Hollywood, but almost gave up along the way.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Divorce and Money 22 mins – “Very few Americans get married with the expectation that their marriage will end in divorce. But despite all our optimism and good intentions, forever often turns out to be shorter than we hoped.According to recent government statistics, over 800,000 divorces and annulments take place every year in the US. Only about half of marriages last twenty years or more. On the surface, Margaret and Leif Jacobsen might sound like a typical divorced couple. They met in college, married soon after, had children, and things were great— until they weren’t. Eventually they both realized that in order to move forward, they would need to go their separate ways. It was a difficult and emotional decision, one compounded by the big question: How do we handle the money? Their unconventional solution has helped them to remain close friends and co-parents.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

E-Discovery 11 mins – “The Association of Certified E-Discovery Specialists (ACEDS) is a member organization that offers certification and a community for professionals working in the field of e-discovery, both in the public and private sectors. Recently, experienced e-discovery service provider and industry leader Mary Mack was named the executive director of ACEDS. What will change and what are her future plans for the organization? “ At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Farming Costs 23 mins – “On Open Account, our guests get honest about how they live in harmony with their money—or try to. As a farmer in California’s Central Valley, Jagpaul Badhesha knows all about harmony. His business relies not just on financial harmony, but harmony with nature. With over 1,000 acres of grapes, almonds, and other California staples, Jagpaul’s income is at the mercy of everything from weather patterns, to the California property market, to China’s growing middle class.  The Badhesha family has been farming for generations. Jagpaul’s great-uncle came to California from India, and labored on other people’s farms to earn enough money to buy his own land. By the 1970’s, Jagpaul’s father had one of the largest Indian-owned farms in the country—until he lost everything during a few years of bad luck. Growing up, 32-year-old Jag saw his parents work tirelessly to rebuild what they’d lost. It’s part of why he’s so committed to carrying on the family business, despite the challenges.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Gambling Addiction 22 mins – “Money is one of the toughest subjects for families to talk about openly. We all make financial choices we regret, and it’s not easy to own up to those choices, especially to the people we love. As difficult as these conversations are, they’re also profoundly necessary; secrets about money are often devastating to families. On this episode of Open Account, three siblings share a deeply personal story, of how a bitter financial secret nearly destroyed their family’s livelihood. Growing up, all three remember their mother as quiet and frugal, while their father was a gregarious entertainer. Both parents worked hard to support the family; Mom was a nurse, and Dad owned a bar in their small town in the Pacific Northwest. As adults, all three siblings learned the truth: Dad had a gambling addiction, which both parents had hidden. Over the years, he squandered the entire family fortune…At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Georgia Civil Violence Cases 68 mins – “Professors Hank Klibanoff and Brett Gadsden talked about the intersection of Civil Rights politics and violence in mid-20th century Georgia. They talk about a number unsolved murders during the segregation-era and the Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases Project.At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Impact Investing 23 mins – “Nancy Pfund is a venture capitalist in San Francisco who believes in “impact investing:” putting her capital towards business ventures that do just as much for the planet as they do for her portfolio. Nancy’s firm is even named DBL Partners, as in “double bottom line.” The double bottom line refers to DBL Partners’ mission: to invest in companies that deliver financial returns while making the world a better place. Along with big names like Tesla, Nancy has backed solar energy companies, healthcare innovators, and sustainable healthy food providers. As a woman in a competitive male-dominated field, she often found she had to work twice as hard to gain investors’ trust. And she met plenty of skepticism when she pitched her vision for a new kind of business, that paid human dividends as well as financial ones. It wasn’t always easy to convince other venture capitalists that investment was about more than dollars and cents, “Some people thought it was nuts, others thought it was visionary,” says Nancy.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Jet Blue Chairman 49 mins – “How did the CEO of a real estate development company become chairman of an airline? How can a competent manager learn to trust his subordinates? Joel Peterson, Chairman of the Board at JetBlue Airways and author of The 10 Laws of Trust, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his career at Trammell Crow and JetBlue and how the concept of trust, outlined in his book, has helped his career. He closes the conversation with a discussion of how he overcame his personal weaknesses that would have handicapped his career–or as he puts it, how he “rewrote his operating system.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kids and Money 19 mins – “Before it looms too large in their lives, kids spend a few years making sense out of money – its made-up symbolism, mysterious behavior, and larger than life power. They see it operating in their parents’ work, at the store, at school and in images of fame and fortune. At its heart, kids understand that money connotes worth, power and freedom – but that it can also empty our lives of meaning and connection. In this episode, we handed the mic over to kids from 5 to 9 years old to discuss the role of money in their lives, and in their imaginations.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Leon Panetta 20 mins – “Our guest this week is former Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta. We discussed his time as CIA Director during the first term of the Obama Administration and the process of transitioning the agency from one presidency to another. We also spoke about his advice for new Secretary of Defense, retired General James Mattis, the changes he’s seen during the nearly 40 years he’s spent in politics, and the importance of the President getting honest – often unvarnished – advice from his cabinet members and his White House staff.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Library of Congress 17 mins – “The largest library in the world contains more than 168 million items, with materials in some 470 languages, and is located in Washington, D.C. The Library of Congress, situated right behind the U.S. Capitol Building and just steps from the Supreme Court of the United States, is a popular spot in D.C., beloved for its ornate ceilings, historic reading room and, well, everything it represents….The Teacher-in-Residence program is about 20 years old, and it invites one U.S. teacher to spend a year at the Library of Congress researching, writing and seeking out primary sources that K-12 teachers across the country could use in their classroom lessons. Then the library makes that source material available and easily accessible to all. Past Teachers-in-Residence include a middle school science teacher, a kindergarten teacher and a performing arts teacher, but for this year’s program, the library specifically wanted to bring on a civics teacher to build out its digital collection of civics-focused curriculum materials…. This interview was conducted at the library back in February, before the COVID-19 outbreak restricted in-person meetings, and when it was still conceivable to think and talk about things other than the global pandemic.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Low Income Housing in California 41 mins – “California faces a shortfall of roughly 1.3 million housing units for its lower-income residents. That’s a massive gap to fill even if it was cheap and easy to construct new housing in California. But low-income housing subsidized by public dollars is especially pricey to build in many parts of the state. How pricey? Well, in the case of the Pearl, a small apartment complex a developer hoped to build in Southern California, each unit would cost $1.1 million to build. “People have some idea that building affordable housing has some basis in reality. It doesn’t,” said Ginger Hitzke, the Pearl’s developer who now says the project will almost certainly not be built because of the extravagant cost. “Take everything you know about real estate, anything you’ve learned, anything you really know, and now throw it out the window.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

LSD History 48 mins – “ Journalist and author Michael Pollan talks about his book, How to Change Your Mind, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Pollan chronicles the history of the use of psychedelic drugs, particularly LSD and psilocybin, to treat addiction, depression and anxiety. He discusses his own experiences with the drugs as well. Much of the conversation focuses on what we might learn from psychedelic drugs about their apparent spiritual dimension, the nature of consciousness, and the nature of the mind.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Matter-Antimatter Rift 8 mins – “In the same underground observatory in Japan where, 18 years ago, neutrinos were first seen oscillating from one “flavor” to another — a landmark discovery that earned two physicists the 2015 Nobel Prize — a tiny anomaly has begun to surface in the neutrinos’ oscillations that could herald an answer to one of the biggest mysteries in physics: why matter dominates over antimatter in the universe. The anomaly, detected by the T2K experiment, is not yet pronounced enough to be sure of, but it and the findings of two related experiments “are all pointing in the same direction,” said Hirohisa Tanaka of the University of Toronto, a member of the T2K team who presented the result to a packed audience in London earlier this month….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meyers Leonard 19 mins – “On Open Account, we’re determined to share the diversity of experience around making, losing, and living with money in America. Many of our guests share stories of life without enough to go around, and Portland Trailblazer Meyers Leonard is no different. After he lost his father when he was six, his mom struggled through poor health to provide for him and his brother. But then Meyers was drafted to the NBA, and in his early 20’s he found himself wealthier than he’d ever imagined….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Middle Class American Finances 20 mins – “Neal Gabler’s cover story about the hidden financial struggles of the middle class sparked a firestorm of attention. Here, we talk with him about the personal story behind his revolutionary confessional, and how it feels to live the truth.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Money and Couples 25 mins – “At Umpqua Bank, we know every marriage is unique, just like the financial sharing that goes along with it. We’re focusing this episode of Open Account on money’s role in a marriage. Our host, SuChin Pak, sits down with Meaghan Wright and Sam Huff to ask the tough questions on marriage, money and balancing their life with their two very successful small businesses, Tanner Goods and Mazama Wares based in Portland, Oregon….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Native Americans in California 50 mins – “Professor Ashley Riley Sousa talked about Native Americans and capitalism in early 19th century California. She focused on local tribes’ commercial interactions with Spanish missions and fur traders. She also talked about the commodities these groups exchanged, such as livestock, fabric, fur, beads, and fish.At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Olympian Brian Clay 22 mins – “Bryan Clay’s story is far from ordinary, but the highs and lows of his journey are familiar to anyone who’s coped with a job change. In 2008, Bryan won gold at the Beijing Summer Olympics in the decathlon, earning him the title of “Greatest Athlete in the World.” He traveled in private jets and juggled sponsorships from heavy hitters like Nike and BMW. But at the 2012 Olympic Trials, Bryan failed to qualify. In just a few months, Bryan lost his spot on the Olympic team, nearly his entire life savings, and most of his sponsorships. He lost his livelihood. How do you bounce back from that? When you’ve worked for something your whole life, and you have a family that depends on you, a job loss can feel like a loss of identity, as well. Bryan recalls, “I had three thousand dollars before I was going to have to empty my 401K. I remember going through this, I’m in a panic and depressed and I’m just trying to survive at this point. And my wife says ‘listen, it doesn’t matter. As long as we’re healthy and we’re together, we’ll be fine.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Opium Addiction 32 mins – “Professor Elizabeth Gray talked about the use of and public opinion on opium and laudanum in the 19th century. Professor Gray described how most laudanum addicts at the time were upper class women who had originally been prescribed the drug by their doctors. She argued that since men at the time were less likely to seek medical attention, and it was more socially acceptable for them to drink, a gender divide was created between alcoholics and opium addicts.” At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Palestine Book 21 mins – “Books and Ideas #8: Palestine by Jimmy Carter. President Jimmy Carter’s book Palestine: Peace not Apartheid has raised the ire of many pro-Israel Americans. Why? Because he dares to point out the blight of the Palestinians. In this podcast, I discuss what I learned from this book and why I think Americans should read this book for themselves.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panama Papers 20 mins – “Nuix Chief Technology Officer Stephen Stewart sits down with Sharon Nelson and John Simek to discuss the Panama Papers, the world’s largest data breach.2.6 terabytes of information spanning over forty years of a Panamanian law firm’s life was leaked to a German newspaper and subsequently, the world. What questions does this raise about a law firm’s responsibility for the loss of client/customer data? What lessons can we learn about security as a result of this firm’s data being compromised? In this episode of the Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek chat with Nuix Chief Technology Officer Stephen Stewart about the Panama Papers, the world’s largest breach of information. Stephen explains that a law firm in Panama named Mossack Fonseca had 2.6 terabytes of information taken from them by an anonymous party, who then gave that information to the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung (SZ). The leaked data contained 11.5 million items that consisted of roughly 5 million emails, 3 million databases, 2 million PDF files, and 1 million images. In an attempt to understand and further investigate the received data, SZ then contacted the International Consortium of Investigative Reporters (ICIJ). Stephen talks about what the ICIJ is (basically an international network that includes 165 investigative journalists over 65 countries) and how Nuix’s software was utilized to aid in the data analysis. The group discusses the authorities’ later raid on the law firm’s office and what evidence the digital forensics experts and financial analysts might be looking for. Stephen closes the interview with an summary of the practices that this breach sheds light on, like who the beneficiaries of offshore funds really are and what significant revelations might come from this particular breach.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Political Tribes 46 mins – “Helen Pluckrose and James Lindsay talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about their essay on the enemies of modernity. Pluckrose and Lindsay argue that modernity–by which they mean democracy, reason, and individual liberty–is under attack from pre-modern and post-modern ideological enemies. They discuss why modernity is under attack and encourage people on the political left and right to support modernity.” At the light right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty 22 mins – “Our goal with Open Account has always been to talk to people about their relationship to money: how they use it, sometimes lose it, the way it changes beliefs, affects relationships and everything in between. From compelling stories about handling money after divorce, to the work it takes to achieve the American Dream, we’ve covered it all. But we’ve never talked about what it means to have never had money at all, and not know if you ever will. On this episode, we’re diving headfirst into what it’s like to live in poverty. Our host, SuChin Pak, sits down with Dr. Donna Beegle, a rare academic that can actually speak from experience. The only person in her family who has never been incarcerated, Dr. Beegle had only ever known poverty. At 26, she couldn’t read a newspaper. Today, she’s one of the most powerful voices in the conversation around poverty in America, and there’s no one better to speak with authority about what it takes to break the cycle.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Predictive Coding 22 mins – “Discovery, as all lawyers know, is the process of collecting and exchanging information about the court case to prepare for the trial. Traditionally, this was done by many lawyers over countless billable hours in which every page of potential evidence was examined for important information. Because of this, the more information existed in reference to a case, the more expensive the case was. As technology developed, law firms began using computers to do keyword searches and conceptual searches. Unfortunately, there were problems including picking the right keywords or concepts, misspelled words, how to structure the items, and that these searches only yielded 20% of important data. Recently, technology has advanced to predictive coding, or teaching a computer program to think like a lawyer would. But how cost effective and practical is predictive coding, and how well does it actually work? In this episode of The Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek discuss the evolution of technology and case discovery, how predictive coding works and is priced, and examples of cases that have involved predictive coding. Simek first explains the importance of culling, or filtering out unimportant data sets through DeNISTing, deduping, or filtering by dates. He then explains predictive coding in its simplicity: to feed a computer program information based on discovery attorneys have already done until the computer can accurately predict which information is important….Nelson concludes the podcast by giving examples of when predictive coding has already appeared in court cases. The landmark case was Da Silva Moore v. Publicis Groupe, in which Magistrate Judge Andrew Peck allowed predictive coding to be used as long as the defense and prosecution agree to its use, there are a large volume of documents, it is the superior technology, it is more cost effective, and it is transparent and defensible. Inevitably, the conclusion is that it is not for the judge to micromanage the discovery process.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Prisons in US 48 mins – “Professor Dan Berger talked about the U.S prison system in the late 20th century and the politics behind it. He spoke about how mass incarceration arose in response to the unexpected ways prisoners joined in the Civil Rights and Black Power movements of the 1960s and 1970s. He also described the role of activist prisoners, such as George Jackson, whose prison letters were published and shed light on problems with the justice system.At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Processed Foods 18 mins – “Have you ever wondered how chicken nuggets are made? Or what propylene glycol monostearate, monocalcium phosphate, or other listed ingredients are doing in your favorite packaged snacks? Distillations hosts Michal Meyer and Robert Kenworthy certainly wondered, and they went to the corner deli to inspect some processed food themselves. They also spoke with experts Bryant Simon, a historian, and David Schleifer, a sociologist, about how trans fats and chicken nuggets arrived on the food scene as the healthier options, but have since turned into villains. Both Simon and Schleifer suggest that when it comes to deciding what we eat, we might have less choice than we think. Class, geography, and convenience (for both food makers and food eaters) all play a role.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Racism 1 37 mins – “We wrap up the show with Anna Holmes, Baratunde Thurston, and Tanner Colby reflecting on what they’ve learned through this experiment in multiracial dialogue, and the ways in which we can’t talk, don’t talk, would rather not talk, but intermittently, fitfully, embarrassingly do talk about culture, identity, power, and privilege in our most-definitely-not-yet-pre-post-yet-still-very-racial society.” At the link right-click “Listen with MP3 player” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism 2 26 mins – “Anna Holmes, Tanner Colby, and Fazeelat Aslam discuss listener feedback to episode #1701: “Will You Be My Black Friend?” At the link right-click “Listen with MP3 player” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism 3 36 mins – “Hosts Baratunde Thurston, Raquel Cepeda, and Tanner Colby discuss the media’s treatment of recent events in Baltimore; why black women, Latinos, and Native Americans are being left out of the current debate on police brutality; and a new study on race, neighborhoods and social mobility.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Retirement Paths 27 mins – “You don’t have to be just starting your career to be intimidated by the prospect of planning for retirement. But the good news is that it’s never too late to start.  The first step in facing your long-term financial future is talking about it. That’s where Open Account comes in. Our mission is to demystify money by having open, honest conversations about the way it affects our lives, both now and in the years to come. One thing is certain: not everyone follows the same path to retirement. That’s what we learned on this week’s episode of Umpqua Bank’s podcast. One of our guests worked at a burger joint. The other is a lawyer. Both have made retirement a financial priority—they’re just choosing to get there in two very different ways….”  At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Scott Explores Antarctica 12 mins – “In recent years, much has been written about Scott the polar loser and bungler. But that personalised focus ignores the pioneering scientific research and discoveries. The revelations transformed Antarctica from an unknown quantity on the map into a profoundly important continent in the Earth’s past and present. Before Scott and Shackleton trekked across the vast ice sheets in the early 1900s, no-one was sure whether there was even a continent there. Some geographers had suggested Antarctica was merely a vast raft of ice anchored to a scattering of islands. The science teams on Scott’s expeditions made fundamental discoveries about Antarctic weather and began to realise the frozen continent’s fundamental role in global climate and ocean circulation. They discovered rocks and fossils which showed Antarctica was once a balmy forested place. They mapped the magnetism around the South Pole for both science and navigators. They found many new species of animals and revealed the extraordinary winter breeding habits of the penguins. The dedication to scientific discovery is most poignantly revealed by fossils that Scott’s party collected after their disappointment of being beaten by Amundsen and a few weeks before they froze to death trudging across the Ross ice shelf. They found a particular plant fossil which had been one of the Holy Grails on the early explorations of Antarctica’s interior. Its discovery proved an hypothesis raised by Darwin among others that all the southern continents were once linked together by a landmass that would lain where Antarctica is today. The fossils were also important evidence to support the new and controversial theory of Continental Drift – a theory which now underpins the entirety of modern Earth science.” At the light right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scott Goes Lunar 12 minsOne hundred years ago, Scott reached the South Pole. However, more than four decades passed before people went back there. On the Moon, Neil Armstrong took his leap for mankind in 1969 and it has been forty years since the last astronaut left the lunar surface. Presenter Kevin Fong talks to space scientists and historians to find out if Robert Scott’s Antarctic exploits provide a road map for future human exploration of the Moon and the planet Mars. Imperial and geopolitical motivations lay behind both South Polar exploration and the effort which took humans briefly to the lunar surface. But what would get us back to the Moon – would it be geopolitical rivalry or science? In times of economic austerity (in the West at least), what scientific questions are important enough to justify exploration of the Moon? The six short Apollo visits to the lunar surface were enough to crack the mystery of how the Moon itself formed – namely that a Mars sized planet crashed into the early Earth. The molten rock that was blasted into orbit by that collision coalesced as our lunar neighbour. Sending astronauts back to explore the rocks of the Moon could solve the most important mysteries about the early Earth – when did life first evolve and under what sort of conditions? Their findings could also settle the questions about the origins of our oceans here on Earth ” At the light right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scott Goes to Mars 12 mins – “One hundred years ago, the first humans reached the South Pole of this planet. More than 40 years ago, man first walked on the moon. When will our species first set foot to explore the planet Mars? Kevin Fong seeks a likely launch date. He asks who will get us there and why we really need to explore the Red Planet.” At the light right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Script Writer and Poet 22 mins – “At Umpqua Bank, we understand that not everyone’s financial or professional goals are the same. That’s why we’re using our podcast to start tough conversations about money and personal finance, to inspire listeners to take charge of their finances without shame or hesitation. In this episode of Open Account, host SuChin Pak talks to writer and poet Bradley Paul about the ups and downs of his career, and how he’s balanced his creative aspirations with the financial needs of himself and his family….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Self Control 12 mins – “Neurophilosopher Pat Churchland discusses the nature of self-control and the light that neuroscience can throw on its mechanisms in conversation with Nigel Warburton.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Listen to Pat Churchland on Self Control;” however, a copy of the podcast is also included in this blog archive.

St Bernard Project 13 mins – “Reese May joined the Marine Corps Reserves at 18 and turned 21 in western Iraq. When he heard about Veterans Corps at the St. Bernard Project, he felt like it had been designed just for him. He interviewed in mid-September and went to work the following Monday. “I thought I wanted to be a site supervisor, but they asked me to take a more analytical position,” he says. “I told them, ‘I want to do whatever you think will make me help best.’ May works on a computer at the St. Bernard Project headquarters, sorting and tracking information from the beginning to the end of each rebuilding project and looking for ways to make each step more efficient. He’s also in charge of filing all building permits. He has no idea what his title is. “I work with an incredible group of people who are more focused on what needs to be done than on titles”. He says being part of Veterans Corps feels fantastic.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Undocumented Immigrants 27 mins – “In this episode of Open Account, SuChin Pak talks money with two young immigrants, Daniel Alejandro Leon-Davis and Santhosh Daniel. Daniel, whose parents brought him to the USA from Venezuela, faced immense challenges when he discovered as a teenager that he was undocumented, which severely curtailed his rights and strained his finances. Santhosh shares a very different story about how his father provided for their family, and contributed to his community in the United States, while holding on to the financial lessons he’d learned growing up in India…..” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Vietnam Conflict Project 32 mins – “In the early 1960s the Pentagon set up a top-secret research project in an old villa in downtown Saigon. The task? To interview captured North Vietnamese soldiers and guerrillas in order to measure the effect of relentless U.S. bombing on their morale. Yet despite a wealth of great data, even the leaders of the study couldn’t agree on what it meant.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Women and Money 32 mins – “Paula Pell is the woman behind many of the funniest, most laugh-out-loud, on-the-floor-crying moments of the past 20 years. From being a lead writer on SNL, to writing and producing NBC’s 30 Rock, to her first feature film Sisters—not to mention rewriting almost every comedy script you know and love—we could go on and on. Never heard of her? That’s just it. Paula’s not one to demand credit, and she’s often in the shadows of comedy greats (and good friends) like Judd Apatow, Amy Poehler and Tina Fey. Her success didn’t happen overnight, either. It was a slow climb, one that meant living paycheck-to-paycheck in New York City, relying on her own admittedly terrible money-management skills. This made for a bumpy road, laden with check-cashing places and what she calls “funky financing.” Paula had to learn fast how to manage the money she was earning. But most importantly, Paula learned to ask for what’s she’s worth— without a single apology.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

WWI Myths 54 mins – “Professor Jennifer Keene talked about myths about America’s involvement in World War I, including the misconceptions that the U.S. was not involved in Europe prior to entering the war, or that World War I failed to have a lasting impact on American society.At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 438: 9-11 Attack Series, Afghanistani Translator Story, Aggregated Journalism, Andrea Mitchell, Asteroid Impact, Blockchain Technology, Chinese CDC, Covid-19 Economic Impact, Covid-19 Lessons, Covid-19 Triage, Cyber Defense, Dark Money Documentary, Domestic Disturbances, Global Warming Webinar, Helicobacter pylori, Internet at 25, NSA Surveillance for Lawyers, Nuclear Power, Opioid Treatment, Parenting, Republican Attitudes, Russian Investigation, Science Communication, Troublemakers, Us Versus Them, Viruses in Air

Exercise your ears: the 41 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 293 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 27,750 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

9-11 Attack Series 24 mins – “Actors Jeff Daniels and Peter Sarsgaard join Chuck to talk about their roles in the new Hulu series “The Looming Tower.” They also discuss how art and culture have changed, and how they can respond to crisis.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Afghanistani Translator Story 24 mins – “U.S. Army Captain Matt Zeller says he wouldn’t be here today if it weren’t for Janis Shinwari, an Afghan Translator who saved his life during an ambush. Years later, Zeller had the chance to return the favor to Janis — and many others. Thousands more still need help.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Aggregated Journalism 32 mins – “James Hohmann, author of the Washington Post’s Daily 202 newsletter, joins Chuck to talk about how news coverage is changing, what to look for in the midterms, and why Minnesota hasn’t gone red yet.” At the link find the square with three dots, right-click it, then right-click “Download” to get the podcast.

Alabama Politics 30 mins – “In 2017, Democratic pollster Paul Maslin teamed up with Joe Trippi to work on the longshot Doug Jones campaign in Alabama – and they believe they had a shot to win the state even before reports of sexual assault allegations were made against Roy Moore.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Andrea Mitchell 24 mins – “In Mitchell’s 40 years at NBC, she has made headlines with groundbreaking coverage of everything from the Jonestown Massacre to the Three Mile Island disaster to Fidel Castro’s regime. NBC’s Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent has covered 7 presidents during her tenure and witnessed and adapted to massive changes in the journalism industry. Mitchell didn’t know journalism would be her calling at first, she said. Entering college, she thought she would be a professional violinist and grew up spending eight hours daily practicing at music school. But she loved writing, history, and politics too much, and at the University of Pennsylvania, she quickly became involved with the Ivy League Radio Network.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asteroid Impact 24 mins – “Whether it’s Black Mirror or Armageddon, dystopia and depicting the end of days continues to capture the imagination of writers and creatives. Chuck Todd sat down with William Cohen, former Secretary of Defense under Bill Clinton and author of “Final Strike”…. An asteroid is on a collision course with Earth, and “Final Strike” is about the world’s race to save themselves….” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beer Brewing 40 mins – “MTS 61, Charles Bamforth – Beer: eight thousand years of technology” At the link find the title, “MTS61,” which can be heard, but not downloaded; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Blockchain Technology 24 mins – “Paul Vigna, Wall Street Journal reporter and co-author of “The Truth Machine” joins Chuck to talk about Blockchain, bitcoin, and the future of cryptocurrency.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Cambridge Analytica 50 mins – “This Sunday on Meet the Press: An exclusive interview with Cambridge Analytica whistleblower Christopher Wylie, Director of Trade and Industrial Policy Peter Navarro, and Sen Mike Rounds (R-S.D.), to discuss the White House’s response to the latest developments in Syria, tariffs on Chinese goods, criticism of Scott Pruitt, and the potential Facebook fallout. Chuck is also joined by the Meet the Press panel, New York Times correspondent Helene Cooper, presidential historian Doris Kearns-Goodwin, Editor for the Cook Political Report Charlie Cook and National Review editor Rich Lowry.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

CDC Disease Outbreaks 42 mins – “When a new biothreat or emerging infectious agent threatens, how are diagnostic protocols put into place? It’s up to the Laboratory Response Network (LRN), a multipartner network of public health, clinical and other labs, to generate and distribute reagents, and provide training to detect these threats. Julie Villanueva, Chief of the Laboratory Preparedness and Response Branch at the CDC, talks about the LRN and how no two weeks on the job are alike.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Chinese CDC 45 mins – “George F. Gao discusses how China CDC promotes global public health during outbreaks SARS and Ebola. He also talks about running a structural biology lab, the importance of both basic and translational research, and the most important discovery of the 20th century. Julie’s Biggest Takeaways: China CDC was founded in 2001. Its experience with the SARS outbreak informed its response to the western Africa Ebola outbreak in 2014-2016, having learned that viruses don’t care about national borders and can quickly become an international problem. Responding to any major outbreak serves both altruistic and selfish motives, since quelling the outbreak decreases the chance that the disease will continue to circulate, potentially reaching your country. Basic research is fundamental for many translational applications to improve human health. By measuring the mutation rate, for example, of a circulating virus, scientists can determine if previous isolates can be used to generate vaccines. The basic research that led to new nucleic acid sequencing techniques has many important applications! When asking other scientists what the most important discovery of the 20th century is, many biomedical scientists name the discovery of the double helix. George points out that bird migration patterns have influenced our understanding of avian diseases like the flu. This discovery led scientists to understand more about the annual transmission patterns of flu, highlighting the importance of interdisciplinary research. George has a foot in both basic and translational sciences and is an ardent supporter of both. The difficulty is in identifying basic research that has potential for application and providing opportunities to basic researchers to create companies and products based on their research. Another hurdles is collaborating and coordinating to ensure people talk to each other…” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Publishing 12 mins – “When China Literature, China’s largest online publishing and ebook website, went public on the Hong Kong stock market nearly two years ago, share prices doubled on the first day of trading. Today, the stock is trading at close to its 52-week low and has lost more than two-thirds in value since its November 2017 debut. For Chinese readers, the result is a more limited choice of books, especially novels with adult themes. For foreign publishers and authors, the door to a promising new market may be closing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid-19 Economic Impact 30 mins – “News on the coronavirus changes constantly. Keeping pace with those shifts is hard enough. Considering how they’ll impact our lives in the months and years ahead can seem impossible. A new podcast from the World Economic Forum hopes to change that. World vs Virus will go beyond the ever-changing headlines and help listeners understand how the pandemic is reshaping society, business and the economy. In the first episode, the economist Nouriel Roubini explains why the economic impact of the COVID-19 coronavirus will be different than anything we have seen before, and a mental health expert gives tips on staying sane. Hosted by World Economic Forum editor Robin Pomeroy and published every week, the podcast puts the news in context with insights and analysis from top global experts in economics, technology, health and culture as well as the World Economic Forum’s reporters and editors.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 in NYC 22 mins – “Matt McCarthy wrote a bestselling book, Superbugs, about the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Now this New York doctor is fighting on the front line against the COVID-19 virus which poses a similar threat. You can hear what it’s like to live and work as a doctor in a city at the US epicentre for the disease in this week’s World Vs Virus podcast.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Covid-19 Lessons 12 mins – “We talk with Colleen Farrell who’s doing her third year of an internal medicine residency in New York City. Fortunately, we caught her during a one-week vacation (she was supposed to be taking two), and she chatted with us about how she and her colleagues are coping. We asked her what she thought COVID-19’s larger lessons would be, and she gave an interesting, impassioned answer.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Target As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid-19 Lockdown How Long 30 mins – “If your sense of touch is one your most important ways of dealing with the world, how to you cope with the threat of Coronavirus? YouTuber Molly Burke gives us her insights on the outbreak and urges us all not to forget people living with disabilities as we all try to protect our health. At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Covid-19 Triage 47 mins – “Journalist and New York Times op-ed writer Thomas Friedman says countries around the world are undergoing a stress test thanks to the coronavirus pandemic. This test, he says, is revealing the quality of nations’ governance, their health care systems, and the strength of their communities. Perhaps surprisingly, some autocratic regimes have fared well, he says, while some democracies – like the United States – have not. Friedman speaks with Elliot Gerson, an executive vice president at the Aspen Institute. Their conversation was held by the Society of Fellows at the Institute. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Cyber Defense 30 mins – “Michael Daniel, President of the Cyber Threat Alliance and former Special Adviser to President Obama joins Chuck to talk about the state of cyber defense. Along the way he describes how internet security is like disaster response, and why your Amazon Echo might not be so bad after all.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Dark Money Documentary 33 mins – “Filmmaker Kimberly Reed talks about her new documentary, “Dark Money,” in which she shows how the Citizens United decision impacts Republicans in Montana.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Dengue Discussion 30 mins – “MTS60, Thomas Scott – The Bone Breaking Virus” At the link find the title, MTS60,” which can be heard, but not downloaded; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Domestic Disturbances 30 mins– “Every year, thousands of musical acts go on tour and perform shows in front of millions of fans. But for fans of country music singer Martina McBride, the day of the concert is more than just a chance to cheer and sing along. It’s a chance to make a difference. “They’re just a very special breed of people,” Sheila Jones says of McBride’s fans. “I think they just feel so deeply and I think her music does that for you.” Jones is the executive director of Martina McBride’s Team Music is Love Foundation. For the past seven years and counting, she’s paired the needs of local communities with the eagerness of McBride’s fans to give back. The results have been impressive – hundreds of thousands of pounds of food distributed, thousands of concert tickets given to those in need, and countless special memories made. “I love the things that we’ve been able to do with it so far,” McBride says. “Building the music program in Guatemala. The cancer research grant that we were able to do. Sending food trucks down to Texas and Florida…I feel like it’s just going to have a ripple effect, starting little but getting widespread.” In this episode, you’ll hear how one country star is using her platform to make a difference — and how one fan brought it all to life.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Doris Kearns Goodwin 24 mins – “Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin talks with Chuck Todd about Trump’s election, and looks back at Hillary Clinton’s legacy to imagine how she will be viewed by history.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Electricity from Microbes 28 mins – “MTS63, Jeff Gralnick – I Sing the Microbe Electric” At the link find the title, MTS63,” which can be heard, but not downloaded; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Galileo Navigation Satellites 163 mins – “In this episode we get a peek into how OHB System AG in Bremen develops satellites — mostly based on the Galileo navigation satellites. We speak with Christian Pauly about systems engineering, with Mathias Tausche about manufacturing and integration, with Andreas Wortmann about the software on the satellites, and with Ingo Engeln about the company as a whole. As a background, you may want to listen to omega tau 26 about satellite buses. omega tau 204 on Planet Labs’ small satellites may be interesting as a contrast.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 File Directly” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Warming Webinar 63 mins – “For many global companies, the spread of COVID-19 has meant growing disruptions to global supply chains and major hits to their operations without a clear end in sight. Business leaders in China have been at the forefront of the response, and they face tough decisions that put their values and resolves to the test. Watch our webinar of two leaders in the Aspen Global Leadership Network, Jane Sun, CEO of Trip.com, and Shane Tedjarati, President of Global High Growth Regions at Honeywell, as they shared how they are leading through this crisis and what we might learn from their experiences.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Global Warming Webinar 63 mins – “For many global companies, the spread of COVID-19 has meant growing disruptions to global supply chains and major hits to their operations without a clear end in sight. Business leaders in China have been at the forefront of the response, and they face tough decisions that put their values and resolves to the test. Watch our webinar of two leaders in the Aspen Global Leadership Network, Jane Sun, CEO of Trip.com, and Shane Tedjarati, President of Global High Growth Regions at Honeywell, as they shared how they are leading through this crisis and what we might learn from their experiences.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Helicobacter pylori..39 mins.- “MTS64, MartinBlaser – Save Our Endangered Germs” At the link find the title, MTS64,” which can be heard, but not downloaded; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Hydroxychloroquine Use – “President Trump has continued to push the anti-malarial drug hydroxychloroquine as a potential treatment for Covid-19, even though scientists say more research is needed to prove that it is safe and effective. But how’d we get here in the first place? Julia Carrie Wong is a reporter for The Guardian who has traced how a misleading, flawed study from France has become a widely-cited piece of evidence by media personalities on Fox and elsewhere. In this podcast extra, she explains what’s deeply wrong with the study’s conclusions and what happened when it got to be featured prominently by Trump’s preferred television network. Wong talks to Bob about what’s so appealing about the hydroxychloroquine narrative and why the administration might be so attracted to it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Internet at 25 21 mins – “Today, March 12, marks the 30th anniversary of the World Wide Web. CERN, where in 1989, Tim Berners-Lee drafted his proposal for a way to link documents and data across the Internet, is celebrating the occasion, along with the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the World Wide Web Foundation. In 2014, when the Web turned 25, CCC’s Chris Kenneally spoke with journalist and author John Naughton about the ways that the Web has sparked an innovation revolution that has yet to run its course. “When people ask me, ‘What is the Internet?’ I say it’s a global machine for springing surprises. That’s really what it is,” says Naughton.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Israel Creation 29 mins – “Martin Fletcher turns to fiction to tell ‘Promised Land’ story – Martin Fletcher covered the Middle East for 26 years at NBC News, but he turned to writing fiction as a way to humanize the tumult. Martin Fletcher has covered reality in the Middle East for 26 years at NBC News, but says he turned to writing fiction as a way to humanize the tumult in that part of the world. In his new novel, “Promised Land,” Fletcher recounts what life was like for two brothers and a refugee in Israel during the nation’s emergence after World War II. Fletcher tells NBC News’ Chuck Todd that he started out to write a non-fiction book but found it too limiting for the story he wanted to tell. “As journalists, we’re always talking about what happened to whom, where, how, but you don’t really get into what was it like to be that person, what was it like to be there at that time? And I just thought fiction was a better vehicle for that,” Fletcher said in the latest episode of “1947: The Meet the Press Podcast.” The book is the first part of a planned trilogy and covers just the first 20 years of Israel’s emergence, ending with the occupation of the West Bank and Gaza in 1967. Fletcher says that readers will have to wait for the second book to see more on Israel-Palestine relations. “In the first 20 years of Israel’s existence, the Arabs and the local Palestinians were really almost of no import, they were ignored completely … I wanted the book to reflect reality,” Fletcher says. Fletcher also discussed present-day events, including President Donald Trump’s attacks on the press and how they follow similar rhetoric from Israel’s Prime Minister Netanyahu.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

NSA Surveillance for Lawyers 24 mins – “Edward Snowden’s leaks about NSA surveillance have been a hot topic in the media for the last few months. But what do lawyers, specifically, need to worry about? The answer is: a lot. On this edition of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon D. Nelson, Esq. and John W. Simek take the stage and examine NSA surveillance as it relates to lawyers. Tune in for an overview of Snowden and the NSA surveillance controversy, how effective (or ineffective) encrypting data is, whether the surveillance is having a chilling effect on lawyers, how to abide by the Model Rules of Professionalism 1.6, and an answer to the underlying question – has George Orwell’s dystopia, 1984, arrived a few decades late?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Nuclear Power 33 mins – “Some say we are on the verge of a bright future in which nuclear power will play a major role in responding to climate change. Others say that we should expect more Fukushimas. Whichever way our nuclear future goes, there will be tradeoffs between energy and the environment. Hosts Michal Meyer and Robert Kenworthy speak with nuclear historians Alex Wellerstein and Linda Richards. They discuss how our turbulent nuclear past has shaped, for better and for worse, our current attitudes.”At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select OK” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Treatment 55 mins – “”We should never, ever forget that addiction treatment is a search for meaning in a place other than using drugs.” -Nancy Campbell, historian of drug addiction. In the final chapter of this series we travel to the heart of our modern opioid crisis. In what is now a notorious Philadelphia neighborhood called Kensington, we meet two victims of the epidemic and follow them on two distinct paths toward recovery. Our current devastating opioid crisis is unprecedented in its reach and deadliness, but it’s not the first such epidemic the United States has experienced or tried to treat. In fact, it’s the third. Treating America’s Opioid Addiction is a three-part series that investigates how we’ve understood and treated opioid addiction over more than a century. Through the years we’ve categorized opioid addiction as some combination of a moral failure, a mental illness, a biological disease, or a crime. And though we’ve desperately wanted the problem to be something science alone can solve, the more we look, the more complicated we learn it is.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Parenting 65 mins – “Economist and author Emily Oster of Brown University talks about her book Cribsheet with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Oster explores what the data and evidence can tell us about parenting in areas such as breastfeeding, sleep habits, discipline, vaccination, and food allergies. Oster often finds that commonly held views on some of these topics are not well supported by the evidence while on others, the evidence appears decisive. Oster thoughtfully explores the challenges of using empirical work and balances our sometimes ignorance with common sense.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Debate 27 mins – “Former Virginia Governor Doug Wilder (D) explains to Chuck Todd why he is withholding his endorsement in the tightening race for governor.” At the link let-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast. 

Republican Attitudes 28 mins – “Some frustrated Republicans are walking out instead of speaking up – With more than 450 days to go until Election Day 2020, many elected Republicans are already eyeing the exits. So far, we’ve seen 11 House Republicans say they’ll retire or seek another office in 2020. And don’t forget that GOP Sens. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, Pat Roberts of Kansas and Mike Enzi of Wyoming have already announced that they aren’t running again. The House exodus includes four GOP members from Texas alone, three of whom won re-election in 2018 by less than a 5-point margin. The story of these retirements isn’t just that some of them open up pickup opportunities for Democrats, though. It’s that they show just how uncomfortable many rank-and-file Republicans have been in the Trump era. Retirements are typically a tell about how members view their party’s chances in the next election. And yes, some of these folks are in their late 70s or older. And of course, the no-fun realities of being in the minority have a way of pushing burnt-out members towards the door. But these retirements also reflect an environment so toxic that even members with safe seats (and potentially promising futures on the Hill) are throwing in the towel. The buzziest recent retirement was Will Hurd — a Trump critic who was vocally upset about the direction of the party and faced a dicey reelection race.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Rudolf Nureyev 28 mins – “Rudolf Nureyev was one of the most dynamic performers of the twentieth century. “He was Mick Jagger before Mick Jagger,” remembers Elizabeth Kaye, who specialized in writing in-depth profiles of men in power for Esquire in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s. Kaye spent a full year with the famously volatile dancer, who unbeknownst to the public was dying of AIDS. She joins host David Brancacchio to discuss the defiance he still showed, even at the end of a glorious career, and the sadness she found behind unceasing charm and bravado.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Russian Investigation 24 mins – “Russian-American Journalist and winner of the National Book Award, Masha Gessen shares her perspective on Presidents Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump and the societies they lead, including the sexual harassment moment in the United States. She discusses her new book, The Future is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia, now a National Book Award Winner.At the link click “Reproducir” to hear the podcast. You can’t download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Science Communication 24 mins – “The Emmy Award winner has built a second career for himself as a communications expert: He participated in the creation of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University, and he’s now out with a new book, “If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?” The book is geared toward bridging gaps in communication between professionals, often in the world of medicine. “They need the training exactly as much – no more and no less – than the rest of us,” Alda said, noting that his Center for Communicating Science has trained over 8,000 scientists and medical professionals across the world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Troublemakers 87 mins – “Psychologist Charlan Nemeth of the University of California, Berkeley and author of In Defense of Troublemakers talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in the book–the power of groupthink, the power of conviction, and the opportunity for an authentic, persistent dissenter to have an impact on a group’s decision. The conversation concludes with a discussion of the challenges of doing careful research in modern times.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

University Buys Online System – “When leaders of Purdue University wanted to move into online education, they took the unusual step of buying an existing online university, a big one with 30,000 students. And here’s the most surprising part: that online school it bought, Kaplan University, was a for-profit business—part of a sector that’s been criticized for high costs and poor outcomes for students. It’s hard to think of another example of two more different higher education cultures placed under the same name.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the playback bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

University Buys Online System – “When leaders of Purdue University wanted to move into online education, they took the unusual step of buying an existing online university, a big one with 30,000 students. And here’s the most surprising part: that online school it bought, Kaplan University, was a for-profit business—part of a sector that’s been criticized for high costs and poor outcomes for students. It’s hard to think of another example of two more different higher education cultures placed under the same name. The deal sparked vocal protests from Purdue professors, and hundreds of them signed petitions opposing the arrangement, calling it an unprecedented privatization of public education. Purdue leaders, meanwhile, say that Kaplan has better outcomes than other for-profits and that it serves an important audience of adult students who aren’t able to go to a traditional campus.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the playback bar and select “OK” on the pop-up menu

Us Versus Them 24 mins – “Ian Bremmer, President and Founder of the Eurasia Group, talks about his new book “Us Vs. Them” and explains why populism is on the rise.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Viruses in Air 36 mins – “MTS62, JessicaGreen – The Living Air” At the link find the title, MTS62,” which can be heard, but not downloaded; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 437: American Comparison, Bacteria Control, Blockchain Discussion, Books Replacement, Brain Divided, Breast Cancer Story, Chinese Capitalism, Cloud Computing, Covid-19 in California, Covid-19 Lessons from China, Culture and Morality, Data Breeches in Law Firms, Disease Spillover Event, Economics in 21st Century, Economics Research Flawed, Electronic Discovery, FBI InfraGard, Genomics Sequencing, HIV Vaccine Research, Home Depot Founder, Hong Kong History, Improving the World, Malaria Discussion, Martin-Luther-King Jr, Native American Diet, Native Americans and Smallpox, Nuclear Bomb Security, Ocean Viruses, Pandemic Lessons, Pneumonia Discussion, Poverty Solution, Prison History in US, Puerto Rico Hurricane Recovery, Recommendation Engines, Robot Law, Sex Trafficker Investigator, Telemedicine Discussion, Tuberculosis Discussion

Exercise your ears: the 50 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 199 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 27,750 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Alan Lightman Interview 72 mins – “Author and Physicist Alan Lightman talks about his book Searching for Stars on an Island in Maine with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. This is a wide-ranging conversation on religion, science, transcendence, consciousness, impermanence, and whether matter is all that matters.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America Comparison 29 mins – “How Does America Compare to the Rest of the World? Last week we looked at how you might compare to the average American. This week we’re looking at how America compares to the rest of the world around issues of debt, college spending, retirement savings, and more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Bacteria Control 43 mins – “In this podcast I talk to Carl Bergstrom of the University of Washington about the mathematics of microbes. Bergstrom is a mathematical biologist who probes the abstract nature of life itself. We talk about how life uses information, and how information can evolve. But in Bergstrom’s hands, these abstractions shed light on very real concerns in medicine, from the way that viruses jam our immune system’s communication systems to to the best ways to fight antibiotic resistance.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Bioluminescence 42 mins – “In this podcast I talk to Bonnie Bassler, a professor at Princeton and the president-elect of the American Society for Microbiology. Bassler studies the conversations that bacteria have, using chemicals instead of words, Her research is not only helping to reveal how bacteria work together to make us sick, but also how we might interrupt their dialogue in order to cure infections.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Blockchain Discussion 41 mins – “What is the blockchain according to Bill Tai? The internet. The blockchain is the same thing but with assets. It can aggregate history into groups of information with communities of interests surrounding it. CEO of ABRA, Bill Barydt. ABRA has recently partnered with the extremely well known American Express. ABRA is a digital currency wallet for IOS and Android. It allows you to store digital dollars on your smartphone with no bank involved. It is the only application that interoperates between the traditional and the new worlds. The third guest was Toni Lane Casserly, founder of Vnation.io. The idea? To leverage core innovation made by Blockchain infrastructure so that people can design new systems of governance. Next was Kevin Shen from Averon with a goal to make sure people aren’t forgetting they are secure on that side. Lastly, on the legal end of the blockchain was Pawel Kuskowski from Coinfirm. Coinfirm serves as a foundation for the safe adoption and use of blockchain.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Books Replacement 66 mins – “Software Engineer Andy Matuschak talks about his essay “Why Books Don’t Work” with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Matuschak argues that most books rely on transmissionism, the idea that an author can share an idea in print and the reader will absorb it. And yet after reading a non-fiction book, most readers will struggle to remember any of the ideas in the book. Matuschak argues for a different approach to transmitting ideas via the web including different ways that authors or teachers can test for understanding that will increase the chances of retention and mastery of complex ideas.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Divided 84 mins – “Psychiatrist and author Iain McGilchrist talks about his book, The Master and His Emissary, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. McGilchrist argues we have misunderstand the purpose and effect of the divided brain. The left side is focused, concrete, and confident while the right side is about integration of ourselves with the complexity of the world around us. McGilchrist uses this distinction to analyze the history of western civilization. This is a wide-ranging conversation that includes discussions of poetry, philosophy, and economics.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Breast Cancer Story 23 mins – “A 39-year-old woman gets diagnosed with breast cancer, then makes a decision that not only helps her survive — it changes the lives of hundreds of other patients and their families.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Chinese Capitalism 35 mins – “A Westerner’s Guide to China – We’re joined by Motley Fool Analyst Ben Ra to discuss how China’s history influences its mindset on capitalism and business.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cloud Computing 32 mins – “The large volume of data that many law firms handle makes utilizing cloud computing services a very enticing prospect. What ethical standards should lawyers expect these companies to abide by? What should lawyers look for in a cloud computing provider? In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway speak with Clio founder and CEO Jack Newton and Rocket Matter founder and CEO Larry Port about cloud computing and the new cloud security standards for legal professionals released by the Legal Cloud Computing Association. Larry explains what the LCCA is and how it formed out of a need to educate lawyers about what is happening in the cloud. Jack provides some insight into the creation of the security standards, such as terms of service privacy policies and encryption, and states that with these standards as a baseline lawyers will be able to more easily assess if a cloud computing provider is adhering to certain ethical standards. Larry also lists a few factors lawyers should consider, like where the SaaS data center is located, and the four things (vulnerability scans, penetration testing, and aesthetic code and dynamic code reviews) that the standards require in security testing. They both end the interview with an analysis of in-transit and at rest encryption and the benefits and drawbacks of zero knowledge level security.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 in California 20 mins – “San Diego County has Dr. Kristi Koenig as medical director of its emergency medical services. That’s fortunate for the county, because she’s co-edited a definitive textbook, “Koenig and Schultz’s Disaster Medicine: Comprehensive principles and practices.” We’re fortunate to have her as our guest. She’s full of sound advice on organizing a community’s response (for example, setting up “incident command” structures) and evaluating patients as new threats emerge (the well-known “three-I’s” approach — Identify, Isolate, and Inform). With the number of COVID-19 cases rising quickly there in San Diego, she’s been busy (as have all of you).At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid-19 Lessons from China 57 mins – “China was the first country in the world to experience effects from COVID-19. Now the epidemic there is slowing. How did the country of more than 1 billion people make it through? Technology played a big role. In this episode, Lydia Lee, Gary Liu, and Andrew McLaughlin join Vivian Schiller, executive director of the Aspen Digital program at the Aspen Institute, to talk over the kinds of technology that were launched or re-purposed to address aspects of the crisis. How did technology help keep the virus from spreading? How was misinformation handled online? Are there lessons that the United States can draw from? The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link find the title, “China, Technology, …” and right-click the play button to hear the podcast. A copy is also included in this blog archive.

Culture and Morality 67 mins – “Economist and author Arnold Kling talks about the economic impact of culture and morality with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Drawing on a recent essay on the importance of social interactions, Kling explores the role of culture and norms and their broad impact on economic life. At the end of the conversation, Roberts discusses the implications of human sociality for the way economics is taught and the way economists think about public policy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Breach Reports 24 mins – “In the aftermath of the Panama Papers data breach many law firms have become hyper aware of their digital security risks. With the number of breaches on the rise what can lawyers do to keep informed of the most pertinent risks facing legal practitioners? In this episode of the Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek speak with Clark Hill PLC Of Counsel David G. Ries about data security, Mandiant’s M-Trends, and Verizon’s Data Breach Investigation Reports. David opens the interview with an explanation of what these reports are (summaries developed by security service providers on data breach trends during the past year) and talks about how they help to organize collected information for ease of use. He then analyzes the subtle differences between the two reports, like the way they define terms like data breach and security incident, and gives some insight into the ways each company acquires their data. David also covers the top three key findings provided by each report and gives examples of how this information can be invaluable to law firms seeking to shore up their security shortcomings. He closes the interview with his major takeaways from this year’s’ reports and tips for law firms on how this research can aid in strengthening your comprehensive cybersecurity program.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Data Breeches in Law Firms 29 mins – “’33% of Fortune 100 Organizations will experience an information crisis by 2017.’ – Gartner, an information technology research and advisory firm Recently, data breaches have become one of the most serious threats to companies worldwide, and as more corporate infrastructure moves online, studies suggest that the rising number of data breaches will cost 2.1 trillion dollars globally by 2019. Because of this, a new market of data breach practice groups has emerged to assist with e-discovery, information governance, data security, and preparation for high-risk technological emergencies. In light of this, what should your law firm or company do to prepare for one of these potentially imminent situations?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Disease Spillover Event 46 mins – “A spillover event occurs when a human is infected from an animal reservoir. Most spillover events are dead ends for the microbe. Only in a few events does the infected person lead to a transmission chain, in which other people are infected. Convincing funding agencies to conduct surveillance when no outbreaks are occurring is like convincing a healthy adult to buy insurance: a tough sell. Investment in surveillance is the most critical thing, however, to successful outbreak prediction. There is no shortage in the number of scientists who will measure these important parameters, when given the funding and resources, and their basic science observations are critical to predicting what happens when an ecosystem becomes unbalanced. Learning the aspects that grant one vector or pathogen a potential for spreading human disease helps researchers and public health officials to determine other vectors or pathogens that might have similar characteristics. Mapping these geographically can inform surveillance efforts and make a case for increased basic research to define these characteristics.At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Economics in 21st Century 64 mins – “Economist, blogger, and author Arnold Kling talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the state of economics in the 21st century. Kling argues that economics would be more useful if it took account of intangibles like culture, incorporated the role of financial intermediation in the economy, and modeled some of the the subtleties of the labor market–how wages are set and the role of team production.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics Research Flawed 64 mins – “John Ioannidis of Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his research on the reliability of published research findings. They discuss Ioannidis’s recent study on bias in economics research, meta-analysis, the challenge of small sample analysis, and the reliability of statistical significance as a measure of success in empirical research.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronic Discovery 24 mins – “Many of our listeners will know the term Technology-Assisted Review (TAR) by it’s more common nickname, “predictive coding.” Lawyers and judges alike need to pay attention to TAR due to potential changes to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP) coming up in December 2015. And since almost all courts accept when lawyers utilize TAR for document review, it is important to keep up. In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Judge Andrew Peck, an expert in issues relating to electronic discovery. Together they discuss the current state of technology-assisted review, how FRCP amendments will affect the way lawyers do discovery, and best practices when using TAR. Judge Peck explains the origin of using “technology-assisted review” as terminology over “predictive coding” or “computer-assisted review.” He explains that training the TAR program effectively is important, but the technology has progressed to a point where TAR will be successful as long as the training is sufficient and the scope of the team is in line. Finally, since the predictive coding programs are very expensive he explains when a case is big enough to warrant its use. Stick around to the end for a tip on using Federal Rule of Evidence 502 in court.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

FBI InfraGard 24 mins – “InfraGard, one of the longest running outreach associations, represents a partnership between the FBI and the private sector. Members include businesses professionals (including many law firm employees), people from academic institutions, and local participants who share their experience and expertise with the FBI to assist in crime prevention. In the recent climate of rampant cyber security issues, many in the private sector are better equipped to fight these cyber threats. So why is it important for lawyers to know about and potentially join InfraGard? In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview FBI special agent and InfraGard coordinator Kara Sidener about the way InfraGard works and why lawyers and other law firm professionals should be interested in joining this two-way information sharing platform.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Genomic Sequencing 56 mins – “Jonathan Eisen is a professor at the University of California, Davis Genome Center. Over the course of his career, he has pioneered new ways of sequencing microbial genomes and analyzing them. I talked to Eisen about some of the weirdest creatures he’s studied, such as bacteria that only live on the bellies of worms at the bottom of the ocean, and how we may be able to exploit their genomes for our own benefit. We also discussed the new movement for open access to scientific literature, a subject that’s a particular passion of Eisen, who is academic editor in chief at the open-access journal PLOS Biology.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play,” but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Government Innovation 67 mins – “Economist and author Mariana Mazzucato talks about her book The Value of Everything with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mazzucato argues that economists have mismeasured value and have failed to appreciate the role of government as innovator. She argues for a more active role for government in the innovation process and for government to share in revenue proportional to its role in the creation of new technology.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV Vaccine Research 37 mins – “Why have scientists struggled to generate a protective HIV vaccine? Dan Barouch lays out the unique challenges and discusses the ongoing clinical trial with an adenovirus-based vaccine developed in his lab.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Home Depot Founder 14 mins – “Langone came from nothing to become a founder of The Home Depot, but never forgot his roots. He’s given staggering sums, but says his money isn’t truly charity. Discover a refreshing outlook that proves you don’t need riches in order to give richly.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Hong Kong History 74 mins – “Neil Monnery, author of Architect of Prosperity, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book–a biography of John Cowperthwaite, the man often credited with the economic success of Hong Kong. Monnery describes the policies that Cowperthwaite championed and the role they played in the evolution of Hong Kong’s economy. How much those policies mattered is the focus of the conversation. Other topics include the relationship between Hong Kong and China and the irony of the challenges Hong Kong faced from U.S. and British protectionism.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Improving the World 72 mins – “Bjorn Lomborg, President of the Copenhagen Consensus Center, talks about the costs and benefits of attacking climate change with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Lomborg argues that we should always be aware of tradeoffs and effectiveness when assessing policies to reduce global warming. He advocates for realistic solutions that consider the potential to improve human life in other ways. He is skeptical of the potential to move away from fossil fuels and argues that geo-engineering and adaptation may be the most effective ways to cope with climate change.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innate Immune System 16 mins – “Christine Biron is the chair of the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at Brown University in Providence, and she focuses her research program on the mechanisms of the innate immune system – the body’s system of non-specific munitions for fighting off pathogens.  Dr. Biron is also a newly elected fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology. When a pathogen gets on or in your body, your innate immune system is on the front lines, working against the pathogen is a non-specific manner.  In research, the innate immune system got short shrift for a long time, and only in the last 10 or 20 years has the field picked up momentum.  Dr. Biron says back when she was in graduate school “the innate immune system wasn’t thought to be very cool”, but she says the field is fast-moving today, in part because of some major discoveries involving Type-1 interferons, natural killer cells, and an increased appreciation of a wider range of antigen processing cells that link the innate and adaptive immune responses. In this interview, I talked with Dr. Biron about our increasing awareness of the innate immune system, why it’s important to bring microbiologists and immunologists together under one big tent, and why it’s best that a battle between a virus and a host ends not in victory for one and defeat for the other, but in détente.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Insect Microbes 54 mins – “How many genes can a species lose and still stay alive? It turns out, bacteria can lose just about all of them! In this podcast, I talk to Nancy Moran of Yale University about her fascinating work on the microbes that live inside insects such as aphids and cicadas. After millions of years, they have become stripped down creatures that are revealing some profound lessons about how superfluous most genes are–at least if you live inside a host.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Lincoln 55 mins – “Abraham Lincoln wasn’t the first lawyer to occupy the Oval Office (and he wouldn’t be the last). Lincoln came to national prominence after a long career settling disputes between farmers and representing litigious railway companies. So what did this enterprising lawyer pick up along the way and how did his legal career influence the President he became? Ed and guest host Lindsay Graham of the American History Tellers podcast explore the career of Lincoln the Lawyer.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malaria Discussion 55 mins – “In this podcast, I talk with Irwin Sherman, professor emeritus at the University of California at Riverside, about the century-long quest for a vaccine against malaria. Scientists have been trying to make a vaccine for the disease almost since the discovery of the parasite that causes malaria. Yet decade after decade, they’ve encountered setbacks and failures. We talked about why it’s so hard to make a malaria vaccine, and how likely it is that scientists will ever be able to do so in the future. If you want to find out more about this long-running saga, check out Sherman’s new book, The Elusive Malaria Vaccine: Miracle or Mirage. About the Book – Chronicling a 100-year quest, this book tells the fascinating story of the hunt for the still-elusive malaria vaccine. Its clear, engaging style makes the book accessible to a general audience and brings to life all the drama of the hunt, celebrating the triumphs and documenting the failures. The author captures the controversies, missteps, wars of words, stolen ideas, and clashes of ego as researchers around the world compete to develop the first successful malaria vaccine.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Martin Luther King Jr 30 mins – “In 1968, just hours after Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, the legendary historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills—then a young writer for Esquire—rushed to Memphis, Tennessee, where he watched as King’s body was embalmed at the mortuary, then later traveled twelve hours by bus with mourners to King’s funeral in Atlanta. Nearly fifty years later, Wills’s “Martin Luther King Jr Is Still on the Case!” remains one of the most revealing and lasting portraits of King and his turbulent era ever written. Writer and director John Ridley—who won an Oscar for his screenplay for 12 Years a Slave—joins host David Brancaccio to discuss why Wills’s wrenching portrait of King continues to resonate today, what has changed in America since it was written, and, most important, what still needs to change.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

More from Less 93 mins – “Andrew McAfee of MIT’s Sloan School of Management talks about his book, More from Less, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. McAfee argues that technology is helping developed nations use fewer resources in producing higher levels of economic output. The improvement is not just a reduction in energy per dollar of GDP but less energy in total as economic growth progresses. This “dematerialization” portends a future that was unimaginable to the economists and pundits of the past. McAfee discusses the potential for dealing with climate change in a dematerialized world, the non-material aspects of economic progress, and the political repercussions of the current distribution of economic progress.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Native American Diet 44 mins -”Lewis and Krithivasan Sankaranarayanan—“Krithi”– both from the University of Oklahoma in Norman talk with Jeff Fox about their analyses of the gut microbiomes of American Indians of Cheyenne and Arapaho ancestry. Lewis, Krithi, and their collaborators learned that the gut microbial taxonomic profiles of these Native Americans are characterized by a reduced abundance of anti-inflammatory bacteria and also that their fecal metabolite profiles are similar to those found in individuals with metabolic disorders. Although this was a random sampling from a generally healthy group of individuals, their gut microbiota suggests that some of them might have health problems brewing below the surface—not a surprise among a population prone to metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. “For three years, we collaborated with the Cheyenne and Arapaho to discuss these topics and identify common ground for the research process, including our microbiome data,” Lewis says. I don’t believe the microbiome pattern resulted from the genetics of the American Indian. It is likely related to the socioeconomic challenges and resource availability in rural areas of Oklahoma.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Native Americans and Smallpox 29 mins – “Paul Kelton of the University of Kansas, Lawrence, talks with Jeff Fox about the introduction of infectious diseases among Native American populations. Kelton’s book Cherokee Medicine, Colonial Germs: an Indigenous Nation’s Fight against Smallpox, 1518–1824, published in April 2015 by the University of Oklahoma Press, looks at how Native American communities responded to new diseases, including establishing quarantines, to protect themselves against smallpox and other diseases. He offers evidence that the high mortality rate ascribed to smallpox in native populations had as much to do with cultural factors and the ferment of trade and warfare during the colonial period, as to any lack of immunity to the new disease. Kelton also discusses the question of whether Europeans may have means to deliberately infect Native Americans.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Nuclear Bomb Security 56 mins – “In 1942, American scientists created the first sustained, controlled nuclear reaction, under the bleachers of a football field. Needless to say, it was the beginning of a new era. On this week’s show, Brian, Joanne and Ed talk atomic power, and the indelible mark it left on American culture. Correction: The Nuclear Test Ban treaty wasn’t signed in 1958. Instead, the U.S. & USSR reached an unofficial moratorium on above-ground weapons testing. Both countries resumed above-ground testing in 1961, but ended it permanently when The Nuclear Test Ban treaty was signed in 1963.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Viruses 27 mins – “In this podcast I talk to Curtis Suttle, a professor and associate dean at the University of British Columbia.Suttle studies the diversity and population of viruses across the entire planet. He has helped show that viruses are by far the most common life forms on the planet. They also contain most of the genetic diversity of life, and they even control how much oxygen we have to breathe. I talked to Suttle about coming to terms with the fact that we live on a virus planet, and how hard it is to find a place on Earth that’s virus-free–even two miles underground.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Pandemic Lessons 14 mins – “Perhaps the only good news from the tragic Ebola epidemic in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia is that it may serve as a wake-up call: we must prepare for future epidemics of diseases that may spread more effectively than Ebola. There is a significant chance that an epidemic of a substantially more infectious disease will occur sometime in the next 20 years; after all, we saw major epidemics during the 20th century, including the Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918–1919 and the ongoing pandemic of human immunodeficiency virus. In fact, of all the things that could kill more than 10 million people around the world, the most likely is an epidemic stemming from either natural causes or bioterrorism….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photosynthesis 21 mins – “In this episode I speak to Sallie “Penny” Chisholm, the Lee and Geraldine Martin Professor of Environmental Studies at MIT. Dr. Chisholm studies photosynthesis—the way life harnesses the energy of the sun. Plants carry out photosynthesis, but so do microbes in the ocean. Dr. Chisholm studies the most abundant of these photosynthetic microbes, a species of bacteria called Prochlorococcus.  There are a trillion trillion Prochlrococcus on Earth. Dr. Chisholm researches these microbial lungs of the biosphere, and how they produce oxygen on which we depend. Along with her scientific research, Dr. Chisholm is also the author of a new children’s book, Living Sunlight: How Plants Bring The Earth To Life.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Pneumonia Discussion 24 mins – “In this podcast I talk to Keith Klugman, William H. Foege Chair of Global Health at Emory University. Dr. Klugman studies the disease that is the number one killer of children worldwide. If you guessed malaria or AIDS, you’d be wrong. It’s pneumonia. Two million children under five die every year from it every year–one child every 15 seconds. Dr. Klugman and I spoke about his research on how pneumonia causes so much devastation, its hidden role in the 50 million deaths in the 1918 flu pandemic, and how a new pneumonia vaccine can stop the disease in its tracks. For more information on pneumonia and how we can all help fight it, visit the World Pneumonia Day web site.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Political Partisanship 68 mins – “Political scientist Lilliana Mason of the University Maryland and author of Uncivil Agreement talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mason argues that political partisanship has become stronger in America in recent years because it aligns with other forms of community and identity. People are associating primarily with people who share their political views in their other social activities outside of politics. As a result, they encounter fewer people from the other side. The intensity of partisanship can even overcome ideology as partisans change their policy positions in their eagerness to be on the winning side. The conversation closes with a discussion of what might be done to improve political discourse in America.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty Solution 76 minsPoverty activist, social entrepreneur and author, Mauricio Miller, talks about his book The Alternative with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Miller, a MacArthur genius grant recipient, argues that we have made poverty tolerable when we should be trying to make it more escapable. This is possible, he argues, if we invest in the poor and encourage them to leverage their skills and social networks. Miller emphasizes the importance of self-determination and self-respect as keys to helping the poor improve their own lives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison History in US 38 mins – “(Contains archival audio in segments 1 and 3.) The United States imprisons more of its citizens than any other nation in the world. This month prisoners across the U.S. took part in a National Prison strike protesting how they are used as cheap labor, and calling for an end to “prison slavery.” In this episode, Brian, Nathan and Joanne reflect on the history of prison labor, and learn more about the challenges facing those behind bars.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Puerto Rico Hurricane Recovery 54 mins – “In August of 2018, officials in Puerto Rico reported that over 3,000 people died in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. One year after the disaster, Brian, Ed and Nathan take a look at the historical relationship between Puerto Rico and the United States. Are Puerto Ricans really Americans in the eyes of the federal government?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recommendation Engines 16 mins – “Agents and publishers want to find authors. Authors want to find readers. And readers, they want to find books. Helping make these discoveries happen is a powerful digital tool that evaluates writing styles and matches a work with books just like it. Inkubate is a data analytics platform expressly designed for authors to reach audiences with pinpoint accurate marketing. Research has shown that readers respond more to writing style than either genre or subject matter. The digital service at Inkubate “reads” a manuscript to find writing characteristics it has in common with other works. On social media platforms, authors then match their books with readers already inclined to like them. “We use very powerful algorithms to look for patterns within a manuscript,” explains Inkubate cofounder Jay Gale. “This allows us to hone on how an individual author uses the underpinnings of the construction of language. We then compare this to the pre-computed ‘fingerprints’ of thousands of manuscripts previously published in the marketplace, and we are able to measure the similarities to find the closest matches.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Law 23 mins – “From self-driving cars and drones to robotic surgeons and soldiers, humans are delegating more tasks to machines and software. But who is responsible when then these new innovations cause damage, injury, or death? Can we trust machines to prioritize preserving human life when accidents inevitably occur? Should we be thinking about sweeping regulations? In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview The Law of Robots Professor Ed Walters. Together they discuss our robotic world and potential future risks. Can humans keep up, will our laws protect us, and how worried should we be? Tune in to hear insight on these questions plus many more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Sex Trafficker Investigator 24 mins – “In middle school, Emily Kennedy thought sex trafficking “was the worst fate I could think of.” Now she’s the CEO of Marinus Analytics, a tech company that’s helping cops send traffickers to jail.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Solzhenitsyn Discussion 60 mins – “Historian and author Stephen Kotkin of Princeton University and Stanford University’s Hoover Institution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the historical significance of the life and work of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of Solzhenitsyn’s birth.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Telemedicine 21 mins – “Has your clinical practice shifted to telemedicine yet? In the era of COVID-19, clinicians everywhere are being thrown into telemedicine, often without any experience or background knowledge. To help us all get up to speed with this patient care technology, Hippo Education’s Dr. Neda Frayha sits down with Dr. Edward Kaftarian, the Vice Chair of Mental Health at the American Telemedicine Association and CEO of Orbit Health Telepsychiatry. Together they explore the benefits and potential pitfalls of telemedicine, the equipment required, billing and coding considerations, appropriate etiquette, and much more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Trent Lott 25 mins – “Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott talked about how the Senate has changed since he left in 2007, what he thinks needs to be done to get both parties to work together, and lessons from Watergate, the Clinton impeachment trial, and some of the grand political bargains of the 1980’s and 1990’s.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Tuberculosis Discussion 24 mins – “Ian Orme is a professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology at Colorado State University, and his research focuses on the immune response to tuberculosis (TB) – a bacterial disease that most often infects the lungs. He’s speaking at the American Society for Microbiology’s Conference for Undergraduate Educators (ASMCUE). In the U.S., TB seems like a thing of the past. Here, public health measures and medical care have all but wiped out the threat from this infection. But worldwide, the WHO says there were 9.2 million new TB cases in 2006 alone, and each person with TB infects an average of 10 to 15 people with the TB bacterium every year. These are just some of the reasons Dr. Orme is delivering a talked titled “Tuberculosis: Why Now Is a Good Time to Leave the Planet” at ASMCUE. He admits leaving the planet isn’t a practical suggestion, but he wants to raise awareness of the disease and he’s not afraid to stir the pot a little. Orme and his group not only study the immune responses to TB bacteria, they’re also following a number of different avenues for developing new vaccines and improving the existing vaccine, BCG (bacille Calmette-Guérin). In this interview, I talked with Dr. Orme about his vaccine work, why he thinks latent TB bacteria aren’t really latent, and how he sometimes feels like the wild-haired radical, cat-calling from the corner of the lecture hall.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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