Media Mining Digest 482: Beekeeping, Bitcoin, Constitution Interpretation, Cuban Life, Electric Car Impact, EV Vehicle Discussion, Evidence Based Medicine, Food Production, Free Market Economics, Government Surveillance, Hatch-Waxman Act, Indian Economy, Innovation and Invention, Monetary Policy, Narconomics, Organ Donations, Pandemic Control, Police Killings, Schools and the Pandemic, Second Machine Age, Sweatshops, Urban Growth, US Transportation System, Vaccine Success and Failures, Water Management

Exercise your ears: the 25 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 147 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Beekeeping 42 mins – “Wally Thurman of North Carolina State University and PERC talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the world of bees, beekeepers, and the market for pollination. Thurman describes how farmers hire beekeepers to pollinate their crops and how that market keeps improving crop yields and producing honey. Thurman then discusses how beekeepers have responded to Colony Collapse Disorder–a not fully understood phenomenon where colonies disband, dramatically reducing the number of bees. The discussion closes with the history of bee pollination as an example of a reciprocal externality and how Coase’s insight helps understand how the pollination market works.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin 45 mins – “Nathaniel Popper of the New York Times and the author of Digital Gold talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Bitcoin. Can Bitcoin make it? What went wrong with Mt. Gox? Why did Ross Ulbricht, the creator of Silk Road, just get sentenced to life in prison? Why are venture capital firms pouring millions of dollars into companies promising easier ways to use Bitcoin? Popper discusses these questions along with the technical side of Bitcoin to help listeners understand why so many investors are excited about the potential of Bitcoin.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constitution Interpretation 42 mins – “Richard Epstein of New York University and Stanford University’s Hoover Institution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the U.S. Constitution. Topics covered in this wide-ranging conversation include how the interpretation of the Constitution has changed over time, the relationship between state and federal power, judicial activism, the increasing importance of administrative agencies’ regulatory power, and political influences on the Supreme Court.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Life 41 mins – “Casey Mulligan of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about life in Cuba. Mulligan, who recently returned from a trip to Cuba, discusses the economy, the standard of living and some of the peculiarities of communist control.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Car Impact 45 mins – “Benedict Evans of Andreessen Horowitz talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about two important trends for the future of personal travel–the increasing number of electric cars and a world of autonomous vehicles. Evans talks about how these two trends are likely to continue and the implications for the economy, urban design, and how we live.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Vehicle Discussion 58 mins – “We get so many questions about electric vehicles or EVs, that we decided to gather some EV experts and enthusiasts to tell us what their experiences are and what those of you curious about Evs should know before getting behind the wheel. Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Allison Sheridan, Rod Simmons, Bodi Grimm, Howard Yermish. Link to show notes.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evidence-Based Medicine 42 mins – “Eric Topol of the Scripps Research Institute and the author of The Creative Destruction of Medicine talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in his book. Topics discussed include “evidence-based” medicine, the influence of the pharmaceutical industry, how medicine is currently conducted for the “average” patient, the potential of genomics to improve health care and the power of technology, generally, to transform medicine.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Production 42 mins – “Thousands of bears in New Jersey. Humpback whales near New York City. Acres devoted to farming stable or declining even as food production soars. Jesse Ausubel of the Rockefeller University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the return of nature. Ausubel shows how technology has reduced many of the dimensions of the human footprint even as population rises and why this trend is likely to continue into the future. The conversation concludes with Ausubel’s cautious optimism about the impact of climate change.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Market Economics 46 mins – “Angus Burgin of Johns Hopkins University and the author of The Great Persuasion talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the idea in his book–the return of free market economics in the aftermath of the Great Depression. Burgin describes the reaction to Hayek’s Road to Serfdom, the creation of the Mont Pelerin Society, and the increasing influence of Milton Friedman on public policy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Surveillance 42 mins – “Bruce Schneier, author and security guru, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about power and the internet. Schneier argues that the internet enhances the power of the powerless but it also enhances the power of the powerful. He argues that we should be worried about both corporate and government uses of the internet to enhance their power. Recorded before news of the PRISM system and the use of Verizon’s customer information by the NSA (National Security Agency), Schneier presciently worries about government surveillance that we are not aware of and explains how governments–democratic and totalitarian–can use the internet to oppress their citizens. The conversation closes with a discussion of terrorism and the costs of the current system for reducing the probability of a terrorist attack.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hatch-Waxman Act 44 mins – “Robin Feldman of the University of California Hastings College of Law and author of Drug Wars talks about her book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Feldman explores the various ways that pharmaceutical companies try to reduce competition from generic drugs. The conversation includes a discussion of the Hatch-Waxman Act and the sometimes crazy world of patent protection.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Economy 44 mins – “Jagdish Bhagwati of Columbia University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the economy of India based on his book with Arvind Panagariya, Why Growth Matters. Bhagwati argues that the economic reforms of 1991 ushered in a new era of growth for India that has reduced poverty and improved the overall standard of living in India. While supportive of social spending on the poor, Bhagwati argues that growth should precede higher levels of spending, providing the tax revenue for expanded spending.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation and Invention 47 mins – “What’s the difference between invention and innovation? Could it be that innovation–the process of making a breakthrough invention available, affordable, and reliable–is actually the hard part? In this week’s EconTalk episode, author Matt Ridley talks about his book How Innovation Works with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Ridley argues that we give too much credit to inventors and not enough to innovators–those who refine and improve an invention to make it valuable to users. Along the way, he emphasizes the power of trial and error and the importance of permissionless innovation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monetary Policy 43 mins – “David Laidler of the University of Western Ontario talks about money and monetary policy with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Laidler sketches the monetarist approach to the Great Depression and the Great Recession. He defends the Federal Reserve’s performance in the recent crisis against the critics. He argues that the Fed’s monetary policies have not been unconventional nor impotent as some critics have suggested. The conversation closes with a discussion of the state of macroeconomics and monetary economics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Narconomics 48 mins – “When fighting the war on drugs, governments typically devote enormous resources trying to reduce the supply. But is this effective? Journalist and author Tom Wainwright of the Economist and author of Narconomics talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ways that the drug cartels respond to government attempts to reduce the availability of drugs. Like any business trying to maintain profitability, cartels look for ways to cut costs and maintain or grow revenue. Wainwright uses extensive on-the-ground interviews and reporting to understand the behavior of the cartels and argues that reducing demand would be a much more effective strategy for reducing drug use.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Organ Donations 40 mins – “Sally Satel, psychiatrist and resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the challenges of increasing the supply of donated organs for transplantation and ways that public policy might increase the supply. Satel, who has received two kidney donations, suggests a federal tax credit as a way to increase the supply of organs while saving the federal government money. She also discusses the ethical issues surrounding various forms of compensation for organ donors.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pandemic Control 54 mins – “Economist and physician Jay Bhattacharya of Stanford University talks about the pandemic with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Bhattacharya, along with Sunetra Gupta of the University of Oxford and Martin Kulldorff of Harvard University, authored The Great Barrington Declaration, which advocates a very different approach to fighting the pandemic than current policy and practice. Bhattacharya and his colleagues argue the best way to reduce overall harm is to focus protection efforts on those most at risk, while allowing low-risk populations to return to a more normal way of life. Bhattacharya argues that we have greatly neglected the costs of lockdown and self-quarantine.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Killings 42 mins – “Franklin Zimring’s 2017 book, When Police Kill, starts with an alarming statistic: Roughly 1,000 Americans die each year at the hands of police. Zimring, criminologist and law professor at the University of California at Berkeley, talks about his book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Zimring argues that better policing practices can reduce the number of citizens killed by the police. He also discusses the barriers that stand in the way of more effective and safer policing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Schools and the Pandemic 43 mins – “Economist and author Emily Oster of Brown University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the challenge of reopening schools in a pandemic. Oster has been collecting data from K-12 schools around the country. Her preliminary analysis finds little evidence that schools are super-spreaders of COVID. She argues that closing schools comes at a high cost for the students with little benefit in reducing the spread of the disease. The conversation ends with a discussion of parenting.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Second Machine Age 40 mins – “Erik Brynjolfsson of MIT and co-author of The Second Machine Age talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in the book, co-authored with Andrew McAfee. He argues we are entering a new age of economic activity dominated by smart machines and computers. Neither dystopian or utopian, Brynjolfsson sees this new age as one of possibility and challenge. He is optimistic that with the right choices and policy responses, the future will have much to celebrate.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sweatshops 52 mins – “If you were a poor person in a poor country, would you prefer steady work in a factory or to be your own boss, buying and selling in the local market? Economist Chris Blattman of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about experimental evidence on how poor people choose in the labor market and the consequences for their income, health, and satisfaction.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban Growth 42 mins – “Paul Romer of New York University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about reforming cities to allow growth and human flourishing. Topics discussed include charter cities, the role of population density in city life, driverless cars, and various ways to help the poorest people in the world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Transportation System 41 mins – “Cliff Winston of the Brookings Institution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his recent article in the Journal of Economic Literature on the U.S. transportation system. Winston argues that the while the United States has a very good transportation system overall, it is extremely expensive and poorly organized. What is needed, Winston argues, is not more money, but to spend the money already allocated more wisely. He discusses the evolution of the U.S. transportation system, government’s role in transportation, dramatic innovations that might transform aviation and driving, and the potential for privatizing airports and roads.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccine Success and Failures 16 mins – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on April 14, 2021, the editors discuss the current state of Covid-19 vaccination, including the rare occurrence of thrombotic thrombocytopenia in recipients of the ChadOx1 nCoV-19 and Ad26.COV2.S vaccines.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Management 40 mins – “David Zetland of Leiden University College in the Netherlands and author of Living with Water Scarcity talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the challenges of water management. Issues covered include the sustainability of water supplies, the affordability of water for the poor, the incentives water companies face, and the management of water systems in the poorest countries. Also discussed are the diamond and water paradox, campaigns to reduce water usage, and the role of prices in managing a water system.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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Media Mining Digest 113 – 10 Jan 2014: 3D Printing, Affordable Care Act Discussion, Age Wave and Women, Alcohol in America, Bank Control in the U.S., Brain Scans, Broadbrand in Libraries, Constitution vs Treaties, Coral Reef Decline, Danish Jews in WWII, Federal Reserve System, First Lady Rosalynn Carter Interview, Greenland Mining, Graphene, India’s Challenges, Innovations in 2013, John Grisham Interview, Knocking On Heaven’s Door, Malcolm Gladwell, Podcasting Basics, Snow Leopards, Social Media Uses, Transportation Trends

The following audio files come from a larger group of 118 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 23 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months.  Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

3D Printing 24 mins – “3D printing looks set to revolutionise manufacturing. But is this democratisation at the expense of expertise? Does 3D printing really facilitate high quality bespoke productions?” At the link find the title, “DigitalP: 31 Dec 13: 3D Printing,” right-click “Media files digitalp_20131231-2050a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Affordable Care Act Discussion 51 mins – “Health insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act is slated to begin Jan. 1, 2014. Diane and her [2] guests discuss the status of the program rollout and how sign-up deadline extensions and exemptions have affected insurers and consumers.” (Over 160 comments!)  You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Age Wave and Women 36 mins – “Maddy Dychtwald – Author of Influence: How Women’s Soaring Economic Power Will Transform Our World for the Better, co-founder of Age Wave, world renowned speaker, leading expert on the changing demographic trends—both generation- and gender-related—shaping the marketplace, the workplace and our lives. The aging of the workforce has been well publicized.  The baby-boom generation is reaching retirement and there is a supposed “talent gap” that is going to be problematic to our economy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link/Target As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcohol in America 52 mins – “…Alcohol has been part of American celebrations – and the American experience – since the country’s inception. Founding father Benjamin Franklin loved the hard stuff so much he compiled “The Drinker’s Dictionary,” featuring 228 synonyms for the word “drunk”! So in this episode, we dive into alcohol in the American past, and emerge without a hangover. We’ll explore how the consumption and production of alcohol has ebbed and flowed over American history, consider why rum became the drink of choice among revolutionary troops, ask why American Indians were rejecting alcohol two centuries before the rest of the country, and follow the long march toward Prohibition.” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link/Target As” from the pop-up menu.

Bank Control in the U.S. 60 mins – “Richard Fisher, President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the problems with “too big to fail”–the policy idea that certain financial institutions are too large to face the bankruptcy or failure and need to be rescued or bailed-out. Fisher argues that “too big to fail” remains a serious problem despite claims that recent financial regulation has eliminated it. Fisher discusses various ways to deal with too-big-to-fail, including his own preferred policy. The last part of the conversation deals with quantitative easing and monetary policy during the crisis.

Brain Scans 27 mins – “Claudia Hammond looks at developments in neuroscience and how our understanding of the brain has changed,” At the link find the title, “HealthC: 25 years of neuroscience,” right-click “Media files healthc 20140101-2000a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Libraries 23 mins – “This week, Don Means joins us to talk about public libraries, their role in the modern era, and an interesting pilot project involving several libraries and white spaces wireless technology. Don is the coordinator of the Gigabit Libraries Network and has a passion for both libraries and expanding Internet access to all. We offer some basic background on “TV white spaces” wireless technology (see our other coverage of that technology here). The pilot libraries in this project are using white spaces as backhaul from a library branch location to nearby areas where they have created Wi-Fi hot spots. Libraries involved with the project are located in Kansas, New Hampshire, Colorado, Illinois, Mississippi, and California.” At the link right-click “…download this MP3 file…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constitution vs Treaties 22 mins – “What does a jilted lover’s revenge have to do with an international chemical weapons treaty? More than you’d think. From poison and duck hunts to our feuding fathers, we step into a very odd tug of war between local and federal law.” At the link right-click “stream” at the left below the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. This will download a (m3u) link that will download and play the podcast, when clicked.

Coral Reef Decline 6 mins – “There’s no shortage of lovely places in Palau, but perhaps none as remarkable as Nikko Bay….  There’s coral everywhere. The bottom is carpeted with fan corals, big boulder-shaped corals, long green tendril-y corals, even squishy corals, all jockeying for position….But here’s the thing — Cohen says this raucous coral ecosystem shouldn’t even exist. The water is way too acidic…. The higher acidity of the water here is natural, but it defies all expectations. Conventional wisdom is that corals don’t like acidic water, and the water in Nikko Bay is acidic enough that it should dissolve the animals’ calcium carbonate skeletons…. That’s what Cohen’s team is trying to figure out — what is it that allows these corals to thrive in such acidic waters?” At the link find the title, “In Palau, scientists hope they’ve found a coral reef to save all coral reefs,” right-click “Media files 010220144.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Danish Jews in WWII 54 mins – “Millions of Jews died in the Holocaust, but very few from Denmark. Why? Historian and journalist Bo Lidegaard investigates how Danish people – and certain Nazis – helped Denmark’s Jews flee to safety.” At the link find the title, “Escaping the Holocaust,” right-click (there or here) “Download Escaping the Holocaust” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Reserve System 22 mins – “The US Federal Reserve, America’s central bank, is one hundred years old. Simon Jack tells its surprising story.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Inside the Fed 31 Dec 2013,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20131231-0032a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Lady Rosalynn Carter Interview 54 mins – “Former first lady Rosalynn Carter talked about her political partnership with Jimmy Carter, the 1976 campaign, and what she learned as first lady of Georgia, as well as her time in the White House: attending cabinet meetings, working on mental health issues, and the Iranian hostage crisis. Topics included negative press coverage of her as first lady and what she hoped her legacy would be. She also talked about her work with the Carter Center after leaving the White House and her continuing work with former President Jimmy Carter on election monitoring, affordable housing, and fighting disease in Africa.” At the link you can hear/watch, but not download (!); however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Greenland Mining 27 mins – “James Fletcher asks if mining for rare earths and uranium will destroy Greenland’s environment – or lead the country to independence?” At the link find the title, “Docs: Greenland: To dig or not to dig? ,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140102-0030a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graphene 24 mins – “Graphene is a super-strong and super-conductive material. Gerry Northam looks at its move from the laboratory to the commercial world.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Riding the Graphene Wave 31 Dec 2013,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20131231-0906a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India’s Challenges 41 mins – “As India gets ready for its national elections – the biggest in the history of the world – Fareed Zakaria looks at the country’s prospects.” At the link find the title, “GPS December 29th,” right-click “Media files GPS 1229_audio.mp3” and select “Save Link/Target As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovations in 2013 8 mins -“Kara Miller reviews her top innovations of 2013 with WGBH Morning Edition host Bob Seay.” Three areas are emphasized: education, gut bacteria and sensors. At the link find the title, “Kara Miller’s Innovation Year in Review 2013,” right-click “Media files Innovation year in review.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

John Grisham Interview 52 mins –  “John Grisham’s first novel was “A Time to Kill,” a thriller about a young, Mississippi lawyer who successfully defends a black client charged with murder. Grisham wrote that book in his laundry room while practicing law in Mississippi. It remains one of the best-selling novels of all time. Now, 25 years later, Grisham returns to the same rural Mississippi town with a sequel: the story features many of the same characters and another controversial trial tinged with race. Attorney Jake Brigance is back and his client is a dead man who left behind a controversial will and a big family secret. Diane talks with best-selling author John Grisham.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Knocking On Heaven’s Door 51 mins – “Nearly a quarter of Medicare’s $550 billion annual budget pays for medical treatment in the last year of life. And almost a third of Medicare patients have surgery in their last month of life. But when people are fully informed about the risks of many life-prolonging procedures, they often decide against them. That’s what happened to a woman in Connecticut. After the devastating experiences her husband went through following a stroke, she refused major heart surgery for herself. In a new book, the couple’s daughter — a journalist — tells their story and offers advice for us all.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Malcolm Gladwell 15 mins – “John Crace digests Malcolm Gladwell’s David and Goliath down to just 600 words, and Oliver Burkeman joins him to discuss whether popular science books have reached a tipping point.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasting Basics 45 mins – “One of the cool things about podcasting is it’s not perfect and when you make a mistake or figure out how to do something better, you can fix it or update in your next episode. Podcasts are, by definition, episodic in nature meaning they follow a common theme and often tell a story over time. Your podcast is that story and it will never be complete. The journey is the fun part. Do your best to produce a great sounding podcasting with fantastic content and your audience will enjoy what you’re doing. I tell people all the time to “grow as you go.” Put in your best effort and your show will improve with every episode but you can’t get any better until you actually publish.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Snow Leopards 5 mins –  The Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia are little more than a month away. The mascot for the games is the snow leopard, a symbol selected by the Russian people….Wildlife biologists estimate that perhaps 40 snow leopards remain in Russia, in the Altai Republic, and 2,000 to 4,000 live in nearby Mongolia, China and Nepal. …In recent years, the big cats have been pushed higher and higher up to the tops of treeless, rocky, barren mountaintops. They’re fleeing poachers who covet their skins, which can sell for $20,000 to $30,000 in Beijing or Moscow…. The prey of the snow leopard — ibex and mountain sheep — have also been over-hunted, forcing snow leopards to look for other animals to eat, often herded animals, which creates further conflicts between snow leopards and people. Despite the bleak situation, Gibbs is optimistic for the future….In recent years, a handful of snow leopards have begun re-populating Russia — from Kazakhstan, most likely. Gibbs credits his colleagues for the recent success: Sergei Spitsyn with Altaisky Zapovednik, Mikhail Paltsyn of WWF-Russia and Jen Castner of The Altai Project…..” At the link find the title, “The snow leopard, a Sochi Olympics symbol, is near extinction,” right-click “Media files 010220147.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Uses 4 mins – “…Iranian officials — including the President Hassan Rouhani and foreign minister Javad Zarif — are frequent users of social media. Yet Iranian citizens are officially banned from signing up….Meanwhile, there has been a push in Iran to lift the ban on social media. In one program aired on state TV, an expert argued that social media platforms are great ways to access information and by banning them, Iranians are missing out. There’s also been pressure from outside. ASL 19, a Toronto-based research lab, helps Iranians get around Internet filtering. …Even though Iranians can’t access these sites directly, there are ways to get around the ban. They can use proxies or Virtual Private Networks, VPNs….” At the link find the title, “Iranian officials are active on social media yet Iranians are banned from using them,” right-click “Media files 010120147.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transportation Trends 56 mins – “Transportation is trending from the “me”-mentality of single occupancy vehicles to the “we”-mentality of the sharing economy. Is collaborative consumption the future of transportation? Innovations in peer-sharing transit systems such as bike sharing and car sharing are gaining momentum in cities across the world. Gabe Klein’s work in both the public and private sector, and his unique experience launching Divvy Bike Share in Chicago, Capital Bike Share in DC, as well as with Zipcar, make him an authority on the subject. How are these systems providing equitable access to public transit in new ways? What new opportunities does the sharing economy provide? Is this cultural shift presenting a unique opportunity to reconsider the ways that organizations can induce mainstream transportation alternatives, moving toward the new collaborative frontier?” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

===============================================================                                                                 ARCHIVE

Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) hereand a pdf list here; Jul-Jul Dec 2013 files in 13 zip segments (720 podcasts) here, and a list here;  Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (360 podcasts) and a pdf list are here, and 593 in 13 parts for Jul-Dec here.  For 2011 a list and 5 segments 184 podcasts. For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed  in this PDF and are zipped here as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 180 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader can import. A PDF list of feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads to remove  duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used to boost playback speed to 1.5x. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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Media Mining Digest 138 – 4 July 2014: Al Jazeera Journalists, Asteroid Hazard, Bank Regulation, Blue Collar Conservatives, Brain Stimulation, Brazil Issues, Central Park Five, Colorado River Delta, Corporation History, Dark Matter Explained, Dark Pools of Wall St, Deportee Protection, End of Life, First World War Impact and Origin, Folklore Online, Foreign Policy, Fracking History, Futurist Daniel Burrus, Gay Marriage, Glacier Riverbeds, Heart Valves, Hospice Issues, Journalist Career, Koch Dynasty, Lifestyles, Medical Apps, Migrant Children, Paperboys, Political Reform, Power Plant Emissions, Propaganda, Publishing R and D, Skyjacking, Software Maintenance, Solar Panel Improvement, South Sudan, Space Dust, Tastemakers, Teen Drivers

The following audio files come from a larger group of 208 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 41 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Al Jazeera Journalists 11 mins – “A judge sentenced three Al Jazeera journalists to prison on charges of reporting false news. Two Egyptian journalists explain the challenges of reporting in a tense political environment.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asteroid Hazard 27 mins – ” With the power of nuclear weapons and the potential to wipe out life on Earth, asteroids hit Earth more frequently than you’d think. Meet the volunteers monitoring the skies.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Great Space Hunt 25 Jun 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140625-1100a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bank Regulation 23 mins – “…Wall Street banks are lobbying to defang sections of the law related to derivatives — the complex financial contracts at the core of the meltdown. One deregulation bill, the “London Whale Loophole Act,” would allow American banks to skip Dodd-Frank’s trading rules on derivatives if they are traded in countries that have similar regulatory structures. “It keeps being weakened and weakened,” economist Anat Admati, co-author of the book, The Bankers’ New Clothes, says of the Dodd-Frank legislation. “We have some tweaks. We have messy, unfocused efforts. But we haven’t really gotten to the heart of the matter and really managed to control this system effectively,” she tells Bill….” At the link find the title, “Full Show: Too Big to Fail and Getting Bigger,” right-click “Media files Moyers_and_Company_323_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blue Collar Conservatives  58 mins – “Former Senator Rick Santorum (R-PA) talked about his book, Blue Collar Conservatives: Recommitting to an America That Works, in which he argues that the working class in the U.S. has been abandoned by both parties and that solutions to its problems are largely conservative in nature. He spoke with the Daily Caller’s Tucker Carlson.” At the link you can watch a video, but downloads cost $.99; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Brain Stimulation 26 mins – “Learn a new language faster than ever! Leave doubt in the dust! Be a better sniper! Could you do all that and more with just a zap to the noggin? Maybe…  with something called trans-cranial direct current stimulation (tDCS).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazil Issues 23 mins – “…When it comes to income inequality, Brazil is in the bottom ten percent, ranking 121st out of 133 countries, and the South American nation holds a similar low standing when it comes to corruption, wealth distribution and quality of infrastructure. So as the World Cup has begun, demonstrations and strikes have continued. Eyewitness to the events occurring right now is past Moyers & Company guest Dave Zirin, sports editor of The Nation magazine, commentator and author whose latest book is Brazil’s Dance with the Devil: The World Cup, the Olympics, and the Fight for Democracy. He spoke with us from Rio.” At the link find the title, “A World Cup for the Wealthy, Not the People
Wednesday, June 18, 2014,” right-click  “Media files zirin_full-MP3-for-Audio-Podcasting.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Central Park Five 10 mins – “New York City reached a $40 million settlement with the “Central Park Five,” men who were wrongfully convicted of a brutal rape in 1990. Sarah Burns, who wrote a book about the case, offers an update.” At the link right-click Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Colorado River Delta 6 mins – “About 150 miles east of San Diego, Morelos Dam stops the Colorado River in its tracks right at the US-Mexico border. Here, the last stretch of the once-mighty river is diverted from its natural path into an irrigation canal, bound for Mexican farms.  It’s been this way for most of the last half century. But then, for a few weeks this spring, it suddenly wasn’t. What happened this spring was a “magical experience,” said river activist Yamilett Carrillo, “because we got to see a river coming back to life.'” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right-end of the sound bar.

Corporation History 53 mins – “The Supreme Court will soon rule on whether Hobby Lobby, a chain of craft stores, can be exempted from parts of the Affordable Care Act on account of the corporation’s religious beliefs. Raising questions about “corporate personhood,” and coming just a few years after the Court’s still-controversial Citizens United ruling, the case has further fueled the debate over corporate power today. But how did corporations become such powerful institutions in American life? And how did Americans in the past view their role and influence?…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right-end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dark Matter Explained 37 mins – “Hundreds of years ago, Galileo told us that the earth is not the center of the universe. Now, physicists are telling us that the normal matter you and I are made of isn’t even the majority of the matter that exists. On this episode, Dr. Katherine Freese, a theoretical astrophysicist at the University of Michigan and author of the Cosmic Cocktail, joins us to talk about the composition of the cosmos and the mysterious nature of dark matter and dark energy.” At the link right-click “Listen to episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dark Pools on Wall St 46 mins – “Dark pools – private stock trading platforms not available to the public – are under investigation by the SEC. We look at inequities in the stock market and what they mean for public investors.

Deportee Protection 57 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute (MPI) panel discussion, in partnership with the Women’s Refugee Commission, focuses on a new toolkit by the Women’s Refugee Commission to provide detained and deported immigrants as well as unauthorized mothers and fathers with crucial information to protect and maintain their parental rights and make well-informed, critical decisions regarding the care and welfare of their children. In addition, speakers discuss the broader policy points surrounding detention and child protection issues and the implications for the immigration enforcement and child welfare systems.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

End of Life  52 mins – “After her father suffered a debilitating stroke, the journalist Katy Butler [Knocking On Heaven’s Door] became his caretaker. Doctors gave him a pacemaker and other medical devices meant to keep him alive, but past a certain point, they were only sustaining his suffering. At the end of life as he wanted to live it, his doctor’s refused to turn off the gadgets and let him die “naturally.” Butler is in town this week and she joins us Tuesday to share her family’s struggle and to talk about what it means to die a “good death” today. ” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First World War Impact 54 mins – “From the Stratford Festival, General John de Chastelain and historian Nick Terpstra discuss the social consequences of war: when there is no longer a centre to hold, what happens to both communities and individuals?” At the link find the title, “Madness and the Prolonged War,” right-click “Download Madness and the Prolonged War” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First World War Origins 54 mins – “Margaret MacMillan is one of the world’s leading scholars on World War One. She talks with Paul Kennedy about the origins of the war and what we’ve learned — and failed to learn — from it.” At the link find the title, “Margaret MacMillan and World War One ,” right-click (here or there) “Download Margaret MacMillan and World War One” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Folklore Online 51 mins – “There’s a lot of hand wringing over what the digital age may be doing to us and society as a whole. And though you may not think LOLCats and auto-tuned politicians are high art, Friday’s guests contend the internet is a vibrant platform for human expression. Lynn McNeill and Trevor Blank are folklorists and they say people have been telling stupid jokes and complaining about government long before the web. They join Doug to talk about digital culture and what we can learn about ourselves from it.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foreign Policy 23 mins – “…We have been engaged in the Islamic world at least since 1980, in a military project based on the assumption that the adroit use of American hard power can somehow pacify or fix this part of the world. We can now examine more than three decades of this effort….” At the link find the title, “Full Show: Chaos in Iraq,” right-click  “Media files Moyers_and_Company_324_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking History 62 mins – “Gregory Zuckerman of the Wall Street Journal and author of The Frackers: The Outrageous Inside Story of the New Billionaire Wildcatters, talks to EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his new book, the rise of hydraulic fracturing (fracking), how this technology developed, and the vibrant personalities that pioneered the energy revolution. Topics discussed along the way include the history and future of fracking, environmental concerns about the process, and how the story of fracking is the classic tale of the successes and failures of determined risk-takers. The role of market forces in driving that success and failure runs through the entire conversation. ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Futurist Daniel Burrus  43 mins – “Our guest this week is considered one of the World’s Leading Futurists on Global Trends and Innovation.The New York Times has referred to him as one of the top three business gurus in the highest demand as a speaker. He is a strategic advisor to executives from Fortune 500 companies helping them to develop game-changing strategies based on his proven methodologies for capitalizing on technology innovations and their future impact. He is the author of six books, including The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal best seller Flash Foresight: How to See the Invisible and Do the Impossible.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gay Marriage 51 mins – “In 2008, voters in California approved Proposition 8, a constitutional amendment restricting marriage to a man and a woman. Proponents of the law argued it was necessary to protect traditional marriage, while critics believed it violated the civil rights of gay and lesbian people. The legal battle to overturn Proposition 8 was waged by an unlikely pairing: David Boies and Ted Olson, on opposite sides in the Bush v. Gore case, came together in the fight for marriage equality. A behind-the-scenes look at the legal struggle to overturn Proposition 8 and what that victory has meant for same-sex marriage laws around the country.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Glacier Riverbeds 4 mins – “…In 1923, J Harlen Bretz rocked the slow-grinding geological establishment. Bretz had been studying the Columbia River Plateau, a vast area covering large parts of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, when he noticed something strange. The deep gorges carved into the landscape weren’t typical of slow erosion. Instead, they showed signs of catastrophic flooding — signs that torrential waters had ravaged the land…” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Valves 18 mins – “Regenerative Medicine Today welcomes Frederick Schoen, MD, PhD. Dr. Schoenis a Senior Pathologist, Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Professor of Pathology and Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School; and Executive Vice Chairman, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Dr. Schoen discusses his research in the tissue engineering of heart valves.

Hospice Issues 46 mins – “When the end comes – and it comes for us all – we want it to be peaceful.  Dignified.  We want to be in calm and knowing hands.  Increasingly for Americans, that means turning, when death is near, to hospice care.  A generation ago, hospice was almost unknown.  A few non-profits here and there.  Today, hospice care has exploded into a huge, multi-billion dollar business.  With lots of distinctly, aggressively for-profit players.  Drawing billions from Medicare.  And charges of fraud and mistreatment.  This hour On Point:  what’s happened with American hospice care.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalist Career   59 mins – “Sharyl Attkisson talked about her career, the state of the media, and her future plans. Ms. Attkisson left CBS News in March 2014 after more than 20 years at the network. She talked about her reasons for leaving CBS, the evolution of network news, her work for the Heritage Foundation’s media outlet, The Daily Signal, as well as her book Stonewalled: My Fight for Truth Against the Forces of Obstruction, Intimidation, and Harassment in Obama’s Washington.” At the link you can watch the video, but an audio download costs $.99; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Koch Dynasty 51 mins – “Along with the Rockefellers and Kennedys, the Kochs are among America’s most influential dynasties. Fred Koch built a business empire and helped create the ultraconservative John Birch Society. When he died in 1967, his four sons waged war over their inheritance. But that legacy allowed controversial brothers Charles and David to become two of the world’s wealthiest men and a powerful force in American politics. Thursday, biographer Daniel Schulman [Sons of Wichita] joins Doug to talk about the dynamics that created the Koch family.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lifestyles 39 mins – “Episode 55 of Books and Ideas is an interview with Dr. John Ratey, co-author of “Go Wild: Free Your Body and Mind from the Afflictions of Civilization.” There is considerable evidence that our hunter-gatherer ancestors were generally suprisingly healthy, so the purpose of this book and our conversation was to explore the scientific evidence supporting a return to a healthier lifestyle. We touch on diet, exercise, the role of sleep and even meditation. We also explore the importance of our relationship with nature and each other.” At the link right-click (here or there) “Direct download: 55-books-Ratey.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Apps 51 mins – “More than 100,000 health and medical apps are now on the market. Many of these connect to high-tech wireless devices that are worn, or even ingested, by consumers and patients. Apple, for example, announced this month the creation of an app that will allow users to track their vital signs and interact with their doctors’ offices. Another app wirelessly connects to a microchip that is swallowed with pills so patients and their doctors can monitor if medicine is taken correctly. Susan Page and a panel of [5] guests discuss the benefits and risks of new wireless health technology.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included  in the blog archive.

Migrant Children 66 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute (MPI) telebriefing discusses factors behind the recent surge in flows of unaccompanied children from Mexico and Central America to the United States as well as short- and longer-term policy options for improving how the U.S. immigration system interacts with this population with distinct needs. Speakers include Doris Meissner, Director of MPI’s U.S. Immigration Policy Program, and Marc Rosenblum, Deputy Director of the U.S. Immigration Policy Program. The call previews a policy brief on unaccompanied minors that MPI will release in July.” At the link right-click “Download” from the pop-up menu.

Paperboys 3 mins – “Today, the invention of the paperboy. The Honors College at the University of Houston presents this program about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Political Reform 51 mins – “Political gridlock has doubled since the 1950s, and a recent poll shows public approval of Congress is just 16%–an all-time low for a midterm year. This week, a bipartisan commission made up of former state and federal officials, business and academic leaders is out with more than sixty recommendations for how to fix the political process. The commission calls for holding one national primary, instituting a five-day workweek for Congress and appointing independent redistricting commissions to prevent gerrymandering. But critics say the recommendations don’t go far enough to address serious, campaign finance problems. Guest host Susan Page and a panel [of 4] discuss new bipartisan efforts to reduce government gridlock and the influence of big donors.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Power Plant Emissions 51 mins – “Proponents of the EPA’s role in regulating heat trapping gasses associated with climate change are calling it a win. Others are not so sure. Yesterday, the Supreme Curt ruled the EPA has the authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. The ruling only applies to plants already required to limit other kinds of air pollutants. It’s the first time since 2007 that the Supreme Court has weighed in on the EPA’s greenhouse gas regulatory authority. A new private funded bipartisan report estimates climate change will cost billions of dollars over the next two decades. Please join us to discuss the Supreme Court, the EPA and climate change.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archives.

Propaganda 54 mins – “Ira Basen explores how the first global war gave rise to what we’d now call public relations.” At the link find the title, “World War One and The Birth of Public Relations,” right-click (here or there) “Download World War One and The Birth of Public Relations” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publishing R and D 66 mins – “Noah Feehan of the NYTimes R&D Lab talks about his experience researching new ways to receive information from our technology and how that will change us all.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Skyjacking 17 mins – “The term “Hijacking” goes back to prohibition days, when gangsters would rob moonshine trucks saying “hold your hands high, Jack!” However, in the early days of commercial air travel, the idea that someone would hijack a plane was scarcely even considered. When the government started to oversee aviation in 1958, hijacking wasn’t technically a crime and the early design of airport terminals reflected this. Airports were once more like train stations, where you walk through the terminal and onto the tarmac, and sometimes straight onto the plane itself, without flashing a ticket or showing anyone your identification. Then in 1961, an epidemic of hijackings began.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Software Maintenance  63 mins – “We now wander in Best Buy, Lowes and on Amazon and buy all sorts of devices from thermostats, hi-fi gear, tablets, phones, and laptops or desktops as well as home routers to build our home networks. Most of these we plug in and forget about. But should we? In this talk Jim Gettys — American computer programmer and former Vice President of Software at the One Laptop per Child project — discusses the immediate actions individuals can take, as well as the changes that must be made in the market, to make the “Internet of Things” more secure.” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Panel Improvement 5 mins – “Using a cheap chemical used normally to make tofu stick together, scientists at the University of Liverpool have stumbled upon a much more environmentally-friendly and cheaper way to manufacture very light-weight solar panels called thin film photovoltaics. Science writer Mark Peplow explains the significance of the find to Chris Smith…” At the link right-click “Download as MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Sudan (2 parts) 21 mins –  “The Small Arms Survey’s Human Security Baseline Assessment (HSBA) for Sudan and South Sudan has documented armed conflict dynamics in the two countries since 2006. In a May 2014 interview, HSBA consultant Joshua Craze, author of several HSBA reports, describes recent developments in South Sudan’s political and humanitarian crisis, which has continued to evolve since December 2013. The second part of this two-part podcast, based on a May 2014 interview with HSBA consultant Joshua Craze, describes the current military situation in South Sudan and outlines possible scenarios for South Sudan’s future.” At the link find the titles, ” The Crisis in South Sudan, Part One: Understanding the impasse,” and “…Part Two No Easy Solution,” right-click “Media files  SAS-Podcast-21-The-Crisis-in-South-Sudan-Part-One-Understanding-the-Impasse.mp3, and “SAS-Podcast-22-The-Crisis-in-South-Sudan-Part-Two-No-easy-solution.mp3” select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space Dust 29 mins – “In a rebroadcast from May 23, 2010, Keith and guest host Tom Gill of the UTEP Geological Sciences Department interview Franco Marcantonio from the Texas A&M Department of Geology and Geophysics about dust. Helium from our solar wind gets implanted in dust particles from outer space…up to 40,000 tones every year! The dust that accumulates in ocean sediment conserves the helium isotope and can help determine the earth’s early climate.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tastemakers 46mins – “You may think you’re immune to food trends, but odds are you’re not.  Compare your diet today to ten years ago.  If there’s not some new Greek yogurt or blueberries or different greens or dishes in there, you’re tough. And then there are the blazing meteors of kale and chia seed, Korean tacos and cronuts and the mad fad of cupcakes everywhere.  Who launches food trends?  Who whips them up and rolls them out and shapes the way we eat, the cravings we embrace, the shopping list we carry?  This hour On Point:  the tastemakers and the boiling world of food trends.” At the link right-click “Download this story”

Teen Drivers 54 mins – “The number of young drivers killed on the roads is double what we’d expect. Despite clever advertising campaigns, psychologist Bridie Scott-Parker says there hasn’t even been a way of measuring young driver behaviour. Progress has not been made in road safety for young drivers.  Bridie Scott-Parker has taken the first step by bringing together information about the drivers, their behaviour and the environment as they all affect each other. At the Australian Academy of Science in Canberra, Bridie Scott-Parker describes her new approach to addressing safety amongst young novice drivers.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3600 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , added to weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is there too,  and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 180 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

 

 

 

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Media Mining Digest 196 – Aug 14, 2015: Acts of Man, Aging Reversal, Alzheimer’s Prevention, Amazing Grace, Artificial Intelligence, Automation and Jobs, Bear Markets, Behavioral Economics, Bonneville Salt Flats, Broadband in New Mexico, Building Deterioration, Business Trends, Calcium Hydroxide, Cancer Drugs, Clean Energy, Climate Denial, Climate Legislation, Coal Wars, Comments Uses, Critical Care Commo, Cultural Psychology, Curitiba Brazil Cleanup, Cyber Security, Daily Show, DIY Diagnosis, Ebola Malaria and Polio Vaccines, Failure Psychology, Government Debt, Greek Economy Stories, Green Packaging, Hiroshima Bomb Anniversary, Homestead Economics, Hotshots, Infidelity, Insurance Rate Hikes, Ketamine in China, Marijuana for Dogs, Mentally Ill in Jail, Migration in Europe, Misfits, Mob Murder, Music Reinvention, Polio History, Polonium Trail, Research Funding, Resuscitation Crisis Manual, Robert Saviano, Seafood Restaurants, Sex Affairs, Shoreline Erosion, Small Arms Survey, Solar Farms, Sunshine Hotel, Taxi Medallions Decline, Twitter Jokes, Warfare Future

The following audio files come from a larger group of 300 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 57 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months.  Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Acts of Man 32 mins – “Mother Nature can do a lot of damage. Tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, and droughts destroy landscapes and ruin lives. But what happens when humans are the ones creating these disasters? This episode of Distillations explores the many ways humans have provoked nature’s destructive forces purposefully and inadvertently through history. Our journey begins in Oklahoma, a state that now has more earthquakes than California. Reporter Anna Stitt talks to the people affected by these new quakes and finds out how their lives have changed. Then we talk to historian Jacob Darwin Hamblin about his latest book, Arming Mother Nature: The Birth of Catastrophic Environmentalism. He tells us how Cold War military planners sought to use the environment as a weapon and in the process discovered how vulnerable our planet really is.” At the link right-click “Download” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Reversal 12 mins – “The average American lifespan rose from about 50 years to nearly 80 during the 20th century. Can we live even longer? Harvard Medical School’s David Sinclair has done research that he says may one day allow many of us to live to 120.” At the link find the title, “Pushing the Limits of the Human Lifespan,” right-click “Media files 080815-Sinclair-Aging.mp3,” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimers Prevention 34 mins – “A recent conference held at the Academy asked a downright outrageous question: Can dementia be prevented by making changes to your diet? In this podcast we look at what the answers might be.” At the link find the title, “Can We Prevent Dementia Through Our Diet?” right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazing Grace 49 mins – “Amazing Grace” on Broadway. We’ll hear the music and remarkable story of the composer who went from slave trader to abolitionist. It’s the song of the hour: “Amazing Grace.” Sung this summer by a President, an anthem for civil rights and now, the title of a Broadway show written by a former cop, who started out with no idea how to write music or lyrics and who had no idea where the song came from. Turns out a one time slave trader wrote it before he turned abolitionist. That happened more than 200 years ago. He was British, but “Amazing Grace” today — it’s wholly American. This hour On Point, “Amazing Grace” — the story of the song, the show, and the sentiment.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence 64 mins – “Mark Johnson is the CEO and co-founder at Descartes Labs. He has a track record of translating complex technologies into usable and successful products. Recently he was the CEO of Zite which he sold twice. First time was to CNN and the second time was to Flipboard. Mark was also a product manager who trained at SAP followed by a string of successful search startups.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Automation and Jobs 52 mins – “ The jobs robots will be able to do in the not so distant future are endless, according to some experts. From painting to directing traffic to fighting fires, many economist and Silicon Valley insiders agree that society is on the verge of significant job displacement. One recent study reported that 47 percent of jobs in the U.S. are vulnerable to automation. In many ways, this story is nothing new — technology has always threatened work. What is different, observers say, is the pace and extent of change. It’s a future, they argue, we need to prepare for now. Guest host Laura Knoy looks at how we think about robots, jobs and work.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Bear Markets 14 mins – “Paul sheds more light on “The 20 things you should know about bear markets”, a MarketWatch.com article by Paul and Rich Buck. Commenting on the impact of inflation and dividends, Paul notes that one force reduces returns and one improves returns. You may be surprised to find out that the biggest long-term bear market was not the Japanese stock market. And, with a little soul searching, you can discover that the only bear market that matters is a personal decision which is solely yours to determine. Paul hopes to help you find it.” At the link fright-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Behavioral Economics 11 mins – “Ever wondered why you kept throwing good money after bad at the poker table? Or why people buy cars with super-high interest rates? Richard Thaler, a founding father of behavioral economics, takes us through the “logic” behind bad decisions, and the surprising ways our irrationality changes the entire economy.” At the link find the title, “The Science of Bad Financial Decisions,” right-click “Media files 0530ThalerWebMix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bonneville Salt Flats 52 mins – “Thursday, we’re talking about the Bonneville Salt Flats’ rip-roaring past and uncertain future. The vast, white expanse is ideal for driving fast, but thinning salt has forced the cancellation* of this year’s big races. Is mining to blame? Or too much rain? Guest host Matt Canham is joined by photojournalist and writer Landspeed Louise Noeth, geologist Brenda Bowen, and the BLM’s Kevin Oliver to discuss what we can and should be doing about the increasingly endangered salt flats.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in New Mexico 23 mins – “ After Santa Fe found its residents and businesses were often paying the same rates for connections at half the speed of peers in Albuquerque, the City began investigating the local broadband market. This week on Community Broadband Bits, Sean Moody joins us to discuss the situation and what Santa Fe is doing to spur more investment. Sean works in the Economic Development Division of the City as a Special Projects Administrator. He explains the bottleneck in middle mile access that allowed CenturyLink to charge higher rates for backhaul than are common in similar communities. The City decided to invest $1 million in a new fiber link that would bypass the choke point and allow various independent companies to have a better choice for access to the wider Internet. Along the way, the City partnered with the state for additional benefits.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Building Deterioration 13 mins – “The Burj Khalifa might be the tallest building in the world, but is it the most advanced? MIT Professor John Ochsendorf thinks that today’s architects should take a page from classical structures.” At the link find the title, “Building Sustainably… The Ancient Way,” right-click “Media files 08012015-Oschendorf-Architecture-FIX-Webmix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Business Trends 58 mins – “The buzz: Crystal ball. Yes, change is inevitable. But today’s unprecedented pace and scale of change presents unique challenges for the future of business. Futurists worldwide are examining and assessing potential business impacts of new and emerging paradigms, energy innovations, physical-digital boundary blurring, business decentralization, and other global drivers. What are the implications for future leaders? The experts speak. Frank Diana, TCS: “We are entering a world where everything we know and understand about the purposes of business and the mission of our own organization will be challenged” (Rohit Talwar). Gray Scott, Futurist: “We are becoming a digitized species…crossing the computational event horizon into a digital black hole.” Timo Elliott, SAP: “Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex. It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction” (E. F. Schumacher). Join us for Emerging Paradigms and the Future of Business.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Calcium Hydroxide 6 mins – “As is often the case with a compound that has long been in use, calcium hydroxide is rich in alternative names. Its best known common description, slaked lime, suggests that it is lime (more properly known as calcium oxide) that has drunk its fill. ‘Milk of lime’ refers to its state before drying, when it is also known as limewater. ‘Hydrated lime’ merely describes its formation by adding calcium oxide to water, while the rather entertaining ‘pickling lime’ shows up one of its less well known uses. Throw in builders’ lime, lime cake, slack lime and choona and you can see that this is an etymological feast….” At the link right-click “Download:…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Drugs 47 mins – “After the diagnosis of cancer, another blow – the often-crippling costs of treatment. We look at the soaring price of cancer drugs. Cancer drugs exist today that can give not just months, but years of life back to patients, which seems like a medical miracle. The catch is what they cost — because prices are soaring — along with every other medical cost. In excess of a hundred thousand dollars a year for some drug, and not all picked up by insurance. Some consider that extortion: your money for your life. Even some cancer doctors are complaining it’s gone too far. So should the market determine the price of life-extending drugs, or should there be limits set? This hour On Point: the financial ethics of miracle medicine.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clean Energy 48 mins – “Tough new carbon restrictions. What the president is proposing, Germany’s already doing. Will the American people buy in? He says he wants America in the lead on fighting climate change, so this week, President Obama announced new rules for power companies that will dramatically reshape the way the US makes electricity in just 15 years. In fact though, it’s Germany who leads the world here — already committed to have its electricity all wind and water-driven by the middle of the century. And Germany’s already started. With the public’s enthusiastic support. While here, debate still rages. So what makes Germany different? And what can we learn? This hour On Point, The President’s Clean Power Act and the debate for hearts and minds.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Denial 60 mins – “In the summer of 2015, it’s another blistering week in North America, and around the world, as weather records fall. It’s 105 degrees, or 40 degrees Celsius outside my studio in British Columbia Canada. The ocean-side city of Portland Oregon experienced back to back days over 100 degrees. A heat wave blasted the East Coast of the United States and Canada. Europe is cooler this week, after a blazing heat wave followed by freakish storms. This same day, a city of 100,000 people in Iran experienced a combination of heat and humidity equal to 163 degrees Fahrenheit, or 74 degrees Celsius. This El Nino year could be the record-shattering jump in global heating we’ve been warning is on the way. Welcome to your hotter world. This week on Radio Ecoshock we turn the tables. Alex Smith is the guest on Post Carbon Radio, as broadcast on KWMR West Marin Community Radio outside San Francisco California. We go for the big picture on shocking climate change, and the eternal question: can we do anything about it? Let’s go to Post Carbon Radio hosts Karen Nyhus and Bing Gong.” At the link and the title, “Alex Smith on Post Carbon Radio,” right-click “Lo-Fi” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Legislation 52 mins – “In a speech Monday, President Barack Obama said that “no challenge poses a greater threat to our future” than climate change. To help address that threat, he announced new federal rules limiting carbon emissions from U.S. power plants. Some critics charge these rules should be stronger given the risks ahead; many others say these rules represent a federal overreach, pose an enormous burden on U.S. coal companies and will mean higher prices for consumers. We look at efforts to cut carbon emissions and America’s role in the international effort to confront the challenges of climate change.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Coal Wars 60 mins – “This week we’re learning more about the fossil fuel that powered humanity’s first industrial age, and helped set us on a course for a looming climate crisis. We’ll speak to Richard Martin, energy editor at the MIT Technology Review, about his book “Coal Wars: The Future of Energy and the Fate of the Planet.” And we’ll explore the environmental impact of coal with Jeff Deyette, assistant director of energy research in the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned ScientistsAt the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comments Uses 18 mins – “Joseph Reagle discusses what we can learn from reading and thinking about internet comments.” At the link find the title, “MIT Press Podcast- Reading the Comments,” right-click “Media files MITP Reagle0315.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Critical Care Commo 46 mins – “Communicating With Your Doctors and Nurses to Ensure the Best Care: Lessons From Those Who Have Been There” At the link find the title (same as the quote), right-click “Media files 29717.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cultural Psychology 45 mins – “Our guest, Steven J. Heine, was one of the authors of a paper that lead to psychology’s greatest epiphany in decades, many (if not all) of the human universals discovered in all of field’s most famous experiments are actually universals among only one demographic, not the entire human species. It was kind of like biologists suddenly learning they had based their entire science just on the animals living in a single cave in Montana. In this episode, you’ll learn why it took so long to figure out it was studying outliers, and what it means for the future of psychology, neuroscience, and many other fields attempting that study human beings as a whole.” At the link right-click “Download” for “Fifty-Five:…” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Curitiba Brazil Cleanup 10 mins – “Curitiba, the eighth largest metropolis in Brazil and the capital of the state of Paraná, has been called the “best-planned city in the world.” Much of the credit goes to Jaime Lerner, a charismatic architect, urban planner and a former mayor of Curitiba. Now in his eighth decade and retired from politics, Lerner, who was mayor or Curitiba three times and the governor of Parana twice, has traveled the world looking at some of the things cities do to make urban life more vibrant and sustainable. In his new book, Urban Acupuncture: Celebrating Pinpricks of Change that Enrich City Life, Lerner says the path to success is often found in doing simple things quickly that enhance the life of a city, he says….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security 34 mins – The following topics are presented from the 15 Jul 2015 Crypto-Gram Newsletter are Crypto-Gram 15 July 2015: organizational doxing, encryption, Snowden documents, backdoors in encryption products, DoD psition on backdoors, NSA reforms and intercepts At the link at the Crypto-Gram 15 July 2015 title right-click “Media files crypto-gram-15-07.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Daily Show 41 mins – “After more than 16 years as America’s funny, biting and fake newsman, Jon Stewart leaves The Daily Show. We’ll look back. He is America’s premier fake newsman — or was till last night. Jon Stewart took his curtain call, with a status rarely achieved by a guy who calls himself a comedian. His going out was treated a national event, and with good reason. Stewart has been a critic, sometimes a conscience and always a touchstone, at least when he was at the desk of “The Daily Show.” But he had a life before “The Daily Show,” and he has a lot of career yet to come. Why he stopped now, and where he might go next. This hour on Point. Jon Stewart, before and yet to come.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DIY Diagnosis 15 mins – “Forget pregnancy tests – in the near future, you could diagnose dozens of diseases, from AIDS to cancer, in the comfort of your home. Dr. Eugene Chan and Professor Andrew Ellington discuss what that means for doctors, patients, and healthcare costs.” At the link find the title, “DIY Diagnoses,” right-click “Media files 0523-BFIX2REAL-WEB.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola, Malaria and Polio Vaccines 28 mins – “Claudia Hammond and her studio guest Dr Sneh Khemka look at the new headline-making Ebola vaccine and other vaccines under development against the virus which has killed more than 11,000 people since its outbreak last year in West Africa. Also in the spotlight, the world’s first malaria vaccine received its first regulatory green light. But is it effective and protective enough to roll out in low-income countries? Kenyaan global health expert Tabitha Mwangi isn’t convinced. Plus an immunisation success story from Nigeria. A decade ago Nigeria became one of the world’s last hotspots for polio after vaccination boycotts in the north of the country. Happily, in the past year, there has not been one reported case of polio in the country. Former Nigerian minister of health Dr Muhammad Pate and medical anthropologist Heidi Larson talk about how this dramatic turnaround came about.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Failure Pychology 47 mins – “’Fail fast, fail often” goes the zeitgeist . But should we have such optimism for failure? When you have a dream — your own business, a great marriage, a career as an artist or an athlete — and you try for the dream but don’t reach it, we call that failure. It hurts, failure. On the other hands. in places like Silicon Valley, failure is seen as good. It’s practically a fetish, where never failing suggests you’re not trying hard enough. And yet it seems only the winners preach that lesson. Are there times when giving up the dream makes the most sense? This hour On Point: failing — how we handle not getting what we want.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Debt 58 mins – “Cato Institute Fellow Michael Tanner talks about the growing national debt in his latest book, [Going for Broke: Deficits, Debt, and the Entitlement Crisis].” At the link find the title, “After Words with Michael Tanner,” right-click “Media files program.401581.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greek Economy Stories 19 mins – “On a visit to Greece, we talk to a guy who found an ingenious place to hoard his cash, a government-protected milk peddler, and a would-be olive oil tycoon.” At the link find the title, “#639: Where To Hide €50,000, And Other Stories From Greece,” right-click “Media files 20150717 blog pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Packaging 56 mins – “Be Green Packaging is the only food and beverage packaging company with Cradle to Cradle™ certified products. Their clients include Whole Foods, Gillette, P&G, 7 Eleven, Wolfgang Puck and many more. In addition to designing, manufacturing, and distributing compostable packaging that is certified by BPI, the company is a champion of social responsibility. Be Green Packaging has been certified by Intertek for the ethical treatment of workers and social conditions at their plants. Their facility in Richland, SC is one of the first factories in the United States to be based upon Cradle to Cradle™ manufacturing protocols. Features of the facility include: Water Recycling System, Composting System, Recycling System, and Zero-Waste-Manufacturing. Our guest today is Ron Blitzer, Co-Founder of Be Green Packaging. @BeGreenPkg “ At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hiroshima Bomb Anniversary 28 mins – “Since the first atomic bomb was dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, scientists have been studying the effect of that huge dose of radiation on survivors. Seventy years on, professor Richard Wakeford tells Roland Pease that researchers have found a surprising lack of hereditary mutation risks, along with many lessons that can be learned about long term radiation risk.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homestead Economics 106 mins – “Joe Mooney is a passionate advocate for becoming more self-reliant and learning through DIY self-education. While a firefighter by trade, he is a DIY project junkie and amateur homesteader by passion. Growing up in both rural and urban areas around the US, Joe now calls his rural ‘homestead’ in the Arizona desert home. He and his family live off of 90% rainwater, collected from their roof and are always looking for new ways to become more self-reliant and live a more satisfying and healthy life. Joe maintains a YouTube channel called “Homesteadonomics” that chronicles many of his DIY projects and homesteading activities. He considers his channel a means to teach others how he does projects on his homestead as well as increasing his own self-education in the process. …In true homesteading fashion, Joe’s projects and homesteading activities also serve to provide additional income as well as hone future skill sets in various disciplines. In addition to making videos, Joe has written articles for backwoods home and sometimes moonlights as a craftsman of odd projects that he sells on craigslist.com.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hotshots 52 mins – “Two years ago, a wildfire ignited near a small town in central Arizona. The 20 elite firefighters of the Granite Mountain Hotshots were sent to fight the blaze. Only one of them survived. Not since 9/11 had so many firefighters been killed in the line of duty. Friday, the journalist Kyle Dickman joins us to talk about his new book that tells the story of the Granite Mountain crew and the tragic Yarnell Hill Fire they died trying to put out. It’s also a window into the intense world of wildland firefighting. Kyle Dickman is a former editor at Outside magazine and a former member of the Tahoe Hotshots. He fought wildfires in California for five seasons. His new book is called On the Burning Edge: A Fateful Fire and the Men Who Fought ItAt the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infidelity 22 mins – “Infidelity is the ultimate betrayal. But does it have to be? Relationship therapist Esther Perel examines why people cheat, and unpacks why affairs are so traumatic: because they threaten our emotional security. In infidelity, she sees something unexpected — an expression of longing and loss. A must-watch for anyone who has ever cheated or been cheated on, or who simply wants a new framework for understanding relationships.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Insurance Rate Hikes 52 mins – “In a speech Monday, President Barack Obama said that “no challenge poses a greater threat to our future” than climate change. To help address that threat, he announced new federal rules limiting carbon emissions from U.S. power plants. Some critics charge these rules should be stronger given the risks ahead; many others say these rules represent a federal overreach, pose an enormous burden on U.S. coal companies and will mean higher prices for consumers. We look at efforts to cut carbon emissions and America’s role in the international effort to confront the challenges of climate change.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Ketamine in China 27 mins – “ China has become a top maker and taker of underground ketamine. Celia Hatton sees the impact of the drug and explores The Fortress – the drug village at the centre of the trade.” At the link find the title, “China’s Ketamine Fortress,” right-click “Media files p02yy48d.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fro the pop-up menu.

Marijuana for Dogs 18 mins – “Watching a pet suffer through an illness can be heartbreaking, but can cannabis be a therapeutic to alleviate pain in animals? On this episode, Darlene Arden discussed medical cannabis for animals.” At the link right-click “VBR MP3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mentally Ill in Jail 52 mins – “President Barack Obama and some members of Congress are pushing for reforms in our criminal justice system. In particular, there’s bipartisan support to give judges more discretion in sentencing, but some say an even bigger problem is the fact that our jails and prisons are crowded with many people who don’t belong there in the first place. They pose no threat to public safety, but suffer from untreated mental illness. In some communities police, attorneys, judges and mental health service groups are working to change this: Join us to discuss new efforts to help people with mentally illness stay out of jail and get into treatment.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Migration in Europe 47 mins – “The migrant crush at the Chunnel, linking France and England, puts a spotlight on Europe’s migration crisis. We’ll go there. They’re poor, they’re desperate, and they’re not wanted: the waves of African and Middle Eastern men — they’re mostly men — flooding into Europe to escape brutal wars at home. Risking all to get across Europe’s soft borders for safety and freedom, only to find fences going up. Hungary’s literally building a wall against the migrants. French police are nightly battling thousands trying to slip into the tunnel under the English Channel that leads to Britain. It’s the summer’s biggest and most heartbreaking story in Europe, with no clear right answer. This hour On Point: Europe’s migrant crisis, and the limits to sanctuary.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Misfits 13 mins – “The mafia, pirates, gangs, and hackers. What can we learn from them? According to author Alexa Clay, turns out a whole lot — including creativity.” At the link find the title, “The Lessons Pirates and Gangsters Can Teach Us,” right-click “Media files 08012015-Clay-Misfits-Webmix.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mob Murder 27 mins – “Farkhunda, a 28-year-old Afghan woman and religious scholar, was beaten to death in the streets of Kabul in March this year. She had reportedly been arguing with a Mullah about the practice of selling charms in front of a mosque. He accused her of burning the Koran.” At the link find the title, “The Killing of Farkhunda,” right-click “Media files p02yt7xq.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Reinvention 13 mins – “The market for recorded music has undergone at least three major reinventions since the dawn of the Internet. …The combination of ubiquitous Internet connectivity and bottomless consumer appetite for music has led to the success of applications like Pandora, Spotify, and Rdio which allow users to access entire music catalogs from virtually anywhere for next to nothing. Streaming has worked. …Where does the money go? A recent study from Berklee College of Music’s Institute for Creative Entrepreneurship showed that 20 to 50 percent of music revenues might never make it to their rightful owners. In some cases artists might get 20% or less of the already tiny dollar amounts coming in from streaming services. But no one knows for sure. …On this week’s episode of the podcast we try to find out if we can crack into the stream and figure out where the money is flowing.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Polio History 52mins – “For a certain generation of Americans, polio is a very scary word. Serious outbreaks of the disease began appearing in the U.S. in the late 1800s. President Franklin Roosevelt contracted polio in 1921. Over the next several decades, tens of thousands of Americans a year were debilitated by the poliomyelitis virus. In 1952, polio killed some 3,000 people in the U.S. and paralyzed many more. Then came Dr. Jonas Salk’s vaccine. Schoolchildren across the country were inoculated, saving untold Americans from contracting the disease. Today, because of aggressive public health efforts, polio has been nearly wiped out globally. We look at the history of polio and the ongoing battle to finally eradicate it worldwide.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Polonium Trail 27 mins – “Former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko died in a London hospital in 2006, after drinking tea poisoned with the highly radioactive material – polonium. But who wanted him dead, and why? And where did his killers get the polonium from?” At the link find the title, “The Polonium Trail,” right-click “Media files p02yhzvg.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Research Funding 36 mins – “Dr. Kathie Olsen discussed the current budgetary crunch in scientific funding and how it affects researchers in the United States.” At the link right-click “VBR MP3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Resuscitation Crisis Manual 5 mins – “A while ago on the podcast, I featured a book called the Anesthetic (Anaesthetic) Crisis Manual by David Borshoff. David is an anesthesiologist and a pilot, so it was natural that he would want the same sort of no-bullshit crisis checklist he used in a plane to be present in the operating theater. Hence the Anesthetic Crisis Manual.At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robert Saviano 49 mins – “Roberto Saviano made a rare appearance in the UK in July 2015 when he came to the Intelligence Squared stage. In conversation with Intelligence Squared’s very own Robert Collins, Saviano talked about his life in hiding and his beginnings as a reporter on the streets of Naples. He revealed his latest work of investigative reporting, ‘Zero Zero Zero’, in which he delves into the sprawling network of the global cocaine trade. He traced how the $400 billion a year generated by drugs trafficking filters into the international banking system through money laundering from Wall Street to the City of London. The cocaine trade isn’t just a playground for criminals, Saviano argued. It is part of the structure of our global economy where some of the biggest players — the banks — have profited without facing a single criminal conviction.” At the link click “Download” to get the file.

Seafood Restaurants 64 mins – “Seafood is highly perishable and supply is often uncertain. Roger Berkowitz, CEO of Legal Sea Foods talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the challenges of running 34 seafood restaurants up and down the east coast. Berkowitz draws 22 mins – “on his 22 year tenure as CEO and discusses how his business works day-to-day and the question of sustainability.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Affairs 22 mins – “Infidelity is the ultimate betrayal. But does it have to be? Relationship therapist Esther Perel examines why people cheat, and unpacks why affairs are so traumatic: because they threaten our emotional security. In infidelity, she sees something unexpected — an expression of longing and loss. A must-watch for anyone who has ever cheated or been cheated on, or who simply wants a new framework for understanding relationships.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shoreline Erosion 52 mins – “In their natural state, beaches constantly change shape. They absorb the impacts of storms; dunes and shorelines come and go. But much of coastal development is designed to be permanent. And many scientists warn these buildings, roads and seawalls along the shore harm the beaches that attracted people to the area in the first place. Rising sea levels, devastating storms and pollution further complicate efforts to preserve coastal areas. A discussion about the state of the world’s beaches and efforts to protect the coastline for this month’s Environmental Outlook.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Small Arms Survey 2015 18 mins (2 parts) – “The Small Arms Survey 2015: Weapons and the World explores the theme of weapons and the environment, as well as offering case studies on a range of aspects of small arms and armed violence. In the first of this two-episode podcast, Senior Researcher Khristopher Carlson and Yearbook Coordinator Glenn McDonald discuss five of the book’s chapters, covering weapons and the environment, trade in weapons, and measures to regulate and control small arms. [In the second part]… Yearbook Coordinator Glenn McDonald and Researcher Claudia Seymour introduce the four case studies discussing armed actors, focusing on their procurement and use of small arms, and their stockpile management practices.” At the link find the title, “Small Arms Survey 2015: Weapons and the World – Part 1,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2.

Solar Farms 29 mins – “Is your home one of the millions that haven’t been able to get solar because you’re a renter? The cost of solar panel installation is half of what it was just five years ago, which should be opening up opportunity everywhere. But many homes and businesses are locked out because they don’t own their rooftops. The good news is that policymakers are starting to look for creative ways to expand solar access — just recently, the Obama Administration announced a $520 million initiative for community solar farms which could allow everyone to get on board the renewable revolution. This week on Sea Change Radio, we talk about this community solar initiative in a panel discussion with Adam Browning and Katherine Bagley. Browning is the executive director of the non-profit solar advocacy organization, Vote Solar, and Bagley is an environmental reporter for Inside Climate News.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sunshine Hotel 28 mins – “The Bowery, in lower Manhattan, is one of New York’s oldest neighborhoods. It’s been through a lot of iterations. In the 1650s, a handful of freed slaves were the neighborhood’s first residents. At the time, New York was still a Dutch colony called New Amsterdam, and the Lower East Side was farm land. In the early 1800s, The Bowery had become a bustling thoroughfare with elegant theaters, and taverns, and shops. But by the late 1800s it had become a much seedier place, full of saloons, and dance halls, and prostitution. By the 1940s, The Bowery had become New York’s skid row—a place where down-and-out men could go and rent a cheap room for the night in one of the neighborhood’s many flop houses.Now, of course, the Lower East Side affords no room for a skid row. The Bowery, like the rest of that area, is full of expensive places to live, and fancy grocery stores.But back in 1998, before the last of the flop hotels closed their doors, David Isay and Stacy Abramson spent months documenting one of the last of these places: The Sunshine Hotel.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taxi Medallions Decline 15 mins – “Gene Freidman built a taxi empire in New York City. Now his empire is starting to crumble.” At the link find the title, “#643: The Taxi King” right-click “Media files 20150731_blog_pmpod2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Twitter Jokes 16 mins – “With 316 million users posting 500 million tweets a day, someone is bound to write an unoriginal tweet now and then. But there are some Twitter users whose entire existence relies completely on plagiarizing tiny jokes and relatable observations created by other Twitter users. Many plagiarizing accounts have follower numbers ranging from the thousands to the millions. Meaning their exposure can lead to career opportunities and sponsorships built on the creativity of others who are just getting started in their writing careers. So it was not without excitement that Twitter users found out last week that they can report plagiarizing accounts to Twitter under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, and have these copied tweets removed. But now we’re forced to ask the question: are jokes protected under copyright? We asked Andy Sellars of Harvard Law School’s Cyberlaw Clinic to weigh in.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Warfare Future 46 mins – “P.W. Singer and August Cole imagine World War III in a new novel where the battlefront goes deeply cyber. It’s the classic lament of military historians. That armies are always training to fight the last war, when they should be figuring out what war will look like next time. Well, if that’s the case, a book called called “Ghost Fleet” may be the remedy. So vividly does it depict the shape of World War III — and how technologies that are part of our world already from wearable technology  to driverless cars to Walmart’s cutting distribution system — may hold the keys to victory or defeat. It’s a novel by the way — fiction — but not really. That’s why it’s the novel everyone in the Pentagon is talking about. This hour On Point: “Ghost Fleet” and the face of warfare in the not so distant future.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic library of 7000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 250 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

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Media Mining Digest 242 – Jul 1, 2016: AARP, Adam Mansbach, Adopted, Aging Reversal, Animal Sentience, Art Access, Asian-American Hip Hop, Autism Movement Therapy, Autopsy, Beyonce Critique, Big Data, Black Lives Matter, Black Panther Movie, Brain Changing Ideas, Brand Name Myths, Breast and Prostate Cancer, Carbon Cap on Wall Street, Christianity in Britain, Citrus Greening Disease, Civil Rights Decline, Cleveland Police Shootings, Communication Workers of America, Confederate Flag, Container Port, Educational Aids, Everyday Incarceration, Exercise Research, External Storage, Farmer Service Solution, Fat and Sugar, Fat People, First Nations Surgeon, Food Fraud Forensics, Forensic Psychiatrist, Free Trade Agreement, Gig Economy, Government Computer Liabilities, Gravity Detectives, Gravity Wave Detection, Grunt Life, Gun Control Law, Heroin for Depression, HG Wells, Hip Hop Culture, HIV Laws, Investing for Kids, ISIS History, Jazz Begins, Jim Crows Discussion, Macedonia Heroines, Marilyn Michaels, Mass Shooting Response, Microbiology Connection, Microbiome Research, Nanotechnology, Native American Land, Net Neutrality Ruling, Networking, Nordic Culture, Norman Lear, Obesity-Cancer Connection, Online Shaming, Personality Changes, Planet Detection, Podcast Reliability, Porcupines, Puerto Ricans Rebuilding Radiation Background Rapper Bank Robbers, Rare Books, Refugee Totals, Refugees in Australia, Retirement Plan, Romanovs, Sake Revolution, Science History, Sea Rise, Sea Warming, Sex Offender Prison, Sharing Economy, Slave Women in the Civil War, Slavery in Early America, South Pole Rescue, Space Colonies, Space Station Scientists, Stroke Avoidance, Superconductivity, Tax Refund Frauds, Team Rubicon, Technology Trends, Ukraine, Underground Railroad, Virology Connection, Water Control, Water from Great Lakes, Wi-Fi Pioneer, Women President

The best 104 podcasts from a larger group of 314 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

AARP 58 mins – “AARP CEO Jo Ann Jenkins discusses her organization’s work, as well as her new book, [Disrupt Aging: A Bold New Path to Living Your Best Life at Every Age].” At the link find the title, ”Q&A with Jo Ann Jenkins, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.442431.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Adam Mansbach 26 mins – “Before writer Adam Mansbach hit it big with bedtime story “Go the F— to Sleep” — capturing the frustration of all parents whose kids refuse to settle in for the night — he wrote several novels with themes on race and culture. He covers interesting territory with host James Peterson, including piracy, hip hop, and why Iggy Azalea may have been inevitable. Listener warning: This segment contains profanity.” At the link find the title, “Bestselling author Adam Mansbach drops the F-bomb on parenting, Sept, 2015,” right-click “Media files mansbach-web-1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Adopted 49 mins – “Ever since she was a little girl, Irish journalist Caitriona Palmer knew she had been adopted. Yet, in her late twenties she developed a growing sense of unease. She sought to calm those feelings by reaching out to her birth mother. The two developed a close attachment, but their relationship had one condition – no one could know. Palmer’s mother had kept her pregnancy a secret for decades, the shame of her experience still trailing her. As the two women continued their clandestine meetings, Palmer began to research the history of her adoption, along with the social issues in 1970s Ireland that surrounded it. She tells the story in a new book….An Affair With My Mother‘” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Aging Reversal 28 minsIs it possible to reverse ageing? By uncovering the genetic secrets of humans and animals that live unusually long lives, scientists are finding extraordinary ways to wind back our cellular clocks. A NOTE ABOUT THE DIET ITSELF Thanks to everyone for your interest in the program. The fasting mimicking diet trialed in Prof Valter Longo’s labs is produced by a private company called Prolon (Prof Longo does not receive profit from this company). Prolon does not distribute the product to Australia and there isn’t a fresh food version released by Prof Longo’s labs. However, the description of the fasting mimicking diet in their published journal paper lists a composition of “at least 9-10% proteins, 34-47% carbohydrates (plant based) and 44-56% fats (no animal fats). The amount of calories in total was around 700 – 800 per day. Unlimited herbal teas – no dairy, advised to drink lots of water. Each daily packet during my five day diet contained a nut bar for breakfast, a vegetable soup for lunch, a vegetable soup for dinner and afternoon snack consisted of 7 olives or some kale crackers. I am obviously not qualified to give medical or dietary advice and suggest you consult your doctor before undertaking any substantial change to your diet. This is a relatively strong intervention.” At the ink right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Animal Sentience 32 mins – “When you think about fish, it’s probably at dinnertime. Author Jonathan Balcombe, on the other hand, spends a lot of time pondering the emotional lives of fish. Balcombe, who serves as the director of animal sentience for the Humane Society Institute for Science and Policy, tells Fresh Air‘s Terry Gross that humans are closer to understanding fish than ever before. “Thanks to the breakthroughs in ethology, sociobiology, neurobiology and ecology, we can now better understand what the world looks like to fish,” Balcombe says….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Art Access 6 mins – “Imagine being able to see artwork in the greatest museums around the world without leaving your chair. Driven by his passion for art, Amit Sood tells the story of how he developed [Google] Art Project to let people do just that.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asian-American Hip Hop 23 mins – “Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival director Rob Buscher and music producer Scott “Chops” Jung discuss the gap between disrespect and celebration of Asian-American culture. The upcoming film festival marks its eighth season, Nov. 12 – 22. It is the largest East Coast showcase of films created by Asian Americans, celebrating music, culture and food along with more than 60 film showings.” At the link find the title, “Asian-American authenticity in hip-hop and movies, Nov, 2015,” right-click “Media files paaff-web.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Movement Therapy 53 mins – “Joyce welcomes Joanne Lara, MA Adjunct Faculty at National University, and founder of Autism Movement Therapy (AMT). Ms. Laura who is also a professional dancer,has dedicated herself to improving the lives of individuals with autism through movement and music. Her advocacy has led to founding the nonprofit organization Autism Movement Therapy® based in Los Angeles, California. Th e organization has received two Autism Speaks grants, Ms. Laura will discuss the mission of Autism Movement Therapy and the beneficial role that movement and music can play in the speech, language, behavioral, and cognitive abilities of individuals on the autism spectrum.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autopsy 56 mins – “This week on the Naked Scientists, we observe a post-mortem. The patient was in his seventies but the coroner ordered an autopsy because the cause of death wasn’t clear. Chris Smith observes pathologist Alison Cluroe conduct the procedure as she tries to find out why the patient died and sees how this once common practice is still saving lives…” At the link right-click “Download as mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beyoncé Critique 23 mins – “Sorry to break the news to The Beyhivé, but not everyone loved Beyoncé’s “Formation.” Host James Peterson spoke with Philadelphia journalist Ernest Owens, who lays out his critique of the popular song and video in the Huffington Post.” At the link find the title, “Throwing shade at Beyoncé’s ‘Formation,’ slut shaming, and the Oscars, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files ernest-web.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Data P1 54 mins – “IDEAS, CBC RADIO ONE in partnership with the MUNK School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto weighs the opportunities, the risks — and the trade-offs — as the world of Big Data relentlessly changes our lives.” At the link find the title, “Big Data, Part 1, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160623_26594.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Lives Matter 15 mins – “This week, I’m the one answering the questions. KLCC’s Eric Alan interviewed me about the emerging Black Lives Matter movement and how a new generation is taking on the struggle for civil rights.” At the link find the title, “Remix host James Peterson on why the Black Lives Matter Movement matters, Oct, 2015,” right-click “Media files klccweb.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Lives Matter 82 mins – “…Join INFORUM and SF Pride for a celebration of San Francisco’s LGBTQI history and a powerful discussion about the work still needing to be done to ensure equal rights and racial and economic justice (this year’s SF Pride theme!) for all, focused on the Black Lives Matter movement. Advocates and spokespeople will discuss their experiences convening diverse allies and communities, and will share their unique insights into the successes they’ve achieved and the challenges they still face in ensuring justice for all.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Panther Movie 24 mins – “”Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution” is a the new documentary from Stanley Nelson. Nelson is the Emmy nominated, Peabody Award, and MacArthur Foundation Award winning director of a body of work that includes films on Emmett Till, Marcus Garvey and the Freedom Riders. When Nelson and his production team started working on the project 7 years their goal was to create a film that told the complete history of the Black Panther movement because it was a story that “people really didn’t know”. They felt that the ideas represented by the Black Panthers were relevant but they could not have foreseen the development of the Black Lives Matter movement and the ongoing protests over police violence. “Little did we know that it would be as relevant as it is, at this historical moment that we find ourselves in now”, says Nelson. Using the voices of former Black Panther members and police, music and archival footage the documentary weaves together a story of a group that was, in many ways, a logical follow up to the non-violent civil rights protests of the 1960’s. “There would have been no Black Panthers without the traditional civil rights movement of Martin Luther King,” says Nelson. The documentary focuses on events that took place nearly 50 years ago, but Nelson says that the same issues of inequality that the Black Panthers organized to confront still exist today. ‘The Black Panthers began in Oakland as a result of police brutality. And here we are today with Black Lives Matter and other movements around the country, as we see African Americans being murdered by the police’” At the link find the title, “Filmmaker Stanley Nelson discusses new documentary on the Black Panther Party, Sept, 2015,” right-click “Media files black-pantherweb.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Changing Ideas 63 mins Dr. Daniel Amen – The most popular psychiatrist in America. Dr. Amen believes that brain health is central to all health and success. “When your brain works right,” he says, “you work right; and when your brain is troubled, you are much more likely to have trouble in your life.” His work is dedicated to helping people have better brains and better lives. In this episode we learn how Dr. Amen uses nuclear brain imaging to diagnose and treat behavioral problems. He also explains how the brain works, what happens when things go wrong, and how to optimize brain function.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brand Name Myths 22 mins – “How much of a brand is real? How much is in our heads?” At the link find the title, “#538: Is A Stradivarius Just A Violin?” right-click “Media files 20160622_pmoney podcast062216.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Breast and Prostate Cancer 58 mins – “There have been controversies over the best methods for detecting and treating each cancer. When should women start getting annual mammograms, for example? How useful are PSA screenings for identifying prostate cancer in men? Our guests are leading experts on the treatment of these cancers, and they do not shy away from controversy. Get an update on the latest thinking on how you can cut your own risk. You’ll also learn what these two different cancers have in common, and what we know about preventing as well as treating breast or prostate cancer. The Research Articles: The research cited on DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ) for breast cancer was published in JAMA Oncology in October 2015. The research on prostate cancer that we discussed was published in the New England Journal of Medicine on October 29, 2015.At the link find the title, “Show 1039: How to Reduce Your Risk from Breast or Prostate Cancer, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files PP-1039BreastProstate.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Cap on Wall Street 49 mins – ““The earth has warmed and we did it” — this is the headline of a large print ad that appeared earlier this week in the opinion pages of the Wall Street Journal. The sponsor of that ad, The Partnership for Responsible Growth, is hoping to get a message through to readers of the Wall Street Journal whose opinion writers regularly introduce uncertainty into the question as to whether the climate is warming and how much human activity has to do with it. For those hoping for strong action to counter the risks of climate change, the last eight years have been dispiriting: Despite the mounting scientific evidence, fewer people are persuaded. For this month’s Environmental Outlook: join us to talk about what people believe about climate change and why.”(6 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Christianity in Britain 33 mins – “Here is part two to our story of religion and religious life at the age of the Great Heathen Army and the Danish invasion of Britain. Last episode, I told you about how the stories we’re often told – of violent atrocities committed against Christian spaces and against Christendom itself – didn’t actually originate from the 9th century, when they supposedly occurred, but only appear in our record during the 12th Century. Two hundred years later during the height of the Crusades. We spoke about how the idea of the pagan zealotry of the Vikings doesn’t align with reports that they converted to Christianity eagerly and easily. And I showed you how the archaeological and contemporary record doesn’t comport with the popular story of a religious war against the Christians of Britain… a story that relies entirely upon records that were written centuries after the fact.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Citrus Greening Disease 51 mins – “If there was anyone that could be dubbed a science wizard, it might be Dr. Jude Grosser. Dr. Grosser has made a career of edgy innovation, creating new solutions that define the forefront of genetic improvements in citrus. He has mastered unconventional techniques that produce new variants of trees (both their scions and rootstocks) that bring improved production quality to Florida’s fresh fruit and orange juice industries. Currently he is a key strategist in the fight to save Florida citrus, where some of his solutions are being trialed, and don’t face the regulatory impediments of “GMO” citrus trees.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil Rights Decline 15 mins – “This week, I’m the one answering the questions. KLCC’s Eric Alan interviewed me about the emerging Black Lives Matter movement and how a new generation is taking on the struggle for civil rights.” At the link find the title, “Remix host James Peterson on why the Black Lives Matter Movement matters, Oct, 2015” right-click “Media files klccweb.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cleveland Police Shooting 19 mins – “Three years ago, Cleveland police officer Michael Brelo stood on the hood of a car and fired 39 shots through the windshield at the unarmed homeless couple inside. On Saturday, May 23, an Ohio judge dropped all charges against Brelo. Dr. James Peterson explores the Brelo case with activist Angela Woodson and scholar Bakari Kitwana, discussing the timing of the verdict (it was announced during the Memorial Day holiday), Ohio’s history of abusive police actions, and the response by local activists.” At the link find the title, “Cleveland’s Brelo verdict the latest denial of justice for victims of excessive police violence, May, 2015,” right-click “Media files cleveland-web.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Workers of America 30 mins – “Christopher Shelton, president of the Communications Workers of America discusses the tentative strike settlement between CWA workers and Verizon. Almost 40,000 workers walked off the job in April, and returned on June 1.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Christopher Shelton, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.445040.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Companion Animals 27 mins -”Keith & Russ talk with Gaylene Fasenko, Associate Professor, Companion Animals, College of Agriculture, Consumer & Environmental Sciences at New Mexico State University. Fasenko talks about her early career in avian embryology, and how she eventually made the move to study companion animals and their relationship with humans. She also talks about the evolution of the domestication of dogs, and about the dangers of overly-selective breeding of dogs.” At the link right-click the play button next to “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Confederate Flag 20 mins – “The Confederate flag has been controversial since the Civil War, but when Dylann Roof allegedly massacred nine African Americans at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, in a racist rampage, calls to “take down the flag” from the grounds of the state’s capitol grew louder and more urgent. In this episode of The Remix, we talk to Logan Jaffe about her online documentary project “Battle Flag” and activist Goad Gatsby who is using hip hop to protest the Confederate flag.” At the link find the title, “Remixing the Confederate flag — heritage, hip hop and hate, Jun, 2015” right-click “Media files flag-web.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Container Port 4 mins – “…I’ve seen shipping containers many times before — those metal crates that look like truck trailers. But never flying at me through the air. A crane twelve stories high latched onto the top of a thirty ton container, then whisked it over the side of the ship, dropping it onto a waiting truck. Just as quickly, back it went to get another. Good crane operators make the round trip in a little over a minute and a half; less efficient operators take an extra thirty seconds. It’s a huge difference in a business that’s all about keeping cargo ships moving. Container ports are a fascinating exercise in engineering. The basic activities are simple enough. But the sheer number of containers is a challenge. Imagine thousands upon thousands of containers moving every which way as ships, trucks, and trains are loaded and unloaded. That’s enough to keep things exciting all by itself. But there’s a lot more that goes on behind the scenes….” At the link click “Click here for audio…,” select “Save File” and “ok” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Aids 46 mins – The Tech Chicks discuss nine apps for teachers, parents and students that help with reading, writing, drawing, editing and coding. Of particular note were Braille Bricks that turn lego bricks into a tool for learning braille. At the link right-click “Download” near the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Everyday Incarceration 10 mins – “Reporter Lisa Riordan Seville and photo editor Zara Katz wanted to engage the public in the discussion of mass incarceration in the United States in a new way. They asked themselves: “What does mass incarceration look like?” To answer that question they created the Instagram account #everydayincarceration.” At the link find the title, “Social media project focuses on the faces of mass incarceration, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files everdayweb.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exercise Research 53 mins – Professor Tim Noakes is one of the most widely respected authorities on exercise and fitness, and he’s built his career by challenging conventional beliefs, including his own. The idea of carb-loading before endurance races: he came up with that. These days he promotes a high-fat low-carb diet, even for athletes. And he’s not a big fan of sports drinks. Noakes joins us Thursday to talk about eating better, drinking less, and running against the grain to achieve better athletic performance. Timothy Noakes is the retired Discovery Health professor of exercise and sport science at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, where he is currently professor emeritus. He is also the founder of the Noakes Foundation and the author of several books, including The Lore of Running, Waterlogged, and his latest, Real Meal Revolution.” At the link right-click the play button next to “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

External Storage 13 mins – “The mind palace, also known as the memory palace or the memory theatre, is something I want badly! Ever since I read the incredible book, the Art of Memory by Frances Yates, I have dreamed of building a mind palace. But in medicine, we should be able to externalize the palace–in fact, we must! The method of loci will not suffice. We need a place to store all of the literature, books, and internet posts/media we feel will be valuable. The storage must be durable (if an internet site goes down, the work remains). If we lose our paid access, we retain the full text of the literature…..” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farmer Service Solution 13 mins – “Half of the world’s poorest people have something in common: they’re small farmers. In this eye-opening talk, activist Andrew Youn shows how his group, One Acre Fund, is helping these farmers lift themselves out of poverty by delivering to them life-sustaining farm services that are already in use all over the world. Enter this talk believing we’ll never be able to solve hunger and extreme poverty, and leave it with a new understanding of the scale of the world’s biggest problems.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fat and Sugar P2 54 mins – “Jill Eisen explores the complex, and sometimes contradictory, science of nutrition – and tries to find clarity amidst the thicket of studies and ambiguous research.” At the link find the title, “Fat and Sugar, Part 2, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160622_86751.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fat People 67 mins – “The way people talk about being fat is shifting. With one-third of Americans classified as overweight, and another third as obese, and almost none of us losing weight and keeping it off, maybe it’s time to rethink the way we see being fat. A show inspired by Lindy West’s book Shrill.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Nations Surgeon 23 mins – “As the first female indigenous woman to graduate from UBC’s medical school, Dr. Nadine Caron says there’s so much to be done to ensure Canada’s Aboriginal people get the health care they need. And she knows how hard it can be from her own experience.” At the link find the title, “Dr. Nadine Caron on her trailblazing path as a First Nations surgeon,” Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160621_52545.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Fraud Forensics 23 mins – “It’s a terrifying thought that a secret chemical war is being waged on supermarket shelves, yet as Sorting the beef from the bull shows, it’s a war that’s as old as time itself. From Roman times onward (apparently the Romans were slightly crazy because their wine was adulterated with lead), the book explores some of these hidden battles as criminals and inspectors attempt to outmanoeuvre each other in a game of chemical hide and seek – one side trying a new wheeze, the other scrambling to detect it….” At the link right-click “Download: Chemistry World Book Club – Sorting the beef from the bull.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Psychiatrist 29 mins – “Dr. Joel Watts’ job isn’t to treat the killers he works with, but to assess their mental state — a side of the criminal justice system Canadians rarely hear about.” At the link find the title, “Forensic psychiatrist opens up on his hours of analyzing killer Luka Magnotta, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160620_70870.mp3” and select “Save LinkAs” from the pop-up menu.

Free Trade Agreement 59 mins – “In conversation with Merit E. Janow, Dean of Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs, Michael Froman, United States Trade Representative, discusses the future of U.S. trade, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and U.S. economic leadership in Asia. Froman examines how the TPP raises labor and environmental standards, addresses exchange rate policy and currency transparency, and prohibits data localization in an unprecedented way. He also speaks to the political challenge of getting TPP passed, which countries are likely to benefit most from its implementation, and how the agreement relates to China’s economic future in particular.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Gig Economy 47 mins – “It’s the age of the “gig economy.” If you’ve got a fulltime job, don’t be so sure it will stay that way. New apps and business models are turning all kinds of people into Uber drivers or the equivalent. Contractors, not employees. Making a living gig by gig. But the law has not kept up. Workers in the gig economy may have freedom, but few have benefits. Sick days. Retirement. A way to bargain. Workers comp. Unemployment. This hour On Point, making the gig economy work for workers.” At the link right-click the tiny arrow in the cloud below the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Computer Liabilities 6 mins – “IT Security of High-Impact Systems – Audio interview by GAO staff with Greg Wilshusen, Director, Information Technology” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gravity Wave Detection 59 mins – “Janna Levin, Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College; Author, Black Hole Blues and Other Songs from Outer SpaceIf black holes collide in outer space and no one can see it, does it make a sound? A black hole collision is an event more powerful than any since the origin of the universe. But when black holes collide, they will do so unilluminated—emanating only gravitational waves. The only evidence would be the sound of spacetime ringing. Levin shares the obsessions, the aspirations, and the trials of the scientists who embarked on an arduous, 50-year endeavor to capture these elusive waves and record the soundtrack of the universe.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grunt Life 46 mins – “We welcome best-selling science writer Mary Roach back on the show to talk about her latest book Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.” At the link find the title, “138 Mary Roach – The Curious Science of Humans at War, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 225dd023-9ed4-4516-bba8-2403d8562312.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grunt Work 62 mins – “Millions of people serve in our armed forces, but what does it take get them prepared and keep them alive? Roach tackles the science behind some of a soldier’s most challenging adversaries—panic, exhaustion, heat and noise. She shares some of her bizarre experiences dodging hostile fire as part of a training exercise with the U.S. Marine Corps Paintball Team and staying up all night with the crew manning missiles on the nuclear submarine USS Tennessee. Take a tour of duty with Roach and you’ll never think about our nation’s defenders the same way again.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Control Law 48 mins – “Following a deadly mass shooting that killed 49 people at a Florida nightclub, debate over how to address gun violence has re-emerged. The Orlando shooter had been on an FBI terrorist watch list but was able to legally purchase an assault-style rifle a few years later. The Senate votes today on four different amendments, which seek to address gun violence in different ways. The Democratic measures ban suspected terrorists from buying a gun and impose mandatory background checks while Republican versions are less restrictive and focus on alerting law enforcement. Guest host Cecilia Kang and guests discuss new attempts in Congress to address gun violence.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Gun Culture 45 mins – “The mass shooting at Pulse nightclub in Orlando has led to a revival of the debate over assault weapons, but journalist Evan Osnos says the real growth in gun ownership is from small, concealed handguns. “Something really profound has changed in the way that we use guns,” Osnos tells Fresh Air‘s Terry Gross. “Concealed carry, as it’s known, is now legal in all 50 states.” Osnos, who writes about the evolution of concealed carry in the current issue of The New Yorker, estimates that there are about 13 million people who are licensed to carry a concealed gun in the United States — more than 12 times the number of police officers and detectives in America. He says that gun manufacturers market a “concealed-carry lifestyle,” which uses fear to sell guns….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heroin for Depression 30 mins – “For many sick people, getting even a temporary break from pain sounds too good to be true. But this week we hear from three people who did get a reprieve from a chronic disease, sometimes in very unconventional ways. One of our listeners, Allison, struggled with severe, undiagnosed depression in her twenties. She hooked up with a no-good boyfriend who got her into a dangerous habit: heroin. Today, she’s 57 and she knows the guy and the drugs were trouble. But she also says heroin had a surprising side effect. Sara Benincasa is a stand-up comedian who grapples with agoraphobia, a fear of crowds and busy places. But during a trip to the Netherlands she encountered a place that changed how she faces this fear, and helped her see what life could look like when she wasn’t scared to leave the house. Hanna wrote into us with a really intimate story about life with ulcerative colitis, an incurable disease with some difficult side effects. When traditional treatments failed, she and her mom tried an experiment that changed how Hanna thinks about her body and her daily life.” At the link click the circle with three dots beside “Listen,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HG Wells 54 mins – “He foretold the atomic bomb, he believed in a world government, he wrote books about both science and science fiction and was the first popular communicator of scientific ideas. Today we commemorate the 150th anniversary of the birth of Herbert George Wells. HG Wells changed the way science was understood by the public, his writings and his warnings are part of the way we think today. The backdrop to all his work, both fiction and non-fiction, was what science will deliver in the future and what we will do with the knowledge. Will it be used for good or evil? Sharon Carleton reports.” At the link fight click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hip Hop Culture 19 mins – “Here, at The Remix, we like to think of ourselves as hip hop scholars and that we are the best damn hip hop scholarship podcast — period. But what exactly does that mean? On his episode, we take a step back to look at the bigger picture.” At the link find the title, “Hip Hop Culture 101, Jun, 2015,” right-click “Media files primer.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV Laws 24 mins – “Last summer, in a Missouri courtroom, a college wrestler named Michael Johnson was sentenced to 30 years in prison for “recklessly infecting a partner with HIV.”Johnson, who also goes by “Tiger Mandingo”, was accused of knowingly infecting his partners with HIV, although at least one of them said Johnson called to tell him the diagnosis when Johnson tested positive for the virus. The case shed light on the stigmas surrounding sexually transmitted infections, or STIs, and especially HIV/AIDS. In more than 30 states there is a legal requirement for HIV positive individuals to disclose their status to whomever they’re having sex with. And while most people agree that honest conversation is a good practice, the laws allow people with HIV to be imprisoned for even spitting, biting or oral sex. “Every person with HIV in the country who knows they have HIV is one accusation away from finding themselves in a courtroom,” said Sean Strub, director of The Sero Project. Strub was diagnosed with HIV in the 1980s. Since then, treatments for STIs like HIV/AIDS has made significant progress across the globe. But Strub argues that an HIV diagnosis has continued to carry a stigma, perhaps even worse than before. And Strub said forcing people to disclose their status can backfire, and alienate a population that needs support. While Strub is working to change the policy, New York University sex researcher and educator, Zhana Vrangalova, is focused on challenging society’s perception of risky sex….” At the link click the circle with three dots beside “Listen,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing for Kids 58 mins – “In this podcast Paul discusses the 12 investment decisions all first time investors must face. He speaks to both the parents, as well as the young investor, about the life changing impact good decisions can have on the young investor’s future. There are a couple of important links mentioned in the podcast.” At the link right-click “Download’ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS History 58 mins – “Professor Fawaz Gerges looks the history and rise of the Islamic State (ISIS/ISIL). Professor Gerges is interviewed by Geneive Abdo, author of [Mecca and Main Street: Muslim Life in America After 9/11].” At the link find the title, “After Words with Fawaz Gerges, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.443112.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jazz Begins 38 mins – “The story of how Jazz began. – Between the Liner Notes is a documentary style podcast about music, why it is the way it is and how it got to be that way. We are a member of The Goat Rodeo podcast network.” At the link find the title, “11: The District, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jim Crow Discussion 11 mins – “Michelle Alexander’s 2010 book “The New Jim Crow” redefined how many view mass incarceration of black men in the United States, generating discussions about the role of race in prison stats and the legacy of racism in the legal treatment of blacks. However, professor Adolph Reed of The University of Pennsylvania says the analogy to “Jim Crow” doesn’t hold up. “I think that a lot of younger scholars find it powerful because they don’t understand the old Jim Crow,” Reed says.” At the link find the title, “What ‘The New Jim Crow’ gets wrong about the old Jim Crow, May, 2015,” right-click “Media files reed-crow-edit.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Macedonia Heroines 27 mins – “Lucy Ash meets Macedonia’s Special Prosecutors -three women who have become the scourge of the political elite and heroines of the street protests now rocking the tiny Balkan nation. Their job is to investigate claims of wrongdoing and corruption revealed in a huge wiretapping scandal. The former Prime Minister has called them puppets of the opposition but to protestors on the street the fearless trio are Macedonia’s Charlie’s Angels. But will they succeed in their crime fighting mission when they have a tight deadline and most state institutions are either refusing to cooperate with them or dragging their feet. Many argue that a Special Prosecution is not much use without a Special Court. Under the current patronage based system, high court judges are appointed only after the approval of senior politicians and the secret police.” At the link find the title, “Macedonia’s Colourful Revolution, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03z4wj0.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marilyn Michaels 71 mins – “Impressionist, singer and comedienne Marilyn Michaels has spent her entire life in show business, performing in the Yiddish Theater at the tender age of 7, signing with a major record label as a teenager, working the Copa, the Catskills and Vegas showrooms and appearing on virtually every TV variety show of the 1960s and ’70s. Also, Marilyn idolizes Judy Garland, duets with Frank Gorshin, smooches Phil Slivers and takes advice from Jack Benny. PLUS: Gottfried “meets” Streisand! Danny Kaye makes his move! Orson Welles gets verklempt! Ethel Merman lays down the law! And the rise and (tragic) fall of George Kirby!” At the link find the title, “#108: Marilyn Michaels. Jun, 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/3660368/8f337cd8-4e29-43a1-8952-ee0363dff79c.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Shooting Response P1 34 mins – “Critical incidents, provider stress and the Orlando active shooter incident with Critical Incident Stress expert Dan McGuire from CISM Perspectives. If that’s what you’re looking for, you found it. It’s the Nursing Show.” At the link find the title, “Orlando Shooting, Nursing Stress Part 1 and Episode 400, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files NursingShow 20160620.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Shooting Response P2 32 mins – “More on critical incident stress and how responders and hospital staff are struggling to recover from the aftermath of the Orlando night club shooting. If that’s what you’re looking for, you found it. It’s the Nursing Show.” At the link find the title, “Critical Incident Stress for Nurses Part 2 and Episode 401,Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files NursingShow 20160627.mp3”

Microbiology Connection 77 mins – ”Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, Michele Swanson, and Michael Schmidt. Guests: David S. Schneide and Vanessa Sperandio The TWiMers get together at ASM Microbe 2016 in Boston to speak with David and Vanessa to talk about their work on regulation of bacterial virulence in the gut by bacterial adrenergic sensors, and the physiological mechanisms that make us ill and that help us recover.” At the link right-click “…download TWIM#130” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbiome Research 15 mins – “The microbiome is one of the fastest-growing areas in biomedical research, fueled in part by engaged patients and citizen scientists with an interest in understanding how their microbiota may affect their overall health. In this One-on-One, Medscape editor-in-chief Eric Topol talks with Jessica Richman about the value of citizen science as well as her company, uBiome, which provides microbiome analyses to consumers and plans to begin providing physician-ordered medical diagnostics in the near future.” At the link find the title, “Citizen Science and Mapping the Microbiome, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files 864972.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muslims in America – “This week we welcome multi-platform journalist and producer Nida Khan to discuss recent incidents of violence against Muslims as backlash over the San Bernardino shootings and Paris attacks.” At the link find the title, “Islamophobia, Donald Trump, and racializing the war on terror, Dec, 2015,” right-click “Media files muslim-web.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nanotechnology 4 mins – …So what is it that makes the nano-world so compelling? For one, physics acts differently at the atomic level. We have to rethink basic ideas like what it means to build and manufacture at such a small scale. No nano-forklifts or welding machines. We’ll learn a lot by thinking little. Then there’s concern for our safety. If certain types of nanotechnology pose a threat, we need to know about them. But there’s also … the dream. The thought of infinitesimally small entities performing complex tasks — with results we can see in our macro-world — is exciting. Buy a can of paint with nanobots that do the painting for you. Get an injection of nano-entities that seek out and destroy cancer. Buy nanofiber clothes that make you invisible. Scientists will tell you that possibility quickly gives way to hyperbole. But it’s the hyperbole of dreamers. Will hungry nanobots ever devour the earth? I find that a little hard to swallow. But will we discover new and wonderful things as we think ever smaller? Of that, I’m certain….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….,” and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Native American Land 52 mins – “Native American tribes have asked the Obama administration to use the Antiquities Act to protect nearly 2 million acres of land in southeastern Utah. It’s a region known as Bears Ears, and it contains more than 100,000 archaeological and sacred sites. Opponents of the proposal—including many high-ranking Utah officials—agree the land needs some kind of protection, but they say a monument’s the wrong way to do it. Monday, we’ll hear from both sides in the debate over the Bears Ears National Monument.” At the link right-click the play button next to “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Net Neutrality Ruling 30 mins – “Fred Campbell, director of Tech Knowledge and Matt Wood, policy director at Free Press discuss a U.S. Court of Appeals decision on internet regulation. The Court upheld the FCC’s 2015 rules, which require ISPs to treat internet traffic equally.” At the link find the title, “Communicators Roundtable on Net Neutrality Decision, Jun, 2016,”right-click “Media file program.446172.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Networking 44 mins – “ …The first time I ever met Brandon in person, he told me he wanted to create a huge event for young entrepreneurs – and he wanted to do it in our relatively small city of Des Moines. I knew it’d be a challenge – there’d need to be funding, speakers, events, and tons of logistical planning to make everything run smoothly….Having been out of college for only a couple years, Brandon had no experience answering those kinds of questions. And yet, back in April, the Young Entrepreneur Convention put on its first successful event. Additionally, Brandon has been able to utilize the connections he’s made through setting up YEC to kickstart other ventures – including an upcoming TV show. This is the reason I wanted to talk with Brandon on the show; among the people I know personally, he’s one of the best at making connections and convincing people to support huge ideas. In this episode, we’ll get deeper into the details of how YEC became a successful event, and into what that success has led to. Perhaps more interestingly, Brandon also talks about the path that led up to YEC – how he started doing things in college (and right out of it) to build relationships and lay the foundation that allowed it all to come together.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nordic Culture 45 mins – “Bernie Sanders’ proposals for free education and healthcare were flatly rejected by those who said “we are not Denmark”. A new book argues that the policies and protections in Nordic countries don’t work because of shared benevolence, but because they benefit everyone’s selfish interests. Today, a Finnish expat gives the US a pep talk. Then, Zarif Khan migrated to America in the early 20th century and became prosperous and beloved in his Wyoming town…though the law prevented his citizenship.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Norman Lear 20 mins – “In the 1970s (and decades following), TV producer Norman Lear touched the lives of millions with culture-altering sitcoms like All in the Family, The Jeffersons and Good Times, pushing the boundaries of the era and giving a primetime voice to underrepresented Americans. In an intimate, smart conversation with Eric Hirshberg, he shares with humility and humor how his early relationship with “the foolishness of the human condition” shaped his life and creative vision.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obesity-Cancer Connection 26 mins – “You’ve heard it once, you’ve heard it a thousand times: the U.S. has a big problem with obesity. But did you know that there are demonstrated links between obesity and all kinds of serious health problems-—including cancer? In this episode, Science & the City explores the obesity-cancer connection. This podcast is presented as part of the Translational Medicine Initiative, a partnership between the New York Academy of Sciences and the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation to foster the translation of basic science discoveries into improved clinical healthcare. It was a co-production of The Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science and Science and the City.” At the link find the title, “Unraveling the Obesity-Cancer Connection, Mar, 2012,” right-click “Media files 03282012_ObesityCancerConnection.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online shaming 47 mins – “The internet can shame in a hurry, and at a scale and speed we’ve never known. Tear people up. Take them down. Whatever you thought of Gorilla Mom, the size and speed of the cyber mob that went after her was astonishing. Alligator Mom, who lost her two-year-old to a gator at Disney World – even she got hit. The attacks can be ferocious, heartless and often uniformed. Like a lynch mob. This hour On Point, internet shaming. When is it citizen justice? When is it mob rule?” At the link right-click the tiny arrow in the cloud below the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Palm Tree Protection 5 mins – “Here’s a question that sounds a lot more theoretical than it really is: When is a tree not a tree? The short answer: When it’s a coconut palm in the Indian state of Goa. In December 2015, the state government kicked the coconut palm off its master list of trees. Earlier this week, two conservation groups sued the state to reverse that decision. To understand the case, we have to go back in time to 1984, when Goa passed a law to imprison anyone who cut down trees covering more than about five acres in one year. To fell more trees, even in a private garden, you need permission from the state forest department. With the state government’s re-classification, the coconut is no longer protected under this act. The state’s environment minister Rajendra Arlekar said at a recent press conference that the amendment was a response to the demands of farmers and orchard owners who begged the government to remove the palm from the list of regulated trees in order to replant higher-yield palms. But citizens and activists think this is really a move to appease builders.   “The government is clearly trying to play games with all of us,” says Armando Gonsalves, who runs Goa For Giving, one of the two NGOs suing the state. “They say it’s for the benefit of the farmers. It’s not. A real farmer would never cut a coconut tree — no Goan would do that, unless you’re a builder. For a builder, it’s blanket permission to do what you want, pick up the land and cut it.” According to Gonsalves, the builder lobby is very strong in Goa. No one will directly stand up to them. The only builder who would speak on the record insisted they never cut trees. On the contrary, they said, they plant many more trees than they ever cut down….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Personality Changes 57 mins – “We like to think of our own personalities – and those of our spouses, children and friends – as predictable and constant over time. But what if they aren’t? In this episode, Alix Spiegel visits a prison to explore whether there is such a thing as a stable personality. And Lulu Miller asks whether scientists can point to a single thing about a person that doesn’t change over time. The answer might surprise you.” At the link find the title, “Jun, 2016, The Personality Myth,” right-click the circle with three dots and select “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Planet Detection 32 mins – “Many of the thousands of alien worlds discovered around distant stars are unlike anything in our solar system. Some face perpetual hurricane-force winds; others have not one, but two suns. But some of these planets do have striking similarities to those in our own cosmic neighbourhood. Could an Earth-like planet capable of harbouring life be one of our next discoveries? Stuart Clark’s new book, The Search For Earth’s Twin, explores these themes, and he joins me in the studio.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcast Reliability 11 mins – A response to criticism about the use of podcasts as a source of medical information by medical practitioners. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Porcupines 4 mins – “We’ve been hearing a lot about porcupines this year. They seem to be everywhere! It’s positively a plague of porcupines! So why are there so many? Biologists don’t have an official answer, but Dave Anderson has a hypothesis involving coyotes and fisher cats. The porcupine’s only real predator is the fisher. It takes a tough critter to eat a porcupine. Anecdotally, trackers and hunters are reporting that fisher numbers appear to be down this year, so it makes sense that porcupine numbers are up…” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Puerto Ricans Rebuilding 5 mins – “José Lebrón and Sheilla Torres had heard the news from Puerto Rico: hospitals aren’t being reimbursed, schools are closing, the official unemployment rate is close to 12 percent, and poverty stands at 45 percent. But a year ago they decided to move back to their island anyway….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radiation Background 30 mins – “Why do we fear radiation? Is it because so much about it is still unknown, or that it’s often invisible to us? Timothy Jorgensen of Georgetown University explains…Timothy Jorgensen, associate professor of radiation medicine at Georgetown University, Washington DC and author of Strange Glow, joins Nicola Davis to discuss the story of radiation, exploring the varied ways it exists, and dispelling some of the myths surrounding it.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rapper Bank Robbers 15 mins – “Journalist Michael Gonzales takes a deep dive into the Philadelphia rap community of the 1980s to find out if where the rappers came from held any clues to where they would eventually end up. His article, “How Cool C and Steady B Robbed a Bank, Killed a Cop and Lost Their Souls,” is in the current edition of the online magazine Cuepoint.” At the link find the title, “How ’80s rappers Steady B and Cool C went from musical sensations to murderers, Apr, 2015,” right-click “Media files gonzo.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rare Books 59 mins – “Catherine Williamson, Ph.D., Vice President, Director of Fine Books & Manuscripts/Entertainment Memorabilia, Bonhams, Los Angeles Dr. Catherine Williamson, who frequently appears as an appraiser for PBS’ “Antiques Roadshow,” is vice president and director of fine books and manuscripts/entertainment memorabilia at Bonhams in Los Angeles. She will talk about the challenges and issues facing appraisers and collectors today, and share stories of some great discoveries on the “Roadshow”—and elsewhere.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Totals 49 mins – “According to a report from the United Nations released this week, 65 million people around the world were displaced from their home by the end of last year– the largest number ever recorded by the agency. While the majority are people are exiled within their own country around 20 million are refugees. The largest group, not surprisingly, is fleeing Syria. Europe has struggled to cope with the influx of migrants and have moved to close their borders. On this side of the Atlantic, anti-immigrant rhetoric is running high. Susan Page and her panel discuss the global refugee crisis and how governments in the U.S. and around the world are responding.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Refugees in Australia 10 mins – “With over 40 years working in trauma, Paul Stevenson believes the conditions of the island camps of Nauru and Manus are the worst he has ever witnessed.” At the link find the title, “Psychologist describes Australian migrant camps as an atrocity, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160623_44287.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Retirement Plan 68 mins – “Larry Jacobson will describe how to make a meaningful and fulfilling transition from career to retirement. Jacobson is a non-financial retirement transition coach whose coaching program, “Sail into Retirement,” is specifically designed to answer the question “What am I going to do with my time in retirement?” Not accepting that retirement is a time to stop growing, he will describe how he coaches clients to discover untapped passions beyond their previous careers, and combines these passions with the knowledge from their vocations to build a plan of action for a retirement of fulfillment and purpose.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Romanovs 60 mins – “Author Simon Sebag Montefiore discusses his book, [The Romanovs], about the dynasty that ruled Russia for over 300 years.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Simon Sebag Montefiore,Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.441803.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Sake Revolution 56 mins – “Jake Myrick, Co-Founder, Sequoia Sake Sequoia Sake, which produces the first artisan sake (pronounced sa-KEH) in San Francisco, is leading the next revolution in beverages. Sequoia blends the traditional art of making sake learned from Japan, where it has been brewed for more than 2,000 years, with the enterprising spirit and unique qualities of San Francisco. Sequoia produces small batches of hand-crafted, premium sake with full rich flavors. It is part of the new American “micro-sake” revolution. Myrick will help us understand how sake is made and how to enjoy its complex flavors and varieties. Come hear and taste!” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science History 23 mins – “Those who don’t know history are doomed to reinvent wheels and miss out on great stories! A historian and a young scientist discuss the rewards and importance of learning about the history of science. Dr. Carol Moberg, historian of science and Senior Research Associate at The Rockefeller University, shares some of the stories behind her book, Entering an Unseen World, about the history and development of modern cell biology. She’s joined by Rockefeller University Graduate Fellow Joseph Luna, who lends his perspective on the value of studying the history of science for students and young scientists.” At the link find the title, “September 28, 2013, Making (and Learning) History!” right-click “download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sea Rise – Norfolk Naval Base 7 mins – “When US Secretary of State John Kerry wanted to push his country to take the lead on climate change, it was no accident that he chose to give a speech in Norfolk, Virginia. Norfolk Naval Station is the biggest naval installation in the world. But, Kerry said last November, “the land it is built on is literally sinking.”That was just weeks before the big United Nations climate change conference in Paris, and Kerry was framing climate change as a national security issue….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sea Rise in Holland 6 mins – “The Dutch have been the world’s experts at building dikes and keeping back water for centuries. Building dikes to hold back high water is pretty much how the country was formed hundreds of years ago. But the Dutch relationship with dikes is changing. And there’s no better way to see that change than from … atop a dike….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sea Warming 60 mins – “At the new raw edge of climate change, scientists Peter Brewer (Monterey Bay Aquarium Institute) & John Shepherd (University of Southampton) peek into upcoming Royal Society conference on oxygen depletion in warming oceans. Seasoned space specialist James Kasting (Penn State) explains a possible end, with scalding seas & bacteria as the only survivors.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Offender Prison 50 mins – “Film-maker Rex Bloomstein, who pioneered a British prison television documentary, gains unprecedented access to the largest sex offender prison in Europe, HMP Whatton in the UK. Since the revelations surrounding high profile figures in the UK entertainment industry, there are more sex offenders in English and Welsh prisons than ever before, around 11,600 out of a total population of 86,000. Bloomstein explores the methods used to get prisoners to confront their offending behaviour and to prepare them to go back out into the world.” At the link find the title, “Treating the Sex Offender, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03ynx24.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharing Economy 49 mins – “’The Sharing Economy may be a misnomer. According to expert Arun Sundararajan, this model — from Airbnb and Uber to Etsy and Taskrabbit — is more like “crowd-based capitalism.” And it’s changing our country’s economy and how we think about employment. Sundararajan and The Washington Post’s Emily Badger on the so-called Sharing Economy of today and tomorrow, and what it could mean for the future of work.” (2 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Slave Women in the Civil War 75 mins – “Boston University professor Nina Silber and her class discuss the roles and lives of women during the Civil War, with a focus on female slaves.” At the link find the title, “Slavery, Women and the Civil War, Mar 2016,” right-click “Media files program.417339.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery in Early America 29 mins – “American slavery predates the founding of the United States. Wendy Warren, author of New England Bound, says the early colonists imported African slaves and enslaved and exported Native Americans….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Pole Rescue 5 mins – “Early Wednesday morning, in the icy cold and pitch black of the Antarctic winter, a small Canadian plane touched down near the South Pole and evacuated two sick workers in a daring rescue mission. It was only the third ever staged at the South Pole during the southern hemisphere’s winter. A Twin Otter turboprop plane retrieved the sick workers from the Amundsen-Scott research station, about 820 feet from the geographic South Pole, a spokesman for the US National Science Foundation, Peter West said. The plane’s crew and a medical team had made the 10-hour journey to the South on Tuesday night to reach two unidentified patients, whose medical condition could not be treated on site. The planes picked up the patients and touched back down at Rothera, a British base in Antarctica about 1,500 miles away from the South Pole station, Wednesday Eastern time…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space Colonies 30 mins – “In 1968, an Italian industrialist and a Scottish scientist started a club to address what they considered to be humankind’s greatest problems—issues like pollution, resource scarcity, and overpopulation. Meeting in Rome, Italy, the group came to be known as the Club of Rome and it grew to include politicians, scientists, economists and business leaders from around the world. Together with a group of MIT researchers doing computer modeling, The Club of Rome concluded that sometime in the 21st century, earth would reach its carrying capacity—that resources would not keep up with population—and there would be a massive collapse of global society. In 1972, the Club of Rome published a book outlining their findings called The Limits to Growth. The book became a bestseller and was translated into more than two dozen languages. It had its critics and detractors, but overall The Limits to Growth was incredibly influential, shaping environmental politics and pop culture for years to come. There was a growing sense that limits would need to be put in place in order to regulate populations and economic growth. But in the midst of the debate, a physicist named Gerard (Gerry) O’Neill suggested a solution—one that would ask us to look beyond planet earth and into outer space. O’Neill wanted to build vast human settlements in space. And although he wasn’t the first to imagine humans living there, he was the first to come up with technologically feasible designs for habitats….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space Station Scientists 16 mins – “On 6 July, the spacecraft Soyuz MS-01 is scheduled to blast-off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, headed for the International Space Station (ISS). On board, will be Dr Kate Rubins, who, along with Anatoli Ivanishin and Takuya Onishi, will be part of the 48th expedition to the ISS, due to return in November this year. Before training with NASA, Kate worked as a microbiologist, most recently at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, where she worked on emerging viruses such as the Ebola and Lassa viruses. For this month’s podcast, we caught up with Kate as she prepared for her mission, and chatted about the experiments she’ll be undertaking in space, what it’s like to train to be an astronaut, and whether a pipette works in microgravity…” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stroke Avoidance 11 mins – “Professor Valery Feigin discusses an Article on the global burden of stroke and risk factors from 1990–2013.” At the link find the title, “Global burden of stroke: The Lancet Neurology: June 22, 2016,” right-click “ Media files laneur_160622.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Superconductivity 25 mins – “Keith & Russ talk with Allan J. Jacobson, Professor of Chemistry, and Director of the Texas Center for Superconductivity, at the University of Houston. Jacobson briefly explains the nature of superconductivity – when certain materials are cooled below a certain temperature, they lose all resistance to electricity, they repel magnetic fields, and become perfect conductors of electricity. Though it’s not fully understood how these superconducting materials work, the Texas Center for Superconductivity is looking into ways to get materials to become superconductive at higher temperatures.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tax Refund Frauds 6 mins – “Identity Theft Tax Refund Fraud- Audio interview by GAO staff with Jay McTigue, Director, Strategic Issues” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Team Rubicon P2 31 mins – “This week on the Disaster Podcast, in part 2 of a two-part episode, we will be looking at one of the premier disaster response NGOs (non-governmental organizations) in the country and probably the world right now, Team Rubicon. Podcast co-hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and Sam Bradley are joined by long-time regular Dr. Joe Holley to chat with Dennis Clancy, Deputy Director of Response for Team Rubicon. Dennis is also a U.S. Army veteran. In this two-part episode, Dennis talks about the structure of Team Rubicon and how they work to respond to disasters. We also talk about the origins of the organization and what services they provide. Find out more about Team Rubicon at TeamRubiconUSA.org. Check out last week’s episode where we looked at how the team was created and some information about where they’ve responded locally and around the world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Trends 62 mins – “Futurist, author, and visionary Kevin Kelly talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his latest book, The Inevitable, Kelly’s look at what the future might be like and the role of the human experience in a world increasingly filled with information, artificial intelligence, virtual reality, and the connecting of the planet’s population.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ukraine 27 mins – “Since the start of the conflict in Ukraine, huge numbers of men have been conscripted into service on the frontline. Many are now returning home to a civilian society which has little understanding of their experiences or how the fighting has changed them. Reporter David Stern follows of a group of Ukrainian veterans as they attempt to adjust to life after the war fare. He is with Sasha, a young recruit posted to the frontline, as he experiences an emotional reunion with his family after his demobilisation. But questions remain about his ability to cope away from his unit, and the psychological impact of the fighting. As Europe’s only active conflict in a generation enters its third year, the programme will explore the unique pressures and dilemmas that a huge cross-section of Ukrainian men is facing after demobilisation.” At the link find the title, “Ukraine – Back from the War, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03yz6kp.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Underground Railroad 14 mins – “The Remix takes a look at a 150-year-old celebration of freedom called Juneteenth. We speak with Cornelia Swinson, executive director of The Johnson House Historic Site, located in the Germantown neighborhood of Philadelphia. Built in 1768, it is the city’s only remaining “accessible and intact” Underground Railroad stop.” At the link find the title, “150 years of Juneteenth — why you should care about celebrating freedom, Jun, 2015,”right-click “Media files junth-web.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virology Connection 89 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Alan DoveGuest: Erica Ollmann SaphireVincent and Alan speak with Erica about her career and her work on understanding the functions of proteins of Ebolaviruses, Marburg virus, and other hemorrhagic fever viruses, at ASM Microbe 2016 in Boston, MA.” At the link right-click “Download TWIV 394” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Control 14 mins – “A country has to sell what it’s got. Lesotho always had more rain and snow than it knew what to do with. So Lesotho made a deal with its neighbor, South Africa, to buy the water. The country moved rivers and built one of the most impressive water projects in Africa to deliver it. Then the drought hit. All over Lesotho, the grass is dry. The corn is stunted. And cows are dying. Yet the water deal with South Africa still holds. Lesotho promised to sell the water and it has to keep delivering it. On the other side of the water tunnels is the city of Johannesburg, one of the economic engines of Africa. The metropolis grew on water from Lesotho and needs even more of it in the future. And they’ll do just about anything to keep the water flowing. In a world of climate change, there are countries that are rich in water and countries that need it desperately. But the story of Lesotho is a cautionary tale about how water is unlike any other export.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water from Great Lakes 21 mins – “The decision to allow Waukesha to “borrow” water from Lake Michigan raises concern for the possibility of future water wars between Canada and the United States.” At the link find the title, “Canadian mayors worry that water to Waukesha sets a dangerous precedent, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160623_45562.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wi-Fi Pioneer Cees Links 64 mins – “Cees Links is a pioneer of the wireless data industry, a visionary leader bringing the world of mobile computing and continuous networking together. Under his responsibility, the first wireless LANs were developed which ultimately became household technology integrated into the PCs and notebooks everyone is familiar with. He also pioneered the development of access points, home networking routers and hotspot base stations, all widely used today. ” At the link click “Download Options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women President 52 mins – “When suffragist Victoria Woodhull set her sights on the White House in 1872, women didn’t have the right to vote. She was the first woman to run for America’s highest office, but of course she wasn’t the last. Tuesday, historian Ellen Fitzpatrick joins us to discuss the presidential bids of Woodhull, Republican Margaret Chase Smith in 1964, and Democrat Shirley Chisholm in 1972. We’ll talk about the opposition they faced and how they paved the way for women like Hillary Clinton today… Her book is called The Highest Glass Ceiling: Women’s Quest for the American Presidency” At the link right-click the play button next to “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 374 – Jan 18, 2019: Amazon and Brexit Situations, Animal Poaching for Medicine, Biofabrication, Birth Surrogates in Canada, Black Life, Border Wall Investigation, Brain Cancer Research, Burundi Human Rights Violations, California Problems, Climate Report Warning, Cuban Infiltrator, Ebola Virus Research, Exosomes, Female Led Revolution, Google and Amazon Operations, Greyhound Diaries, Innovator Henry Sutton, Instant Noodle History, Investment Myths, Investment Strategies, Jamal Khashoggi Murder, Ladies’ Landmine Agency, Loan Forgiveness Program Is Broken, Loneliness, Palm Oil Problems, Plastic Recycled Into Roadways, Psychedelic Research, Radio La Colifata in Argentina, Reading Wars, Red State Blue State, Regeneration Research, Renewable Energy Retailer, Social Media Impact, Soup Kitchen Operations, Stroke Treatment, Successful Investment Strategy, Syrian Survivor, Taxation Changes Discussion, Vertical Farming with Trump Jr, Veselnitskaya Indictment, Vicky Phelan Activist, Vietnam War, White House Press Access, Women Reporters

Exercise your ears: the 68 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 444 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 23,756 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 157GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 496 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Amazon and Brexit Situations 50 mins – “Slate Money talks Amazon’s new headquarters, mayhem with Brexit, and Steve Cohen getting more billions. ” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Poaching for Medicine 11 mins – “Bears, tigers, rhinos, pangolin. They are all in poachers’ sights, slaughtered and cut to pieces, then smuggled to hubs of traditional Chinese medicine such as Hong Kong. The pressure is so intense that many species face extinction in the near future. And for what? For treatments for which there is little evidence of effectiveness. Peter Hadfield visits Kazakhstan where the Asian antelope, the Saiga once numbered in their millions. Recently, males have been hunted for their horns, and the species is now close to collapse. Work is being done to find substitutes for animal parts, but it’s an uphill battle against tradition. And now the Chinese government is supporting traditional Chinese medicine by setting up teaching and clinical centres outside China, increasing demand for pieces of animals facing extinction.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronomer George Ellery Hale 27 mins – “A celebration of the amazing work of the little known astronomer (the world’s first astrophysicist) George Ellery Hale. He covered the peak of Mount Wilson with a constellation of instruments for observing the sky. His first objective – to study one particular star, our Sun. Hale’s monumental discovery in 1908 – that the Sun generated powerful magnetic fields – has been a source of inspiration for the world’s astronomer’s. During his life (born Chicago 1868, died Pasadena 1938) he founded several major observatories and introduced novel telescope designs that saw further and deeper into space. In fact, breakthroughs in astronomy in the first decades of the 20th Century are largely due to Hale’s instruments – he actually built the world’s largest telescope four times. He also established the internationally renowned university known as CalTech and brought scientists from different disciplines together in global co-operative research organisations that still operate today. And the publication he started in the 1890s, the Astrophysical journal, has become the leading forum of its kind – in the world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Australian Science Writing 4 mins – “Physicist and Australian of the Year Michelle Simmons reflects on how scientists view the world, and how this is illustrated in the short stories featured in this year’s The Best Australia Science Writing 2018.At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bernie Sanders Interview 82 mins – “Most Americans support progressive policies, and Bernie Sanders wants to give them what they want.” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Biofabrication 10 mins – “Engineer Mathilde Desselle shows some applications of biofabrication, brought about by combining 3D scanning, modelling and printing. An injured skull has a specifically designed implant to plug the hole, following injury. A model of a patient’s heart shows doctors what they’ll see during an operation. And prosthetics are produced for children with deformed ears. As Mathilde Desselle explains, these were examples shown to students during a recent STEM camp run by QUT where high school students are shown the surprising applications which arise from studying STEM subjects.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Birth Surrogates in Canada 27 mins – “In Canada, many women volunteer to give birth to a stranger’s child and do not get paid in return. Under Canadian laws, gestational surrogates receive only expenses in exchange for getting pregnant and carrying a baby for nine months. There is an altruistic surrogacy model in place, radically different from commercial surrogacy in other countries. This forward-thinking country has seen a dramatic increase in surrogacy, with an estimated 400% growth over the last decade, and has welcomed intended parents from all over the globe, who get matched to a Canadian surrogate to go on a life-changing journey together. Surrogates in Canada are part of a tight-knit community: they get together to share experiences and exchange advice, as the country debates changes in its legislation to respond to the increasing demand of women who volunteer as gestational carriers. But why do they do it? The BBC’s Valeria Perasso follows them as they navigate the emotional challenges of giving life to a baby that they will say goodbye to after birth, and meets the families who will welcome home these special babies.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Black Life 60 mins – “Reniqua Allen examines whether the “American Dream” is attainable today. She’s interviewed by [The Root] editor-in-chief Danielle Belton.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Reniqua Allen” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. “

Border Wall Investigation 47 mins – “There is growing chaos at the southern border, as some officials say the Trump administration’s focus on deterrence at the border has left them unable to handle and properly house thousands of families. We’ll get a reality check on the ground.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Cancer Research 4 mins – “Andrew Olle was a highly respected journalist presenting 4 Corners on ABC TV and morning current affairs on ABC Sydney for many years. In 1995 he died from a brain tumour which was not diagnosed until he was rushed to hospital following a massive stroke and collapse. He didn’t regain consciousness and died within a week. The Olle Fund for Brain Cancer Research was established by Annette Olle to honour the memory of her late husband. Each year a dinner is held to remember Andrew and raise money for the fund. Kerrie McDonald, an Australian scientist working on brain cancer research spoke at the dinner. Her specialty is matching the right treatments to the right patients using genomics. This is an excerpt from Kerrie’s McDonald’s address.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burundi Human Rights Violations 27 mins – “An investigation into the ‘killing machine’ of one of Africa’s most repressive and secretive countries. Three years ago there was widespread unrest in the East African country of Burundi when the country’s president ran for a third term. Protestors said he was violating the constitution that limits presidential terms to just two. Since then street protests have ended but a BBC investigation has now uncovered evidence of government sponsored torture and killings designed to silence dissent. The government has always denied any human rights violations, and declined to comment on the allegations in this programme. Reporter Maud Jullien. Producers Charlotte Atwood and Michael Gallagher.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

California Problems 50 mins – “President Trump took to the airwaves Tuesday night to make his case for a wall spanning the country’s Southern border. We get reactions. Plus, KPCC’s new podcast The Big One is meant to be a wakeup call about preparing for a major earthquake along the San Andrea fault. And, we check in with Montecito mudslide victims one year later.” At the link click the play button, then right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cambodia Surrogate Mothers in Trouble 27 mins – “In a Cambodian hospital, a group of terrified new mothers nurse tiny babies under the watch of police guards. They’re surrogates, desperately poor women promised $10,000 to bear children for parents in China. But they were arrested under new anti-trafficking rules, and now they face an agonising choice: either they agree to keep children they didn’t want and can’t easily afford to bring up, children who aren’t genetically theirs – or they honour their surrogacy contracts, and face up to 20 years in jail. Tim Whewell reports on the suffering as country after country in Asia cracks down on commercial surrogacy – and asks whether the detained mothers are criminals – or victims.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Climate Report Warning 5 mins – “The 2018 Emissions Gap Report released this week by UN Environment shows global emissions have hit an historic high and are showing “no signs of peaking”. Australia is among several countries currently not on track to meet their unconditional Paris carbon emissions reduction targets by 2030. The report says global efforts need to be tripled by 2030 to hold warming at 2C and ramped up five-fold for warming to remain at 1.5C. Nick Kilvert speaks to one of the report’s lead authors, Dr Joeri Rogelj.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Infiltrator 31 mins – “When Jack Boyles signed up for the Navy in the early 1960s he was excited to work aboard the USS Shangri-La. As the ship’s only yeoman he had access to top secret information so he knew before most people why the ship was docked off of Cuba. But little did he know what was in store for him.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Virus Research 79 mins – “Brianne and Vincent tackle two studies that utilize infectious viruses to examine zoonotic potential of Bombali virus, a new ebolavirus from an insectivorous species in Sierra Leone, and a human mumps-like virus from an African flying fox in DRC” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Exosomes 79 mins -”The TWiM-opods consider two stories about exosomes, vesicles that are shed from cells: those that eliminate airway pathogens, and those from the plants we eat that shape our gut microbiome” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Female Led Revolution in Argentina 27 mins – “Argentina is on the brink of a female-led revolution, and in Buenos Aires women are fighting for an equal footing everywhere from the institutions of government to the Tango hall. Since 2015 political pressure around women’s rights has peaked, following a string of horrifying femicides. It spawned a social media movement #NiUnaMenos, and continent wide strikes and protests. This year the almost-unthinkable happened in the birthplace of the Pope, a bill to legalise abortion reached the upper house of parliament. But the abortion bill was defeated. Is the fight for gender equality in one of the most macho cultures in the world a case of two steps forward one step back? Katy Watson speaks to the activists who started this latest feminist wave, to women who have escaped violence, to a self-proclaimed reformed macho man, and explores how tango – the proud national dance of Argentina is being re-interpreted with equality in mind. The old Tango songs about a woman slighting a man and having bloody revenge exacted upon her are increasingly taboo, and female dancers have started their own feminist collective. Katy also speaks to one of the famous “Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo” about how she feels about the latest surge of public protest.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Google and Amazon Operations 45 mins – “Workers at Amazon fulfillment centers in Minneapolis are fighting for better conditions. And Amazon is starting to come to the table.” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Greyhound Diaries 50 mins – “Stories from the travelling underbelly of America, collected on Greyhound buses by traveler and musician Doug Levitt. Singer-songwriter Doug Levitt hears the stories of America’s struggling people as they ride across the country on long-haul coaches – and turns their tales into songs. For twelve years and 120,000 miles, he’s crossed the United States by Greyhound, guitar on his back, and notebook in his pocket. The people on the margins ride Greyhound, the only form of long distance travel they can afford. It makes for a singular community of people on the move, looking for work, dealing with family emergencies and taking leaps of faith in pursuit of transformation, redemption and healing. He meets travellers like Kat, whose boyfriend is in jail and who is heading back home to see her daughter. There’s Jay, who’s taking his two-year-old son back to his former partner after a two-week visit under their joint custody arrangement. There’s the traveller known as the Sombrero Man, who’s become a full-time campaigner against many causes including gun control – and who tells us a story of a man who tried to help him. And Sam, who got addicted to painkillers after being hit by a car. Doug composes songs based around his fellow passengers’ life stories, and pays a visit to the hometown of his inspiration, the songwriter Woody Guthrie, in Okemah, Oklahoma.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Hubble Trouble 27 mins – “As federal employees many US scientists have been affected by the US government shutdown. They are not being paid, can’t talk about their work or go to scientific conferences. We look at how this US political stand-off is affecting scientific research. One of the casualties is the Hubble space telescope, in need of repairs, which cannot start until its federal employed engineers can get back to work. Meanwhile, in Antarctica a US led team have extracted microbes, water and rock samples from a subglacial lake covered with kilometre thick ice. Their live samples may have evolved in the depths and dark of the lake, hidden from view for thousands of years. And just how are we to feed the world in the future? One team of scientists have successfully increased the yield of their experimental plants by 40 percent. They are hoping to repeat the technique with food crops. This comes at the same time as an investigation into China’s future food needs. While demand is going to increase, researchers offer an optimistic view, more efficient farming methods might mean China could be self-sufficient in food in years to come – and even use less land to grow it on than they do currently.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indias Online Porn 53 mins – “Politicians in parliament, colleagues in the office, commuters on the bus… the sight of someone watching porn on their mobile phone in India does not surprise anyone anymore, even if it does anger many. Access to pornography though mobile phone has been sudden and widespread in the country – some say way too sudden for a conservative society and blame this for the sexual violence against women. But when legal attempts are made to ban pornography, a strong resistance emerges in the name of freedom of expression, including sexual expression. Others argue that online pornography is the wrong target, pointing out that around a third of porn viewers in India are women. But what do Indian men themselves make of this? The BBC’s India Women Affairs correspondent Divya Arya travels the country to meet men from all backgrounds to find out.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Innovator Henry Sutton 27 mins – “eHenry Sutton was born in Ballarat in 1855. He built some of Australia’s first automobiles, developed wireless radio, and pioneered the technology behind television. He stood as an equal alongside Alexander Graham Bell, Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison. Although applauded around the world in his day for his remarkable achievements, Henry Sutton went largely unnoticed in Australia. Only when his enormous body of work is documented in one place do you gain the true picture and depth of the remarkable achievements that remained unrecorded, until now. 106 years after his death, the forgotten innovator is finally being remembered in a book written by his great granddaughter, Lorayne Branch. Robyn Williams reports from the launch of Henry Sutton The Innovative Man in Ballarat, Victoria. Below you find a link to the publisher and information on how to obtain the book.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Instant Noodle History 53 mins – “What is the most traded legal item in US prisons? Instant Noodles. According to the World Instant Noodles Association, 270 million servings of instant noodles are eaten around the world every day. Annually, that’s 16 to 17 portions for every man, woman and child. At the turn of the millennium, a Japanese poll found that “The Japanese believe that their best invention of the twentieth century was instant noodles.” The Taiwanese-Japanese man who invented them (Momofuku Ando) was convinced that real peace would only come when people have enough to eat. In the bleak wreckage of post-war Japan, he spent a year in a backyard hut, creating the world’s most successful industrial food. Crucially, he wanted the noodles to be ready to eat in less than three minutes. That convenience has since become a selling point for noodles that are consumed by students, travellers and, yes, prisoners the world over. Instant noodles first went on sale in 1958, and they’ve changed little since. Sixty years on, Celia Hatton explores the story behind instant noodles. It’s a journey that starts in Japan, at the nation’s instant noodle museum, and then takes her to China, still the world’s number one market for “convenient noodles” as they’re known there. Chinese sales of instant noodles are falling, though, as the country becomes wealthier. But noodles are still on sale in every food store in the country. The story ends with Celia being shown how to make a “prison burrito” by an ex-prisoner from Riker’s Island prison in New Jersey, in the US. We hear why instant noodles have emerged as the prisoners’ currency of choice. Momofuku Ando’s invention lives on.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Investment Equity Strategies 46 mins – “Since the market started making noises like a baby bear, more investors are asking,”What is the appropriate percentage of equities in my portfolio?” Paul addresses this question from the points of view of a young investor, a pre-retiree and a retiree, and also considers the dangerous probabilities of bad advice from commission-based advisors.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Lies 57 mins – “Paul discusses 9 different lies, or myths, that keep millions of investors from investing in stocks. Some of these lies are created by the “fake news and advertising” from Wall Street, and some by the natural fear of loss.  In one example of an investment myth — “Investing is risky” — he compares the worst results of stocks with the worst returns of bonds. The outcome may suggest that bonds are more risky than stocks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Myths 45 mins – “In this lively conversation, Paul talks with Tim Ranzetta of NextGen Personal Finance about index funds, dispelling common myths young people have about money, how to build a portfolio for life, target date funds, the importance of diversification, the commitment to helping people help themselves, and more. NGPF.org provides an abundance of financial education resources for teachers and parents. Tim’s article, “10 Money Milestones for Parents Who Want to Teach Their Kids About Money” was featured in Paul’s last bi-monthly newsletter. (If you’re not yet a free subscriber, sign up at PaulMerriman.com ).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Strategies 43 mins – “In wishing listeners a Happy Thanksgiving, Paul shares some of the reasons for his gratitude, and 12 important decisions/choices that every first-time investor will make. He provides a few reasons why one path is likely to lead to a better financial outcome. Attached is a list of the choices he recently used to teach high school students, as well as a few 30-somethings. Paul’s hope is that this podcast and list will be helpful in sharing your knowledge and care with your loved ones. One day they will surely thank you for this.  Click here for “The Only 12 Things You Need to Know to be a Successful Investor for Life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investments and Elections 66 mins – “This podcast, recorded before the market opened on Election Day in the U.S., begins with Paul’s advice on how to respond to the election results. He then answers the following questions from his readers and listeners: Why are bond funds losing money? Are individual bonds better than bond funds? How has mid-cap value performed compared to small-cap value? What international funds do you recommend? Should I put more money in equities if all my bond funds are in a stable value fund? What will Do-It-Yourself investors do if you stop giving your recommendations? Which do you prefer, ETFs or regular mutual funds? Does your foundation accept donations?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jamal Khashoggi Murder 27 mins – “Saudi’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has come under intense scrutiny since the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, with many believing he may have been behind it. Mohammed bin Salman has condemned the act. But a secret source has told the BBC that they believe Khashoggi’s killing wasn’t the first to be carried out by people close to the Crown Prince. With BBC Arabic we investigate these allegations and ask if Mohammed bin Salman can survive the furore over Jamal Khashoggi’s killing.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Ladies’ Landmine Agency 27 mins – “we follow a unique group of Sahrawi women working alongside the world’s longest minefield, the 2,700km sand wall or berm built by Morocco across the region. We join Baba, Minetou, Nora and the team working in temperatures exceeding 42°c (107°f), hundreds of miles from even rudimentary medical care, as they risk their lives in Western Sahara’s so-called “Liberated Territories” east of the Berm, clearing some of the seven million landmines and unexploded bombs left over from the still unresolved conflict between Morocco and the ethnic Sahrawi liberation movement, the Polisario Front. Despite decades of paralysis in the UN-led decolonisation and referendum process, and some little scepticism in their own society, over sweet Sahrawi tea and camel pizza we learn how these young women have realised universal aspirations to an education, a family and a vocation, and beyond those goals to act as role models in a community exiled and forgotten deep in the Sahara for over 40 years. Dreaming of a day they might reside freely in an independent homeland, but living in an era defined by calls to “Build That Wall”, Number One Ladies’ Landmine Agency reveals a story of hope and tolerance embodied by a group of young women redefining the stereotype of the veiled, subjugated Arab woman, whose shared mission is to tear down barriers in all their forms.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Loan Forgiveness Program Is Broken 57 mins – “Former co-host and now PM&R Doctor Cole Cheney returns for a discussion of what he’s discovered about the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program, which rewards careers in public service by forgiving student loans after 10 years of qualifying work.  The first 11 years have passed since its inception, and you’ll never guess how many people have had their loans forgiven.  Aline Sandouk, Dylan Todd, Brady Campbell, and financial aid counselor Chris Roling were on hand for a discussion of why you’ll want to have a backup plan to pay off your med school debt….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Loneliness 27 mins – “White Coat Black Art looks at ways of dealing with loneliness in seniors. We visit roommates Cara Duncan, 23 and Lesly Adamson, 92. Dr. Mayur Lakhani, a family doctor and president of Britain’s Royal College of General Practitioners, talks about the social prescribing expert in his office who guides his patients to local community activities. Dr. Helen Kingston, another U.K. doctor, tells Brian about the Compassionate Frome Project, a plan to treat lonely patients in her hometown of Frome.” At the link find the title, ”Prescription for loneliness,” right-click “Download Prescription for loneliness,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Manafort 27 mins – “Virginia Heffernan gets into the gritty details with A.G. of the indie podcast Mueller She Wrote about everything from Paul Manafort to Oleg Deripaska. Also explored: Russian oligarchy ties, Viktor Yanukovych, and Mariia Butina. ” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Health Problems 8 mins – “Sandersan Onie is a PhD student at UNSW in psychology studying attentional biases in anxiety. But today he talks about another area of psychology about which he is passionate. It concerns the prevalence, acceptance and treatment of mental health in his country of birth, Indonesia. There is widespread stigma attached to mental health in Indonesia. In some places it as a taboo topic. People hide away in their rooms suffering alone rather than seeking treatment. In some cultures, people suffering panic attacks, anxiety or depression are hidden, with houses having a cage where relatives sit, cut off from human contact. There is scant recognition of mental health issues from service providers with little research and few options available to those requiring care. Sandersan Onie says culture change is required regarding attitudes to mental health in Indonesia.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbial Genetics 81 mins – “How does an engineer approach microbial genetics? cworks with microbes of all kinds to optimize metabolic and agricultural systems. Here he discusses his work with Rhodobacter to make biofuels and for membrane protein expression, with Agrobacterium and plant pathogenic viruses to make drought-resistant plants, and with Clostridium and yeast cocultures for lignocellulose digestion.” At the link left-click “MP3” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Museum Curator 75 mins – “The next person taking us inside life at MoMA is Sarah Meister, a curator in the museum’s department of photography. Sarah’s work ranges from pitching exhibits, tracking down and acquiring pieces, to writing those words on the wall that let you know what makes a work special. ” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Nigerian Patient Captives 33 mins – “Nigeria: Patients Held For Unpaid Medical Bills Some patients are being forced to remain in hospital for months – because they can’t pay their debts.

O’Neill and Reagan 46 mins – “Republican President Ronald Reagan and Democratic House Speaker Tip O’Neill demonstrate how bipartisanship can lead to compromise when it comes to Social Security.” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Palm Oil Problems 9 mins – “The warnings are becoming more urgent. Time is running out to avoid breaching a 1.5-degree rise in global temperatures, which would see irreparable damage to entire ecosystems and society. So far, our efforts have been insufficient. Emissions continue to rise. Natural forests, especially those in the tropics play a key role in climate stabilization and maintaining biodiversity. But in Southest Asia, in recent years, forests and peatlands have been cleared for palm oil, with production rising from 3 million tonnes in 1970 to 70 million tonnes in 2017. The paradox lies in palm oil being a very efficient crop. It is six times more productive than its nearest vegetable rival oil using less land and growing faster. In addition, more than half the imports to the EU are used for biodiesel, replacing diesel from fossil fuels. Brendan May outlines the dilemma of palm oil and calls for action from various quarters.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plastic Recycled into Roadways 9 mins – “The world is awash with plastic. One type which is often removed from recycling channels is soft plastic. It is used widely in distribution to wrap boxes and items on pallets. Passengers can be seen wrapping their bags with it at airports. Some supermarkets have collection points. The Downer Group makes asphalt for roads. They are running trials using soft plastic to replace bitumen in their asphalt mix. The advantage is a reduction in the use of new hydrocarbons in road making, with the potential to set up a hungry new use for the mountains of soft plastic which are either stockpiled or buried. Dante Cremasco describes the process using soft plastic in asphalt and how the trial is proceeding.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychedelic Research 172 mins– “’I realized people were not having LSD experiences; they were having experiences of themselves. But they were coming from depths that psychoanalysis didn’t know anything about.’ Stanislav Grof Stanislav Grof, M.D., (stanislavgrof.com) is a psychiatrist with more than 60 years of experience in research of “holotropic” states of consciousness, a large and important subgroup of non-ordinary states that have healing, transformative, and evolutionary potential. Previously, he was Principal Investigator in a psychedelic research program at the Psychiatric Research Institute in Prague, Czechoslovakia, Chief of Psychiatric Research at the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, and Scholar-in-Residence at the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, CA. Currently, Stan is Professor of Psychology at the California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS) in San Francisco, CA, and conducts professional training programs in holotropic breathwork and transpersonal psychology, and gives lectures and seminars worldwide. He is one of the founders and chief theoreticians of transpersonal psychology and the founding president of the International Transpersonal Association (ITA). His publications include more than 150 articles in professional journals and books like Psychology of the Future, The Cosmic Game, and Holotropic Breathwork, among many others.” At the link under the sound bar “Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

Radio La Colifata in Argentina 27 mins – “How is a radio station in an Argentinian psychiatric hospital changing the way people view mental illness? Radio La Colifata – slang for loon, or crazy person – airs from Hospital Jose Borda in Buenos Aires every Saturday afternoon. In-patients produce and present the shows, discussing everything from Argentinean politics and the economy to their own mental health and treatment. Millions of Argentinians tune in and interact with the show as it goes out live, encouraging a dialogue between the La Colifata team and the outside world which otherwise might not happen. Founder and psychologist Alfredo Olivera says, “La Colifata represents a broken space forgotten by others.” The impact of Alfredo’s seemingly simple innovation cannot be underestimated. The programme doesn’t model itself on a traditional radio show. Their goal is not to filter voices but to provide a platform for them to be heard, regardless of how challenging or unconventional they may be. For example, one contributor reflected on a period of intense anxiety and psychosis when she began to rethink the concept of walking on two legs. This opened up a philosophical discussion on the nature of physical movement. By allowing these conversations to happen and for others to be able to listen, Radio La Colifata is changing the dialogue around mental health, encouraging others to start rethinking their approach.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Reading Wars 25 mins – “Researchers say science makes it clear that there’s a direct, systematic way we should be teaching kids to read. But lots of people discount the science of reading. They say teaching kids to sound out words is boring, and kids will learn to read naturally if they’re read to and exposed to lots of books. This is more of an angry argument than a polite debate. It’s been raging for years. And there’s a lot at stake. Millions of American adults are not proficient readers.” At the link find the title, “Reading Wars,” right-click “Play Nowand select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Red State Blue State 10 mins – “The midterm election results seem to deliver conflicting messages depending on where you live. In California, candidates were rewarded for opposing President Trump — critics like California’s new Gov. Gavin Newsom won big. But in West Virginia, Sen. Joe Manchin was returned to office while siding with the president on key issues. What’s going on? Trey talks with Cherry Glazer of KCRW in California in the latest episode of “Red State Blue State,” our weekly chat between Trump Country and the Blue Bubble.” At the link find the title, “EXTRA: Red State Blue State, Ep.7 — Two Views,” right-click “Play Now” an select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Regeneration Research 7 mins – “Normally, an adult frog does not regenerate a leg if it is lost when say bitten off by a predator. But Michael Levin’s lab at Tufts University in Boston has come up with a way of convincing the cells of a frog to produce a new leg, after the initial leg was removed. Mike Levin’s lab studies cell communication and the electrical signals which control cell growth and lead to the building of structures. They removed a frog’s leg and applied a cylinder within which were drugs which stimulated the regeneration process. The drugs were applied for just 24 hours and acted on the cells at the wound site. Nine months later, the leg regenerated. This is seen as an important first step with the aim of developing regenerative human treatments for birth defects and degenerative brain conditions.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Renewable Energy Retailer 10 mins – “Enova is Australia’s first community owned renewable energy retailer, based in northern NSW. As Alison Crook explains, $300 million dollars leaves the region each year as people pay large city-based companies for their electricity. With a local retailer, that money stays within the local community creating employment. And there are other savings. Long distance transmission of energy from large generating plants incurs average losses of roughly 10%. That is eliminated in local production. The local sources are solar, wind and bioenergy, supported by batteries. Smart software allows sharing and metering of energy production, use and accounting.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Risk Assessment 8 mins – “Worldwide, scientists talk of the risk posed by climate change. But action to mitigate the risk is often non-existent, or piecemeal. Despite the world’s climate changing for all future generations, the message isn’t getting through. Elsewhere, people talk of the risk of applying herbicides. But what of the risk of not combatting weeds? Kate Hughes researches hazardous chemicals and remediation. She describes some approaches to explaining risk and says scientists are notoriously poor at this important task.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ruby Ridge Trial 32 mins – “In the final episode of Standoff, our narrative miniseries on the story of Ruby Ridge, host Ruth Graham recaps Randy Weaver’s and Kevin Harris’ prosecutions, and explores how the story of the standoff became legendary among the modern far right. Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Standoff every week. This week, Graham describes what happened to the Weaver family after the standoff, and how the story continues to resonate. Then, she talks with Tara Westover, the author of the memoir Educated, which describes an upbringing in a family of survivalists in Idaho that wasn’t so much different from the Weavers.” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Objectivity 60 mins – “This week we’re looking back at where some of our modern ideas about science being objective, independent, and apolitical come from. We journey back to the Cold War with historian and writer Audra Wolfe, talking about her newest book “Freedom’s Laboratory: The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science”. At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scott Kelly in Space 52 mins – “It hurtles above us at 17,500 miles per hour. It orbits the Earth every 90 minutes. Some say it’s the single greatest project ever completed by humanity. And above all of that, it serves as a home for the privileged few. On this episode of StarTalk, Neil deGrasse Tyson sits down with retired astronaut Scott Kelly – who stayed aboard the International Space Station for almost an entire year – to find out what it’s like to live in space. Joining Neil in-studio is comic co-host Sasheer Zamata and retired astronaut Terry Virts. Scott gives us some background on why academic shortcomings don’t necessarily reflect the potential to do something great. We explore why the danger factor of being a tehttps://paulmerriman.com/the-only-12-things-you-need-to-know-to-be-a-successful-investor-for-life/st pilot is one of the main reasons that people do it. You’ll hear about “The Right Stuff” and if what makes up that “stuff” has changed over time. Learn why the ability to deal with risk is a key factor in selecting new astronauts.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Impact 146 mins – “Your first podcast of the week is the last word in tech. Join the top tech pundits in a roundtable discussion of the latest trends in high tech. What role did Facebook play in the French riots? Tumblr bans porn, Facebook bans vague hints that sex might be a thing that exists. Meanwhile in the UK, Parliament releases sensitive internal Facebook memos and emails. Tik Tok is where all the youngs are at. And then there were 5: Google tries to make sense of its Messaging platforms. Meanwhile, Apple’s iMessage is the one app that could rule them all. Microsoft puts some Chromium in their Edge. Canada arrests Huawei’s CFO for allegedly violating sanctions on Iran. Australia passes a dangerously vague anti-encryption law.” At the link left-click “Download Options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soup Kitchen Operations 48 mins – “In this Thanksgiving bonus episode, Working takes a detour from MOMA to visit one of New York City’s biggest emergency food programs, Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen. Jordan talks to Michael Ottley, the director of operations of the program about tracking down turkeys for Thanksgiving, feeding 1,000 people a day, and how he had to convince Yelp to take down a rave review that was sending hordes of tourists to their kitchen for free meals.” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Spiro Agnew Indictment 48 mins – “Bad Behavior By People In High Office’: Rachel Maddow On The Lessons Of Spiro Agnew” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stroke Treatment 27 mins – “Dr. Brian Goldman speaks to Linda Windross from Castor, Alberta about her husband’s frustrating wait for stroke rehabilitation. Dr. Anita Mountain of Dalhousie University in Halifax and Heart and Stroke’s Patrice Lindsay tell Dr. Goldman that the good news is more patients are surviving strokes, but the bad news, we “haven’t got a system built for that many survivors.” At the link find the title, “Early therapy is best after a stroke, but many rural Canadians are missing out,” right-click “Download Early therapy is best after a stroke, but many rural Canadians are missing out,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Survivor 34 mins – “Kassem Eid had spent two years living in a city under siege.  After he and his neighbors took part in the protests during the Arab Spring in 2011, Syrian President Bashar Al Assad began to punish towns like Kassem’s. His forces bombed them, surrounded them, and starved them. That’s when Kassem decided to fight back. Thank you so much to Kassem Eid for sharing his story with us. Kassem was recently accepted into Columbia University. You can check out his new book, “My Country,” out now. Find him on twitter at @qzakarya. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taxation Changes Discussion 48 mins – “Radical? Or the right thing to do? We’ll analyze the numbers behind Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s proposal to push the top tax rate to 70 percent.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Cure 27 mins – “Our lives are consumed more and more by the online world whether it be for entertainment or every day activities. For some people it becomes too much – and here, musician turned broadcaster Ana Matronic meets some young people whose online use has quite literally taken over their lives. She visits a centre in Seattle, Washington, near where she grew up, which has been set up to help people, mainly young men, who feel their relationship with the online and tech world has become too stifling. The Restart Centre is somewhere these young men can go and quite literally tune out of our all-consuming switched on world. They play board games, listen to and play musical instruments, talk to each other, enjoy the outdoors and the company of animals. Ana discovers a complex mix of emotional stories and hears how the centre looks to help these young people reintegrate back into the online world with confidence and a renewed sense of balance. Ana also hears experts building a new centre in the UK geared to help people who have become too consumed by social media and a constant need to react, respond and seek approval. Meanwhile tech entrepreneurs creating new smart phones aimed at people who want to keep their tech use to the basics tell Ana how it works.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Tony Fadell 10 mins – “Tony Fadell is one of the creators of the iPod and a co-founder of Nest. In his own words, he talks about his start at General Magic and building the iPod.” At the link left click “Download options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vertical Farming with Trump Jr 19 mins – “…Trump Jr. invested in the startup, a company that grows organic lettuce in a hydroponic greenhouse, last year, records show. Those records don’t state how much money — if any —  Trump paid for his 7,500 shares. But the shares would have been worth about $650,000 at the end of last year, based on a formula used by another shareholder in a recent court filing. Neither Trump Jr. nor the company have disclosed his investment publicly. Trump Jr. obtained the stake through a limited liability company called MSMDF Agriculture LLC, which was set up by a Trump Organization employee last fall….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Veselnitskaya Indictment 30 mins – “Veselnitskaya Benjamin Wittes talks to Jaimie Nawaday, a former federal prosecutor in the Southern District of New York, to discuss the indictment of Natalia Veselnitskaya over alleged obstruction of justice in a case Nawaday handled. Nawaday talks about Russian abuse of the American justice system and how Veselnitskaya colluded with the Russian chief prosecutor’s office to frustrate American prosecutors.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Nawaday_mixdown.mp3 and select “save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vicky Phelan Activist 27 mins – “This is the story of Vicky Phelan, a mother of two from Limerick, Ireland. Vicky has cancer of the cervix and in 2017 she was given just six months to live. As she battled to save her own life, Vicky uncovered a scandal that rocked the Irish establishment and exposed a country still coming to grips with radical social upheaval. As part of the ‘BBC 100 Women’ season, Helen Devlin meets the woman who changed Ireland.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Vietnam War 130 mins – “Historian David Parsons joins Breht to talk about the Vietnam War, Ho Chi Minh, American Imperial War Crimes, Historical Memory, and much more!” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

White House Press Access 29 mins – “Dahlia Lithwick is joined by Ted Boutrous, who represented CNN and Jim Acosta in their case against the White House. Jim Acosta’s “hard pass,” or permanent press pass, was revoked by the Trump administration after Acosta clashed with the president at a Nov. 7 news conference. Dahlia Lithwick and Ted Boutrous examine questions of due process and free speech brought up by the case.” At the link left-click “Share” square at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Women Reporters 53 mins – “Women make up roughly 50% of the world but in the 21st Century is the media reporting the issues that matter to them? Do women want to hear more debate around taboo subjects like abortion and domestic violence or do they want to hear more success stories about women in the media? How could the media’s reporting of rape cases be improved? And, as news sources become more diverse, how can the mainstream media reflect the stories being discussed by women on social media? Lyse Doucet hears from female students in India who are frustrated by how women are portrayed in the Indian media. In Bihar, there is anger at how media reports of attacks on women focus more on what the victim was wearing rather than the attacker. In Tamil Nadhu, students believe the news is too negative and sensational. And in Nagpur the young women challenge journalists to write more positive stories about inter-caste marriage. In the second half of the programme Lyse Doucet is joined by three of the BBC’s Women’s Affairs Journalists; Divya Arya who is based in Delhi , Abigail Ony Nwaohuocha who covers West Africa from Lagos, Nigeria and Feranak Amidi who works across the Near East including Iran, Afghanistan, Kurdistan, Uzbekistan and Turkey. They discuss the issues raised in the first part of the programme in a debate recorded before an audience at BBC New Broadcasting House.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

World War One Unknown Soldier 27 mins – “Moira Stuart tells the astonishing story of the idea of the Unknown Soldier: a powerful prism for national grief, a brilliant interplay between anonymity and universal recognition, an icon which spread across the globe. On the second anniversary of the armistice following the end of the Great War, the remains of a single Unknown Soldier were brought home from the battlefields of the Western Front. Given the scale of the carnage and the fact that so many of the fallen were simply unidentifiable, the idea to commemorate the dead through the remains of one anonymous soldier – that would represent them all – was more than just pragmatic. As an idea it had a symbolic, almost poetic, resonance. And so the remains of the Unknown Soldier were interred with full honours in Westminster Abbey in London. The outpouring of grief brought the nation to a standstill. There were extraordinary scenes on the streets of London. Other Allied nations followed suit. Millions paid their respects. But even from the beginning the concept of the Unknown Soldier was not without its critics. Some saw it as emblematic of the callousness of states and their governments in wartime – the Unknown could be read as figure of righteous anger, of the terrible, mass anonymity of countless young men lost without trace. And Moira uncovers a twist in the tale: that the future of the Unknown Soldier as a timeless, abstract memorial is open to doubt for the simple reason that thanks to DNA testing, human remains are no longer unidentifiable. There is even a move to use DNA science to re-identify the remains of existing Unknowns around the world. In this moving feature marking the centenary of Armistice Day, Moira asks whether the Unknown Soldier is finally an icon of war or peace; of sorrow and mourning – or is he a warning to us still?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

WWII Racism 46 mins – “In the second of a two-part program, curator Daniel Greene gave a tour of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum exhibit which uses films, artifacts, and documents to explore how the U.S. public and government officials reacted to Nazi Germany’s persecution of Jews during World War II. The exhibit looks at the “America First” movement to stay out of the war, and sets out to examine two questions: what did Americans know about the Holocaust as it was happening, and what could have been done to save European Jews? The first program focused on the 1930 to 1939 time period and the rise of Nazi Germany, the second – from 1939 to 1945.” At the link you can watch/listen and pay for a download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 417 – Nov 15, 2019: Alzheimer Disease, Blind Education Issues, Blind Jobs, Blind Mentor, Blind Menus, California Drug Policy, California Electricity and Fires, Chronic Pain, Dementia Pseudo Medicine, Education Technology Situation, Farm Hubs, Farm Loans, Homeless Death Prevention, Innovations on Farms, Investment Basics, Investment Market Timing, Nematodes in Space, Opioid Crisis Response, Opioid-Heroin-Fentanyl, Parent Tele-Support Network, Student Introverts, Teen Tele-Support, War Stories

Exercise your ears: the 24 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 332 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Alzheimer Disease 84 mins – “Worldwide 50 million people live with dementia. By 2040 over 70% of them will be living in the developing world. Dr. Shamiel McFarlane explores the social and economic cost of dementia around the world. Recorded on 05/28/2019. (#34779)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” or “Video MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Education Issues 22 mins – “Rachel Carver is the Public Relations Senior Specialist at Outlook Business Solutions. Rachel joins Jeff Thompson in the Blind Abilities studio to talk about National Disability Employment Awareness Month and the capabilities of the visually impaired in the workforce. Outlook Business Solutions is a sister company to Outlook Nebraska, the state’s largest employer of the blind. Outlook Business Solutions offers full-time and freelance work opportunities to the visually impaired in knowledge-based jobs in the areas of marketing, customer care, writing and public relations. Rachel leads Outlook Nebraska’s public policy efforts, meeting with state and federal officials at home and in Washington, DC.  Rachel is the first Blind person in the United States to earn the accreditation in public relations certification.  Join Rachel as she talks about her Career and Outlook Business Solutions and how they are creating opportunities and solutions for the Visually Impaired and the workforce.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Jobs 39 mins – “Business Relations Specialist, Pam Gowan, has worked at State Services for over 45 years and with retirement just around the corner. Lisa larges, Outreach Coordinater at SSB, sat down with Pam to talk about Pam’s history at SSB and walk through the process a customer/client would experience or expect when a counselor enlist the services of an employment specialist such as Pam Gowan. With October being National Disability Employment Awareness month, we thought Pam would be the one who could best talk about preparing for the workforce and Pam does a great job. Not only working with individuals to help them with the job search and application process, Pam works with businesses and employers to educate them about the possibilities and abilities of the Blind and Visually Impaired. Pam has seen a lot of changes evolve over her 45 year career and shares with us some memorable moments. She also gives us some great tips and suggestions for job seeking and putting your best self forward.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Mentor 58 mins – “Dr. Amit Patel is a proud father, a speaker, motivator and becoming an advocate for the Blind. After suddenly losing his eyesight six years ago, Amit was devastated and within 6 months he started to take charge of his situation and get on with the life he wanted. He learned how to use the cane, read Braille, use assistive technology to gain back his independence. He did not want to be a burden on others and wanted to face the World and the challenges ahead of him. Amit missed driving and with a bit of chance and a desire to drive, he was soon sitting behind the wheel of a Toyota GT86 and navigating a racetrack. Yes, #StartYourImpossible. Dr. Amit Patel may be using his doctoring skills when his kids get an owie and maybe address his possibilities of returning as a doctor in a few years. Amit is a happy father, husband, son and welcomes every day as he has accepted his blindness realizing that he can do anything he puts his mind to. Join Dr. Amit Patel and Jeff Thompson in the Blind Abilities Studio and learn how Amit went from not wanting to face another day not being able to see to his drive in the Toyota sports car and beyond.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Menus 16 mins – “Stephanie Jones joined Jeff Thompson in the Blind Abilities Studio to let us all no about Menus4ALL. A web based database of over 50,000 menus from over 12,000 cities across the states. Accessibility is as accessible as your screen reader on your smart phone, tablet or computer. If you use a refreshable braille device, then you are all set. Menus4ALL is ready anytime and anywhere. From having heading navigation and categorical price ranges, one can actually just take a glance at the Menus4ALL menus or dig in deep and find out the full details of the Seafood Platter or what is in that Mystery Burger. Check out Menus4ALL on the web and see what’s on the menus in your area.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Drug Policy 59 mins – “The Drug Policy Alliance advances policies and attitudes that best reduce the harms of both drug use and drug prohibition, and promotes the sovereignty of individuals over their minds and bodies. California’s deputy director Laura Thomas talks about the history of drug prohibition, the consequences and a more effective path moving forward. Recorded on 05/22/2019. (#34792)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” or “Video MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Electricity and Fires 35 mins – “A year ago, we spoke to the Mayor of Paradise, California just days after a wildfire broke out there. The Paradise fire, and another blaze that devastated parts of Wine Country, are very much on the minds of Californians today as more fires burn up and down the state. Wine Country is threatened again: this time by a blaze near a power line that reportedly failed minutes before the fire started. Those lines belong to PG&E: a company that’s faced investigations and lawsuits over negligent maintenance. What’s the latest with these fires? And what might they tell us about the threats the rest of the nation’s power grids face? To answer these questions, we spoke to Russell Gold, a senior energy reporter for the Wall Street Journal and author of Superpower: One Man’s Quest to Transform American Energy; Ted Nordhaus, the founder and executive director of the Breakthrough Institute — a California-based think tank that focuses on tech solutions to environmental challenges; Sam Liccardo, the mayor of San Jose, California; and Susie Cagle, a climate and energy reporter with the Guardian US.” At the link right-click the down-poitning arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Pain 31 mins – “What do we know about the way we experience pain? What purpose does it serve, and could we be close to dealing with the kind of chronic pain not yet treatable with medicine? Scientists at University College London have made a discovery which makes mice pain-free, and have reversed painlessness in a woman with a rare condition. Nicola Davis is joined by Dr Natasha Curran, Consultant in Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine at University College London Hospitals, and by Professor John Wood, lead author of the study and a neuroscientist at UCL.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Pseudo Medicine 83 mins -”There are modifiable behaviors that may reduce the risk factor of Alzheimer’s: vascular disease, sedentary lifestyle, depression/stress, diet factors and alcohol. Kaitlin Casaletto talks about the benefits of an active lifestyle and proper nutrition. Then Dr. Joanna Hellmuth looks at how to decode direct-to-consumer interventions – dietary supplements – and the rise of pseudo-medicine for dementia. She explains that supplements may or may not be safe and that manufacturers can make broad claims without supporting evidence. Recorded on 05/21/2019.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” or “Video MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Technology Situation Room  62 mins – “Welcome to episode 150 of the EdTech Situation Room from October 2, 2019, where technology news meets educational analysis. This week Jason Neiffer (@techsavvyteach) and Wesley Fryer (@wfryer) discussed newly announced hardware from this week’s Microsoft event, security concerns over the latest way to add Google Apps to Huawei smartphones, and the implications of a recent New York Times expose of the horrific proliferation of images of sexual abuse of children online. Exciting and important announcements from Google focusing on protecting your privacy online, managing your passwords, and checking existing passwords saved with Google against a database of known breaches / compromised were also highlighted. Additional article topics included newly announced efforts by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to crack down on White Supremacists, Andrew Yang’s policy platform announcement on protecting digital data as personal property, and the media literacy education importance of imagery shared online of China’s 70 year birthday of the Communist Party with increased street violence in consecutive week 17 of youth led protests in Hong Kong. Newly announced jailbreak exploits to older versions of iOS / the iPhone operating system were also discussed, along with the perils of jailbreaking / rooting your smartphone. Geeks of the week included a superb post by Richard Byrne (@rmbyrne) about digital storytelling tools for students, Auto Update Expiration (AUE) dates for ChromeOS / Chromebooks, and an excellent article explaining the difference between Chromium and ChromiumOS.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Hubs 50 mins – “Chris Damico is the CEO and Founder at Farm’d. Farm’d is described as an online platform that enables farmers to connect to local buyers directly. The idea was born from annual price hikes, long transits, and expensive middlemen. Chris’ company benefit farmers through their transparency in market prices and profitability, as well as offer convenient ways to confirm and adjust orders in real time. Chris joins me today to describe how Farm’d works and how farmers can join the platforms. He shares what it was like to source for capital and the company’s humble beginnings. He explains how their platform works, the services they offer, and the benefits to both consumer and seller. Chris also discusses what they’re looking for in future users.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Loans 36 mins – “Bill York is the Founding Partner, CEO, and Chief Credit Officer at FarmOp Capital, a lending company that provides funding primarily to farm operators. Their independent business model allows farmers to decide which suppliers to buy from. Bill has over 40 years of experience in the ag lending space and has held senior positions in various major ag lending companies. He specializes in business development, particularly increasing profits and assets of the businesses he works with. Bill York joins me to describe what FarmOp Capital is and its efforts to provide farmers with a helping hand in receiving capital loans. He explains the trends that make their company ripe for the ag industry and the benefits of doing business with them from a farmer’s perspective. He also shares the criteria and requirements they have for their customers and explains what sets their company apart from traditional lending companies. “If you’re able to get a loan that is timely and adequate to meet all of your operating needs, you’re better able to purchase inputs efficiently to buy the optimum level of inputs and actually reduce your costs.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless Death Prevention 83 mins – “Dr. Barry Zevin is the medical director of Street Medicine and Shelter Health, San Francisco Department of Public Health. He describes programs to treat opioid use disorder in persons experiencing homelessness, safe consumption sites, and homeless deaths. Recorded on 04/17/2019. (#34787)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” or “Video MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovations on Farms 41 mins – “Kerryann Cocher is a Principal at Rock Road Consulting, a practice that focuses on improving the translation of science and technology into something that will give value to farmers, ranchers, and other producers. Kerryann specializes in helping struggling ag businesses to be competitive again by providing re-engineering solutions. She is also an expert on animal health, feed ingredients, and protein production. Kerryann joins me today to share the various opportunities and untapped potential in animal agriculture. She describes the challenges that the animal agriculture industry currently faces and the solutions she proposes to resolve these issues. She also explains how she brings people to the table to innovate in animal agriculture and why she remains motivated about the success of the animal agriculture industry. “It’s more than a choice to play in ag; it’s a lifelong commitment.” – Kerryann Kocher” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Basics 87 mins – “I had the recent pleasure of being interviewed by Meb Faber, co-founder and the Chief Investment Officer of Cambria Investment Management, and author of five books. We covered a lot of ground, speaking in some detail about my “Ultimate Buy & Hold Portfolio,” the power of diversification, and the pitfalls of emotional investing. We discussed the benefits of investing early, and the challenges of educating young people as to its importance, as well as different investing needs over a lifetime. Through Meb’s good questions, we touched upon many other subjects including how and when to invest, how to avoid getting screwed by your advisor, investment newsletters, buy-and-hold versus market timing, the importance of understanding past performance, giving money to grandkids and my most memorable trade. I hope you enjoy this podcast and share it with anyone you think might benefit from it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Market Timing 43 mins – “Do you think the market is close to the top and you should be considering an exit strategy? Let’s talk about market timing, as it seems a lot of investors are concerned with it, judging from the number of questions I am receiving about timing subsequent to my interview with Meb Faber and Bogleheads’ comments after my interview with Dr. Jim Dahle of WhiteCoatInvestor.com. In this podcast I seek to present market timing from a more complete and realistic point of view. And it may surprise you that most people who claim market timing doesn’t work actually use it on a regular basis.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Market Timing 52 mins – “In this interview with Pure Financial‘s “Today on Your Money, Your Wealth”, Paul discusses the truth on market timing vs. buy-and-hold – and explains why he still does both. Plus, he answers questions on collecting Social Security and a pension, rolling and converting IRA money, and whether there are financial perks to waiting until after the first of the year to get married.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nematodes in Space 37 mins – “Dr. Fatma Kaplan and Cameron Schiller founded Pheronym, an agricultural biotech company that provides safe, non-toxic, and innovative solutions to solve numerous agricultural problems. They also recently become involved in the development of space nematodes under the company AstroNematode. AstroNematode seeks to establish interstellar agriculture for Earth. The first launching experiment will happen this December and provide data to pave the way for sustainable agriculture outside of Earth. Dr. Fatma and Cameron join me today to share their latest project, AstroNematode, and how it can help provide sustainable solutions for future generations. They describe the origins of this idea and the companies that helped fund the project. They discuss their tie-ins with private companies like Space-X and explain the experiments that will happen in space. They also share what it’s like to work on this project while running Pheronym at the same time.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Crisis Response 83 mins – “Dr. Phillip Coffin talks about the history of opioid crisis and available medical treatments. Coffin is the director of substance use research at the San Francisco Department of Public Health and assistant professor in the division of HIV/AIDS at the University of California, San Francisco Recorded on 05/08/2019. (#34790)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” or “Video MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid-Heroin-Fentanyl 59 mins – “Deaths from drug overdose are greater than from car accidents or guns. Dr. Daniel Ciccarone, talks about the triple wave: opioids, heroin and fentanyl. This epidemic is the worst in decades and a comprehensive response is needed. Recorded on 05/15/2019. (#34791)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” or “Video MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parent Tele-Support Network 15 mins – “Connect with other parents to share resources, experiences and strength – The Lighthouse Guild Parent Tele-Support Network – Support is a phone call away! Audio Player Dr. Linda Gerra, Director of the Parent Support Program at Lighthouse Guild, and Parents, Maria Ceferatti and Himanshu Neema share their experiences participating in the Parent Tele-Support Network. The Lighthouse Guild has Tele-Support Networks for Teens and Parents of Blind and Visually Impaired children. Support is a phone call away – Wherever you live, there’s a community of caring parents who understand how you feel, because they’re going through the same thing. Through our National Tele-Support Network for Parents of Children with Visual Impairment, you can connect with other parents to share resources, experiences, strength, and hope. These free tele-support groups meet weekly, and are professionally moderated. Whether you choose to actively participate or just listen, you are welcome and not alone.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Introverts 62 mins – “After leaving her corporate law practice, Susan Cain decided to write a book exploring how people like her—introverts with a lot to offer—were being left by the sidelines in a world increasingly geared toward extroverts. Apparently she hit a nerve. The 2012 book, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, has been a huge best-seller. In a recent talk recorded at 6th and I Historic Synagogue in Washington, D.C., Cain and her old friend and law school classmate Angie Kim discuss how businesses and schools are beginning to absorb the lessons of the book—and how Cain and Kim, an avowed extrovert, experienced their law school days very differently.” At the link right-click “Download” under the soundbar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teen Telesupport 21mins – “Chat with Other Teens Around the Country! Talk about School, Tech, Relationships, Careers and Whatever is on Your Mind – Join the Lighthouse Guild Teen Support Network – Dr. Linda Gerra, Director of the Family Support Program at Lighthouse Guild, Daria Zawadzki, Simon Bonenfant, Matthew Cooper and Sanya Neema talk about their experiences participating on the Nationwide Lighthouse Guild Teen Support Program.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Stories  44 mins – “Fresh off the success of her first novel, Swamplandia!, a finalist for last year’s Pulitzer Prize for fiction (and an unwitting participant in the notorious Pulitzer selection process that resulted in no 2012 winner), Karen Russell is back with a quirky, and according to many critics brilliant, collection of short stories. The title piece in Vampires in the Lemon Grove concerns aging blood-suckers who are trying to temper their addiction to bodily fluids by sucking on citrus. But at this Feb. 25 appearance at Politics & Prose, Russell read instead from another story in the collection, “Proving Up.” She also answered a wide range of audience questions.” At the link right-click “Download” under the soundbar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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MMD446 Media Mining Digest: 5G and Huawei in Canada, Alien and Sedition Acts, American Civil War, Australian Wildfires, Banana Peels Purify Water, Broadband in North Carolina, Canada in Venezuela, Canadian Tech Oilsands, Corona Virus Spread Outside China, Coronavirus and Canadians in Wuhan, Coronavirus in Wuhan, Covid 19 Treatment, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Energy Efficiency, ESL Founder, Fiber in Idaho Falls, Fiber in Ponca City Oklahoma, Fiber to Home in Colorado, Flood Prevention, Food Scene, Food Stylist, Free Trade, Government Today, Happiness Lab, Hearing Protection, Human Screenome Project, Medical Conservative, Money in Early America, Nazi Death Camps, Oil Prices, Partners in Health, Plant Based Meat, Port-Out Fraud, Prisons, Rehab Programs, Republican Party Creation, Resilience and Environmental Justice, Resilience Funding Strategies, Resilience Planning, Slave Labor Economy, Syria Crisis, Take Back White House, Technology Impact, Telehealth, The Last Archive, Thinking Much Bigger, TikToc in Canada, US Constitution, US Western Ecosystem, Walking Exercise, Wildfire Prevention

Exercise your ears: the 60 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 792 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

5G and Huawei in Canada 21 mins – We ask why Canada should trust Huawei to build our 5G network, the next big step in our internet infrastructure. Alykhan Velshi, vice president of corporate affairs for Huawei Canada, says there’s nothing to worry about, but China expert Margaret McCuaig-Johnston isn’t so sure.” At the link find the title, “Should Canada trust Huawei to build our 5G network?” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. (Feb 20, 2020)

Alien and Sedition Acts 38 mins – “The Alien and Sedition Acts consisted of four laws enacted by the United States government in 1798. The United States passed these laws during a time of great uncertainty, a time when many Americans feared for the very survival for their nation. But why did Americans fear for the United States’ existence and why did they think four laws that limited citizenship and freedom of speech would protect and secure their young republic? Terri Halperin, an instructor at the University of Richmond and author of The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798: Testing the Constitution, will help us find answers to these questions by taking us through the Alien and Sedition Acts and how they came to be.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

American Civil War 37 mins – “The American Civil War claimed more than 620,000 American lives. Did you know that it also cost American forests, landscapes, cities, and institutions? Today, we explore the different types of ruination wrought by the American Civil War with Megan Kate Nelson, author of Ruin Nation: Destruction and the American Civil War.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Australian Wildfires 7 mins – “After devastating wildfires in Australia, photographs of green shoots in the burnt-out bush have sparked hope. Photographer Murray Lowe joins us to discuss his images, which went viral when he posted them online.” At the link find the title, “Green shoots in the ashes of the Australian bushfires,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Banana Peels Purify Water 2 mins – “A study in the American Chemical Society’s journal, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, reports that minced banana peel performs better than an array of other water purification materials and can do so in a sustainable way.” At the link find the title, “Developing New Materials: Using banana peels to purify water” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Broadband in North Carolina 14 mins – “Last week, we unveiled the new podcast project we’re working on with the nonprofit NC Broadband Matters, whose focus is on bringing ubiquitous broadband coverage to local communities for residents and businesses in North Carolina. The ten episode podcast series, titled “Why NC Broadband Matters,” explores broadband and related issues in North Carolina. In episode two, “Fiber Rich Wilson, Why and What’s Next?”, Christopher talks with Gene Scott, General Manager for Outside Plant for Greenlight, a division of the city of Wilson, North Carolina. If you’ve heard many of our podcasts, you know all about Wilson and their municipal Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) network. We’ve followed the development of the network for years and have reported on many of their innovations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 19 mins – “This is the transcript for episode 4 of the Why NC Broadband Matters series on the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher interviews Jane Smith Patterson about the history of broadband in the state and how it can move forward. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 19 mins – “This week is episode three of the new podcast project we’re working on with the nonprofit NC Broadband Matters, whose focus is on bringing ubiquitous broadband coverage to local communities for residents and businesses in North Carolina.  The ten episode podcast series, titled “Why NC Broadband Matters,” explores broadband and related issues in North Carolina. This week, Christopher and his guests explore mapping in our episode titled, “Broadband Mapping Means Money: Understanding How Data Drives Decisions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 36 mins – “We’re pleased to bring you the first episode from a special bonus series of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast titled “Why NC Broadband Matters.” The series is a collaboration with the nonprofit NC Broadband Matters, whose focus is on facilitating the expansion of ubiquitous broadband coverage to local communities for residents and businesses. We’ll be working with NC Broadband Matters on this series to develop nine more episodes that center around broadband in North Carolina.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 42 mins- “This is the transcript for our special bonus episode of Community Broadband Bits series, Why NC Broadband Matters. In this episode, Christopher talks with Dr. Jeff Cox and Zach Barricklow from Wilkes Community College about improving economic mobility in rural places of North Carolina. Listen to the episode, or read the transcript below.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canada in Venezuela 12 mins –As Venezuelan politician Juan Guaidó visits Ottawa, trying to shore up support, we discuss what role Canada should play in breaking the political stalemate in Venezuela.” At the link find the title, “Canada’s role in Venezuela,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Canadian Teck Oilsands 13 mins – We look at the deep divisions over the proposed Teck Frontier oilsands mine in Alberta, and competing concerns about the economy and the environment. The government must weigh these factors as it decides whether to approve the mine, an enormous facility half the size of Edmonton.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Corona Virus in Wuhan 13 mins – “We hear from people in Wuhan who say the Chinese government has played down the coronavirus outbreak at home.” At the link find the title, “Conditions and frustration in Wuhan,” whichyou can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Coronavirus and Canadian in Wuhan 13 mins – “Amid the coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan, Canadian Wayne Duplessis tells us why he and his family have decided to stay in the city. Plus, we talk to disease ecologist Jonathan Epstein about the theory the disease has originated with bats.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Coronavirus Spreads Outside China 14 mins – “As more coronavirus cases are reported outside of China, what can be done to help countries with less robust health systems respond to the problem? We’re talking to public health reporter Helen Branswell about the situation in Iran; as well as Dr. Michel Yao, the emergency operations manager for the WHO Regional Office for Africa; and Paul Hunter, a professor of health protection at the University of East Anglia in England.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 Treatment 14 mins – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on June 3, 2020, the editors discuss two new studies: one comparing test swabs collected by health care workers with swabs collected by the patients themselves and one assessing hydroxychloroquine treatment in people who had been exposed to Covid-19 but weren’t yet ill. The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal.” At the link right-click “Download” to get the podcast.

Doris Kearns Goodwin 19 mins – “What makes a great leader? This week on Sea Change Radio, we are honored to have Pulitzer Prize-winning presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin here to give us her take on that question. Goodwin’s book, Leadership in Turbulent Times, just released in paperback, re-examines four US presidents she has studied in the past: Abe Lincoln, Teddy and Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson. She discusses the contrast between these presidents’ leadership and the behavior of the current grifter-in-chief, puts today’s impeachment proceedings in historical context, and hypothesize about how past presidents might have addressed momentous issues like climate change and election tampering. Then, we dig into the Sea Change Radio archives and listen to Rebecca Vallas, a Vice President at the Center for American Progress, talk about the Trump administration’s absurd claims that poverty and hunger are now things of the past in this country.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Efficiency 19 mins – “Most environmentally minded folks agree that our shopping habits need to be significantly curbed for the good of the planet. And many often turn to the virtues of efficiency as one answer – on the surface, it certainly seems to make sense to strive for more efficient use of resources. But is the goal of efficiency the right one? On the heels of the Christmas shopping season, what better time to revisit our 2018 Sea Change Radio discussion with Kris De Decker. The founder of Low Tech Magazine, De Decker makes a compelling case for the abandonment of efficiency as the barometer for planetary stewardship. He proposes we use the simpler, but perhaps more painful objective of sufficiency and argues that pursuing greener, more efficient methods and technologies is, more often than not, a fool’s errand. De Decker maintains that the human appetite for comfort, growth, and acquisition tends to turn efficiencies into increased consumption, and that the only way to truly fight climate change is for all of us to recognize that enough is, well, enough.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ESL Founder 16 mins – “Here’s why the 88-year-old founder of ESL [ESL is an abbreviation of “English as a second language.] In-Home of Northern Nevada feels like she’s in her 40s.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Fiber in Idaho Falls 25 mins – “This is episode 390 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. In this episode, Christopher interviews Bear Prairie from Idaho Falls Power and Fiber and Kim McKinley from UTOPIA Fiber about the utilities’ cross-state fiber partnership.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fiber in Ponca City, Oklahoma 18 mins – “People with an interest in municipal networks usually know about Ponca City, Oklahoma’s free municipal fixed wireless network because it’s been around for years. In the summer of 2019, however, community leaders decided it was time to start offering Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) and created Ponca City Broadband.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fiber to Home in Colorado 20 mins – “NextLight, the municipal Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) network in Longmont, Colorado, has been serving residents and businesses in the community since 2014 and offers reliable gigabit connectivity at affordable rates. This week, Director of NextLight, Valerie Dodd, is on the show to discuss the past, present, and future of NextLight with Christopher.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flood Prevention 7 mins – “The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region IX produced the Level Up Audio Project to share stories, case studies, and best practices to inspire hazard mitigation action and strengthen our community of hazard mitigation and climate adaptation professionals. As a resource to state and local governments on climate adaptation and resilience, the Georgetown Climate Center (GCC) partnered with FEMA Region IX to make the audio series available.  Streambeds are vital ecosystems that can both serve and threaten the communities they run through. Because of the sensitivity of the ecosystems and the potential for increased flooding, stream work requires permits. Securing permits can be time consuming and costly. In this episode, Roland Sanford from the Solano County Water Agency in California shares how his agency works with local landowners to provide microgrants for flood mitigation work and technical assistance to aid in the process to secure permits.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Food Scene 34 mins – “Camilla Marcus is one of the most dynamic women on the food scene. Not only is she the founder of west-bourne, the rule-bending, community-minded all-day eatery in SoHo, but she is a change agent pushing the industry to confront the challenges faced by working families. Camilla, who became a mom recently, has partnered with a local child care company and is providing her employees with subsidized access to daycare and nightcare. Tune in to hear how Camilla is making it happen.  Also, learn why blogger Laura Scherb of Page And Plate thinks Emily Nejad of Bon Vivant Cakes is the bombe!  This episode is presented by Sugar Free Three by author Michele Promaulayko.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Food Scene 27 mins – “From pink peppermint ice cream to raspberry jam and a holiday ham, Christine Tobin had to bring the food of Little Women to life on the big screen. As the food stylist for the highly anticipated adaptation by writer-director Greta Gerwig, Christine immersed herself in the life of author Louisa May Alcott and mid-1800s Massachusetts, where Louisa lived and where the book and film are set. Christine is a different kind of food stylist, who avoids movie-magic food tricks in favor of food that actors can actually eat. Tune in to hear her behind-the-scenes take, how she got her start, and what advice she has for aspiring food stylists. Plus, hear why Tara Hankinson the co-founder of TALEA Beer Co. thinks Suellen Tunney is the Bombe! ” At the link you can listen, but not download the file; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Food Stylist 37 mins – “Radio Cherry Bombe stopped in Columbus, Ohio, last year as part of its Food For Thought tour for a live episode at the headquarters of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams. Paula Haines of Freedom a la Cart, Chef Cara Mangini of Little Eater, and Faith Durand of The Kitchn each spoke about what’s on their mind when it comes to the food world. They are followed by a panel featuring Chef Catie Randazzo of Preston’s and Ambrose & Eve, Bidisha Nag of Create Your Curry, Ms. Ena of Ena’s Caribbean Kitchen, Jeni Britton Bauer of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams, and Radio Cherry Bombe host Kerry Diamond. Thank you to Kerrygold for supporting our tour.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Free Trade 46 mins – “Economist and author Kimberly Clausing of Reed College talks about her book Open with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Clausing, a self-described progressive, argues that the United States should continue to embrace free trade but she argues for other interventions to soften the impact of trade on workers and communities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Today 37 mins – “As I catch-up on posting shows that should have been posted several months ago, but are (perhaps sadly) still quite timely, I’m pleased to post Show # 262, May 31, 2017, my interview with Prof. Al Roberts, Director of the School of Public Policy at University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and author of Four Crises of American Democracy: Representation, Mastery, Discipline, Anticipation. Al is one of the nation’s leading scholars on government secrecy, and his recent work has focused on the broad functional challenges faced by governmental institutions today. In our wide ranging discussion, we examined the state of government today, its capacity to withstand the pressures exerted on it by outside forces, and what we can reasonably expect government to do and not do in response. Obviously pressing and critical issues, I always enjoy my discussions with Al, and hope that you do as well!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Happiness Lab 22 mins – “Dr. Laurie Santos, a Yale researcher whose course on happiness is now a worldwide phenomenon, says there’s a cost to self-care and power in giving more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Hearing Protection 18 mins – “Are we paying enough attention to our hearing? Author David Owen is worried that we’re not; he joins us to discuss his new book Volume Control: Hearing in a Deafening World. Then Natalie Phillips discusses her research into the links between hearing loss and cognitive decline.” At the link find the title, “Why it’s important to pay attention to your hearing,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Human Screenome Project 16 mins – “Do you get screen time reports on your phone — and swipe away without checking? Byron Reeves, a professor of communication at Stanford University, says we should be measuring the impact of screen time, but we need a better way to do it. That’s why he’s co-founded the Human Screenome Project.” At the link find the title, “The Human Screenome Project,” which yoyu can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Medical Conservative 49 mins – “Physician and author Adam Cifu of the University of Chicago talks about being a medical conservative with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Cifu encourages doctors to appreciate the complexity of medical care and the reality that many medical techniques advocated by experts are not always beneficial or cost-effective. The conversation explores the challenges of finding reliable evidence to support medical interventions and the inherent uncertainty surrounding outcomes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nazi Death Camps 24 mins – The CBC’s Susan Bonner reports from Auschwitz as the world marks 75 years since the liberation of the Nazi death camp, and author Andrea Pitzer discusses the history of concentration camps, both before and after Hitler.” At the link find the title, “Legacy of Auschwitz, 75 years after liberation,” which you can can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Oil Prices 19 mins – “On the heels of being impeached by the House of Representatives, Donald Trump unsurprisingly created a diversion, having a key Iranian General assassinated by US drones. But as tensions in the Middle East mounted, the price of oil somehow remained relatively steady. Why was this the case? This week on Sea Change Radio, we talk oil with energy expert Daniel Dicker. We discuss the current state of global oil markets, learn the important differences between sweet and sour crude, and examine Dicker’s contention that the best thing for the environment would be much higher oil prices.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Partners in Health 25 mins – “The founders of Partners in Health share how they’ve brought needed healthcare to more than four million patients around the globe.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Plant Based Meat 16 mins – “Is plant-based “meat” the food of the future, or just another junk food? Author and food journalist Mark Bittman says it’s complicated… but he’s not eating the stuff.” At the link find the title, “Mark Bittman on plant-based ‘meat’,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Port-out Fraud 10 mins – Port-out fraud lets scammers steal your phone number, and then access everything from your banking information to online shopping apps. Samantha Burnet tells us what happened to her, and the struggle she’s faced in finding help, while digital rights advocate Jesse Schooff discusses what needs to be done about it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Prisons 24 mins – “American prisons are overcrowded. The United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world and nearly 2.5 million Americans are serving prison sentences. Nearly all politicians agree that we need to reform the American prison system, but they disagree on how to do it. Can gaining historical perspective on this present-day problem help us solve it? Today, we investigate early American prisons and prison life with Jen Manion, an Assistant Professor of History at Connecticut College and author of Liberty’s Prisoners: Carceral Culture in Early America.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Rehab Programs 25 mins – “Hoke, the founder of three rehabilitation programs for prisoners, has had to overcome her own battles to find her “generous hustle.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Republican Party Creation 45 mins – “The United States has entered presidential primary season, which means it won’t be long before a Republican presidential candidate or a reporter mentions the birth of the ‘Grand Old Party’ in 1854 and its association with Lincoln. We explore the history of the Republican Party with Heather Cox Richardson, Professor of History at Boston College and author of To Make Men Free: A History of the Republican Party.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Resilience and Environmental Justice 11 mins – “The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region IX produced the Level Up Audio Project to share stories, case studies, and best practices to inspire hazard mitigation action and strengthen our community of hazard mitigation and climate adaptation professionals. As a resource to state and local governments on climate adaptation and resilience, the Georgetown Climate Center (GCC) partnered with FEMA Region IX to make the audio series available.  Hazard mitigation efforts often focus on property and infrastructure, but every community’s most important resource is its people. Lucas Zucker, the policy and communications director for the California-based organization Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy, or CAUSE, talks about ways communities can support low-income and immigrant populations before, during, and after hazard events.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Resilience Funding Strategies 9 mins – “The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region IX produced the Level Up Audio Project to share stories, case studies, and best practices to inspire hazard mitigation action and strengthen our community of hazard mitigation and climate adaptation professionals. As a resource to state and local governments on climate adaptation and resilience, the Georgetown Climate Center (GCC) partnered with FEMA Region IX to make the audio series available.  When you ask emergency managers and city planners what they need to make their community more resilient to disaster, most have the same answer: money. Federal and state grants can help finance projects, but the requirements can be labor intensive and often require a financial match from the community. Carolyn Steffan from the City of Tehama in California stitched together funding from multiple sources—federal and state—to protect residents from flooding by elevating 39 homes in her city.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Resilience Planning 10 mins – “The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region IX produced the Level Up Audio Project to share stories, case studies, and best practices to inspire hazard mitigation action and strengthen our community of hazard mitigation and climate adaptation professionals. As a resource to state and local governments on climate adaptation and resilience, the Georgetown Climate Center (GCC) partnered with FEMA Region IX to make the audio series available.  Most communities develop numerous planning documents to guide growth and development. These plans are often created and adopted in standalone processes, leading to fragmented implementation. Tiffany Wise West, the Sustainability and Climate Action Manager for the City of Santa Cruz, California, managed to avoid that trap and developed a Climate Adaptation Plan in conjunction with the city’s Local Hazard Mitigation Plan. In this episode, she discusses the benefits and challenges of the plan integration process.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Slave Labor Economy 28 mins – “If early Americans desired slaves mostly to produce sugarcane, cotton, rice, indigo, and tobacco, what would happen if Europeans and early Americans stopped purchasing those products?
 Would boycotting slave-produced goods and starving slavery of its economic sustenance be enough to end the practice of slavery in North America? Julie Holcomb, an Associate Professor of Museum Studies at Baylor University and author of Moral Commerce: The Transatlantic Boycott of the Slave Labor Economy, helps us explore answers to these questions by leading us through the transatlantic boycott of slave produced goods.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

SyriaCrisis 14 mins – “Syrian and Russian forces are advancing on the last opposition strongholds in Idlib province and around Aleppo, forcing civilians to flee from the falling bombs. We talk to Dr. Farida Almouslem, who is caught up in the displacement, as well as United Nations representative Mark Cutts, and journalist Kareem Shaheen.” At the link you can listen, but not download the file; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download the file; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. (Feb 10, 2020)

Take Back White House 19 mins – “What can all the money in the world buy you? Thanks to the Beatles, we already know it’s not love, but could it perhaps buy you the most powerful office in the world? We may have an answer to this question as early as Super Tuesday, as one of the wealthiest humans on the planet attempts to buy the US presidency. This week on Sea Change Radio, we talk to author Steve Almond about the state of the Democratic primary. He offers his perspective on what we should be learning from Mike Bloomberg’s political ads that presently blanket our nation’s air waves, how the age of Trump changes the way that people view the field of presidential hopefuls, and what Democrats need to do if the nominee ends up being someone other than their favorite.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Impact 14 mins – “We speak to author and professor Ramesh Srinivasan, who says we need a digital bill of rights, and an alternative to the big tech companies that control so much of our digital lives.” At the link find the title, “Ramesh Srinivasan on big tech,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Telehealth 19 mins – “In February, Christopher was in North Carolina at the Institute for Emerging Issues Forum at North Carolina State University. While he was there, he had the opportunity to conduct several interviews with people engaged in research, working with boots on the ground to expand broadband, or advocating for better policy so more people have access to high-quality Internet access. One of the people he spoke with was Danika Tynes, Ph.D., a Senior Research Associate from the Georgia Tech Research Institute. One of Danika’s areas of expertise is telehealth, which continues to expand in relevance and application with new innovations and the expansion of broadband access. During the conversation, Danika discusses some of the results of her research, including the elements that help telehealth efforts succeed. She also discusses how telehealth applies in different environments and how data can be used to improve its applications for patients and healthcare professionals. Danika also shares a personal experience that illustrates how telehealth is actually more ingrained in our daily lives than we realize.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

The Last Archive 1 3 mins – “The Last Archive​:​ a new podcast about the history of evidence written and hosted by New Yorker writer, author, and celebrated historian Jill Lepore.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

The Last Archive 2 46 mins – “The Clue of the Blue Bottle – On a spring day in 1919, a woman’s body was found bound, gagged, and strangled in a garden in Barre, Vermont. Who was she?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

The Last Archive 3 47 mins – “Detection of Deception – When James Frye, a young black man, is charged with murder under unusual circumstances in 1922, he trusts his fate to a strange new machine: the lie detector.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

The Last Archive 4 38 mins – “The Invisible Lady – In 1804, an Invisible Lady arrived in New York City.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

The Last Archive 5 43 mins – “Unheard – In 1945, Ralph Ellison went to a barn in Vermont and began to write ‘Invisible Man.’” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Thinking Much Bigger 20 mins – “First, Pallotta raised millions to fight cancer and AIDS by inventing multi-day fundraisers. Now he’s out to change everything you think about charity — and yourself.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

TikTok in Canada 16 mins – “How the TikTok app from China became the most addictive — and potentially lucrative — social media platform.” At the link find the title, “The rise and rise of TikTok,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

US Constitution 45 mins – “How did the framers draft the Constitution of 1787? What powers does the Constitution provide the federal government? Why do we elect the President of the United States by an electoral system rather than by popular vote? These are some of the many questions you’ve asked since November 2016. And today we’re going to explore some answers. Michael Klarman, the Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and author of The Founders’ Coup: The Making of the United States Constitution joins us to discuss the United States Constitution and how and why the framers drafted it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

US Western Ecosystems 19 mins – “As we embark upon a new decade, many of us are contemplating ongoing environmental challenges and what may be in store for the earth in the decade to come. Fortunately, there are some excellent journalists out there with their fingers on the pulse, whose mission is to uncover environmental news both alarming and inspiring. This week on Sea Change Radio we are checking in with Bob Berwyn, an Austrian-based environmental journalist who writes for Inside Climate News and is in the midst of a three-month tour of the western United States and Mexico. Berwyn discusses the fragile ecosystems west of the Rockies, tells us about permaculture in Oaxaca, and examines the ethical dilemmas that both skiers and ski resorts are facing as the planet warms and snowfall becomes less consistent.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Walking Exercise 16 mins – “Erling Kagge has reached the North and South Poles … on foot. He explains why, in a world of running around, we need to learn to slow down and walk.” At the link find the title, “The incredible power of walking,” which you can hear, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Wildfire Prevention 8 mins – “The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region IX produced the Level Up Audio Project to share stories, case studies, and best practices to inspire hazard mitigation action and strengthen our community of hazard mitigation and climate adaptation professionals. As a resource to state and local governments on climate adaptation and resilience, the Georgetown Climate Center (GCC) partnered with FEMA Region IX to make the audio series available.  In Butte County, California, much of the natural fuel that allows wildfires to spread is found on private property. Communities must approve, and landowners need to agree, to remove brush from these lands and reduce wildfire risk. This is not unusual—many types of mitigation work involve private property. In this episode, Calli-Jane DeAnda from the Butte County Fire Safe Council speaks about her experience with community outreach and protecting communities and infrastructure from wildfire.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

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Media Mining Digest MMD480: 5G, Edge Computing and AI, Agriculture Technology, AI and How Work Is Done, AI and Human Ethics, Aviation Careers, Cancer and Radiation Therapy, Carbon Neutral Ranch, Climate Change, Climate Change and Health, Corona Virus Identification, Covid 19 Delivery to Minority Communities, Covid and Blind, Covid Identification, Covid Research, Cowpox to MRNA 19 Vaccines, Digital Fingerprints, Epidemic Lessons Learned, Farm Data Analytics, Farm Data Economics, Forensic Science Impact on Criminal Justice, Global Warming Solutions, Health Progress, Immunotherapy and Cancer, Kodiak Cakes, Meera Deo, Student Mental Health

Exercise your ears: the 27 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 399 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

5G, Edge Computing and AI 32 mins – “As one of the nation’s largest wireless communication providers, over 120 million subscribers count on Verizon to stay connected, but we’re not just talking about phones. Today, Verizon and IBM are working together to better connect entire industries. In this episode of Smart Talks, Malcolm talks to Srini Kalapala VP, Global Technology, Strategy and Network Cloud at Verizon and Steve Canepa, Global GM & Managing Director of IBM’s Communications Sector about how 5G, Edge Computing and AI will reshape the way work gets done.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Technology 20 mins – “Today’s show connects back to episode 241 with Craig Rupp of Sabanto, where we talked about, among many other things, how the Climate Corp has been able to become a central data collection platform on so many large scale farms.  Ranjeeta Singh, the Chief Product Officer of The Climate Corp joins us to further explore data ownership, product strategy and design thinking. Ranjeeta was hired last year to drive the product strategy and roadmap for Climate’s digital farming solutions. She has more than two decades of background in hardware and software at the intersection of IoT, AI and data science with companies like Intel and Teradata. She holds five patents at Intel, and multiple publications. She is also the recipient of the “Top 50 under 50 most powerful women in technology”. Her perspective as someone coming from a career in tech to now a career in agtech is something I found interesting and insightful.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” to get the podcast. 

AI and How Work Is Done 31 mins – “With hybrid cloud and AI, businesses today can challenge the limits of how they put their data to work across the organization. In this episode of Smart Talks, Malcolm talks to Rob Thomas, SVP Cloud and Data Platform at IBM about what’s possible, and the steps businesses can take to access more of their data to help them make more informed decisions” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI and Human Ethics 30 mins – “Artificial intelligence can help or hurt us on our quest for a more equitable world. We learn about the history of computer ethics, some of the issues in AI ethics today and what challenges we have to overcome in the future.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aviation Careers 1 22 mins “Welcome to the inspirational, informational, and transparent aviation careers podcast. Joining me today is Dustin Dryden – the Founder and Chairman of Volare Aviation based out of London Oxford Airport in the UK. We will be discussing the future of air travel and how the pandemic has shifted flying and what career opportunities have arisen around the world. ” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save File” to get the podcast.

Aviation Careers 2 22 mins – “Welcome to the inspirational, informational, and transparent aviation careers podcast. Today we discuss careers in aviation law with Jenny Urban.” At the link left-click “Downloa and select “Save File” to get the podcast.

Cancer and Radiation Therapy 38 mins – “The state between localized cancer and wide-spread metastatic disease is termed oligometastatic. This presentation explores radiotherapy and the principles of treatment for oligometastasis.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Neutral Ranch 17 mins – “Fourth generation cattle rancher Loren Poncia and his wife Lisa transformed Stemple Creek Ranch into one of the few carbon neutral livestock ranches in the United States, and have since made their ranch carbon positive, sequestering more carbon than they emit. Lisa and Loren spoke with Guy about how consumers are helping drive the sustainable farming movement, and how they doubled down on online retail after many restaurants shut down. These conversations are excerpts from our How I Built Resilience series, where Guy talks online with founders and entrepreneurs about how they’re navigating turbulent times. ” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 56 mins – “Climate change represented the biggest global health threat of this century but tackling it successfully is the greatest health opportunity of the century. The University of California has a strong sustainable practices policy. This presentation looks at the measures being in healthcare and at the UCSF campus and hospitals. Recorded on 12/01/2020. (#36494)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change and Health 82 mins – “Climate change affects the health of all Americans. The adverse health consequences are projected to worsen with additional climate change. Kristie Ebi, University of Washington, explains that proactive adaptation policies and programs reduce the risks and impacts from climate-sensitive health outcomes and from disruptions in healthcare services. Additional benefits to health arise from explicitly accounting for climate change risks in infrastructure planning and urban design. Recorded on 11/10/2020. (#36491)

Corona Virus Identification 59 mins – “As the United States continues to set new daily record levels for coronavirus cases Dr. George Rutherford, a professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at UCSF, explores what we know about SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and what the future holds. He talks about intervention, vaccines and models of super spreading.” At the link right-click “36498” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid 19 Delivery to Minority Communities 35 mins – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on March 30, 2021, the editors are joined by Carlos Del Rio from the Emory University School of Medicine and Chidi Akusobi from Harvard Medical School to discuss ensuring vaccination equity in minority communities.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save File” to get the podcast.

Covid and Blind 13 mins – “Peter Wilkins tells us about the loss of his wife who died in a care home he was barely allowed to visit due to Covid restrictions. He says the isolation felt by those with sight loss in care homes is unbearable. And London Underground changes its policy for blind and visually impaired users. Physically assisted guidance is resuming after it was stopped for eight months due to Covid.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Lessor quality” to get podcast.

Covid Identification 53 mins -”With COVID-19 diagnostic testing, people who test positive can isolate and get care earlier. Dr. Charles Chiu, UCSF Professor, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Medicine / Infectious Diseases, explores the various tests and their features. He also talks about SARS-CoV-2 genomic sequencing and its uses and a new study to identify biomarkers of the virus. Recorded on 10/28/2020. (#36497)” At the link right-click “36497” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Research 44 mins – “UCSF scientists studying a key enzyme used by the virus that causes COVID-19 have identified chemical building blocks that might eventually be used to make an antiviral drug. The chemical fragments could bind to and disable the enzyme, called the “macro domain,” which is a crucial part of the SARS-CoV-2 virus’s ability to replicate in human cells. James Fraser discusses the finding from this research. Recorded on 12/02/2020. (#36500)” At the link right-click “36500” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cowpox to mRNA 19 Vaccines 5 mins – “On the Shoulders of Giants — From Jenner’s Cowpox to mRNA Covid Vaccines – Interview with Dr. Paul Offit on how more than two centuries of vaccine advances have paved the way for Covid-19 vaccines. In September 2008, Katalin Karikó, Drew Weissman, and their colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania modified messenger RNA (mRNA) using nucleoside analogues. These modifications stabilized the molecule and eliminated its capacity for inducing innate immunity, thereby making mRNA a promising tool for both gene replacement and vaccination.1 In December 2020, on the basis of safety and efficacy data generated in two large, placebo-controlled studies, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued emergency use authorizations for two mRNA vaccines for the prevention of Covid-19. Clearance of this hurdle by the first mRNA vaccines represents the most recent in a series of breakthroughs in the realm of viral vaccines, each building on the last and each with a compelling record of disease prevention. The first major vaccine-related advance occurred in 1796, when Edward Jenner, a physician working in southern England, found that an animal virus (cowpox) could protect against disease caused by a human virus (smallpox).2 One hundred years would pass before viruses would be identified as causative agents of disease; nevertheless, the notion that infectious diseases could be prevented by vaccination was born. Jenner’s work ultimately led to the eradication of a disease that is estimated to have killed more than 300 million people in the 20th century. The strategy of using animal viruses to prevent human diseases continues today with a rotavirus vaccine that is derived in part from a bovine strain of the virus. The second breakthrough occurred nearly a century after the first. In 1885, Louis Pasteur found that the spinal cords of rabbits that had been experimentally inoculated with rabies virus were no longer infectious after 15 days of desiccation.3 On July 6, 1885, Joseph Meister, a 9-year-old boy who had been attacked by a rabid dog 2 days earlier, visited Pasteur’s laboratory. Using a series of inoculations with suspensions of desiccated rabbit spinal cords, Pasteur saved Meister’s life. Rabies, a disease with a mortality of virtually 100%, was now preventable after exposure. Pasteur had opened the door for vaccines made with physically or chemically inactivated viruses. During the 20th century, notable successes that relied on the killed-virus strategy included an influenza vaccine developed by Thomas Francis in the early 1940s, a polio vaccine developed by Jonas Salk in the mid-1950s (Salk had trained in Francis’s laboratory at the University of Michigan), and a hepatitis A vaccine developed by Philip Provost and Maurice Hilleman in 1991. The third major advance in vaccinology occurred in 1937, when Max Theiler attenuated yellow fever virus by means of serial passage in mouse and chicken embryos.4 By forcing the virus to grow in nonhuman cells, Theiler introduced a series of blind genetic alterations in the virus that rendered it less capable of causing disease but still capable of inducing protective immunity. For this work, Theiler was awarded the 1951 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Derivatives of Theiler’s yellow fever vaccine are still used today. The latter half of the 20th century witnessed an explosion of live attenuated viral vaccines developed using his technique. In the early 1960s, Albert Sabin, who had trained in Theiler’s laboratory at the Rockefeller Foundation in New York City, made a polio vaccine by weakening polio viruses using serial passage in monkey kidney and testicular cells. Other live attenuated vaccines followed, including vaccines to prevent measles (1963), mumps (1967), rubella (1969), varicella (1995), and rotavirus (2008) The fourth breakthrough occurred in 1980, when Stanford biochemists Richard Mulligan and Paul Berg published findings from their experiments that involved transfecting monkey kidney cells with an Escherichia coli gene and thereby causing mammalian cells to make a bacterial protein.5 Recombinant DNA technology was born. Made using yeast or baculovirus-expression systems, vaccines containing purified surface proteins from hepatitis B virus (1986), human papillomavirus (2006), and influenza virus (2013) have since become available. Although there is still much work to be done to address vaccine hesitancy, build trust, and ensure equitable benefits from vaccination, the list of vaccine successes in the United States is long. After the introduction of Salk’s inactivated polio vaccine, for example, the incidence of polio dropped from 29,000 cases in 1955 to fewer than 900 in 1962. With the introduction of Sabin’s live attenuated vaccine in the early 1960s, polio was eliminated from the United States. Since its licensure in 2006, the bovine–human reassortant rotavirus vaccine has virtually eliminated rotavirus, preventing up to 75,000 hospitalizations and 60 deaths per year. During the 2019–2020 influenza season, the influenza vaccine prevented an estimated 7.52 million infections, 3.69 million medical visits, 105,000 hospitalizations, and 6300 deaths in the United States….Now, the world faces its most devastating pandemic since 1918, when influenza virus killed about 50 million people. As of January 2021, the SARS-CoV-2 virus had killed more than 500,000 people in the United States and more than 2.5 million people worldwide. Vaccines are again being tapped as an important component of the public health response. With more than 180 research institutes and 100 companies worldwide involved in vaccine-development efforts, every strategy that has ever been used to make vaccines is being advanced against SARS-CoV-2. New technologies are also being used. With the recent authorization of mRNA vaccines, we have entered the fifth era of vaccinology. This class of vaccines doesn’t contain viral proteins; rather, these vaccines use mRNA, DNA, or viral vectors that provide instructions to cells on how to make such proteins. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic will be an important test of whether these new platforms can fulfill their promise of creating safe, effective, and scalable vaccines more quickly than traditional methods. If they pass this test, the next task will be to accomplish equitable, efficient vaccine distribution — which would represent an even greater achievement.” At the link you can listen, view the transcript and view the slides. A copy of the audio portion is included in this blog archive.

Digital Fingerprints 40 mins – “How has the Digital Age improved the centuries-old practice of fingerprinting? We explore the history of fingerprint tech and explain how modern scanners use optics, capacitance, heat and ultrasound to create prints that are harder than ever to hack.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Epidemic Lessons Learned 25 mins – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on March 23, 2021, the editors are joined by historian of medicine Allan Brandt, who assesses the impact of pandemics on human society and the outlook for the post-Covid world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Data Analytics 14 mins- “Terry and I discussed how farm data should be valued, some of the nuances of adoption of variable rate technology, and why he doesn’t advise farmers to jump headfirst into joining a data service.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” to get the podcast.  

Farm Data Economics 14 mins – “This is one of two short episodes I’m releasing for you today, both exploring some aspect of farm data. You may have already listened to the first part with Dr. Terry Griffin at Kansas State University. Now we turn our attention to another Purdue graduate, Aaron Gault, cofounder and agronomy manager of Advanced Agrilytics. Advanced Agrilytics offers agronomy services equipped with their analytics platform, which helps farmer customers get a better picture of what’s working and not working in their agronomic practices.  Aaron focuses on in-season crop management and the understanding of real-time crop performance influenced by the environmental conditions of any given growing season. Aaron’s ability to integrate yield response probability with in-field stimuli is a key component of Advanced Agrilytics sub-acre approach to understanding yield. Before joining Advanced Agrilyitcs, Aaron worked as a professional agronomist for leading agriculture companies. Aaron and I discuss what makes Advanced Agrilytics approach different from others, how this aspect of the precision agriculture industry has evolved, and how the farmer can best utilize their own data to improve their operation.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” to get the podcast.  

Farm Data Economics 14 mins – “For the first time, I’m releasing two episodes on the same day. I’ve trimmed each of the two episodes down to about half of my normal length so the total time commitment on your part is still about the same as a regular week, but if you’re a subscriber, you probably already noticed, there are two today.  There’s a few reasons for this, but mostly it’s to try something new. This isn’t something I’m planning to keep doing on a regular basis, but maybe occasionally, if you like it, so let me know what you think.  Both of today’s episodes are about farm data. This one you’re about to hear is on the economics of farm data with Dr. Terry Griffin, and the next one is on the analytics of farm data with Aaron Gault, which I encourage you to listen to after this one.  I’ve been meaning to bring Dr. Terry Griffin on the show for a long time, because he is not only well-researched and data-driven, but as you’ll hear he’s not afraid to explore ideas that may be somewhat unconventional or even unpopular. Terry is associate professor and cropping systems economist at Kansas State University specializing in farm management and agricultural technology. For his achievements in advancing digital agriculture, Griffin has received the 2014 Pierre C. Robert International Precision Agriculture Young Scientist Award, the 2012 Conservation Systems Precision Ag Researcher of the Year, and the 2010 PrecisionAg Award of Excellence for Researchers.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” to get the podcast.  

Forensic Science Impact on Criminal Justice 77 mins – “Speakers – Eric Martin, Social Science Analyst, National Institute of Justice; James Anderson, Director, Justice Policy Program and Institute for Civil Justice, RAND Corporation; Kevin J. Strom, PhD Director, Center for Policing Research & Investigative Science, RTI International ; Donia Slack Researcah Forensic Scientist, Associate Director of NIJ Forensic Technology Center of Excellence (FTCoE), RTI International In 2004, the National Institute of Justice created the social science research on forensic sciences (SSRFS) research program to explore the impact of forensic sciences on the criminal justice system and the administration of justice. Much of the early research from the SSRFS program focused on DNA processing and the use of DNA in investigations and prosecutions. Now, after over ten separate research projects, including a demonstration field experiment, the SSRFS research agenda is set to enter into a new phase by approaching questions much broader than just the impact of DNA research on investigations. This panel will highlight notable projects on DNA processing efficiencies, cost-benefit analyses, and forensic evidence’s impact on investigations from both the SSRFS program and complementary NIJ research efforts. We will then discuss the next set of research topics the SSRFS program will explore and highlight outstanding questions from these topics.” At the link you can listen, download the transcript, and download the slides. A copy of the audio portion is included in this blog archive.

Global Warming Solutions 59 mins – “Complex problems can have shared solution. Explore actions that can simultaneously improve human health and health inequities, while mitigating global warming. Recorded on 12/08/2020. (#36495)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Progress 9 mins – “Since the start of the 20th century, there have been substantial reductions in deaths from infectious diseases in high-income countries. In the United States, infectious disease mortality fell from about 800 per 100,000 people in 1900 (accounting for nearly 50% of all deaths) to 50 per 100,000 people in 1950 (accounting for about 6% of deaths).1 Over the past three decades, a similar transformation has occurred in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. As immunization coverage of children increased to 80% worldwide, deaths among children younger than 5 years of age in these countries decreased by more than 50%. Global maternal mortality has also dropped by nearly 50% during this period, deaths from malaria have decreased by 60%, and the HIV infection rate has fallen by more than 40%. Poliovirus now stands on the brink of eradication….We believe it’s time for world leaders to heed warning signs, abandon half-measures, and commit to the global system we need to respond to the ever-present danger of emerging infectious diseases. We simply cannot afford the alternative.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save File” to get the podcast.

Immunotherapy and Cancer 56 mins – “Immunotherapy has allowed many people with previously incurable cancers to live for years. This presentation explores the options of immunotherapy, radiation and surgery and the potential combination of treatments to treat skin cancer and head and neck cancer. Recorded on 11/12/2020. (#36505)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kodiak Cakes 52 mins – “When he was 8 years old, Joel Clark loaded bags of his mom’s whole grain pancake mix into a red wagon to sell door-to-door. By the mid-90s, he and his older brother had upgraded to selling the mix out of a Mazda sedan and calling it Kodiak Cakes. As he tried to scale the business, Joel made some risky business decisions and almost went bankrupt, but eventually got the brand into Target—a major turning point. Today, Kodiak Cakes is approaching $200 million in annual revenue as one of the best-selling pancake mixes in America.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meera Deo 45 mins – “Most people did not think about a job in law teaching, and yet we’re waiting for them to come to us. They’re probably not going to come to us in any meaningful numbers. If a law school is willing to open the door and then just hope somebody falls in the door, it’s not going to happen, right? You kind of need to get out of your comfort zone and try things a little bit differently than you’ve been doing them or you’re probably going to keep getting the same result that you’ve already gotten…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Student Mental Health 14 mins – “When an outbreak of COVID-19 cases led Norwich University to put the campus on lockdown, the school asked students to stay in their dorm rooms full time, except to use the bathroom. Pretty soon, the university’s president, Mark Anarumo, began to worry about the mental-health impacts of that social isolation. So Anarumo made an unusual decision: He moved into a campus dorm himself. The idea was to show solidarity, to see what it was really like and to get an on-the-ground sense of student mental health. He even made some videos that he posted to Facebook about the experience. Anarumo said he wanted to be treated like any other resident of the dorm, and that he wanted to try to keep it quiet. But word soon got out, including a feature in The New York Times. EdSurge connected with Anarumo to hear the story of his stint living on campus for this week’s EdSurge Podcast.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up window.

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Media Mining Digest 479: 5G Innovations, 1918 Flu Epidemic, AI Development, Average Student, Benford’s Law, Biogeomicrobiology, Biological Science Research, Black Boys and Men Challenges, Breathing, Countering Online Terrorism, Covid Care for Migrant Workers, Covid Economic Impact, Crypto Currency Basics, End of Life Care, Epidemics, Facial Recognition, Fish Farming Future, Gene Patents, Heat Stress Control, Medical Exports During Covid, Medical Innovations During Pandemic, Migrant Employment, Mini PC’s, Plymouth Colony, Presidential Powers, QAnon Understanding, Recycling in Schools, Song Writing, Swamp Gravy, Truman Presidency

Exercise your ears: the 29 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 401 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 30,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

1918 Flu Pandemic 33 mins – “With the an apparent second wave of COVID-19 in full force, the media are sounding the alarm on a deadly virus growing out of control. But during the Spanish Flu 100 years ago, the media downplayed the pandemic. On this week’s show, a look at how the Spanish Flu vanished from our collective memory. Then, how Shakespeare, a British icon, became an American hero.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

5G Innovations 25 mins – “Our guest this week comes from a similar industry as mine. We share many mutual connections. Mo Katibeh, the EVP-Chief Product & Platform Officer of AT&T Business, joins us to discuss 5G innovations. He’s on the show to discuss about what is real versus what is hype when it comes to innovation in 5G capabilities, […]” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

AI Development 41 mins – “Artificial intelligence (AI) is the transformative technology of our time. It is being deployed in many different sectors, analyzing data in real time, and making intelligent decisions based on that analysis. Yet despite its widespread utilization, AI has aroused a number of fears concerning fairness, bias, privacy, security, and human safety. On November 17, the Center for Technology Innovation hosted a webinar to discuss the future of AI, how it is being deployed, and the policy and legal issues being raised. Speakers explored ways to mitigate possible concerns and how to move forward safely, securely, and in a manner consistent with human values.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Average Students 16 mins – “You may know Todd Rose from his bestselling book, “The End of Average.” He was formerly a professor at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education, but recently left to focus on his own nonprofit, Populace. It’s a think tank devoted to finding new ways to measure the views of individual Americans on issues like education. He says he knows what it feels like when grades and tests suggest you’re not good enough. “It culminated in high school where I had just failed so many times,” he says. “So I dropped out.” He found his way back to college years later, first in a night program where he graduated as honor student of the year, and later getting his Ph.D from Harvard University.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the playback block and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Benford’s Law 40 mins – “Lies, liars, and lie catchers. This hour of Radiolab asks if it’s possible for anyone to lead a life without deception. We consult a cast of characters, from pathological liars to lying snakes to drunken psychiatrists, to try and understand the strange power of lying to yourself and others.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Biogeomicrobiology 29 mins – “Denise Akob discusses her studies of microbial communities of contaminated and pristine environments using life science and earth science techniques. She discusses how to figure out “who’s there,” how to optimize select natural microbial activities, and her career path into government research.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Biological Science Research 36 mins – “Distinguished Professor Antoine van Oijen at the University of Wollongong has been awarded a NSW Premier’s Prize for Excellence in Medical Biological Sciences. Professor van Oijen has pioneered the visualisation of complex molecules such as proteins. He has also developed a research program that has transformed our understanding of how bacteria copy and repair their DNA and how these processes play a role in the development of drug resistance. His leadership has led to an $80 million University of Wollongong investment to establish a world-class molecular life sciences institute, Molecular Horizons, where interdisciplinary research will tackle the world’s most pressing health challenges.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Boys and Men Challenges 41 mins – “In an effort to reclaim and refocus the day on November 19, the Future of the Middle Class Initiative and the Race, Prosperity, and Inclusion Initiative at Brookings will host an event to highlight the evidence for the very specific disadvantages faced by Black boys and men.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Breathing 33 mins – “Take a breath. Like, right now. Did you use your nose or your mouth? Turns out, that matters. Journalist and author James Nestor is our guest this Friday at 11 a.m. His book is Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art and he wants to help us breathe better. Specifically, he wants us to breathe through our noses more. Sleep apnea, fatigue, clogged sinuses — many times, these issues arise because too often, we’re breathing through our mouths. And get this: our ancestors? They didn’t have these problems. They used their noses to breath. By the end of the hour, you’ll be hunting for surgical tape to keep your mouth closed when you go to bed. Really.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Countering Online Terrorism 36 mins – “On this episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on platforms and disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Nick Rasmussen, the Executive Director of the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism (also known as GIFCT). The GIFCT is an organization working to facilitate cross-industry efforts to counter the spread of terrorist and violent extremist content online. It was founded in 2017 by four platforms, but is now transitioning to a new life as an independent organization, which Nick is heading up. Online violent extremism is one of the most difficult problems of the internet age, and collaboration between companies and governments may be the only way to effectively tackle it. But how can the GIFCT balance this with the need to respect legitimate free speech concerns? How is Nick thinking about the transparency and accountability problems that such collaboration might exacerbate? And why might the GIFCT be one of the most important institutions for the future of online free speech?” At the link right-click “Direct download: Collaborating_to_Counter_Violent_Extremism_Online.mp3,” and select :Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Covid Care for Migrant Workers 19 mins – “Mobile clinic set up on farm to address accessibility challenges, encourage workers to prioritize health When you take a bite out of a locally grown apple or a slice of tomato, it’s a good time to consider the well-being of the person who picked it — especially during the global pandemic, say health-care professionals who provide care for farm labourers. Another round of COVID-19 outbreaks among migrant workers on Canada’s farms highlights a crack in the health-care system that leaves the people who put food on our tables especially vulnerable, said Eliseo Martell, a health promoter and educator in Brantford, Ont. “The accessibility to the workers has decreased a lot. They are not allowed to leave their farms [because of COVID]. And so for us to reach them has been very, very challenging in these times,” he told White Coat, Black Art  host Dr. Brian Goldman. At least 10 workers tested positive at Schuyler Farms, a major grower of apples and sour cherries near Simcoe, Ont., earlier this month. Each year, it employs more than 200 migrant workers, in addition to Canadian staff. Another 40 workers were infected in nearby Elgin County at Martin Family Fruit Farms. During the first wave of COVID-19, outbreaks at other southwestern Ontario farms led to around 500 cases and three deaths. All told, there have been more than 1,000 cases among migrant farm workers in Ontario alone. Tight living quarters make physical distancing difficult, PPE may be in short supply, and fear of losing income may make some workers reluctant to come forward for testing. On Monday, Ernie Hardeman, Ontario’s minister of agriculture, introduced a new strategy for curbing the spread of COVID-19 among migrant farm workers, but advocacy groups say the plan falls short by leaving employee feedback out.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid Economic Impact 19 mins – “Economist Nouriel Roubini explains why the economic impact of the COVID-19 coronavirus will be different than anything we have seen before, and a mental health expert gives tips on staying sane. Nouriel Roubini is a professor of economics at the Stern School of Business New York University and chairman of Roubini Global Economics an economic consultancy. Economist Nouriel Roubini was one of the first to predict the current economic crisis. In his new book, Crisis Economics: A Crash Course in the Future of Finance, he argues that such crises are predictable.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

End of Life Care 30 mins – “Rob Orman steers a conversation on skillful ways to discuss code status, comfort care, intubation, and whether or not dying debilitated patients should go to the ICU.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

End of Life Care 10 mins – “Communicable disease has haunted humanity for all of history. As such, the responses to coronavirus in our midst have a grimly timeless quality. In fact, to one scholar, epidemics are a great lens for peering into the values, temperament, infrastructures and moral structures of the societies they attack. Frank M. Snowden is a professor emeritus of the history of medicine at Yale and author of Epidemics and Society: From the Black Death to the Present. An epidemic, he writes, “holds a mirror” to the civilization in which it occurs. In this podcast extra, he speaks to Bob about what we can learn about ourselves from the infectious diseases we’ve faced, from the bubonic plague in the 14th century to the Ebola outbreak in 2014 to COVID-19 today.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Epidemics 10 mins – “Communicable disease has haunted humanity for all of history. As such, the responses to coronavirus in our midst have a grimly timeless quality. In fact, to one scholar, epidemics are a great lens for peering into the values, temperament, infrastructures and moral structures of the societies they attack. Frank M. Snowden is a professor emeritus of the history of medicine at Yale and author of Epidemics and Society: From the Black Death to the Present. An epidemic, he writes, “holds a mirror” to the civilization in which it occurs. In this podcast extra, he speaks to Bob about what we can learn about ourselves from the infectious diseases we’ve faced, from the bubonic plague in the 14th century to the Ebola outbreak in 2014 to COVID-19 today.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facial Recognition 34 mins – “MIT researcher Joy Buolamwini was working with facial recognition software when she encountered a problem: The robot she was programming could not detect her own female, dark skinned face. Shalini Kantayya’s documentary, Coded Bias, explores the fallout from Joy’s discovery that AI is neither racially nor gender neutral and introduces us to the rebels and misfits of data science. As the creators of the Algorithmic Justice League, Joy and her team work to increase awareness – including calling for legislation – about facial recognition technology that officials often use in surveillance, policing and much more. We’ll talk with Shalini ahead of our screening about what happens when technology starts to encroach on our liberties, this Friday at noon.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fish Farming Future 24 mins – “These days, about half of the protein the world’s population eats is from seafood. Staff Writer Erik Stokstad joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how brand-new biotech and old-fashioned breeding programs are helping keep up with demand, by expanding where we can farm fish and how fast we can grow them. Sarah also spoke with Jan Claesen, an assistant professor at the Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute, about skin microbes that use their own antibiotic to fight off harmful bacteria. Understanding the microbes native to our skin and the molecules they produce could lead to treatments for skin disorders such as atopic dermatitis aDnd acne. Finally, in a segment sponsored by MilliporeSigma, Science’s Custom Publishing Director and Senior Editor Sean Sanders talks with Timothy Cernak, an assistant professor of medicinal chemistry and chemistry at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, about retrosynthesis—the process of starting with a known chemical final product and figuring out how to make that molecule efficiently from available pieces.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gene Patents 17 mins – “In 2005, Chris Hansen, a lawyer at the ACLU, heard that a biotech company called Myriad Genetics had identified a gene responsible for most types of inherited breast and ovarian cancer… and then patented it. With its patent, Myriad could effectively block anyone else from doing comprehensive testing or in some cases even doing research on the gene. And Chris thought that this was definitely not okay. Today on the show, the story of the rise and fall of gene patents, and how the Supreme Court answered the question: Who do your genes belong to? It’s Big Biotech versus the right to the information encoded in our very DNA, and how that fight went all the way to the Supreme Court. Come for the deoxyribonucleic acid — stay for the chocolate chip cookies and baseball bats.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heat Stress Control 22 mins – “This week the whole show focuses on keeping cool in a warming world. First up, host Sarah Crespi talks with Senior News Correspondent Elizabeth Pennisi about the latest research into how to stay safe when things heat up—whether you’re running marathons or fighting fires.  Sarah also talks with Po-Chun Hsu, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Duke University, about the future of cooling fabrics for everyday use. It turns out we can save a lot of energy and avoid carbon dioxide emissions by wearing clothing designed to keep us cool in slightly warmer buildings than we’re used to now. But the question is, will cooling clothes ever be ‘cool’?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Innovations During Covid 38 mins – “Throughout the show’s history, we’ve done interviews with medical professionals and those pursuing innovations in the medical field. This week’s guest created a breakthrough product used during this global pandemic. Clive Smith, the CEO and founder of Thinklabs joins us on the show. We will discuss a medical innovation and what he’s doing to disrupt […]” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Migrant Employment 50 mins – “Following the arrival of large numbers of migrants and asylum seekers in Europe from 2015 onwards, many non-traditional actors—from tech start-ups to social enterprises—have pioneered innovative solutions to foster the social and economic inclusion of newcomers. In the context of this experimentation, business has played a fundamental role, with companies on both sides of the Atlantic leveraging their potential as employers, donors, and partners in innovative alliances. This two-day conference reflected on how innovative initiatives for refugee inclusion can grow beyond pockets of good practice and inspire large-scale, long-term change. The event brought together a diverse group of public officials, business leaders, service designers, social entrepreneurs, civil society organisations, and refugee initiatives from Europe, the United States, and Canada. This workshop on Employer Engagement: Innovative Approaches to Training and Hiring Refugees featured:  Chair: Laurent Aujean, Policy Officer, Unit Legal Migration and Integration, DG Home, European Commission Sayre Nyce, Executive Director, Talent Beyond Boundaries, United States Peter O’Sullivan, Resettlement Officer, UNHCR, Bureau for Europe Mustafa Alroomi, Web Developer & Askim Kintziger, Innovation Consultant, Cronos Groep, Belgium” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mini PC’s 40 mins – “Suppose we told you that solutions to the world’s most intractable problems are possible in the next decade. Poverty. Inequality. Climate change. You’d probably say impossible, preposterous, unthinkable. We’ve heard that about our predictions before. But we have been proven right. Now, we are predicting the fastest, deepest, most consequential technological disruption in history and with it, a moment civilization has never encountered before. In the next 10 years, key technologies will converge to completely disrupt the five foundational sectors—information, energy, food, transportation, and materials—that underpin our global economy, and with them every major industry in the world today. Costs will fall by 10 times or more, while production processes become an order of magnitude (10x) more efficient, using 90% fewer natural resources and producing 10 times to 100 times less waste. These technological disruptions are turning the prevailing extraction and exploitation, scarcity and central control model of production on its head, driving a new model of localized creation from limitless, ubiquitous building blocks—a world built not on coal, oil, steel, livestock, and concrete, but on photons, electrons, DNA, molecules and (q)bits.” At the link right-click “https://podnutz.com/mini116/,” and select “Play Now” to hear the podcast. (It is also included in this blog archive.)

Presidential Powers 13 mins – “When President-elect Joe Biden takes office in two months, the Senate will likely be controlled by Republicans. Biden will probably be facing a start of term mired in congressional gridlock. What this means: don’t expect many laws to get passed in the next couple years. Still, there’s quite a bit that Biden can do even without Congress. At the top of the list are some of the arguably most urgent items, like rejoining the World Health Organization as the world enters what looks to be a harsh pandemic winter. But there’s much more, especially when it comes to economic policy. Today on the show, we ask experts about the actions Biden can take without Congress that could have a big effect on Americans’ economic lives. It’s about banks, bureaucrats, billions (in tariffs), and the ‘burbs.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

QAnon Understanding 16 mins – “EXTENDED VERSION (includes content we had to leave on the cutting room floor to make the interview fit into the broadcast) It’s been two weeks since Trump lost the election to Biden. But he and his followers are still claiming victory. Jeff Sharlet, who has been covering the election for Vanity Fair, credits two Christian-adjacent ideas for these claims. The first is the so-called “prosperity gospel”: the notion that, among other things, positive thinking can manifest positive consequences. Even electoral victory in the face of electoral loss. But the problem with prosperity gospel, like day-and-date rapture prophecies, is that when its bets don’t pay off, it’s glaringly obvious. As prosperity thinking loses its edge for Trump, another strain of fringe Christianity — dating back nearly two millennia — is flourishing. Jeff Sharlet says an ancient heresy, Gnosticism, can help us understand the unifying force of pseudo-intellectualism on the right. Sharlet explains how a gnostic emphasis on “hidden” truths has animated QAnon conspiracies and Trump’s base.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recycling in Schools – “Schools are vital hubs to their local communities and are uniquely positioned to teach students waste reduction behaviors. Students can learn waste reduction at schools and bring that messaging home to their families, caregivers, and all those with whom they come in contact. Schools and universities generate about 562,442 tons of waste each year in California. Almost half of school waste is comprised of organic materials like paper, cardboard, and uneaten cafeteria food. Much of the waste generated in the California education system is recyclable. Many school districts have been successful in improving their economic and environmental performance through the implementation of waste reduction initiatives. Today we will speak with the leaders of the CalRecycle Schools Team who provide resources to help California schools reduce waste, and help educate students and adults about why this is so important to the state’s future.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up- menu.

Song Writing 15 mins – “Wilco singer/guitarist Jeff Tweedy has been busy. He has a new solo album out called Love is the King. And his new book How to Write One Song has a lot of advice for aspiring songwriters. But it’s also about a lot more than that. Nerdette host Greta Johnsen spoke with Tweedy from his recording studio in Chicago.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Swamp Gravy 21 mins – “For a particularly difficult Thanksgiving, we thought we’d bring our listeners one of the most heartwarming economic stories from the vault, with a little update. Colquitt, Georgia has a population of about 2,000 people. And like a lot of small towns in America, Colquitt had been struggling with a shrinking population, and the departure of manufacturing, and the decline of farming, and all the other economic troubles that plague small towns. And then Joy Jinks stumbled across a bizarre way for the town to try and save itself: they’d stage a musical! On today’s show: how a homespun theater production helped revitalize a struggling peanut-farming town in southwestern Georgia.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Truman Presidency 30 mins – “With the formal transition of power process finally underway, President-elect Joe Biden can now access the reins of government as he prepares to step into the White House in January. But Donald Trump hasn’t conceded, and some close to him say he may never do so. It’s part of an effort to undermine the legitimacy of the election and make governing as hard as possible for his successor and Diane’s guest, Joe Scarborough, says looking to our country’s 33rd president, Harry Truman, can offer lessons to Joe Biden on how to navigate this rocky transition. Truman’s foreign policy helped create the “American Century”, a vision President Trump has used his four years in office to reject. Joe Scarborough’s new book is “Saving Freedom: Truman, the Cold War, and the Fight for Western Civilization.” He co-hosts MSNBC’s “Morning Joe”.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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