MMD456 Media Mining Digest: Algae Blooms, Animal Preservation, Childbirth Quandary, Climate Change and Agriculture, Climate Warming, Concentration Camp Survivor, Documentary Film Maker, Earthbound Problems, Fake Videos, Ghetto Gastro, Hate Online, Headstart versus Upstart, Immigrant Issues, Meat Substitute, Menopause Quandary, Menstruation, Micro Museum, Microbiome Underground, Neighborhood Pollution, Newspaper Shrinkage, North Korea Refugees, Obituary Writer, One Child Policy, Online Marketplaces, Optogenetic Tools, Paleontology, Peptide Medicines, Ping Pong, Police Women, Political Participation, Prisoner Story, Protein Designer, Racism Solution, Refugee Rights, Robot Impact, Scotland’s Well Being, Soul Food, Time Measurement, Transgender, Unhealthy Relationships, Vertical Farming, Work Rules

Exercise your ears: the 43 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 512 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,610 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Algae Blooms 8 mins – “When the ocean changes, the planet changes — and it all starts with microbes, says biological oceanographer Angelicque White. Backed by decades of data, White shares how scientists use these ancient microorganisms as a crucial barometer of ocean health — and how we might rejuvenate them as marine temperatures steadily rise.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download video” [only video is available] and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Animal Preservation 9 mins – “To save the achoque — an exotic (and adorable) salamander found in a lake in northern Mexico — scientists teamed up with an unexpected research partner: a group of nuns called the Sisters of the Immaculate Health. In this delightful talk, science journalist Victoria Gill shares the story of how this unusual collaboration saved the achoque from extinction — and demonstrates how local and indigenous people could hold the secret to saving our planet’s weird, wonderful and most threatened species.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download video” [only video is available] and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Climate Warming 8 mins – “The climate crisis is too vast and complicated to solve with a silver bullet, says author David Wallace-Wells. What we need is a shift in how we live. Follow along as he lays out some of the dramatic actions we could take to build a livable, prosperous world in the age of global warming.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Concentration Camp Survivor 7 mins – “Holocaust survivor Werner Reich recounts his harrowing adolescence as a prisoner transported between concentration camps — and shares how a small, kind act can inspire a lifetime of compassion. “If you ever know somebody who needs help, if you know somebody who is scared, be kind to them,” he says. “If you do it at the right time, it will enter their heart, and it will be with them wherever they go, forever.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Documentary Film Maker 8 mins – “Film has the power to change the way we think about ourselves and our culture. Documentarian and TED Fellow Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy uses it to fight violence against women, turning her camera on the tradition of honor killings in Pakistan. In a stirring talk, she shares how she took her Oscar-winning film on the road in a mobile cinema, visiting small towns and villages across Pakistan — and shifting the dynamics between women, men and society, one screening at a time.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Earthbound Problems 4 mins – “To study a system as complex as the entire universe, astrophysicists need to be experts at extracting simple solutions from large data sets. What else could they do with this expertise? In an interdisciplinary talk, TED Fellow and astrophysicist Federica Bianco explains how she uses astrophysical data analysis to solve urban and social problems — as well as stellar mysteries.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Fake Videos 9 mins – “The use of deepfake technology to manipulate video and audio for malicious purposes — whether it’s to stoke violence or defame politicians and journalists — is becoming a real threat. As these tools become more accessible and their products more realistic, how will they shape what we believe about the world? In a portentous talk, law professor Danielle Citron reveals how deepfakes magnify our distrust — and suggests approaches to safeguarding the truth.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Ghetto Gastro 6 mins – “”The hood is good,” says Jon Gray of the Bronx, New York-based creative collective Ghetto Gastro. Working at the intersection of food, design and art, Gray and his team honor the soul and history of their community while applying their unbridled creativity and expansive imagination to unexpected, otherworldly collaborations. Learn more about how they’re creating and investing in their home borough — bringing the Bronx to the world and vice versa.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Hate Online 7 mins – “Digital creator Dylan Marron has racked up millions of views for projects like “Every Single Word” and “Sitting in Bathrooms With Trans People” — but he’s found that the flip side of success online is internet hate. Over time, he’s developed an unexpected coping mechanism: calling the people who leave him insensitive comments and asking a simple question: “Why did you write that?” In a thoughtful talk about how we interact online, Marron explains how sometimes the most subversive thing you can do is actually speak with people you disagree with, not simply at them.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Headstart versus Upstart 6 mins – “Early education is critical to children’s success — but millions of kids in the United States still don’t have access to programs that prepare them to thrive in kindergarten and beyond. Enter the UPSTART Project, a plan to bring early learning into the homes of children in underserved communities, at no cost to families. Education innovator Claudia Miner shares how UPSTART is setting four-year-olds up for success with 15 minutes of learning a day — and how you can help. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Immigrant Issues 8 mins – “Refugee and immigrants rights attorney Melanie Nezer shares an urgently needed historical perspective on the crisis at the southern US border, showing how citizens can hold their governments accountable for protecting the vulnerable. “A country shows strength through compassion and pragmatism, not through force and through fear,” she says.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Meat Substitutes 4 mins – “Conventional meat production causes harm to our environment and presents risks to global health, but people aren’t going to eat less meat unless we give them alternatives that cost the same (or less) and that taste the same (or better). In an eye-opening talk, food innovator and TED Fellow Bruce Friedrich shows the plant- and cell-based products that could soon transform the global meat industry — and your dinner plate.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Meat Substitutes 4 mins – Conventional meat production causes harm to our environment and presents risks to global health, but people aren’t going to eat less meat unless we give them alternatives that cost the same (or less) and that taste the same (or better). In an eye-opening talk, food innovator and TED Fellow Bruce Friedrich shows the plant- and cell-based products that could soon transform the global meat industry — and your dinner plate.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Menopause Quandary 9 mins – “Many of the symptoms of menopause — hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, memory lapses, depression and anxiety — start in the brain. How exactly does menopause impact cognitive health? Sharing groundbreaking findings from her research, neuroscientist Lisa Mosconi reveals how decreasing hormonal levels affect brain aging — and shares simple lifestyle changes you can make to support lifelong brain health.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Menstruation 7 mins – “Having your period is exhausting — and for many people across the world, menstruation is even more challenging because of stigmas and difficulty getting basic hygiene supplies, says social activist Ananya Grover. In this uplifting, actionable talk, she shares how “Pravahkriti,” her campaign to spread period positivity, creatively engages with everyone to promote menstrual health, raise awareness and break taboos around periods.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Micro Museums 8 mins – “Sometimes, small things make a huge impact. After studying how bees in urban environments can survive by navigating small land patches, ecologist Amanda Schochet was inspired to build MICRO, a network of portable science museums the size of vending machines. Learn how these tiny museums are being deployed in libraries, community centers, transit hubs and elsewhere to increase public access to science.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Microbiome Underground 8 mins – “The ground beneath your feet is home to a massive, mysterious world of microbes — some of which have been in the earth’s crust for hundreds of thousands of years. What’s it like down there? Take a trip to the volcanoes and hot springs of Costa Rica as microbiologist Karen Lloyd shines a light on these subterranean organisms and shows how they could have a profound impact on life up here.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Neighborhood Pollution 4 mins – “To study a system as complex as the entire universe, astrophysicists need to be experts at extracting simple solutions from large data sets. What else could they do with this expertise? In an interdisciplinary talk, TED Fellow and astrophysicist Federica Bianco explains how she uses astrophysical data analysis to solve urban and social problems — as well as stellar mysteries.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Newspaper Shrinkage 8 mins – “Nearly 1,800 newsrooms have shuttered across the US since 2004, leaving many communities unseen, unheard and in the dark. In this passionate talk and rallying cry, journalist Chuck Plunkett explains why he rebelled against his employer to raise awareness for an industry under threat of extinction — and makes the case for local news as an essential part of any healthy democracy.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

North Korea Refugees 8 mins – “”North Korea is unimaginable,” says human rights activist Yeonmi Park, who escaped the country at the age of 13. Sharing the harrowing story of her childhood, she reflects on the fragility of freedom — and shows how change can be achieved even in the world’s darkest places.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Obituary Writers 8 mins – “Since its founding in 1851, the “New York Times” has published thousands of obituaries — for heads of state, famous celebrities, even the inventor of the sock puppet. But only a small percentage of them chronicle the lives of women and people of color. In this insightful talk, “Times” editor Amy Padnani shares the story behind “Overlooked,” the project she’s leading to recognize people from history whose deaths were ignored — and refocus society’s lens on who is considered important.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

One Child Problem 4 mins -”China’s one-child policy ended in 2015, but we’re just beginning to understand what it was like to live under the program, says TED Fellow and documentary filmmaker Nanfu Wang. With footage from her film “One Child Nation,” she shares untold stories that reveal the policy’s complex consequences and expose the creeping power of propaganda. w generation of medicine — made from smaller, more durable proteins known as peptides — is on its way. In a quick, informative talk, molecular engineer and TED Fellow Christopher Bahl explains how he’s using computational design to create powerful peptides that could one day neutralize the flu, protect against botulism poisoning and even stop cancer cells from growing.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download video” [only video is available] and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Online Marketplaces 8 mins – “The growth of online marketplaces like Uber, Airbnb and Amazon can sometimes threaten local businesses such as taxis, hotels and retail shops by taking away jobs or reducing income to the community. But it doesn’t have to be this way, says strategy consultant Amane Dannouni. Pointing to examples like Gojek (Indonesia’s Uber for motorbikes) and Jumia (Africa’s version of Amazon), he explains how some online marketplaces make deliberate trade-offs to include, rather than replace, existing players in local economies — benefiting everyone in the long run.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Optogenetic Tools 9 mins – “Neuroscientist Kay M. Tye investigates how your brain gives rise to complex emotional states like depression, anxiety or loneliness. From the cutting edge of science, she shares her latest findings — including the development of a tool that uses light to activate specific neurons and create dramatic behavioral changes in mice. Learn how these discoveries could change the way you think about your mind — and possibly uncover effective treatments for mental disorders.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Paleontology 6 mns – “In this hilarious, whirlwind tour of the last four billion years of evolution, paleontologist and TED Fellow Lauren Sallan introduces us to some of the wildly diverse animals that roamed the prehistoric planet (from sharks with wings to galloping crocodiles and long-necked rhinos) and shows why paleontology is about way more than dinosaurs.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download video” [only video is available] and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Peptide Medicines 3 mins – “Some common life-saving medicines, such as insulin, are made of proteins so large and fragile that they need to be injected instead of ingested as pills. But a new generation of medicine — made from smaller, more durable proteins known as peptides — is on its way. In a quick, informative talk, molecular engineer and TED Fellow Christopher Bahl explains how he’s using computational design to create powerful peptides that could one day neutralize the flu, protect against botulism poisoning and even stop cancer cells from growing.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download video” [only video is available] and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Ping Pong 9 mins – “Growing up in England, Pico Iyer was taught that the point of a game was to win. Now, some 50 years later, he’s realized that competition can be “more like an act of love.” In this charming, subtly profound talk, he explores what regular games of ping-pong in his neighborhood in Japan have revealed about the riddle of winning — and shows why not knowing who’s won can feel like the ultimate victory.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Police Women 4 mins – “Less than 13 percent of police officers in the United States are women — despite their proven effectiveness in diffusing violent situations and reducing the use of force. Drawing on more than two decades of experience as a police officer and chief, TED Fellow Ivonne Roman shares how a simple change to police academy physical fitness tests could help build a more balanced force that benefits communities and officers alike.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Political Participation 8 mins – “Everyone should participate in decision-making and politics — and it starts at home, says activist Hajer Sharief. She introduces a simple yet transformative idea: that parents can teach their children about political agency by giving them a say in how their households are run, in the form of candid family meetings where everyone can express their opinions, negotiate and compromise. “We need to teach people that political, national and global affairs are as relevant to them as personal and family affairs,” she says. “Can you really afford not to be interested or not participate in politics?” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Prisoner Story 9 mins – “A few weeks before his release from prison, Jarrell Daniels took a class where incarcerated men learned alongside prosecutors. By simply sitting together and talking, they uncovered surprising truths about the criminal justice system and ideas for how real change happens. Now a scholar and activist, Daniels reflects on how collaborative education could transform the justice system and unlock solutions to social problems.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download video” [only video is available] and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Protein Designer 7 mins – “Proteins are remarkable molecular machines: they digest your food, fire your neurons, power your immune system and so much more. What if we could design new ones, with functions never before seen in nature? In this remarkable glimpse of the future, David Baker shares how his team at the Institute for Protein Design is creating entirely new proteins from scratch — and shows how they could help us tackle five massive challenges facing humanity. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio”and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Racism Solution 8 mins – “When we define racism as behaviors instead of feelings, we can measure it — and transform it from an impossible problem into a solvable one, says justice scientist Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff. In an actionable talk, he shares his work at the Center for Policing Equity, an organization that helps police departments diagnose and track racial gaps in policing in order to eliminate them. Learn more about their data-driven approach — and how you can get involved with the work that still needs to be done. (This ambitious plan is part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Refugee Rights 8 mins – Refugee and immigrants rights attorney Melanie Nezer shares an urgently needed historical perspective on the crisis at the southern US border, showing how citizens can hold their governments accountable for protecting the vulnerable. “A country shows strength through compassion and pragmatism, not through force and through fear,” she says.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Robot Impact 4 mins – “How comfortable are you with robots taking over your life? Covering a wide range of potential applications — from the mundane (robot house cleaner) to the mischievous (robot sex partner) to the downright macabre (uploading your brain to live on after death) — technology strategist Lucy Farey-Jones shares data-backed evidence of how our willingness to accept AI may be radically changing.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Scotland’s Well Being 7 mins – “First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon joined TEDSummit in Edinburgh to deliver a visionary talk about making collective well-being the main aim of public policy and the economy. Watch the full talk at go.ted.com/nicolasturgeon. It was a charged week in UK politics; that same morning, Boris Johnson assumed office as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. After the talk, Head of TED Chris Anderson joined First Minister Sturgeon to ask a few questions about the political situation in the UK.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Soul Food 8 mins – “In a lyrical talk full of radical imagination, poet Aja Monet and community organizer phillip agnew share the story of how they fell in love and what they’ve learned about the powerful connection between great social movements and meaningful art. Journey to Smoke Signals Studio in Miami, their home and community art space where they’re creating a refuge for neighbors and creators — and imagining a new answer to distraction, anger and anxiety.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Time Measurement 8 mins – “Ask any deep space navigator like Jill Seubert what makes steering a spacecraft difficult, and they’ll tell you it’s all about the timing; a split-second can decide a mission’s success or failure. So what do you do when a spacecraft is bad at telling time? You get it a clock — an atomic clock, to be precise. Let Seubert whisk you away with the revolutionary potential of a future where you could receive stellar, GPS-like directions — no matter where you are in the universe.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Transgender 8 mins – “In much of the world, gender is viewed as binary: man or woman, each assigned characteristics and traits designated by biological sex. But that’s not the case everywhere, says France Villarta. In a talk that’s part cultural love letter, part history lesson, he details the legacy of gender fluidity and inclusivity in his native Philippines — and emphasizes the universal beauty of all people, regardless of society’s labels.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio” and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Unhealthy Relationships 8 mins – “In a talk about understanding and practicing the art of healthy relationships, Katie Hood reveals the five signs you might be in an unhealthy relationship — with a romantic partner, a friend, a family member — and shares the things you can do every day to love with respect, kindness and joy. “While love is an instinct and an emotion, the ability to love better is a skill we can all build and improve on over time,” she says.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio”and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Vertical Farming 7 mns – “By 2050, the global population is projected to reach 9.8 billion. How are we going to feed everyone? Investment-banker-turned-farmer Stuart Oda points to indoor vertical farming: growing food on tiered racks in a controlled, climate-proof environment. In a forward-looking talk, he explains how this method can maintain better safety standards, save money, use less water and help us provide for future generations.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio”and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Work Rules 4 mins – “Most companies operate on a set of policies: mandated vacation days, travel guidelines, standard work hours, annual goals. But what happens when a company looks less to control and more to trust? Patty McCord, the iconic former chief talent officer at Netflix, shares the key insights that led her to toss the handbook out the window.” At the link left-click “Share” then left-click “Download” and select “Download audio”and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

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MMD455 Media Mining Digest: AI versus Creativity, Blood Clotting Process, Building Considerations, Cancer Cell Clearance, CAR T Cells, Checkpoint Immunotherapy, Clinton Impeachment, Corona Vaccine Trials, Corona Virus 19 Preparation, Corona Virus Expert, Corona Virus Immunotyping, Corona Virus, Corona Virus T Cells, Corona Virus Update, Corona Virus versus SARS, Digital Currencies, Dumb Mistakes, Enterovirus, Fake News, FDA Intrigue, Gerrymandering Hazard, Giant Virus, Hate, Hepatitis C Story, High Containment Labs, Human Health Collaboration, Immunology Basics, Impeachment, Lymphocyte Tracking, Neutrophil Discussion, Prometheus Project, Science Funding, Soleimani Killing, Telemedicine Do’s and Don’ts, Vaccine Alternative, Virology Diagnostics, Virology History, Virology Researchers, Virus Research, Wild Salmon Virus

Exercise your ears: the 48 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 622 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,500 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

AI versus Creativity 26 mins – “Innovation and creation come from our learnings and experiences. With every new creation comes inspiration from something else. Edison didn’t invent the lightbulb; he perfected it. Einstein was inspired by physicists that went before him. So what is the difference between AI invented and AI-inspired? Input and experience play a key role. For AI, that comes in the form of the “training data” supplied to the system to recognize patterns and identify the best solutions. Training data is critically important and allows AI to do what it does. It is part of an element called machine learning, which has historically applied to games like chess and go. It was initially thought that humans had a unique advantage at these kinds of things.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Blood Clotting Process 59 mins – “The Immune trio explains how activation of the inflammasome by a bacterial protein causes blood clotting through a programmed cell death process called pyroptosis.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Building Considerations P1 11 mins – “Do you know what you should consider when choosing your home site?  After deciding to build instead of buy a new home, many people are so focused on the house design and that they give little thought to the LAND on which they will place their future home.  But what lot you choose is a major factor in determining how much it will cost you to build and maintain your home, and how much you will ultimately enjoy it.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Building Considerations P2 9 mins – “Back on track after unavoidable pre-construction setbacks, my homebuilding journey has had its share of challenges, even before the foundation was placed.  But delays have been used as opportunities for design improvements that will make the house even more resilient than originally planned.  This episode is kind of a construction update.  I’ll tell you about our delays and what we did to make lemonade out of lemons.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Cancer Cell Clearance 46 mins – “The immunophiles explain how metabolic rewiring of macrophages by CpG promotes clearance of cancer cells.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

CAR T Cells 56 mins – “The immu-knowledge-ists deconstruct the holy grail of oncologists, cancer immunotherapy, and the exciting development of CAR T cells and how they work.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Checkpoint Immunotherapy 54 mins – “The Immune team explains the science behind the 2018 Nobel Prizes awarded to Allison and Honjo: checkpoint immunotherapy.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Clinton Impeachment 33 mins – “President Trump is just the fourth president to face impeachment proceedings. In 2016, The Post’s Presidential podcast examined the three presidents in that category before Trump. We finish our series from Presidential with the story of Bill Clinton.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Corona Vaccine Trials 17 mins – “Is AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine in jeopardy? Why can’t politicians and scientists in Washington get along? Did you miss STAT’s first-ever Health Tech Summit? We discuss all that and more this week on “The Readout LOUD,” STAT’s biotech podcast. First, we’ll break down the big news of the week: the global pause on AstraZeneca’s Phase 3 trials of its Covid-19 vaccine due to a suspected serious adverse reaction in a participant in the U.K. Then, STAT’s Lev Facher joins us for an update on the charged politics of the Covid-19 response. Lastly, we’ll highlight three top moments from STAT’s inaugural Health Tech Summit, which took place virtually this week.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus 19 Preparation 44 mins – “Columbia University Chief Neurology Resident Genna Waldman joins TWiN to explains how her department prepared for COVID-19, and the neurological symptoms associated with the disease.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus Expert 71 mins – “Coronavirus expert Ralph Baric joins TWiV to explain the virology and epidemiology of the recent zoonotic outbreak spreading across China and overseas.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus Immunotyping 56 mins – “Immune explains a study of 125 COVID-19 patients by deep immune profiling, which revealed three immunotypes associated with poor clinical prognosis or recovery.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus P1 58 mins – “Brianne Barker joins Immune to discuss the immune response to infection with SARS-CoV-2, including immune respones, pathogenesis, immunopathology and more.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus P2 56 mins – “Brianne Barker returns to continue a discussion of the immune response to infection with SARS-CoV-2, including use of steroid, coagulation in some patients, cytokine storm, and vaccines.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus P3 60 mins – “Immune continues a discussion of the immune response to infection with SARS-CoV-2, including vaccines and immunity, effects of BCG and OPV, immunity passports, and answers to listener questions.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus P4 60 mins – “Immune continues a discussion of the immune response to infection with SARS-CoV-2, including inflammatory responses and disease, antibody and T-cell responses, and vaccines, and answers to listener questions.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus T Cells 58 mins – “Immune explains a study demonstrating T cells that react with SARS-CoV-2 epitopes in individuals who have never been infected with the virus, implying cross-reactivity with common cold coronaviruses.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Corona Virus Update 56 mins – “Vincent and Rich update the current situation with COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2, including fatality ratios, virus spreading outside of China, immunity to infection, vaccines, antivirals and much more.” At the right-click “Download TWiV 589,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corona Virus versus SARS 79 mins – “TWiV provides updates on the new coronavirus causing respiratory disease in China, the current influenza season, and the epidemic of African swine fever, including determination of the three-dimensional structure of the virus particle.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Digital Currencies 21 mins – “Digital currencies from central banks could change money as you know it -Technology has no borders and to understand how it is transforming business, the global economy and peoples’ lives you have to look beyond Silicon Valley. “Beyond the Valley” tells the stories of how technology is shaping the world – no matter where they happen on the globe. Increasingly, some of the biggest technological developments and trends are finding their start outside the traditional tech power centers. “Beyond the Valley” brings the world of tech – and tech around the world – to you.” At the link right click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop up menu.

Dumb Mistakes 27 mins – “We talk to science journalist David Robson about his new book The Intelligence Trap: Why Smart People Make Dumb Mistakes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Enterovirus 81 mins – [Enteroviruses are a group of viruses that cause a number of infectious illnesses which are usually mild. However if they infect the central nervous system, they can cause serious illness. The two most common ones are echovirus and coxsackievirus, but there are several others.] “Amy joins the TWiV team to review evidence that enterovirus D68 is an etiologic agent of childhood paralysis, and her finding that the ability of the virus to infect cells of the nervous system is not a recently acquired property.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 572,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 41 mins – “There is no fact/fiction lobe, no area in the cerebral cortex that holds true facts. We’re not wired for truth—but we are deeply wired for stories. In fact, compelling stories trump true facts as often as not, and our world view is defined by the fake world of 24 or suitcase nukes than they are by cold reality. We’re been looking for this program for a decade, someone who can talk clearly about the nuance of narrative, the power of stories and the resilience of myth. Tried twice before, and didn’t get it. But tonight America’s leading investigative journalist draws on her academic training and over a decade deep in the weeds of natiional security, intelligence and politic to talk about truth. The discussion draws heavily from Marcy’s post On “Fake News”” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

FDA Intrigue 16 mins – “…Eric Topol of Scripps Research calls in to discuss his fiery criticism of FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn and the future of the agency’s reputation. Then, we talk to STAT’s Matthew Herper about how vaccines for Covid-19 might prove their worth before the end of the year. Finally, STAT’s op-ed page, First Opinion, hit a milestone this week, publishing its 2,000th piece, and First Opinion editor Patrick Skerrett joins us for a look behind the scenes and a glimpse at the future.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Gerrymandering 34 mins – “Moon Duchin, a professor of mathematics at Tufts University, uses metric geometry to help defend democracy against the threat posed by gerrymandering. But as she discusses with host Steven Strogatz, the problem of fair voting in a representative democracy can’t simply be reduced to an objective function. This episode was produced by Dana Bialek. Read more at Quantamagazine.org. Production and original music by Story Mechanics.“ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gerrymandering Hazard 3 mins – “It has been happening for more than 200 years. Electoral boundaries are redrawn to favour one party over another. In the United States, a party may receive most votes in a state. But district boundaries mean the less popular party receives more congressional seats. Jared Diamond says it is a perversion of the electoral process and is undermining American democracy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Giant Virus 80 mins – “From the Fourth Symposium on Giant Virus Biology in Germany, Vincent, Rich, and Nels speak with Assaf, Stephen, and Alexandra about their careers and their work on giant viruses that infect ocean hosts: Emiliana huxleyi, Aureococcus anophagefferans, and a choanoflagellate.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 575,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate P1 27 mins – “Getting Out begins with the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August 2017. But this isn’t about that white supremacist rally — it’s about a woman named Samantha, who worked behind the scenes to support this violent alt-right march. This chapter leads us through the story of how Samantha became the women’s coordinator of Identity Evropa, a white nationalist group, and why she decided she had to get out.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Hate P2 27 mins – “Part two takes Samantha’s story from the privacy of chatrooms to the corridors of power. What was the cost of her neo-Nazi separatist views? How did she contribute to the spread of deadly lies? And why did she decide to get out?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Hepatitis CStory 64 mins – “Coronavirus expert Ralph Baric joins TWiV to explain the virology and epidemiology of the recent zoonotic outbreak spreading across China and overseas.” At the link right-click “TWIV 580” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hepatitis C Story 64 mins – “From the University of Texas at Austin, Vincent and Rich speak with Chris Sullivan about his work on miRNAs encoded in the genomes of polyomaviruses and papillomaviruses, and how an RNA triphosphatase restricts hepatitis C virus replication.” At the link right-click “TWIV 580” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

High Containment Labs 56 mins – “Vincent and Rich travel to Galveston National Laboratory to speak with Jim LeDuc, Tom Ksiazek, and Bob Tesch about their long careers as virus hunters.” At the link right-click “TWIV 583” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Health Collaborations 45 mins – “From ASM Microbe 2019 in San Francisco, Vincent speaks with Victoria McGovern, Carl Nathan, and Dan Portnoy about advancing human health through innovative collaborations.” At the linkrRight click to download “TWiM#207” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immunology Basics 48 mins – “The Immune trifecta explores systems immunology, and its use in a study of immune system development in newborn children.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Impeachment P1 109 mins – “It was an impeachment double-header today in the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. In the morning, the committee heard testimony from Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, U.S. Army officer and the top Ukraine expert on the National Security Council, and Jennifer Williams, a foreign service officer detailed to the Vice President’s staff. In the afternoon, the committee heard from Tim Morrison, the former senior director for Europe and Russia at the National Security Council, and Kurt Volker, the former U.S. special envoy to Ukraine. That was a lot to pack into one day, but we here at Lawfare have taken out all the unnecessary speeches, partisan bickering, and repetition to bring you just the portions of the testimony you need to hear. Audio from both hearings can be found below.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment P2 115 mins – “It was an impeachment double-header today… “ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lymphocyte Tracking 58 mins – “Cindy, Steph, and Vincent reveal that lymphocyte trafficking through lymph nodes and lymph is circadian – it is dependent on the time of day.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Neutrophil Discussion 58 mins – “Stephanie takes the Immune team on a tour of neutrophils, the most abundant leukocytes in mammals, including tethers and slings, neutrophil rolling, and neutrophil nets.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Prometheus Project 61 mins – “Vincent speaks with members of Prometheus, a team of academic and industrial scientists assembled to develop antibody-based therapeutics against infections caused by tick-borne Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus and rodent-borne hantaviruses, for which no approved vaccines or specific drugs are available.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 578,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Funding 48 mins – “From Georgia State, Vincent speaks with economics professor Paula Stephan about the ways science is supported in the US, how universities offload risks, the absence of risk-taking, and much more.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 574,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soleimani Killing 42 mins – “The American drone strike last night that killed Qassem Soleimani, the commander of the Iranian Quds Force, is a seismic event in U.S.-Iranian relations—and for the broader Middle East. We put together an emergency podcast, drawing on the resources of both Lawfare and the Brookings Institution and reflecting the depth of the remarkable collaboration between the two. Iran scholar Suzanne Maloney, terrorism and Middle East scholar Daniel Byman, Middle East scholar and former State Department official Tamara Cofman Wittes and former State Department lawyer and Baghdad embassy official Scott Anderson—who is also a Lawfare senior editor—came together the morning after the strike for a diverse discussion of the reasons for the operation, the vast repercussions of it, the legality of the strike and the role Soleimani played in the Iranian regime.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Telemedicine Dos and Don’ts 19 mins – “In this Hippo Education bonus, Dr. Mizuho Morrison from the Urgent Care RAP team sits down with Dr. Ajsa Nikolic, family medicine physician and medical director for Ochsner Health’s Virtual Care Provider Network. They discuss practical do’s and don’ts for those starting out in telemedicine, as an introduction to Hippo Education’s newest video course, Telemedicine: Common Conditions. Check out the course at hippoed.com/telemed!” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Vaccine Alternative 52 mins – “Immune reveals an alternative to a protective vaccine, engineered B cells that produce antiviral antibodies.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Virology Diagnostics 36 mins – “From the 22nd meeting of the European Society for Clinical Virology in Copenhagen, Vincent speaks with Thea, Heli, Kim, Caroline and Irma about big data and its increasing use in virology diagnostics, epidemiology, and public health.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 576,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virology Research 50 mins – “Vincent speaks with Félix Rey about his career and his work on solving structures of a variety of viruses and the insights learned about viral membrane fusion and antibody-mediated neutralization.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 577,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virology Researchers 67 mins – “Vincent speaks with virologists at the University of Nevada at Reno about their careers and their work on herpesviruses, arboviruses, and the development of diagnostics for infectious diseases.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 579,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virus History 76 mins – “William Summers joins the TWiV team to discuss some virology history, including the ever-changing concept of ‘virus’ and the contribution of phage research to the study of animal viruses.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 573,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wild Salmon Virus 74 mins – “The TWiV pro-vaxxers reveal viruses that infect endangered wild salmon, and how iron in host serum modulates dengue virus acquisition by mosquitoes.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 569,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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MMD447 Media Mining Digest: Agriculture’s Father, Amazon Forest Fires, ASARCO Copper Smelter, Book History, C-Diff Diagnosis, Chicago Storm Water Control, Chimeras for Organ Transplants, Clearview AI, Climate Warming in Britain, Creativity and Space, Crisis in Racial Justice, Dept of Energy on AI, Drug Patent Revision, Eddie Glaude Jr on Democracy, Elitism vs Populism Politicians, Farm Hacking Software, Farming in Canada, Farming in New York, Farmland Investing, Farmland Investment, Farmland Irrigation, Future of Agriculture, Greenhouse Technology, Guest Worker Visas, Gun Rally in Virginia, House Prices in Canada, Hydroponics in Space, Iron Curtain Turns Green, Leadership Traits, Malware Analyst, Menstruation, Most Fun We Ever Had, Plant Based Meat, Plastic Gardens, Powering Britain, Product Sources, Registry Recon Tool, Soil Genetic Testing, SRUM Tool, Synthetic Biology, Threat Analysis Training, Vegan Diet, Winery Open Source, Winners Take All, Woman President, WWI Pacific Theater

Exercise your ears: the 50 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 662 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Agriculture Future 31 mins – “Happy New Year, and welcome to everyone listening to the very first episode of the year for the Future of Agriculture podcast. 2019 was such a good year for the show and was rife with amazing guests bearing their trade secrets and intelligent insights into the world of agriculture. To commemorate the year we had, I decided to categorize the overarching themes that summarize what 2019 was like for the Future of Agriculture podcast. In today’s episode, I discuss the five trends that governed much of the events in 2019. I share a few clips of the most well-received episodes that relate to the trends we had. I discuss some of the trends that we’ll be doing a deeper dive this year and some of the changes that will happen. I also share some of your wonderful ideas and suggestions.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture’s Father 31 mins – “Dr. Ray Goldberg holds the title of George M. Moffett Professor of Agriculture and Business, Emeritus at Harvard Business School. He’s among the pioneers of modern agribusiness, coining the term himself. He is the author of Food Citizenship, a book that talks about the global food system and the many faces that are leading the charge in changing the way we look at food and agriculture forever. Ray has decades of experience in the industry, from authoring journal articles and teaching materials to holding seminars about climate and its effect on food systems. Ray joins me today to share the progress the ag industry has made over the many years he has watched over it. He describes the need to form a group of individuals that represent different parts of the industry, the reason why he authored his latest book, and what readers can expect. He explains the relationship between capitalism and agriculture, and why the government needs to help small farmers more. Ray also shares his thoughts on millennials and why he looks forward to what they can bring for the next generation.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon Forest Fires 19 mins – “How can we prevent a repeat of the devastating fires in the Amazon? Tom Heap and Lucy Siegle search for solutions.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

ASARCO Copper Smelter 18 mins – “Dr. Pannell sits down with Daniel Carey-Whalen Director of the Centenniel Museums and Gardens to discuss the new exhibit, “The Town and the Smelter”. ASARCO and the community of Smeltertown.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in this blog archive.

Book History 13 mins – “What is a book? For centuries, books have existed in a form that has come to be universally recognized. Few of us ever bothered to give the book, either as object or idea, very much thought, any more than we might ask, ‘what is a chair? ‘ What is a book? The answer just seems so obvious. Yet poet, scholar, and book artist Amaranth Borsuk has taken up the challenge to offer much more than a simple definition. Her latest book, The Book from MIT Press, is a thoughtful interrogation of the book as object and idea. An Assistant Professor in the School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington Bothell, Amaranth Borsuk concentrates her focus on what she calls ‘textual materiality,’ the surface of the printed page as well as the surface of language.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

C-Diff Diagnosis 8 mins – “Why is C. diff such a serious disease and what are clinical microbiologists doing to improve patient outcomes with better diagnostic tools?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chicago Storm Water Control 13 mins – “Managing stormwater in cities is important to reduce flooding and secure people and property. Stormwater needs some kind of treatment before it flows to surface waters, and that treatment can be essential in older areas where stormwater and sanitary waste are collected in combined sewers. The Chicago area has built a network of underground tunnels to store that stormwater for later treatment before it goes to the river. To understand this extraordinary project we’re talking with Kevin Fitzpatrick, Managing Civil Engineer for the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago, who works on what is called the Tunnel and Reservoir Plan.” At the link find the title, “Storing Stormwater Underground – Chicago’s Deep tunnel System,” right-click “Listen to this episode now,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chimeras for Organ Transplants 21 mins – “Researchers have been making animal embryos from two different species, so-called “chimeras,” for years, by introducing stem cells from one species into a very early embryo of another species. The ultimate goal is to coax the foreign cells into forming an organ for transplantation. But questions abound: Can evolutionarily distant animals, like pigs and humans, be mixed together to produce such organs? Or could species closely related to us, like chimps and macaques, stand in for tests with human cells? Staff Writer Kelly Servick joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the research, the regulations, and the growing ethical debate. Also this week, Sarah talks with Yossi Yovel of the School of Zoology and the Sagol School of Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University in Israel about his work on sensory integration in bats. Writing in Science Advances, he and his colleagues show through several clever experiments when bats switch between echolocation and vision. Yossi and Sarah discuss how these trade-offs in bats can inform larger questions about our own perception.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clearview AI 16 mins – “A secretive facial recognition software used by hundreds of police forces is raising concerns after a New York Times investigation said it could “end privacy as we know it.” Clearview AI has extracted more than three billion photos from public web sites like Facebook, Instagram, employment sites and others, and used them to create a database used by more than 600 law enforcement agencies in the U.S., Canada and elsewhere, according to Times reporter Kashmir Hill. “It is being used to solve many murder cases, identity fraud cases, child exploitation cases,” Hill told The Current’s host Matt Galloway. Police officers who spoke to Hill said the app was a far more powerful tool for cracking cases than any government database they had used before. The company claims their software finds a match in three out of four cases. The software is so effective, Hill said, that even when she covered her face and mouth for a photo, it still pulled up seven images of her. “I was just shocked at how well this face recognition algorithm works,” she said. ” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Climate Warming in England 19 mins – “Whilst this Autumn’s heavy rainfall has caused some rivers in the north of England to burst their banks and flood neighbourhoods there are rivers in the south-east with barely a drop of water in them. Tom Heap asks what impact this is this having on aquatic ecosystems. He talks to water companies and environmental campaigner Feargal Sharkey to find out how flora and fauna are changing as a result of the shortage of water. It’s a particular concern for chalk streams, which provide a unique wildlife habitat found in very few places in the world. Tom asks who’s the blame – the water companies for taking water out of the rivers, the Environment Agency for giving them permission to do it, or us consumers for using more water per person than we ever have before?” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity and Space 26 mins – “What is the role of nature in regard to creativity?  The human body craves to be near nature; unfortunately, we spend ninety percent of our time indoors.  Rattner says to you do not have to do a lot to bring nature to your workplace.  One study showed that simply placing a plant on your work desk can boost your creative output from fifteen to twenty percent.  Fortunately, you do not need hours of exposure; you need a certain amount of inputs to achieve the necessary restorative affect nature has on the human body and mind.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Crisis of Racial Justice 24 mins – “I paid a visit to New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture recently to help a large gathering of the Schomburg’s devoted friends and visitors say goodbye — very reluctantly — to Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad. He’s been the beloved director of the Schomburg for the past five years and has done much to expand the reach and the influence of the Harlem institution that devotes itself to researching and disseminating the history of African Americans. But Muhammad is also a scholar and he is now eager to evaluate everything he has gleaned about the contemporary concerns of black America from a new vantage point. He’s on his way to join Harvard University’s faculty as a professor of history, race and public policy at the Kennedy School of Government.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Eddie Glaude Jr on Democracy p1 26 mins – “I’m holding in my hand what has been called “one of the most daring books of the 21st century,” a “book for the ages,” “bracing,” “unrelenting.” The title is Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul, and it breathes with prophetic fire. Its power comes because the author does not begin with “pristine principles or with assumptions about our inherent goodness.” Rather, its view of democracy, as he writes, “emerges out of an unflinching encounter with lynching trees, prison cells, foreclosed homes, young men and women gunned down by police and places where ‘hope, unborn, had died.’” Democracy in Black is rich in history and bold in opinion, and inconvenient truths leap from every page. For example, and I’m quoting the book again, “black people must lose their blackness if America is to be transformed. But of course, white people get to stay white.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “Download File” and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Eddie Glaude Jr on Democracyp2 17 mins – “My guest is Eddie Glaude Jr., author of Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul. In the first part of our conversation, Professor Glaude and I discussed the crisis that continues to engulf black America. Eddie Glaude Jr.: We talk about the achievement gap, we talk about the empathy gap, we talk about the wealth gap, and the value gap is this: the belief that white people matter more than others. And to the extent to which that belief animates our social arrangements, our political practices, our economic realities, under different material conditions, as long as that belief obtains, democracy will always be in abeyance in this country. We continue with Professor Glaude’s proposal to upend our politics and launch a revolution of values.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Saves File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Dept of Energy on AI 26 mins – “Typically, people don’t notice much of the DOE’s activity in their everyday lives. In reality, the Department of Energy continuously operates from the shadows fixing our nation’s toughest problems. It works in areas that range from the health industry to electrical grids. At its core, the Dept of Energy exists to fix a wide variety of issues by leveraging its innovative capabilities. Dimitri Kusnezov, says that the DOE is the biggest funder of physical sciences in the U.S. They focus on public-private partnerships to accomplish their many goals. The DOE uses connections, as well as advanced innovative technologies, to keep our nation running efficiently.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Drug Patent Revision 9 mins – “Between 2006 and 2016, the number of drug patents granted in the United States doubled — but not because there was an explosion in invention or innovation. Drug companies have learned how to game the system, accumulating patents not for new medicines but for small changes to existing ones, which allows them to build monopolies, block competition and drive prices up. Health justice lawyer Priti Krishtel sheds light on how we’ve lost sight of the patent system’s original intent — and offers five reforms for a redesign that would serve the public and save lives.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in this blog archive.

Elitism vs Populism Politicians 17 mins – “The old idea of the two parties in America and many countries just doesn’t matter anymore. It’s now elitist versus populist. It’s the cities versus the rural areas and everything’s being realigned that way.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Farm Hacking Software 26 mins – “Michael Stenta is the software developer and owner of farmOS, a web-based app used for planning, record keeping, and general farm management. What sets farmOS apart from other apps is its open-source nature. This means the app can be tweaked or fixed by virtually any contributor. To take advantage of its open-source nature, Michael also created Farmier, a platform that makes it easy for farmers to update or host their farmOS systems. Michael joins me today to discuss what farmOS is, its purpose, and why he decided to develop it. He shares where his passion for programming came from and what inspired him to apply his skills to the ag industry. He explains the unique aspects of creating an app that is open-source by nature and some of the benefits and risks involved with open-source platforms. Michael also describes what the farmOS community is like and the onboarding process involved with using the app.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in Canada 50 mins – “Jean-Martin Fortier is most famous for his book, “The Market Gardener,” based on the high-output systems he developed at Quebec’s Les Jardens de la Grelinette, where his wife, Maude Helen, currently produces over $150,000 of produce on an acre and a half of production ground. He currently farms at La Ferme de Quatre Temps, an enlarged version of the same model on six acres of production ground. We dig into the foundations of JM’s production model, from high fertility to an emphasis on weed prevention, and how that model has translated to more acres on his new project. JM reflects on the changed constraints with his new farm, and we discuss the lessons that JM has learned about personnel with a much larger crew and a different role for himself.” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in Iowa 47 mins – “Jan Libbey raises three acres of vegetables with her husband, Tim Landgraf, at One Step at a Time Gardens in North Central Iowa. With sales through their CSA and the North Iowa Fresh Food Hub, the market farm makes up one of multiple streams of income that include cash rent and CRP income on their 132 acre farm. We dig into how Jan and Tim have made One Step at a Time Gardens work in rural Iowa, with an emphasis on their marketing efforts. Jan shares the story of growing the market farm operation, and then choosing to shrink it again as the business matured. We discuss how they’ve chosen their investments on the farm so that they are mechanizing where it counts. We take a deep dive into their carrot production and the crop rotation they follow on their hilly farm, as well as the landscape and habitat restoration efforts…” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in New York 50 mins – “Jack Algiere is the farm director for Stone Barns Center in the New York’s lower Hudson Valley. Actively farming since the early 1990s, Jack has been the director at Stone Barns since its inception fifteen years ago. Jack oversees the extensive and diversified farm operations, including indoor and outdoor vegetable production, small grains, and a diverse array of livestock. Most of the farm’s produce and meat is sold to the partner restaurant Blue Hill, and we dig into how this relationship has benefitted both the farm and the restaurant. We also take a look at how the vegetables are integrated into the livestock and pasture operation, the half-acre gutter connect greenhouse and how that differs from high tunnel production, and the compost heating system for the propagation operation.” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in Tennessee 38 mins – “Lauren Palmer raised 15 acres of vegetables in Smyrna, Tennessee, just south of Nashville. With year-round production, a sprouts operation, a 300-member CSA, wholesale accounts, farmers markets, and on-farm events, Bloomsbury Farm is a thriving hot spot in the local food scene in Nashville. We dig into how Lauren has built the farm from the ground up since its start in 2009, taking a deep dive into Bloomsbury’s sprout production, employment structures, and CSA setup. We discuss how she deals with extreme deer pressure and regulations, and how she navigated a farm divorce. And Lauren reflects on the value of four-season production and building relationships with her customers and community” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farmland Investing 22 mins – “Carter Malloy is the Founder and CEO of AcreTrader, an online platform that seeks to provide a bridge that connects investors and farm sellers. Before starting his company, Carter was a successful Managing Director at Stephens Inc., a large private investment bank. His passion for conservation and agriculture was drawn from his experience growing up in an Arkansas farming family. This passion eventually led to founding AcreTrader. Carter joins me to share what AcreTrader can do for farm owners and people seeking a long-term investment. He explains how the platform works, what a typical transaction would look like, and some of the fees involved. Carter discusses the total amount of investments in farmland and why it’s still insignificant from the perspective of the entire ag industry. He also describes some of the reasons why farm sellers should use their platform over traditional methods.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Farmland Investment 23 mins – “David Chan is the COO and Founding Team Member at Farm Together, a company that offers a simplified approach to US farmland investment. The company not only serves Americans, but also welcomes foreign investors who are interested in growing their assets or simply having a continuous source of income in their retirement. David has over five years of Fin-Tech experience in the ag industry. He describes himself as a meteorologist by background, but a financier and technologist by training. David earned his MBA at Harvard Business School and is also part of the Board of Directors at the Harvard Alumni for Agriculture. David joins me today to share how their company, Farm Together, will make it easier for local and foreign investors to invest in US farmlands. He explains how their platform works, when their investors get paid, and the due diligence they conduct prior to putting a property for sale. He discusses several risks involved in investing in different states. David also describes how they plan to put regenerative agriculture in the limelight.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Farmland Irrigation 23 mins – “Leif Chastaine is the Co-founder and COO of WaterBit. WaterBit is a precision ag irrigation company that wants to solve farming problems through its Automated Irrigation Solution technology. Before Leif cofounded WaterBit, he founded and helped grow other companies in the IoT and photography industry. He obtained his BBA in Production and Operations Management from Boise State University. Leif joins me today to explain how WaterBit can help farmers gather water data through their sensor technology. He shares the humble beginnings of WaterBit and the difficulty in raising funds for this kind of startup. He discusses the pain points farmers have and how they built a solution around those issues. Leif also describes how WaterBit is unique in a type of market that is always full of standout startups.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Future of Agriculture 26 mins – “We are going back to the farm today. Zach Johnson, the YouTuber Minnesota Millennial Farmer and Mitchell Hora, farmer and founder of Continuum Ag, join us today. These two co-host the Fieldwork Podcast, “a podcast for farmers, from farmers.” Fieldwork Podcast focuses on sustainable farming practices, their environmental impact and how to make them profitable. For Mitchell, Continuum Ag specifically supplies health data analytics and does consulting for farmers. Mitchell and Zach farm 500 miles apart but find common ground in adopting soil health principles and are enjoying the opportunity to share that with other farmers.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Greenhouse Technology 23 mins – “Joe Swartz is the Vice President and Lead Horticulturist at AmHydro, a company recognized as a top innovator in the ag industry and focused on developing products that promote efficient hydroponic growing systems. Joe is also widely recognized as one of the leading consultants when it comes to Controlled Environment Agricultural industries that include commercial greenhouse farms. He specializes in crop production improvements, pesticide-free insect and disease control, and professional grower training, among other skills. Joe joins me today to discuss the economic implications of fusing traditional farming with greenhouse technology. He shares why he is interested in greenhouse farming and how he initially tried it himself. He explains how controlled ag works and the factors required to make it work. He describes the benefits traditional farmers can reap from adapting greenhouse operations. Joe also shares some of the limitations of controlled environment agriculture.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Guest Worker Visas 7 mins – “By October 2018, Juan Carlos Rivera could no longer afford to live in his home in Copan, Honduras. As the “Dallas Morning News” reported, a gang was taking 10 percent of his earnings from his barber shop. His wife was assaulted going to her pre-K teaching job. And they were concerned about the safety of their young daughter. What could they do? Run away? Seek asylum in another country? They didn’t want to do that. They just wanted to live in their country safely. But their options were limited. So that month, Juan Carlos moved his family to a safer location while he joined a group of migrants on the long and perilous journey from Central America to a job a family member said was open for him in the United States.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in this blog archive.

Gun Rally in Virginia 7 mins – “Fears of violence at upcoming pro-gun group rally in Virginia. Former Manitoba reservist Patrik Mathews’ alleged involvement in a U.S. neo-Nazi group is “not entirely shocking,” according to an investigative reporter who tracks far-right movements. “White supremacist groups often target the military and active service members to try to build out their ranks with people like Mathews, who is reported to have had experience with explosives and combat engineering,” Jared Holt, an investigative reporter for the non-profit publication Right Wing Watch, told The Current’s host Matt Galloway. The FBI arrested Mathews and two other alleged members of the neo-Nazi group The Base in Delaware on Thursday on firearm-related charges. According to experts who track far-right movements, The Base is an extremist group that hopes to start a race war, and believes in a philosophy called accelerationism. “This is the idea that in order to evoke their agenda of a white ethno-state in the United States, or Canada — or whatever country they belong to — that the fastest path to that is to destabilize society through acts of mass chaos, including terrorism,” said Holt….According to the New York Times, the three men had also talked online about attending a pro-gun rally in Richmond, Va., on Monday. The arrests came a day after Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam declared a state of emergency in Richmond ahead of the rally, saying that law enforcement believed there was a “credible” threat of violence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

House Prices in Canada 16 mins – “What’s the secret to real estate? Location, location, location. In Canada though, you’ll also need money, money, money. As the housing market continues to boom and communities across this country face an affordability crisis, the federal government is easing the so-called mortgage stress test. Is allowing people to take on more debt such a smart idea? We’ll discuss in 30 minutes. And after that.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Hydropondics in Space 28 mins – “Dr. Ray Wheeler is NASA’s Plant Physiologist and the lead for Advanced Life Support Research activities in the Exploration Research and Technology Program at Kennedy Space Center. He began his career at NASA in 1988 and the bulk of his research revolved around the use of hydroponic techniques for space farming experiments. One of Ray’s goals is to allow humanity to grow safe and nutritious crops off the Earth. Ray joins me today to discuss some of NASA’s recent developments regarding planting crops in space. He shares some of the systems and tech that have been made commercial in the ag industry and explains why it’s difficult to experiment with plants in space. Ray also describes some of the benefits of being able to grow plants on other planets.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Iron Curtain Turns Green 19 mins – “The Iron Curtain was an accidental wildlife haven. 30 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall, Tom Heap walks the borderlands to see how nature has continued to thrive. Before the fall of the wall naturalists in West Germany had noticed that some bird and mammal species favoured life in the deathzone with its lack of human disturbance. When the Soviet bloc crumbled they joined friends and colleagues in the East to declare a Greenbelt through Europe, from Trieste on the Adriatic to Lubeck on the Baltic. Against the odds their campaign has met with great success, creating new migration routes for some of Europe’s biggest mammals whilst keeping developers away from most of the old border between East and West.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Leadership Traits 51 mins – “Can a great leader or manager be humble in public? Or is exuding confidence, even when it may not be merited, a key part of leadership? In this episode of EconTalk, host Russ Roberts talks with David Deppner, CEO of Psyberware, about an email David sent Russ wondering how Russ might reconcile his passion for humility and honesty with the demands put upon leaders to inspire followers with confidence in their vision.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malware Analyst 24 mins – “HackerNinjaScissors — With Bret Padres. www.crypsisgroup.com Today we talk with Lauren Pearce – a member of the IR team and a malware analyst for Los Alamos National Labs. Lauren shares with us her journey to become a malware analyst and talks about the importance of flailing and mentorship.” At the link right-click “HNS Podcast 2 Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Menstruation 8 mins – “’It shouldn’t be an act of feminism to know how your body works,’ says gynecologist and author Jen Gunter. In this revelatory talk, she explains how menstrual shame silences and represses — and leads to the spread of harmful misinformation and the mismanagement of pain. Declaring the era of the menstrual taboos over, she delivers a clear, much-needed lesson on the once-mysterious mechanics of the uterus.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in this blog archive.

Most Fun We Ever Had 10 mins – “There’s a new book out called The Most Fun We Ever Had. It’s about a suburban Chicago couple and their four grown daughters, who each seem to be messed up in their own special way. The oldest daughter is an erratic alcoholic racked with grief; the second is a control freak who doesn’t want to meet the son she put up for adoption 15 years ago; the next is pregnant and falling out of love with her partner; and the youngest is a thousand miles away, caught up in a massive lie. In this bonus interview of Nerdette, WBEZ’s Greta Johnsen talks with author Claire Lombardo about her debut novel, which tells the story of the Sorenson family through seven points of view, across two timelines, over the course of 40 years.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Plant Based Meat 25 mins – “Bruce Friedrich is Co-Founder and Executive Director at The Good Food Institute (GFI), a company that promotes plant-based and cultivated meat food products by making them just as good, just as convenient, and just as affordable as real meat. Their company has several branches in over six countries, all working towards the goal of making the alternative meat industry more attractive to consumers. Bruce oversees the business’ global strategy and programs. He also works with its directors, staff, and international representatives to guarantee the effectiveness of their programs. Bruce joins me today to discuss how GFI is making plant-based and cultivated meat products more consumer-friendly and just as competitive as traditional meat. He shares where he drew inspiration to innovate food, how the idea of starting GFI began and the company’s current progress. Bruce also explains why they’re not here to disrupt the meat industry and shares his thoughts on animal agriculture.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Plastic Gardens 18 mins – “The last decade has seen a huge rise in the number of people opting for artificial turf in their gardens. Meanwhile businesses and corporations are making more use of plastic plants in both indoor and outdoor spaces. What effect does choosing fake over real plants have on the environment? Peter Gibbs investigates.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Powering Britain 18 mins – “Britain urgently needs a zero carbon source of reliable energy for our homes, industry and the new generation of electric vehicles. This summer’s electricity blackouts suggest that we’re a long way from achieving the goal. Tom Heap and a panel of power experts offer their solutions. Tom is joined by Jillian Ambrose, Energy Correspondent of The Guardian, the Chief Executive of the Committee on Climate Change, Chris Stark and CEO of power company Good Energy, Juliet Davenport.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Product Sources 9 mins – “Given the option, few would choose to buy products that harm the earth — yet it’s nearly impossible to know how most consumer goods are made or where they’re sourced from. That’s about to change, says supply chain innovator Markus Mutz. He shares how he used blockchain technology to track Patagonian toothfish on their journey from ocean to dinner plate — and proved it’s possible to offer consumers a product they can trust.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in this blog archive.

Registry Recon Tool 26 mins – “This episode of CyberSpeak we conduct recon on Mark Spencer and his new Windows registry analysis tool Registry Recon. Mark is the President of Arsenal Consulting. This new registry tool could change the way we analyze the Windows registry. No longer will you be satisfied just looking at the current/active registry. [Registry Recon, developed by Arsenal Recon, is a powerful computer forensics tool used to extract, recover, and parse registry data from Windows systems. The process of manually scouring Windows Registry files proves to be extremely time consuming and leaves gaping holes in the ability to recover critical information. What makes this tool superior to others is its capability to examine registry files not only from the current installation of a Windows operating system, but former installations as well. In addition, this application can be used to quickly and efficiently determine external devices that have been connected to the computer. The company’s slogan is, “Computer forensics tools by computer forensics experts.” This tool certainly affirms the slogan!]” At the link right-click “Download: Cyberspeak Show 145 2013-02-16.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soil Genetic Testing 27 mins – “Dr. Poornima Parameswaran is the President and Co-Founder of Trace Genomics. Trace Genomics is a company that based its business around mapping living soil, analyzing its microbial content, and helping growers maximize yield potential without sacrificing sustainability. Poornima’s goal is to build the world’s most massive actionable body of soil intelligence, allowing even ordinary farmers to have access to expert information on what’s underground. Poornima earned her Ph.D. in Microbiology and Immunology at Stanford University School of Medicine, her entrepreneurial skills at Stanford University Graduate School of Business, and her Bachelor’s degree in Cellular and Molecular Biology at The University of Texas at Austin. Poornima joins me today to discuss how Trace Genomics seeks to improve farm yield and sustainability through genetic testing for soil. She shares the benefits of knowing which microbes are dominant in a particular farmland. She also explains how their analytics engine works, their process, and what a typical scenario using their technology would be like.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

SRUM Artifact 37 mins – “CyberSpeak is BACK and we hope to publish a monthly podcast (more if I’m lucky). This episode on CyberSpeak we briefly discuss possible implications to U.S. forensicators with the release of the Ashley Madison database (hopefully not). We also have a great interview with Yogesh Khatri, an assistant professor at Champlain College and a security researcher about the SRUM or System Resourse Usage Monitor forensic artifact. Website of the week: Has your email been Pwned? Check it out here -> Have I Been Pwned” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcasts is included in this blog.

Synthetic Biology 22 mins – “Dr. John Cumbers is the founder of SynBioBeta. SynBioBeta prides itself as the premier innovation network for innovators, investors, entrepreneurs, and biological engineers. Their focus is introducing synthetic biology innovations to improve the human condition and make life more sustainable. John is a recipient of multiple grants and awards from NASA and the National Academy of Sciences for his work in the industry. He received his Ph.D. in Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry from Brown University, his MSc in Bioinformatics from Edinburgh University, and a degree in Computer Science with Information Engineering from the University of Hull. John joins me today to discuss the potential of synthetic biology if applied to today’s agriculture sector. He explains what SynBioBeta stands for, what they want to accomplish, and the innovations we can look forward to as consumers. He shares his thoughts on lab-grown meat, the Anti-GMO crowds, and the future of Mars exploration. John also discusses what we can look forward to from their Beta Space Event.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Threat Analysis Training 33 mins – “In the inaugural show of HackerNinjaScissors, Bret Padres interviews Robert M Lee. Robert M. Lee is the CEO and Founder of the critical infrastructure cyber security company Dragos where he has a passion for control system traffic analysis, digital forensics, and threat intelligence research. He is also a non-resident National Cybersecurity Fellow at New America focusing on policy issues relating to the cyber security of critical infrastructure. For his research and focus areas, Robert was named one of Passcode’s Influencers, awarded EnergySec’s Cyber Security Professional of the Year (2015), and inducted into Forbes’ 30 under 30 for Enterprise Technology (2016).” At the link right-click “HNS Podacast 1 Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vegan Diet 19 mins – “What would the British countryside look like if we all adopted the vegan diet recommended by many environmental campaigners? Tom Heap hosts a discussion with panellists from the National Farmers Union and the Vegan Society. We also hear from expert witnesses from Oxford University, Aberystwyth University, Harvard Law School and Rothamsted Research.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Winery Open Source 21 mins – “Reinier van der Lee is the CEO & Founder of Vinduino, an AgTech company that supports farmers and other producers in the ag industry with products that improve profits and fruit quality as well as increase yield. One of the company’s latest products is the Vinduino R4 Sensor station, an open-source sensor that gives farmers data on water usage and efficiency. Reinier also owns a 4-acre vineyard and credits his need for better irrigation management as the reason why he founded Vinduino. Reinier joins me today to share how Vinduino is helping farmers gather the kind of data they need and understand when it comes to water management. He explains how their products work, what separates them from other AgTech companies, and why knowing how much water you’re using is critical to your business. He also discusses why he chose to keep their products open source and shares some of the upcoming events and projects they have lined up this year.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Winery Open Source 22 mins – “Mike Barrow is the Project Lead at OpenVino, a company that aims to create the first-ever open-source, transparent winery, and wine-based cryptocurrency under the Costaflores label. Costaflores is a boutique organic winery based in Argentina. As suggested, OpenVino will rely on blockchain technology to engage in a new and innovative way of selling wine products. With over 30 years of experience in IT, data science, and cloud services, Mike aims to disrupt the wine world with a business that converts consumers into shareholders. Mike joins me today to share how OpenVino will innovate the way we consume wine through blockchain tech. He shares his passion for wine, what inspired him to start OpenVino, and why he chose to make the company open-source. He explains their data collecting strategies and how consumers can benefit from buying their cryptocurrency. Mike also describes how wine is priced and why quality is second to story.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Winners Take All Politics 24 mins – “Here’s what the 2016 election should be about: Winner-Take-All Politics — How Washington Made the Rich Richer and Turned Its Back on the Middle Class. It’s a groundbreaking account of how our political system was hijacked by the super rich and engineered to work for them at the expense of everyone else. Two of our top political scientists – Jacob Hacker and Paul Pierson – published it four years ago to wide acclaim. Robert Solow, winner of the Nobel Memorial Prize for Economics, said of it: “This book is a wake-up call. Read it and wake up.” Elizabeth Warren called it “must reading for anyone who wants to understand how Washington stopped working for the middle class.” I interviewed Hacker and Pierson at the time, and given how inequality has continued to grow and divide our country, what they wrote and said is more relevant than ever. Take a listen and let me know what you think can be done.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Saves File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Woman President 10 mins – “Can of woman beat Donald Trump. Look at the men on this stage. Collectively, they have lost 10 elections. The only people on this stage who have won every single election that they’ve been in are the women.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

WWII Pacific Theater 196 mins – “Japan’s rising sun goes supernova and engulfs a huge area of Asia and the Pacific. A war without mercy begins to develop infusing the whole conflict with a savage vibe.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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MMD454 Media Mining Digest: Africa and East Germany, Aircraft Fume Event, Ambassador Yovanovich, Apartheid Policy Opponent, Argentina Killers, Ayahuasca, Black in Italy, British Government Communications Headquarters, Buddhist versus Muslims, Cameroon’s MMA Champion, Carnegie Billionaire, Chernobyl Zone, Child Brides, Chinese Seaside City, Conspiracy Trends, Deep Fakes, Digital Politics, Disagreements, Drug Runners in UK, Finland’s Carbon Neutral, Finlands Green Trailblazer, Going Back to Sierra Leone, Greenland Music, Iceland’s Thaw, Iraq’s Secret Sex Trade, Jewish Rescues WWII, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Lebanon Electricity Shortage, LGBT Change, Lithium in Argentina, Mafia, Lalawi Tapes, sMusic Inequalities, Music Soundtracks, Music Therapy, Nazi Crime Investigators, Nigeria Sex for Grades, Qanon and On and On, Raed Fares Syrian Activist, Romanian Revolution, Russian Domestic Abuse, Solar Power, Sormeh Impact in Persia, South Korea Youth Pressures, Soviet War in Afghanistan, Space Sewing Sisters, Star Wars Production, Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg, Thai Activist Disappearance, Translating Children, Uganda War, Zogos of Liberia

Exercise your ears: the 53 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 752 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,300 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Africa and East Germany 35 mins – “How Communist East Germany tried to influence Africa via radio, during the Cold War. The West often saw the GDR as a grim and grey place, so it’s something of a surprise to find a radio station based in East Berlin playing swinging African tunes. Yet Radio Berlin International (RBI), the ‘voice of the German Democratic Republic’, made it all happen over the many years it broadcast to Africa. It built on the little known strong bonds between East Germany and several large states in Africa such as Tanzania and Angola during the 1960s, ‘70s and ‘80s. Dr Emily Oliver, a historian of postwar Germany from Warwick University, finds out why multicultural Radio Berlin International was a special place within East Germany and what happened behind the scenes. The government set tight reporting restrictions on output. Staff faced the dilemma of following the rules while competing with the likes of the BBC World Service. They were also conscious of the output of the station’s main direct rival, West Germany’s Deutsche Welle, which portrayed the world quite differently. And how did RBI employees coming from nations like Tanzania cope with working for the oppressive East German regime? Emily hears how RBI appealed to listeners in Africa, reveals how East Germans and Angolans made friends over coffee and tractors, and discovers how the Cold War played out in Africa at a time when many African states were fighting for independence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Airplane Fume Event 19 mins – “How safe is the air inside airline cabins? In January 2020, a British Airways flight from Athens to London issued a mayday emergency call when the pilot flying the plane became incapacitated during a “fume event”. The airline industry does not reveal how often fume events happen, but according to some estimates they occur every day. Pilots and cabin crew say that sudden fume events and long term low level exposure to toxic cabin air are making them seriously ill and in some cases causing premature deaths. The industry insists that serious leaks of toxic gas into cockpits and cabins are relatively very rare, given the number of flights each day. And that no causal link between toxic cabin air and health problems has yet been proven. But airlines face multiple court cases later this year. For Assignment, Mike Powell talks to a representative of the airline industry about fume events, lack of transparency and claims that the health of hundreds of pilots, cabin crew and frequent fliers is being put at risk. Presenter: Mike Powell Producer: Paul Waters” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ambassador Yovanovitch 105 mins – “Former Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch testified before the House Intelligence Committee as a part of the impeachment investigation. Yovanovitch answered questions about her career, her experience in Ukraine and her abrupt dismissal. The hearing saw some of the same grandstanding and distractions as the first public hearing, But we cut out all the unnecessary repetition and theatrics to leave you with just the questions and answers that you need to hear.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File,” and right-click “OK”.

Apartheid Policy Opponent 19 mins – “On 27 September 1969, Imam Abdullah Haron – an outspoken Muslim cleric in South Africa – died in police detention. Abdullah Haron was the only Muslim cleric in Cape Town who used his sermons to speak out against apartheid policies and laws. His family do not accept the official conclusion that he fell down the stairs. And, to mark 50 years of his death, they want the government to commission a new inquest, which they say will uncover torture and murder. At the centre of the family’s renewed push for justice will be a series of artworks by visual artist Haroon Gunn-Salie.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Argentina Killers 32 mins – “’Did you actually kill hundreds of people, Dad?’ This is certainly not a question that many people feel the need to ask their parents. But for a group of young women in Argentina, it was one they could no longer ignore. Their fathers have been accused, held under trial and in some cases sentenced for some of the worst crimes in Argentina’s history – all members of the military and police forces during the country’s last military regime, that kidnapped, tortured and killed thousands of people over a period of seven years. Forty years later, these women have come together and decided to speak up against their fathers. The BBC’s Valeria Perasso followed them on their journey to become a voice in the ongoing public conversation about human rights to help heal the country – and themselves.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ayahuasca 18 mins – “Psychedelic plants, the spiritual tourism backlash – and sexual abuse. Increasing numbers of tourists are travelling to the Peruvian Amazon to drink ayahuasca, a traditional plant medicine said to bring about a higher state of consciousness. Foreigners come looking for spiritual enlightenment or help with mental health problems like trauma, depression, and addiction. But not everyone is happy about Peru’s booming ayahuasca tourism industry. A group of indigenous healers are fighting back against what they see as the exploitation and appropriation of their cultural heritage by foreigners – who run most of the ayahuasca retreats popular with tourists. This coming together of cultures has thrown up another serious problem too: vulnerable women being sexually abused while under the influence of charismatic healers and this powerful psychedelic.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black in Italy 18 mins – “Dickens Olewe meets Italy’s first and only black senator, Tony Iwobi, and hears how a new generation of black Italians are fighting to claim their place in a society that’s still very white. Born and raised in Nigeria, Senator Iwobi moved to Italy as a young man and carved out a successful career in business. Now he’s immigration spokesperson for the right-wing Lega party and wants to stop the illegal flow of migrants coming to Italy from Africa. BBC Africa journalist Dickens Olewe follows Iwobi in the Senate in Rome and finds out what it’s like to be black in a party that’s widely perceived as racist. At a festival on the bank of the River Tiber, Dickens meets aspiring politician Paolo Diop from the Far-Right Brothers of Italy. Diop moved to Italy from Senegal as a baby and describes himself as “an Italian nationalist and an African nationalist” who wants to “make Africa great” by sending migrants home. We also meet the young black activists coming of age in the midst of the migrant crisis and the rise of the political right. Born and bred in Italy, they feel deeply Italian but are not always recognised as such – among them the rapper Tommy Kuti whose work explores his Afro-Italian identity, the founder of Milan’s Afro Fashion Week Michelle Francine Ngonmo and the writer Igiaba Scego, whose parents grew up in one of Italy’s African colonies.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Government Communications Headquarters 19 mins – “The work of GCHQ started just after the end of World War One as telegraph became a vital means of military communications. We hear from people who worked at the listening station in the Yorkshire seaside resort of Scarborough during World War Two and the Cold War. BBC security correspondent Gordon Corera reveals how Government Communications Headquarters – GCHQ – has been listening in for 100 years. And Gordon reveals the vital role played by the Scarborough station during the Cuban Missile Crisis.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Buddhist versus Muslims 18 mins – “There’s a new climate of fear in Sri Lanka. This time it’s the Muslim community who are fearful of the future. The Easter bomb attacks in Sri Lanka – targeting churches and international hotels – horrified the island. It’s suffered civil war – between the majority Sinhalese and the minority Tamils – but never known jihadi violence. But the attacks also intensified a creeping campaign by the Sinhala Buddhist majority against the Muslim community – with Muslims murdered, their businesses burned or boycotted. Jill McGivering investigates the growing climate of fear now driving many Muslims to emigrate and casting a shadow over those left behind. Caroline Finnigan producing.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cameroon’s MMA Champion 19 mins – “By the age of 10 Francis Ngannou was working in a sand quarry, where he dreamed of becoming a world class boxer. As a young man he traversed the Sahara Desert and Mediterranean Sea to find himself homeless in Paris. From there, within an extraordinarily short amount of time, he exploded through the ranks to the highest echelons of the fastest growing sport in the world, mixed martial arts. He is now a leading contender for heavyweight champion of the world and a global star. He returns to his village in western Cameroon, where he is investing in the next generation. Zak Brophy travels to Cameroon to hear the story of his incredible life, and his dreams of becoming a role model within his community.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carnegie Billionaire 19 mins – “What should billionaires do with their money? The world’s greatest philanthropist, Andrew Carnegie said they should give it all away. Andrew Carnegie was born in Scotland and moved to America where he became a steel magnate and the richest man in the world. In his guidebook to philanthropy, The Gospel of Wealth, he challenged people who acquired great wealth to give it back to the community. He also believed the most important cause to support was education. Former UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown asks why today’s billionaire philanthropists aren’t giving away more money and why education is no longer the top priority.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chernobyl Zone 18 mins – “Ninety year old Galina is one of the last witnesses to the wild natural world that preceded the Chernobyl zone in southern Belarus. ‘We lived with wolves’ she says ‘and moose, and elk and wild boars.’ Soviet development destroyed that ecosystem. Forests and marshland were tamed and laid to farmland and industrial use. But when the Chernobyl reactor exploded in 1986, the human population was evacuated; their villages were buried beneath the earth as though they had never existed. A generation on, it seems that the animals Galina knew are returning. But how are they are affected by their radioactive environment? And what can we infer about the state of the land? Monica Whitlock visits the strange new wilderness emerging in the heart of Europe.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Brides 34 mins – “A tense debate is taking place in states across America. At what age should someone be allowed to marry? Currently in 48 out of 50 states a child can marry, usually with parental consent or a judge’s discretion. In 17 states there is no minimum age, meaning in theory, a two year old could marry. But there is a campaign to change the law and raise the minimum age of marriage to 18 without exceptions across all American states.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Seaside City 19 mins – “In the span of five years, Chairman Huang turned farmland in China’s Sichuan province into Seaside City. The ocean-themed town, which Huang says was inspired by Dubai and Disneyland, is now home to more than 400,000 people. In the city centre, numerous maritime spectacles attract visitors from afar. The crown jewel is the world’s largest aquarium with several whale sharks and a community of sea turtles. But is Seaside City a forward-thinking economic experiment or the personal fiefdom of a megalomaniac? What do former peasants in the area think of the city?” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conspiracy Theory 13 mins – “We’ve all been there – that awkward situation that happens over the dinner table or at a party, when someone starts talking about conspiracy theories. With the coronavirus pandemic has come a huge wave of novel online misinformation – including some outlandish ideas and panicky people who are buying into them. So what do you do when confronted with someone who starts spouting obvious falsehoods about “evil plots” and “deadly vaccines”? Trending brings together a man who’s been drawn towards social media’s fringes and an expert who studies the psychology of people who believe in conspiracy theories. What happened when they sat down for a socially distanced chat? Plus we give some tips on how to talk to people who are edging towards the rabbit hole.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep Fakes 16 mins – “Recently an app called Zao zoomed up the charts in China. It uses artificial intelligence to allow people to upload themselves into famous movies. One viral clip showed a young Chinese man being transformed into Leonardo DiCaprio in the film Titanic. Although for most people it was harmless fun, the rise of Zao prompted more worrying headlines about “deepfake” technology. The concerns are not that it could be used to make fake movie clips, but instead to make fake news – for instance, viral videos of politicians appearing to utter things they never actually said. While the technology behind deepfakes has been in development for a while, it’s only in the last few years that it has become good enough to trick people on a wide scale, using the power of social media. Some experts say that in that in a year it may be tough to tell which videos on our timelines are real and which ones are fake. We go deep into the world of deepfakes, meet some of the people who are trying to develop methods to detect them and find out just how easy it is to make a deepfake from scratch. ” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Politics 19 mins – “In the UK’s 2019 general election, social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram are playing a more prominent role than in any previous campaign. As the election enters its final stages, political scientist Travis Ridout, co-director of the highly respected Wesleyan Media Project – travels to the UK to immerses himself in current online activity. He finds out what strategies and techniques are being used to influence – or manipulate voters – and considers what lessons from the USA could be influencing the campaign. He reports from the digital front line in a key marginal constituency to find out how digital campaigning is being used to target undecided voters.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disagreements 19 mins – “Why do we hold our opponents in contempt? Former politician Douglas Alexander believes that disagreement is good, it’s how the best arguments get refined. But, today, public discourse has become so ill-tempered, snide and lacking in respect that we are no longer engaged in a battle of ideas but a slanging match. He talks to people with personal tales about how we might all raise our game and disagree better, among them a relationship counsellor, an ex-soldier, a peace broker and a foster mother. Their tips? Civility is not enough. And knowledge is essential, as well as radical honesty, fierce intimacy and openness. So, dial down the rhetoric, rein in the insults – they will persuade no-one that your opinion is worth listening to – and pay attention.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Drug Runners in UK 19 mins – “New figures released in the UK have revealed at least 4,000 young people are currently caught up in what are known as “county lines” – meeting orders for heroin and cocaine via mobile phone “deal lines”. They are transporting drugs from cities to rural and coastal towns, and carrying weapons too – knives, hammers and acid. Many find themselves selling drugs in a strange town, trapped, too scared to leave. Increasingly, when police raid the “traphouses” where the drugs are held, they are finding girls. For Assignment, Jane Deith hears the stories of young women caught in a world of sexual violence and drug running.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Finland’s Carbon Neutral 18 mins – “How do you achieve net-zero carbon emissions in just fifteen years? In Finland, a fisherman-turned-climate scientist believes he has part of the answer: re-wilding the country’s peat fields. Gabriel Gatehouse travels to the country’s frozen north to meet Tero Mustonen, as he battles lobbyists and vested interests in government and the peat industry, in a race to mitigate the consequences of climate change.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Finlands Green Trailblazer..19 mins – “The town of Ii in northern Finland is a green trailblazer. It has managed to stop burning fossil fuels and will have reduced carbon emissions by 80% by 2020; that is 30 years ahead of the EU target. It is also aiming to be the world’s first zero-waste town. It is happening because of the collective effort of the community. Erika Benke discovers how everyone is involved; from local businessmen to the mayor and from schoolchildren to their parents and grandparents.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Going Back to Sierra Leone 18 mins – “Fatmata, Jamilatu and Alimamy all see themselves as failures. They’re young Sierra Leoneans who risked everything for the sake of a better life in Europe. Along the way, they were imprisoned and enslaved. They saw friends die. Eventually, they gave up. Now, they’re home again – facing the devastating consequences of what they did to their families before they left, actions that have left them ostracised by their nearest and dearest. Who will help them to survive back home? Can they rebuild their lives, and achieve any reconciliation with their parents? And if they can’t, will they be tempted to set off again, to seek their fortunes abroad?” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greenland Music 34 mins – “Kate Molleson visits the world’s largest island to explore the role of traditional and new music for its communities today. Between the capital of Nuuk and smaller fishing town of Maniitsoq, Kate encounters drum dancers resurrecting a traditional Inuit practice which almost died out on Greenland’s west coast, discovers the political and sonic influence of the Greenlandic language on music from hymn singing to hip-hop, meets artists using their lyrics to engage with issues from the climate to the country’s deep-rooted social problems, and visits a music school offering a safe space to young people.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iceland’s Thaw 22 mins – “Iceland’s glaciers are melting at an unprecedented rate, with scientists predicting that they could all be gone 200 years from now. How is this affecting the lives of local people, and the identity of a nation that has ice in its name? Maria Margaronis talks to Icelandic farmers and fishermen, scientists and environmental activists about their (sometimes surprising) responses to climate change, and asks why it’s so difficult even for those who see its effects from their windows every day to take in what it means.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Iraq’s Secret Sex Trade 18 mins – “Muslim men and women are forbidden to sleep together outside marriage, but in Iraq, it’s possible for men to find a way round this obstacle to sexual freedom through a deeply controversial custom. So-called ‘pleasure marriages’ allow time-limited wedlock, sometimes for as little as half an hour, and with no commitment whatsoever. The practice is illegal, though some Shi’a clerics nevertheless claim it is permitted under Sharia, and offer to oversee pleasure marriages in return for payment. As Nawal al-Maghafi of BBC Arabic discovers in this disturbing story, the clerics’ lucrative business comes at enormous personal cost to many women, who are often tricked and coerced into marrying, only to be dumped shortly afterwards. Worse, their life-chances and even their lives are put at risk, because virginity is a prerequisite for proper marriage. Using undercover reporting and secret recording, the programme also finds clerics willing to supply women for sex, and even to officiate for men who want to have sex with children.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jewish Rescues WWII 34 mins – “In the heart of Hitler’s Nazi Germany, members of the Resistance worked tirelessly and at great risk to themselves to help those whose lives were threatened. Amongst them was Elisabeth Charlotte Gloeden – known as Liselotte or “Lilo” – who, along with her husband Erich, hid Jews in their home in Berlin, before arranging safe passage for them out of Germany. The couple’s efforts went undetected until 1944 when they took in General Fritz Lindemann, who was being hunted by the Gestapo for being part of the plot to assassinate Hitler.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

John Lennon and Yoko Ono 22 mins – “John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s bed-in for peace protest and the people who witnessed it ” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lebanon’s Electricity Shortage 19 mins – “Life in Lebanon is a daily battle to beat the power cuts caused by the country’s chronic electricity shortage. If you live in a block of flats, you have to time when you go in and out to avoid getting trapped in the lift. Food goes bad because fridges don’t work, families must often choose between air-conditioning and watching TV, and those on life-support machines live in constant fear of a switch-off. But if it’s hell for citizens, it’s heaven for operators of illegal private generators who profit by filling the gap left by the failures of the national grid. Some are former warlords who led militias in Lebanon’s civil war. They’re given an unofficial licence to operate, often in return for favours to the authorities in Lebanon’s chaotic and often corrupt sectarian system. Now a huge protest movement is demanding change in Lebanon – and a constant power supply is one of the demonstrators’ main demands. They want to break the power of the “fuel mafia” that imports diesel for the generators and has close links to the country’s leading politicians. For them, the fight for light is a fight against corruption. But can Lebanon’s feeble state ever manage to turn all the lights on?” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

LGBT Changes 20 mins – “Detransitioners are people who once identified as trans, but have returned to the gender they were assigned at birth. Some may also re-identify as non-binary or gender-fluid. There are no figures revealing how many people reverse or change their gender journeys – we only know that more people are telling their stories. Brian Belovitch was born a boy, and then transitioned and lived for more than a decade as Natalia – a performer, club hostess and glamorous party animal. Then at a crisis point in his life he made a momentous decision – to live again as Brian. These are not easy choices. Daniel was brought up male, then had gender reassignment surgery and became Danielle. Now he has detransitioned, married a woman, and is awaiting a complex operation to reconstruct his male genitalia.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Lithium in Argentina 19 mins – “Are lithium-powered electric vehicles as ‘green’ as we think they are? With the advent of electric cars, manufacturers tell us we’re racing towards a clean-energy future. It’s lithium that powers these vehicles. Most of the world’s stocks of this lightest of metals are found in brine deep beneath salt flats, high in the Andes.In Argentina, in Jujuy – the province with the highest percentage of indigenous households in the country – massive projects are underway. But in a super-dry region, with water the most precious resource, and lithium extraction demanding huge quantities of it, there’s anxiety – and outright opposition.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mafia 19 mins – “Across Italy hundreds of mafia leaders, hitmen and drug-traffickers are being jailed thanks to the most powerful weapon now in the hands of Italy’s anti-mafia investigators: the words of one clan against another. Italy’s state collaborator scheme has seen mafia chiefs breaking the code of silence – in return for a lifetime in witness protection, rather than a life behind bars. For Assignment, Dominic Casciani gets exclusive access to an anti-mafia prison to meet one of Naples’ most important “Penitents” – a boss and killer whose evidence has jailed his associates. In the city itself, he witnesses, alongside hardened investigators, the ongoing nightly battle against the Camorra – and also hears voices of hope across the city that the tide has finally turned.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malwai Tapes 34 mins – “A race is on to save thousands of tapes of traditional Malawian music in danger of disintegrating in the archives of state broadcaster, Malawi Broadcasting Corporation. The old reel-to-reel tapes date back to the 1930s, ’40s, ’50s and ’60s and were recorded in towns and villages all over Malawi and in the MBC studios. The folk songs, traditional chants, dances and contemporary music of the time all provide a snapshot of Malawi’s social and musical history.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Inequalities 18 mins – “This week, Beyonce writer and pop star Raye is back in the presenter’s chair with a new round of musicians. This time she is joined by: the winner of the 2012 MOBO UnSung regional competition in Birmingham and ‘Unknown (To You)’ singer Jacob Banks; producer, radio host, and DJ on the up Melle Brown who’s also signed to Jamz Supernova’s label; and Californian poet and spoken word artist Tenesha the Wordsmith. Led by Raye they’ll be discussing how their careers affect the people around them, how women treat other women in music, and inequalities and race in the industry.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Music Soundtracks 23 mins – “A huge episode of Music Life this week sees one of the most versatile composers working today, Max Richter (Peaky Blinders, Black Mirror, Ad Astra, Mary Queen of Scots), ask renowned creators of music for film, TV and the stage how they got their starts in the music business, their creative processes, how they convey emotion through their work, and how it’s actually quite difficult to create something simple. Among those answering these questions is a man who really needs no introduction, Hans Zimmer. He’s scored over 100 films so far, putting his signature sound on everything from James Bond to the Dark Knight Trilogy via Thelma & Louise. There isn’t a film that isn’t vastly improved with Hans’ work behind it. Also with Max is Icelandic composer, cellist and vocalist Hildur Guðnadóttir. She won the Academy Award for best score for the controversial film Joker, and you can also hear her music-less score in the haunting TV series Chernobyl. Puerto Rican composer and multi-instrumentalist Angélica Negrón completes the line up; she writes music for chamber ensembles, orchestras, film, theatre, robotic instruments, and even toys. This is a meeting of minds that’s not to be missed.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Therapy 17 mins – “Young country stars Kane Brown, Holly Macve and Olivia Lane discuss writing songs as therapy, recurring themes, and being put in a difficult position by their lyrics. Kane Brown is a superstar in the making from Tennessee, and has been called the ‘Justin Bieber of country’. He has worked with the likes of Khalid, Becky G, and Marshmello, and his influences include Chris Young, George Strait, Lee Brice and Garth Brooks. He’s also the only artist in to simultaneously top all five of Billboard’s country music charts. Olivia Lane is an up and coming artist who is also from Tennessee, but was born in Texas. Her lyrics cover a wide range of topics from romance to mental health struggles. She cites Shania Twain, Frank Sinatra, Linda Ronstadt, Carole King and Taylor Swift as some of her musical influences. And this week’s host, Holly Macve, is an Irish alt-country singer and guitarist, who has shared a stage with the likes of John Grant, Benjamin Clementine, and Ryley Walker. Her grandfather was a classical composer and her mother sang and collected blues, country and jazz records, so music definitely runs in the family.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Nazi Crime Investigators 34 mins – “This year, 2020, sees the 75th anniversary of the end of World War Two. Its legacy remains. Nowhere more so than in Germany, where the rise of Nazism led to the war, and terrible crimes against humanity. Chris Bowlby explores how post-war Germans have faced this inheritance and discovers how a search for justice in relation to Nazi crimes has continued, despite heavy pressure to stop. Alongside that, a powerful culture of remembrance has emerged, as each new generation makes its reckoning with the past. We meet the little-known small team of Nazi crime investigators, working discreetly behind walled premises in Ludwigsburg in Southern Germany. They used to carry guns for self-protection, such was hostility to their work. Through their research they have identified more than 28,000 Nazi crime scenes. But soon those who lived through the Nazi period will all be dead. What difference will it make when there are no more victims alive to tell their stories, no more prosecutions or trials? Will this history still be remembered and understood? And we hear from a new, young and diverse generation of Germans what they think about their country’s Nazi past.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Nigeria Sex for Grades 18 mins – “University lecturers sexually harassing and blackmailing their students. It’s a problem which plagues West Africa but it’s almost never proven. Until now. This week Assignment teams up with the World Service investigative series, Africa Eye, which sent female journalists posing as students inside a top university in Nigeria to secretly record men who sexually harass and abuse young women. A year-long investigation reveals how lecturers – who can make or break academic careers – groom victims in academic settings; abusing their power to try to get what they want. Sex for grades is described as being so normalised it has become an epidemic, where vast numbers of young women have been harassed and abused.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Qanon and on and on 16 mins – “It’s bursting into the mainstream – a bizarre conspiracy theory that casts US President Donald Trump as its hero. QAnon claims that the president is secretly fighting a cabal of high-placed paedophiles in Hollywood and the so-called “deep state”. But why has it had an apparent surge in popularity during the global pandemic? Since it first emerged in an anonymous post on an online message board in 2017, QAnon has developed into a movement which is now making inroads into the American political psyche. However, many families of QAnon followers feel they have lost their relatives to a dangerous cult. Several people have been arrested plotting attacks while seemingly under the influence of the conspiracy theory. This week Twitter banned thousands of QAnon-themed accounts, but it’s likely that at least one adherent will enter the US Congress after elections in November. What role might this strange belief system play in US politics?” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Raed Fares Syrian Activist 18 mins – “Raed Fares, founder of Syria’s legendary Radio Fresh FM, was mowed down by unknown gunmen as he left his studios in rebel-held Idlib in November 2018. The death of the man who fought hatred with humour and laughed in the faces of President Assad, ISIS and al-Qaeda, sent shockwaves way beyond his troubled homeland. When ordered by Islamist extremists to stop broadcasting music he had replied with bird song and clucking chickens. On being told to take his female presenters off air, he put their voices through software to make them sound like men. In tribute to its founder, Raed Fares’s radio station has refused to die with him. One year on from his killing it continues to broadcast the comedy programmes he loved, as Assad’s troops close in and bombs fall around it.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Romanian Revolution 18 mins – “Thirty years after Dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife Elena were executed on Christmas Day, Tessa Dunlop looks back at the violent birth of post-Communist Romania and asks if it has shaken off the legacy of decades of ruthless totalitarianism. The violence of the Romanian Revolution marked its difference from the other former Eastern European communist states which were swept away by largely peaceful pro-democracy movements born after the fall of the Berlin wall. In Romania, hundreds died in bloody protests as the regime’s grisly endgame was played out across the world’s media. Now, three decades on, we revisit the hope and trauma behind the December Revolution. What has changed, and how well has Romania come to terms with its past?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Russian Domestic Abuse 18 mins – “Domestic abuse in Russia is endemic with thousands of women dying at the hands of their partners every year. Despite this a controversial law was passed in 2017, which scrapped prison sentences for first-time abusers. Beatings that do not cause broken bones or concussion are now treated as administrative offences rather than crimes. As one activist puts it: “the punishment for beating your wife now feels like paying a parking ticket.” But Russian society is waking up to the crisis. The case of three girls – the Khachaturyan sisters – who face long prison sentences for murdering their tyrannical father, has sparked mass protests. More than 300,000 people have signed an online petition urging prosecutors to drop the murder charges. The girls’ mother tells reporter Lucy Ash that her daughters were acting in self-defence against a man who had abused them physically, emotionally and sexually for years. Lucy also meets the mother of a woman stabbed to death by her husband who was discovered in her blood soaked bed by her seven year old son. In all three cases, the frightened women had appealed to the police but to no avail. These tragedies might have been averted if only the authorities had taken earlier warnings seriously. In Moscow, Lucy talks to activists who are fighting back by supporting victims, pushing for legal reforms and drawing attention to the cause through art, video games and social media. And she meets a lone feminist MP in the Russian Duma who is trying to bring in restraining orders for violent husbands, boyfriends and family members. Today Russia has no such laws and domestic violence is not a standalone offence in either the criminal or the civil code.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Power 1 34 mins – “In the plains of Andalusia, just outside Seville, a giant tower stands bathed in a supernatural glow. This futuristic spectacle is a solar power station generating enough electricity to power a town – by day, and extraordinarily by night. It is just one part of a technological movement with revolutionary political consequences. For more than a century, the world has revolved around fossil fuels. Wars have been fought over them. The nations that had oil and gas had power. They controlled the price, they controlled the supply and could tell their customers what to do. The BBC’s Diplomatic Correspondent, James Landale, now explores what will happen as countries around the world develop enough renewable energy to end their dependence on hydrocarbons and assesses the geopolitical consequences of this energy revolution. How long will the transition take? Will the powerful oil and gas producers in the Middle East reform in time or will their economies implode, leaving failed states, regional conflict and a population exodus? How will Russia respond if Europe no longer needs so much of its gas? And which countries will be the new energy superpowers? Who will control resources like lithium and cobalt that will be needed for new high tech batteries? Above all, who will call the shots in this new renewable world order? The energy revolution is coming and it could change our world forever.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Solar Power 2 18 mins – “…Above all, who will call the shots in this new renewable world order? The energy revolution is coming and it could change our world forever.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Sormeh Impact in Persia 19 mins – “The eyes have always been a focal point of Persian beauty for men and women and they have always been embellished with sormeh, or thick black eyeliner. Presenter Nassim Hatam’s grandmother taught her mother how to apply sormeh, which originates from a 4000-year-old recipe, and when the family was scattered to the four winds by revolution she made it her responsibility to supply the family women with their sormeh wherever they had settled. Now for Nassim, and millions of modern Persian women, the wearing of sormeh or black eye makeup has become something much bigger than make-up – it is an important part of their resistance to oppression.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Korea Youth Pressures 19 mins – “Academic expectations, job competition and financial pressures are forcing some young South Koreans to give up on relationships, marriage and kids. This phenomenon is known as the ‘sampo’ or ‘give up’ generation. The daily struggle to succeed within a patriotic and competitive culture is a shared experience. The suicide rate in Korea is the second highest among developed countries. In recent years, the quality of life reached such a low point, young people started referring to the country as, ‘hell Joseon’.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soviet War in Afghanistan 34 mins – “The story of the Soviet war in Afghanistan told through its teenage soldiers and the music they created. The 10-year conflict from 1979 to 1989 was one of the most dramatic and consequential wars of modern times. It saw the end of an empire, and triggered a political shockwave that we still live with today. Time Has Chosen Us tells the story of this under-examined war through the oral histories of Soviet soldiers who reveal honest, sad and funny accounts of their teenage years on the frontlines.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Space Sewing Sisters 19 mins – “Space travel is not always high-tech. When the Apollo astronauts landed on the Moon in 1969, seamstresses made their spacesuits at a company famous for stitching latex into Playtex bras. During the Space Shuttle era, a group of 18 women were in charge of all soft goods – the fabrics for machine and hand sewing the spaceplane’s thermal blankets. These women became known as the Sew Sisters. Presenter, artist and former Nasa astronaut Nicole Stott meets some of the sew sisters from past and present missions and celebrates their contributions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Star Wars Production 34 mins – “This is the true story of how Star Wars Episode IV-A New Hope got made. A film that, as plain old Star Wars, transformed cinema to become part of a pop culture phenomenon known across the world. As Episode IX arrives in our cinemas, wrapping up the destinies of the original trilogy characters and much more, we travel back a long, long time ago to the often agonising, challenging and ground breaking creation of the first film.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg 19 mins – “Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is the leading liberal Judge on the US Supreme Court. At 86 she has spent many decades fighting for women’s rights, including equal pay and access to abortion. A pioneer, this is a rare interview with a living legend. Razia Iqbal presents this special programme from New York as she receives the $1m Berggruen Prize for philosophy and culture.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thai Activist Disappearance 19 mins – “Polajee “Billy” Rakchongcharoen was last seen on April 17, 2014. At the time the human rights activist was working with lawyers in Bangkok to stop the eviction of Karen indigenous people from Thailand’s Kaeng Krachan National park. For five years his wife fought to solve the mystery of his disappearance, suspecting a cover up by local park authorities. But this summer Billy’s body was found burned and stuffed into a 200-litre oil drum which had been dumped in a reservoir on the outskirts of the national park. BBC Thai’s correspondent, Chaiyot Yongcharoenchai, investigates Billy’s murder and discovers how his death could end up helping the families of other disappeared people in Thailand.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Translating Children 18 mins – “Across the UK, in supermarkets, hospitals, council houses and solicitors’ offices, children and young people are doing vital unpaid work: interpreting for their parents. Psychologist and former child migrant Humera Iqbal takes us inside the lives of Britain’s young translators as they try to make the most of their childhood and teenage years while shouldering adult responsibilities – from dealing with the landlord to taking mum for a smear test.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uganda’s War 34 mins – “Alan Kasujja tells the story of the guerilla war in Uganda which began nearly 40 years ago and led to the current President Yoweri Museveni taking power. After the fall of Idi Amin there was a power vacuum in Uganda which led up to a general election. The former President Milton Obote returned from exile and was declared the winner. But amidst accusations of gerrymandering and intimidation, opposition groups claimed the 1980 election had been rigged. A young politician, Yoweri Museveni, had promised to fight an armed uprising in the bush if Obote won, and in 1981 he began a protracted guerrilla war.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zogos of Liberia 18 mins – “When Miatta was 14 years old, armed rebels stormed into her classroom and forcibly recruited her and her classmates. They were trained to use machine guns and then sent to the front line to fight in Liberia’s devastating civil war. Nineteen years later, Miatta is what many Liberians would call a Zogo. The Zogos are Liberia’s underclass: jobless, homeless and addicted to drugs. They’re a menace on the streets of the capital, Monrovia, where many make their living by snatching purses and phones from passers-by. In this Assignment, Lucy Ash follows a projects aiming to rehabilitate hundreds of Liberia’s Zogos – including Miatta.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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MMD453 Media Mining Digest: AI Impact, Black Hair and Swimming, Brain Functions, Brazil Museum Burns, Chile’s First Female President, Chile’s Stolen Babies, Climate Doomsday, Cloud Importance, Cognitive Seduction, Covid Contact Tracing, Cuba’s Digital Revolution, Elephants in India, Fake News, Finances Small Cap Futures, Gravity Bikes in Columbia, Hazelnut Harvest, Health Disparities, Hearing Loss, Heart Disease, Investing Allocations, Investing DIY, Investing Long Term, Investing-Past-Present-Future, Investing Small-Cap Value, Ireland in 1969, Leprosy, Machine Bias Concerns, Marawi Lost City, Medical Costs, Mosambu Bridge Collapse, MRL Mouse, Negotiating, Neural Networks, Nobel Prizes, Ocean Health, Passport Business, Politicians Mangle Science, Press Releases, Rainbow Railroad, Robert Mugabe, Scaramucci Interview, Smartphone Access, Southern Tales, Stearman Aircraft, Theranos, Time Cells, Undocumented Immigrant, Warp Speed, Warts, WWII Economics

Exercise your ears: the 54 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 682 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,300 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

AI Impact 22 mins – “No human, or team of humans, could possibly keep up with the avalanche of information produced by many of today’s physics and astronomy experiments. Some of them record terabytes of data every day — and the torrent is only increasing. The Square Kilometer Array, a radio telescope slated to switch on in the mid-2020s, will generate about as much data traffic each year as the entire internet. The deluge has many scientists turning to artificial intelligence for help. With minimal human input, AI systems such as artificial neural networks — computer-simulated networks of neurons that mimic the function of brains — can plow through mountains of data, highlighting anomalies and detecting patterns that humans could never have spotted….“It’s basically a third approach, between observation and simulation,” says Kevin Schawinski, an astrophysicist and one of generative modeling’s most enthusiastic proponents, who worked until recently at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH Zurich). “It’s a different way to attack a problem.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Functions 26 mins – “Emerging evidence suggests that the brain encodes abstract knowledge in the same way that it represents positions in space, which hints at a more universal theory of cognition.We humans have always experienced an odd — and oddly deep — connection between the mental worlds and physical worlds we inhabit, especially when it comes to memory. We’re good at remembering landmarks and settings, and if we give our memories a location for context, hanging on to them becomes easier. To remember long speeches, ancient Greek and Roman orators imagined wandering through “memory palaces” full of reminders. Modern memory contest champions still use that technique to “place” long lists of numbers, names and other pieces of information. As the philosopher Immanuel Kant put it, the concept of space serves as the organizing principle by which we perceive and interpret the world, even in abstract ways. “Our language is riddled with spatial metaphors for reasoning, and for memory in general,” said Kim Stachenfeld, a neuroscientist at the British artificial intelligence company DeepMind.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chiles Stolen Babies – “A Chilean man – adopted at birth and sent overseas – searches for the mother forced to give him up. He is among thousands now finding out the truth about their past. Many mothers were pressurised into giving up their children during General Pinochet’s military dictatorship in the 1970s and 80s. A government investigation is gathering evidence from judges, socials workers, medical staff and nuns who are all thought to be involved. Families are meeting after decades. And mothers are being reunited with children they were told were dead.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Doomsday – “Have you heard? Climate change. We did it. And it’s bad. It’s going to be worse. We are already suffering the effects of it in many ways. How should we TALK about the dangers we are facing, though? Should we get people good and scared? Or give them hope? Or both? Host Bethany Brookshire talks with David Wallace-Wells and Sheril Kirschenbaum to find out. This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cloud Importance – “On a 1987 voyage to the Antarctic, the paleoceanographer James Kennett and his crew dropped anchor in the Weddell Sea, drilled into the seabed, and extracted a vertical cylinder of sediment. In an inch-thick layer of plankton fossils and other detritus buried more than 500 feet deep, they found a disturbing clue about the planet’s past that could spell disaster for the future. Lower in the sediment core, fossils abounded from 60 plankton species. But in that thin cross-section from about 56 million years ago, the number of species dropped to 17. And the planktons’ oxygen and carbon isotope compositions had dramatically changed. Kennett and his student Lowell Stott deduced from the anomalous isotopes that carbon dioxide had flooded the air, causing the ocean to rapidly acidify and heat up, in a process similar to what we are seeing today.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid Contact Tracing – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on August 19, 2020, the editors discuss the use of contact tracing to limit the spread of SARS-CoV-2 and the challenges posed by certain characteristics of the virus.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cubas Digital Revolution – A revolution is underway in Cuba. The country’s communist leaders, who normally retain tight control of the media, have encouraged Cubans to become more connected online. Internet access used to be the preserve of a privileged (and relatively rich) few. But prices have come down, public wifi spots are popular, and less than a year ago 3G data access became available on Cuban phones. Along with a huge uptake in the internet has come a flood of Cubans signing up to social media accounts. Even President Miguel Diaz-Canel is on Twitter. And unlike staid and traditional state-run media, Cuban social media is relatively open, freewheeling, full of jokes, criticism of the government and, of course, memes. Prices are still high and the government keeps a close eye on dissidents or “counter-revolutionaries”. But online, Cubans are exploring new ways to communicate that would have been unheard of just a few years ago. The BBC’s Cuba correspondent Will Grant and BBC Trending reporter Reha Kansara have been meeting the Cubans at the forefront of their country’s digital revolution. They meet political podcasters, a lesbian activist, a pro-government blogger, a gamer-turned-protester, a dissident journalist and one of Cuba’s biggest YouTube stars. How are Cubans making their voices heard in a way they never have before – and how might social media transform the country?” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Geysers – “Geothermal energy brings steam created with the heat of magma deep in the earth to generate electric power. California is endowed with numerous sites where magma is close enough to the surface to make geothermal energy practical. The Geysers, a geothermal field in northern California, is the world’s largest source of geothermal electric energy, where six different companies use steam from 350 wells to provide enough electric power to support nearly half-a-million homes. To learn more about the Geysers, and to explore the functionality and sustainability of geothermal power, we talk with California Energy Commissioner Karen Douglas, an attorney and one of five members of the commission.” At the link find the title, “The Geysers Geothermal Field in California – the World’s Largest Geothermal Energy Producer,” right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gravity Bikes in Colomia – “Precipitous mountain roads, specially-modified bikes, and deadly consequences. Simon Maybin spends time with the young men who race down the steep roads of Colombia’s second city Medellin. Marlon is 16 and he’s a gravitoso – a gravity biker. He hooks onto the back of lorries or buses climbing the precipitous roads to reach high points around the city. Then, he lets gravity do its thing and – without any safety gear – hurtles back down the roads, trying to dodge the traffic. This year, two of his friends have died gravity biking and Marlon has had a near-fatal accident. But he’s not quitting. So what drives young men like him to take their lives into their own hands? And what’s being done to stop more deaths?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Hazelnut Harvest – “Every August tens of thousands of Kurdish migrant workers, including children, toil long hours for a pittance in the mountains of northern Turkey picking hazelnuts for the spreads and chocolate bars the world adores. Turkey provides 70% of all hazelnut supplies – and the biggest buyer is Ferrero, maker of Nutella and Kinder Bueno. The confectionery giant says it’s committed to ethical sourcing, and aiming for its hazelnuts to be 100% traceable next year. But how is that possible in Turkey, with its half a million tiny family orchards, where child labour is rife? Tim Whewell investigates Ferrero’s complex supply chain and finds that while hazelnuts are celebrated in Turkish culture and song, it’s a sector where workers and farmers feel increasingly unhappy and reform is very hard to achieve.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Health Disparities – “In this Hippo Education bonus conversation, Drs. Jay-Sheree Allen and Neda Frayha sit down with noted health disparities researcher Dr. Utibe Essien, an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Core Investigator for the Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion at the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System. They explore reasons for disparities in the health care outcomes of our patients, disparities in the diversity of our medical profession, and the crucial bridge that connects these two. They close with three concrete steps we all can take to improve our clinical practice and reduce health disparities in our patient communities.” At the link you can listen, but must subscribe to download the podcast; however, it is included in this audio archive.

Hearing Losses – “(This programme contains audio effects that may cause discomfort to people living with hearing conditions. There is a modified version of this programme, with quieter effects, on this page https://bbc.in/2TrInga) What does life sound like for someone whose hearing has suddenly changed? Carly Sygrove is a British teacher living in Madrid. She was sitting in her school’s auditorium when suddenly her head was filled with a loud screeching sound. Diagnosed as sudden sensorineural hearing loss, Carly no longer has any functional hearing in her left ear, and battles with the whoops, squeals and ringing that comes from having tinnitus. This dramatically changed her work and personal life, as well as her ability to communicate in a country thousands of kilometres from where she was born. It made Carly realise how fragile our bodies are – and how wonderful sounds can be. In this intimate programme for the BBC World Service, Carly shares her personal story and speaks honestly about how life with hearing in only one ear is far from quiet.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Investing Allocations – “Do you want to have a better idea of the range — or returns and risks of loss — that different equity asset classes have generated over a long period of time?  In this podcast, Paul discusses 5 tables covering the S&P 500, Worldwide Equity (50% U.S./50% International), Worldwide Equity (70% U.S./30% International), All Value (50% U.S./50% International)  All Value (70% U.S./30% International).  In each case the table will show 50 years of annual returns of the equity portfolio, as well as returns with 9 different combinations of fixed income and equity. It will be helpful to listen to Paul’s podcast on the Ultimate Buy and Hold Strategy 2020 Update before listening to this podcast. Our enormous thanks to Daryl Bahls for building the tables for this podcast and the balance of the more than 60 tables we will cover in the next 2 months. Links to Tables: S&P 500 Worldwide Equity (50% U.S./50% International) Worldwide Equity (70% U.S./30% International) All Value (50% U.S./50% International) All Value (70% U.S./30% International)” At the link select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Investing DIY – “On February 22, before the recent bear market and during the very early days of the Coronavirus, I was scheduled to speak at Vestory’s Annual Retiremeet.  I went a day early so I could interview two very good friends I’d worked with for more than 10 years, Tom Cock and Don MacDonald. The three of us used to do a weekly radio show together.  It was always fun and we had great guests like John Bogle, Knight Kiplinger, Larry Swedroe, Scott Burns, Robert Kiyosaki and Joe Granville, to name a few. In 2009 Tom and Don left the Merriman firm to found Vestory  a registered investment advisory firm. In this podcast we discuss the challenges of helping the do-it-yourself investor.  While Don mentions the importance of staying in front of the investors on a regular basis, they felt one of the most difficult decisions for DIY investors is determining their risk tolerance. They offer an interesting risk tolerance test that I took. It has some very good questions. I suggest you give it a try as it is more specific than most.” At the link select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Investing in Small Cap Funds – “Some controversy and concern seems to have risen about small-cap-value returns. While on vacation in Europe recently, I used the early morning hours to complete a study examining the history of returns for many of the popular asset classes: S&P 500, Total Market Index, Large Cap Value, Small Cap Blend, Small Cap Value, U.S. Long Term Bonds, U.S. Treasury Bills and Inflation. My goal was to see what we might learn from the past performance of these asset classes.  What can we learn from history about predicting future returns? Should we expect the Total Market Index to give us access to the premium returns of small-cap and value?  Should we expect bonds to give an excess return over taxes and inflation? In this podcast, I am happy to share what I learned and deduced.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Investing Long Term – “What’s the toughest challenge for many investors? Staying the course for the long term. In this podcast, Paul discusses what he considers “the most useful information for investors.” While adding new insights to his Ultimate Buy and Hold StrategyFine Tuning Your Asset Allocation and Distributions in Retirement articles and podcasts, Paul explores nine decades of returns for six asset classes that academics have studied for over 50 years. It turns out that the end result of the returns has been exactly what the academics predicted, but the trip was not an easy one for investors. See and download the Tables referenced here. Paul hopes that in understanding this, all investors  — especially young investors — will see that the strategy with the most predictable returns is also the one with the best predictable returns, and maintain the focus and confidence to make it through the normal ups and downs of the market without giving up.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Past, Present and Future – “In this special presentation to the Bainbridge Community Foundation, June 2020, Paul provides insights into the past, present and future of investing. What are the most important lessons learned about investing in the last 50 years? How can we use them to make more money for our retirement? What 3 myths cost investors up to half their retirement savings? What three people changed investing forever? And much more. If you enjoy this podcast, please share.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Small Cap Questions – “Some controversy and concern seems to have risen about small-cap-value returns. While on vacation in Europe recently, I used the early morning hours to complete a study examining the history of returns for many of the popular asset classes: S&P 500, Total Market Index, Large Cap Value, Small Cap Blend, Small Cap Value, U.S. Long Term Bonds, U.S. Treasury Bills and Inflation. My goal was to see what we might learn from the past performance of these asset classes.  What can we learn from history about predicting future returns? Should we expect the Total Market Index to give us access to the premium returns of small-cap and value?  Should we expect bonds to give an excess return over taxes and inflation? In this podcast, I am happy to share what I learned and deduced.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Investing Small-Cap Value – “Focusing on small-cap value from every angle Paul knows, this podcast compares Price-to-Earnings ratios, Price-to-Book ratios, average size company and one-year and 40-year period returns.  Paul shares the latest academic research on small-cap value, comparison of risk and return for S&P vs. small-cap value asset classes, and the likely long-term impact of adding even a little small-cap value to a portfolio. He also discusses the Fine Tuning Your Asset Allocation table for small-cap value, and Tables 1 and 3 from “90 Years of Evidence Shows Investor Patience Leads to Better Returns“.” At the link select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Ireland in 1969 – “Ruth Sanderson grew up in Northern Ireland yet never really understood how the Troubles started. Although the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement effectively brought peace in 1998, Ruth believes the fallout from the violence continues to cast a long shadow over a society which is still divided. Now Ruth returns to the same courtroom in Belfast where the Scarman Tribunal sat and begins to piece together the events of August 1969 when Northern Ireland spiralled out of control. The Northern Irish Troubles began when civil disturbances tipped into widespread violence across a single week in August 1969. The bitter conflict between those who wanted Northern Ireland to remain part of the United Kingdom and those who wanted a united Ireland would go on for more than three decades and claim thousands of lives. While there is no definitive way of knowing exactly what happened during the week when violence erupted, the Scarman Tribunal sat soon after and compelled witnesses from all sides to give their account of the events which led to the breakdown of law and order and the British Army being deployed.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Leprosy – “When Aleks Krotoski was six years old she lived in a world surrounded by people with leprosy, or Hansen’s Disease as it’s officially known. Both her dad and step mum worked at the US’s last leper home, the National Hansen’s Disease Centre in Carville Louisiana, tucked away in a bend of the mighty Mississippi. Today she makes a return journey to find out if the stigma of leprosy still exists and how the disease is being treated.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Machine Bias Concerns – “Now that algorithms are everywhere, helping us to both run and make sense of the world, a strange question has emerged among artificial intelligence researchers: When is it ok to predict the future based on the past? When is it ok to be biased? “I want a machine-learning algorithm to learn what tumors looked like in the past, and I want it to become biased toward selecting those kind of tumors in the future,” explains philosopher Shannon Vallor at Santa Clara University.  “But I don’t want a machine-learning algorithm to learn what successful engineers and doctors looked like in the past and then become biased toward selecting those kinds of people when sorting and ranking resumes.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marawi Lost City – “In 2017, Marawi was besieged by Islamic State supporters. Today it is a city of ghosts.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Costs – “Entrepreneur and Anesthesiologist Keith Smith of the Surgery Center of Oklahoma talks with host Russ Roberts about what it’s like to run a surgery center that posts prices on the internet and that does not take insurance. Along the way, he discusses the distortions in the market for health care and how a real market for health care might function if government took a smaller role.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Negotiating – “In this episode, we sit down with negotiation expert Misha Glouberman who explains how to talk to people about things — that is, how to avoid the pitfalls associated with debate when two or more people attempt to come to an agreement that will be mutually beneficial. Misha Glouberman teaches negotiation, both in the classroom and within organizations, and he also works as a professional facilitator, which means he helps people design and run conferences and meetings. He also lectures, hosts Trampoline Hall (which has a podcast) — where he interviews the speakers afterfield and fields questions from the audience — and he is the co-author of the book The Chairs Are Where the People Go, a collection of his dictated musings about life recorded and edited by author Sheila Heti.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neural Networks – “When we design a skyscraper we expect it will perform to specification: that the tower will support so much weight and be able to withstand an earthquake of a certain strength. But with one of the most important technologies of the modern world, we’re effectively building blind. We play with different designs, tinker with different setups, but until we take it out for a test run, we don’t really know what it can do or where it will fail. This technology is the neural network, which underpins today’s most advanced artificial intelligence systems. Increasingly, neural networks are moving into the core areas of society: They determine what we learn of the world through our social media feeds, they help doctors diagnose illnesses, and they even influence whether a person convicted of a crime will spend time in jail. Yet “the best approximation to what we know is that we know almost nothing about how neural networks actually work and what a really insightful theory would be,” said Boris Hanin, a mathematician at Texas A&M University and a visiting scientist at Facebook AI Research who studies neural networks. He likens the situation to the development of another revolutionary technology: the steam engine. At first, steam engines weren’t good for much more than pumping water. Then they powered trains, which is maybe the level of sophistication neural networks have reached. Then scientists and mathematicians developed a theory of thermodynamics, which let them understand exactly what was going on inside engines of any kind. Eventually, that knowledge took us to the moon. “First you had great engineering, and you had some great trains, then you needed some theoretical understanding to go to rocket ships,” Hanin said. Within the sprawling community of neural network development, there is a small group of mathematically minded researchers who are trying to build a theory of neural networks — one that would explain how they work and guarantee that if you construct a neural network in a prescribed manner, it will be able to perform certain tasks. This work is still in its very early stages, but in the last year researchers have produced several papers which elaborate the relationship between form and function in neural networks. The work takes neural networks all the way down to their foundations. It shows that long before you can certify that neural networks can drive cars, you need to prove that they can multiply.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nobel Prizes – “This week we start with this year’s physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds — and sometimes thousands — of people’s hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Operation Warp Speed – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on August 26, 2020, the editors discuss the U.S. government’s rapid SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development strategy, as well as the recent FDA approval of convalescent plasma to treat Covid-19.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Passport Business – “Citizenship is changing; and half the world’s governments are making money through citizenship schemes. In Vanuatu, a tiny Pacific Island Nation, a blossoming and controversial passport scheme is in place. Vanuatu’s government says it needs the revenue to boost the weak economy, but many are asking why the money from passport sales does not seem to have trickled down, while growing Chinese influence in the region is becoming a common cause of concern.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Passport Business – “Citizenship is changing; and half the world’s governments are making money through citizenship schemes. We investigate the booming trade in passports, and in a rare interview with the boss of the world’s biggest citizenship brokerage, we hear how easy it can be to get a second – or third – passport, for the right price.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Politicians Mangle Science – “Our guest in this episode of the You Are Not So Smart Podcast is Dave Levitan, a science journalist with a new book titled: Not a Scientist: how politicians mistake, misrepresent, and utterly mangle science.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Press Releases – “Everyone’s seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you’d be right. But there’s other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We’re talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rainbow Railroad – “Jane and Patricia fled their home in the middle of the night. Days before they had narrowly escaped an arson attack. It’s illegal to be gay in Barbados. You can be sent to prison for life. Now they needed out. A few months before they had reached out to an organisation in Canada, the Rainbow Railroad which helps move gay people, persecuted for their sexuality, to safety. After the arson attack Jane and Patricia contacted them again – “Please help us now”. In Canada, the team leapt into action. In collaboration with CBC’s The Doc Project, presenter Acey Rowe picks up the story as the women pack to board a flight to an uncertain future.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Robert Mugabe – “Audrey Brown looks back at the life of the former Zimbabwean president, Robert Mugabe, who has died in Singapore aged 95.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Scaramucci Interview – “Anthony Scaramucci, the infamous 11-day communications director for President Donald Trump in 2017, talks to Virginia Heffernan about his conversion from Trumpism; his politics and his relationship to power; growing up working-class; his wife, Diedre; and the real story behind missing the birth of his son.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Smartphone Access – “Windows 7 support dies today, but 1 in 7 PCs are still running it; Cablehaunt- the remote exploit with the catchy logo that works on ALL cable modems; US government still wants backdoor access to iPhones; CheckRain iPhone jailbreak keeps getting better; How Apple scans your photos for evidence of child abuse; The sim swapping threat; Anatomy/timeline of the exploitation of an unpatched VPN bug, and speaking of patching right away… patch your Firefox browser right now!” At the link right-click “Download now,” then right-click “audio,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Southern Stories – “Episode Info – TFTS #54 Encore: Tin Roof Project with Vic Fleming, April 4th, 2016” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Theranos – “Theranos is an unbelievable tale of ambition and fame gone terribly wrong. How did the world’s youngest self-made female billionaire lose it all in the blink of an eye? How did the woman once heralded as “the next Steve Jobs” find herself facing criminal charges — to which she pleaded not guilty — and up to 20 years in jail? How did her technology, meant to revolutionize healthcare, potentially put millions of patients at risk? And how did so many smart people get it so wrong along the way? ABC News chief business, technology and economics correspondent Rebecca Jarvis, along with producers Taylor Dunn and Victoria Thompson, take listeners on a journey that includes a three-year-long investigation.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Time Cells – “Our brains have an extraordinary ability to monitor time. A driver can judge just how much time is left to run a yellow light; a dancer can keep a beat down to the millisecond. But exactly how the brain tracks time is still a mystery. Researchers have defined the brain areas involved in movement, memory, color vision and other functions, but not the ones that monitor time. Indeed, our neural timekeeper has proved so elusive that most scientists assume this mechanism is distributed throughout the brain, with different regions using different monitors to keep track of time according to their needs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undocumented Immigrant – “Imran fled violence in Myanmar – now he is in detention on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea, with no papers and no idea what will happen to him. Hosted by Academy Award-winning documentary film-maker Asif Kapadia (Amy, Senna, Diego Maradona), this is the fourth episode in a five-part series from BBC World Service in collaboration with Robert Redford’s Sundance Institute. Detours takes us off the main roads of our lives, following people who didn’t end up where they expected.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Undocumented Immigrants in Costa Rica – “A small Costa Rican surfing city is the unexpected final home for people leaving Asia and Africa in search of a better life in the US. Hosted by Academy Award-winning documentary film-maker Asif Kapadia (Amy, Senna, Diego Maradona), this is the last episode in a five-part series from BBC World Service in collaboration with Robert Redford’s Sundance Institute. Detours takes us off the main roads of our lives, following people who didn’t end up where they expected.” At the link left- click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Undocumented Immigrants in Costa Rica – “A small Costa Rican surfing city is the unexpected final home for people leaving Asia and Africa in search of a better life in the US. Hosted by Academy Award-winning documentary film-maker Asif Kapadia (Amy, Senna, Diego Maradona), this is the last episode in a five-part series from BBC World Service in collaboration with Robert Redford’s Sundance Institute. Detours takes us off the main roads of our lives, following people who didn’t end up where they expected.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Warts – “Warts…Not Just a Toad Problem” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

WWII Economics – “The story of World War Two is usually told in terms of heroism on the battlefield, but perhaps the most important struggle was the economic battle. Across the world countries were fighting to feed their populations, maximise production from their factories and fund their armies. To mark the 80th anniversary of the start of World War Two, economist Duncan Weldon examines how the economies of the European powers, the United Kingdom, Germany, France and the Soviet Union, set the scene for the conduct of the war in 1939 and 1940.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

Black Hair and Swimming – “Seren Jones swam competitively for 13 years in the UK and in the US collegiate system. But in that time she only ever saw six other black girls in the pool. Why so few? A survey published by the University of Memphis and USA Swimming found that black respondents were significantly more concerned about getting their hair wet, and about the negative impact of chemicals on their appearances, than white respondents. Seren explores whether maintaining ‘good’ hair really is the leading factor behind why black women do not take part in competitive swimming.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu.

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MMD452 Media Mining Digest: 12 Rules for Life, 1619 Slavery, Agriculture Industry, Airplane Safety, Andersonville, Antarctica Explorer, Arms Trafficking in North Korea, AUMF Impact, Australia Wildfire Impact, Babeiosis, Behavior Modification, Civil Rights Sit-Ins, Dan Carlin Podcast, Depression Era Women, Digital Billboards, Economic Question, Environmental Movement and Litigation, Ethics, Feeble Mindedness, Feminism and Music, Gender Roles Over Time, Girl Power, Heart Disease, Homeland Threats, Innovation Skills, Latif at Guantanamo Bay, Libyan Female Fighters, Man Against Horse, Maps, Metaphysics, Mexico and California War, Middle East War, Munition Explosions, Race to the Moon, Racism Machine, Railway Train Control, Russian Election Interference, Satanic Panic, Scarsdale Murder Case, Sexism in Science, Slavery in North America, Small Arms Gender, Solar Power Development, Soleimani Assassination, Suicide Prevention, Technology and Government, Unmasking the Presidency, US Trade Policy, Vietnam War Lessons, Weinstein Sexual Assaults, WW II Women

Exercise your ears: the 68 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 772 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,270 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

12 Rules for Life 52 mins – “Jordan Peterson, author of 12 Rules for Life, talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Topics covered include parenting, conversation, the role of literature in everyday life, and the relationship between sacrificial rites and trade.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

1619 Slavery 36 mins – “In 1619, a privateer ship called the White Lion arrived in the English colony of Virginia carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans. This fateful trip ultimately changed America, shaping the country’s history and identity as we know it today. On the 400th anniversary of this consequential moment, 1619‘s host Nikole Hannah-Jones explores the long, harrowing history of American slavery and the shadow it left behind.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Agriculture Industry 66 mins – “In this Panel Debate, Patrick Holden (Sustainable Food Trust), Joanna Lewis (Soil Association), Jo Edwards (Castle Farm Organics), Phil Stocker (National Sheep Association), and Jack Farmer (LettUs Grow) discuss how can we ensure that the way we grow, distribute and eat food provides healthy and affordable nutrition whilst restoring ecosystems and improving the livelihoods of farmers; what the future of British farming may look like; and how we can measure and value sustainability and soil, plant and animal health, whilst at the same time protecting our farmers and farming communities as well as our environment. This Panel Debate took place on 19 November 2019, and is part of the IPR’s public event series, ‘The future is in our lands’.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Airplane Safety 48 mins – “Well, here it is…..finally ! Episode 1 of Plane Safety Podcast with Pilot Pip. In this episode, latest news, feedback (sort of) and the topic of the week is ‘Flying in Uncontrolled Airspace’ Enjoy and please get involved by sending feedback, questions and ideas to planesafetypodcast@gmail.com.” At the link right-click “Direct download: plane_safety_podcast_episode_1final48.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Andersonville Prison 39 mins – “Professor Carole Emberton talked about Andersonville Prison, the Confederate Civil War military prison where 13,000 Union soldiers died, and the trial of its commander, Henry Wirz. She also spoke about the halt of the prisoner exchange program toward the end of the war and how the Wirz trial was used as a precedent for later war crimes proceedings.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Antarctica Explorer 12 mins – “It’s 100 years this month since Amundsen – and then Scott – first reached the South Pole. It was one of the great achievements of the golden age of exploration – and it seemed that mankind would go on to reach every corner of the globe. But despite another 100 years of exploration, there are still vast swathes of our planet which remain uncharted, unknown to the map makers, the geologists and the botanists. So where’s left to explore? This week on One Planet we speak to three modern-day adventurers to discuss the parts of the world still unknown to science – and what will happen to us when we’ve been everywhere. Polar explorer and broadcaster Paul Rose, marine biologist Katrin Linse and botanist Alex Monro join Richard Hollingham at London’s Natural History Museum. As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Arms Trafficking in North Korea 24 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on illicit arms trafficking from North Korea, including sources of arms, routes and modes of transport, concealment methods, and ways to curb such trafficking. Our discussants are Bruce Bechtol, North Korea expert as well as professor of Political Science, Angelo State University; and Matt Schroeder, senior researcher, Small Arms Survey, and co-author of the Survey’s upcoming Briefing Paper on the mechanics of North Korean arms trafficking. The episode forms part of the Small Arms Survey project Strengthening Implementation and Enforcement of the Arms Embargo on North Korea (SAENK), supported by the Kingdom of the Netherlands.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AUMF Impact 44 mins – “This hour we pull apart one sentence, written in the hours after September 11th, 2001, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace. Last weekend President Trump authorized a strike that killed Iranian General Qasem Soleimani in Iraq. The news had us thinking about an episode we produced in 2014. We pulled apart one sentence, written in the hours after September 11th, 2001, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace. In the hours after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, a lawyer sat down in front of a computer and started writing a legal justification for taking action against those responsible. The language that he drafted and that President George W. Bush signed into law – called the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) –  has at its heart one single sentence, 60 words long. Over the last decade, those 60 words have become the legal foundation for the “war on terror.” In this collaboration with BuzzFeed, reporter Gregory Johnsen tells us the story of how this has come to be one of the most important, confusing, troubling sentences of the last two decades. We go into the meetings that took place in the chaotic days just after 9/11, speak with Congresswoman Barbara Lee and former Congressman Ron Dellums about the vote on the AUMF. We hear from former White House and State Department lawyers John Bellinger & Harold Koh. We learn how this legal language unleashed Guantanamo, Navy Seal raids and drone strikes. And we speak with journalist Daniel Klaidman, legal expert Benjamin Wittes and Virginia Senator Tim Kaine about how these words came to be interpreted, and what they mean for the future of war and peace. Finally, we check back in with Wittes, to see how the AUMF has trickled into the 2020s.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australia Wildfire Impact 36 mins – “When Valentina Mella looks out the window of her Sydney home, she’s horrified at what she sees. “To be honest with you it’s literally like an apocalypse,” Mella told Quirks & Quarks host Bob McDonald.  “People don’t know if it’s day or night and this red smoke and sky near the ocean. It doesn’t even look real. It looks like one of those Hollywood movies.” Since October, Australia has been battling massive, unpredictable bushfires. So far, 27 people have been killed and 103,000 square kilometres of land have burned. More than a billion animals are feared dead. “I think that’s actually a conservative estimate,” said Mella, an ecologist with the University of Sydney. “What we are seeing is a lot more has been lost.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Behavior Modification 19 mins – “In this episode you’ll learn: • Jacob introduces the last two systems for learning the psychology of behavior modification • The habit cycle and changing the way we perceive things • Why working on your behaviors before stepping foot in the studio is critical to do • Ways to add new behaviors and eliminate the old ones • How momentum and motivation work in tandem in the process of behavior modification” At the link right-click the box with three dots, then right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Gold Rush Impact 55 mins – “Professor Patrick Allitt talked about the California Gold Rush of the mid-1800s. He described how people got there, the physical geography of the area, and the evolving technology used to mine gold.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Civil Rights Sit-Ins 48 mins – “In 1960, four African American students sat down at a segregated Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, launching a civil rights movement that would spread to other cities. University of Massachusetts, Amherst Professor Traci Parker joined American History TV and “Washington Journal” to take viewer questions about protests against desegregation during that time. She is the author of Department Stores and the Black Freedom Movement: Workers, Consumers, and Civil Rights from the 1930s to the 1980s.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Dan Carlin Podcast 6 mins – “Dan Carlin has been creating podcasts for pretty much as long as podcasts have existed.  He launched his first show, Common Sense, way back in 2005, when you still could only listen to podcasts on a desktop computer or an iPod — because smartphones hadn’t been invented yet. Dan is probably best known as the host of Hardcore History. It’s a longform podcast that dives deep into moments from world history, from the ancient world to the 20th century. The episodes are as epic as the stories they tell — they often run more than five hours long. Now, after many years behind the mic, Dan Carlin has released a book. It’s called The End Is Always Near: Apocalyptic Moments, from the Bronze Age Collapse to Nuclear Near Misses. Podcast Playlist associate producer Julian Uzielli recently spoke to Dan Carlin from a studio in Eugene, Ore.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Dan Savage 46 mins – “Trouble in love? Time to call in an expert. Savage Lovecast is a call-in pod hosted by sex, love and relationship authority, Dan Savage. His sex-advice column titled Savage Love first appeared in The Stranger, Seattle’s alternative biweekly paper, in 1991. To this day, his column is syndicated to more than 50 papers across North America. But to keep up with the growing number of e-mails from those seeking his advice, he created the Savage Lovecast in 2006 which has since emerged as one of the most highly acclaimed podcasts about sexual health and dating.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Depression Era 51 mins – “Southern Methodist University professor Alexis McCrossen teaches a class on the abundance of the 1920s and the Great Depression. She argues that low wages and an unequal distribution of wealth hindered American consumers from keeping up with the high levels of economic productivity. She also talks about the demands for political solutions and President Roosevelt’s “New Deal” programs.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Depression Era Women 49 mins – “Georgetown University Professor Katherine Benton-Cohen taught a class on the Progressive Era. She talked about how politicians and reform groups in the early 20th century attempted to improve social and economic conditions through trust busting, interstate regulation, and prohibition. She also discussed the policies and campaigns of Theodore Roosevelt, the period’s most dominant political figure.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Digital Billboards 17 mins – “We’ve all seen billboards. That’s sort of the point. Can’t click out of them, can’t turn the channel, can’t use fast forward through them. Basically, you can’t miss them. Almost two centuries since their advent, billboards are still one of the most powerful tools in advertising. In today’s show, we explore their power, and why, after all these years — when it comes to catching your attention — nothing beats a billboard. Here are some of the studies we mention in this episode: OOH Online Activation Survey. Yale Privacy Lab – Tracker Profiles.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Question 14 mins – “The American Economic Association’s annual conference is the biggest meeting of economists in the United States. Everyone who’s anyone in economics attends. We decided to go and ask a bunch of different economists one simple question to try and better understand not only the economy, but life, and the world. The question is: What’s the most useful idea in economics?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Movement and Litigation 44 mins – “Rutgers University Professor Jefferson Decker taught a class on the history of the environmental movement and laws and litigation regarding natural resources. He described the relationship between private property and government regulation and explored who is legally allowed to represent environmental interests in court.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the lecture is included in this blog archive.

Ethics 13 mins – “Are thought experiments the best way of doing practical ethics? Not according to James Wilson. He thinks we need the rich detail of real cases or complex imaginary cases not a simplified version of reality to make sense of the moral problems we face. We are grateful for support for this episode from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from our supporters on Patreon.” At the link right-click “Direct download: James_Wilson_on_Real_World_Ethics.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feeble Mindedness 36 mins – ““The New York Times Book Review calls She Has Her Mother’s Laugh “extraordinary…This book is Zimmer at his best: obliterating misconceptions about science with gentle prose. He brings the reader on his journey of discovery as he visits laboratory after laboratory, peering at mutant mosquitoes and talking to scientists about traces of Neanderthal ancestry within his own genome. Any fan of his previous books or his journalism will appreciate this work. But so, too, will parents wishing to understand the magnitude of the legacy they’re bequeathing to their children, people who want to grasp their history through genetic ancestry testing and those seeking a fuller context for the discussions about race and genetics so prevalent today.”  Two strands, twenty-three pairs of chromosomes, tens-of-thousands of genes. These are the elements that define our eye colour, our sex and our susceptibility to certain diseases; but how did scientists figure out how it all works, and what terrible mistakes got made along the way? In his latest book, She Has Her Mother’s Laugh, Carl Zimmer looks at the history, the science and the thorny ethical problems of genetic inheritance.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feminism and Music 49 mins – “Indiana University history professor Michael McGerr talked about women and feminism in 1960-1970s popular music. This class was from his course titled “Rock, Hip Hop and Revolution: Popular Music in the Making of Modern America, 1940 to the Present.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Gender Roles Over Time 51 mins – “Vassar College Professor Rebecca Edwards taught a class about the differences between 19th-century political parties and their views on gender roles, racial equality and family dynamics. She described the transition from a patriarchal family unit before the Civil War to a Reconstruction-era ideal of a nuclear family comprised of a husband as breadwinner and a wife in charge of the domestic sphere.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Girl Power 15 mins – “These days there are more and more celebrations of women who might have otherwise been relegated to the footnotes of history. They’re finally getting their own books, movies and streets named after them. And here at Nerdette, we’re all about that. Totally into it. Zero complaints. But what is equally as wonderful is when the spotlight also lands on accomplished young women. And that’s what author Kate Schatz and illustrator Miriam Klein Stahl have done with their book Rad Girls Can, which tells the stories of inspiring young women who have made positive impacts on the world before turning 20. Below are three of Schatz and Stahl’s favorite stories from Rad Girls Can….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Green Growth 38 mins – “In this IPR Public Lecture, Professor Timothy Mitchell discusses how the climate emergency confronts us with the problem of growth. Can we avert a planetary catastrophe by altering the ways we consume resources, adopting a new path of “green growth”? Or is the survival of human societies incompatible with continued economic expansion, requiring the radical alternative of de-growth? Professor Mitchell is a University of Bath Global Chair for the 2018 – 2019 academic year. His appointment has been funded by the International Relations Office’s Global Chair scheme, a flagship programme designed to attract distinguished, globally renowned scholars to engage in high-profile research activities at Bath.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Heart Disease 31 mins – “We talk to cardiologist, writer, and clinical researcher Haider Warraich about his new book State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science, and Future of Cardiac Disease.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Homeland Threats 16 mins – “Despite the successes that result from the hard work of the men and women of the FBI, our Joint Terrorism Task Forces, and our partners across the government, terrorism continues to pose a persistent threat to the homeland and our interests overseas. As we saw just recently, with the arrest of a man in Pueblo, Colorado, who allegedly planned to bomb a synagogue in furtherance of his ideology, lone actors pose a lethal terrorism threat to the American people. But this case also highlights the power of the Joint Terrorism Task Force, whose reach extends around the globe and is a force multiplier in the fight against terrorism. Together, with our partners, we stand shoulder to shoulder and remain vigilant against these threats. It’s been said, “It takes a network to defeat a network.” While the whole-of-government approach has been successful in mitigating many of the threats posed by overseas terrorism networks, a whole-of-society approach will be required to mitigate the evolving lone offender terrorism threat within our borders…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Impeachment of Trump 19 mins – “The impeachment trial of President Donald Trump has formally started. But as U.S. Senators prepare to consider the two articles of impeachment brought against Trump, more details in the case continue to emerge. If, and, when any of the new evidence will be part of the Senate trial is still a question. Even if it is, whether it would sway any Senators – many of whom have already laid down their positions – is also unclear. To explain this historic moment, Diane spoke with Neal Katyal. He’s a Georgetown Law professor and the author of “Impeach: The Case Against Donald Trump.” Katyal previously served as the acting solicitor general of the United States.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Impeachment of Trump 21 mins – “Why The Senate Trial Matters (Even If No Minds Are Changed) Frank Bowman, constitutional law professor, joins Diane to discuss the arguments being made on both sides. At the link right-click “Download This Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Skills 26 mins – “The number one skillset I have discussed many times over the years is self-confidence that you are creative. We were all born highly creative. Watch kids with the creative things they say, do and come up with. The problem is creativity is driven out of us from an early age. Children learn conformity from grade school through college. We are brainwashed into thinking that it is vital to act the same in order to be relevant. When we move into a professional career we are asked to be more creative, think differently and come up with solutions, after being taught conformity for 16+ years. It’s no myth that CEOs recruit creativity. Creativity drives innovation. It’s a catalyst for growth in a business. If you are not exercising your creativity and unlocking its potential you could become irrelevant.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Interviews and Skype Out 9 mins – “Today I answer a listener question about the best way to get interviews PLUS the ins and outs of Skype Out.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Latif at Guantanamo Bay 42 mins – “Radiolab’s Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda’s top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser’s lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab’s Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn’t do. Along the way, Radiolab’s Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Libyan Female Fighters 17 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on Libyan female fighters and the role of women during the Libyan conflict and post-conflict peacebuilding, as part of the Survey’s Security Assessment in North Africa (SANA) project. The discussants are: Hasnaa El Jamali, Small Arms Survey consultant who has conducted original research with Libyan women who were active during and after the 2011 revolution; David Lochhead, Small Arms Survey consultant with wide experience on security sector reform, border security, and peacekeeping in different parts of Africa with the United Nations; and Manal Taha, Small Arms Survey consultant and northern Africa regional expert with extensive knowledge on violent extremist, stabilization, and conflict resolution.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lincoln-Johnson and Constitution 47 mins – “Andrew Slap of East Tennessee State University taught a class on Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, and the Constitution. He compared how both presidents have been portrayed as either upholding or disregarding the Constitution and whether their reputations match their actions in office.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the lecture is included in this blog archive.

Man Against Horse 40 mins – “This is a story about your butt. It’s a story about how you got your butt, why you have your butt, and how your butt might be one of the most important and essential things for you being you, for being human. Today, reporters Heather Radke and Matt Kielty talk to two researchers who followed the butt from our ancient beginnings, through millions of years of evolution, and all the way to today, out to a valley in Arizona, where our butts are put to the ultimate test.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Maps 9 mins – “Tim Harford returns with a new series of Pop Up Ideas. This time Tim and his guests tell intriguing stories inspired by maps. In the first talk, Tim argues that maps – for all their beauty – can be dangerous. In the hands of powerful people, the map begins to shape the world in its image. He tells the story of th Johann Gottlieb Beckmann, who mapped German forests. He developed the idea of the “normalbaum”, a kind of platonic ideal of what a tree should be, which could be planted in neat rows to make mapping and harvesting them easier. It appeared to be a brilliant idea and produced unprecedented growth in the forestry business. But the forests came to resemble the map – with all its uniformity – and eventually the resulting lack of diversity led to the destruction of the forests themselves. Tim then looks at the taxpayer-funded Home Owners Loan Corporation (HOLC) which operated in Depression-era America and refused “to grant credit to people, not because of their credit history, not because of their ability to repay, not even because of their need. But just because of where they lived on the map.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Legal Loses in Canada 36 mins – “…The Indicator is constantly surprising – and this episode on how the legalization of marijuana will have an impact on Canada’s GDP totally changed the way I thought about Canada’s black market economy. Which, to be honest, is not something I had thought much about. Plus, the podcast gets bonus points for being short and sweet, so it’s always worth your time.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Metaphysics 13 mins – “Some philosophers have drawn very strange conclusions about the nature of reality. But that doesn’t necessarily mean we shouldn’t study their work. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Emily Thomas discusses how wildly implausible metaphysics can be enlightening when we learn the reasons why these philosophers adopted these positions.” At the link right-click “Listen to Emily Thomas on Wildly Implausible Metaphysics” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexico and California War 45 mins – “When Mexico gained its independence from Spain in 1821, the new country’s northernmost holding was the sparsely populated territory of California. Rick Kennedy of Point Loma Nazarene University taught a class about Mexico’s governance and plans for California in the decades leading-up to the 1848 Mexican-American War, in which Mexico lost California to the United States.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Middle East Nations 21 mins – “The Washington Institute for Near East Policy hosted a discussion on the future of foreign policy among Middle East nations, with a focus on U.S. allies Saudi Arabia, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates. Topics discussed included relations with U.S. under the Trump administration, the influence of Iran, and anti-corruption efforts within each nation. Panelists also reported back on their meetings with leaders from each country.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Munition Explosions 34 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on unplanned explosions at munitions sites (UEMS). Our speakers, Jovana Carapic, Remo Gassmann, and Benjamin King, discuss the problem at hand, the causes behind these explosions, as well as their consequences. The episode forms part of our Gender Lens for Arms Control Support and Sustainability (GLASS) project, funded by the Government of Canada.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nature’s 150th Anniversary 22 mins – “Nature is arguably the world’s most prestigious scientific journal. Editor in chief Magdalena Skipper spoke with Scientific American’s acting editor in chief Curtis Brainard about her journal as it celebrates its 150th anniversary.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the soundbar end and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Partially Examined Life 10 yr Retrospective 49 mins – “Mark, Seth, Dylan, and Wes reflect on the changing state of podcasting and public philosophy over the last decade, how our goals and interests have changed since we started we arted. Why don’t colleges pay their faculty to educate the public through regular, broadcasted conversations like ours? If you think we’re snarky, take a look at actual philosophy faculty! Should we continue to do more literature, poetry, and other topics that are not strictly philosophy? Also, the stalled state of the PEL book. Thanks so much to each and every Partially Examined Life listener for making it worth our time to do this!At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race to the Moon 29 mins – “With no idea how to get there, the race to the moon begins – “we intend to win”. To understand how the story ends, we need to start at the very beginning. With Kevin Fong.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Racism Machine 11 mins – “When a white nationalist massacred 22 people in an El Paso Walmart last week, who besides the shooter was to blame? Most of the media commentary on that question this week focused on Trump, but Bob starts this hour by taking on another culprit — Fox News. But it’s not just Fox that’s spreading dangerous rhetoric. Racism and xenophobia seep into other mainstream outlets under the guise of electoral pragmatism. Bob speaks with Tom Scocca, politics editor at Slate, about how tolerance for intolerable ideology is too often framed as a virtue — even in “ostensibly liberal” outlets.  This is a segment from our August 9, 2019 program, The Democracy We Think We Live In.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Railway Train Control 13 mins – “The US freight railroad system is moving to a different operating strategy, called Precision Scheduled Railroading (PSR), intended to speed up service, get better utilization from infrastructure, and reduce operating costs. What is it and why does it matter? In this interview, we learn about PSR from John Friedmann, who is Vice President-Network Planning and Optimization for the Norfolk Southern railroad.” At the link find the title, “Precision Scheduled Railroading,” right-click “Listen to this episode now, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Red Cross Donuts 14 mins – “Everybody likes free. But free can be dangerous, too. Today’s show is about what happens when you take something that was free and you give it a price. That is a highly risky move. And the damage can be enormous. Free of charge, we bring you the story of the Red Cross, its free doughnuts, and what happened when they suddenly weren’t free any more.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ronald Walters Career 49 mins – “University of Texas at Austin Professor Peniel Joseph taught a class on the life and career of civil rights pioneer Ronald Walters. In 1958, Mr. Walters organized a desegregation sit-in and was later influential in the spread of African-American studies as a scholarly field. He also served as an adviser to the founding members of the Congressional Black Caucus and was campaign manager and consultant for Jesse Jackson in his 1984 and 1988 presidential campaigns.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Russian Election Interference 23 mins – “Russia’s Attempts To Influence 2020 May Already Be Paying Off – After a week of mixed messages from the U.S. intelligence community about Russia’s plans to influence the 2020 election, Diane talks to Shane Harris of the Washington Post what’s really going on.” At the link right-click “Download This Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Satanic Panic 32 mins – “New True Crime Podcast Discoveries – You’ve heard about art heists. You’ve heard about bank heists. But what about maple syrup heists? We go behind the syrupy scheme that made millions. This week on Podcast Playlist, we bring you the best true crime podcasts to binge this winter. Podcasts featured this week: . The Score: Bank Robber Diaries – “Breaking the rules at a young age set Joe Loya up for a descent into crime. From his first time robbing a bank, to a violent altercation behind bars, this is Joe Loya’s origin story.” . Uncover: Satanic Panic – “In the newest season of Uncover, host Lisa Bryn Rundle unravels the history of a moral hysteria that took root across North America.” Plus: An interview with creator Lisa Bryn Rundle. . Detective Trapp – Los Angeles Times’ Christopher Goffard tells the story of homicide detective, Julissa Trapp, who worked on a case about four missing women in Orange County, California. In this clip we meet Detective Julissa Trapp. . Beyond Bizarre True Crime – “With popularity comes demand and with every commodity comes a black market. Maple syrup is no different. So when a group of thieves decided to steal some sweet liquid gold from a storage warehouse in Quebec, they weren’t about to stop at a couple of bottles or cases. This would go down as one of the most lucrative and perhaps most unusual robberies in Canadian history.” At the link find the title, “New True Crime Podcast Discoveries,” right-click “Download New True Crime Podcast Discoveries,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scarsdale Murder Trial 46 mins – “University of Colorado Denver Professor Sarah Fields taught a class about the 1981 trial of Jean Harris, who was accused of murdering the “Scarsdale Diet” doctor. Professor Fields described Harris’ background, her long relationship with Dr. Herman Tarnower, and her conviction for the doctor’s murder.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Sexism in Science 36 mins -”It’s 2019 and women are still significantly underrepresented in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). Women hold about about one-third of the academic positions in science, though that number is much lower in fields like math and engineering. In all, women are fewer than a quarter of the science and technology workers in Canada….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Small Arms Gender 19 mins – This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on gender in small arms control, as part of the Gender Lens for Arms Control Support and Sustainability (GLASS) project, funded by the Government of Canada. The Small Arms Survey will publish a Handbook on gender and arms control later in 2019, the authors and editor of which are discussants in this episode: Vanessa Corlazzoli, independent evaluation consultant Emile LeBrun, Small Arms Survey consultant Henri Myrttinen, independent researcher Allison Pytlak, disarmament programme manager, Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Power Development 14 mins – “When solar started it had a problem: solar panels were extremely expensive and not very efficient. In this episode we head to Germany to find out how one country built a market to solve that problem. On today’s show, we meet the person who kickstarted the green energy market and learn about the wonky policy tool that helped him do it. We teamed up with Vox’s The Impact podcast for this story. (More from them here.)At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soleimani Assassination 20 mins – “It began when President Trump ordered the assassination of Iranian Maj. Gen. Qasem Soleimani … and ended when Iran retaliated with a non-fatal missile strike against an American base in Iraq. But the deteriorating relationship between the two countries’ leaders started long before the assassination, and are not likely to end with this current de-escalation. Diane talks to longtime National Intelligence Analyst Paul Pillar about what’s next for the relationship between the U.S. and Iran. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Suicide Prevention 18 mins – “Changing the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline from 1-800-273- 8255 (TALK) to a three-digit number could save lives—especially when coupled with other strategies. Host Meagan Cantwell talks to Greg Miller, a science journalist based in Portland, Oregon, about three effective methods to prevent suicides—crisis hotlines, standardizing mental health care, and restricting lethal means. Greg’s feature is part of a larger package in Science exploring paths out of darkness. With more solutions this week, host Sarah Crespi speaks with A. R. Siders, a social scientist at the Disaster Research Center at the University of Delaware in Newark, about her policy forum on the need for “managed climate retreat”—strategically moving people and property away from high-risk flood and fire zones. Integrating relocation into a larger strategy could maximize its benefits, supporting equality and economic development along the way.” At the link right-click “Download MP3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology and Government 39 mins – “University of Washington History Professor Margaret O’Mara discussed her book The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America, about the rise of Silicon Valley and the role that the federal government played in its evolution.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Unmasking the President 25 mins – “The Presidency According To Donald Trump – How Donald Trump is transforming fundamental ideas about what it means to be president. Diane talks to Lawfare’s Susan Hennessey and Benjamin Wittes about their new book, “Unmaking the Presidency.” At the link right-click “Download This Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Trade Policy 20 mins – “Trump claims victory on two trade deals. Diane talks to New York Times reporter Ana Swanson about what they will mean for U.S. business, the economy, and American families.” At the link right-click “Download This Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam War Lessons Learned 41 mins – “Triton College professor Edward White taught a class on lessons learned from the Vietnam War. He covered what military generals said after the war and how films and documentaries have portrayed the conflict.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Weinstein Sexual Assaults 7 mins – “In New York this week, jury selection began in the trial of former Hollywood titan Harvey Weinstein. News of his alleged sexual predations launched the #MeToo movement in October 2017, through investigative reporting from both The New York Times and The New Yorker. Even as he prepares to stand trial in New York, sexual assault charges were filed against him in Los Angeles. To date, over eighty women in the film industry have accused him of rape and sexual assault and abuse. Weinstein claims they were all consensual acts. The reporting has been groundbreaking in its detail, laying out the allegations for the public. But in Hollywood, Weinstein’s abuses already were an open secret. In 2017, Brooke spoke with Buzzfeed senior culture writer Anne Helen Petersen about the essential role of gossip and whisper networks in protecting the vulnerable and spreading news that threatens the powerful. 

WW II Origins 53 mins – “Lafayette College Professor Robert Weiner taught a class on the origins of World War II in Europe. He described how the British and French governments initially saw Soviet Russia as a bigger threat than the fascists in Germany and Italy. He argued that some leaders’ reluctance to enter another war led to appeasement efforts with Hitler and military unpreparedness.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

WW II Women 54 mins – “Texas Woman’s University Professor Katherine Landdeck taught a class about the ways American women contributed to the World War II effort. She detailed the expectations for women on the home front to write letters to soldiers, plant victory gardens, and work in factories. She also compared what options were available to women for service with each military branch.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

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MMD451 Media Mining Digest: Artificial Intelligence, Australia Wildfires, Books and Learning, Climate Change, Climate Walkout by Amazon Employees, Concorde Airplane, Covid 19 Deaths, Covid 19 Vaccine Development, Creative Inspiration, Dematerialize, Democracy Defined, Democracy in India, Egg Sexing, Einstein, Entrepreneurial Success, Game of Thrones Creator, Gut Microbiome, Human Health Advancement, Human Rights, Hungarian Immigrant Fence, Impeachment Investigation, Index Funds, Institution Reform, Investing long Term, Investment Prospects, Judiciary Hearing on Ukraine, Language Impact, Manuka Honey NASA History, Open Access Books, Pathogen Essential Genes, Poor Kids, Science Language and culture, Seaweed, Solar Storms, Summer Vacation, Walls and Barriers, Wine Making, Wisdom and Knowledge, World War Two Letters

Exercise your ears: the 51 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 601 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,270 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Artificial Intelligence 75 mins – “Melanie Mitchell is a professor of computer science at Portland State University and an external professor at Santa Fe Institute. She has worked on and written about artificial intelligence from fascinating perspectives including adaptive complex systems, genetic algorithms, and the Copycat cognitive architecture which places the process of analogy making at the core of human cognition. From her doctoral work with her advisors Douglas Hofstadter and John Holland to today, she has contributed a lot of important ideas to the field of AI, including her recent book, simply called Artificial Intelligence: A Guide for Thinking Humans. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence 53 mins – “Artificial intelligence is better than humans at playing chess or go, but still has trouble holding a conversation or driving a car. A simple way to think about the discrepancy is through the lens of “common sense” — there are features of the world, from the fact that tables are solid to the prediction that a tree won’t walk across the street, that humans take for granted but that machines have difficulty learning. Melanie Mitchell is a computer scientist and complexity researcher who has written a new book about the prospects of modern AI. We talk about deep learning and other AI strategies, why they currently fall short at equipping computers with a functional “folk physics” understanding of the world, and how we might move forward.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australia Wildfires 12 mins – “For years, climate change experts have said that hotter and drier summers would exacerbate the threat of bushfires in Australia. Fires have been raging since September and a prolonged drought and record-breaking temperatures mean the blazes won’t stop for weeks — if not months.  But to read or watch or listen to the conservative press in Australia is to get an altogether different story: that it’s arson, not climate change, that’s mainly responsible for the deaths of nearly 30 humans and an estimated one billion animals. Damien Cave is the New York Times bureau chief in Sydney, and he recently wrote about “How Rupert Murdoch Is Influencing Australia’s Bushfire Debate.” He spoke to Bob about the media landscape of denial and deflection, and why critics say it’s making it harder to hold the government accountable.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Books and Learning 44 mins – “Software Engineer Andy Matuschak talks about his essay “Why Books Don’t Work” with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Matuschak argues that most books rely on transmissionism, the idea that an author can share an idea in print and the reader will absorb it. And yet after reading a non-fiction book, most readers will struggle to remember any of the ideas in the book. Matuschak argues for a different approach to transmitting ideas via the web including different ways that authors or teachers can test for understanding that will increase the chances of retention and mastery of complex ideas.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 38 mins – “On this episode, Debbie talks to journalist Tatiana Schlossberg about what we can do, as individuals, about climate change.” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Walkout by Amazon Employees 34 mins – “When more than a thousand Amazon employees walked off the job last September, it wasn’t higher wages or better benefits they were demanding. “It was a really, really powerful moment to see such support for something as radical, I guess as climate change,” remembers Sarah Read, an Amazon User Experience Researcher. “That was a moment when I realized that we as employees could change what the company was doing,” agrees software designer Jacob Adamson. “Just the mere act of signing a letter could move the largest company, move the richest man in the world, to do something.” Read and Adamson are both members of Amazon Employees for Climate Justice (AECJ), the group that organized the walkout. Workers in Amazon offices from Seattle to New York to Dublin participated, joined by students, youth groups and tech workers from other companies. It was the culmination of a long-waged employee campaign urging CEO Jeff Bezos and other upper level management to reduce the company’s carbon footprint. (Amazon scored a “C” on the Greenpeace Click Clean Report; tech companies Facebook, Google and Youtube each scored an “A.” Bezos has since pledged to make the company carbon neutral, in line with the Paris Climate Agreement.)…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Concorde Airplane 33 mins – “Not so long ago, if you had a lot of money, you could fly from New York to London in about three hours. The plane was the Concorde, which came out of service in 2003. The Concorde failed commercially, but it lives on as an object of luxury design. In his book, Supersonic, Lawrence Azerrad explores the look and feel of the iconic airplane and the history of it’s creation. Lawrence Azerrad is also a graphic designer, his studio LADdesign specializes in design, art direction, and branding. On this episode, a conversation with Lawrence about the design of the Concorde. “It was part of this dream of the future…coming from an era when we used to think bigger.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Covid 19 Clinician Mental Health 16 mins – “In this Hippo Education Short, psychiatrist Dr. Melissa Shepard sits down with Primary Care RAP host Dr. Neda Frayha for some real talk on the mental health challenges facing health care workers in the COVID-19 pandemic, and some concrete, tangible tools to help us get through this period. Spoiler alert: it’s more than yoga.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Covid 19 Deaths 15 mins – “How are you coping with all of the death around us these days? In this Hippo Education update, Primary Care RAP host Dr. Neda Frayha interviews Dr. BJ Miller, a hospice and palliative care specialist at the University of California, San Francisco whose TED talk on what really matters at the end of life has been viewed over 10 million times. Along with Shoshana Berger, Dr. Miller is the co-author of the book, A Beginner’s Guide to the End: Practical Advice for Living Life and Facing Death and founder of the Center for Dying and Living. In this conversation, he helps us come to terms with our own mortality and provide better support to our patients at the end of life. ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Covid 19 Vaccine Development 15 mins – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on July 15, 2020, the editors discuss a phase 1 study of a candidate vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 and outline what needs to happen next.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creative Inspiration 25 mins- “Humans use creativity every day to solve complex issues.  Some people are more creative than others in problem solving.  How do these people manage to stay ahead of everyone else creatively?  First, these people are inspired. Find something that piques your interest, that drives you to go above and beyond, to experiment and learn.  You can find creative inspiration even at work. If you are passionate about what you are doing, then you are feeding your creativity. Practicing CreativityAnother common denominator of creative people is that they practice creativity.  People do not just wake up already skilled at something. They have to practice it until they have mastered it.  Practice can be defined as two things: To do repeated exercises for proficiency To pursue a profession actively There is a myth that you can’t practice creativity and innovation.  You can practice and become proficient. There are many ways to exercise your creative abilities.  There are exercises for daily, weekly, monthly, and quarterly practice of creative skills.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.  

Crisis Response During Corona Virus 41 mins – “Presenter / Eric Yaverbaum, CEO of Ericho Communications, is a communications, media, and public relations expert with over 35-years in the industry, having co-founded Jericho Communications and served as president from 1985 until its successful merger in 2006 with LIME Public Relations & Promotions. Yaverbaum has worked with a wide-range of top-of-their-industry clients including Sony, IKEA, Progressive Insurance, Domino’s, Beachbody, H&M, and fitness guru Jack LaLanne. He is also a bestselling author who literally wrote the book on public relations—the industry-standard bestseller PR for Dummies—as well as six other titles including, Leadership Secrets of the World’s Most Successful CEOs (over a million copies sold). His expert commentary has been featured on Forbes, The Washington Post, The New York Times, HuffPost, CNBC, Fox Business, and PR Week, among others.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Dematerialize 63 mins – “Andrew McAfee of MIT’s Sloan School of Management talks about his book, More from Less, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. McAfee argues that technology is helping developed nations use fewer resources in producing higher levels of economic output. The improvement is not just a reduction in energy per dollar of GDP but less energy in total as economic growth progresses. This “dematerialization” portends a future that was unimaginable to the economists and pundits of the past. McAfee discusses the potential for dealing with climate change in a dematerialized world, the non-material aspects of economic progress, and the political repercussions of the current distribution of economic progress.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Defined P2 33 mins – “It’s too easy to define democracy in terms of political structures like parliamentary systems or voting procedures. Astra Taylor argues that democracy has to be looked at in much broader terms, she asserted while sitting on a New York ferry — itself is a profoundly democratic service. “We’ve done ourselves a real disservice by letting democracy be limited to this sort of formal political sphere. And not recognizing that democratic principles have to infuse all of the spaces we inhabit,” Taylor told IDEAS host Nahlah Ayed. “So we’re just about freedom and equality. What if you have accessible, efficient public transit?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Democracy in India 14 mins – “ Last week, India’s ruling party (the BJP) passed the Citizenship Amendment Act. The legislation grants a clear path to Indian citizenship to non-Muslim refugees from Bangladesh, Pakistan and Afghanistan. Opponents pointed out flaws in the law almost as soon as it was introduced. The law fails to mention Muslim minorities who face persecution in their own countries, such as the Rohingyas in Myanmar. Critics see it as the latest step in the Hindu nationalist government’s steady march toward a Hindu nation-state. The move follows the revocation of Kashmir’s autonomy this summer, and two million people losing statehood in Northeast India after being left off of a national register of citizens. The list requires citizens to provide documents to prove Indian ancestry. Many Muslims fear that the National Register of Citizens will be enacted across India, leaving religious minorities in the world’s largest democracy in danger of losing their home. Union Home Minister Amit Shah twisted history to provide justification for the Citizenship Amendment Act, shouting to his colleagues in Parliament that decades ago it was the now opposition, Congress Party, that divided India and Pakistan along religious lines. As Indian historian Romila Thapar wrote in The New York Times earlier this year, “extreme nationalists require their own particular version of the past to legitimize their actions in the present.” This week, we go back to a piece reported by OTM Producer Asthaa Chaturvedi. She examines how Hindu nationalists are rewriting Indian history in the world’s largest democracy, with journalist Shoaib Daniyal, political scientist Christophe Jaffrelot, and sociology professor Nandini Sundar.” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” to get the podcast.

Egg Sexing 15 mins – “Researchers, regulators, and the chicken industry are all united in their search for a way to make eggs more ethical by stopping culling—the killing of male chicks born to laying hens. Contributing Correspondent Gretchen Vogel talks with host Sarah Crespi about the many approaches being tried to determine the sex of chicken embryos before they hatch, from robots with lasers, to MRIs, to artificial intelligence, to gene editing with CRISPR. Also this week, Sarah talks with Melanie Bergmann, a marine biologist at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany, about finding microplastic particles in snow all the way up at the Fram Strait, between Greenland and the Svalbarg archipelago in Norway.” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” to get the podcast.

Einstein 36 mins – “In 1905, when Albert Einstein worked as a patent office clerk, he published a series of academic papers that revolutionized physics and our thinking about space and time, mass and energy. His ideas were a great leap forward. Panellists at the Stratford Festival discuss how Einstein revolutionized how we live our lives today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Entrepreneurial Success 29 mins – “Rodney Williams, CEO and Co-Founder of LISNR, leads one of the most disruptive companies in the IoT space and the world of mobile connectivity. He is the 2016 Black Enterprise Tech Entrepreneur of the Year and has also been honored by Ad Age’s Top 40 under 40 and the Upstart100. Prior to LISNR, Rodney spent over four years at Procter & Gamble as a brand manager and is most noted for being the first marketer there to co-write digital patents. He is also a former Lockheed Martin and Department of Energy disruptor. Rodney achieved those honors after earning four degrees by the age of 24, including an MBA and Masters in Integrated Marketing Communications from Howard University.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Game of Thrones Creator 22 mins – “George R.R. Martin is the author of A Song of Ice and Fire, the acclaimed book series that was adapted into the uber-popular HBO show Game of Thrones. These days, he’s in the midst of writing the final two novels in that series. Before he sat down with Nerdette’s Greta Johnsen earlier this month, his team told us that he couldn’t answer the question on everyone’s mind (so, like, when’s the next book coming out?) so we didn’t ask. But Martin did tell us how writing is going, how he’s managing fan expectations and what he expects for the future of fantasy TV. (Plus, we have a super-special announcement at the end of the interview.)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. …

Gut Microbiome 20 mins- “Micro-organisms live inside everything from the human gut to coral—but where do they come from? Host Meagan Cantwell talks to Staff Writer Elizabeth Pennisi about the first comprehensive survey of microbes in Hawaii’s Waimea Valley, which revealed that plants and animals get their unique microbiomes from organisms below them in the food chain or the wider environment. Going global, Meagan then speaks with Erle Ellis, professor of geography and environmental science at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about a project that aggregated the expertise of more than 250 archaeologists to map human land use over the past 10,000 years. This detailed map will help fine-tune climate models.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Health Advancement 45 mins – “From ASM Microbe 2019 in San Francisco, Vincent speaks with Victoria McGovern, Carl Nathan, and Dan Portnoy about advancing human health through innovative collaborations.” At the link right-click “Right click to download TWiM#207” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Rights 28 mins – “Jonathan Sumption assess the pros and cons of written and unwritten constitutions, comparing the US and UK.” At the link right-click “Download,” select “Higher quality,” then “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Hungarian Immigrant Fence 36 mins – “In 2015, as hundreds of thousands of Afghan, Iraqi, Sudanese but mostly Syrian refugees fleeing their respective war zones landed in countries around the world, Hungary was one of several European countries that erected barriers to stave off illegal migrants.  Nearly five years later, those migrants are gone. But the fence remains….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Impeachment Investigation 105 mins – “Former Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch testified before the House Intelligence Committee as a part of the impeachment investigation. Yovanovitch answered questions about her career, her experience in Ukraine and her abrupt dismissal. The hearing saw some of the same grandstanding and distractions as the first public hearing, But we cut out all the unnecessary repetition and theatrics to leave you with just the questions and answers that you need to hear.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Index Funds 27 mins – “While he has been writing articles about index funds for decades, the most read is “30 reasons to fall in love with index funds”.  While the most common advantages are low expenses, low turnover, massive diversification, Paul suggests the #1 reason may be staying as far away as you possibly can from commission-based sales people, con artists and other conflicts of interest typically not associated with index fund providers. Many do-it-yourself investors rely of services that have a large presence on the internet. A wonderful aspect of the internet is the ability to do meaningful due diligence on the reputations of those offering their “special ways” to perform better than index funds.  But can you depend on the information you find on the internet? Paul discusses the services of “search engine suppression consultants.”  These very clever people are wizards at making bad information disappear.  In fact, in many cases their fees are not earned until all the damaging information is totally eliminated.  He reads an example of one such article that claims to address the pros and cons of a well-known investment manager.  The pros are strong convincing points, while the cons are almost the mistakes that we would expect would be found in any firm.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation in Cincinnati 26 mins – “When civic and business leaders have a meeting of the minds, amazing things can happen.  Cincinnati is home to several major corporations and health care organizations. The demand is high for tech innovation.  This midwestern city has created a unique approach to draw in the best talent.  Cintrifuse is the confluence of innovation in Cincinnati. […]” At the link right-click “Download” and “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Institutional Reform 47 mins – “Political Scientist and author Terry Moe of Stanford University talks about his book, The Politics of Institutional Reform with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Moe explores the politics and effectiveness of educational reform in the New Orleans public school system in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Moe finds that policy-makers turned to charter schools for pragmatic reasons and students enjoyed dramatic improvements in educational outcomes as a result. Moe uses this experience to draw lessons about political reforms generally and the power of vested interests to preserve the status quo in the absence of catastrophic events like Katrina.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Long Term 44 mins – “What’s the toughest challenge for many investors? Staying the course for the long term. In this podcast, Paul discusses what he considers “the most useful information for investors.” While adding new insights to his Ultimate Buy and Hold StrategyFine Tuning Your Asset Allocation and Distributions in Retirement articles and podcasts, Paul explores nine decades of returns for six asset classes that academics have studied for over 50 years. It turns out that the end result of the returns has been exactly what the academics predicted, but the trip was not an easy one for investors. See and download the Tables referenced here. Paul hopes that in understanding this, all investors  — especially young investors — will see that the strategy with the most predictable returns is also the one with the best predictable returns, and maintain the focus and confidence to make it through the normal ups and downs of the market without giving up.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Prospects 41 mins – “Paul discusses the comparative returns from the Vanguard, DFA and Best-In-Class Portfolios for 2019. He also responds to 12 questions from listeners and readers of paulmerriman.com’s podcasts, articles, videos, books and recommendations for mutual funds, ETFs, 401k’s, the Ultimate Buy-and-Hold Portfolio and more.  To learn more about comparative returns, take a look at the 2-4 Fund Combo Returns 1928-2018. 12 Q&A  How does the new Fidelity Small-Cap Value (FISVX) compare to our IJS and SLYV?   What’s a good Vanguard Small-Cap Value Fund for a 66-year-old investor? Do you really recommend large and small-cap growth funds? Why are you so high on DFA funds? What’s your plan for helping kids with their IRAs?  When will you be updating the S&P 500 Fine-Tuning Table?  What does a long-time client of Paul’s old firm have to say?  Where can an investor find historical data on stock and bond returns?  What about supplying transcripts of your podcasts?  Which is better: VTWW or FISVX small-cap value funds?  How do Vanguard Value Index and Vanguard Equity Index funds compare? How much would $20,000 become in 45 years if I invest it in small-cap value?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Q & A 44 mins – “In this podcast, Paul shares his thoughts for the coming year and answers investor questions. The S&P 500 has made 5% more than the portfolio you recommend.  Should I put it all in the S&P? What do you think of the new Avantis ETFs? What do you think about structured notes?  In the answer I make reference to an article by Larry Swedroe:  31:34 https://alphaarchitect.com/2019/08/22/structured-notes-the-exploitation-of-retail-investors/ Can whole life insurance cash value be considered the same as bonds? I am 27 with a wife and 2 year old daughter.  What should I do with $150,000? I want to live on $2 million in retirement.  What dividend funds do you recommend? What do I do if my 401k does not offer target date funds? For a young investor do you prefer your portfolio 7 (well diversified) or portfolio 8 (all value).  This is the link to the recommended portfolios:  https://paulmerriman.com/best-in-class-recommended-portfolios-2019/” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Judiciary Hearings on Ukraine..16 mins.- “Today, the Judiciary Committee held a public hearing that Democrats hope will allow them to fully lay out the evidence in their case against Donald Trump. We heard testimony from the Intelligence Committee lawyers from each party. Continuing their line of attack against the fairness of the inquiry’s proceedings, committee Republicans raised a sequence of objection’s to Chairman Rep. Jerry Nadler’s handling of the hearing. The Justice Department’s Inspector General released a report into the underlying evidence that served as the impetus for the Mueller probe. ” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language Impact 31 mins – “We talk to cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsk about how language can influence the way we think.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Manuka Honey 5 mins – “This is a special Microbiology Today edition of Microbe Talk. The latest issue of the Society’s magazine, Microbiology Today, focuses on natural products and drug discovery. In this podcast we talk with two researchers about their work to find new antimicrobial compounds that could be used to form new treatments: Lorena T. Fernández-Martínez from Edge Hill University about her research on actinomycetes and Aled Roberts from Swansea University Medical School about his work on manuka honey.” At the link left-click “Download episode” and select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

NASA History 38 mins – “NASA turns 60 this week. We’re joined by Former NASA chief technologist Mason Peck joins us to discuss the agency’s history of spaceflight milestones, which include landing humans on the Moon (six times!), putting rovers on Mars, sending probes to interstellar space, and partnering on the International Space Station. Beyond these physical exploration achievements, NASA has also revolutionized the human view of Earth, the solar system, the Milky Way, and the deep swaths of space and time beyond our local group of galaxies. We also discuss NASA’s future, including its partnerships with the commercial space sector, megaprojects like the Space Launch System and the James Webb Space Telescope, and human exploration of the Moon and Mars.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Nucleotides Synthesized by Bacteria 44 mins – “The TWiM holobionts pay tribute to Stuart Levy, and reveal the remarkably diverse array of cyclic nucleotides synthesized by bacteria that likely mediate interactions with animal and plant hosts.” At the link right-click “Right click to download TWiM#206” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Access Books 20 mins – “Open access is transforming scholarly journal publishing, yet the looming size of the journal ecosystem has thrown into deep shadow an equally remarkable transformation in scholarly books. In recent years, e-book acquisition rates and usage have soared. E-books offer multiple advantages, from acquisition models to accessibility and researcher engagement metrics. In parallel with research coming out of the UK, an ongoing study by the US-based Book Industry Study Group is identifying the challenges in understanding the usage of OA e-books. This research will provide much needed documentation on e-book impact levels, especially for funders of open access publishing programs….” At the link right-click “Download and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Pathogen Essential Genes 55 mins – “At Georgia Tech, members and trainees of the Center for Microbial Dynamics and Infection discuss the identification of pathogen essential genes during coinfections, and how coral management can improve coral defenses against pathogens.” At the link right-click “Right click to download TWiM#208” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poor Kids 50 mins – “Sociologist Susan Mayer of the University of Chicago talks about her book What Money Can’t Buy with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mayer reports on her research which found that giving poor parents money had little measured effect on improving the lives of their children. She emphasizes the importance of accurately understanding the challenges facing children in poverty if the goal is to actually help them. She concludes that there is no simple way to help the most vulnerable children and that strategies to help them must recognize this reality. The conversation ends with a discussion of the potential role of education and parenting practices to help children in poor families.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Language and Culture 23 mins – “As a former science teacher and now professor of education at Stanford, Dr. Bryan A. Brown is keenly interested in improving science teaching and learning in urban communities by investigating how language and culture matter for effective science teaching. Some of this work is shared in his new book Science in the City, where Brown examines the interplay of language and culture in effective science teaching. Dr. Brown joins us to discuss his new book, the power of using technology to adapt to the cultural background of our students, and the need for adjusting our science language that better serves students in inner-city context.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scripture 36 mins – “THE LOST ART OF SCRIPTURE – Karen Armstrong is a former Catholic sister who resided in a convent, and is now a hugely popular writer on religious beliefs who travels the world. She now describes herself as a freelance monotheist. Her focus now is on the sounds, rituals and power of scripture, all of which she feels is endangered in our secular, digital age. She joins Nahlah Ayed to talk about recovering what she calls “the lost art of scripture.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Seaweed 15 mins – “For countries like Malaysia, Tanzania and the Philippines, seaweed agriculture is a major industry. However, these countries still see significant crop losses due to disease and pests. So what role does microbiology have in helping these countries’ growth in the industry? On this month’s episode Matt visited London’s Natural History Museum to talk to Professor Juliet Brodie. Professor Brodie is a seaweed researcher working with GlobalSeaweedSTAR, a programme aiming to grow the research and innovation capabilities of developing countries engaged in seaweed farming. To find out more about GlobalseaweedSTAR’s work, visit their website. www.globalseaweed.org/” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Storms 5 mins – “A massive solar storm today could create electrical chaos in our modern technological society Solar storms can be much more powerful — as much as ten times more powerful — than we previously thought, according to a new study led by researchers from Lund University.  They found evidence of a massive solar storm in 660 BCE in chemical traces formed in the atmosphere which then rained down and were found in ice cores from Greenland. “We saw a huge spike in the ice cores,” said Florian Mekhaldi, a co-author of the paper that announced this discovery, and a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Geology at Lund University in Sweden. “That’s a signal that Earth was hit by some huge event.” Research in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Previous research by the group had found evidence of two other major solar storms in ice cores that date back to 775 and 994 CE. Taken together, they prove that massive solar storms have happened throughout history that were much more powerful than anything we’ve been able to detect in the past 70 years, when we first began to monitor solar activity in earnest. This suggests that we might be underestimating the risk of solar storms if our assessment was based on our relatively recent monitoring efforts, said Mekhaldi. Solar storms are violent bursts of charged particles that are driven off the sun by the sun’s magnetic field. A particularly powerful storm on the surface of the star can end up forming solar flares and coronal mass ejections that send particles at tremendous speed towards us. They don’t have much impact on biological life on Earth.  But their interaction with the Earth’s magnetic field can cause severe disruptions to our electric grid and satellite system by causing electric currents to surge.  For the past 70 years, scientists have been using satellites to monitor solar storms, and occasionally we’ve experienced large ones that have caused significant disruption. A large solar storm caused a massive power outage in Quebec in 1989 and another had similar impacts in Malmö, Sweden in 2003. But according to Mekhaldi, they were rather mild events that aren’t even detectable in the ice cores he examined. The proof is in the ice The research team found large concentrations of radioactive isotopes beryllium-10 and chlorine-36 left over from the 660 BCE solar storm when they looked at ice cores from Greenland.”These cosmic rays are so high energy, they produce a lot of particles in the atmosphere,” said Raimund Muscheler, the senior author of the paper and a professor in the department of geology at Lund University. Evidence of a powerful solar storm from 660 BCE was discovered in ice cores extracted from Greenland. (Raimund Muscheler) The more they come into the atmosphere, they more they produce in the ice cores and you can see back in time this way.” If such a powerful solar storm were to occur today in our modern technological society, it could take weeks to months to restore power, and cost trillions of dollars in damages and repairs, according to Mekhadi. Given the enormous repercussions, we need to better understand its impact on Earth and take precautions. For now, scientists can’t say how often these massive solar storms occur, or when the next one will happen. But Mekhaldi and his colleagues will continue to search for traces of other major solar storms in the ice to get a better picture of how often they occur.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Summer Vacation 14 mins – “This past week, my kids went back to school. Summer vacation has come and gone. And that’s gotten me thinking about the very idea of summer vacation because every summer, for the past several years, my wife, her sisters and our families have had this tradition of going to a cabin for a few days to get out of the city. We don’t own a cabin. We have to rent one. And this year, the process of finding it, looking at pictures of all the possible cabins on all the possible lakes, made me wonder about this particular, middle-class American ritual of going into the wilderness for vacation, where that ritual came from, and what it says about our relationship to modern life.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

This American Life – “I’m announcing a whole new podcast, and giving you a listen to the first episode. The podcast is called Before It Had a Theme, and on it, Britta Greene an I discuss and deconstruct old episodes of This American Life. On this episode, we discuss the very first episode of that show, as well as why the show is worth discussing, how we and others became fans of the show, and why we love Ira Glass’s mother.” The podcast isn’t available at the link, but is included in this blog’s archive.

US and UK Constitutional Models 28 mins – “Jonathan Sumption, formerly one of England and Wales’s most senior judges sitting in the UK’s Supreme Court, assesses the US and UK’s constitutional models.” The podcast isn’t available at the link, but is included in this blog’s archive.

Walls and Barriers 36 mins – “Canadian author and journalist Marcello Di Cintio is a wall traveller and says the 21st century has been a boom time for walls. In 2012, he wrote a book about our walled world and has made it his business to track them since. The Twenty-Walled Century is the fifth and final part in our series: Walking the Border: Walls That Divide Us.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Wine Making 33 mins – “Claude Blankiet was a pioneer in stone washing denim and is now applying the same innovative thinking to wine making. While visiting New York from France, he noticed very traditional styles and a lack of ingenuity in fashion. He moved there in the 1970’s to continue his work in the jean business, eventually creating a technique of washing denim in pumice stones to create worn, lighter wash jeans. Years later, he operates his Napa winery using the same inventive mentality. Upon entering the wine business, Blankiet began work with experienced, yet stubborn winemakers. Professionals were limited by their own knowledge making the wine high quality, but not progressive, just as the fashion industry had been. Blankiet shifted his business away from such mentors and now relied solely on his own taste, which has led to his success.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” from “OK” to get the podcast.

Wisdom and Knowledge 44 mins – “Software Engineer Andy Matuschak talks about his essay “Why Books Don’t Work” with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Matuschak argues that most books rely on transmissionism, the idea that an author can share an idea in print and the reader will absorb it. And yet after reading a non-fiction book, most readers will struggle to remember any of the ideas in the book. Matuschak argues for a different approach to transmitting ideas via the web including different ways that authors or teachers can test for understanding that will increase the chances of retention and mastery of complex ideas.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War Two Letters 33 mins – “Comedian Nicole Byer shares some of the tips she’s learned from friends on her podcast Why Won’t You Date Me. Reporter Dan Lamothe tells us about reading hundreds of letters from World War II, Heather Mizeur describes how she rebuilt her politics after losing an election, and Cristen Conger and Caroline Ervin define what being Unladylike means to them.” At the link find the title, “Nicole Byer Wants to Date You (Encore),” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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MMD450 Media Mining Digest: Africa’s Future, Al Hussein on Human Rights, Autism, Biology Becomes Technology, Bisphenol A (BPA), Blockchain Defined, Cervantes, Chicago Water Tunnels, China 2049, DACA’s Implementation, Dilberts Creator, Disabilities Forum, Educational Reform, Epilepsy Drugs, Ethical Algorithms, Evangelical Trump, Gambling, Government Reform, Holocaust Survivors, Honest Income, Immigration Policy, Impeachment Ends, Innovation Bootcamp, Irrationality, Judiciary, Language Shapes Thought, Low Head Dams, Mathematician Interview, NBA Innovation Experience, Paul Dirac, Precognition, Railroading, Secondhand, Shade Saves, Snow Removal in Colorado, Supply Side Transparency, Telemedicine for Covid 19, Theranos Whistleblower, Trump Analyzed, Ukraine Investigation, Vaccine Development, Vietnam War Music

Exercise your ears: the 52 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 772 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,270 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Africa’s Future 77 mins – “ The new year 2020 marks the beginning of a promising decade for Africa. Through at least the first half of the decade, economic growth across Africa will continue to outperform that of other regions, with the continent continuing to be home to seven of the world’s 10 fastest-growing economies. Collective action among African and global policymakers to improve the livelihoods of all under the blueprint of the sustainable development goals and the African Union’s Agenda 2063 is creating a shared energy and excitement around Africa’s potential. With business environments improving, regional integration centered around the African Continental Free Trade Agreement progressing, and the transformational technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution spreading, never before has the region been better primed for trade, investment, and mutually beneficial partnerships. The recent, unprecedented interest of an increasingly diversified group of external partners to engage with Africa highlights this potential. Despite the continent’s promise, though, obstacles to success linger, as job creation still has not caught up with the growing youth labor force, gaps in good and inclusive governance remain, and climate change as well as state fragility threaten to reverse the hard-won gains of past decades. The Africa Growth Initiative (AGI) at Brookings explores these trends and features diverse expert viewpoints in Foresight Africa, its annual flagship report. Foresight Africa 2020 is a special edition focusing on the top priorities for the continent over the next decade: 2020-2030.” At the link right-click“audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Al Hussein on Human Rights 36 mins – “Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein is perhaps best known as the outspoken UN High Commissioner for Human Rights — considered the world’s moral-arbiter-in-chief — from 2014 to 2018. But he refused to run for a second term because he says it might have meant  “bending a knee in supplication” before the five permanent members of the UN Security Council: United States, France, Russia, China and the United Kingdom. “I didn’t see my job as defending governments. Governments are more than capable of defending themselves. My job is not to defend them. Why should I excuse their behaviour? Why should I play to them? Why should I grovel before them?” Al Hussein told Ideas producer Mary Lynk at his home in Harlem, New York. “The job is to speak on behalf of all of those who are in detention, who are arbitrarily arrested, who are denied basic services, the right to education, the right to health, the right to adequate housing, clean drinking water.”

Autism 22 mins – “Many people with autistic spectrum disorder learn techniques to overcome their difficulties interacting with others. The first study that has looked at the consequences of these compensatory strategies reveals some benefits but also significant downsides. The consequences can be stress, low self-esteem, mental illness and misdiagnosis. Claudia talks to lead researcher Professor Francesca Happé from King’s College London and Eloise Stark, a woman with autism. A new research programme at Imperial College London is investigating the link between obesity and infertility in men. Madeleine Finlay explores why weight gain and other factors of modern life might be influencing men’s sperm health. Tick-borne Lyme disease is on the rise in the northern hemisphere. Lyme disease can develop into a serious illness. It is hard to diagnosis early and delayed diagnosis means lengthy treatment and recovery. Dr Mollie Jewett at the University of Central Florida is working on a much faster means of diagnosis, and a more effective treatment. Deborah Cohen meets Dr Jewett and her ticks. Graham Easton is in the Health Check studio to talk about links between hearing loss and dementia, and the worrying spread of bacteria resistant to carbapenems, one of the most important kinds of antibiotic drugs.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher Quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biology Becomes Technology 8 mins – “We’ve been promised a future of chrome — but what if the future is fleshy?” asks biological designer Christina Agapakis. In this awe-inspiring talk, Agapakis details her work in synthetic biology — a multidisciplinary area of research that pokes holes in the line between what’s natural and artificial — and shares how breaking down the boundaries between science, society, nature and technology can lead us to imagine different possible futures.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Bisphenol A (BPA..19 mins – “As part of a special issue on chemicals for tomorrow’s Earth, we’ve got two green chemistry stories. First, host Sarah Crespi talks with contributing correspondent Warren Cornwell about how a company came up with a replacement for the popular can lining material bisphenol A and then recruited knowledgeable critics to test its safety. Sarah is also joined by Beate Escher of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the University of Tübingen to discuss ways to trace complex mixtures of humanmade chemicals in the environment. They talk about how new technologies can help detect these mixtures, understand their toxicity, and eventually connect their effects on the environment, wildlife, and people.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain ABRA 26 mins – “What is the blockchain according to Bill Tai? The internet. The blockchain is the same thing but with assets. It can aggregate history into groups of information with communities of interests surrounding it. CEO of ABRA, Bill Barydt. ABRA has recently partnered with the extremely well known American Express. ABRA is a digital currency wallet for IOS and Android. It allows you to store digital dollars on your smartphone with no bank involved. It is the only application that interoperates between the traditional and the new worlds. The third guest was Toni Lane Casserly, founder of Vnation.io. The idea? To leverage core innovation made by Blockchain infrastructure so that people can design new systems of governance. Next was Kevin Shen from Averon with a goal to make sure people aren’t forgetting they are secure on that side. Lastly, on the legal end of the blockchain was Pawel Kuskowski from Coinfirm. Coinfirm serves as a foundation for the safe adoption and use of blockchain.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Defined 27 mins – “What is the blockchain according to Bill Tai? The internet. The blockchain is the same thing but with assets. It can aggregate history into groups of information with communities of interests surrounding it. CEO of ABRA, Bill Barydt. ABRA has recently partnered with the extremely well known American Express. ABRA is a digital currency wallet for IOS and Android. It allows you to store digital dollars on your smartphone with no bank involved. It is the only application that interoperates between the traditional and the new worlds. The third guest was Toni Lane Casserly, founder of Vnation.io. The idea? To leverage core innovation made by Blockchain infrastructure so that people can design new systems of governance. Next was Kevin Shen from Averon with a goal to make sure people aren’t forgetting they are secure on that side. Lastly, on the legal end of the blockchain was Pawel Kuskowski from Coinfirm. Coinfirm serves as a foundation for the safe adoption and use of blockchain.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cervantes 9 mins – “He was destined for greatness.  No one knew it but him.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Chicago Water Tunnels 13 mins – “Managing stormwater in cities is important to reduce flooding and secure people and property. Stormwater needs some kind of treatment before it flows to surface waters, and that treatment can be essential in older areas where stormwater and sanitary waste are collected in combined sewers. The Chicago area has built a network of underground tunnels to store that stormwater for later treatment before it goes to the river. To understand this extraordinary project we’re talking with Kevin Fitzpatrick, Managing Civil Engineer for the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago, who works on what is called the Tunnel and Reservoir Plan.” At the link find the title, “Storing Stormwater Underground – Chicago’s Deep tunnel System,” and right-click “Listen to this episode nowto get the podcast.

China 2049 99 mins – “In 2012, the Chinese government announced two centennial goals. The first was to double the 2010 GDP and per capita income for both urban and rural residents by 2021. The second was to build China into a fully developed country by 2049, the year when the People’s Republic of China (PRC) celebrates its centenary. Indeed, China has ascended successfully from one of the world’s poorest economies in 1978 to a high middle-income economy in 2019. However, there are greater uncertainties surrounding the path to the second centennial goal. How might rising domestic challenges such as an aging population, automation and AI, and financial risks impact China’s growth and stability? How might escalating economic tensions at home and abroad and de-globalization affect the international environment for China’s development? What role might China be able to play in managing tensions, reforming the global economic order, and developing nodes of cooperation in the face of global challenges such as climate change and financial instability?” At the link right-click “audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China Economy 58 mins – “The resilience of China’s economy since the global financial crisis has provided a welcome boost to global demand, and substantial progress has been made in rebalancing China’s external accounts. However, according to the latest IMF annual report on China’s economy, the country’s growth remains too reliant on investment and credit, with growing risks in the financial sector, local government finances, and real estate. The resulting questions surrounding China’s economic outlook reverberate globally, given China’s meteoric rise over the past three decades to become the second-largest economy in the world. On September 26, Brookings hosted a discussion on the IMF’s latest assessment of the economic outlook and policies in China. In particular, the panel explored recent economic developments and whether a ‘hard landing’ of the economy is imminent, and reviewed initial progress with the government’s reform blueprint announced last year. Brookings Vice President Kemal Derviș introduced the panel, followed by a short presentation by Markus Rodlauer, IMF Deputy Director of the Asia and Pacific Department and China Mission Chief, and then moderated a discussion onstage.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

DACA’s Implementation 45 mins – “Given the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program’s unique position at the convergence of the immigration and education fields, the Migration Policy Institute’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy has sought to capture the ways in which local educational institutions, legal service providers, and youth advocates have responded to DACA’s first phase. In this webinar, authors of the report Lessons from the Local Level: DACA’s Implementation and Impact on Education and Training Success discuss key challenges facing legal service providers and educators serving DACA youth, along with lessons for new and ongoing efforts seeking to support the implementation of the DACA and Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents programs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Dilbert Creator 39 mins – “Today on the Knowledge Project, I speak with Scott Adams (@ScottAdamsSays), creator of the Dilbert cartoon and author of multiple best-selling books, including his most recent Loserthink: How Untrained Brains are Ruining America. After a stalled career in the telecommunications and banking industry left Scott unfulfilled and uncertain of his future, he decided to try his hand at his childhood dream of becoming a cartoonist. As you’ll hear in this interview, Scott combined his unique talents with some hard work, persistence, some kind encouragement from a stranger, and a little luck, to transform his little cartoon into a syndicated powerhouse that’s recognized all over the world. Dilbert now appears in over 2,000 newspapers in 65 countries and is translated into 25 languages….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabilities Forum 10 mins – “Publishing has long approached visual disabilities as an opportunity, at least for its products. Over many decades, publishers have created special editions of books and other texts in Braille and in large print. The proliferation of audio books, too, means even greater access to information and entertainment for the visually impaired. Access to jobs in publishing for the disabled, though, is another matter. While publishing has made strides in opening its ranks to greater diversity, the industry still struggles with inclusion for people with disabilities. At Elsevier, Simon Holt, a senior acquisitions editor, is chair of Elsevier Enabled, a company-wide initiative to promote an accessible workplace and to highlight best practices for creating an inclusive professional culture. “As publishers, we have a responsibility to our customers,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “If we aren’t a diverse set of people, we’re not going to be able to publish diverse perspectives, and we’re not going to be aware of the challenges that face our readers, including, of course, accessibility.” December 3rd is observed as International Day of Persons with Disabilities, an occasion first proclaimed by the United Nations in 1992. For Holt, who is visually impaired, the occasion is an opportunity to remind people that physical challenges often give individuals special strengths. “Obviously through childhood, like a lot of people, books were very important to me, and access to books in large print and audio were also very important to me. The education sector is quite good at making provision for differently-abled people,” he explains. “When I got into the world of work, I realized that it was different. I found the publishing industry to be a place where people were super wanting to help but not really knowing how to help. I’d go to interviews and I’d get some inappropriate questions. I thought, well, if I ever get to a position where I can change things, then I’m going to try and do that, so in the future when people come for an interview the manager will see somebody who’s resilient, resourceful, and good at problem solving and good at building relationships, etc., as a result of having a disability, as opposed to just seeing limitations and problems.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Reform 47 mins – “Political Scientist and author Terry Moe of Stanford University talks about his book, The Politics of Institutional Reform with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Moe explores the politics and effectiveness of educational reform in the New Orleans public school system in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Moe finds that policy-makers turned to charter schools for pragmatic reasons and students enjoyed dramatic improvements in educational outcomes as a result. Moe uses this experience to draw lessons about political reforms generally and the power of vested interests to preserve the status quo in the absence of catastrophic events like Katrina.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Epilepsy Drugs 19 mins – “About one-third of people with epilepsy are treatment resistant. Up until now, epilepsy treatments have focused on taming seizures rather than the source of the disease and for good reason—so many roads lead to epilepsy: traumatic brain injury, extreme fever and infection, and genetic disorders, to name a few. Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks with host Sarah Crespi about researchers that are turning back the pages on epilepsy, trying to get to the beginning of the story where new treatments might work. And Sarah also talks with Torsten Neurbert at the Technical University of Denmark’s National Space Institute in Kongens Lyngby about capturing high-altitude “transient luminous events” from the International Space Station (ISS). These lightning-induced bursts of light, color, and occasionally gamma rays were first reported in the 1990s but had only been recorded from the ground or aircraft. With new measurements from the ISS come new insights into the anatomy of lightning.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethical Algorithms 39 mins – “On January 14, Michael Kearns and Aaron Roth, authors of “The Ethical Algorithm: The Science of Socially Aware Algorithm Design”, joined Brookings scholar Nicol Turner-Lee to discuss the role, limits, and challenges of implementing ethical algorithms. Defining ethical algorithmsFrom education to employment, algorithms are increasingly augmenting human decisionmaking in important sectors. Despite widespread implementation to streamline processes, reduce human prejudice, and cut costs, algorithms are far from neutral. In fact, algorithmic bias can lead to systematically discriminatory outcomes that have significant impacts on people’s lives. Under most circumstances, algorithmic bias is an unintentional side effect of machine learning. Training these algorithms involves the collection and analysis of enormous quantities of historical data that is used to inform decisionmaking and optimization. However, any historical biases embedded in the data can be absorbed and reproduced.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Reform 40 mins – “The United States is at a major inflection point as the government struggles to contain a widespread pandemic and every facet of life has been upended. The ongoing crisis has exposed government shortcomings and raised questions about performance, efficiency, and effectiveness. The country faces critical issues in terms of public health, the economy, and social well-being. Problems such as political polarization, disinformation, and the weaponization of social media continue to be problematic in the lead-up to the 2020 elections. On May 5, as part of the twelfth annual A. Alfred Taubman Forum on Public Policy, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted a webinar to look at problems of American government and possible structural and institutional reforms. Speakers discussed how to improve government performance and how to mitigate the effects of disinformation and polarization—all obstacles that hinder good governance.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Holocaust Survivors 52 mins – “Today I’m excited to welcome to The Knowledge Project Esther Perel, renowned couples therapist and New York Times best selling author of Mating in Captivity and The State of Affairs. Esther’s refreshingly frank approach to topics like sex, intimacy, divorce, and fidelity has made her one of the most unique and sought after voices on modern relationships. Between her best-selling books, her TED talks (which have been viewed nearly 30 million times,) and her award-winning podcasts, Esther’s simple, yet insightful advice is positively impacting millions of people all over the globe from the bedroom to the boardroom. (Her new podcast series How’s Work? shifts her expertise from couples, to the stressors, conflicts and ever-changing dynamics of the workplace.) In this interview, Esther shares lessons she learned from two parents who survived the Holocaust and the key differences between living and surviving. She also offers practical strategies for reigniting romance in a busy or “autopilot” relationship, how to spot and overcome common triggers and fight patterns that weaken our bonds, and how we can invite more imagination and play into our partnerships.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honest Income 56 mins – “Economist and author Daniel Klein of George Mason University talks about the ethics of working and the potential for our working lives to make the world a better place. This is a wide-ranging conversation that includes discussion of Adam Smith, what jobs we should work on, what charities we should donate to, how we can make ourselves more virtuous, the movies Se7en and Sabrina, and ultimately what Adam Smith calls “the becoming use of our own.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Horse Evolution 33 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the origins of horses, from their dog sized ancestors to their proliferation in the New World until hunted to extinction, their domestication in Asia and their development since. The genetics of the modern horse are the most studied of any animal, after humans, yet it is still uncertain why they only have one toe on each foot when their wider family had more, or whether speed or stamina has been more important in their evolution. What is clear, though, is that when humans first chose to ride horses, as well as eat them, the future of both species changed immeasurably.” At the link right-click “Download,” select “Higher Quality,” then right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Policy P2 50 mins – “In recent years, the humanitarian and migration crisis in the three Northern Triangle countries of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras has resulted in increasing international migration, particularly of women and children as well as unaccompanied minors. Most of them cross the Guatemala-Mexico border to head towards the United States, while some migrate to countries in the region, such as Costa Rica. Many are fleeing serious violence carried out by gangs and other non-state actors, though the search for better livelihoods and family reunification with relatives already in the United States plays a role as well. Governments do not control territories where gangs and drug cartels rule, nor are they able to protect women and girls from domestic abuse and other forms of violence or insecurity. Natural disasters, climate change, food insecurity, and poor economic conditions exacerbate the situation for vulnerable people. This panel discussed the best ways for governments, international organizations, and NGOs in the region to address this crisis, particularly in terms of root causes and the protection of families and children.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Policy P3 54 mins – “Under the current administration, U.S.-Mexico border polices have dominated headlines, becoming both the symbol and testing ground of hardline immigration policy. Family separation, the deaths of children in immigration custody, and the detention of men, women, and children in unsafe, overcrowded conditions have stirred national concern. The asylum system alone has been hamstrung by “metering” that slows entry to a trickle, enormous court backlogs, the wholesale return to Mexico of asylum applicants awaiting their court appearances, and policies that attempt to force applicants to first seek protection in other countries. This panel explores what these policies have meant to asylum seekers and the communities that straddle the 2,000-mile-long line. Topics include family separation, Remain in Mexico, the wall, state and local work, and more. The panelists also considered whether the administration is achieving results with its efforts to reshape overall enforcement, the responses from local border communities, and related litigation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Policy P4 52 mins – “From Donald Trump’s first utterances as a presidential candidate in 2015 to the hundreds of policy actions undertaken during his administration, immigration has loomed as the major touchstone for his political base. It is the issue to which the president and his administration return again and again. Chaos at the U.S.-Mexico border resulted from a sharp uptick in flows, as well as outmatched policies, infrastructure, and resources. Now, a growing number of Americans cite immigration as one of the most crucial national issues. Yet Congress remains incapable of even small-bore fixes, continuing its nearly two-decade inability to undertake substantive immigration legislation. Vast differences exist among Republican and Democratic politicians and other stakeholders—from “build the wall” and narrowing humanitarian protections on one side, to #AbolishICE and pressing to decriminalize illegal crossings on the other. Whither immigration as high-stakes elections approach in 2020? In this lively State of Play conversation, political and policy experts will explore the politics of immigration, the pitfalls for both political parties, and the potential for a post-election pause in the brinkmanship, along with what other pressing challenges may converge to force action in Washington.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment Ends 18 mins – “Where are we on impeachment today? Lawmakers in the Senate voted yesterday along near-perfect party lines to acquit President Trump of the two articles of impeachment, abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The only Republican to break ranks was Utah’s junior Senator Mitt Romney, who voted to convict based on only the abuse of power charge. Alabama Democrat Doug Jones, a moderate up for election in November, whose vote was seen by members of his party as up in the air, ultimately voted to convict the President. And with those votes cast, the impeachment trial of Donald J. Trump has come to an end.  On today’s episode: Andrea Bernstein, senior editor for politics and policy for WNYC News and co-host of the podcast Trump Inc. and the author of American Oligarchs: The Kushners, the Trumps, and the Marriage of Money and Power (W. W. Norton & Company, January 2020)” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Bootcamp 26 mins – “…My strong belief is that creativity is not a gift.  It is not bestowed on people, it is a skill that anybody can learn, practice, and become proficient at.  It ignores age, demographics, education levels, and geography.  It is the ability to put your own thought processes in place, to come up with the next idea, product, or service.  A lot of people are self-pessimistic and are convinced that they do not have it and they are not creative. The fact is that we are creative creatures; we were created to create.  Think about kids and how creative they are with a simple object like a toilet paper roll. The problem is through the process of our education systems and through jobs, we literally beat that creativity out of our people.  How do we bring back that amount of creativity that we see in kids and bring it back to our day to day lives?  We need that ability to take our filters off and see things from an unbiased and different perspective.  I had a conversation with a co-worker many years ago about “old think and new think.”  Old think is when you are coming up with an idea and then you put a filter on it and decide to go safe and go with the old way of doing things.  New think is all about breaking perspectives and getting rid of perspectives that confine and restrict us from coming up with new ideas.  The best ideas will sound stupid.  If you are not coming up with stupid ideas, then try harder!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language Shapes Thought 46 mins – “BS 168 is an interview with psychologist Cecilia Heyes from Oxford University in the UK. We talk about her fascinating book “Cognitive Gadgets: The Cultural Evolution of Thinking.” Our focus is on exploring the evidence that several cognitive skills that appear to be unique to humans are learned from other people rather than being inherited genetically as is often assumed. Her proposal that language is a cognitive gadget NOT a cognitive instinct is controversial and has very important implications. Cognitive Gadgets is written for an academic audience, but this interview makes the key ideas assessable to everyone.” At the link left-click the down-pointing and “Save As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Low Head Dams 12 mins – “People have been building dams for centuries to impound water for drinking and recreation, to support navigation, to manage floods, and as a source of hydroelectric power. But dams can also present dangers. Low-head dams, in particular, can pose invisible and deadly hazards to swimmers and boaters. To learn more about these dams, the risks they present, and what we can do about them we talk with Roger Adams, President of the Association of State Dam Safety Officials, and Paul Schweiger, a member of the Association and Vice President and Dams and Hydraulics Section Manager with Gannett Fleming.” At the link find the title, “Dam Dangers – The Risks of Low-Head Dams,” and right-click “Listen to this episode now” to get the podcast.

Mathematician Interview 64 mins – “Today on The Knowledge Project, I speak with Steven Strogatz (@StevenStrogatz), professor of applied mathematics at Cornell University and the author of five books. His most recent book, Infinite Powers explores the power of calculus in reshaping our world, from its role in ensuring NASA’s rocket wouldn’t miss the moon, the development of technologies like GPS, cell phones, and ultrasound, to downgrading AIDS from an acute fatal disease to a manageable chronic condition. In this discussion, Steven and I talk about the negative stigma of math, how to make it fun again, and what parents can do to encourage their children to embrace math as a tool to explore the wonders of the universe. We also talk about decision making, mental models of learning, and why it’s critical to put your ego on the shelf when you venture into new, uncharted territory.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paul Dirac 34 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the theoretical physicist Dirac (1902-1984), whose achievements far exceed his general fame. To his peers, he was ranked with Einstein and, when he moved to America in his retirement, he was welcomed as if he were Shakespeare. Born in Bristol, he trained as an engineer before developing theories in his twenties that changed the understanding of quantum mechanics, bringing him a Nobel Prize in 1933 which he shared with Erwin Schrödinger. He continued to make deep contributions, bringing abstract maths to physics, beyond predicting anti-particles as he did in his Dirac Equation.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Higher Quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Precognition 36 mins – “In 2011, an American psychologist named Daryl Bem proved the impossible. He showed that precognition — the ability to sense the future — is real. His study was explosive, and shook the very foundations of psychology.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Railroading 10 mins – “The US freight railroad system is moving to a different operating strategy, called Precision Scheduled Railroading (PSR), intended to speed up service, get better utilization from infrastructure, and reduce operating costs. What is it and why does it matter? In this interview, we learn about PSR from John Friedmann, who is Vice President-Network Planning and Optimization for the Norfolk Southern railroad.” At the link find the title, “Precision Scheduled Railroading,” and right-click ”Listen to this episode now” to get the podcast.

Secondhand 46 mins – “Journalist and author Adam Minter talks about his book Secondhand with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Minter explores the strange and fascinating world of secondhand stuff–the downsizing that the elderly do when they move to smaller quarters, the unseen side of Goodwill Industries, and the global market for rags.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Snow Removal in Colorado 13 mins – “Colorado gets plenty of snow in the winter – some mountain areas dig out of as much as 40 feet in a season. Keeping the state roads open and safe for trucks and cars is both important and demanding. To find out more about how it’s done, the role technology is playing, we are speaking with Kyle Lester, who is Director of Maintenance and Operations for the Colorado Dept. of Transportation.” At the link find the title, “Battling Snow on the Roads of Colorado,” and right-click “Listen to this episode now” to get the podcast.

Supply Side Transparency 9 mins – “In our own homes and in the House of Representatives, the holder of the power of the purse is in a powerful position. Spending choices determine what we will have for dinner and how government will invest in guns and butter. Yet spending choices also matter in many far-reaching and lasting ways. Welcome to Copyright Clearance Center’s podcast series. I’m Christopher Kenneally for Beyond the Book. Jane Mosbacher Morris is founder and CEO of To The Market, a company that connects businesses and consumers to ethically made products from around the world. In her new book, Buy the Change You Want to See, Mosbacher Morris urges us to think consciously about all of our purchases and to leverage our consumption habits to bring about change in the world around us. The choices we make whenever we open our wallet, she says, affect our environment, our communities, and our culture. Jane Mosbacher Morris joins me now on Beyond the Book. Welcome, Jane.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Telemedicine for Covid 19 11 mins – “Recognizing that patients prioritize convenient and inexpensive care, Duffy and Lee recently asked whether in-person visits should become the second, third, or even last option for meeting patient needs.1 Previous work has specifically described the potential for using telemedicine in disasters and public health emergencies.2 No telemedicine program can be created overnight, but U.S. health systems that have already implemented telemedical innovations can leverage them for the response to Covid-19.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Theranos Whistleblower 17 mins – “In the second episode of our “Entrepreneurship and Ethics” miniseries, Stanford professor Tom Byers connects with Theranos whistleblower Erika Cheung. Together, they explore how she found the courage to speak up, and why she’s starting a nonprofit organization focused on creating ethical toolkits for entrepreneurs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ukraine Investigation P1 35 mins – “The first two years of the Trump presidency were tied up with the Russia scandal. Now, there’s another scandal involving Russia’s next-door neighbor: Ukraine. The revelation that President Trump and his envoys pressured the Ukrainian government for information about debunked claims of Biden family corruption in Ukraine have brought Ukrainian domestic politics onto the American stage. The Ukrainian side of this very American scandal is complicated yet vital to understanding the whistleblower complaint and the reality of what happened with the Ukrainian prosecutor and Joe Biden’s son. Quinta Jurecic sat down with Alina Polyakova, the Director of the Project on Global Democracy and Emerging Technology at the Brookings Institution, to break it all down. They talked about recent Ukrainian political developments, what exactly Joe Biden did or didn’t do in Ukraine, and what this might mean for the U.S.-Ukraine relationship going forward.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ukraine Investigation P2 39 mins – “There is an evolving standoff between the House Intelligence Committee and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence over a whistleblower complaint reportedly involving President Trump. Meanwhile, reports have emerged that Trump urged the president of Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden’s son during a July telephone call between the two leaders—have captured national attention in the past week. In a series of public comments, both President Trump and his personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, have confirmed certain aspects of Ukraine reporting. Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire is scheduled to testify before the House Intelligence Committee on Thursday and will likely face questions about the whistleblower, the president’s phone call and the potential links between the two. Benjamin Wittes talked with Susan Hennessey, David Kris, Bob Litt and Margaret Taylor to try to make sense of it all.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ukraine Investigation P3 108 mins – “On Thursday, Fiona Hill, the former National Security Council Russia adviser, and David Holmes, counselor for political affairs at the U.S. embassy in Ukraine, testified before the House Intelligence Committee. Here is the testimony of Hill and Holmes with no member-infighting, no speechifying, and no unnecessary fluff.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccine Development 15 mins – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on July 15, 2020, the editors discuss a phase 1 study of a candidate vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 and outline what needs to happen next.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam War Music 42 mins – Doug Bradley and Craig Werner talk about their new book “We Gotta Get Out of This Place,” which explores how and why U.S. troops turned to music as a way of coping with the complexities of the war. Through personal stories from Vietnam veterans, the book demonstrates how music was important for veterans of all races, gender and military rank.” At the link right-click “Episode Website” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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MMD449: Active Measures book, Advertising and Branding, AI Research in China and US, Alpha Girls in Silicon Valley, Amazon Publishing, America’s Great Divide, Apple and FBI, Bootstrapping a Business, Bot Research, Brazil Democracy, Cadillac CMO, Chinese AI Giant, Congressional Reform, Craigslist Killer, Crossfire Hurricane, Cultural Norms, Digging Up Bones, Disinformation, Election Safety, Electronic Discovery, Future of Media, H1B Holder Ban, Hackers for Hire, Harmful Chemicals, iFlytek, Impeachment Inquiry, Industrial Espionage, Iranian Secret Documents, Kim Jong Un, Library Technology, Medical Nihilism, Monopolies, Nematodes, in Space, News Guard, Opioid Crisis, Police Violence, Produce Varieties, Protect and Moderate Online Speech, Puerto Rico Scorcese, Trumps Assault on Truth, Trumps War on Presidency, Warrior Cops, Wikipedia, World Food Prize, Zorin for Linux

Exercise your ears: the 54 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 802 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Active Measures book 34 mins – “In this episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth miniseries on disinformation, Quinta Jurecic and Alina Polyakova spoke with Thomas Rid about his new book, “Active Measures: The Secret History of Disinformation and Political Warfare.” Yesterday’s episode of the Lawfare Podcast featured a conversation between Thomas and Jack Goldsmith about the book, focusing on the early history of disinformation through the 1980s. In this episode, Alina and Quinta follow up with a discussion with Thomas on disinformation in the digital age, along with some questions about what it’s like to interview former KGB and Stasi officials about their influence campaigns.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Advertising and Branding 56 mins – “Author and Advertising Executive Rory Sutherland of Ogilvy talks about his book Alchemy with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Sutherland makes the case for the magic (yes, magic!) of advertising and branding in helping markets work well. This is a wide-ranging conversation on consumer choice, public policy, travel, real estate, and corporate decision-making using insights from behavioral economics and decades of experience in the world of advertising.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Research in China and US 19 mins – “Who’s spending big? Does it matter? Zach Arnold and Ashwin Acharya join the show to discuss their reports on Chinese public sector AI R&D spending and strengthening America’s AI workforce.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Alpha Girls in Silicon Valley 42 mins – “Julian Guthrie shares the untold story of four dynamic women, Magdalena Yesil, Mary Jane Elmore, Theresia Gouw and Sonja Hoel Perkins, who helped shape the tech landscape of Silicon Valley. Through grit and ingenuity, these trailblazers rewrote the rules and conquered the challenges of working in a male-dominated venture capital industry. Hear more about their personal stories as we celebrate the achievements and relentless perseverance of these extraordinary women. In association with Santa Clara County Library District, Santa Clara County Office of Education, the San Jose Public Library and DeAnza College Speaker photo (from left to right): Theresia Gouw, Sonja Hoel Perkins, Mary Jane Elmore, Magdalena Yesil and Julian Guthrie” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Amazon Publishing 10 mins – “Announced in October 2012 and completed the following July, the merger of Penguin and Random House reduced the Big Six by one. In the years since, trade book publishing has counted its leading houses on a single hand. But that calculation may be quietly changing. If you’re wondering who is the insurgent publisher, then maybe you should ask Alexa. The Amazon smart speaker and virtual assistant is one element of a multi-faceted effort looking to make Amazon a leading force in publishing trade books for adults and children. Over the last two decades, of course, Amazon became the dominant player in book sales. Amazon Publishing, launched in 2009, is also on the rise, says literary agent Mark Gottlieb of Trident Media Group. As its differentiator, he explains, Amazon Publishing has developed strategic marketing programs and sophisticated online author services. Want to know your book’s current monthly sales numbers? Just ask Alexa that, too. “What Amazon is able to do, not just as a publisher but also a retailer, is very similar to what publishers used to do,” Gottlieb tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. In the past, he explains, publishers Scribner and Scholastic operated bookstores from their offices in Manhattan. “Amazon really owns their online storefront in that [same] way, and they can place a lot of their own titles there,” says Gottlieb. “Just look at the Amazon top 100 and see how many titles there are from Amazon imprints.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America’s Great Divide P5, P6, P7, P8 77 mins – “FRONTLINE begins its 2020 election year coverage with a two-part, four-hour documentary series investigating America’s increasingly bitter, divided and toxic politics. From veteran FRONTLINE filmmaker Michael Kirk and his team, America’s Great Divide: From Obama to Trump draws on revelatory new interviews with key political and cultural figures, as well as an unparalleled archive of in-depth broadcast reporting across two presidential administrations, to offer crucial context for the current moment.” At the link right-click “https://soundcloud.com/frontlinepbs/sets/frontline-pbs-americas-great,” and select section to hear. You can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Apple and FBI 63 mins – “In our 317th episode of The Cyberlaw Podcast, Stewart Baker interviews Mara Hvistendahl, investigative journalist at The Intercept and author of the new book, The Scientist and the Spy. Stewart is also joined by Matthew Heiman, Gus Hurwitz (@gushurwitz), and Nick Weaver (@ncweaver) to discuss… “ At the link right-click “Download the 317th Episode (mp3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bootstrapping a Business 35 mins – “Clare Vivier first got the idea for her handbag business while working as a journalist for French TV. She was looking for functional, but stylish laptop cases and, when she couldn’t find one, she made her own. Many other designs followed in the years after, including chic handbags made with luxury materials in colorful, understated designs. In the decade since that first design, Clare has upgraded her business, Clare V, into a well-respected handbag and accessories line that is stocked in retailers ranging from Net-a-Porter to Nordstrom, along with her flagship store in Silver Lake. Tune in to this episode of Girlboss Radio to hear how Clare bootstrapped the business early on, why she insists on producing products locally and how she knew she found the right business partner. Plus, hear how one encounter with a buyer provided a difficult, but valuable lesson on how to best price your products.” At the link left click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Bot Research 34 mins – “On this episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Darius Kazemi, an internet artist and bot-maker extraordinaire. Recently, there have been a lot of ominous headlines about bots—including an NPR article stating that nearly 50 percent of all Twitter commentary about the pandemic has been driven by bots rather than human users. That sounds bad—but Darius thinks that we shouldn’t be so worried about bots. In fact, he argues, a great deal of reporting and research on bots is often wrong and actually causes harm by drumming up needless worry and limiting online conversations. So, what is a bot, anyway? Do they unfairly take the blame for the state of things online? And if weeding out bot activity isn’t a simple way to cultivate healthier online spaces, what other options are there for building a less unpleasant internet?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Brazil’s Democracy 20 mins – “In her new film, The Edge of Democracy, director Petra Costa tells the story of how Brazil went from a rising star among free nations to a democracy on the verge of collapse. With unprecedented access, Costa documents the rise and fall of Brazil’s Workers Party and its charismatic leader Lula da Silva, the impeachment of Brazil’s first female president, Dilma Rousseff, and the rise of President Jair Bolsonaro who has ushered in, as Costa puts it, a new era of rule by the bible, the bullet, and the banks. After the end of military rule, many had high hopes for Brazil, yet the Bolsonaro regime has been marked by an increase in violent repression and gender-based violence. In this very personal conversation, Laura and Petra discuss life and politics in the U.S. and Brazil—nations built on land theft, genocide, and extraction. They wonder if democracy can survive in states that fail to reckon with their pasts.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.Cadillac CMO 23 mins – “The strategy behind smart marketing, with Melissa Grady, CMO of Cadillac – Marketing isn’t exactly what it used to be 10 years ago (or even five or three years ago). Today, companies big and small are spending big budgets on targeted ads, social media, influencers, and more. But does that mean the fundamentals of marketing no longer apply? On this week’s episode of Girlboss Radio, we get some answers, thanks to Melissa Grady, the CMO of Cadillac. As CMO of Cadillac, Melissa leads strategic marketing around the world for the luxury car dealer. Tune in to hear Sophia chat with Melissa about how Cadillac has continued to find new and ~smarter~ ways to target customers, why she’s so excited about Super Cruise and what’s next for the automobile company. Plus, hear Melissa’s best advice for managers and team leaders.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Chinese AI Giant 28 mins – “In 1937, the year that George Orwell was shot in the neck while fighting fascists in Spain, Julian Chen was born in Shanghai. His parents, a music teacher and a chemist, enrolled him in a school run by Christian missionaries, and like Orwell he became fascinated by language. He studied English, Russian, and Mandarin while speaking Shanghainese at home. Later he took on French, German, and Japanese. In 1949, the year Mao Zedong came to power and Orwell published 1984, learning languages became dangerous in China. In the purges of the late 1950s, intellectuals were denounced, sent to labor camps, and even executed. Chen, who by then was a student at prestigious Peking University, was banished to a Beijing glass factory. Chen’s job was to cart wagons full of coal and ash to and from the factory’s furnace. He kept his mind nimble by listening to his coworkers speak. At night, in the workers’ dormitory, he compiled a sort of linguistic ethnography for the Beijing dialect. He finished the book around 1960. Soon after, Communist Party apparatchiks confiscated it….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Congressional Reform 61 mins – “The United States Congress is a vital institution for pluralistic American governance. Congress is the one body that can represent the broad diversity of the vast American republic and forge complex compromises across competing and overlapping interests and values. In a moment of great challenges facing American political institutions, how can Congress fulfill its role as a co-equal branch of governance? What changes are necessary in order for Congress to measure up to the contemporary challenges facing American political institutions? And what changes are possible in an institution as old and as complex as the U.S. Congress? On January 9, Brookings co-hosted an event with the American Political Science Association and R Street Institute, featuring members of the Task Force Project on Congressional Reform. The expert panel discussed their report on the challenges Congress faces and the reforms needed to support a transformational legislature.” At the link click the “audio only” option, then right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Craigslist Killer 23 mins – “The case of the Craiglist Killer has lived on through digital forensics. The Boston Police released their case files in the Craigslist Killer case to the Boston Phoenix which then published a remarkable story about the investigation in April of 2012. Digital Detectives co-hosts, Sharon D. Nelson, Esq., President of Sensei Enterprises, Inc., and John W. Simek, Vice President of Sensei Enterprises, explore the intricacies of this captivating case including: evidence from surveillance cameras and privacy implications, getting social media evidence and poaching wireless networks.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included on this blog archive.

Crossfire Hurricane 81 mins – “By Elena Kagan – Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee to discuss his recently released report on the Russia investigation. The hearing was contentious and occasionally devolved into speechify-ing. But we cut out all the unnecessary repetition and theatrics to leave you with just the questions and answers that you need to hear.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Cultural Norms 46 mins – “Psychologist Michele Gelfand talks about her book, Rule Makers, Rule Breakers, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Gelfand distinguishes between loose cultures and tight cultures–the degree to which culture and regulation restrict behavior or leave it alone. Gelfand explores the causes of why some cultures are tighter than others and the challenges societies face when culture is too tight or too loose. She also applies these ideas of cultural tightness and looseness to corporate mergers and family life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digging Up Bones 12 mins – “We wanted to address the so-called “CSI Effect,” caused by the simplification of forensic science in popular culture. CSIand like-minded TV shows–with their heroic investigators solving crimes in mere minutes–mislead viewers and affect real court cases. The reality of investigation is much slower and more complex, but no less fascinating. Hosts Michal Meyer and Robert Kenworthy speak with experts Anna Dhody, a physical and forensic anthropologist, and Lisa Rosner, a historian. They discuss the early days of solving crime and the on-going chemistry of the human body throughout life and death.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Disinformation 29 mins – “Jack Goldsmith spoke with Thomas Rid about Rid’s new book, “Active Measures: The Secret History of Disinformation and Political Warfare.” The book is about the history of information operations and influence campaigns, and we’re bringing you a two-part Lawfare Podcast to discuss it in detail. On this episode, Jack and Thomas discuss the history of disinformation from the beginning of the 20th century through the 1980s. Tomorrow on the Lawfare Podcast’s “Arbiters of Truth” miniseries on disinformation, Alina Polyakova and Quinta Jurecic will be sharing their discussion with Thomas about his research starting at the beginning of the internet age.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Disinformation 32 mins – “For this week’s episode of our Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Alina Polyakova talked to Aric Toler of Bellingcat, a collective that has quickly become the gold-standard for open source and social media investigations. Aric recently published a blog post in response to a New York Times article on Russian influence campaigns—one retweeted by former President Barak Obama no less—that Aric called “How Not to Report on Disinformation.” Evelyn and Alina asked him about the article and what exactly Aric thought was wrong with it as a case study in the challenges for reporters writing about disinformation operations. When are reporters helping to uncover threats to democracy, and when are they giving oxygen to fringe actors?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Disinformation 32 mins – “On this week’s episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek spoke with Craig Silverman, the media editor for Buzzfeed News and one of the leading journalists covering the disinformation beat. Craig is credited with coining the phrase “Fake News.” Evelyn spoke with him about how he feels about that, especially now that the phrase has taken on a life of its own. They also talked about a book Craig edited, the second edition of the “Verification Handbook,” available online now, that equips journalists with the tools they need to verify the things they see online. Journalism and reporting on disinformation has never been so important—but the internet has never been so chaotic, and journalists are not only observers of disinformation, but also targets of it.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Disinformation 34 mins – “This week on Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Deen Freelon, an associate professor at the University of North Carolina Hussman School of Journalism and Media. Deen’s work focuses on data science and political expression on social media, and they discussed research he conducted on tweets from the Internet Research Agency troll farm and their attempts to influence U.S. politics, including around the 2016 election. In a recent article, Deen and his coauthors found that IRA tweets from accounts presenting themselves as Black Americans received particularly high engagement from other users on Twitter—which raises interesting questions about the interaction of race and disinformation. They also talked about what the data show on whether the IRA actually succeeded in changing political beliefs and just how many reporters quoted IRA trolls in their news reports without realizing it.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Disinformation 37 mins – “By Jen Patja Howell – In this episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Whitney Phillips and Ryan Milner, authors of the new book, “You Are Here: A Field Guide for Navigating Polarized Speech, Conspiracy Theories, and Our Polluted Media Landscape.” Phillips is an assistant professor in Communications and Rhetorical Studies at Syracuse University, and Milner is an associate professor of Communication at the College of Charleston. In “You Are Here,” they look at the uniquely disorienting aspects of the current online information environment and how that is exacerbated by aspects of “internet culture” that don’t make sense from the outside. They discussed the challenges for journalists in understanding and reporting on that culture and how that can fuel information pollution, how the internet got to this point where everything is so polluted, and, of course, what QAnon has to do with it.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Election Safety 28 mins – “COVID-19 is still rampaging around the country, primaries in several states did not go as planned, and, of course, there are Russians lurking in the background. With all of this happening around us, what is going to happen with the election we are about to hold in November? Benjamin Wittes checked in with Nate Persily, the James B. McClatchy Professor of Law at Stanford Law School, a guru on conducting a safe and efficacious election in the era of COVID, and Lawfare senior editor Margaret Taylor, who has been tracking what, if anything, Congress is going to do about any of this. They talked about where we are, where we need to be and how long a road we can expect over the next few months. ” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Electronic Discovery 16 mins- “Joe Looby recently released his documentary The Decade of Discovery about the United States versus Philip Morris tobacco lawsuit in the early 2000s and email e-discovery issues. The film also discusses the emergence of the Sedona Conference as a think tank and forum for discussion about cooperation in e-discovery. Many prominent federal judges were interviewed about the issues with open government and record keeping. Also in the documentary, Jason R. Baron, Esq. talks about open government, record keeping at the White House, and how the e-discovery issues played out in the lawsuit. We are beginning to wonder, in this world of big data, how are we dealing with information governance, specifically within issues of open government and data security? In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Jason Baron about information governance, dark data, open government, and his role in The Decade of Discovery. Baron talks about the increasing amount of electronic data affecting the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and the discussion e-discovery experts need to have about providing public access to government records….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included on this blog archive.

Future of Media 33 mins – “It’s no secret that the media landscape has changed dramatically with the growth of social media apps. (Think: Click bait headlines and inflated viewership that make it harder to decipher what content is actually resonating with audiences). But fear not! At Girlboss, we’re focused on YOU, our loyal community of listeners, readers and fans. Which brings us to why we’re so excited about the next chapter of Girlboss. That is, we’ve *officially* been acquired by the media holding company Attention Capital! Sound scary? It’s not—it just means even bigger things are ahead for us. To walk us through what changes are ahead for Girlboss, Sophia talks with Ashlyn Gentry, a founding partner of Attention Capital. Tune in for an honest conversation about the future of media, why brands must pass the “T-shirt test,” and so much more. To learn more about Attention Capital, go to:https://attentioncapital.com/ Have feedback on the show?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

H1B Holder Ban 29 mins- “This week Trump banned valid H1B holders from entering the country. What are the broader implications for America’s technological ecosystem and national security? To discuss, Tina Huang and Remco Zwetsloot from CSET talk about their recent research on tech and immigration. We discuss the potential lasting impacts of the, for now, temporary ban, how the US immigration process compares to other nations’ policies, what China is doing to bolster their homegrown talent as well as the threat of corporate espionage. Here is the paper I mentioned on corporate espionage. See here for the CSET research discussed.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Hackers for Hire 42 mins – “Our interview this week is with Chris Bing, a cybersecurity reporter with Reuters, and John Scott-Railton, Senior Researcher at Citizen Lab and PhD student at UCLA. John coauthored Citizen Lab’s report last week on BellTroX and Indian hackers for hire, and Chris reported for Reuters on the same organization’s activities – and criminal exposure – in the United States. The most remarkable aspect of the story is how thoroughly normalized hacking legal and lobbying opponents seems to have become, at least in parts of the US legal and investigative ecosystem. I suggest that instead of a long extradition battle, the US give the head of BellTroX a ticket to the US and a guaranteed income for the next few years as a witness against his customers. In the news roundup, Nick Weaver tells the remarkable story of how Facebook funded an exploit aimed at taking down a particularly vile online abuser of young girls who was nearly invulnerable because he was using TAILS, the secure, thumb drive-based communication system (Vice, Gizmodo). This is a great story because it really doesn’t fit into any of the stilted narratives into which most internet security stories are usually jammed.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Harmful Chemicals 17 mins – “As part of a special issue on chemicals for tomorrow’s Earth, we’ve got two green chemistry stories. First, host Sarah Crespi talks with contributing correspondent Warren Cornwell about how a company came up with a replacement for the popular can lining material bisphenol A and then recruited knowledgeable critics to test its safety. Sarah is also joined by Beate Escher of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the University of Tübingen to discuss ways to trace complex mixtures of humanmade chemicals in the environment. They talk about how new technologies can help detect these mixtures, understand their toxicity, and eventually connect their effects on the environment, wildlife, and people.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IFlytek 28 mins – “In 1937, the year that George Orwell was shot in the neck while fighting fascists in Spain, Julian Chen was born in Shanghai. His parents, a music teacher and a chemist, enrolled him in a school run by Christian missionaries, and like Orwell he became fascinated by language. He studied English, Russian, and Mandarin while speaking Shanghainese at home. Later he took on French, German, and Japanese. In 1949, the year Mao Zedong came to power and Orwell published 1984, learning languages became dangerous in China. In the purges of the late 1950s, intellectuals were denounced, sent to labor camps, and even executed. Chen, who by then was a student at prestigious Peking University, was banished to a Beijing glass factory…. Chen’s job was to cart wagons full of coal and ash to and from the factory’s furnace. He kept his mind nimble by listening to his coworkers speak. At night, in the workers’ dormitory, he compiled a sort of linguistic ethnography for the Beijing dialect. He finished the book around 1960. Soon after, Communist Party apparatchiks confiscated it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Impeachment Inquiry 36 mins – “The White House has released a memorandum of a July 25 call between Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and President Donald Trump. The call is at the center of the new impeachment inquiry into the president, and is reportedly also the subject of a whistleblower complaint that the Department of Justice has prevented the Acting Director of National Intelligence from sharing with congressional intelligence committees. For the second time this week, Lawfare put together a special edition podcast. Scott Anderson, Susan Hennessey, Quinta Jurecic and Margaret Taylor joined Benjamin Wittes in the Jungle Studio, while Bob Bauer, David Kris and Bob Litt called in from afar to discuss the new revelations and what this all means for the president, Congress and the impeachment inquiry.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Emergency_Podcast_mixdown_1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Industrial Espionage 63 mins – “Our interview is with Mara Hvistendahl, investigative journalist at The Intercept and author of a new book, The Scientist and the Spy: A True Story of China, the FBI, and Industrial Espionage, as well as a deep WIRED article on the least known Chinese AI champion, iFlytek. Mara’s book raises questions about the expense and motivations of the FBI’s pursuit of commercial spying from China. In the News Roundup, Gus Hurwitz, Nick Weaver, and I wrestle with whether Apple’s lawsuit against Corellium is really aimed at the FBI. The answer looks to be affirmative, since an Apple victory would make it harder for contractors to find hackable flaws in the iPhone….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Iranian Secret Documents 32 mins – “’Intercept’ Senior National Security Correspondent James Risen says new documents show how Iran has embedded itself in the politics of its neighbor, Iraq — and that the late Gen. Soleimani oversaw Iran’s proxy wars in Iraq and Syria.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kim Jong Un 35 mins – “Jung Pak is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, a former CIA analyst and a North Korea specialist. She is the author of “Becoming Kim Jong Un: A Former CIA Analyst’s Insights into North Korea’s Enigmatic Young Dictator.” She joined Benjamin Wittes to discuss Kim Jong Un, the recent questions about whether he had died or become seriously ill, his rise to power and his confrontations with Donald Trump over nuclear weapons.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Library Technology 12 mins – The content librarians manage today is no longer measured in bookshelves, but in bytes.  Over the last two decades librarians have increasingly come to view their roles and responsibilities in terms of technology.  And in the delivery of information, innovation is pre-eminent. Jason Griffey self-identifies as a library technologist. He is currently Director of Strategic Initiatives at NISO, and was very recently a fellow and affiliate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. “The library technologist is increasingly a way that a lot of people tend to identify themselves in libraries,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “A technologist is someone who is a sort of jack of all trades when it comes to things digital.  I started using the term as my experience in libraries expanded outward from the small managing a Web presence or managing a particular set of systems to the broader understanding of how technology interacts with all of the multifaceted parts of a modern library.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Nihilism 52 mins – “Philosopher and author Jacob Stegenga of the University of Cambridge talks about his book Medical Nihilism with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Stegenga argues that many medical treatments either fail to achieve their intended goals or achieve those goals with many negative side effects. Stegenga argues that the approval process for pharmaceuticals, for example, exaggerates benefits and underestimates costs. He criticizes the FDA approval process for approving too many drugs that are not sufficiently helpful relative to their side effects. Stegenga argues for a more realistic understanding of what medical practice can and cannot achieve.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monopolies 47 mins – “Matt Stoller of the Open Market Institute talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the growing influence of Google, Facebook, and Amazon on commercial and political life. Stoller argues that these large firms have too much power over our options as consumers and creators as well as having a large impact on our access to information.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nematodes in Space 25 mins – “Dr. Fatma Kaplan and Cameron Schiller founded Pheronym, an agricultural biotech company that provides safe, non-toxic, and innovative solutions to solve numerous agricultural problems. They also recently become involved in the development of space nematodes under the company AstroNematode. AstroNematode seeks to establish interstellar agriculture for Earth. The first launching experiment will happen this December and provide data to pave the way for sustainable agriculture outside of Earth. Dr. Fatma and Cameron join me today to share their latest project, AstroNematode, and how it can help provide sustainable solutions for future generations. They describe the origins of this idea and the companies that helped fund the project. They discuss their tie-ins with private companies like Space-X and explain the experiments that will happen in space. They also share what it’s like to work on this project while running Pheronym at the same time.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get podcast.

News Guard 11 mins – “In the emerging area of online trust technology, the startup NewsGuard has decided to disinfect the web of false reporting with the detergent of journalism. A team of experienced journalists researches online news brands; determines when a website has a hidden agenda or publishes falsehoods; and then posts red or green rating signals visible as a plug-in on many web browsers. Public libraries can use NewsGuard as a news literacy tool, while advertisers can keep their brands off unreliable sites. Journalism advocates the Knight Foundation and global advertising conglomerate Publicis are among the company’s investors. “The world has become such that regular people feel very anxious about whether they’re getting news from reliable sources or not,” says Gordon Crovitz, a distinguished publishing veteran who co-founded NewsGuard with acclaimed journalist Steve Brill in 2018. In 2016 and 2017, Crovitz was interim CEO, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. He is also a former publisher, editorial board member, and opinion columnist for the Wall Street Journal.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Crisis P1 32 mins – “Dr. Jeanmarie Perrone runs a medical toxicology and addiction department in the University of Pennsylvania’s medical system. This means she’s an E.R. doctor as well as a UPenn professor and researcher who knows a great deal about — and who’s seen a great deal of the opioid crisis up close. Perrone recently walked us through the E.R. at one of the UPenn hospitals. She introduced us to the team working that day. Here’s Dr. Kit Delgado:…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Crisis P2 32 mins – “The opioid crisis, we learned, is really a story of supply and demand. In retrospect, there’s plenty of blame to go around; there was inattention and wishful thinking and almost certainly some deception, or at least greed. As a result, hundreds of thousands of people have died; countless families have been broken. And one unintended consequence of the crisis is that many people who have legitimate need for pain management and who have never abused those drugs now find it much harder to get the medicine they need. One such person wrote to us recently. “I was born with severe scoliosis,” he said, “and needed multiple surgeries starting as an 11-year-old. I was on fentanyl patches for over 10 years. They allowed me to not hurt every minute of the day. I did not get high. I went to a pain clinic every month and was drug-tested. A year and half ago, they stopped prescribing me because of government regulations. Now every day is a struggle to get out of bed and be productive.” So as this man suggests, the prescribing protocols for opioids have changed — in his case, not for the better. How have the new protocols affected potential opioid abuse? The fact is that more than one in five Americans still gets at least one opioid prescription filled or refilled per year. And a dependence on prescription opioids often leads to a dependence on heroin or synthetic fentanyl, both of which are even deadlier. Just how many people are we talking about here? The Department of Health and Human Services estimates there are roughly 2 million people in the U.S. with what it calls opioid-use disorder. As the healthcare economist Alicia Sasser Modestino told us last week: an entire generation has been addicted at this point. So what’s to be done about that? Today on Freakonomics Radio: our second of two episodes about the opioid crisis. The focus today: an addiction treatment option that some people think should be universal.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Violence 35 mins – “By Jen Patja Howell – Dr. Rashawn Ray is a David M. Rubenstein fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution. He’s also an associate professor of sociology at the University of Maryland, College Park, where he directs the Lab for Applied Social Science Research (LASSR). He is a scholar of, among other things, police-civilian relations and has done a lot of work on police-involved killings. He joined Benjamin Wittes to discuss the mechanisms of police violence, what causes it, what can be done to address it and reduce it, and the role of race in this problem. They talked about police unions, implicit bias, the difference between legality and morality in police shootings and what policy levers are available to bring an end to the rash of police killings.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Produce Varieties 29 mins – “The produce section of most American supermarkets in the 1950s was minimal to a fault, with only a few dozen fruits and vegetables to choose from: perhaps one kind of apple, one kind of lettuce, a yellow onion, a pile of bananas. Today, grocery stores routinely offer hundreds of different fruits and vegetables, many of which would be unrecognizable to time travelers from a half century ago. What changed, and how did Americans learn to embrace spaghetti squash, sugar snap peas, and kiwi fruit? This episode, we tell the story of the woman behind this transformation: Frieda Caplan, the Queen of Kiwi. In late 1950s, when Frieda Caplan began working as a book-keeper at a wholesale produce business owned by her husband’s aunt and uncle, she had no interest in fruit and vegetables beyond eating them. She also had no real qualifications for the job: she had studied political science at UCLA, and, according to her daughter, Karen Caplan, “she got a D in math.” But that political background and love for campaigning ended up coming in handy. When her relatives went out of town on vacation a few weeks after hiring her, she found herself on the Los Angeles Produce Market floor, enthusiastically promoting a pallet of brown mushrooms that had been sitting in the corner, looking neglected. At the time, white button mushrooms were the only kind of fungi found in most grocery stores—but, somehow, Karen told us, Frieda “fluffed her hair and put on her lipstick,” and she succeeded in charming a supermarket buyer into purchasing these exotic brown mushrooms. Word quickly spread among growers of unusual or foreign fruits and vegetables that Frieda was the secret to getting their underloved produce onto supermarket shelves. Frieda’s Specialty Produce, the company Frieda ended up founding in 1962, was the first wholesale produce business to be owned and operated by a woman. Since then, Frieda and her daughter Karen, the company’s current CEO, have successfully introduced hundreds of new fruits and vegetables to the American supermarket shelves, including red seedless grapes, radicchio, Habanero peppers, Delicata squash, shallots, and, her first big hit, the kiwi.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Produce Varieties 35 mins – “From stripy fuchsia beets to unicorn doughnuts, the foods available today on grocery store shelves and in cafe displays are more brightly colored than ever. But this hasn’t always been the case. This episode of Gastropod, we offer three stories that explore the colors of our cuisine: How did a food fight between Florida and California turn oranges (the fruit) that perfect bright orange (the color)? Why did US consumers freak out about the food dye Red #2, and what was the impact on our M&Ms? And finally, who invented the blue raspberry? All that, plus one very sexy indigo-hued blossom.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Protect and Moderate Online Speech 27 mins – “On this episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Alina Polyakova and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Eileen Donahoe, the executive director of the Global Digital Policy Incubator at Stanford University. There’s no shortage of controversies roiling right now about free expression and the future of the internet—from platforms aggressively removing misinformation about the ongoing pandemic, to President Trump’s executive order targeting Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Eileen, Quinta and Alina take a step back and review the landscape of online speech as a whole to get a more holistic sense of what things look like right now and where platforms and governments might be headed when it comes to regulating speech. They talked about the various debates over content moderation taking place within the United States and around the world, and Eileen made the case for why international human rights law should be used as the framework for both protecting and moderating online speech.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Puerto Rico 20 mins – “What does freedom from fantasy mean? When most Americans know about Puerto Rico is based on a colonial fantasy, says journalist and Columbia University professor, Ed Morales. This fantasy, and the reality it obscures, is the subject of his new book, Fantasy Island. In this episode, Laura interviews Morales and scholar/activist Rosa Clemente about the personal and political implications of the island’s ongoing debt crisis, recovering from Hurricane Maria, and #RickyRenuncia, the intersectional protest movement that led to the resignation of Governor Ricardo Rosselló in the summer of 2019. Exploitation, corruption, and neglect may be business as usual in the United States’ relationship with Puerto Rico but Morales and Clemente suggest that new movements provide some hope for change and freedom from fantasy.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scorsese 33 mins – “Scorsese’s latest film, ‘The Irishman,’ is up for 10 Academy Awards, including best picture and best director. He spoke with Terry Gross about death, redemption and his biggest flop. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the WWI epic ‘1917.’ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump’s Assault on Truth 27 mins – “Glenn Kessler is the head of the Fact Checker staff of the Washington Post. Along with Salvador Rizzo and Meg Kelly, he is the author of the new book, “Donald Trump and His Assault on Truth: The President’s Falsehoods, Misleading Claims and Flat-Out Lies.” It is a compilation and distillation of the 19,000 false or misleading statements Donald Trump has made and the Washington Post has documented in its mammoth database of presidential untruths since the president took office. Kessler spoke with Benjamin Wittes about what makes Trump different from other presidents, the task of documenting the president’s lack of candor on a daily basis and what it all means to have a president who lies this much.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Trump’s War on Presidency 24 mins – “From the moment of his inauguration, Trump has challenged our deepest expectations of the presidency. But what are those expectations? Where did they come from, and how great is the damage? “Unmaking the Presidency: Donald Trump’s War on the World’s Most Powerful Office,” by Benjamin Wittes and Susan Hennessey, which is excerpted in this episode, situates Trump era scandals and outrages in the deeper context of the presidency itself. Now, the coronavirus pandemic presents one of the greatest challenges the modern American executive has ever faced. How did we get here? And in Donald Trump’s hands, where does the world’s most powerful office go from here?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Warrior Cops 38 mins – “Patrick Skinner is a police officer in Savannah, Georgia, who brings diverse experience to that job. He served as a case officer at the Central Intelligence Agency, handling foreign intelligence sources in places like Afghanistan, Iraq and Jordan. He also has previous law enforcement experience with the U.S. Coast Guard, the U.S. Capitol Police and the U.S. Federal Air Marshal Service. David Priess spoke with Skinner about today’s policing crisis, Pat’s experiences with counterterrorism operations and what they taught him about effective law enforcement, and the hazards of the warrior mentality that is common across many police departments today.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Wikipedia 34 mins – “In this episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Ryan Merkley, the chief of staff to the executive director of the Wikimedia Foundation. We’ve spent a lot of time on this podcast discussing how social media platforms have handled issues of disinformation and misinformation. But what about Wikipedia? It’s a massive online encyclopedia written and edited entirely by volunteers—so, not a platform, but still an online service grappling with a wave of untruths in an uncertain time. Ryan, Evelyn and Quinta talked about Wikipedia’s unique structure, how the site has managed to become a reliable resource on an often untrustworthy internet, and how readers, writers and editors of Wikipedia are navigating the need for information amidst both the pandemic and ongoing protests over police abuse of Black Americans.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

World Food Prize 24 mins – “Kenneth Quinn is the former President of the World Food Prize Foundation, an organization that seeks to give individuals recognition for achievements that directly improve the quality, quantity, and availability of food in the world. Kenneth is often referred to as “the Ambassador” because he was the US Ambassador to the Kingdom of Cambodia. During his time as President, he received various high-level honors and awards from different organizations, including The American Farm Bureau and The Crop Science Society of America. Kenneth joins me today to describe what the World Food Prize Foundation stands for, how it got started, and what makes it similar and different to the Nobel Peace Prize. He shares his journey, his time as Ambassador, and how he began to follow in the footsteps of Norman Borlaug. He explains the current state of agriculture across various countries and the agricultural hindrances that America needs to fix. Kenneth also discusses what he wants his legacy to be and the dangers that Americans face in regards to agricultural research.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get podcast.

Zorin for Linux Users 22 mins – “Zorin OS is the alternative to Windows and macOS designed to make your computer faster, more powerful, secure, and privacy respecting. It’s Time To Pay Attention To Zorin OS 15 — Zorin OS is the best desktop Linux distribution you’ve never heard of. Our review of of Zorin OS includes a give-away of one copy of Zorin Ultimate. The following resources are mentioned in this episode: Zorin Linux: https://zorinos.com/ Contact Zorin: https://zorinos.com/about/#contact Education version: https://zorinos.com/education/ Computers with Zorin pre-installed: https://zorinos.com/computers/ 08:50 Zorin Review 09:33 Core vs. Ultimate 10:35 Is the Core version of Zorin crippled? 16:44 Any issues installing or running Zorin? 20:10 What about installing software applications? 22:45 Customizing the Zorin Desktop 24:37 Anything else we need to know about Zorin? 27:49 The overview 32:01 Bill’s final rating of Zorin 33:02 What is the price of Zorin Ultimate?” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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MMD448 Media Mining Digest: Abortion Activist, AI Book, AI Concerns, Anti-Semitic Violence, Bactria Domestication, Carl Sagan, Chernobyl Aftermath, Chinese Surveillance App, CIA Interrogations, Citrus Greening Update, Climate Science, Disability Technology, Disinformation, Emergency Medicine Doctor, Free Trade, Google Bug Hunters, Harry Houdini, Hate Speech Online, Homestead Prepping, Impeachment History, Internet Health Report, Iran Internet Shutdown, Iran Turmoil, Jane Hodgson, Marine Accident Investigation, Mosul Battle, Nazism in Germany, Plant Genetic Engineering, Presidential Special Counsel, PTSI(Injury), Rare Earth Elements, Regenerative Agriculture, Russian Skulduggery, Secondhand, Sewage History, South Africa Power Cuts, Syria Activities, Trump Presidency Impact

Exercise your ears: the 52 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 711 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Abortion Activist 34 mins – “The story of how abortion became legal in the United States isn’t as straightforward as many of us think. The common narrative is that feminist activism and the sexual liberation movement in the 1960s led to Roe v. Wade in 1973. But it turns out the path to Roe led over some unexpected and unsettling terrain, and involves a complicated story winding through culture, society, disease, and our prejudices and fears about disability. In the 1960s a rubella epidemic swept the United States and panicked every pregnant woman in the country. Rubella, also called German measles, is a disease we hardly remember anymore, but it’s the “R” in the MMR vaccine. Though the virus is relatively harmless for most people, when contracted during pregnancy, it can severely harm the developing fetus. During the epidemic many pregnant women who may have never identified as abortion-rights advocates suddenly found themselves seeking abortions and dismantling barriers to access. Though not everyone agreed with these women, people listened. And this historical moment, sparked by a virus, helped pave the way for the legalization of abortion.” Two podcasts are at the link. At the link for “Roe v.Wade v. Rubella” left click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to download. Do the same for “BONUS EPISODE: Jane Hodgson.”

AI Book 53 mins – “Computer Scientist and author Melanie Mitchell of Portland State University and the Santa Fe Institute talks about her book Artificial Intelligence with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mitchell explains where we are today in the world of artificial intelligence (AI) and where we might be going. Despite the hype and excitement surrounding AI, Mitchell argues that much of what is called “learning” and “intelligence” when done by machines is not analogous to human capabilities. The capabilities of machines are highly limited to explicit, narrow tasks with little transfer to similar but different challenges. Along the way, Mitchell explains some of the techniques used in AI and how progress has been made in many areas.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Concerns 25 mins – “Why is AI so far from perfect? A special episode looking at AI – why it still is far from perfect? We discuss what would happen if you took a driverless car from the streets of California and put it on roads in a developing country, why deep fakes are so difficult to detect and how the images that are used to teach machines to recognise things are biased against women and ethnic minorities.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Anti-Semitic Violence 26 mins – “Batya Ungar-Sargon on the Anti-Semitic Violence in New York Batya Ungar-Sargon is the opinion editor of The Forward, the Jewish newspaper published out of New York City. She has been among the chroniclers, both in print and on Twitter, of the recent spate of attacks against Orthodox communities in New York and New Jersey. She joined Benjamin Wittes by Skype to talk about the origins of these attacks, why it is so hard to respond to them, and why they don’t fit in with any of our political preconceptions.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_497.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Genetic Crops 20 mins – “Australia has welcomed the use of genetically engineered crops, and farmers have found particular benefit from broad acre canola and cotton cultivation. However, the benefits were not realized by some states because of local moratoriums imposed by state governments. Farmers in South Australia grow wheat, canola and pulses, along with wine grapes, olives and other horticultural crops.  They would like the option to grow GE canola, as it may offer some benefits. More importantly, new technologies in gene editing may permit rapid response to new threats as well as tackle current issues in drought, frost, and pathogens. Fortunately, a science-minded change in government has led to discussion of removing the ban.  I speak with four agricultural leaders from the Grain Producers SA, a non-profit organization coordinating grower advocacy and communications. With Tanya Morgan, Adrian McCabe (@AdrianMcCabe6), Wade Dabinette and Dion Woolford (@rudigermaxpower).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ayahuasca Tourism in Peru 18 mins – “Ayahuasca: Fear and healing in the Amazon – Increasing numbers of tourists are travelling to the Peruvian Amazon to drink Ayahuasca, a traditional plant medicine said to bring about a higher state of consciousness. Foreigners come looking for spiritual enlightenment or help with mental health problems like trauma, depression, and addiction. But not everyone is happy about Peru’s booming Ayahuasca tourism industry. A group of indigenous healers are fighting back against what they see as the exploitation and appropriation of their cultural heritage by foreigners – who run most of the Ayahuasca retreats popular with tourists. This coming together of cultures has thrown up another serious problem too – vulnerable women being sexually abused while under the influence of charismatic healers and this powerful psychedelic.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Bacteria Domestication 21 mins – “Bacteria  surround us and have specialized functions in adaptation and metabolism.  Could they be helpful as micro machines that catalyze key reactions?  Could teams of collaborating bacteria be combined to perform important industrial processes?  Dr. Sarah Richardson from MicroByre asks that question. She is in the business of bacterial discovery and domestication, bringing wild bacteria that perform important chemistry into human control.  Her company then uses collaborations of microbes to take on important production jobs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carl Sagan 47 mins.- “Science on TV: An Interview with Ingrid Ockert – Historian of science and media Ingrid Ockert discusses the exact moment Carl Sagan began wearing turtlenecks, how NOVA changed television, and the key to any successful show: respect the audience.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Chernobyl Aftermath 18 mins – “Belarus: The wild world of Chernobyl – Ninety year old Galina is one of the last witnesses to the wild natural world that preceded the Chernobyl zone in southern Belarus. ‘We lived with wolves’ she says ‘and moose, and elk and wild boars.’ Soviet development destroyed that ecosystem. Forests and marshland were tamed and laid to farmland and industrial use. But when the Chernobyl reactor exploded in 1986, the human population was evacuated; their villages were buried beneath the earth as though they had never existed. A generation on, it seems that the animals Galina knew are returning. But how are they are affected by their radioactive environment? And what can we infer about the state of the land? Monica Whitlock visits the strange new wilderness emerging in the heart of Europe.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Surveillance App 27 mins – “Travellers to China through Kyrgyzstan are being forced to install a surveillance app on their phones. Professor Thorsten Holt is on the programme to explain, with the help of investigative journalists, how he has hacked into and analysed this surveillance app. He says the app compiles a report on your phone contacts, text messages and even your social media accounts, as well as searching for over 73,000 specific files. Atmospheric Memory – A breath-taking new art environment where you can see, hear and even touch sound, has opened in Manchester. The exhibit is inspired by Charles Babbage, a pioneer of computing technology from 180 years ago. He once proposed that if all spoken words remain recorded in the air, a powerful computer could potentially ‘rewind’ the movement of all air molecules. So how has the ground-breaking ideas of Charles Babbage influenced art and technology today?. Robotic Endoscopy – Endoscopies are medical procedures that involve threading a camera through the body to see inside. Anyone who has had one will know how uncomfortable they can be. But, they are also challenging for the doctor – taking on average 100 to 250 procedures to be able to perform well. Reporter Madeleine Finlay met Dr Joe Norton, who is part of an international team developing an intelligent robotic system that could make it a lot less painful for both the patient and clinician. Game Designing: Mentoring the Next Generation – Mathew Applegate works with over 300 young people in Suffolk on game design, and has just won the BAFTA Young Game Designers Mentor Award. Having been a hacker and spent time working for the government, Mathew then set up his Creative Computing Club in 2012, which delivers courses on game design, robotics, AI, VR and much more. He spoke to us on why he believes game design is so beneficial for the young people of Suffolk.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA Interrogations 38 mins – ”Philip Mudd is currently a counterterrorism and national security analyst with CNN, but before that, Mudd spent 25 years working at the Central Intelligence Agency, on the NSC staff, and eventually at the FBI. His third book is “Black Site: The CIA in the Post-9/11 World.” David Priess sat down with Phil to talk about his career at CIA, the book, his research into the advanced interrogations and the interrogation program at CIA after 9/11, and the ethics of it all. Thanks to Grammarly for supporting The Lawfare Podcast. For 20% off a Grammarly premium account, go to Grammarly.com/lawfare.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_465.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Citrus Greening Update 27 mins – “What is the current state of the devastating citrus greening disease, Huanglongbing (HLB).  Dr. Jude Grosser from the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center discusses the current state of the disease, the current therapies and the future possibilities of leveraging genetics and nutrition to help keep citrus in production.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Science 55 mins – “An important consequence of the warming of the planet due to climate change is that the frequency and/or severity of extreme weather events will increase. But how can we tell whether a particular event can be attributed to the changing climate? Would it have happened in “normal” climate as well, and if so, how would the event have been different? This aspect of climate science is called attribution science, and the guest of this episode, Friederike Otto is a pioneer in the field.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 File Directly” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Expert 71 mins – “In this episode, we sit down with negotiation expert Misha Glouberman who explains how to talk to people about things — that is, how to avoid the pitfalls associated with debate when two or more people attempt to come to an agreement that will be mutually beneficial. Misha Glouberman teaches negotiation, both in the classroom and within organizations, and he also works as a professional facilitator, which means he helps people design and run conferences and meetings. He also lectures, hosts Trampoline Hall (which has a podcast) — where he interviews the speakers afterfield and fields questions from the audience — and he is the co-author of the book The Chairs Are Where the People Go, a collection of his dictated musings about life recorded and edited by author Sheila Heti. To put it simply, Misha is an expert on communication, and people pay him to help them communicate better. In our long, wide-ranging conversation, you’ll pick up a zillion nuggets of wisdom that will help you the next time you set out to negotiate, facilitate, or solve shared problems with people through conversation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Page As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep Fakes 34 mins – “Bobby Chesney and Danielle Citron on Deep Fakes – On this episode of the Arbiters of Truth series, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with law professors Bobby Chesney and Danielle Citron about deep fakes—that is, artificial audio and video that can be used to depict a person doing or saying something that they never did or said. They talked about the paper that Bobby and Danielle wrote in 2018 about how deep fakes pose a looming challenge for privacy, democracy, and national security. And with recently circulated, doctored video of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and presidential candidate Joe Biden, they talked about how the issue hasn’t gone away, as well as the distinction between deep fakes and other less sophisticated forms of editing.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_496.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disability Technology 32 mins – “The latest in disability tech – From fitting prosthetic limbs in a few hours to teaching blind children to code how technology is making a difference to everyday lives.” At the link left-click “Download, then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disinformation 25 mins – “This is the first episode in a new special series—”Arbiters of Truth”—about disinformation and online speech in the lead up to the 2020 election. From Russian election interference, to scandals over privacy and invasive ad targeting, to presidential tweets: it’s all happening in online spaces governed by private social media companies. And as the 2020 presidential election draws nearer, these conflicts are only going to grow in importance. In this series, Evelyn Douek, Kate Klonick, Alina Polyakova, and Quinta Jurecic will be talking to experts and practitioners about the major challenges our new information ecosystem poses for elections and democracy in general, and the dangers of finding cures that are worse than the disease. “Arbiters of Truth” is a reference to something Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said right after the 2016 election, when Facebook was still reeling from accusations that it hadn’t done enough to clamp down on disinformation during the presidential campaign. Zuckerberg wrote that social media platforms “must be extremely cautious about becoming arbiters of truth ourselves.” Well, if Facebook doesn’t want to be the arbiter of truth, we’re here to do it for them. In this episode, the group sat down to talk about their work on disinformation and the main questions that they hope to answer in this podcast over the coming months.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_466.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eggplants in Bangladesh 23 mins – “Bangladesh is a population dense country with relatively little farmland.  Subsistence farmers make a living by growing, harvesting and selling brinjal, or the fruit westerners know as the eggplant.  The biggest threat to production is the fruit and shoot borer, an insect larvae that digs into the fruit, leaving its waste, and inviting pathogens and decay.  To combat this, farmers traditionally use massive amounts of insecticides, upward of 80-100 sprays per season. It is their family’s livelihood, so sprays protect the crop, and protect the family. The Bt brinjal is genetically engineered to produce a natural protein that stops the fruit and shoot borer. The plants need minimal spray application and are more profitable for growers. Today co-hosts Modesta Abugu and Kevin Folta speak with Arif Hossein, leader of Farm the Future Bangladesh about the brinjal and its adoption by Bangladesh farmers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emergency Medicine Doctor 27 mins – “Today with visit with Dr. Sam Ni, a third year emergency medicine resident and USAR Doc in Training. Dr. Joe Holley connected us with Dr. Ni so we could get an understanding about what draws some ER docs to this unique calling. We chat with Dr. Ni about the process of her training. She shares what parts she enjoyed the most and what challenged her more than others. She also shares her understanding how this opportunity offers her a different look at emergency medicine and disaster medicine as two sides of the same coin. Dr. Ni will be returning to the show in the future as her training proceeds so we can follow up on the process with her. Also on the show were co-hosts Sam Bradley, and Jamie Davis.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Trade 46 mins – “Economist and author Kimberly Clausing of Reed College talks about her book Open with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Clausing, a self-described progressive, argues that the United States should continue to embrace free trade but she argues for other interventions to soften the impact of trade on workers and communities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Google Bug Hunters 27 mins – “Google’s offering up to $1.5m to anyone who can identify bugs in its new chip for Android smartphones. This is a especially high reward but Google’s just one of a host of big well-known companies running bug hunting programmes. But is this the best way for big business to protect its new tech? AI in Africa – Does Africa need a different approach to AI – yes according to Professor Alan Blackwell of the Computer Laboratory at Cambridge University in England. He’s just started a sabbatical year across Africa working with AI experts – we spoke to him on the first leg of his trip at the Bahir Institute of Technology (BIT) in the North West of Ethiopia. Wi-fi on the bus – Being online when travelling on the bus in parts of Kenya and Rwanda is not new, but now it is also possible in parts of South Africa as BRCK launch their public internet service there. Nanotech tracing stolen cars – Around 143,000 vehicles worldwide were reported as stolen in 2018 according to Interpol. In the UK, only half are recovered. Now nanosatellites could be a new tool in retrieving stolen cars. Digital Planet’s Izzie Clarke has more.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Harry Houdini 57 mins – “Journalist and author Joe Posnanski talks about his book, The Life and Afterlife of Harry Houdini, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Posnanski explores the enduring fame of Houdini who remains an iconic cultural figure almost a century after his death. Topics discussed include the nature of celebrity, the nature of ambition, parenting, magic, and the use of public relations to create and sustain reputation and celebrity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Speech Online 26 mins – “Ethiopia’s online hate speech law – Disseminating hate speech online in Ethiopia could now land you with a prison sentence of up to three years and a fine of $3000US, but the new law has proved controversial. Julie Owonp, Excutive Director of Internet without borders explains their concerns. Kivuwatt – Rwanda has an ambitious plan to go from half of the population having electricity at the moment to everyone within the next four years. Digital Planet has been given access to one project that aims to be a key part of that expansion. In the depths of Lake Kivu – one of East Africa’s great lakes – there’s methane and they’re burning the methane to generate electricity. Kivu is one of Africa’s so-called ‘killer lakes’, because the gases it harbours could be deadly for the thousands who live on shore. Burning some of the gas could help make it safer. Gareth Mitchell reports from the floating barge that is supplying 30% of the country’s electricity. Carnival 4.0 – It’s Carnival week in Rio and this year for the first time celebrations have gone fully hi-tech with augmented reality floats, QR Codes and RFID tags tracking costumes and smart bands monitoring the health of performers. But there have also been warnings about facial recognition. Brazil-based journalist Angelica Mari has been following proceedings. And joins us on the programme.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Homestead Prepping 46 mins – “Episode-2613- Why Homesteading is one of the best “Preps” you can Make” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Humanitarian Drone Corridor in Africa 31 mins -Sierra Leone has just launched West Africa’s first drone corridor – it’s a dedicated channel of airspace for medical delivery drones. UNICEF is part of the project and already has three other humanitarian corridors open globally. Wikipedia untagging of women – Dr. Jess Wade from Imperial College London is continuing her mission of getting more female scientists onto Wikipedia, however a few days ago many of her entries were marked as not notable enough to be included. This was done anonymously by another Wiki editor. We hear from Jess and Wikipedia’s Katherine Maher. Cats detecting earthquakes – Could cats detect earthquakes? Yes says Celeste Labedz a seismologist at Caltech – if they are fitted with a motion tracker device. It’s purely a theoretical idea as she explains on the programme. Smart tattoos – Smart ink that changes colour could lead to medical smart tattoos that monito conditions like diabetes. Harrison Lewis has been finding out more.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment 37 mins – “It’s January 2018. Paul Manafort and Rick Gates are in a whole lot of trouble. The past is catching up to them. Three months earlier, they’d both been indicted on multiple felony counts and now it looks like there might be even more charges coming. Gates is getting nervous–they’re facing many years in prison. Manafort tells Gates to relax. He’s talked to the president’s personal counsel. He says they’re going to “take care of us.” Manafort tells Gates he’d be stupid to plead guilty now, “just sit tight, we’ll be taken care of.” Gates wants to be crystal clear on what exactly Manafort’s getting at. So he asks: Is the president going to pardon them?” At the link right-click “Direct download: Ep_13-_Pardons_on_the_Table.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment History 26 mins – “The impeachment trial of President Donald Trump is set to begin on Jan. 21, and the question of what constitutes an impeachable offense is sure to feature in the trial itself and in the broader discussion of the president’s conduct. To answer that question, many commentators, lawmakers and experts may rely on what the Founders said at the time the Impeachment Clause was written into the Constitution. But there’s another way to think about an impeachable offense: by looking at the offenses for which Congress has actually impeached people. Hilary Hurd explored that sordid and unexpected history of impeachment in a recent article for Lawfare. In the latest edition of the Lawfare Podcast Shorts, you can listen to that article in-full, read by the author.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Internet Health Report 26 mins – “Solana Larsen, leader of the team at Mozilla that compiled the recent Health of the Internet report talks about the highlights, including openness, privacy and security, digital inclusion, web literacy and centralisation. Multi-purpose drones – A drone in Malawi in one flight dropped off medical supplies by parachute, was used by game rangers to monitor animal poaching and created a high resolution 3D mapping of an area. Daniel Ronen, co-founder of UAVAid explains how they have developed their multi-purpose drones. Nam June Paik – Nam June Paik embraced technology and digital developments in his art. Born in South Korea in 1932 his work has always been collaborative with musicians, poets and other artists using TV and sound in his often playful art. The Tate Modern gallery in London has brought together 50 years of his most innovative and influential art. Reporter Hannah Fisher, and regular studio commentator, Ghislaine Boddington, went along to explore.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran Internet Shutdown 26 mins – “Iran is now almost entirely offline as authorities try to stem the spread of protests that started last week. The government increased fuel prices by as much as 300% and since people took to the streets online access has been restricted. We find out the latest from online monitoring group NetBlocks. US Election emails unsafe – Agari was the company that uncovered and confirmed that the webserver the email that ‘hacked’ Hilary Clinton’s campaign came from Russia. They have now conducted a poll and found that only Elizabeth Warren out of all the potential presidential candidates has secure emails. This matters not only from a data security point of view but also from a voter and donor point – the company has found that voters are less likely to vote for a candidate with a data breach and that donors are less likely to give money. Hate speech control using tech – Hate speech that incites violence or hate against vulnerable groups has long been a problem in human societies but has more recently been weaponised by social media. The current system means the direct or indirect recipient needs to complain. The alternative approach is to develop artificial intelligence to identify potential hate speech and put the post in quarantine until either the direct recipient has agreed it should be deleted or has read it and agreed it should be allowed. Cargo Ship tech – Our reporter Snezana Curcic has travelled across the North Atlantic Ocean in a bit of an unusual and adventurous way – on a cargo ship. With only eight hours of Wi-Fi allowance per week, Snezana filed this story on her journey from Liverpool to New York on the Atlantic Star. She looks at the tech on board and how this hugely competitive and complex industry is adapting to the digital age to survive. Even e-commerce leaders, like Ali Baba and Amazon, are heavily investing in ocean cargo services and stepping up their game.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran Turmoil 51 mins – “Iran is in turmoil. Protests erupted across the country last month, sparked by the government’s decision to triple the price of gasoline. The Iranian government has responded with brute force, imposing a blackout of the internet and deploying security forces to crack down in the streets. The crackdown has left hundreds dead and thousands injured or detained. On December 18, the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution hosted a discussion on the unrest in Iran, what it means for the future of the country and the region, and how the United States and the international community should respond. Washington Post columnist David Ignatius led the conversation, which featured Brookings senior fellow Suzanne Maloney and film maker and journalist Maziar Bahari, who leads IranWire, a news site that conveys original information from Iran via citizen journalists.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_491.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iraq Shuts Down Internet 29 mins – “In response to anti-government protests the Iraq government shut down the internet six days ago. Coverage returned briefly before the president was due to give a televised address on Sunday allowing social media reports of violence at the demonstrations to be posted. Currently 75% of Iraq is covered by the ban. Kurdistan is unaffected. Mismatch – There’s no such thing as normal—so why are we all made to use devices, live in cities or travel in vehicles that are so uniform? Whether it’s a computer accessory that only works for right-handed people or airline seats that are unusable for taller people, we need more inclusive design. We discuss Kat Holmes’ new book Mismatch: How Inclusion Shapes Design. Beatie at the Barbican – Singer-songwriter and innovator Beatie Wolfe is showing a “teaser” of her new work at London’s Barbican gallery alongside the launch of a film about her. This environmental protest piece distils 800,000 years of historic data of carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere. It will become an interactive visualisation and soundtrack using gaming software. The Lightyear One: a self-charging electric car – The Lightyear One is a prototype solar-powered electric car. There are plans to take it into production by 2021. The manufacturer claims a range of 720km in sunny climates and even 400 km in cloudy, wet UK winter. Tom Stephens reports.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Jane Hodgson 8 mins – “BONUS EPISODE: Distillations | Science History Institute – She broke abortion law to try to change it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Marine Accident Investigation 25 mins – “Investigating marine accidents – sea tech latest – Digital Planet visits the UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch for learn more about the technology used to investigate incidents at sea. Gareth Mitchell and Dr. Leigh Marsh look at voyage data recorders recovered from ship wrecks, location beacons, CCTV footage through to simulators that can recreate incidents at sea.” At the link left-click “Download, then right-click “Higher quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosul Battle 30 mins – “In 2014, the precipitous fall of the ancient city of Mosul signaled the sudden rise to power of the Islamic State, a group that would soon declare a new caliphate from Mosul’s Great Mosque. Two years later, Mosul served as one of the group’s last major enclaves in Iraq and became the site of grinding, brutal urban warfare as Iraqi forces sought to reclaim control, block by block. Last week, Lawfare senior editor Scott R. Anderson sat down with two journalists who have produced new works documenting the battle for Mosul: veteran war correspondent James Verini, who is the author of the new book “They Will Have to Die Now,” and former CIA official Dan Gabriel, who recently directed the documentary film entitled Mosul. They discussed the pivotal role the city has played in recent Iraqi history—and what the struggle over it may be able to tell us about the future of the country and region” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_463.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nazism in Germany 34 mins – This year, 2020, sees the 75th anniversary of the end of World War Two. Its legacy remains. Nowhere more so than in Germany, where the rise of Nazism led to the war, and terrible crimes against humanity. Chris Bowlby explores how post-war Germans have faced this inheritance and discovers how a search for justice in relation to Nazi crimes has continued, despite heavy pressure to stop.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Plagiarism in Scientific Research 30 mins – “Dr. Elisabeth Bik is a hero. Classically trained with plenty of lab-bench expertise, today she patrols the best scientific literature in search for plagiarism and image manipulation.  Her expert eye identifies manipulated images in our best scientific publications, including the revered science weekly journals that present allegedly breakthrough work. Dr. Bik talks about her path to become a publication sleuth, a high-resolution machine with an eye for things that just don’t look right. She talks about her work, its repercussions and how pervasive plagiarism and image manipulation are in contemporary science.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plant Genetic Engineering 42 mins – “Today’s podcast marks five complete years of podcast episodes, and there’s no better guest than someone on the Mount Rushmore of plant genetic engineering.  We’re joined today by Dr. Robb Fraley, who was at ground zero of the first transformed plants.  He recalls the race to transform plants, his time as a leader in the Monsanto company, and his vision for the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Special Counsel 39 mins – “It’s May 17, 2017. White House Counsel Don McGahn is in the Oval Office with the president. McGahn’s job is to represent the office of the presidency, which isn’t quite the same as representing the president personally. It’s a delicate line to walk, and Trump hasn’t made the job any easier. McGahn is supposed to act as the point of contact between the White House and the Department of Justice, to ensure all the rules are being followed. But the president has made clear, he’s not interested in following the rules. Trump has already fired his FBI director. That’s why McGahn is in the Oval that morning, they need to interview a new nominee for the position. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is there too. Sessions interrupts the meeting. He has an urgent phone call from the Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, so he steps outside to take it. Sessions returns a moment later and relays the message: Rosenstein has appointed a Special Counsel to oversee the Russia investigation. It’s the former FBI director, Robert Mueller. Trump slumps back in his chair. He says, “Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my Presidency. I’m fucked.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Ep_11_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

PTSI(Injury) 48 mins – “We brought back Dan McGuire from CISM Perspectives to talk about updates to the ways work-related stress for first responders is handled. The biggest change Dan noted was a focus on building resiliency into initial first responder education and ongoing training before the critical incident occurs. One of the biggest changes Dan advocates for is to change the name from “Stress Disorder” to “Stress Injury.” This removes the stigma of a disorder and helps responders relate to the possibility of long-term injury in response to work-related stress.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rare Earth Elements P1 17 mins – “The 17 rare earth elements are often called the spices or vitamins of industry. While we don’t need much of them, they’re sprinkled in small amounts through our most powerful, futuristic, and dare we say it, magical tools. They power our iPhones and computers; they’re in wind turbines and hybrid cars. They’re in dental implants, X-ray machines, and life-saving cancer drugs. They have unusual magnetic and electrical properties that make our gadgets faster, stronger, and lighter. And we’ve all been coasting along enjoying their magic for a while now. In fact, we’ve come to expect magic. But magic comes at a cost, and in the case of mining and processing rare earths, that cost is environmental devastation. Most of us in the Western world aren’t aware of the destruction/ because most rare earths are mined elsewhere. But some scientists are trying to find a more environmentally sound way to get them.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Rare Earth Elements P2 21 mins – “The 17 rare earth elements are often called the spices or vitamins of industry. While we don’t need much of them, they’re sprinkled in small amounts through our most powerful, futuristic, and dare we say it, magical tools. They power our iPhones and computers; they’re in wind turbines and hybrid cars. They’re in dental implants, X-ray machines, and life-saving cancer drugs. They have unusual magnetic and electrical properties that make our gadgets faster, stronger, and lighter. And we’ve all been coasting along enjoying their magic for a while now. In fact, we’ve come to expect magic. But magic comes at a cost, and in the case of mining and processing rare earths, that cost is environmental devastation. Most of us in the Western world aren’t aware of the destruction/ because most rare earths are mined elsewhere. But some scientists are trying to find a more environmentally sound way to get them.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Regenerative Agriculture 63 mins – “One thing we know is the current food system works, ‘shocked that I said that?  Okay when is the last time you had money, wanted food and could not get any?  This is true in most of the world, people that go with out food do so from poverty not scarcity.  In fact billions of tons of good food it thrown away annually.  So when I say works, I mean the main stated goal of the managed Global Food System is produce enough food to feed the world.  It does that.  We must start there or no meaningful discussion about correcting the many problems in this system can be had. Yes it works…”At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Russian Skulduggery 34 mins – “Michael Schwirtz on Russia’s Lethal Actions in Europe The past few years have seen an uptick in Russian covert actions across Europe, including assassinations and attempted killings of people in Ukraine, Bulgaria, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Just this week, Bulgaria charged three Russian agents with the poisoning of a prominent Bulgarian arms manufacturer. Michael Schwirtz has been an investigative reporter with the New York Times for almost 15 years, and he’s been tracking this Russian skulduggery carefully in many of those countries for much of that time. Recently, he’s reported on how quite a bit of that activity is linked to one particular unit within the Russian GRU. David Priess sat down with Michael to work through this increasingly aggressive Russian action and what it all means going forward.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_500.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Secondhand 46 mins – “Journalist and author Adam Minter talks about his book Secondhand with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Minter explores the strange and fascinating world of secondhand stuff–the downsizing that the elderly do when they move to smaller quarters, the unseen side of Goodwill Industries, and the global market for rags.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sewage History 32 mins – “Philadelphia just had its wettest decade on record, and all that precipitation has wreaked havoc on the city’s waterways. Like most old cities, Philadelphia has a combined sewer system—that is, one pipe is used to carry both sewage and stormwater. When it rains a lot, the system gets overwhelmed, forcing the water department to send raw sewage into rivers and creeks. City officials and engineers knew this was going to be a problem when they built the sewer system in the 1800s. The reason they used a combined system anyway can be best explained by two forces: knowledge ceilings and path dependency. In this episode we explore how the city got to this point and how, in an interesting twist, it led to Philadelphia having one of the most innovative water systems in the country. Philadelphia is home of the Distillations podcast. For this episode we break down three centuries of water-pollution history in our backyard. It is a special collaboration with the Philadelphia Inquirer as part of their series From the Source: Stories of the Delaware River.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Sickle Cell Disease 15 mins – “Sickle cell disease is an inherited condition that predominantly affects people of African descent. The disease results in chronic pain and early death, and is caused by a misfolding of oxygen-toting hemoglobin, a central protein in red blood cells.  Vertex Pharmaceuticals and the CRISPR Therapeutics companies have combined to test a potential therapy.  A patients stem cells are gene edited using CRISPR/Cas9 so that they stop producing adult mutant hemoglobin, and produce a fetal version instead.  The engineered stem cells are returned to the patient, who then manufactures fetal hemoglobin in their own blood cells, potentially curing the disease. Clinical trials have just begun.  Dr. Brenda Eustace, Director of Discovery Research, takes us through the problem, its effects and the Vertex solution that could bring needed relief to millions worldwide.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Africa Power Cuts 29 mins – “South Africa Power Cuts – s South Africa facing a blackout? Power cuts across the country are now happening regularly as the country struggles with demand for electricity. There’s even an app that tells you if your lights are going to stay on today, or tomorrow. Professor Keith Bell from Strathclyde University explains why this is happening. Plasmonics – computing with light – Fancy computing with the speed of light? Well for the first time this is possible thanks to research at Oxford University. Scientists have managed use light to store, access and now process data on chip. The research could significantly increase processing speeds at data centres, not only making computing faster but saving significant amounts of energy. Land of Iron – A National Park is usually synonymous with nature and wildlife. Perhaps not the obvious place to find a technology story, but in North Yorkshire in the UK a project is underway that is using technology in many different forms to bring a forgotten history back to life. Our reporter Jack Meegan has been time-travelling for us. Jack finds out how the park’s industrial past can now be seen thanks to technology. World Wise Web – Digital Planet gets a sneak preview of a brand BBC new tech podcast. On World Wise Web, teenagers from around the world get the chance to talk to the technology pioneers who have shaped our digital world.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Higher quality” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Sterile Insect Technique 21 mins – “The tiny mosquito is a nuisance in the industrialized world, yet around the world it is a ruthless killer, spreading blood-borne diseases that bring about pain and suffering, particularly in developing nations.  In many regions these are invasive species with little to no ecological role. For years scientists have used “sterile insect technique” to control them, a process that treats sexually compatible insects with radiation, rendering them infertile.  The low-fertility insects are released into the wild and crash problematic populations. The Oxitec company has a genetic solution.  Mosquitoes have been genetically engineered to contain a lethal gene that can be turned off in the laboratory with a simple chemical.  Upon release, these mosquitoes breed against target populations, spreading the lethal gene, and leaving the next generation inviable.  The process creates a reproductive dead end.  While amazingly successful, these trials have suffered from a lack of public acceptance.  This week an article in Scientific Reports from a credible lab introduced language that bred fear, uncertainty and doubt in the Oxitec approach.  This unwarranted speculation was then amplified and exaggerated by the credulous anti-biotech media, further eroding public perception.  In this episode I spoke with Dr. Kelly Matsen, Research and Development and Operations lead at Oxitech.  She described the experiments in question, the actual results, the published paper, and how Oxitech’s technology actually has worked in field releases.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syria Activities 38 mins – :It’s been a horrible week in northeastern Syria. The U.S. abandoned its Kurdish allies after the president had a conversation by phone with Turkish President Erdogan and pulled the plug on the stabilizing U.S. presence in the region. The Turkish government began a major incursion over the border, which has produced significant casualties and major questions about ISIS detainees in Kurdish custody. To talk through it all, we pulled together quite a group. In the first half of the podcast, Benjamin Wittes spoke with Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, an adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and Scott R. Anderson and Dan Byman, both of Brookings and Lawfare. In the second half, Ben sat down with Oula A. Alrifai, a fellow with the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and Leah West, a Lecturer of International Affairs at Carleton University in Canada.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_462.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Presidency Impact 37 mins – “It’s January 2018. Paul Manafort and Rick Gates are in a whole lot of trouble. The past is catching up to them. Three months earlier, they’d both been indicted on multiple felony counts and now it looks like there might be even more charges coming. Gates is getting nervous–they’re facing many years in prison. Manafort tells Gates to relax. He’s talked to the president’s personal counsel. He says they’re going to “take care of us.” Manafort tells Gates he’d be stupid to plead guilty now, “just sit tight, we’ll be taken care of.” Gates wants to be crystal clear on what exactly Manafort’s getting at. So he asks: Is the president going to pardon them?” At the link right-click “Direct download: Ep_13-_Pardons_on_the_Table.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Presidency Impact 59 mins – “”Unmaking the Presidency: Donald Trump’s War on the World’s Most Powerful Office,” by Susan Hennessey and Benjamin Wittes, was published today. The Brookings Institution hosted a launch event, moderated by Fred Hiatt, in which Susan and Ben discussed the book. “Unmaking the Presidency” is an attempt to explore the Trump presidency through the lens of the norms of the traditional presidency that he has violated. It’s a look at his vision of the presidency, a look at the range of presidential powers that vision affects, and a look at the history of how those norms developed.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_498.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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