Media Mining Digest 190 – July 3, 2015: 3D Printing Trends, African Economy, Asteroid Hazards, Astronauts, Black Plague, Boxer Rebellion, British Scandals, Broadband Overview, Climate Warming, Communications Studies, Cortisol, Data Management, Dr Pinault-Aerospace, Economic Concerns, Energy Futures, Estonia and Russia, Eye in the Sky, Food Supply Basics, Home Food Production, Individual Rights, Interpol, ISIS Background, Learned Helplessness, Methanol, Mexican-American War, Nazi Germany Insider, Negotiation Fallacies, Opium History in China, Podcast Women, Racism in America, Raisin Outlaw, Russo-Japanese War, Shortwave Report, Silencers, Social Media and Pilots, Sugar Concerns, Terrorist Creation, The Super, Two Gun Cohen, Water Management Breakdown, Water Management in Lima, Women in Science, World War One – Canada, WW II Female Agents

The following audio files come from a larger group of 204 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 52 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

3D Printing Tends 53 mins – “On the show this week we explore the future of 3D Printing. To do so, Indre goes to SolidCon—a conference about “Hardware, Software & the Internet of Things”—and talks to people from two companies in attendance: Will Walker, a sculptor, designer, and educator from Formlabs and Kevin Czinger, the founder and CEO of Divergent Microfactories, Inc.” At the link click “Download” then “OK” from the pop-up menu.

African Economy 72 mins – “Morten Jerven of Simon Frasier University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his new book, Africa: Why Economists Get It Wrong. Jerven, who will be joining Noragric at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences this fall, argues that economists have misread the economic history of Africa, ignoring successful episodes of economic growth while trying to explain a perpetual malaise that does not exist. Jerven is critical of many of the attempts to explain growth using econometric techniques and suggests that a richer approach is necessary that is aware of the particular circumstances facing poor countries.” AT the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Airplane Automation Issues 31 mins – “On the evening of May 31, 2009, 216 passengers, three pilots, and nine flight attendants boarded an Airbus 330 in Rio de Janeiro. This flight, Air France 447, was headed across the Atlantic to Paris. The take-off was unremarkable. The plane reached a cruising altitude of 35,000 feet. The passengers read and watched movies and slept. Everything proceeded normally for several hours. Then, with no communication to the ground or air traffic control, flight 447 suddenly disappeared. Days later, several bodies and some pieces of the plane were found floating in the Atlantic Ocean. But it would be two more years before most of the wreckage was recovered from the ocean’s depths. All 228 people on board had died. The cockpit voice recorder and the flight data recorders, however, were intact, and these recordings told a story about how Flight 447 ended up in the bottom of the Atlantic. The story they told was was about what happened when the automated system flying the plane suddenly shut off, and the pilots were left surprised, confused, and ultimately unable to fly their own plane….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asteroid Hazard 39 mins – “Millions of asteroids have struck Earth in the past. The vast majority have been relatively small, equivalent to the impact of a typical hydrogen bomb. But a few have been much larger: in the 100m hydrogen bomb category, destroying much of life on the planet in short order. To discuss the threat we face from asteroids, and how we might protect life on Earth, Ian Sample is joined down the line from Cambridge University by Lord Rees, the astronomer royal, and co-founder of the Centre for Study of Existential Risk. In the studio, is Clemens Rumpf from Southampton University who is a member of the EU’s Stardust Research Network, which studies the space dust and asteroid situation. Also in the studio is Hannah Devlin, the Guardian’s science correspondent.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronaut Jones 52 mins – “In this very special episode of the Talking Space Podcast, we have author and four-time space shuttle astronaut Dr. Tom Jones. With Dr. Jones we discuss his books Sky Walking, Planetology: Unlocking The Secrets of the Solar System, and Hell Hawks!along with his view on where NASA is going and much more! A special thank you to Dr. Jones also for coming on to participate in this interview and giving his insight.” At the link fright-click “Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronaut Mullane 124 mins – “Three time astronaut Mike Mullane talks about his life and book Riding Rockets. Best selling author Rowland White updates us on his space shuttle project and Gene Mikulka from Talking Space discusses space launches, space travel and what’s happening around the solar system.” At the link fright-click “Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Plague Overview 53 mins – “Tens of thousands of Londoners developed painful, apple-sized, pus-filled boils before dying from the dreadful disease within days. But just as the ordeal of the Black Death seemed to be subsiding, the Great Fire struck the city. But did the conflagration actually save the lives of thousands? In this scorcher of a show, we go in search of the cause of the plague, explore the origins of the Great Fire, and ask whether history might repeat itself? “ At the link right-click “Download as mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boxer Rebellion 60 mins – “The Boxer Rebellion is not a rebellion, and it has nothing to do with boxing, or people that box. However, it is absolutely fascinating, so take a look! I cover the main gripes of the Chinese at this time, and look at why the Boxers were able to rise as quickly as they did. Lemme know what you thought history friends!” At the link find the title, “WDF 15: The Boxer Rebellion ,” right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Scandals 39 mins – “This week’s podcast puts the Guardian’s former editor Alan Rusbridger across the table from one of Britain’s most eminent lawyers, the Queen’s Counsel Jeremy Hutchinson, at a Guardian Live event.They discuss how the second half of the 20th century was shaped by confrontations in the high court. Hutchinson recalls the moment Christine Keeler walked into his chambers and conjures up the atmosphere of early 1960s Britain. He remembers how DH Lawrence’s prose made the case against the censor in the Lady Chatterley’s Lover trial, and pays tribute to Edward Snowden in a post-privacy age.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Overview 66 mins – “Broadband is the defining infrastructure of the 21st century, and the impact of high-speed wired and wireless connectivity is just beginning to be realized. The government institution at the forefront of U.S. broadband policy and implementation is the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), helmed by Chairman Tom Wheeler. On June 26, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings and the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings hosted FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, who discussed his vision for maximizing the benefits of broadband. Chairman Wheeler’s remarks outlined the ways technology is changing network economics and highlight a series of policies aimed at driving fast, universal, and open broadband in this new environment.” At the link right-click on “Maximizing the benefits of broadband” just above “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming 4 mins – “You’d think that in this day and age, no one would die from heatstroke any more. This story is based on a radio interview. Listen to the full interview. What’s the use of all that energy we generate if you can’t power a simple fan to cool down? Well, it’s not that simple. And we’re seeing that play out in Pakistan right now. The country is being blasted by a heat wave, with temperatures well over 110 degrees Fahrenheit. And the supply of electricity is inconsistent in Pakistan. That’s a deadly combination. Hundreds have died. “It’s been a challenging four days or so,” says Karachi-based writer and journalist Bina Shah. “I’m still a lot more fortunate than many people in the city who have just been suffering.” The heat hit her hometown hard. Water supplies are pumped with electricity. The power’s been out. So, at times, there’s no water.  It’s been particularly difficult for the blue collar workers. They’re forced to go out into the intense heat. Plus, it’s Ramadan. “That means no food or water from sunrise to sunset,” says Shah. “In these extreme conditions, taking on a challenge like that is deadly.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Studies 20 mins – “This week on The Voice, our host Gabriela Warrior Renaud chats with Tim Schwab, Associate Professor for the Department of Communications Studies at Concordia University, about the Communications Studies program is structured, and what it offers students who are looking to start a career in Communications.”  At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cortisol 6 mins – “Brian Clegg investigates a compound that calms inflamed joints and excites the stressed brain: Cortisol” At the link find the title, “Cortisol & Hydrocortisone: Chemistry in its element,” right-click” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Management 65 mins – “Universities are drowning in data, not only data produced by their researchers and students, but also data they collect about their communities. Research data are subject to sharing and retention requirements by funding agencies and journals. Data from course management systems, faculty personnel records, security cameras, and social media are being used as indicators for decision making. In this talk Christine L. Borgman — author of the new book “Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World” and Professor and Presidential Chair in Information Studies at UCLA — identifies challenges faced by universities in managing and governing these complex categories of data.” At the link right-click “Download the MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dr Pinault – Aerospace 62 min – “In this special episode, Xtended gets an exclusive interview with one of the most influential people in aerospace today, Dr Lewis Pinault. Covering everything from his life as a Consultant to working for NASA and the UK Government, Dr Lewis shares his views on being short listed for the Mars One flight and what does it feel like to be on the one way flight; space junk and his exciting role for Lunar Mission One.” At the link fright-click “Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Concerns 24 mins – “We ask three economists: Is there some falling anvil that’s about to crush the economy?” At the link find the title, “#634: Worst Case Scenario,” right-click “Media files 20150619_blog_pmpod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Futures P2 54 mins – “Wind and water—these are the forces of nature which shape much of our world. But could they be harnessed to power a nation? In sunny South Australia, wind now supplies 30 per cent of the state’s electricity. Ten years ago it supplied none. In this second episode of Energy Futures, looking at Australia’s energy options beyond fossil fuels, Carl Smith gets inside wind turbines and bobs up and down on waves to discover the energy generating potential of wind, ocean waves and hydro-power.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Estonia and Russia 27 mins – “Neal Razzell reports from the Estonian city of Narva, which is in NATO but almost entirely Russian. Could this be the west’s weak spot? Here, the Estonian government says, Moscow is trying to destabilise it by exploiting local grievances – just as NATO says it did in Ukraine. So Estonia is mounting an urgent campaign to win hearts and minds among its Russian population. Ethnic Russians account for a quarter of all Estonians, and most say their economic prospects are best served by living in the west. But many are also profoundly ambivalent about their identity, culturally and linguistically at odds with the majority, and asking questions about what it means to be an Estonian. Produced by Michael Gallagher” At the link find the title, “Estonia’s Russian Problem,” right-click “Media files p02vmcr8.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evolution 52 mins – “It’s hard to imagine the twists and turns of evolution that gave rise to Homo Sapiens. After all, it required geologic time, and the existence of many long-gone species that were once close relatives. That may be one reason why – according to a recent poll – one-third of all Americans reject the theory of evolution. They prefer to believe that humans and other living organisms have existed in their current form since the beginning of time. But if you’ve ever been sick, you’ve been the victim of evolution on a very observable time scale. Nasty viruses and bacteria take full advantage of evolutionary forces to adapt to new hosts. And they can do it quickly. Discover how comparing the deadly 1918 flu virus with variants today may help us prevent the next pandemic. Also, while antibiotic resistance is threatening to become a major health crisis, better understanding of how bacteria evolve their defenses against our drugs may help us out. And the geneticist who sequenced the Neanderthal genome says yes, our hirsute neighbors co-mingled with humans. It’s Skeptic Check … but don’t take our word for it!” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eye in the Sky 29 mins – “Ross McNutt has a superpower — he can zoom in on everyday life, then rewind and fast-forward to solve crimes in a shutter-flash. But should he? In 2004, when casualties in Iraq were rising due to roadside bombs, Ross McNutt and his team came up with an idea. With a small plane and a 44 mega-pixel camera, they figured out how to watch an entire city all at once, all day long. Whenever a bomb detonated, they could zoom onto that spot and then, because this eye in the sky had been there all along, they could scroll back in time and see – literally see – who planted it. After the war, Ross McNutt retired from the airforce, and brought this technology back home with him. Manoush Zomorodi and Alex Goldmark from the podcast “Note to Self” give us the low-down on Ross’s unique brand of persistent surveillance, from Juarez, Mexico to Dayton, Ohio. Then, once we realize what we can do, we wonder whether we should.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Supply Basics 16 mins – “Our food supply is so integral to our lives that few may notice the degree of processing involved. On this episode, Megan Kimble discussed unprocessed foods.” At the link find the title, “Unprocessed — Groks Science Show 2015-06-24,” right-click “Media files groks062515.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Home Food Production 92 mins – “Episode-1592- Ben Hewitt on Nutrient Dense Food Production – Ben and his wife, Penny, along with their two sons, have transformed a worn out Vermont hillside into a thriving homestead, which currently provides more than 90% of their food, along with most of their building materials, all their heating and cooking fuel, and many other essentials. They call their style of homestead scale food production “practiculture,” reflecting the fact that they draw on many different methodologies while always striving to make this work “doable.” They are the authors of the recently-published book The Nourishing Homestead. Ben’s previous book is Home Grown, which explores his experience with the public ed system (he’s a high school dropout) and his family’s experiences “unschooling” their two sons.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Individual Rights 52 mins – “With the Supreme Court ready to rule any day now on gay marriage rights, Brian, Ed and Peter wade into America’s long history of struggles over rights. How have Americans claimed, framed and changed their rights over time? Where do we think “rights” come from anyway… is it God, nature, the government, the founding documents? Join the Guys as they explore moments from the past that reveal how Americans have asserted their rights and — sometimes in the same breath — denied them to others. We have stories about freedom suits, religious liberty, labor law and… smoking rights?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interpol 27 mins – “Interpol is the world’s biggest and most powerful international policing organisation. Spanning almost every existing country – with the notable exception of North Korea – it carries out vital work in combatting worldwide organised crime. Increasingly important in our globalised era, but lacking in accountability and surrounded with an aura of mystery, it has to cope with new scrutiny. In this age of accountability and transparency, how long can it withstand demands for change” At the link find the title, “Inside Interpol,” right-click “Media files p02vc6nv.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Overview 89 mins – “Though insurgent groups are a fixture of contemporary politics and warfare, the Islamic State or ISIS is unprecedented in its mix of brutality, media savvy, territorial gain, and recruitment. In ISIS: The State of Terror, two of America’s leading experts on violent extremism and terrorism explain the genesis, evolution, and impact of the Islamic State. Drawing on their unique access to intelligence and law enforcement and through their own groundbreaking research, Jessica Stern and J.M. Berger detail ISIS’s strategies and techniques – and challenge our own conceptions of terrorism in a rapidly changing jihadi landscape.” At the link right-click the title, just above “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Learned Helplessness 46 mins – “Stuck in a bad situation, even when the prison doors are left wide open, we sometimes refuse to attempt escape. Why is that? In this episode learn all about the strange phenomenon of learned helplessness and how it keeps people in bad jobs, poor health, terrible relationships, and awful circumstances despite how easy it might be to escape any one of those scenarios with just one more effort. In the episode, you’ll learn how to defeat this psychological trap with advice from psychologists Jennifer Welbourne, who studies attributional styles in the workplace, and Kym Bennett who studies the effects of pessimism on health.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download: and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Methanol 6 mins – “Tempted by a tipple of home-brewed moonshine? Andrew Turley examines the risks associated with drinking methanol.” At the link find the title, “Methanol: Chemistry in its element,” right-click “Media files CIIE_Methanol.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexican-American War 57 mins –After a small break, we return with a bang in the form of the 1846-48 war between Mexico and America. It is quite the story! Texas gets looked into, as does Santa Anna, as does Tabasco, so check it out! I also have some pretty exciting news for you all AND a new BEFIT reminder. What more could you possibly want? You are so very welcome my history friends!” At the link find the title, “EP11-Mexican_American War,” right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nazi Germany Insider -87 mins – “Episode 100-Nazi Germany from Within – The following is my 100th Episode Celebration. After thanking those who have shared this journey with me, I interview Henry Niemann who grew up in Germany during the Nazi Period and was then drafted near the end of the war. Thank you to everyone who listens to my attempt at bringing this amazing story to the current generation and podcasting world.” At the link right-click “Media files Episode100.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Negotiation Fallacies 14 mins – “You can’t always get what you want – or can you? Stanford Business School professor Margaret Ann Neale argues that you can negotiate successfully; it just takes a little help from science.” At the link find the title, “The Art of Negotiation,” right-click “Media files NealeWebMixReal.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opium History in China 40 mins – “In this episode Laszlo examines remarks made by distinguished UCLA Professor of Public Policy Mark Kleiman who had commented on Britain’s participation in the Opium War.  The main point was that the cause of the Opium War was due more to protecting imperial tax revenues and the domestic market than trying to stamp out the opium problem. Opium’s history in China began centuries before, at least during the Tang and maybe as far back as the Eastern Jin.  The focus of this episode is on opium’s history in China prior to the Opium War.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasting Women 46 mins – “Episode 57 is the first episode of Books and Ideas that I have produced in 2015. It is a conversation with experienced podcaster Elsie Escobar. Elsie brings a unique perspective to the question Why Podcast? because she does it all: she hosts and produces 2 shows, works for Libsyn, the company that hosts my shows and many others, and she listens to more podcasts than seems humanly possible.” At the link find the title, “BI 57 Why Podcast? with Elsie Escobar,” right-click “Media files 57-BI-Escobar-au.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in America 47 mins – “Dylann Roof could not have been much more clear about his motives. He chose one of the most prominent black churches in America for his night of terror. He shot nine black church members in cold blood. Eyewitnesses quote him saying you’re “taking over our country. You have to go.” He has reportedly confessed he wanted to start a race war. His online selfie features a Confederate battle flag. What fed all that? What is this nut of hatred? And what about the rest of us? This Hour, On Point: Race in America now and what needs to be said, what needs to be done, after Charleston.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in South Carolina 51 mins – “Investigators continue to sift through evidence about the man who gunned down nine parishioners Wednesday inside an historic black church in Charleston, South Carolina. What is already clear is that this horrific event lays bare longstanding and lethal contradictions in this country: Mentally deranged individuals have no trouble getting guns, and more than 150 years after the Union defeated the confederacy and freed its slaves, racism lives on. Can this tragedy galvanize the personal and political will needed to face these issues directly and make change across the country?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Raisin Outlaw 19 mins – “A farmer wanted to sell all his raisins, but the federal government said no. So he took it to the Supreme Court.” At the link find the title, “#478: The Raisin Outlaw,” right-click “Media files 20150624 blog pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russo-Japanese War 43 mins – “This week we look at the 1904-05 war between a young Japan and a massive Russia. I talk about some interesting Japanese history, Russia’s greatest defeats and I put on a fantastic Russian accent. Trust me. Thanks to all of you for your support, hope you enjoy this one. Be sure to let me know what you thought!” At the link find the title, “WDF 3: The Russo-Japanese War,” right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shortwave Report 30 mins – “A weekly 30 minute review of international news and opinion, recorded from a shortwave radio and the internet…. This week’s show features stories from NHK World Radio Japan, China Radio International, Radio Deutsche-Welle, Radio Havana Cuba, and Sputnik Radio. At the link right-click “Media files swr150626.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Silencers 57 mins – “Lane Douglas graduated from UT-Martin in 1975 with an Engineering degree. After a few years as an engineer, he began working in Industrial Sales. He retired in 2011, after 32 years in sales management, the last 12 as Regional Sales Operations Director for MSC Industrial Supply. He opened Southern Silencers, LLC in 2014, a NFA Class 3, silencer business, selling silencers in the State of Tennessee.  His company provides suppressors and nothing else.  They are 100% customer focused and will work hard to help their customers make the right choice for their needs.They also provide all the information you need to complete the necessary ATF paperwork for owning a suppressor and will even complete as much of the paper work for you as the law will allow, to help you make sure you get it done properly.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media and Pilots 79 mins – “Do you have a social media policy for your career? Welcome to the podcast where we inform, motivate, and give you an inside look at the many aviation careers. Some of our favorite co hosts join us. First , Eric Crump, Aerospace Director at Polk State College and a passionate aviation educator. We also have Tom Wachowski, Corporate Pilot and career advocate. Welcome to the show Eric and Tom!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sugar Concerns 19 mins – “ This installment explores the pleasures and perils of sugar, the viral vegetable kale, and whether kale devotees can have too much of a good thing. With a bonus yarn about a chia seed-induced emergency room visit.” At the link find the title, “Scary Food Stories,” right-click “Media files checkup15062201_ghit.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorist Creation 9 mins – “There’s an organization responsible for more terrorism plots in the United States than al-Qaeda, al-Shabaab and ISIS combined: The FBI. How? Why? In an eye-opening talk, investigative journalist Trevor Aaronson reveals a disturbing FBI practice that breeds terrorist plots by exploiting Muslim-Americans with mental health problems.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

The Super 60 mins – “#323: The Super – In 1980’s New York City, rent is rising: it seems out of control, and residents struggle to keep up. So Jack Hitt helps organize tenants, and threatens a rent strike. This does not go over so well with his building super, who, as it turns out, is a very dangerous man.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Two Gun Cohen 101 mins (2 parts) – “Today I wanted to introduce a sort of lovable rogue who haunted the hotel lobby’s of Shanghai, Guangzhou, Hong Kong, London and Edmonton.  Today’s subject was by no means a historic figure.  In fact, I don’t think you can even call him a bit player.  Nonetheless, Morris Abraham Cohen had a China story that deserves a telling.   Today’s episode will look at his early life, how he ended up in Canada and how he got hooked up with the local Chinese Canadians.  We’ll get as far as the death of Sun Yat-sen in early 1925.  We’ll finish up next time with Morris Cohen’s life after Dr. Sun.  I mainly used Daniel S. Levy’s superb biography: Two-Gun Cohen, A Biography.” At the link right-click “Download now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2 here.

Water Management Breakdown 30 mins – “Abrahm Lustgarten of ProPublica discusses the panoply of unfortunate water management policies and practices in the West.” At the link find the title, “Abrahm Lustgarten: Water Management Breakdown,” right-click “Media files SC-2015-06-23.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Management in Lima 5 mins – “Lima taps ancient Andean canals to help fight its water shortage.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Science 26 mins – “Author and journalist Rachel Swaby discussed a few of the substantial contributions that women have made to science.” At the link find the title, “Girl Power — Groks Science Show 2015-06-17,” right-click “Media files groks061715.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One – Canada 275 mins (5 parts) – “Stories from those who lived to tell them. This series draws on the testimony of 200 Canadians who fought in WW1, recorded by CBC Radio in 1964. The men’s stories are supplemented by letters, war diaries, military reports and poetry.” At the link find the titles, The Bugle and the Passing Bell, Part1 [Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5], right-click beside “Media files…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WW II Female Agents 37 mins – “With us for this episode is writer Kathryn J. Atwood, arthor of Women Heroes of World War II and editor of Code Name Pauline: Memoirs of a World War II Special Agent and it is the later book we will be discussing. The protagonist, Pearl, Code Named Pauline, came from humble beginnings to do her part to as an SOE agent, behind enemies lines in Occupied France, to thwart the Nazi’s before and after D-Day. For all those looking for strong female role models, Mrs. Atwood’s books fit the bill beautifully.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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An alphabetic library of 6500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually (right-click “Podcast Encyclopedia” there to download the zip).  Over 240 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 189 – June 26, 2015: Addiction, Alzheimers and Food, Aung San Suu Kyi, Battle of Britain Vet, Biohacking, Books History, Carbon Giants Battle, Cardiologist, Career Selection, Cars and Chicken Tax, Clean Water Act, Coaching Ourselves, Comanches and Texas, Complex Television, Creativity, Damian Lewis, DARPA Program Manager, Dave Brubeck, David Attenborough, David Suchet, Dawn French, Dizzy Gillespie, Drug Research, Dustin Hoffman, Energy Futures, Ethics, Facial Recognition, Govt Job Applications, Grace Hopper, Grand Canyon Development, Hiring Interns, Hiring Overqualfieds, Hugh Laurie, Independent Power Producers, Interview Questions, Japanese Internment and Press, Lauren Bacall, Louis Armstrong, Magna Carta Impact, Malcom Gladwell, Multitasking Caution, Muscular Dystrophy Scientist, Native Americans in 1700s, Panama Canal Expansion, Patent Trolls, Pittsburgh Tech Council, Price Tags History, Prison State, Putin Background, Relativity, Shami Chakrabarti, Solitary Confinement, Standards, Stem Cells Background, Stephen Fry, Terry Gilliam, Timing Is Key, Tom Jones, Transplant Scarcity, Twitter History, Urinary Tract Dysfunction, Waters Fourth Phase, Whoopi Goldberg, Woman Aviator

The following audio files come from a larger group of 221 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 67 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Addiction 34 mins – “This week, Jesse talks about addiction with Dr. Jeremy MartinezCould a smart drug “habit” be a gateway to addiction?  What’s the difference between addiction and physical dependence?  What’s going on with the brain’s dopaminergic systems during addictive behavior?  Tune in to find out.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alice in Wonderland 47 mins – “For “Alice in Wonderland” and the rabbit-hole and his world of make-believe, author Lewis Carroll has been called the godfather of virtual reality. One-hundred and fifty years ago, he unleashed the Mad Hatter and the Queen of Hearts and the White Rabbit and the Cheshire Cat – and, above all, Alice. The young girl whose imagination was set free, and took the world’s with it. And then came Peter Pan, Middle Earth, Hogwarts, League of Legends. The back story? An uptight Oxford mathematician. A real girl – Alice.  And a different age. This hour On Point: the Victorian Age. Inside “Alice in Wonderland.‘” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimers and Food 87 mins – “…Dr. Dale Bredesen was the Buck Institute’s founding President and CEO and is an internationally recognized expert on Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Bredesen’s ground-breaking discoveries have led to a recent clinical trial as well as evidence for memory loss reversal associated with Alzheimer’s disease using lifestyle modifications… Dr. Bredesen says Dr. Perlmutter’s new book, Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain—for Life, explains how nurturing gut health can enhance brain function. “Thanks in large part to a dramatic new understanding of the brain-gut-microbiome connection, there’s new hope for the treatment of autism to Alzheimer’s to multiple sclerosis. David Perlmutter is a leader in this burgeoning field. His book is a landmark contribution.”At the link you can listen/watch, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is in the blog archive.

Aung San Suu Kyi 45 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is Aung San Suu Kyi. The programme was recorded on location in Naypyitaw, Burma in December 2012. Now Leader of Burma’s opposition party, she has dedicated her life to fighting for human rights and democracy in her homeland. A figure of world renown, she is known in Burma as simply “The Lady” and her integrity, determination and grace have provided a beacon of hope to a nation oppressed and exploited by decades of brutal military dictatorship. President Obama says she is an “icon of democracy” and Desmond Tutu calls her “a remarkable woman … ready to work for the healing of her motherland”. Her renown has come at significant personal sacrifice: she endured nearly 20 years of house arrest and persecution, exiled from her children and apart from her British husband who died from cancer in 1999. She says “It takes courage to feel the truth, to feel one’s conscience because once you do, you must engage your fundamental purpose for being alive. You can’t just expect to sit idly by and have freedom handed to you.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battle of Britain Vet 39 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway is the veteran RAF pilot Tony Iveson. Aged 21, he survived being shot down in his Spitfire over the North Sea during his first taste of combat in the Battle of Britain. Unusually for a fighter pilot, he then went on to join Bomber Command and the famous Dambusters squadron, sinking the German battleship The Tirpitz and winning a Distinguished Flying Cross. Aged 89 he returned to the skies, becoming the oldest man to fly a Lancaster bomber: “Well, I got out of that aeroplane and looked at it and it and thought how did we do it?” he says. “I know it was a long time ago and I was young and fit and a professional flier. But I thought about some of my friends who had been lost and it was an emotional experience.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biohacking 60 mins – “This week we’re talking about do-it-yourself biology, and the community labs that are changing the biotech landscape from the grassroots up. We’ll discuss open-source genetics and biohacking spaces with Will Canine of Brooklyn lab Genspace, and Tito Jankowski, co-founder of Silicon Valley’s BioCurious. And we’ll talk to transdisciplinary artist and educator Heather Dewey-Hagborg about her art projects exploring our relationship with genetics and privacy.” At the link find the title, “#322 Biohacking,” right-click “Media files Science for the People, 322 Biohacking.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Books History 19 mins – “…Democratization came to books and journals decisively in the 1980s, when desktop publishing began to replace physical plants and industrial machinery. Digital media master Richard Nash says the digital revolution took many by surprise in the book world because it was a change in disguise. At first blush, nothing seemed to have changed at all.Today, though, we see change in every direction. An open network has replaced a closed supply chain of warehouses and bookstores; the bond that writers share with their readers is now the paramount relationship; and everyone is a creator. As Nash tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally, printed books may have given birth to industrialism, yet digital publishing is returning society to a pre-modern phase. Today, though, we see change in every direction. An open network has replaced a closed supply chain of warehouses and bookstores; the bond that writers share with their readers is now the paramount relationship; and everyone is a creator….” At the link right-click “Download,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Giants Battle 60 mins – “…Welcome to Radio Ecoshock. This week we investigate attempts by the fossil fuel industry to capture otherwise green-thinking ports in the Pacific Northwest, of the United States and Canada, to export carbon to Asia. It’s a battle you hardly hear about. Citizens are lining up against huge corporations with huge money, to fight off giant coal ports, liquified natural gas ports, even propane ports. If we commit to that infrastructure, we commit to devastating climate change – not to mention the explosive, toxic and polluting impacts of these big projects on the Pacific coast….” At the link right-click the first reference to “Lo_Fi” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cardiologist 60 mins – “Q&A with Dr. Patrick O’Gara – Dr. Patrick O’Gara talked about advances in heart surgery, progress in understanding heart health and heart diseases, and the impact of the Affordable Care Act on doctors and patients. He also spoke about his family and career.” At the link you can listen, but a download costs $.99; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Career Selection P1 20 mins – “The most quoted speech in the realm of ‘follow your passion’ is Steve Job’s Stanford graduation commencement speech. He said: I’m convinced that the only thing that kept me going was that I loved what I did. You’ve got to find what you love. And that is as true for work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. And don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking. Don’t settle. What isn’t often quoted is another part of the same speech: It wasn’t all romantic. I didn’t have a dorm room, so I slept on the floor in friends’ rooms, I returned coke bottles for the $0.05 deposits to buy food with, and I would walk the 7 miles across town every Sunday night to get one good meal a week at the Hare Krishna temple.” Part 2 is here. (One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cars and Chicken Tax 16 mins “How the American auto industry is built on a trade dispute over frozen chicken parts.” At the link find the title, “#632: The Chicken Tax,” right-click “Media files 20150612_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clean Water Act 51 mins – “Major rivers — like the Mississippi — are protected under the clean water act of 1972. But it’s been unclear if smaller wetlands and streams that feed into major rivers and lakes are also safeguarded. The Obama administration is seeking to clear up that confusion. Last month, it announced a rule that would clarify the number of smaller waterways protected by federal law. The Environmental Protection Agency says this will ensure safe drinking water for a third of Americans. But farmers and developers say it violates their property rights. A look at the debate over how to best protect the nation’s lakes and rivers. [3 guests]” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Coaching Ourselves 38 mins – “Our guidance on how to coach yourself – Many people tell us that their boss doesn’t coach, or their company doesn’t provide training or a mentoring program and they don’t know how they can improve their skills. So in this guidance, we’re going to tell you can use our coaching model to help yourself.” (One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comanches and Texas 53 mins – “Sixty years ago John Ford travelled to Monument Valley to make his greatest Western, The Searchers. Based on Alan LeMay’s novel, it is still a powerful tale of race, violence and redemption as Ethan Edwards (John Wayne) searches for his niece Debbie, abducted by a Comanche raiding party on the Texas frontier. But, as Mark Burman discovers, The Searchers is a gateway to the real and powerful story of the forging of Texas statehood and the rise and fall of the Comanche empire.” At the link find the title, “In Search of The Real Searchers,” right-click “Media files p02tl312.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up media.

Complex Television 15 mins – “We’ve all heard the age old complaint: hundreds of shows, but nothing to watch. Author and Professor of Media Jason Mittell explains why that disgruntled channel-flipping is becoming a thing of the past — and how today’s television just keeps getting better.” At the link find the tite, “How IMBD and Amazon Are Making TV Better,” right-click “Media files 0620-Mittell-Webmix-Fix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity 49 mins – “Whether it’s work, school, the kids, or having a David Bowie/Queen collaboration stuck in our heads, we’re all under pressure. This week, we’ll examine how we get under pressure, and how we get out of it. Harvard’s Teresa Amabile will tell us about workplace creativity, and what types of tension can heighten it. Reporter Daniel Gross looks at the engineering and psychology behind one of the most aggravating experiences in human existence… traffic. James Bessen, an economist at BU, gives some insight and historical context into the fear of knowing that a robot might soon have your job. Finally, John Ioannidis talks about the stress scientists are under to come up with interesting research, and how that’s created a crisis in scientific literature. So give love one more chance, and listen to our show about pressure.” At the link find the title, “6.13.15 Pressure Pushing Down on Us,” right-click “Media files 0613-FullShow-WebMix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Damian Lewis 35 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is the actor, Damian Lewis. As part of the wave of British talent that’s crashed onto America’s shores in recent years his impact has made a deep impression on the creative landscape. His role as Sergeant Brodie in Homeland saw him win both an Emmy and Golden Globe and along with Band of Brothers, The Forsyte Saga and a long list of other credits, he now ranks as one of our most well recognised and highly regarded performers. Things didn’t always look so peachy: aged 11, and in the school production of Princess Ida, he forgot the entire third act and stood mute in front of a packed auditorium. Tellingly, rather than scuttling into the wings with shame he soldiered on and by 16 he knew performing was, more than anything, what he wanted to do. He says, “I am a person who is ambitious. I’m ambitious to get the very best from every moment and even if that’s just taking my children to the zoo … I want it to be the best it can be.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DARPA Program Manager 67 mins – “Dr. Justin Sanchez and DARPA – Hosted by Leo Laporte. DARPA program manager exploring neurotechnology, brain science and systems neurobiology. Hosts: Leo Laporte and Marc Pelletier. Dr. Justin Sanchez joined DARPA as a program manager in 2013 to explore neurotechnology, brain science and systems neurobiology.” At the link right-click “Download options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dave Brubeck 17 mins – “Roy Plomley’s castaway is jazz musician Dave Brubeck.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

David Attenburough 40 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway for the 70th anniversary edition of Desert Island Discs is Sir David Attenborough. He has seen more of the world than anyone else who has ever lived – he’s visited the north and south poles and witnessed most of the life in-between – from the birds in the canopies of tropical rainforests to giant earthworms in Australia. But despite his extraordinary travels, there is one part of the globe that’s eluded him. As a young man and a keen rock-climber, he yearned to conquer the highest peak in the world. “I won’t make it now – I won’t make it to base camp now – but as a teenager, I thought that the only thing a red-blooded Englishman really should do was to climb Everest.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

David Suchet 37 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is the actor David Suchet. He has won armfuls of awards for his work – most recently an Emmy for his portrayal of Robert Maxwell – but he is best known for the character he has been associated with for 20 years, Hercule Poirot. His approach to his work is meticulous and he says he has to inhabit each role he takes on. In this illuminating interview he recalls how, early in his career, a psychologist showed him how to shed his character at the end of each performance otherwise, he found, the edges between his own life and those of the person he was playing became blurred.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dawn French 35 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is Dawn French. Her career started back when dungarees were considered a legitimate fashion choice and she’s built her reputation on borderline surreal skits and glowingly warm characterisations. Brought up in a forces family she had to move schools a lot and found making people laugh helped to make them her friends. Since then it’s made her a household name and she may be moments away from becoming a ‘national treasure’. Double act partner, sit-com star, sketch show performer, writer, actor, Dawn has made us laugh for years. So does she ever feel overwhelmed by people’s expectations? She says “I tell myself that I’m the sort of person who can open a one-woman play in the West End, so I do …. I am the sort of person who writes a book – so I do”. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dizzy Gillespie 30 mins – “Roy Plomley’s castaway is jazz trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Research 26 mins – “Extracts of the Mexican poppy found in Mali can treat malaria. Dr Merlin Willcox, a clinical researcher from Oxford University, visited communities in Mali to see how healers are using local plants to treat disease. He found that the Mexican poppy has some active ingredients that can treat malaria in some ways as effectively as current medicines. He told Claudia Hammond about how he went about this process of reverse pharmacology. Iron Fish Fights Anaemia In Cambodia iron deficiency affects as many as half of all women and children, but supplements can be hard to get hold of and can have unpleasant side effects. Nick Wood reports on how some families are using a piece of iron, 8cm long and shaped like a fish, to improve their nutrition and prevent anaemia. They just drop it into their cooking pots. Professor Imelda Bates of Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine explains why anaemia is detrimental to health and how the iron fish idea could be adapted for other cultures. How Many Drugs are Fake? Research just published in PloS One and conducted by Dr Harparkash Kaur, a pharmacologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, has shown that in parts of Nigeria there are fewer fake drugs than was feared, but more sub standard ones, which bring their own risks. Dr Kaur tells Claudia how they carried out their research.” At the link find the title, “Plants to Treat Malaria,” right-click “Media files p02tyntf.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dustin Hoffman 36 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is Dustin Hoffman. In spite of his Aunt Pearl telling him he wasn’t good looking enough to be an actor for the past forty-five years he’s been crafting landmark movie performances. He is that rare and apparently contradictory thing – a character actor and a superstar. The Graduate, Midnight Cowboy, Lenny, All The President’s Men, Marathon Man, Kramer v Kramer, Tootsie, Rain Man, Wag The Dog, and Last Chance Harvey are just a handful of the movies that contribute to an unparalleled body of work: he is the only actor in history to have top billing in three films that won Best Picture Oscars. Now in his mid-70s he is making his directorial debut. He says “I’m always fighting to break through… I’m trying to show you the part of me that wants to love, wants to kill, that wants to find my way out, that feels there is no way out.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Futures P1 54mins – “This week we begin the first of a four-part series in which Carl Smith looks at Australia’s energy options beyond fossil fuels. Today, he investigates geothermal and nuclear power. The energy stored below Australia is immense. But it’s not just coal and gas. There’s also a huge amount of geothermal heat. Can this energy be harnessed to fuel the nation? And Australia has one-third of the world’s uranium. Carl Smith discovers the immense heat beneath our feet, and visits Australia’s only nuclear reactor to discover the potential of geothermal energy and nuclear power as replacements for coal as Australia’s major source of electricity. (A four minute brief about coughing starts the program.)” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethics 42 mins – “Our guidance on ethical behavior. Although this show was originally recorded as a Career Tools cast, we’ve included it for free for our Manager Tools listeners and Licensees given the underlying assumption of ethical behavior in all our recommendations. We started this cast with the intention of putting it in our new series for newcomers to the workforce: First Job Fundamentals. But it’s too important not to give everyone access to it. Ethical behavior underpins the Manager Tools and Career Tools philosophy. We’ve always taken it for granted that our listeners understand that. This cast makes clear our stance on ethics.” (One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facial Recognition 47 mins – “Facial recognition technology takes privacy and personal identification issues to a whole new level. With enough cameras around and enough data, you can identify almost anyone – everyone – anywhere, anytime. It’s as good as fingerprints but requires no contact. Just a watchful, electronic eye. ID-ing you, wherever you go. Facebook and Google and US law enforcement have lots at work already. The Obama administration has been trying to hammer out privacy restraints. Last week, the privacy advocates walked out. This hour On Point: facial recognition and the future of privacy in America.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Job Applications 21 mins – “Our guidance on the application process in government – We’ve been asked about how to get through the application process for government jobs – both local, state and federal. There are a lot of similarities, whether you look at any of the levels within the US, and in other countries in the world. This cast won’t be specific to any one system, but we will go over the basics.” (One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grace Hopper 4 mins – “…Rear Admiral Hopper finally retired from the Navy at the age of 80 as the oldest active duty officer in the US military. Hopper continued to consult and speak in the computing industry and on college campuses until her death in 1992. Grace Hopper was a pioneer of computer programming, sometimes remembered as the ‘Queen of Code.’….” (Photo of the first computer bug is also here.) At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grand Canyon Development 52mins – “The Grand Canyon is an awe-inspiring gorge of the Colorado River in Arizona. About 5 million sightseers, hikers and paddlers visit Grand Canyon National Park every year. As federal land it’s protected, but much of the land nearby is not. There’s a fierce battle going on in the region and nationally over two proposed development plans: One is a 1.4 mile tramway that would take visitors to new restaurants and an amphitheater at the bottom of the canyon. The other is a commercial development with more than 2,000 new homes, less than two miles from the park entrance. We look at the battle to balance private property rights and public land preservation. [5 guests]” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Hiring Interns 22 mins – “Our guidance on hiring internsHiring interns is often a task delegated to team members by managers to give them hiring experience.  There’s a thought there that because interns aren’t around long, getting a bad hire doesn’t mean much and there’s less risk if you get it wrong.
Of course, it’s not true.  A great intern can have a really positive effect in as little as a month. A bad intern just gives everyone more work to do.  So, how do you choose an intern?”
(One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hiring Overqualifieds 27 mins – “This guidance describes how – and why – to hire “overqualified” candidates. In 2013, there are overqualified candidates in the job market. And Manager Tools recommends you HIRE them. Stop complaining about how you have to help and train and push your directs all the time, and hire someone who can MORE than do the job. The benefits – to an effective, smart manager – FAR outweigh the risks. Maybe it’s not for the faint of heart, but come on boys, do you want to live forever? Hiring overqualified candidates is a clever competitive advantage for an effective Manager Tools manager.” (One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hugh Lourie 33 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway is the actor, Hugh Laurie. If life were straightforward he’d be marooned on the island because of his achievements as an Olympic rower. But his early promise on the water was scuppered by a bout of glandular fever – so he’s had to make do instead with life as a worldwide entertainment superstar. Very British comedy, very big budget movies, very successful syndicated TV drama – his 30 year career has taken him from A Little Bit of Fry & Laurie to a big bit of broadcasting history: his role in the U.S. show House ran for 8 series and had a global audience of 81 million. So why now does he feel the need to risk his stellar reputation by making music too? He says, “as soon as I acknowledge to myself that something is frightening and carries the risk of public humiliation I feel like I have to do it.”At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Independent Power Production 29 mins – “Todd Thorner, an entrepreneur who has started wind, solar and hydro-electric companies. discusses the role of independent power producers in the U.S. The post Todd Thorner on Independent Power Producers appeared first on Sea Change Radio.” At the link find the title, “Todd Thorner on Independent Power Producers,” right-click “Media files SC-2015-06-16.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interview Questions 22 mins – “Our guidance on answering the question ‘why do you want to work here?’This guidance is part of a series helping you answer common interview questions. ‘Why do you want to work here?’ is a dispositive question for many interviewers. An enthusiastic, well thought through answer will make up for poor answers elsewhere, and a stuttered half answer will detract from your whole interview. So what is the right way to answer?” (One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Japanese Internment and Press 64 mins – “University of Southern California lecturer Richard Reeves talks about the internment experiences of the Japanese on the U.S. West coast and how the press fueled hysteria over sabotage.” At the link find the title, “Discussion on the Press and Japanese Internment in World War II,” right-click “Media files program.377774.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lauren Bacall 28 mins – “Roy Plomley’s castaway is actress Lauren Bacall.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Louis Armstrong 25 mins – “Roy Plomley’s castaway is jazz trumpeter and singer Louis Armstrong.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Magna Carta Impact 110 mins (2 parts) – “It’s been hailed as the cornerstone of our justice system. From property rights to women’s rights, the rule of law, equality before the law and defined roles for judges: all roads seem to lead us back to Magna Carta Libertatum. But is this entirely true?” At the link find the title, “ Much Ado About Magna Carta, Part 1,” right-click “Media files ideas 20150615_66349.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2.

Malcolm Gladwell 37 mins – “The writer Malcolm Gladwell is interviewed by Kirsty Young for Desert Island Discs. Always concise, frequently counterintuitive and unexpectedly beguiling, his work orders the world in a way that gives fresh insights into human behaviour. He believes that a knowledge of people’s backgrounds is necessary to understanding their success; his own achievements may presumably then be attributed, not just to his keen mind and polished prose, but also to his parents – an English mathematician and a Jamaican psychotherapist. He says, “I am the bird attached to the top of a very large beast, pecking away and eating the gnats…. I am someone who draws inspiration from the brilliance of others and repackages it … I am a populariser, a simplifier and a synthesizer.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Multitasking 28 mins – “We’ve said often on air that multi-tasking is a lie. We don’t mince our words, and we totally mean it. Multi-tasking is impossible for humans. It’s not even possible for computers. In the early days they just switched between tasks so quickly that it seemed as if they were multi-tasking. Nowadays they have multiple chips, so it can be argued they are multi-tasking, but you still only have one brain, so the argument doesn’t help you. Yes, you can rub your belly and pat your head at the same time. How much concentration does that take though? If we do it, we can’t do anything else, because doing those two things simultaneously takes up our WHOLE brain. We sometimes show this video at our conferences: Test Your Awareness: Do The Test. In it, you’re asked to look out for the number of passes the basketball players make. Something else happens in the video, which if you haven’t seen it before, you won’t see. Why? BECAUSE YOU CAN’T MULTITASK! If you are counting basketball passes (a relatively simple task) you cannot see the other things that happen. And, it doesn’t matter if you’re male or female, old or young, computer savvy or technically barely literate. No-one can multi-task. It’s just not in our physiology. (Humans differ by .1% from each other, so we’re all a lot more the same that we are different). Those of you who are thinking, but this isn’t me… *I* can multi-task, you’re wrong, but apparently not being convinced. Please try and experiment with us. Try these techniques for just a week and see if your output improves. If it doesn’t, you can go back to multi-tasking with our blessing.” (One of 900 related podcasts on career and management from www.manager-tools.com) At the link right-click “Download this cast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muscular Dystrophy Scientist 45 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is the scientist Professor Kay Davies. She has dedicated much of her life to finding a cure for the severest form of muscular dystrophy. Before she was 40, she had helped to develop the antenatal test which is now used around the world, then she isolated the gene sequence which could be instrumental in treating the condition. After years spent working on that, human trials for a possible treatment are about to begin. It’s quite something for a woman who doesn’t have an O-level in biology. Although, even as a child she did possess that critical quality crucial to scientific pioneers: “I loved solving problems,” she says, “I was very tenacious and would sit in my room until I had finished the problem. I am a sticker.” [Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Native Americans in 1700s 70 mins – “Professor Paul Mapp talks about the interactions between the European colonial powers and Native American tribes on the Great Plains during the 1700s.” At the link find the title, “Discussion on the Colonial West,” right-click “Media files program.376832.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panama Canal Expansion P1 13 mins – “The expanded Panama Canal is scheduled to open in the winter of 2016, featuring a new, parallel set of locks and deeper channels, allowing the passage of Neo-Panamax container ships carrying as many as 13,000 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs), in contrast to 5000 TEU capacity of today’s Panamax ships, as well as larger bulk carriers and now LNG ships. Larger ships mean lower transportation costs, and the possibility of reducing consumer prices and making some US businesses more competitive in the global markets. But a key question for the U.S. is “Are our ports, harbor, and landside transportation systems ready for these larger ships?” Are channels deep enough, cranes sufficiently large and plentiful, and do rail, road, and storage facilities have the throughput capacity to move the bulk and containerized goods? Host Joseph Schofer discusses the national perspective on port readiness with Roger Bohnert, Deputy Associate Administrator-Office of Intermodal System Development, and Yvette Fields, Director, Office of Deepwater Ports and Offshore Activities, at the U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD). The Phase I report of MARAD’s Panama Canal impact study is hereAt the link right-click “Listen to this episode now,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patent Trolls 25 mins – “Communicators on Patent Reform – Representative Hank Johnson (D-GA), Austin Meyer, and Daniel Zadoff talked about patent legislation before Congress and other issues. They were each interviewed in the Rayburn House Office Building on unknown dates.” Done during a CES Technology Fair held in Washington, DC. At the link you can listen, but a download costs $.99; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Pittsburgh Tech Council 54 mins – “Joyce welcomes Audrey Russo, president and CEO of the Pittsburgh Technology Council. Discussed on the show will be the mission of this organization.” At the link find the title, “Mission of the Pittsburgh Technology Council,” right-click “Media files bender061615.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Price Tags History 17 mins – “The price tag is a fairly recent invention. And it’s already on its way out.” At the link find the title, “#633: The Birth And Death Of The Price Tag,” right-click “Media files 20150617_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison State 86 mins – “An intimate look at the cycle of mass incarceration in America.” At the link right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Putin Background 27 mins – “Vladimir Putin, then a KGB agent, was caught up in dramatic events as East Germany collapsed. He saw crowds take control as communist power collapsed, and had to defend his KGB office in Dresden as demonstrators tried to break in. Chris Bowlby explores how this experience shaped Putin’s career and behaviour today – his determination to restore Russian power, his fear of demonstrations, his sense of the power of nationalism.” At the link find the title, “The Moment that Made Putin,” right-click “Media files p02tssz5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Relativity 52 mins – “A century ago, Albert Einstein rewrote our understanding of physics with his Theory of General Relativity. Our intuitive ideas about space, time, mass, and gravity turned out to be wrong. Find out how this masterwork changed our understanding of how the universe works and why you can thank Einstein whenever you turn on your GPS. Also, high-profile experiments looking for gravitational waves and for black holes will put the theories of the German genius to the test – will they pass? And why the story of a box, a Geiger counter, and a zombie cat made Einstein and his friend Erwin Schrödinger uneasy about the quantum physics revolution.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shami Chakrabarti 37 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is the director of Liberty, Shami Chakrabarti. A pithy and incisive speaker, she is rarely out of the media spotlight and has been voted ‘one of our most inspiring political figures’. She joined Liberty the day before the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and, as the events unfolded on the television screens, it was, she says, impossible to predict just how much they would shape the civil rights debate in the years that followed. For her, it was not just a matter of philosophical or political principle – her son was born soon after the attacks and his birth, she says, influenced her own feelings: “I understood more what it is to be afraid, what it is to really worry about whether your family are going to be blown up on the underground.” [Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solitary Confinement 34 mins – “Special Podcast: FRONTLINE asks how corrections officials are changing the use of solitary confinement in the U.S.” At the link find the title, “Frontline Roundtable: Solitary Confinement,” right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Standards 4 mins – “We spend a good part of our lives measuring things — length, weight, time. But how do we know that a pound of coffee weighs the same in Miami as it does in Seattle? Or that a gallon of gas is the same in Houston as it is in New York? The need for uniform measures in the United States was recognized in the Constitution. It grants Congress the power to establish standards. George Washington understood the need for standards. In his 1790 State of the Union address, he proclaimed that “Uniformity in the currency, weights, and measures of the United States is an object of great importance, and will, I am persuaded, be duly attended to.” However, it wasn’t until 1901 that Congress established the organization we know today as the National Institute of Standards and Technology, or NIST for short….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stems Cells Background 126 mins – “Stem cells are an important part of today’s medical practice, and their importance will grow in the future based on research conducted today. One of the researchers in Derrick Rossi of Harvard and the Boston Children’s Hospital. In the episode we introduce the different kinds of stem cells and their role in the body and in medical treatments. We then discuss some clinical use cases as well as current research (in general and in Derrick’s group).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stephen Fry 39 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is Stephen Fry. Comedian, actor, writer, director, presenter & award-ceremony host – his list of accomplishments is long, varied and impressive. His younger years were troubled and with a propensity for stealing and lying, he was expelled from two schools and imprisoned for credit card fraud. The turning point came when he knuckled down and won a scholarship to Queens’ College, Cambridge, where he read English and joined the Cambridge Footlights, becoming lifelong friends with Emma Thompson and Hugh Laurie. His career highlights include the fruits of his collaborative work with Laurie – from A Bit of Fry and Laurie to Jeeves and Wooster, he played Lord Melchett in Blackadder and Oscar Wilde on the big screen. He is a best-selling author of fiction and three volumes of autobiography, is the voice of the Harry Potter audio books and presents BBC Two’s QI. He has also spoken of his experience of mental health issues and in 2006 he made a documentary exploring the effects of living with Bipolar – it won an Emmy Award.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terry gilliam 36 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway is the animator and director Terry Gilliam. He first planted his foot-print on our cultural landscape more than thirty years ago – back then, it was a huge, animated foot which squashed everything beneath it and became one of the defining images of Monty Python’s Flying Circus. In the years since, his film credits have included Brazil, Twelve Monkeys and The Imaginarium of Dr Parnassus. Now aged 70, he’s directing his first opera. He says: “I’ve always liked the extremes, the edges. I like to know where the cliff is, but you only find out by stepping off.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Timing Is Key 7 mins – “Bill Gross has founded a lot of startups, and incubated many others — and he got curious about why some succeeded and others failed. So he gathered data from hundreds of companies, his own and other people’s, and ranked each company on five key factors. He found one factor that stands out from the others — and surprised even him.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tom Jones 36 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway is the singer Sir Tom Jones. In a career spanning fifty years he’s sold 150 million albums and his hits have included It’s Not Unusual, What’s New Pussycat? and Delilah. As a child it was assumed he’d follow in his father’s footsteps and become a miner. But he developed TB when he was twelve and doctors warned his parents against sending their only son to the pit; they said his lungs were too weak. Now aged seventy, he has no plans to retire. “Singing’s like breathing to me”, he says, “my voice drives me, it tells me that I have to do it”. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transplant Scarcity 17 mins – “Do we know our bodies’ true value? Northeastern’s Kara Swanson says the massive gap between organ supply and demand makes it much higher than we might think.” At the link find the title, “Organ Marketplaces” of the Future, right-click “Media files Swanson-Webmix-0620.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Twitter History 29 mins – “…New York Times columnist & technology reporter Nick Bilton discusses his book, “Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal,” in which he traces the origins of Twitter from the perspectives of its four co-founders.” At the link find the title, “The Communicators with Nick Bilton,” right-click “Media files comm012514 podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urinary Tract Dysfunction 24 mins – “Jalesh Panicker discusses lower urinary tract dysfunction, a common problem in people with neurological disorders.” At the link find the title, “Lower urinary tract dysfunction: The Lancet Neurology: June 16, 2015,” right-click “download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water’s Fourth Phase 24 mins – “How On Earth reporter Kendra Krueger caught up with Gerald Pollack, Bioengineering professor from the University of Washington to talk about the physical chemistry of water.  The science of water has a sordid past of controversy and dispute which continues today in our current scientific and layman communities.  Why is that? What is so strange about the properties of water?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whoopi Goldberg 35 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is the comic and actress Whoopi Goldberg. As a child she used to practise the acceptance speeches she was sure she would one day make – little surprise then that she’s one of a handful of people to have won an Oscar, a Grammy, a Tony and Emmy awards.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Woman Aviator 4 mins – “Today, Hilda Hewlett — not a young daredevil. The University of Houston’s College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them. The stories of first-women-fliers reveal one adventure-seeking young lady after another. But, when we come to Hilda Hewlett — first British woman pilot — the script changes dramatically. Hilda Hewlett was born in 1864 while we were still fighting our Civil War. She was almost 40 when the Wright Brothers flew….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

=======================================================================

ARCHIVE

An alphabetic library of 6500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 240 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 188 – June 19, 2015: Abortion Legislation, App for Parking, Autistic Adults, Bitcoins, Bond Funds, Carbon Bubble, Changing Minds rev, Corporate Responsibility, Dollar Democracy, Elon Musk Book, Faith Based Medicine, Habit Building, Hybrid Authors, Inequality in America, Infrastructure, Job Growth, Jobs and Robots, Lawmaggeddon, Legal Services, Liberia, Looted Antiquities, Monsanto Issues, North Korean Teacher, Putin’s Way, SEAL Team, Sexual Freedom, Solar Women, Spectrum Management, Superbugs, Torture and CIA, Viagra for Women, Virtual Reality, Work Improvement

The following audio files come from a larger group of 187 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 34 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Abortion Legislation 52 mins – “Two years ago, Texas passed a law requiring all clinics that offer abortions to meet the same standards as hospital surgical centers. On Tuesday, a federal court upheld the Texas law, saying it did not place an “undue burden” on women seeking abortions. And in Wisconsin this week, a bill that would ban all abortions after 20 weeks passed the state senate. Fourteen states now have a similar ban on the books. Supporters of these laws say they are needed to protect the health and safety of women. But critics say they are unconstitutional and simply make it harder for women to obtain abortions. Diane and guests discuss new state laws restricting abortion and how courts are responding.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

App for Parking 17 mins – “The story of a 24-year-old kid and the idea he thought would reduce congestion, cut greenhouse gasses and make urban life easier for everyone. Instead, it brought him nothing but trouble.” At the link find the title, “#630: Free Parking,” right-click “Media files 20150605_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Austic Adults 52 mins – “Over the last few weeks, high school seniors around the country have lined up to receive their diplomas. It’s an exciting time, but this transition into adulthood can also be challenging. It is especially difficult for those with an autism spectrum disorder. Members of the autism community refer to leaving high school as “falling off a cliff,” as it marks the end of most government support services. Unemployment for these young adults is high, as are rates of social isolation, even when compared to people with other disabilities. Now, as 50,000 individuals on the autism spectrum enter adulthood each year, calls to address their needs are growing louder. We look at new efforts to support adults with autism.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Bitcoins 68 mins – “Nathaniel Popper of the New York Times and the author of Digital Gold talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Bitcoin. Can Bitcoin make it? What went wrong with Mt. Gox? Why did Ross Ulbricht, the creator of Silk Road, just get sentenced to life in prison? Why are venture capital firms pouring millions of dollars into companies promising easier ways to use Bitcoin? Popper discusses these questions along with the technical side of Bitcoin to help listeners understand why so many investors are excited about the potential of Bitcoin.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bond Funds 46 mins – “What Do You Want To Know About Bond Funds? Paul [Merriman] answers the 14 most common questions about bond funds. He references the following article about bond risk: FINRA.org” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Bubble 60 mins – “With the Tar Sands and the crash in oil prices, Canada went from being a world petro-state to an economy in trouble. Our next guest says the carbon bubble is bursting in Canada, and that may not be a bad thing. Jeff Rubin is no ordinary critic of fossil fuels. He was the Chief Economist for CIBC World Markets, the investment arm of a Canadian mega-bank. Since then he’s written the books “The End of Growth” and “Your World is About to Get A Whole Lot Smaller”. Now Rubin has a new work out: “The Carbon Bubble: What Happens to Us When it Bursts.” The obvious question, which everyone asks: what is a carbon bubble?” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” above the playback image and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Changing Minds rev. 45 mins – (Begins for nine minutes talking about faulty data concerning the topic, “Changing Minds” and then discusses the topic of money in life.) “It’s peculiar, your inability to predict what will make you happy, and that inability leads you to do stupid things with your money. Once you get a decent job that allows you to buy new shoes on a whim, you start accumulating stuff, and the psychological research into happiness says that stuff is a crappy source of lasting joy. In this rebroadcast, listen as psychologist Elizabeth Dunn explains how to get more happiness out of your money…with science!” At the link find the title, “Media files 050_Happy_Money, Elizabeth_Dunn_rebroadcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corporate Responsibility 25 mins – “How responsible should companies be about their impact on the world? Christine Bader, author of The Evolution of a Corporate Idealist: When Girl Meets Oil, and Arvind Ganesan, director of the business and human rights division at Human Rights Watch, discuss corporate social responsibility. Hosted by Sarah Childress.” At the link find the title, “Frontline Roundtable: Corporate Social Responsibility,” right-click “Media files 177665035-frontlinepbs-frontline roundtable corporate social responsibility.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dollar Democracy 56 mins – “ Dan has talked in the past about funding drives to get reformers elected, but this show explores a more “if you can’t beat them, join them” approach to achieving public policy goals in a money-dominated system.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elon Musk Book 58 mins – “Ashlee Vance is the author of ‘Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future,’ which provides the first inside look into the extraordinary life and times of Silicon Valley’s most audacious entrepreneur, and he is the feature writer for Businessweek.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing blue arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Faith Based Medicine 58 mins – “…our guest is Dr. Paul Offit, whose new book examines the uneasy relationship between religion and medicine in America. Offit tells the stories of children who have died from treatable ailments because their parents put their faith in scripture over medical intervention. He says his message isn’t anti-religious, but that medical neglect is itself un-Christian. We’ll talk about the choices some parents make and why he says the legal system is failing our most vulnerable.”At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Habit Building 40 mins – “Part of the reason for this is that different people have different personalities and traits. For example, some people are wired to want to uphold all expectations – both external (set by others) and internal (set by themselves). Others are rebels – they don’t want to be told what to do at all. Gretchen Rubin, an author of multiple best-selling books, outlines many of these personality types and traits – and how you can use the knowledge of yours to build habits – in her new book Better Than Before: Mastering the Habits of Our Everyday Lives. In this episode, she and I talk about this subject; if you’re interesting in improving your habits, check it out!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hybrid Authors 41 mins – “The first wave of independent publishing in the digital age promised a golden age of reading and writing. Many caught up in the excitement were swift to proclaim the demise of traditional publishing models. What we see in 2015 is a world that has found room for both the upstarts and the established players. Authors frequently migrate from “indie” status to traditional houses and back again. Authors are making choices based on personal and professional “ROI” assessments – and not only about revenue potential but also considering their long-term career goals. Depending on the book and the trajectory of an author’s career, independent publishing is the right choice now, or a year from now. For the keynote panel opening this year’s uPublishU at BookExpo America, CCC’s Chris Kenneally spoke with a panel whose direct experience working in today’s “hybrid” environment covers editing, publishing and representing authors.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inequality in America 58 mins – “Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz talks about his book, [The Great Divide]. He is interviewed by Heather McGhee, president of Demos.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Joseph Stiglitz,” right-click “Media files program.400404.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save ink As” from the pop-up menu.

Infrastructure History 52 mins – “ As crash experts sort out why an Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia last month, killing eight passengers, Congress is still haggling over how to replenish the nation’s Highway Trust Fund before it goes dry. All the while, the safety of America’s roads and rails hangs in the balance. So on this show, Brian, Ed and Peter uncover the stuff of modern life that’s hidden in plain sight. How have Americans decided what infrastructure to invest in, how to maintain it, and who ultimately has to pay for it? Our stories take a look behind the scenes at the electric grid, the shipping industry and the origins of oil pipelines.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Growth 20 mins – “If you’re worried that a robot might take your job, well, you’ve come to the right place. Economist James Bessen explores why technology may NOT displace workers – and why 19th-Century textile workers have a lot in common with techies in Silicon Valley.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jobs and Robots 24 mins – “If you aren’t already worried about being replaced by a robot, maybe you should be. Today on the show, three races pit humans against machines.” At the link find the title, “#622: Humans vs. Robots,” right-click “Media files 20150508_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lawmageddon 31 mins – “In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Nathaniel Russell about his definition of Lawmageddon, what the legal profession needs to embrace these changes, and the consequences lawyers face if they fail the tests of Lawmageddon. In the second half of the podcast, Russell discusses what can happen if lawyers ignore the presence of social media as evidence and the ethical responsibility all lawyers have to their clients with regard to social media and due diligence.” At the link find the titel, “Lawmageddon and How to Prepare for Social Media in the Courtroom,” right-click “lawmaggeddon-social-media-courtroom.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Legal Services 29 mins – “In this episode of The Digital Edge, Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview Judy Perry Martinez, chair of the ABA Presidential Commission on the Future of Legal Services. Martinez discusses specific actions the commission is taking to find solutions, including grassroots meetings across the country, a national summit, public hearings, and lawyer education. She explains how discussions with lawyers, judges, technology innovators, law students, academics, and law librarians bring awareness to issues in the changing legal landscape and encourages solution ideas. These changes present challenges and opportunities for lawyers today, but those who do not jump on board will likely be left behind.” At the link find the title, “The ABA Commission on the Future of Legal Services,” right-click “Media files aba-commission-future-legal-services.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liberia 87 mins – “FRONTLINE and ProPublica investigate the secret history of Firestone in Liberia.” At the link find the title, “Firestone and the Warlord,” right-click “Media files 209423642 frontlinepbs firestone and the warlord.mp3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Looted Antiquities P1 55 mins – “When the Taliban and ISIS destroy ancient artifacts, the world responds with outrage. But where should that outrage lead: taking ancient art out of the country of origin? Or would that amount to cultural genocide? Just who owns ancient art?” At the link find the title, “Who Owns Ancient Art? Part 1,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150612_96342.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monsanto Issues 51 mins – “The world’s largest seed company, Monsanto, is hoping to expand its business in insecticides and other herbicides by acquiring Syngenta, a major player in the chemicals business based in Switzerland. So far, Syngenta has said no, but Monsanto is likely to raise its offer. If Syngenta ultimately agrees to the deal, some fear the possible takeover could mean higher seed and food prices. In addition, anti-trust regulators will be looking closely at Monsanto’s expanded power in global seed and pesticide markets.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

North Korean Teacher 13 mins – “For six months, Suki Kim worked as an English teacher at an elite school for North Korea’s future leaders — while writing a book on one of the world’s most repressive regimes. As she helped her students grapple with concepts like “truth” and “critical thinking,” she came to wonder: Was teaching these students to seek the truth putting them in peril?” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Putin’s Way 56 mins – “FRONTLINE investigates the accusations surrounding Vladimir Putin’s reign in Russia.” At the link find the title, “Putin’s Way,” right-click “Media files 209427949 frontlinepbs putins way.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

SEAL Team 6 47 mins – “A huge report out this weekend on SEAL Team 6 – the special operations forces that killed Osama bin Laden. The New York Times spent a year digging in to the most elite, most deadly, most secretive force in the US military. What they found was a lot of killing, and rescue, and intelligence-gathering. An evolution in US force projection from big military to fierce, focused out-of-nowhere attacks that can show up almost anywhere – and do. It’s a gripping story with big questions attached. Their reporting staff is with us. This hour On Point:  Deadly force, global reach, and SEAL Team 6.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Freedom 57 mins – “Rising star historian Faramerz Dabhoiwala came to the Intelligence Squared stage in February 2012 to describe how the permissive society arrived in Western Europe, not in the 1960s as we like to think, but between 1600 and 1800. It began in England and is now shaping and challenging patterns of sexual behaviour all over the world. For most of western history, all sex outside marriage was illegal, and the church, the state, and ordinary people all devoted huge efforts to suppressing and punishing it. This was a central feature of Christian civilization, one that had steadily grown in importance since the early middle ages. Three hundred years ago this entire world view was shattered by revolutionary new ideas – that sex is a private matter; that morality cannot be imposed by force; that men are more lustful than women. Henceforth, the private lives of both sexes were to be endlessly broadcast and debated, in a rapidly expanding universe of public media: newspapers, pamphlets, journals, novels, poems, and prints. In his account of this first sexual revolution, Dabhoiwala will argue that the creation of our modern culture of sex was a central part of the Enlightenment, intertwined with the era’s major social, political and intellectual trends. It helped create a new model of Western civilization, whose principles of privacy, equality, and freedom of the individual remain distinctive to this day.” At the link find the title, “Faramerz Dabhoiwala on the Origins of Sex,” right-click “Media files 209708542-intelligence2-origins-of-sex.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Women 6 mins – “Take a step back from Zanzibar’s white sand beaches and big hotels and you’re in a very different world. One where the island’s dusty, inland villages largely go dark once the sun sets. This is when the differences between people who have electricity and those who don’t are most pronounced….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spectrum Management 30 mins – “Karl Nebbia, who formerly led spectrum management operations for the federal government, talked about the spectrum used for cell phones, the Internet, and streaming content. He discussed issues with the growth of wireless devices in recent years and how the government was addressing regulations.” At the link you can listen, but downloads cost $.99; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Suberbugs at NIH 19 mins – “FRONTLINE’s exclusive interview with the family of a young man who died in a superbug outbreak that swept through a hospital at the National Institutes of Health.” At the link find the title, Outbreak at NIH,” right-click “Media files 209421489 frontlinepbs outbreak at nih.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Superbugs 40 mins – “FRONTLINE investigates the widespread use of antibiotics in food animals and whether it is fueling the growing crisis of antibiotic resistance in people.” At the link find the title, “The Trouble with Antibiotics,” right-click “Media files 209419838 frontlinepbs the trouble with antibiotics.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Torture and CIA 57 mins – “The secret history of the CIA’s controversial “enhanced interrogation” methods.” At the link find the title, “Secrets, Politics, and Torture,” right-click “Media files 209431399-frontlinepbs secrets politics and torture.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Viagra for Women 48 mins – “A little pink pill called flibanserin got a green light last week from advisers to the FDA. Its purpose: to enhance sexual desire in women. The headline writers could not resist calling it “Viagra for women.” The same pill had been rejected twice before. At hearings it was called a “mediocre aphrodisiac with scary side effects.” But a big lobbying push demanded gender equity on the sex pill front – and finally got the panel’s recommendation. For “Viagra for women.” This hour On Point:  the little pink pill. Women, sex, side-effects and the making of desire.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virtual Reality 54 mins – “On the show this week we talk all things virtual reality with Will Smith and Norman Chan from Tested.com. Did VR fail in the 90s?How many times does it have to fail to succeed? What’s it useful for besides video games and Lawnmower Men? If you’re confused by the recent VR comeback, Will and Norm have answers. (Starts after a 12 minute intro.) At the link find the title, “90 Will Smith & Norman Chan – Understanding Virtual Reality,” right-click “Media files 209977852 inquiringminds 90-Will-Smith-Norman-Chan on understanding virtual reality.mp3

Work Improvement 71 mins ‑ “Work sucks, but it doesn’t have to. In this episode we go inside Google in an interview with Lazlo Bock, head of People Operations. Bock has helped the company conduct experiments and introduce policies and procedures that have applied knowledge gained from psychology and neuroscience concerning biases, fallacies, and other weird human behavior quirks. The result has been a workplace where people are happier, more productive, and better able to pursue that which fulfills their ambitions. Learn all about Google’s approach as Lazlo describes his new book, Work Rules, a collection of insights from Google’s evidence-based, data-driven human relations.” (At the At the link find the title, “051 – Work – Lazlo Bock,” right-click “Media files 051, Work by Lazlo Bock.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

=======================================================================

ARCHIVE

An alphabetic library of 6500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 240 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 187 – June 12, 2015: Al Shabaab, Anger, Animal Rights, Artificial Intelligence Impact, Asa Carter, Baratunde Thurston, Bee Health, Black Ad Man, Brain Injury Treatment, Broadband in Seattle, Cancer Immunotherapy, Child Sexual Abuse, Climate Change Mobilization, Climate Shock, Comedy, Dataclysm, David Brooks, Dementia Prevention, Deportee Story, Diet and Nutrition, DIY Diagnosis, Dr Ruth, Draught in Australia, Einstein, Electric Cars, Food and Hunger, Future of College, Global Positioning Satellites, Hate Speech, Ideas, Intelligence Quotients, Internet Service Trends, ISIS Insights, John Boggle, Lynching Story, Mali Weapons, Math Education Question, Methane Releases, Movement Affects Mind, Native School Conditions, Parasitism Research, Phosgene, Physical Therapy Games, Pigeonroost Hollow War, Poaching Weapons, Podcasting Business, Police Violence, Publication Trends, Reslience, Saiga Antelope Dieoff, Science Under Siege, Sex Scandals, Shepherd’s Life, Singe Teenage Mom, Sirius Radio Founder, Soil Preservation, Sound Bites, South Sudan, Street Violence Fix, Temple Grandin, Thorium Reactors, Turkey Politics, Visual Effects, War Aftermaths, Warfare Roundtable, Water Knife, Women and Health, Working – by Turkel, Wrongful Execution

The following audio files come from a larger group of 260 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 71 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Al Shabaab 26 mins ­ “Al Shabaab make an unexpected appearance and lecture a congregation in a mosque in Kenya.” At the link find the title, “Thu 21 May 2015,” right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anger 51 mins – “Spats, tantrums and explosions from the archive. American satirist Joe Queenan presents.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Rights 14 mins – “Chimpanzees are people too, you know. Ok, not exactly. But lawyer Steven Wise has spent the last 30 years working to change these animals’ status from “things” to “persons.” It’s not a matter of legal semantics; as he describes in this fascinating talk, recognizing that animals like chimps have extraordinary cognitive capabilities and rethinking the way we treat them — legally — is no less than a moral duty.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence Impact 60mins – “Artificial intelligence is already well on its way to making “good jobs” obsolete: many paralegals, physicians and even – ironically – computer programmers are poised to be replaced by robots. As technology continues to develop, more and more traditional jobs will be shed. Unless we radically reassess our economic and political systems, some fear that this transition to extreme automation could result in massive unemployment, stark inequality and the implosion of the economy itself.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asa Carter 17 mins –Asa Carter was a speechwriter for Alabama Governor George Wallace. He penned one of the most infamous speeches of the era… Wallace’s Segregation Now, Segregation Forever address. Forrest Carter was a Cherokee writer who grew up in Tennessee. His autobiography, The Education of Little Tree, is a beloved classic that has sold millions of copies around the world. But these two men shared a secret.” At the link find the title, “#14: The Long Shadow of Forrest Carter,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Baratunde Thurston 62 mins –Comedian, author, and self-described vigilante pundit, Baratunde Thurston is the former Digital Director for The Onion and the creator of Cultivated Wit, a startup that blends comedy with new digital platforms. A regular contributor to Fast Company and named by The Root as one of the 100 most influential African Americans, he is the cofounder of the political blog Jack and Jill Politics. Honored by the ACLU of Michigan “for changing the political and social landscape one laugh at a time,” he speaks globally on satire, democracy, storytelling, the digital future, race, and politics. Taking razor-sharp comedic shots at cultural stereotypes in this insightful memoir cum satiric guidebook, Thurston unpacks the complexities of racial politics and personal identity in the New York Times bestselling book How to Be Black.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bee Health 52 mins – “Bees are responsible for pollinating a third of the food that appears on Americans’ plates. Yet a recent study found the health of the bee population continues to decline. Last year, beekeepers lost 42 percent of their hives, up from an average of 30 percent during the last eight years. Most scientists agree the problem is a combination of pests, disease, poor nutrition and toxins from pesticides, yet how big a role each of those plays is up for debate – as are the solutions. Now, President Barack Obama has weighed in with a plan to save the bees and other pollinators. But some say it doesn’t go far enough. We learn more about new efforts to support the ailing bee population.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Black Ad Man 23 mins – “In the early 1960s, Tom Burrell became the first black man in Chicago advertising. Today on the show, the story of how he changed the way people think about ads and how advertising thinks about us.” At the link find the title, “#628: This Ad’s For You,” right-click “Media files 20150529 blog pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Injury Treatment 51 mins – “Clark Elliott’s world collapsed after his car was rear-ended 16 years ago. He suffered a concussion and often had severe cognitive problems, from seizures to short-term memory loss that sometimes left him unable to even name his children. Dozens of doctors told him there was nothing they could do. Then, the DePaul University professor began working with specialists who were using new treatments based on recent brain research. He worked on brain teasers and puzzles and was given special eye glasses. Within months, his symptoms were gone. We look at new treatments for concussions and what they could mean for patients.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Broadband in Seattle 24 mins – “We were excited to begin writing about the Upgrade Seattle campaign back in January and this week we are presenting a discussion with several people behind the campaign for episode 153 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. We are joined by Sabrina Roach, Devin Glaser, and Karen Toering to discuss what motivates the Upgrade Seattle campaign and the impact it hopes to have on the community. We discuss their strategy for improving Internet access, how people are reacting, and how Upgrade Seattle is already working with, learning from, and sharing lessons to, people organizing in other communities for similar goals.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Immunotherapy 51 mins – “The battle against cancer includes familiar tools such as surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. But for some, a new treatment may be worth considering: Immunotherapy. It’s a strategy that involves activating a patient’s own immune system to beat back and even eliminate the cancer. Recent research demonstrates positive results with several kinds of cancers such as brain, bladder and skin. The treatment has proven effective in some cases when no other therapy has worked, but much more research is needed to determine in advance which patients are most likely to see results. A look at new research on using our own immune systems to treat cancer.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Child Sexual Abuse 48 mins _”Child sex abuse in the headlines recently. First with Josh Duggar, the family values reality TV star confessing to teenage abuse of young girls. Then with former Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert over alleged hush money and misconduct when he was a high school wrestling coach. Reportedly with boys. And in the tragic story of Beau Biden’s early death, a reminder that young Biden had successfully prosecuted one of the worst pedophiles in American history. A pediatrician! This hour On Point: we look at the reality of child sex abuse – behind the headlines.” At the right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Mobilization 60 mins – “Psychologist Margaret Klein Salamon on movement to mobilize to save the climate – a total shift in society. The transformative power of climate truth. Plus scientist Paul Beckwith on chemtrails and geoengineering. She’s an American clinical psychologist and host of theclimatepsychologist.com. Now Margaret Klein Salamon is calling the United States to an emergency mobilization – to stave off a disastrous shift in our climate. Why it might work. Why it has to. Then we’re back with climate scientist Paul Beckwith to talk over chemtrails or covert climate geoengineering. Maybe it hasn’t started, but Beckwith thinks it should.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” in the download section and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Shock 68 mins – “Is climate change the ultimate Black Swan? Martin Weitzman of Harvard University and co-author of Climate Shock talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the risks of climate change. Weitzman argues that climate change is a fat-tailed phenomenon–there is a non-trivial risk of a catastrophe. Though Weitzman concedes that our knowledge of the climate is quite incomplete, he suggests that it is prudent to take serious measures, including possibly geo-engineering, to reduce the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comedy 55 mins – “Michael Enright revisits interviews with two of the funniest people in show business: Monty Python’s John Cleese and legendary talk show host Dick Cavett.” At the link find the title, “The Enright Files – John Cleese/Dick Cavett,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150601_49573.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dataclysm 60 mins – “This week we’re looking at how powerful computers and massive data sets are changing the we study each other, scientifically and socially. We’re joined by machine learning researcher Hanna Wallach, to talk about the definition of “big data,” and social science research techniques that use data about individual people to model patterns in human behavior. And we’ll speak to Christian Rudder, co-founder of OkCupid and author of the OkTrends blog, about his book “Dataclysm: Who We Are (When We Think No One’s Looking).” At the link find the title, “#320 Dataclysm,” right-click “Media files Science for the People 320 Dataclysm.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

David Brooks 60 mins – “On May 26th 2015, New York Times columnist David Brooks came to the Intelligence Squared stage to share the insights of his latest book, The Road to Character. Brooks argued that today’s ‘Big Me’ culture is making us increasingly self-preoccupied: we live in a world where we’re taught to be assertive, to master skills, to broadcast our brand, to get likes, to get followers. But amidst all the noise of self-promotion, Brooks claimed that we’ve lost sight of an important and counterintuitive truth: that in order to fulfil ourselves we need to learn how to forget ourselves. Brooks was joined on stage by writer and lecturer on psychology, politics, and the arts Andrew Solomon.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right side of the sound bar and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Prevention 38 mins – “A recent conference held at the Academy asked a downright outrageous question: Can dementia be prevented by making changes to your diet? In this podcast we look at what the answers might be.” At the link find the title,“Can We Prevent Dementia Through Our Diet?” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deportee Story 32 mins – “Jose William Huezo Soriano – aka Weasel – is a 26-year-old Los Angeles resident who gets deported to his parents’ home country of El Salvador, which he has not seen since the age of five. In this episode, you’ll hear Weasel’s original audio diary, as well as an update from Weasel in which he talks about his life over the past 15 years.” At the link find the title, “#22: Weasel’s Diary, Revisited,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diet and Nutrition 108 mins – “Dr.. Robert Baron explores why we should care about what we eat – from calories to fiber – and general principles of a healthy diet and lifestyle. He also looks at dietary supplements and they role they play in preventing illness. Recorded on 03/18/2015. (#29284)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Heroes 26 mins – “We look at a new book, “Disaster Heroes”, that tells the stories of the anonymous, ordinary people that help out in times of catastrophe.” At the link find the title, “Disaster Heroes’ tells story of everyday people who step up in crisis – June 5, 2015,” right-click “Download ‘Disaster Heroes’ tells story of everyday people who step up in crisis – June 5, 2015” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DIY Diagnoses 16 mins –Forget pregnancy tests – in the near future, you could diagnose dozens of diseases, from AIDS to cancer, in the comfort of your home. Dr. Eugene Chan and Professor Andrew Ellington discuss what that means for doctors, patients, and healthcare costs.” At the link find the title, “DIY Diagnoses,” right-click “Media files 0523-BFIX2REAL-WEB.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dr Ruth 52 mins – “As a 10-year-old girl, Dr. Ruth Westheimer was put on a train to Switzerland from Germany. Her father had already been taken away by the Nazis. While in an orphanage in Switzerland, she would lose her entire family in the Holocaust. Following the war, she had no real home, no close family and no proper education. What she did have, she says, was a zest for life. Bouncing from Israel to France and eventually the U.S., Dr. Ruth found her true calling in a career she never would have imagined: Sex therapy. And more remarkably, when she reached her 50s, it made her a celebrity. She opens up on love, life and joie de vivre.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Drought in Australia 48 mins – “Farmers say Australia urgently needs a new national plan for drought, because concessional loans are ‘missing the mark’. Agriculture Department figures show that less than half the money allocated for concessional loans in the past two years, has actually made its way to farmers. Around the globe, depending on whether you are in a developed, or developing country, food security takes on a very different definition. Former chair of Agriculture at the University of Melbourne Professor Lindsay Falvey has a very clear view of secure food. Lindsay Falvey told Sally Dakis that larger and larger farms are not the universal answer to global food security.” At the link find the title, “Country Hour for Tuesday 2nd June 2015,” right-click “Media files rural-tas-podcast-020615.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

E.L.Doctorow E. L. Doctorow concocts “a ferocious re-imagining of the past that returns it to us as something powerful and strange” (Time) in novels such as The Book of Daniel, Ragtime, World’s Fair, Billy Bathgate, City of God, March, and Homer & Langley…. Doctorow once again shows his ability to meld “the personal and the mythic into a thrilling and poignant story” (New York Times) in Andrew’s Brain, a radical, lyrical trip through the mind that raises probing questions about what we know about our memories and each other. In conversation with Jim Holt, bestselling author of Why Does The World Exist?: An Existential Detective Story.At the link right-click “Listen to MP3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Einstein 60 mins – “Walter Isaacson | Einstein: His Life and Universe – Walter Isaacson has been the Chairman and CEO of CNN and the Managing Editor of Time Magazine. He is the author of the best-selling biography Benjamin Franklin: An American Life, and he has won several awards for his reporting, including the Overseas Press Club Award for foreign news interpretation. Einstein is a new biography of the German-born, Nobel Prize-winning physicist.” At the link right-click “Listen toMP3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Vehicles 17mins –Electric vehicles have long been touted as the answer to many environmental problems from the potential to make a serious dent in emissions which harm human health and warm the planet – to reducing the demand on diminishing oil supplies. But after years of being talked up as a great alternative to the combustion engine, so far electric vehicles have yet to take hold in any market in the world, even as prices become more comparable with those of other new vehicles. So when might there be a tipping point for electric vehicles and what kind of infrastructure do countries need to make that happen? Chris Binns is the City of Sydney’s manager of strategy and assets who, in 2009 made a plan to cut the city’s vehicle fleet emissions by 20 percent in five years. That target’s been exceeded by introducing electric cars and hybrid-diesel trucks and Chris Binns is in our Auckland studio. And there with him is the chief executive of Mighty River Power, Fraser Whineray who is leading the corporate charge for adoption of electric vehicles and charging stations.” At the link right-click “MP3” beside the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food and Hunger 47 mins – “ Good news on world hunger recently. Not great. Not solved. But good. While the world’s population zoomed up in the last 25 years, hunger fell. A new UN report shows that while the global population jumped up by two billion, the number of hungry people – without sufficient food supplies – fell by about 200 million. There’s still plenty of hunger. But the percent of those going hungry in the developing word has fallen by nearly half. That’s worth exploring. Understanding. Improving on. This hour On Point:  with population up, what’s driven world hunger down?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future of College 12 mins – “ We talked last week with Kevin Carey, author of “The End of College: Creating the Future of Learning and the University of Everywhere,” a book that’s stirring up hot debate in higher ed circles. This week on the podcast a response Carey’s book by Sara Goldrick-Rab, a professor of Educational Policy Studies and Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Goldrick-Rab recently wrote a critique of the book with journalist Audrey Watters for Inside Higher Ed.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “OK” for “Save File” option in the pop-up box.

Global Positioning Satellites 15 mins – “Using a physical map to find your way around? That’s so, like, ten years ago. Tech writer Hiawatha Bray examines the science and history that gave us GPS — and how we owe some of that to Einstein.” At the link find the title, “How Einstein Gave Us GPS,” right-click “Media files BrayWebMix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Speech 20mins – “Few sectors of the networked environment get a worse reputation for hate speech than online gaming. Competitive games with chat functions have always involved some level of trash talking. Slurs, shaming, and casual threats are part of the players’ toolkit for riling up their opponent. But the toxicity levels of video game forums have reached a dangerous point. Unregulated and unchecked, many gaming networks have become zones where cyberbullying, misogyny, racism, and homophobic language are the norm. At least one gaming company has decided that this behavior should NOT be the norm. In 2012, Riot Games – makers of the insanely popular League of Legends (over 60 million players around the world) – hired a cognitive neuroscientist named Jeffrey “Lyte” Lin to “game” the game. Jeffrey is in charge of building social systems that de-incentivize bad behavior and bring about a more sportsman-like culture…” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ideas 26 mins – “Bride Rosney, Tom Garvin and Noel Dorr discuss on ‘Governing the World: The History of an Idea’ by Mark Mazower (Allen Lane)” At the link find the date, “ Saturday 20th April,” right-click the down-pointing blue arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Quotients 5 mins – “ We might put Albert Einstein up on a pedestal as the quintessential genius. But author David Shenk and psychologist Elaine Castles argue that the way we’ve defined intelligence is all wrong.” At the link find the title, “Busting Up IQ Myths,” right-click “Media files Castles-ShenkWebMix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Service Trends 47 mins – “Once upon a time there were businesses that did things. You went to them, or they sent their employees to you. Then came Uber. The transportation company with no cars and no employees out on the road. Hit the app on your smartphone and the service shows up, freelanced and on-demand. Now everybody wants to launch an Uber for everything. To wash your clothes, park your car, take your temperature, rub your shoulders, make you a drink. And they’re launching. Delivering.  Disrupting. This hour On Point: the “on-demand” economy, and the Uber-fication of everything.” At the right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Insights 69 mins – “The Middle East seems to be imploding. Dan[Carlin]thinks this is likely all part of a natural process of redrawing articifical borders and re-balancing power relationships. But that doesn’t mean it’s going to be fun to live through.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

John Bogle 73mins – “John Bogle | Common Sense on Mutual FundsRecorded 3/9/2000 – The author and mutual fund pioneer helps investors navigate the industry. John Bogle is founder of the Vanguard Group and creator of the retail index fund.”  At the link right-click “Download MP3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lynching Story 16 mins –The images coming out of Ferguson, MO this summer have reminded us of another upsetting image of race in America. It’s a photograph that was taken just a few hours from Ferguson, but eight decades ago…and it inspired the Billie Holiday song, Strange Fruit. Listen to our story (and be advised that it is disturbing.)” At the link find the title, “#18: Strange Fruit – Voices of a Lynching,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mali Weapons 8 mins – “In the second installment of this two-episode podcast on ‘Small Arms Survey 2015: Weapons and the World’, Yearbook Coordinator Glenn McDonald and Researcher Claudia Seymour introduce the four case studies discussing armed actors, focusing on their procurement and use of small arms, and their stockpile management practices.” At the link find the title, “Small Arms Survey 2015: Weapons and the World – Part 2,” right-click “Media files SAS-Podcast-32-Small-Arms-Survey-2015-Weapons-and-the-environment-Part-2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Math Education Question 52 mins – “ENCORE Imagine a world without algebra. We can hear the sound of school children applauding. What practical use are parametric equations and polynomials, anyway? Even some scholars argue that algebra is the Latin of today, and should be dropped from the mandatory curriculum. But why stop there? Maybe we should do away with math classes altogether. An astronomer says he’d be out of work: we can all forget about understanding the origins of the universe, the cycles of the moon and how to communicate with alien life. Also, no math = no cybersecurity + hackers (who have taken math) will have the upper hand. Also, without mathematics, you’ll laugh < you do now. The Simpsons creator Matt Groening has peppered his animated show with hidden math jokes. And why mathematics = love.” At the link right-click “Download link” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Methane Releases 29 mins – “When we think of the potential dangers of fracking for natural gas, what may come to mind is the dramatic image of flaming tap-water. But the prospect of methane released in the hydraulic fracturing process goes beyond contaminated ground water to include poor air quality and accelerated climate change. Researchers have struggled to accurately measure how much methane is released through fracking, and studies vary widely in their findings. This week on Sea Change Radio, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Lisa Song, of Inside Climate News joins us to make some sense of the various studies, and help us understand the impact of fracking on the air we breathe. We also delve into the political divide among environmental groups, as nonprofits like the Environmental Defense Fund break with longstanding allies on the subject.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Movement Affects Thoughts 14 mins – “Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move through space. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think? That’s what Sian Beilock asks in her new book, “How the Body Knows Its Mind: The Surprising Power of the Physical Environment to Influence How You Think and Feel.” Beilock is a psychology professor at the University of Chicago. She looked how our physical movement affects our thoughts and emotions in different settings – from school, to work, to human relationships.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “OK” for “Save File” option in the pop-up box.

Native School Conditions 13 mins – “There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis. Last year the Star Tribune of Minneapolis ran a series of editorials about conditions in schools run BIE.  Editorial writer Jill Burcum led the Star Tribune’s investigation into the schools in Northern Minnesota and North Dakota. Since the editorial series was published, Burcum was asked to testify at a Congressional hearing that looked at challenges facing Native American schools, and she was a finalist for the 2015 Pulitzer prize in Editorial Writing.At the link click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “OK” for “Save File” option in the pop-up menu.

Parasitism Research 121 mins – “Host Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, and Daniel Griffin discuss identification of an erythrocyte protein essential for invasion of Plasmodium falciparum, and introduce a new case study.” It’s cutting edge malaria research, with asides about why we have different blood groups, parasite migration, magnets to separate liver cells and the problem with red cells having no nuclei. At the link right clip “TWIP#190” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phosgene 6 mins – “Gas! Gas! Quick, boys! – An ecstasy of fumbling,
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
But someone was still yelling out and stumbling,
And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime…
The searing words of Wilfred Owen rang out in anguish during the first world war. Through Owen’s haunting stanzas, and those of his contemporaries including Siegfried Sassoon, the British public gained a true insight into the nature of war – not through the distorting lens of pomp and patriotism, but by being exposed to the abject horrors experienced by those on the frontline.” At the link right-click “Download: CIIE_Phosgene.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physical Therapy Games 6 mins – “You’ve just been injured, and you’re on the way home from an hour of physical therapy. The last thing you want to do on your own is confusing exercises that take too long to show results. TED Fellow Cosmin Mihaiu demos a fun, cheap solution that turns boring physical therapy exercises into a video game with crystal-clear instructions.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pigeonroost Hollow War 15 mins –A few years ago, we produced a story about the greatest underdog we’d ever met: Jimmy Weekley. Jimmy was the last remaining resident of Pigeonroost Hollow, West Virginia. Jimmy spent most of the last two decades fighting one of the largest coal companies in the country in an attempt to save his hometown. He said he was born in Pigeonroost Hollow, and he planned to die there. This year, he did. He was 74. Today on the Radio Diaries Podcast, we’re remembering Jimmy Weekley, The Last Man on the Mountain.” At the link find the title, “#24: Last Man on the Mountain – Updated,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poaching Weapons 9 mins – “The Small Arms Survey 2015: Weapons and the World explores the theme of weapons and the environment, as well as offering case studies on a range of aspects of small arms and armed violence. In the first of this two-episode podcast, Senior Researcher Khristopher Karlson and Yearbook Coordinator Glenn McDonald discuss five of the book’s chapters, covering weapons and the environment, trade in weapons, and measures to regulate and control small arms.” At the link find the title, “Small Arms Survey 2015: Weapons and the World – Part 1,” right-click “Media files SAS-Podcast-31-Small-Arms-Survey-2015-Weapons-and-the-environment-Part-1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasting Business 28 mins – “A major decision for most entrepreneurs is the one to enter a market that has a reputation of being “saturated.” The cause could be one of many reasons. In this Bonus episode, we look into issues and concerns for the entrepreneur to either enter or continue in a saturated market — and we do so from real-life case studies of small businesses. The first case study examines the risks and the suggested recommendations for looking at the product, service, offering or brand entry into a “saturated market. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Violence 54 mins ­- “The shooting death of Michael Brown by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, in August last year sparked a firestorm of popular anger, frustration and a fair degree of hopelessness. Since then the problem seems only to get worse, with more and more reports of similar instances of police brutality towards young African American men. The racial tensions ignited in riots in Baltimore in April – after yet another death due to police brutality. Australia has watched on, horrified at the depth of racial antipathies in the US. But why is this all happening now? And what can the problems in the US tell us about our own record on race and police violence?” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publication Trends 43 mins – “Across the world of publishing, change is underway. Book publishing and distribution are fundamentally different than even a few years ago – and opportunity at a global scale is available to all sizes of publishers. With a combination of digitally-driven print-on-demand and e-commerce services, as well as innovation in shipping and delivery, publishers are reaching readers on all continents. However, they must remain vigilant to protect their greatest assets – the content itself – from piracy and other illicit dealings. For BookExpo America 2015, CCC’s Chris Kenneally moderated an interactive discussion targeted to publishers ready to expand their business beyond US national borders as well as multinational publishers looking to learn about current trends and breaking news in global licensing, exports, and copyright.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Resilience 22 mins – “Resilience and why some people cope with trauma better –This week marked the 4th anniversary of the Christchurch and Canterbury earthquake. New research from the University of Otago in Christchurch with earthquake survivors is shedding some light on the question of what makes some people cope better with trauma than others. A group of psychiatrists and psychologists from the University have been studying a group of more than 100 Cantabrians exposed to high levels of stress during the earthquakes who coped well. They compared this group against a group of patients with post-earthquake trauma, being treated by the Adult Specialist Services Earthquake Treatment Team, or ASSETT, set up by the Canterbury DHB. Dr Gini McIntosh from the Otago University is part of the research team, and one of the psychologists with ASSETT.” At the link right-click “MP3” beside the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saiga Antelop Dieoff 4 mins – “Two weeks ago, the saiga, an endangered type of antelope that roams Central Asia, suddenly began dying en masse.  More than 60,000 animals in Kazakhstan mysteriously fell ill and died within hours of getting sick — decimating over a third of the global population of saigas, according to E.J. Milner-Gulland, professor of Conservation Science at Imperial College London. Their sudden massive death has stumped animal conservationists, Milner-Gulland says.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right side of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Under Siege, P1 55 mins (165 mins total) – “Scientists around the world are increasingly restricted in what they can research, publish and say — constrained by belief and ideology from all sides. What happens to societies which turn their backs on curiosity-driven research?” At the link find the title, “Science Under Siege, Part 1,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150603_33313.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for P2 and P3 for their media files.

Sex Scandals 52 mins – “15 years ago this month, then-President Bill Clinton was impeached by the US House of Representatives for perjury and obstruction of justice. The root of the trouble was, of course, the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Though Clinton was later acquitted by the Senate, the trial sparked questions about the blurry line between private and public misconduct. But Americans have been puzzling over just where to draw that line for centuries. So in this episode, Peter, Ed, and Brian look back over other scandals in American history, exploring the public response and the legacies they’ve left behind….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shepherd’s Life 48 mins – “Life is change, we hear a lot these days. For James Rebanks, that is only partly true. Rebanks is a shepherd in the far north of England, on land his family has farmed since ancient days. He went to Oxford, and then came home. To farm. To his sheep. He’s written the story of that life, the shepherd’s life, in a new book that’s getting raves all over. Maybe it’s a sign of others’ longing for that sense of continuity and rootedness, the land. Maybe it’s your longing. But would you want the work? This hour On Point: news from the hills. “The Shepherd’s Life.’” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Single Teenage Mom 40 mins –As an 18-year-old raised in the foster care system, Melissa took NPR listeners along when she gave birth to her son Issaiah. Over the past 16 years Melissa and her son have faced many challenges, from eviction notices to her son’s life-threatening medical diagnosis. In this podcast episode, listen to Melissa’s Teenage Diary and her new ‘grown-up’ diary from Teenage Diaries Revisited. Plus, Joe interviews Melissa about the process of documenting her life over the years.” At the link find the title, “#3: Teenage Diaries Revisited: Melissa,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sirius Radio Founder 21 mins – “The founder of Sirius XM satellite radio, Martine Rothblatt now heads up a drug company that makes life-saving medicines for rare diseases (including one drug that saved her own daughter’s life). Meanwhile she is working to preserve the consciousness of the woman she loves in a digital file … and a companion robot. In an onstage conversation with TED’s Chris Anderson, Rothblatt shares her powerful story of love, identity, creativity, and limitless possibility.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soil Preservation 18 mins – “It’s time to talk about soil because if we don’t we could face a very serious problem. The world needs to double sustainable food production by 2050 to feed a projected population increase of 9 billion people. This means that food security is one of the world’s most pressing problems. People need access to food, there needs to be enough for everyone and it needs to be nutritional and affordable. Soil is essential for food security so we need look after it so it can remain healthy so we can all be healthy. So how do you make healthy soil?” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sound Bites 40 mins – “The first portable audio recorder was made in 1945 by a man named Tony Schwartz. He moved the VU meter from inside of the unit to the top, so he could see the recording volume. And, he put a strap on it so that he could hang the device over his shoulder. Armed with his recorder (and sometimes a secret microphone attached to his wrist), Schwartz chronicled every sound in his Manhattan neighborhood.  He recorded children singing songs in the park, street festival music, jukeboxes in restaurants, vendors peddling vegetables, and more than 700 conversations with cab drivers, just to name a few examples.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Sudan 30 mins – “South Sudan in Focus is a 30-minute weekday English-language broadcast/internet program covering rapidly changing developments in the new nation of South Sudan and the region.” At the link find the title, “South Sudan in Focus June 05, 2015,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Street Violence Fix 18 mins – “An architect of the “Boston miracle,” Rev. Jeffrey Brown started out as a bewildered young pastor watching his Boston neighborhood fall apart around him, as drugs and gang violence took hold of the kids on the streets. The first step to recovery: Listen to those kids, don’t just preach to them, and help them reduce violence in their own neighborhoods. It’s a powerful talk about listening to make change.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Temple Grandin 64 mins – Time Magazine Top 100 Hero, Temple Grandin has become a philosophical leader of both the animal welfare and autism advocacy movements. Diagnosed with autism as a child, she studied psychology and earned a Ph.D. in Animal Science. A passionate voice for the humane treatment of animals, her professional and popular writing and research on animal behavior has revolutionized the treatment of farm animals. The HBO movie based on her life, starring Claire Danes, received seven Emmy Awards. Her candid autobiographies, Emergence and Thinking in Pictures, shed light on the autistic mind for scientists studying the disorder and provide “a fascinating look at autism from the inside” (Psychology Today). In The Autistic Brain, Grandin weaves her own experience with remarkable new discoveries in the autism revolution.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thorium Reactors 43 mins – “Two years ago, we interviewed Kirk Sorensen about the potential for thorium to offer humanity a safe, cheap and abundant source of energy. He is an active advocate for developing liquid fluoride thorium reactor (LFTR) technology, the details of which were covered in our earlier podcast: A Detailed Exploration of Thorium’s Potential As An Energy Source. That interview concluded with Kirk’s observation that the West could have a fully-operational LFTR reactor up and running at commercial scale within a decade, but it won’t, because it is simply choosing not to prioritize exploring its potential. But that doesn’t mean other countries are ignoring thorium’s promise. Kirk returns this week to relay what has happened in the thorium space since our last conversation. The East, most notably China, is now fully-mobilized around getting its first reactor operational by as soon as 2020. If indeed thorium reactors are as successful as hoped, the US will find itself playing catch up against countries who suddenly hold a tremendous technology advantage:” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkey Politics 27 mins – “Turkey goes to the polls on Sunday in a critical general election. Many of the voters opposed to the ruling party of President Erdogan are putting their hopes in the HDP, which has its roots in Kurdish nationalism. If it gets the 10% of the vote it needed to enter parliament, it could block Erdogan’s plans to give the presidency more power. Maria Margaronis visited a run-down area of Istanbul – one of the HDP’s strongholds.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Visual Effects 77 mins – “Host Leo Laporte interviews Stewart Lew, Bay Area Chairman of the Visual Effects Society, about his extensive production experience in feature films, commercials, and interactive next-gen games development.” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the blue down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Aftermaths 52 mins – “At the end of May, President Barack Obama told the graduating class at West Point that “we are winding down our war in Afghanistan,” having committed to withdraw most US troops by the end of the year, and all of them by 2016. Ending the United States’ longest war has been a lengthy and gradual process, but have American wars typically had neat or definitive endings? In this episode, BackStory casts its gaze over prominent conflicts of the last three centuries, and explores what it takes to end a war — both in legal terms, and in the popular imagination. From military and diplomatic maneuvers, to courtroom battles and ongoing cultural conflict, the Guys and their guests explore whether wars ever really end.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Warfare Roundtable 23 mins – “The basic components of human conflict may never change, but the way we fight certainly will. Peter Singer, a senior fellow at the New America Foundation, and Missy Cummings, director of Duke’s Humans and Autonomy Lab, explain how developing technologies like robots and hacking are radically transforming the way America goes to war.” At the link find the title, “Technology and the Future of War,” right-click “Media files 0530WarRoundtableWebMix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Knife 53 mins – “In his new novel, the writer Paolo Bacigalupi imagines what would happen if our greatest fears for water in the West came true. He sets his story of speculative fiction in a near future when extreme drought has the poor paying $6 for a gallon of water while the rich live in lush high-rise cities. Western states war with each other for dwindling water shares and hire mercenary “water knives” to claim the few sources left. Bacigalupi is coming to Utah, and he joins us Monday to talk about his novel The Water Knife…Paolo Bacigalupi is the author of six books. His debut novel, The Windup Girl, was awarded Hugo, Nebula, and John W. Campbell Memorial Awards in 2010. His new novel is called The Water Knife.At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Health 16 mins – “Ana Langer discusses a new Lancet Commission on Women and Health with Richard Lane.” At the link find the title, “Women and Health: The Lancet: June 5, 2015,” right-click “05june.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working – by Terkel 12 mins – “In the early 1970s, radio host and oral historian Studs Terkel went around the country, tape recorder in hand, interviewing people about their jobs. Studs collected more than 130 interviews, and the result was a book called “Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do.” And – something unprecedented for an oral history collection – it became a bestseller. In this episode of The Radio Diaries Podcast, we bring you two of the lost interviews that never made it into the book: Helen Moog, a taxi driver and grandmother of five who happened to drive Studs to the Youngstown, OH airport; and Lovin’ Al Pommier, a “car hiker.‘” At the link find the title, “#19: Working, Then and Now,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wrongful Execution 27 mins – “Bridgette McGee grew up knowing nothing about her grandfather, Willie McGee. Now she is on a quest to unearth everything she can about his life – and his death. In 1945, Willie McGee was accused of raping a white woman. The all-white jury took less than three minutes to find him guilty and McGee was sentenced to death. Over the next six years, the case went through three trials and sparked international protests and appeals from Albert Einstein, William Faulkner, Paul Robeson, and Josephine Baker. McGee was defended by a young Bella Abzug arguing her first major case. But in 1951, McGee was put to death in Mississippi’s traveling electric chair. His execution was broadcast live by a local radio station. Today, a newly discovered recording of that broadcast provides a chilling window into a lost episode of civil rights history. Narrated by Bridgette McGee, this documentary follows a granddaughter’s search for the truth about a case that has been called a real-life To Kill A Mockingbird.” At the link find the title, “#11: The Traveling Electric Chair,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic library of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

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Media Mining Digest 186 – June 5, 2015: ADHD Treatment, Alcohol Impairment, American Disabilities Act, Americans in China, Anonymous, Apple Production, Australian Immigrants, Black Neurologist Researcher, Brain Plasticity, Calcium Hydroxide, Catastrophic Environmentalism, China and French Wine, Chinese Tea, Cleveland Police, Climate Policy Costs, Climate Science, Cuba Economy and TPP, Cuban Art School, Cyberspace Hate Crime, Disabled and Institutionalized, Diseases of Aging, Elephants, Engineer Careers, Exclusivity, FIFA, Fighting Causes, Filipino Migrant Workers, Fracking Legislation, Hate Trolling, Infrastructure Overview, ISIS Finances, Job Fairs, John Nash, Loneliness, Lying, Maroons of Jamaica, Megaprojects, Military Suicides, Nepal Earthquake Aid, Nutrition Facts and Fads, Nutshell Studies, OVerdose Deaths, Paris Commune of 1871, Personal Information Sharing, Phantom Pain, Pilot Training, POWs in America, Prescription Drug Costs, Rare Earths, Separation and Divorce, Storytelling, Substance Abuse, T.Boone Pickens on Energy, Tablets in Restaurants, Technology Impact, Teenage Brain, Travelogue Stories, Uganda AIDS

The following audio files come from a larger group of 190 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 61 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

ADHD in Childhood 24 mins – “Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, presents with persistent symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity causing impairment in multiple settings. It is a disorder that attracts considerable debate and controversy. The this part of this podcast, focused on the treatment of ADHD, two of the authors of the review, Mina Fazel, consultant psychiatrist at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, and Nienke Verkuijl, specialty trainee at the University of Oxford and Rachel, a parent of a child who has a diagnosis of ADHD.” At the link find the title, “ADHD in childhood – treatment,” right-click “Media files 206512103-bmjgroup-adhd-in-childhood-treatment.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcohol Impairment 45 mins – “In this episode we talk to Jason Hack about an index to quantify alcohol impairment. We also discuss a change in name and direction at the podcast. Checkout the H Index article. Additionally, download your own starter pack to try out the HII score. Contributors include Matthew Zuckerman and Jason Hack.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Disability Act 56 mins – “Joyce welcomes Rebecca Cokely, executive director of the National Council on Disability (NCD). The Council promotes policies.” At the link find the title, “National Council on Disability and the ADA,” right-click “Media files bender052615.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Americans in China 60 mins – “It used to be that the American expats in China were the big shots. They had the money, the status, the know-how. But that’s changed. What’s it like to be an American living in China now? And what do they understand about China that we don’t?” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anonymous 23 mins – “This week Anthropologist Gabriella Coleman tells us about the internet’s original Dislike Club, Anonymous. Biella has spent the last eight years hanging out with Anons both on IRC and in IRL. Her new book “Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: the many faces of Anonymous”  is the definitive book on the topic, nothing else comes close.  Biella also gets me to watch V for Vendetta, something I have refused to do out of my fanboy respect for writer Alan Moore (who refused to watch it or put his name on the movie). I wish I could un-see it already.  Also: Commodify your dislike!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apple Production 14 mins – “Today on the show, how we got from mealy, nasty apples to apples that taste delicious. The story starts with a breeder who discovered a miracle apple. But discovering that apple wasn’t enough.” At the link find the title, “#627: The Miracle Apple,” right-click “Media files 20150527_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Immigrants 27 mins – “Claudia Taranto travels to Australia where she hears how temporary workers are changing the face of a country founded on the idea of permanent settlement. She uncovers abuses of the temporary migrant visa system and speaks to a group of Filipino welders earning far less than they were promised in their contracts. Claudia also hears from critics who call for a return to a ‘settler society’.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Neurologist Researcher 15 mins – “When neuroscientist Carl Hart meets with his cousin he wonders about what he now knows about psychiatric medication and society, and whether his own life is a success.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Plasticity 39 mins – “I first talked with with Dr. Edward Taub the inventor of Constraint Induced (CI) Movement Therapy back in early 2008 (BSP 28). CI Therapy is a revolutionary rehabilitation method based on the principles of brain plasticity. Evidence supporting its effectiveness has mounted since we last talked. Unfortunately, because it is so different from traditional physical therapy, it requires special training and it is still not covered by many major insurance companies. The Veteran’s Administration recognizes it as the preferred treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) but they currently have no therapists trained in the method. I have a recorded a new interview with Dr. Taub, which I have split into two parts. The rest of the interview will be posted next month. This month’s episode (BSP 119) focuses on how CI Therapy works and also provides a brief historical overview of the neuroscientific discovery of brain plasticity.” At the link right-click “audio mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Calcium Hydroxide 6 mins – “As is often the case with a compound that has long been in use, calcium hydroxide is rich in alternative names. Its best known common description, slaked lime, suggests that it is lime (more properly known as calcium oxide) that has drunk its fill. ‘Milk of lime’ refers to its state before drying, when it is also known as limewater. ‘Hydrated lime’ merely describes its formation by adding calcium oxide to water, while the rather entertaining ‘pickling lime’ shows up one of its less well known uses. Throw in builders’ lime, lime cake, slack lime and choona and you can see that this is an etymological feast….” At the link right-click “Download: CIIE CalciumHydroxide.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Catastrophic Environmentalismc 36 mins – “Mother Nature can do a lot of damage. Tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, and droughts destroy landscapes and ruin lives. But what happens when humans are the ones creating these disasters? This episode of Distillations explores the many ways humans have provoked nature’s destructive forces purposefully and inadvertently through history. Our journey begins in Oklahoma, a state that now has more earthquakes than California. Reporter Anna Stitt talks to the people affected by these new quakes and finds out how their lives have changed. Then we talk to historian Jacob Darwin Hamblin about his latest book, Arming Mother Nature: The Birth of Catastrophic Environmentalism. He tells us how Cold War military planners sought to use the environment as a weapon and in the process discovered how vulnerable our planet really is.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese and French Wine P1 36 mins – “The voice of the ToE episode announcer revealed! (her name is Mathilde)  and she joins our host for this two part series about the intersection between France and China and wine. The story of the red obsession of Wealthy Chinese has been told many times, but what is going to happen when China’s elusive emerging middle class gets wine fever? Can wine transmit cultural values? Can it transcend consumerism?  In this installment Benjamen and Mathilde traverse France to discover this vino nouvelle vague.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. (If that doesn’t work click on the Subscribe: RSS button and download from there.) For P II (37 mins) go here, find the title, “Art De Vivre (II of II),” right-click “Media files toe43artdevivre2a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Tea Change 21 mins – “Christina Larson discusses the impact of climate change on tea in China. [and] Roundup of online news stories.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cleveland Police 48 mins – “ It got so bad in Cleveland that the Feds came in. After years of black Clevelanders complaining about police and abuse. With a Cleveland cop taking two seconds to shoot a 12-year-old dead. After officer Michael Brelo climbed on the hood of a car and pumped 15 rounds through the windshield — after the chase. After more than a hundred other shots. Now the Department of Justice has levelled a consent decree on Cleveland’s police. This is how you’ll do. It’s very detailed. It’s tough. This hour On Point: The new Cleveland standard of policing. Could it, should it, be a model for the nation?” At the link right-click “Download this story,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Policy Costs 47 mins – “Bjorn Lomborg is a Danish author and political scientist, and President of the Copenhagen Consensus Centre. He’s best known for his 2001 book, The Skeptical Environmentalist, in which he controversially claimed that overpopulation, declining energy resources, species loss, certain aspects of global warming are unsupported by the evidence. Lomborg isn’t a sceptic in the climate change denial sense – his stance is more that “man-made global warming is real – it just isn’t the end of the world.” Lomborg spoke to the Guardian’s Keep It In The Ground campaign recently about the economics of climate change, emissions targets, fracking, and green energy. Reacting to Lomborg are ​Dr Chris Hope​ from the Judge Business School at the University of Cambridge, M​ark Maslin,​ professor of climatology at University College London, and A​dam Vaughan,​ editor of the Guardian’s Environment site.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Science 56 mins – “In her new book, Driving the Future, Margo Oge (Former Director, Office of Transportation and Air Quality, United States Environmental Protection Agency) portrays a future where clean, intelligent vehicles with lighter frames and alternative power trains will produce zero emissions and run at 100+ mpg. With electronic architectures more like that of airplanes, cars will be smarter and safer, will park themselves, and will network with other vehicles on the road to drive themselves. Offering an insider account of the partnership between Federal agencies, states, environmental groups, and car manufacturers that led to the historic deal, she discusses the science of climate change, the politics of addressing it and the lessons learned for policymakers.” At the link right-click “DownloadMP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Art School 23 mins – “On January 3rd, 1961, Che Guevara suggested to Fidel Castro that they go play a round of golf. They drove out to what was then the ritziest, most elite country club in Havana. It was empty—almost all the members had fled during the revolution—and Fidel and Che romped around the bucolic green acres while their official photographer snapped publicity shots. As they played, they realized that the grounds of the country club were spectacular. They knew they had to do something with the property. There, with golf clubs in hand, they decided they would build an art school.” (A 90 min Hulu movie is at this link.) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuba Economy and TPP 47 mins – “On this week’s episode of Slate Money, data scientist Cathy O’Neil of mathbabe.org and Slate’s Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann welcome special guest Cardiff Garcia of the blog FT Alphaville to discuss the criminal guilt of the banks, the reality of the Cuban economy and the fight over the trade deal none of us can read.” At the link find the title, “The Off the Books Edition,” right-click “Media files SM15052301_money.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyberspace Hate Crimes 56 mins – “I’m pleased to post Show # 234, April 22, my interview with Prof. Danielle Citron of the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, author of Hate Crimes in Cyberspace. Danielle has written the definitive study of the range of activities that constitute “hate crimes” on the Internet. Focusing on activities ranging from “revenge porn” to cyber-stalking, Danielle takes a critical look at the law and norms around this behavior today. Given that policymakers, speech platforms and even law enforcement are struggling to ascertain the scope of these problems and how they should be addressed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled and Institutionalized 60 mins – “This week we’re talking about the use – and appalling misuse – of genetics in pursuit of human perfection. We’ll speak to Claudia Malacrida, sociology professor and eugenics researcher, about her book “A Special Hell: Institutional Life in Alberta’s Eugenic Years.” And we’ll talk to Hannah Brown, postdoctoral researcher at the University of Adelaide, about the ethical issues raised by the creation of a genetically modified human embryo.” At the link find the title, “#319 A Special Hell,” right-click “Media files Science for the People 319 A Special_Hell.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diseases of Aging 85 mins – “Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable MD discusses a shift in how we care for older and frail patients with distinct focus on quality of life. Hear how this new outlook shapes they way we diagnose, treat, and manage dementia, osteoporosis, and urinary disfunction as well as recognizing dementia and preventing the risk of falls. Recorded on 03/11/2015. (#29283)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elephants 53 mins – “When author Vicki Constantine Croke saw an illustration of an elephant and rider on a precarious cliff ledge from 1943, she wanted to know more. It was of “Elephant Bill” Williams, an Englishman who was a gifted trainer and champion of elephants in Burma. His work made headlines though when the Japanese invaded, and his “Elephant Company” managed a daring escape over treacherous mountain terrain. Monday, Croke joins us to tell the story of Williams, the animals he loved and the lessons they taught him about courage and trust.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Liten” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineer Careers 79 mins – “We talk with aeronautical engineer Patrick Riordan about the challenges of developing and navigating a career road map, Archimedes’ lever, and the Star Trek method for being perceived as a miracle worker.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exclusivity 50 mins – “On this episode of Marketplace Weekend, we take a look at exclusivity in the economy, our lives and our wallets. Lizzie speaks with Jon Taffer, best known as host of the reality series “Bar Rescue” on Spike about how to build an exclusive bar. Joshua Tilliman, better known as Father John Misty, talks about the exclusive radius clauses in his contracts. Later, Dr. Molly Coye, chief innovation officer at UCLA Health, talks with Lizzie about the changing landscape of healthcare and whether it’s making medicine more accessible, and personal finance columnist Michelle Singletary discusses the best ways to build and maintain a good credit score. Plus, Marketplace’s Tracey Samuelson talks about spoilers (and how to avoid them) and preserving an exclusive story.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right-end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FIFA 48 mins – “Nobody who pays attention thought the world of international soccer was squeaky clean. Bribes and kickbacks have been the stories that have swirled for years. But even so, the dramatic arrests in Switzerland last night of top officials of FIFA, soccer’s governing body, were startling. Big figures hustled out of a five-star hotel, indicted by the USA. Forty-seven counts. Racketeering, bribery, money laundering, fraud. A $150 million scandal alleged. And criminal proceedings opened on the World Cup hostings awarded to Russia and Qatar. This hour On Point: corruption and soccer.” At the link right-click “Download this story,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fighting Causes 27 mins – “Millions of people paid to watch the Mayweather Pacquiao boxing match. Why? On this episode, we talk with English professor and cage fighter Dr. Jonathan Gottschall.” At the link right-click your desired audio download under “Download Options” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Filipino Migrant Workers 50 mins – “Claudia Taranto travels to the Philippines where 10% of the population work overseas. She travels to the coastal town of Mabini where many citizens have gone to Italy for work. She hears from the children left behind, including 10-year-old Jen who lives with her 80-year-old grandmother. Claudia asks whether the Philippines have become over-reliant on work abroad and if there is any prospect of breaking the cycle.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking Legislation 51 mins – “Over the past decade, new technologies have fueled an oil and gas boom in the U.S., but hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” has triggered a backlash in some cities and towns. In November 2014, Denton, Texas banned fracking within its city limits. But this spring, the state passed a law that prevents local communities from banning fracking. And now, Oklahoma has passed a similar law, which the governor could sign today. Supporters of these laws say they ensure landowners aren’t deprived of their property rights. Critics argue they take away a community’s right to protect the health and safety of its citizens. We look at both sides of the debate over state laws that outlaw local bans on fracking.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Hate Trolling 27 mins – “In 2007 writer, programmer, and horse trainer Kathy Sierra quit the internet because of misogynist hate trolling. She stayed off the social web for 7 years but last year she came back to see what Twitter was like. She tells us why she only lasted a few weeks and her theory about why so many women are targets online. Plus Danielle Keats Citron explains how we could use the law to drain the cesspool.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infrastructure Overview 61 mins – “Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter discusses America’s transportation infrastructure. She was interviewed by Rodney Slater, former U.S. Secretary of Transportation from 1997 to 2001.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Rosabeth Moss Kanter,” right-click “Media files program.400175.MP3-STD.mp3”

ISIS Finances 27 mins – “The story of how Islamic State, a small band of fanatical jihadi fighters, became the world’s richest terror army.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Fairs 69 mins – “We are back from Sun N Fun and had a wonderful time. One thing I am very excited about is the ability to participate in the first annual Job Fair. I spent many hours speaking with applicants and wandering around to the various job booths. Through observation and interaction with applicants I was reminded how We are back from Sun N Fun and had a wonderful time. One thing I am very excited about is the ability to participate in the first annual Job Fair. I spent many hours speaking with applicants and wandering around to the various job booths. Through observation and interaction with applicants I was reminded how some do not understand how to prepare for a job Fair. If you are considering attending a job fair I want to share with you some advice and a list of actionable items I feel will be helpful.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

John Nash 47 mins – “Remembering a beautiful mind: Nobel –prize winning game theorist John Nash . We’ll look at his game theory. His schizophrenia. His genius.” At the link right-click “Download this story,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Loneliness 27 mins – “After moving to New York alone, writer Olivia Laing discovered the truth about loneliness. She says it is a gift.  Eric Klinenberg explains why more and more people are choosing to live alone and why cities like New York must invest in housing stock that singletons actually want to live in, the type of housing they have in Scandinavian countries.  In Denmark when someone dies alone, and no-one claims the body, the authorities put an ad in the newspaper calling forPossible Relatives. This is also the title of a photo-book by Danish photographer Tina Enghoff.  She tells us about the pictures she took of the apartments after the dead were removed. Some of these bodies went undiscovered for months.

Lying 49 mins – “Lying liars lie.  That’s clear.  But does everyone else lie too? Are we all liars? A new documentary called “(Dis)Honesty – The Truth About Lies” rounds up the research and lays out what we know. Little lies, white lies, big lies, whoppers. What we condemn and what we roll with. It’s quite a smorgasbord. You may think you’re above all that. But are you? And what about the power-brokers who frame our world? What happens when they lie? This hour On Point: the truth about lies.” At the link right-click “Download this story,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maroons of Jamaica 20 mins – “Decades before the first shot was fired in the American revolution a band of runaway slaves known as the Maroons living in the mountains in Colonial Jamaica took on the British Empire and won.  I’ve long been obsessed with the Maroons and so last summer I jumped at the opportunity to visit their compound in Charlestown for the annual celebration of their 1739 victory. I learned the Maroons hope to play a leading role today as Jamaica moves down the path of Marijuana decriminalization and legalization, but some of the folks I met claim the Maroons are still listening to Radio What’s Innit Fo Me?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Megaprojects 64 mins – “Bent Flyvbjerg of Oxford University speaks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the political economy of megaprojects–massive investments of a billion dollars or more in infrastructure or technology. Flyvbjerg argues that such projects consistently end up costing more with smaller benefits than projected and almost always end up with costs that exceed the benefits. Flyvbjerg explores the reasons for the poor predictions and poor performance of giant investment projects and what might be done to improve their effectiveness.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Suicides 51 mins – “Suicides in the military have skyrocketed since the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The military’s suicide rate jumped more than 80 percent between 2002 and 2009. One military family is trying to change that. The Grahams lost two sons: one in combat in Iraq and one to suicide. But the Grahams were astonished by the different reactions their deaths received from the Army. The one killed in combat was lauded as a hero, while the other’s death was met with silence. In a new book, Yochi Dreazen, the managing editor of Foreign Policy, shows how this family channeled their grief into working to transform the military’s approach to soldiers with mental illness.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Nepal Earthquake Aid 27 mins – “ Aid is pouring in to Nepal in the wake of the recent earthquakes. But in a country where corruption is endemic, will the money go where it is meant to? Simon Cox investigates.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nutrition Facts and Fads 58 mins – “Alan Levinovitz is an assistant professor of Chinese philosophy and religion at James Madison University and author of The Gluten Lie: And Other Myths About What You Eat. On the show this week we talk to Levinovitz about gluten and gluten-free diets. Should everyone go gluten-free? What does the actual science about it say? Why is a professor of religion is writing about diets in the first place? Listen and find out.” At the right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nutshell Studies 24 mins – “The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Baltimore, Maryland is a busy place. Anyone who dies unexpectedly in the state of Maryland will end up there for an autopsy. On an average day, they might perform twelve autopsies; on more hectic day, they might do more than twenty. But there’s one room on the fourth floor that sits apart from the buzz of normal activity. It feels a bit like an art gallery. This room houses the “Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death….‘” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Overdose Deaths 10 mins – “Josiah ‘Jody’ Rich discusses a research article about methadone treatment for US prisoners.” At the link find the title, “Methadone in prisons: The Lancet: May 29, 2015,” right-click “29may.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paris Commune of 1871 55 mins – “The Paris Commune of 1871 was a model for the revolutions of the 20th century — freedom, liberty, equality. But the violence it unleashed foreshadowed the abuses of state power to come — in the 20th century until today.” At the link find the title, “Fire and Blood: The Paris Commune of 1871,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150528_46899.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Personal Information Sharing 55 mins –There are any number of compelling reasons the US would want to have a good information relationship with other countries, from counter-terrorism and cyber-crime prevention, to simple tax identification. This information sharing is not only necessary to strengthen relations with foreign governments but to protect the country from threats, foreign and domestic. But how does the U.S. government share such personal information with foreign governments?…” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phantom Pain 28 mins – “Rubber hand illusions by Ian Woolf, Tristan Robinson talks about his autonomous robots, Jake Fountain talks about his virtual realities, Joseph Wang talks about the Meta augmented reality headset, Leila Alem talks about her remote mentoring augmented reality service.” At the link right-click “download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pilot Training 51 mins – “Welcome to Episode 84. The goal of this podcast is to inform, entertain, and motivate you to achieve your career goal. We to bring you the viewpoint of all those involved with careers in aviation and aerospace.  Although we primarily focus on the positive aspects of a career in aviation and specifically as an airline pilot we also know that we must represent the challenges of choosing a career in aviation. To help you understand some of the challenges concerning salaries in the piloting career I have with me Ben Mandell author of Don’t Pay Any Flight School More Than $2500 In Advance: The Censored Information The Bad Guys Don’t Want You To Know and Pilots on food stamps: An Inside Look At Why Your Flight Was Cancelled. At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

POWs in America 30 mins – “Reporter Karen Duffin and her father were talking one day when, just as an aside, he mentioned the Nazi prisoners of war that worked on his Idaho farm when he was a kid. Karen was shocked … and then immediately obsessed. So she spoke with historians, dug through the National Archives and oral histories, and uncovered the astonishing story of a small town in Alabama overwhelmed by thousands of German prisoners of war. Along the way, she discovered that a very fundamental question – one that we are struggling with today – was playing out seventy years ago in hundreds of towns across America: When your enemy is at your mercy, how should you treat them? Karen helps Jad and Robert try to figure out why we did what we did then, and why we are doing things so differently now.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prescription Drug Costs 51 mins – “Prescription drugs account for one tenth of the nation’s health care spending. Most drug prices have been rising slowly, but the cost of specialty drugs, including those used to treat some neurological diseases, cancers and hepatitis C have become much more expensive. For the most part taxpayers and healthier insured patients are picking up the tab, but some say drug companies need to do more to reduce prices: Please join us to discuss the cost of prescription drugs.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Rare Earths 27 mins – “We continue our journey to the center of the cloud, by way of the earth: Rare Earth. China controls 95% of the market for the 17 Rare Earth elements that power our invisible technologies so your host decides to pay a visit to the Ganzhou region, to see the illegal mines in the with his own eyes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. It has two parts. Part 2 (20 mins) is downloaded from this link.

Separation and Divorce 52 mins – “Divorce turns many children’s lives’ upside down. In the English-speaking world today, only about half of all children celebrate their 16th birthdays with their biological parents still living together. New scientific research indicates that many assumptions about shared custody arrangements can actually undermine a child’s well-being, according to psychologist Penelope Leach. In a new book, the best-selling author argues that what seems fair for the parents is seldom best for the child. She tells us how parents can help their children deal with divorce by putting the needs of the child first.” You can listen at the link but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Storytelling P1 55 mins “Analysing stories is usually territory claimed by writers, critics, and university scholars. But recently, evolutionary psychologists have begun to look at the human propensity for storytelling from a scientific perspective.” At the link find the title, “Vestigial Tale, Part 1,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150526_61661.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Storytelling P2 55 mins – “Analysing stories is usually territory claimed by writers, critics, and university scholars. But recently, evolutionary psychologists have begun to look at the human propensity for storytelling from a scientific perspective.” At the link find the title, “Vestigial Tale, Part 2,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150527_16956.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Substance Abuse 29 mins – “In a rebroadcast from December 12, 2010, Keith talks with Charles France, Maharaj Ticku Professor of Pharmacology, Professor of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio.  France studies drugs for their addictive qualities, and examines how animal studies translate to human subjects.” At the link right-click the play buttun beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

T. Boone Pickens on Energy 60 mins- “Part of the Club’s Series on Ethics and Accountability, underwritten by the Travers Family Foundation – The collapse of oil prices has once again driven the American energy industry from boom to bust. However as U.S companies lay down their rigs T. Boone Pickens thinks supply will contract and prices will head back toward $100 a barrel in the coming year. Other observers say slowing economies in China and Europe could tame oil demand and keep prices around $50 or $60 a barrel. What do low gasoline prices mean for the US economy? What does $2 gasoline mean for renewable fuels and cutting carbon emissions? Join us for a conversation with a legendary oilman about powering America’s economy,  pursuing energy independence and the new geopolitics of oil.” At the link find the title, “Episode 3: Climate One Interview with Greg Dalton at the Commonwealth Club,” right-click “Media files 3159364-episode-3-climate-one-interview-with-greg-dalton-at-the-commonwealth-club.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tablets in Restaurants 17 mins – “Service jobs were a refuge for people when robots took factory jobs. Service jobs seemed safe—you needed the human touch. But robots are making headway there, too. They’re checking us in at hotels, renting us cars and ringing us up at the supermarket. Today on the show, we go out for pizza at a place where machines have taken over parts of the server’s job. Waiters are the latest group of workers meeting the machines that might replace them.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Impact 61 mins Today we feel the impact of technology everywhere except in our paychecks. In the past, technological advancements dramatically increased wages, but during the last three decades, the median wage has remained stagnant. Machines have taken over much of the work of humans, destroying old jobs while increasing profits for business owners. In this talk, James Bessen — Lecturer in Law at the Boston University School of Law and author of the new book “Learning by Doing: The Real Connection Between Innovation, Wages, and Wealth” — argues that workers can benefit by acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to implement rapidly evolving technologies and sharing knowledge. Bessen is joined in conversation by Berkman Faculty Associate Karim Lakhani” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teenage Brain 26 mins – “The health podcast from WBUR and Slate explores three ways in which the adolescent mind is radically different from yours and mine. With hosts Carey Goldberg and Rachel Zimmerman of WBUR’s CommonHealth blog. Do you beg your teenager to go to sleep earlier so he or she can function in the morning? Well, it turns out they physically can’t do that, explains Marvin Wang, a pediatrician at Massachusetts General Hospital, who’s on a mission to make middle and high schools start later in the day. Also, why adolescent brain development is the culprit behind so much bad (and sometimes law-breaking) decision-making and reckless behavior. And, a sex therapist talks about how Internet porn can sabotage a teenager’s ability to have a normal romantic relationship.” At the link find the title, “Teenage Zombies,” right-click “Media files checkup15052602_teenage.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Travelogue Stories 50 mins – “In the last episode of State of the Re:Union, the team brings you a collection of our favorite stories from the road. [Environmental Illnesses, Superman, Deportee, Blues] Host Al Letson reflects on six years of SOTRU and says goodbye to the show.” At the link find the title, “Travelogue: Volume Two,” right-click “TravelogueVolume2_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uganda AIDS 28 mins – “Dr Peter Mugyenyi runs one of Africa’s largest HIV medical research institutes, the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Kampala, which he helped to found in the early years of Uganda’s AIDS epidemic. Uganda was the first African country in which AIDS was identified. Peter explains the realities of HIV treatment in Ugandan clinics today, a decade after effective drugs against the virus started to become more widely available in African countries. Life prospects for hundreds of thousands of Ugandans are much better than they were. Yet an estimated 40% of adults with HIV are not receiving any treatment. The proportion of untreated infected children is even higher. In conversations with Ugandans who are living with HIV, fellow medics and health workers, activists and government representatives, Peter Mugyenyi explores the successes, failures and challenges in getting the best possible treatment to every Ugandan who needs it. That ambition is also a vital part of preventing the continuing transmission of the virus in African countries.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

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Media Mining Digest 185 – May 29, 2015: 3D Printing Quickly, Africa Mobile Health, AIDS in Russia, Arctic Ocean, Astrobiology, Automotive Propulsion, Bamboo, Biker Gangs, Biomedical Innovation Conf, Black Girls Code, Blind Bargains Podcast, Cat Predation, Chinese in America, Civil Disengagement, Coding Concepts, College Education Value, Common Sense, Dante, Decentralization, Dementia, Digitalization, Eating Disorders, Editing the New Yorker, Energy Subsidies, Failures, Freakonomics Author, Greek Finance Minister, Hacking and Privacy, Hitch Hiking, Huffington Post, Infrastructure Repairs, Invasive Species Value, ISIS in Iraq, Joan of Arc, Magna Carta, Match Making Process, Measles Legacy, Microbiome, Moral Enhancement, National Security Threats, Nepal Immigrants, Niagara Falls Electricity, Plague Hygiene of Olde, School Discipline, Sexuality, Singapore Work Prospects, Somalia Recovery, Stiglitz on Equality, Student Debt, Water Management, Workplace Tools

The following audio files come from a larger group of 207 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 59 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

3D Printing Quickly 11 mins – “What we think of as 3D printing, says Joseph DeSimone, is really just 2D printing over and over … slowly. Onstage at TED2015, he unveils a bold new technique — inspired, yes, by Terminator 2 — that’s 25 to 100 times faster, and creates smooth, strong parts. Could it finally help to fulfill the tremendous promise of 3D printing?” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Africa Mobile Health 112 mins – “Mobile technology is upending how healthcare is delivered in Africa. Mobile devices and mobile health (mHealth) services have, for example, revolutionized maternal care, chronic disease prevention, and the management of Ebola and malaria epidemics. Innovations in mHealth have shown to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of African medical systems through patient tracking and reporting, as well as extend critically needed health services to underserved areas, found both in rural and urban African communities.” At the link under the audio tab right-click “Mobile technology and mHealth: The newest frontline in health care innovation in Africa” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AIDS in Russia 27 mins – “Former UK Health Secretary Norman Fowler continues his investigation into what works and what does not when it comes to reducing the rate of HIV/Aids. He travels first to Russia where the infection rate is still rising, mainly among drug addicts. He finds tough drug abstinence programmes in place rather than needle exchanges and the use of methadone, policies which have been applied effectively elsewhere. And, he hears testimony of the stigma and suffering endured by Russian homosexuals. He journeys on to Sydney in Australia, where he finds some of the most effective public health programmes in place – including the decriminalisation and regulation of sex work.” At the link find the title, “HealthC: The Truth About AIDS 20 May 15,” right-click “healthc_20150520-2000a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arctic Ocean 48 mins – “In Seattle this week, kayakers saying no to a big new Shell Oil drilling rig in the Arctic. Protesters blocking the terminal. In Connecticut, the President saying global warming – climate change – is a very real security threat to the USA. And in the Arctic itself, as spring turns to summer, yet another season in which the Arctic ice cap shrinks and shrinks. And hungry would-be developers from many nations are moving in. The Arctic melt is essentially opening a new ocean. New resources, and risks. Up next, On Point: the new ocean at the top of the world, and the rush for Arctic riches.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astrobiology 45 mins – “Like the mutating cells it was trying to investigate, and through a serendipitous series of unrelated coincidences, what started out as a multi-disciplinary UK-based research project to explore the stratosphere using helium balloons somehow evolved and mutated into a high-powered rocketry based research collaboration with NASA Astrobiologists in the Nevada Desert. This high-octane talk by University of Bath researcher Dr Paul Shepherd explores the highs and lows of his journey into High Altitude Bioprospecting for a project which has fused structural engineering, electronics, computer science and biology.” At the link find the title, “What is high-altitude bioprospecting?” right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronaut 60 mins – “Canadian Astronaut Chris Hadfield discusses his three missions on the International Space Station and his books, including [You Are Here: Around the World in 92 Minutes] and [an Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth].” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Astronaut Chris Hadfield,” right-click “Media files program.398285.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Automotive Propulsion 63mins – “In his Inaugural Lecture, Deputy Director of the PVRC in the University’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, Professor Chris Brace discusses what the future holds for automotive propulsion. During the 20th century the growth of affordable personal mobility changed the way we live and work. Today the passenger car as we know it is under increasing pressure from changing expectations, including air quality, safety, sustainability and CO2. In addition, driver needs and expectations are changing as we move to a more urban way of living. This lecture sets out some of the challenges ahead and examines some likely directions that personal mobility will take in the future. Once we have an idea of future developments, what will the implications be for powertrain research?” At the link find the title, “The Future of Automotive Propulsion,” right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bamboo 11 mins – “You’ve never seen buildings like this. The stunning bamboo homes built by Elora Hardy and her team in Bali twist, curve and surprise at every turn. They defy convention because the bamboo itself is so enigmatic. No two poles of bamboo are alike, so every home, bridge and bathroom is exquisitely unique. In this beautiful, immersive talk, she shares the potential of bamboo, as both a sustainable resource and a spark for the imagination. “We have had to invent our own rules,” she says.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Behavior Factors 55 mins – “University of British Columbia student David Moscrop argues that modern democracy just isn’t built right for our brains, and that it dooms us into dumb thinking. He’s got an idea for fixing that.” At the link find the title, “Ideas from the Trenches – Too Dumb for Democracy,” right-click “Media files ideas 20150514_66585.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biker Gangs 48 mins – “The shoot-out at the Twin Peaks sports bar and restaurant in Waco, Texas is still turning heads for its numbers. Nine dead. 18 wounded. 170 arrested. And then the weaponry: knives, chains, clubs, brass knuckles and more than a hundred guns. And of course, the biker gangs. Motorcycle “clubs” that are probably not your uncle Johnny out for his weekend roar. Bandidos, Cossacks, Scimitars. It all sounds antique, like an old Marlon Brando film. But it’s now. This hour on On Point: the biker gangs of Texas and the bloody shoot-out in Waco. Plus, we’ll look at the Texas fever over US military exercises, Jade Helm 15.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bikers in Waco 52 mins _”On Monday, police in Waco, Texas, charged about 170 people in connection with Sunday’s deadly shootout. Nine people were killed and 18 were wounded when a brawl that began inside a restaurant spilled out to the parking lot. The killings were reportedly sparked by a long standing feud between rival motorcycle gangs. Those arrested have been charged with organized crime in connection to capital murder. The violence is the latest in a number of deadly encounters in recent years among motorcycle gangs in the U.S. We look at what’s behind the violence among bikers and their links to organized crime.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Biomedical Innovation Conf 160 mins – “As policy agendas for 2015 come into sharper focus, much of the national conversation is aimed at tackling challenges in biomedical innovation. The first two months of the year alone have seen landmark proposals from Congress and the Obama Administration, including the House’s 21st Century Cures initiative, a bipartisan Senate working group focused on medical progress, President Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative and a number of additional priorities being advanced by federal agencies and other stakeholders. On March 13, the Engelberg Center for Health Care Reform hosted the State of Biomedical Innovation Conference to provide an overview of emerging policy efforts and priorities related to improving the biomedical innovation process. Senior leaders from government, academia, industry, and patient advocacy shared their thoughts on the challenges facing medical product development and promising approaches to overcome them. The discussion also examined the data and analyses that provide the basis for new policies and track their ultimate success.” At the link under the audio tab right-click “State of biomedical innovation conference,” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Girls Code 62 mins – “…In 2011, only 6 percent of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) workers nationwide were black, up a mere 4 percentage points over the last 40 years, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. For black women, the minority of minorities in the STEM world, access to opportunities that will shatter Silicon Valley’s “boy’s club” and diversify the industry have been long coming. Kimberly Bryant is looking to hasten this change. Founder of Black Girls Code, a nonprofit offering after-school programs and summer programs for young women of every color, Bryant seeks to give Silicon Valley’s next generation of girls a fighting chance to program the future, one line of code at a time. Join us for a conversation between Kimberly Bryant and another innovator bridging the digital divide, Khan Academy founder Sal Khan.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Bargain Podcast 109 mins – “The “Justice League” can’t hold a candle to the podcasting might of our BBQ team this week. J.J. and Joe are joined by Chancy, Shelly and Ricky to bring you news and fun conversation that spans not just one week… Oh no! Nearly half of the year so far are summed up in our Discussion topic section. We also managed to cram in a tip plus your feedback and a meme-driven “Last Word”.” At the link find and right-click “Download the file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cat Predation 16 mins – “Birds v. Cats (start time 4:35): Spring is in full bloom on Colorado’s Front Range. Robins and other birds wake us up before the crack of dawn with their choruses.  This is also a time when many chicks will hatch and then fledge — a time when they are most vulnerable to predators. The biggest single threat to birds is a favorite household pet – yes, cats. Actually, feral and pet cats alike.  Dr. Amanda Rodewald, an ecologist and director of conservation science at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology at Cornell University, discusses with host Susan Moran the various threats to birds and their habitat, and how humans can be part of the solution. Spoiler alert: Keep Felix inside, at least during nesting season. For more info on how you can get involved, go to the American Bird Conservancy‘s Cats Indoors program.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese in America 51 mins – “The San Gabriel Valley is just like any other suburb in America. Life revolves around family and school; the social fabric is woven over cheap eats at the mall. But unlike most suburbs in America, the San Gabriel Valley is home to the largest Chinese diaspora in the country. In fact, eight of the region’s cities are majority Asian. That makes the “SGV” one of the few places where being Asian American is the norm – but where there is no normal version of being Asian American.” At the link find the title, “San Gabriel Valley, CA: Small Town, Global City,” right-click “Media files SanGabrielValley Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil Disengagement 13 mins – “America may BE a participatory democracy, but that doesn’t mean we want to participate. In 2014, only 36% of those who could vote, actually did. So, how do you get people to care? To vote, protest, attend town meetings, or generally get involved in their community? First, says researcher Kate Krontiris, you have to identify “the interested bystanders,” who she estimates may constitute about half the US population. They’re the folks who care about their community, who see the potential to be involved – and yet hang back.” At the link find the title, “Civic Disengagement (And How To Fix It),” right-click “Media files KRONTIRISWEBMIX.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coding Concepts 65 mins – “Host Fr. Robert Ballecer, SJ and Lou MarescaLou has the best practices for Programming and code review, and Carlos joins us for Ruby on Rails part 4 of 4.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow beside “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Education Value 73 mins – “For the United States to remain competitive in the global economy, our citizens need to be innovative, versatile and well-educated. To provide for these qualifications, does our model of higher education need a wholesale renovation? What would an education that is tailored to the needs of the 21st century – and affordable to all – even look like? Join this distinguished panel of public and private college educators to tackle the difficult challenges ahead: What is the value of a liberal arts college education versus a pre-professional vocational skill-building model? Why does college cost so much? How can we close the gap between attendance and graduation rates? Can we design blended in-person and online courses that are both instructive and cost-efficient? And finally, how can we get our state and federal governments to continue to support higher education and to take the financial burden off of students?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Common Sense 65 mins – “Recorded to the soothing background sounds of jackhammers, this show talks about the electorate’s collective memory with a bit about riots and partisan self-image thrown in for variety’s sake.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communication Legislation 27 mins – “Representatives Thomas Massie (R-KY), Suzan Delbene (D-WA), and Doug Collins (R-GA) discuss privacy, the National Security Agency’s (NSA) collection of phone records, and legislation on net neutrality, data breaches, patents, and phone service.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Members of Congress,” right-click “Media files program.400686.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dante 165 mins (3 parts) – “On the 750th anniversary of his birth, a celebration of the life and work of poet Dante Alighieri. At the link find the titles, “Dante: Poet of the Impossible,” Part 1, Media files ideas 20150520_68619.mp3:” “Part 2;” “Media files ideas 20150521_33188.mp3;” and “Part 3” “Media files ideas 20150522_93674.mp3;” right-click the Media files parts and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menus.

Decentralization 57 mins – “The buzz: Decentralizing. In the industrial age, businesses like railroads and electric power companies grew large because centralizing allowed them to deliver improved services to their markets. Now we’re seeing a paradigm shift fueled by technology-enabled de-centralization. Innovations like 3D printing, the Internet of Things, smart watches, mobile technology and Tesla’s standalone battery to power a home or office – all allow us to de-couple from businesses. These exciting – or scary – disruptions have vast implications for the future of your business. Are you ready? The experts speak. Frank Diana, TCS: “The challenge is to rehearse the future and prepare for a range of possibilities” (Fast Future Research). Gray Scott, Futurist: “Nothing comes unannounced, but many can miss the announcement” (Terence McKenna). Timo Elliott, SAP: “Status Quo is, you know, Latin for ‘the mess we’re in’” (Ronald Reagan). Join us for Eating Disruption for Lunch: Digesting Decentralization.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia P5 39 mins – “In the final episode of our Dementia Decoded series, we look at some of the innovative approaches that are being taken, and how they hold out new hope for the future.” At the link find the title,“Dementia Decoded: Moving Forward,” right-click “Media files 150400 dementia decoded_ep5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eating Disorders 52 mins – “About 24 million Americans suffer from eating disorders. They are among the most difficult psychiatric conditions to treat and have higher mortality rates than most other forms of mental illness. Clare and Elena Dunkle know these statistics well. This mother and daughter pair has just released companion memoirs, documenting Elena’s struggle with anorexia nervosa. Written for young adults, “Elena Vanishing” traces the story as Elena moves in and out of treatment, her disease threatening her life. “Hope and Other Luxuries” recounts the same events from the perspective of a mother, desperately battling for the health of her child. We hear their stories and more about the disease from an expert.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Editing The New Yorker 53 mins – “Mary Norris has spent more than three decades in The New Yorker‘s copy editing department, maintaining the magazine’s high standards for grammar, punctuation, and style. In a new book, she shares her vast knowledge, good cheer, and sharp pencil with the rest of us. It’s partly a book of practical advice on language usage, and it also offers a peek inside the hallowed halls of one of the world’s most important publications. Norris joins us Thursday to share what she’s learned as a self-proclaimed “comma queen.” Mary Norris began working for The New Yorker in 1978. Her new book is called Between You and Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Subsidies 87 mins – “The issue of energy subsidy and taxation reform remains high on the international policy agenda reflecting the need for countries to pledge carbon reductions ahead of the Paris 2015 United Nations climate conference. A new study by staff at the Fiscal Affairs Department of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) provides a comprehensive, updated picture of energy subsidies at the global and regional levels. It focuses on the broad notion of energy subsidies, which captures the failure to charge for the environmental damage from energy consumption as well as to tax energy consumption in the same way as other consumption goods to raise government revenues.” At the link under the audio tab right-click “How large are global energy subsidies?,” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Failures 34 mins – “Failure Is Your Friend… In which we argue that failure should not only be tolerated but celebrated.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freakonomics Author 57 mins – “On the show this week we talk to Stephen Dubner, award-winning author, journalist, and radio and TV personality. He is best-known for writing, along with the economist Steven D. Levitt, Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics, which have sold more than 5 million copies in 35 languages. “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greek Finance Minister 76 mins – “Since 2010, the economy of Greece has repeatedly faced challenges initially brought on by the global financial crisis. Over the past five years, various Greek governments have sought to overcome these challenges, restructure debt, and renew the country’s economy with some, but limited, success. Unemployment remains close to 25 percent and the cumulative loss of GDP has approached 28 percent. Conversations with partner governments in the eurozone have at times been contentious. Now, a new party has been elected in Greece and is charged with tackling its fiscal challenges, and conversations continue to swirl about what lies ahead.” At the link under the audio tab right-click “The Greek economy and its global partners: A conversation with Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis,” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hacking and Privacy 52 mins – “You’re a private person. But as long as you’re on-line and have skin and hair, you’re shedding little bits of data and DNA everywhere you go. Find out how that personal information – whether or not it’s used against you – is no longer solely your own. Are your private thoughts next? A security expert shares stories of ingenious computer hacking … a forensic scientist develops tools to create a mug shot based on a snippet of DNA … and from the frontiers of neuroscience: mind reading may no longer be the stuff of sketchy psychics.” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hitch Hiking 30 mins – “’Whither goest thou, America, in thy shiny car in the night?” Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road” perfectly captured the essence of the American fascination with the automobile. But that love affair has been dysfunctional, at least as far as the environment goes. This week on Sea Change Radio, we hear from Ginger Strand, a non-fiction writer who has written extensively on the American interstate. Strand and host Alex Wise discuss the history of American roads over the past five decades, efforts to protect wildlife in the face of road encroachment, and the evolution of hitch-hiking as the rideshare movement continues to blossom. Then, we revisit our conversation with Paul Minett, the founder of the Ridesharing Institute in Auckland, NZ and Mark Svenvold, a journalist who’s profiled Minett’s work.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Huffington Post 43 mins – “On the 10th anniversary of The Huffington Post website, Washington, D.C., bureau chief Ryan Grim, senior politics editor Sam Stein and politics managing editor Amanda Terkel gather to talk about some of the biggest stories the site has covered.” At the link find the title, “10 Years of The Huffington Post ,” right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infrastructure Repairs 47 mins – “Travel abroad and you will quickly see how American infrastructure has fallen behind.  Fallen apart.  Just traveling across town in this winter of big snow has been a challenge to aging systems.  But how do we pay for an upgrade?  This week, the Obama administration put a plan on the table.  Tax huge overseas profits of GE, Pfizer, Microsoft, Apple and more.  Put that windfall into American infrastructure.  It could be a beginning of tax reform and American rebuilding.  Is it a good idea?  This hour On Point:  Paying to rebuild, and a look-ahead at the next 30 years of American transportation.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop up menu.

Invasive Species Value 53 mins – “When journalist Fred Pearce set out to write a book about the role invasive species play in our environment, he imagined it would be about the havoc they cause. What he found surprised him though. He says the horror stories are overblown and that these resourceful plants and animals are often responding to the damage that humans have wrought. They push their way through concrete and thrive in pollution. Tuesday, Pearce joins Doug to explain why he says invasive species could be nature’s salvation.” At the link right-click the blue button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS in Iraq 48 mins – “A call for fresh volunteers today from the Iraqi government in Baghdad to try to retake Ramadi, and maybe to save Iraq. Over the weekend, Iraqi troops cut and ran, again, as fighters of the Islamic State blasted their way into control of the capitol of Anbar Province. With Ramadi in its control, the Islamic State is now just 70 miles from Baghdad. Instead of a promised retaking of Mosul and pushback of the Islamists, the US and Baghdad government are themselves back on their heels. This hour, On Point: the fall of Ramadi, where US troops fought and died, and the uncertain future of Iraq itself.”At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop up menu.

Joan of Arc 52 mins – “A young, French peasant girl standing in a field receives a heavenly message: she must lead the French in driving the English out of the country. So begin most retellings of the story of Joan of Arc. But medieval historian Helen Castor says that to get a true picture of the girl and her place in history – and to understand how her remarkable story was possible – we need to go back further. Castor brings us deep into France of the early 1400s: into a country long ravaged by war, and a society where fears about the will of God are ever-present. A fresh look at the woman known as Joan of Arc and the world she inhabited.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Lawrence of Arabia 55 mins – “T.E. Lawrence — Lawrence of Arabia — was one of the most brilliant and enigmatic figures of the 20th Century. Archaeologist, cartographer, military tactician and leader in WW1, he was also uncannily prescient about the shape of the world to come.” At the link find the title, “The Shape of Thing To Come – T.E. Lawrence,” right-click “Media files ideas 20150519_12147.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Magna Carta 70 mins – “Did an 800-year old piece of parchment really change the world? Nicholas Vincent of the University of East Anglia talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the Magna Carta, the founding document of English law and liberty. The Magna Carta was repudiated just ten weeks after King John issued it. Yet, its impact is still with us today. In this conversation, Vincent explains what led to the Magna Carta and how its influence remains with us today in England and elsewhere.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Match Making Process 31 mins – “Inside Dating Ring’s Matchmaking System “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Measles Legacy 64 mins – “The TWiM team discusses how measles vaccination protects against other infectious diseases, and links between bacterial biofilms and colon cancer.” [Conversely, victims of measles are susceptible to other infections.] At the link right-click “TWiM#104” and select “Save Link As” from the popup menu.

Microbiome 17 mins – “Rob Knight is a pioneer in studying human microbes, the community of tiny single-cell organisms living inside our bodies that have a huge — and largely unexplored — role in our health. “The three pounds of microbes that you carry around with you might be more important than every single gene you carry around in your genome,” he says. Find out why.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moral Enhancement 39 mins – “Jesse has a freewheeling discussion with John Danaher about “moral enhancement” technologies – old and new.  They talk about emerging technologies, ethics and the notion that the mind extends much beyond our body and brain.  (All without sounding remotely woo-woo!) “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Security Threats 91 mins – “Cutting-edge technology has led to medical breakthroughs, the information age, and space exploration, among many other innovations. The growing ubiquity of advanced technology, however, means that almost anyone can harness its power to threaten national, international, and individual security. In their new book, The Future of Violence: Robots and Germs, Hackers and Drones—Confronting a New Age of Threat (Basic Books, 2015), Benjamin Wittes and Gabriella Blum explore the potential dangers of modern technology when acquired by hostile groups or individuals. On March 11, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted a book event to discuss the new threats to national security and the developing framework for confronting the technology-enabled threats of the 21st century. In order to manage the challenges and risks associated with advanced technology, governments, organizations, and citizens must reconsider the intersection of security, privacy, and liberty. What does this mean for domestic and international surveillance? How will the government protect its citizens in an age of technology proliferation?” At the link under the audio tab right-click “Confronting national security threats in the technology age,” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nepal Immigrants 28 mins – “Claudia Taranto travels to Nepal where – until the recent disasters – 1600 people were leaving each day to travel overseas for work. The earthquakes are only likely to add to this exodus in the coming years. Claudia discovers the benefits of money earned in the Middle East, but also hears appalling accounts of exploitation. She discovers the benefits of money earned in the Middle East, but also hears appalling accounts of exploitation.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Niagara Falls Electricity 4 mins – “Not long ago, while traveling near the Canadian border, I chanced upon a curious building. It was shaped like an ancient funerary temple on the banks of the Nile: a long stone façade punctuated by evenly spaced columns and bays. It also had that forlorn look so common to aging turn-of-the-century structures: classical elegance plus blown-out windows. My building might even have been an eyesore except for the colossal eye-magnet just a few hundred yards away. Did I mention it sat at the foot of Niagara Falls? The mystery building turned out to be the Ontario Power Company Generating Station, built in 1904, and it has a back-story as interesting as its appearance.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plague Hygiene of OldeA Gobbet o’ Pus 712. I am now to be called the Chief Morber.” At the link find the title, “712,” right-click “gop712.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

School Discipline 53 mins – “Something changed in America’s schools after the tragedy at Columbine High School. Worried about child safety, administrators, parents, and teachers teamed up with police to crack down on discipline. Trouble that once landed kids in detention is now punished with out-of-school suspension, expulsion, even arrest. The result is a pipeline that funnels children from school straight to prison. Wednesday, we’re talking about the school-to-prison pipeline in Utah and asking whom it affects and what can be done to stem its flow.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexuality 60 mins – “This week we’re looking at the intersection of human sexuality, research and education. We’re joined by sexuality educator and blogger Emily Nagoski, to talk about her book “Come as You Are: The Surprising New Science that Will Transform Your Sex Life.” And we’ll speak to medical humanities and bioethics professor Alice Dreger, about her experience live-tweeting her son’s abstinence-focused sex-ed class.” At the link find the title, “#318 Come As You Are,” right-click “Media files Science for the People_318_Come_as_You_Are.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Singapore Work Prospects 28 mins – “Claudia Taranto visits Singapore, which is increasingly reliant on labour from abroad – 40% of the population are in the country temporarily for work. She hears from locals who feel anger at being squeezed out of the job market and from exploited migrant workers who are in despair at Singapore’s complex and bureaucratic system for resolving workplace problems.” At the link find the title, “Singapore: Workers Without Borders,” right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Small Business Round Table 68 mins – “Former Secretary of State and 2016 Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton participates in a discussion with members of the small business and lending communities in Cedar Falls, Iowa. She also takes questions on her State Department emails.” At the link find the title, “Hillary Clinton on Small Business Lending,” right-click “Media files program.401230.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Somalia Recovery 28 mins – “Andrew Harding speaks to defectors inside the militant group Al Shabab and asks if Somalia is turning the tide against extremism.” Andrew Harding speaks to defectors inside the militant group Al Shabab and asks if Somalia is turning the tide against extremism.” At the link find the title, “Somalia – Back from the Brink,” right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stiglitz on Equality 62 mins – “We are living in an era defined by economic uncertainty and bitter politics: The gap between the rich and the poor continues to grow, an emboldened Wall Street has shrugged off attempts at regulation, and important political policies have become the playthings of financial interests. Still, economist Joseph Stiglitz believes that a healthy economy and a fair democracy are within our grasp. By taking what he sees as practical political steps, such as making those at the top pay their fair share, spending more in areas that we all value – education, health, and infrastructure – and eliminating the corrosive advantages built into our markets, Stiglitz argues that we can once again create the opportunities that have for so long defined America, and get the country back on track. Stiglitz is a former senior vice president and chief economist of the World Bank and is a recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Debt 55 mins – “It’s cap and gown time all over the country.  And since it’s this country, that means a lot of new young college graduates graduating with a lot of debt.  $26,000 on average now for student loan borrowers.  In total, more than a trillion dollars in student debt.  Famously more student debt now in this country than credit card debt.Nobel prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz says this isn’t just an astonishing number.  It’s a real drag on the US economy, and a real promoter of US inequality.  It’s got to change, he says.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Management 55 mins – “Opening a new era for cooperation on the world’s most critical water issues, mayors from across Great Lakes and the Middle East will sign a pioneering agreement this month that links their cities through game-changing “Sister Waters” partnerships. The treaty-signing will take place at Water after Borders: Global Stakes, Local Politics, a historic two-day summit at the University of Illinois at Chicago, April 23rd-24th, 2015. Water After Borders will focus on strategies for sharing water across political, geographical, and cultural boundaries. The partnerships will be facilitated by EcoPeace Middle East – an Israeli/Jordanian/Palestinian trilateral organization dedicated to environmental peacebuilding – and the Great Lakes & St. Lawrence Cities Initiative – a coalition aimed at protecting and restoring the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River. Tune in to hear the mayors themselves discuss this historic partnership!” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Women 60 mins – “Caroline Fredrickson, president of the American Constitution Society, talks about her book [Under the Bus: How Working Women are Being Run Over], in which she argues that women in the U.S. still face many challenges in the workplace.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Caroline Fredrickson,” right-click “Media files program.398588.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Workplace Tools 52 mins – “Two hundred years ago, there was no such thing as the “workplace” — and the tools of one’s trade were rudimentary by today’s standards. Since then, of course, America has witnessed the Industrial Revolution, the rise of white-collar work and, now, an age of digital devices that allows the workplace to follow us everywhere. So on this episode of BackStory, from utopian visions of the cubicle to video surveillance in law enforcement, the Guys size up some of the stuff Americans have worked with — and, in turn, how that stuff has shaped the lives of American workers.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

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Media Mining Digest 184 – May 22, 2015: Creatine, Cuban Science, Currency Concepts, Dementia, Drone Construction, Freakonomics Insights, Free Speech – Cartoons, Hair Tragedy, Hedy Lamarr, HIV in Austin Indiana, Hyaluronic Acid, Iraqi Refugees, ISIS Propaganda, Israeli Dilemma, Japanese Internment Camps, Las Vegas Rejuvenation, Laughter, Meat Contamination, Migrant Child Disposition, Nancy Houston, Patient Power, Patriot Act, Peru Wildlife Trade, Powers of Two, Racism and Drones, Rebellion, Saudi Social Change, Social Media Propaganda, Stereotypes, Superpowers, Teen Driver Deaths, Teen Suicides, Trans Pacific Partnership, Ty Cobb Story, Underground Coffee, Vietnam War Photography, Walter Pincus, Wright Brothers, WWII – Crete, WWII Code Breaking, WWII Displaced Kids, WWII Rapes

The following audio files come from a larger group of 180 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 57 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Adaptation of Life 52 mins – “Darwinian evolution is adaptive and slow … millennia can go by before a species changes very much. But with the tools of genetic engineering we can now make radical changes in just one generation. By removing genes or inserting new ones, we can give an organism radically different traits and behaviors. We are taking evolution into our own hands. It all began with the domestication of plants and animals, which one science writer says created civilization. Today, as humans tinker with their own genome, is it possible we will produce Homo sapiens 2.0? Also, what happens to those species who can’t control their destiny? How climate change is forcing the biggest genetic reshuffling in recorded history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Students in Britain 27 mins – “Over 35,000 African students studied at British universities last year – part of a growing number of foreign students coming to the UK. Bola Masuro charts the progress of four students from Africa. What do they want to take back with them from the British way of life? And what could the UK learn from Africa?” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: African Students Abroad,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150513-0300a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up men.

AIDS History 27 mins – “AIDS Expert Dr Tony Fauci looks back at the scientific breakthroughs that have transformed HIV/AIDS from a death sentence to a disease that can now be treated and prevented. Archive clip from ‘How to Survive a Plague’ courtesy of Dartmouth Films & Public Square Films.” At the link find the title, “HealthC: The Truth About AIDS,” right-click “healthc_20150506-2005a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.”

Backyard Brains 87 mins – “…Greg Gage and Tim Marzullo of Backyard Brains! (hereafter annotated as “BB”) The focus of BB is to make simple to use electronics so that neuroscience is taught sooner in students’ lives. The Spiker box is a signal chain with bio instrumentation amp, then bandpass filtering, then an amplifier to output through a speaker; It turns out that plants also have electrophysiology (action potential firing). Especially – The cortex is done in layers, so the polarity lines up and the signals are detectible; The human brain initiative is part of a push from the Obama administration. It’s meant to increase the understanding of the brain. Tim did some predication of the future: 2035 neuromotes, silicon wrapped in biocompatible material [and] 2165 is the completely controllable to the single neuron layer. There is a bluetooth kit to control bugs by manipulating their antennae. It’s called The Roboroach; it uses similar science as to the experiments by Luigi Galvani on frog legs. Greg gave a TED talk about the human to human interface” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beatrix Potter 54 mins – “Most people only know Beatrix Potter as the author of children’s books such as The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Her books have sold more than 100 million copies in 35 languages. But Beatrix Potter only began writing seriously in her 30s and before this pursued an interest in the natural sciences. She made intricate drawings of fungi and lichens and worked as an amateur scientist. She even wrote a scientific paper which despite its quality was dismissed as it was written by a female amateur. Sharon Carleton traces the scientific life of author Beatrix Potter.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Billards 16 mins – “We live in a post-billiards age. There was an age of billiards, and it has been over for so long, most of us have no idea how huge billiards once was. For many decades, starting in the mid-19th Century, billiards was the one of the most popular amusements. A hundred years ago, there were 830 pool halls in the city of Chicago. Today, there are ten. Billiards is not what it used to be—but we continue to live in a world affected by its former prominence. The growth of billiards led to the development of a material that would come to define the modern world. Without billiards, we might never have discovered plastic. The story starts with a man named Michael Phelan, the father of American billiards.

Blind Guide Dogs 26 mins “Professor Paul Upchurch is a Palaeobiolgoist at London’s UCL. His interest in dinosaurs and the living world began when he was a small boy and he now regards his hobby as his work. Paul is registered blind and talks to Peter about the way his visual impairment impacts on his work and his personal life. Lee Kumutat has travelled to Torquay in Devon, to meet Steph Read. Steph has the hereditary connective-tissue disorder known as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and she uses a wheelchair. Steph has a dual assistance dog, called Vegas, to help her with both her visual impairment and her physical disability and she talks to Lee about the difference Vegas makes to her daily living. Producer: Cheryl Gabriel” At the link for a few weeks find the title, “InTouch 05 May 15: Dinosaurs and Dogs,” right-click “Download 9MB” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blindness for Beginners 19 mins – “In Touch revisits its ‘Blindness for Beginners’ series to look at shopping. Peter White is joined by broadcaster Richard de Costobadie and Diane Roworth, CEO of the York Blind and Partially-Sighted Society, who share their experiences and advice on what can make shopping trips easier. They discuss the best way to retain your independence and choice if you’re blind or visually-impaired. The emphasis is on staying in control and finding the best way to get exactly what you want without losing your autonomy …. or temper. Producer: Cheryl Gabriel” At the link, for a short time, find the title, “InTouch 12 May 15: Blindness for Beginners – Shopping, “right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boat Migrants 47 mins – “The boats out of Burma and Bangladesh are bobbing off of Malaysia and Thailand right now.  Jammed and desperate. You already know about the boats out of North Africa – Libya – coming in waves across the Mediterranean. Europe, debating whether to save them or sink them before they can leave their ports. The world is looking at another migrant crisis moment. Last summer it was kids on the Rio Grande.  In the future, with political upheaval and climate change, it could be all over. With tough choices attached. This hour On Point: desperate migrants on the move.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Future 36 mins – “In a lecture at the Canadian Literature Centre at the University of Alberta and in interview with Paul Kennedy, novelist Lynn Coady explores what happens if we separate the idea of ‘the book’ from the experience they’ve traditionally provided.” At the link find the title, “The Monster At The End,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150506_98892.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brewing and Distilling 53 mins – [starts at 12 m]“Adam Rogers is an editor at Wired and the author of Proof: The Science of Booze. On the show this week we talk to Rogers about alcohol and the science behind it—from yeast, to bourbon, to Star Trek’s synthehol.” At the link find the title, “86 Adam Rogers – The Science of Booze,” “Media files 205557655-inquiringminds-86-adam-rogers-the-science-of-booze.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil War Echoes 52 mins – “One hundred and fifty years have now passed since the end of the civil war. Pulitzer-prize winning historian James McPherson argues that most of today’s pressing issues – from racial inequality and voting rights to state sovereignty – can be traced back to this war. In a new book, McPherson says it is impossible to understand most contemporary issues without understanding their roots in the civil war era. We look at the enduring legacy of the conflict that nearly destroyed the country.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Civil War Thoughts 49 mins – “American historian David Blight explores the legacy of the American Civil War – especially regarding the issue of race-relations. He joins the dots between events from 150 years ago through to the American Civil Rights movement of the 1960s to more recent protests in the US cities of Baltimore and Ferguson.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Alistair Cooke Memorial Lecture 9 May 2015,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150509-2259a.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 56 mins – “In her new book, Driving the Future, Margo Oge (Former Director, Office of Transportation and Air Quality, United States Environmental Protection Agency) portrays a future where clean, intelligent vehicles with lighter frames and alternative power trains will produce zero emissions and run at 100+ mpg. With electronic architectures more like that of airplanes, cars will be smarter and safer, will park themselves, and will network with other vehicles on the road to drive themselves. Offering an insider account of the partnership between Federal agencies, states, environmental groups, and car manufacturers that led to the historic deal, she discusses the science of climate change, the politics of addressing it and the lessons learned for policymakers.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Thesis 47 mins – “ For many college seniors, it’s the last great intellectual exercise of their college careers. The capstone before donning the cap and gown. I’m talking about the senior thesis. That deep dive into the unexplored and unanswered. Original research. Fresh takes on the classics. Out of the box thinking on just about everything: neotropical migrant birds.  Feminism and fairy tales. An original musical. Must-reads, at least for the eyes of the thesis advisor — and hopefully mom and dad. And you’re in for a treat, too. This hour, On Point: the Class of 2015 presents their senior theses.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concrete Problems 7 mins – “You already feel guilty about the car you drive to work, but you might want to start feeling guilty about your workplace too. Reporter Daniel Gross takes a look at why concrete is helping destroy the environment.” At the link find the title, “How Concrete Is Crushing the Earth,” right-click “Media files GROSSCONCRETEWEBMIX.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conspiracy Theories 21 mins – “What is a conspiracy? Why do conspiracies – real or imagined –  matter to philsophy? Cassim Quaassam explores these questions in conversation with Nigel Warburton “ At the link right-clcik beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creatine 28 mins – “What is Creatine?  It’s long been known as a supplement-of-choice for athletes and weightlifters… but what cognitive benefits might Creatine provide?  To answer these and other questions, Dr. Maurizio Balestrino joins Jesse for an intellectual powwow this week.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Science 24 mins – [starts at 10 m]On this week’s show: Cuban science looks toward the future, and a roundup of daily news stories”At the link right-click “Download MP3 file for this show” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Currency Concepts 55 mins – “The world over, alternative currencies are helping societies solve key issues. Sheetal Lodhia explores how healthy communities can be built without money.” At the link find the title, “Why Money Isn’t Everything,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150512_56349.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia P4 46 mins – “In this episode of the Dementia Decoded series, we’ll look at new and innovative ways people around the world are addressing this problem, and offer some tools and strategies for people dealing with dementia in their own families and communities.” At the link find the title, “Dementia Decoded: Fighting Forgetting,” right-click “Media files 150400_dementia_decoded_ep4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Construction Lessons 109 mins – “In this week’s show we get a little deeper into FPV and talk about some of the cool Ground Stations we’ve seen – some are really stinking expensive, while others show that you can get the job done WITHOUT breaking the bank (these are MY favorite systems). Also, we get a chance to visit with Jake ‘FleshPilot’ Wells for the first time on the show. You may remember our referencing Jake in some previous shows, as he’s the guy that’s been putting out some of those awesome videos we’ve enjoyed from Washington state.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freakonomics Insights 47 mins – “Dubner and Levitt are live onstage at the 92nd Street Y in New York to celebrate their new book “When to Rob a Bank” — and a decade of working together.” At the link find the title, “Ten Years of Freakonomics,” right-click “Media files freakonomics_podcast051415.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Speech – Cartoons 47 mins – “On Sunday in the Dallas suburb Garland, Texas, two men with assault rifles were shot dead by an off-duty traffic cop. The men had come to kill attendees of a Muhammad Art Exhibit and Contest where there was a $10,000 prize for the best caricature of the prophet. Images considered sacrilegious by many Muslims. But the outspoken organizer Pamela Gellar says it’s all fine and well – it’s free speech. Others say, not so fast. This is hate. Bigotry. Racism. This was meant to provoke violence. So where is the line between free speech and hate speech? How far can you go? This hour, On Point: Free speech, hate speech.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hair Tragedy 14 mins – “Geneticist Chris Gunter worries about passing on a rare condition to her son. Chris Gunter is a human geneticist by training, and a science communicator by choice. She earned her Ph.D. at Emory University and then moved up and down the east coast, ending up as a Senior Editor at the journal Nature. Currently she serves as the Associate Director for Research for the Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, and as an Associate Professor in Pediatrics for the Emory University School of Medicine. If she had any spare time, she would probably garden or bake.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hedy Lamarr 42 mins – “Hedy Lamarr provides the classic case of a superbly bright woman constrained by the narrow views of her time as to what women should be allowed to do.   She is well known as a 1940s actor, and was promoted as “The Most Beautiful Woman in the World.”  But behind the gloss, Lamarr was a natural inventor and amateur engineer.  Together with composer George Antheil, she patented a new system of communication. That technology forms the basis of ‘spread spectrum technology’ which gives us our mobile phones today. Sharon Carleton traces the life of Hedy Lamarr, ‘the most gorgeous geek of all time’ and a very damaged woman.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV in Austin Indiana 48 mins – “Austin, Indiana, a town with just 4,200 people, is in  the throes of a HIV outbreak. Austin is poor. With a huge opiate addiction problem. Addicts are sharing dirty needles. The governor declared a state of emergency and Tuesday expanded a needle exchange program to address the crisis. The issues facing Austin – addiction, poverty, unemployment –aren’t unique to rural Indiana. Communities across the country face similar challenges. With dire outcomes. This hour, On Point: Indiana’s HIV outbreak, needle exchanges and America’s enduring drug problem.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hyaluronic Acid 6 mins – “If there’s one thing to make anyone with a scientific background cringe it’s when an advertiser starts pushing ‘the science stuff’. Probably the worst offenders are cosmetic manufacturers, and you don’t have to take in many of their adverts before getting the impression that hyaluronic acid is a wonder substance, a compound well worthy of study. Hyaluronic acid, also known as hyaluronan, is one of a group of naturally occurring complex organic compounds called glycosaminoglycans, that form long polysaccharide chains with a repeating formula of C14H21NO11. It was first found in the vitreous humour – the clear gel that fills the eye – which is where its name, combining ‘hyalos’, the Greek for ‘vitreous’, with ‘uronic acid’, originates. But hyaluronic acid also occurs widely in connective tissues, forming a major component of the matrix that supports cells in an organism. Its properties were first investigated by the German biochemist Karl Meyer at the University of California, Berkeley in the 1930s….” At the link right-click beside “Download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iraqi Refugees 47 mins – “Sometimes the story behind the story needs a lot more attention than it gets. And that’s the case now in Iraq. We’ve watched since last summer the advance of ISIS as it swept east from Syria into Iraq.  he black flags, the beheadings, the collapse of the Iraqi army. Now the pushback, with the help of Iran on the ground and the US in the air. But almost overlooked are the millions of Iraqis who had to flee all that fighting. And all those refugees, all those lost towns, a whole other layer of despair and challenge.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Propaganda 27 mins – “Dominic Casciani explores the way the so called Islamic State use social media to recruit people to their cause, and what can we be done combat this. Dominic travels to Canada to meet a mother whose son was recruited by IS and executed by the FSA, and the police chief who says a lot more needs to be done to counter IS online.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Islamic State’s Social Media Machine,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150505-0300a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Israeli Dilemma 54 mins – “Michael Enright in conversation with Ari Shavit, the author of the acclaimed book, My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel, and the award-winning, but highly polarizing Gideon Levy.” At the link find the title, “The Enright Files – Israeli-Palestinian Relations,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150504_56711.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Japanese Internment 52 mins – “Shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the U.S. began rounding up tens of thousands of Japanese Americans. They were sent to concentration camps in the western U.S. For nearly four years, men, women and children spent their lives enclosed behind barbed wire, watched by armed guards in towers. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and those who supported his executive order that paved the way for the camps said they were a military necessity. It was, after all, a time of war. But today many consider it to be one of the most shameful periods in American history. We look at how internment camps affected the lives of Japanese Americans for generations.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Las Vegas Rejuvenation 56 mins – “Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh has a wild vision and the dollars to try to make it real. But it still might be the biggest gamble in town.” At the link find the title, “Could the Next Brooklyn Be … Las Vegas?!” right-click “Media files freakonomics_podcast050715.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Laughter 17 mins – “Did you know that you’re 30 times more likely to laugh if you’re with somebody else than if you’re alone? Cognitive neuroscientist Sophie Scott shares this and other surprising facts about laughter in this fast-paced, action-packed and, yes, hilarious dash through the science of the topic.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As “ from the pop-up menu.

Meat Contamination 57 mins – “FRONTLINE investigates the spread of dangerous pathogens in meat particularly poultry.” At the link find the title, “The Trouble With Chicken,” right-click “Download File – 85.3 MB” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Migrant Child Disposition 52 mins – “Last spring, striking images of the U.S. border began showing up in the media: Children from Central America, many traveling alone, piling up at immigration facilities. By October, nearly 70,000 unaccompanied child migrants had arrived seeking entry to the United States. This year, the numbers have dropped by about 40 percent, due in large part to stepped up enforcement by Mexico. However, that still means tens of thousands of kids will be taken into custody by the U.S. immigration system, even as the government struggles to process last year’s arrivals. A look at the ongoing migration of children from Central America and the tension between protection and prevention.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Nancy Houston 55 mins – “Paul Kennedy talks to the writer Nancy Huston, winner of the 2015 Blue Metropolis Grand Literary Prize.” At the link find the title, “Literary Amphibuim – Nancy Huston,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150507_84074.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patient Power 28 mins – “Episode 12 of the health podcast from Slate and WBUR offers up three ways to take charge of your medical experience. There are specific ways to feel better about both the quality and cost of your medical care, says Dr. Don Goldmann of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Also, medical informatics wiz Dr. Isaac Kohane on pushing the “blue button” to gain real control of your own medical data. And, we’ll show how telling your own medical story can help you heal.” At the link find the title, “The Checkup: Power to the Patient,” right-click “Media files checkup15051102_checkup.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop up menu.

Patient Power 67 mins – “We’re in the middle of a healthcare revolution but it’s about more than marvelous life-saving and life-enhancing apps on our smartphone. Eric Topol of the Scripps Translational Science Institute and author of The Patient Will See You Now argues that the digital revolution will give us more control of our health information and data. More powerful patients will transform the doctor-patient interaction. Topol talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his new book giving us a glimpse of the changes coming to medicine from the digital revolution.” At the link right-click ‘Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patriot Act 47 mins – “We know because of Edward Snowden. The NSA – the National Security Agency – took the PATRIOT Act, passed after 9/11, and ran and ran with it. Including forcing American phone companies to pour their records directly into government computers. Where our “metadata” was at their fingertips. Everyone you called. Now, that PATRIOT Act provision is expiring. Should that NSA domestic surveillance be ended with it? Defenders say no. Say ISIS and more are a real and current threat. Opponents say end it. For privacy. For freedom. And we don’t need it. This hour, On Point: the NSA’s spying at home.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patriot Act Limits 52 mins – “Most Americans had no idea the U.S. government was conducting a daily dragnet of their phone records until two years ago. That’s when Edward Snowden made this and several other NSA operations public, sparking a firestorm. Last week, a federal appeals court ruled that the Patriot Act, as written, doesn’t allow this practice. Now it’s up to Congress to make a decision. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) supports re-authorizing bulk surveillance for five years, but a bipartisan group in the House is pushing for changes. If Congress doesn’t act, the program expires on June 1. We look at the future of the Patriot Act and what it means for your privacy and security.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Peru Wildlife Trade 27 mins – “Peru is one of the most biodiverse nations in the world. But its precious wildlife is threatened by traffickers. Crossing Continents goes on operations with the wildlife police.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Peru’s Wildlife for Sale – 14 May 2015,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150514-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Powers of Two 52 mins – “Forget what you think you know about creativity being the domain of the solitary genius. The writer Joshua Wolf Shenk says it’s a myth that’s outlived its usefulness. In his book Powers of Two, Shenk looks at hundreds of creative duos — like John Lennon and Paul McCartney or Marie and Pierre Curie — to understand what he calls the “electrified space” of their partnership. Friday, Shenk joins us to explain how these creative connections work, and why two heads really are better than one.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism and Drones 53 mins – “The deep historical roots of the Baltimore protests, shedding light on drone strikes, and combating sex worker stereotypes.” At the link find the title, “Unseen & Inscrutable,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rebellion 47 mins – “Chris Hedges went out into the world as a journalist. Covered war and more all over for years. And came back an activist. Warning first against war, and then more. Against what he calls a corporate takeover of power globally. Against the crushing of the possibility of real change through democracy. Against what he sees as a profit-driven rush to environmental catastrophe, and maybe the extinction of the human race. The only answer now, says Hedges, is revolt. Even if it hurts. It’s a hard message, and he knows it. This hour On Point: Chris Hedges on the case for revolt.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Social Change 27 mins – “Tarek Osman considers how the impact of the Arab Uprisings of 2011 was felt in Saudi Arabia. The country’s growing youth population faced high unemployment and was well adapted to social media. But unlike other Arab countries, they did not take to the streets. And, As King Salman takes power, what is the future of this traditional society and global banker of oil?” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Saudi Arabian Spring,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150506-0300a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Propaganda 27 mins – “The Jordanian social media campaign run in response to the burning of pilot Moaz al-Kasasbeh. Dominic Casciani examines Islamic State’s social media strategy and the attempts to combat it.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Jordan Takes On the Islamic State’s Digital Machine,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150512-1330a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stereotypes 11 mins – “Psychologist Claude Steele says stereotypes are even more important than we realize, and he explains the psychology that underpins them.” At the link find the title, “Looking Closer at Stereotypes,” right-click “Media files SteeleWebMix.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Superpowers 60 mins – “This is an updated version of a classic episode, featuring a new story from Snap Judgment. We answer the following questions about superpowers: Can superheroes be real people? (No.) Can real people become superheroes? (Maybe.) And which is better: flight or invisibility? (Depends who you ask.) Chris ware’s comic mentioned in the episode is here.” At the ink right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teen Driver Deaths 54 mins – “The number of young drivers killed on the roads is double what we’d expect. Despite clever advertising campaigns, psychologist Bridie Scott-Parker says there hasn’t even been a way of measuring young driver behaviour. Progress has not been made in road safety for young drivers.  Bridie Scott-Parker has taken the first step by bringing together information about the drivers, their behaviour and the environment as they all affect each other. At the Australian Academy of Science in Canberra, Bridie Scott-Parker describes her new approach to addressing safety amongst young novice drivers.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teen Suicides 47 mins – “Three Palo Alto, California teenagers took their own lives this winter. And it’s happened there before. In Newton, Massachusetts, three teens committed suicide last year. And another three in Fairfax County, Virginia. Is there too much competition in these hyper-competitive communities? Psychologists tell us that suicide clusters are rare. And caution against singling out any one factor. But with one in four kids now with a clinical diagnosis of depression or anxiety — something’s going wrong.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Pacific Partnership 50 mins – “The Democrats’ revolt against President Obama’s Trans Pacific Partnership has everything to do with the “giant sucking sound” of job loss echoing over Baltimore and St. Louis, Detroit and Gary… and still more to do with the inability of our own polarized and privatized society to repair the social contract at home. Only at the end of our untypically acrimonious hour did a moral come clear: the 30-year regime of expanding global trade could well founder for want of a firm public decision to share the pain and the profits in that transformation. The more we learn about TPP, the more it looks like a blunt instrument of the banking and corporate interests to protect their investments, and of Big Pharma, Hollywood and Info Tech to protect their “intellectual property” abroad.   Enforceable compensations for workers and communities, here and there, would be nice, too.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Pacific Partnership 47 mins – “The President wants a huge new Pacific trade deal, and he wants it fast so it doesn’t get bogged down and derailed. So China doesn’t write the rules. Yesterday, his own party said no. Senate Democrats rebelled without more assurances, protections, guarantees. And now, the fate of the Trans Pacific Partnership – the TPP – is way up in the air. The White House is calling it a “snafu.” Maybe. But it’s also a serious battle over how the world will work. How Americans workers, business and trade will fare. This hour On Point: the red hot politics of Pacific trade.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ty Cobb Story 48 mins – “’Ty Cobb. That name is hard-wired into the story of baseball and the roaring early days of 20th Century America. One of the game’s first superstars.  Babe Ruth admired him. His fans adored him. Other fans hated how he could hit, steal and run rings around their teams.  But somehow, after he died, he became baseball’s anti-hero. The guy who sharpened his spikes and used them. The violent man, the racist, the major league bully. Turns out, that whole anti-hero story is wrong. This hour, On Point: the true story of the great Ty Cobb.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Underground Coffee 50 mins – “This week we talk to Chris Hoke about finding spirituality within the darkness – Chris Hoke is a jail chaplain and minister to Mexican gang and migrant worker communities in Washington’s Skagit Valley. His experiences are recounted in his new book, Wanted: A Spiritual Pursuit Through Jail, Among Outlaws, and Across Borders, which Kirkus calls “a liberating, transformative chronicle of how spirituality can foster inspiration and hope while emboldening the downtrodden through their darkest days.” Through his work with the organization Tierra Nueva, Hoke co-founded a coffee-roasting business, Underground Coffee, which employs men coming out of prison and addiction, and connects them to agricultural partners in Honduras. Hoke’s work has been featured on NPR’s Snap Judgment and in SojournersImage JournalModern Farmer, and Christian Century. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam War Photography 54 mins – “Members of the U.S. Army’s 221st Signal Company, an official documenting agency for the U.S. Army, talk about their work chronicling the Vietnam War through photography and film.” At the link right-click “IM_20150509.mp3” beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Walter Pincus 60 mins – “Walter Pincus talked about the framework agreement on Iran’s nuclear program, U.S.-Israel relations, and defense department spending and budget sequestration. He also spoke about the 2003 war in Iraq, his career at the Washington Post, and his forthcoming book.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Walter Pincus,” right-click “Media files program.396138.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wright Brothers 52 mins – “On Dec. 17, 1903, Orville Wright, in a plane he designed with his brother Wilbur, becomes the first person to fly. For many of us, this is where the story of the Wright brothers begins and ends. But Pulitzer Prize-winning author and historian David McCullough says there’s so much more to what the two accomplished. By examining a trove of private letters, diaries and notebooks, McCullough finds the brothers extraordinary intelligent, intensely driven, loyal to their family and completely self-made. David McCullough gives us more insight into the men who taught the world to fly.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

WW II – Crete 52 mins – “Thursday, our guest is journalist Christopher McDougall who wrote the book that kicked off the barefoot running movement. While he was writing, McDougall came across the story of a Greek foot messenger who accomplished remarkable athletic feats during World War II. It got him thinking about what makes a hero, and he learned it’s not chance and you don’t have to be superhuman. McDougall is in Utah and joins us to explore how normal people can develop their natural skills to be ready in a crisis.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII Code Breaking and Quantum PCs 60 mins – “This week, we’re looking at technology for keeping secrets safe from prying eyes and ears. We’re joined by Dan Younger, professor emeritus of mathematics at the University of Waterloo, to discuss the remarkable work of his colleague Bill Tutte, who broke the German Lorenz Code during World War II [first 30 mins] And we’ll discuss the cutting edge of quantum security with Physics and Computer Science Professor Shohini Ghose [starts at 29 mins].” At the link find the title, “#317 Secure Communications,” right-click “Media files Science for the People_317_Secure_Communication.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII Displaced Kids 50 mins – “Following the end of World War Two, the BBC began a series of special radio appeals on behalf of a group of children who had survived the Holocaust but were now stranded as orphans in post-war Europe. Alex Last finds out what happened to the 12 children named in the recordings.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Lost Children of the Holocaust,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150506-2200a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII Rapes 50 mins- “Lucy Ash investigates the mass rapes committed by Soviet troops in Germany at the end of World II – in part as revenge for Nazi atrocities in the Soviet Union.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Rape of Berlin – 2 May 2015,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150502-1830a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

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