Media Mining Digest 172 – Feb 27, 2015: 3D Scanning, Adaptability Skills, Afghanistan Post War, Aging By the Book,Aging Prevention, Bats, Black Journalist Story, Brain Plasticity, Burning Man, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Climate and Disease, Cloud Computing, Communicating Vividly, Creative Diversity, Crises Responses, Cyber Security, Duke Energy CEO, Energy Policy in U.S., Evolutionary Biologist, Fishless World, Fukushima Aftermath, Gay and Lesbian Rights, Ghettoside, Green Myths, Human Trafficking, India Innovation, ISIS Shock and Awe, LGMT Community, Longshoremen, Medical Concepts, Medicine and Money, Mexico’s Drug War, Muslim Comic, Muslims in America, Net Neutrality, Neuroplasticity, Nuclear Power Future, Ocean Plastic Load, Omega-3 Concern, Pebble Mine Impact, Pope of Wine, Prison Slavery, PTSD Impact, San Francisco Silver, Social Networking Impact, Solar Farms, Standardized Testing, Startup Beginnings, Sufism, Syria Town Hall, Talent Gap, Technology Revolution, Terrorists Viewpoints, Through a Lens Darkly, University Reform, Urban Agriculture Case Study, Urban Wine Making, Wall Street Culpability, Water in India, Weavers of Oaxaca, Wine in California, You Tube

The following audio files come from a larger group of 132 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 65 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

3D Scanning 65mins – “Ancient monuments give us clues to astonishing past civilizations, but they’re under threat from pollution, war and neglect. Kacyra invented a groundbreaking 3D laser scanning system and is using his invention to scan and preserve the world’s heritage in archival detail. His nonprofit organization, CyArk, is now launching the 500 Challenge, an ambitious goal to “digitally preserve” 500 heritage sites. Digital Preservation, a technology twist on brick and mortar conservation, takes advantage of digital content to share the stories and significance of these ancient places with children and adults through virtual tours, online lesson plans, and soon, “the holodeck,” in addition to making critical data available to conservators for their conservation work.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Adaptability Skills 51 mins – “Jenny Blake is one of the most skilled people I know when it comes to adapting to new situations and challenges. As a professional speaker, business coach, published author, and the founder of Life After College – a site that both helped and inspired me as a freshman in college – Jenny is a pro .” At the link find the title, “Building The Skill Of Adaptability In Your Career With Jenny Blake (Ep. 24),” right-click “Media files 2882.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Afghanistan Post War 61 mins – “A leading advocate for global women’s issues discusses the state of post-troop withdrawal in Afghanistan as well as the role of women in peace talks with the Taliban. Since 2002, Noori has helped more than 33,000 women survivors of war in Afghanistan rebuild their lives through business and vocational skills training, rights awareness and health education.” Sweeta Nori, Afghanistan Country Director, Women for Women International ; Dr. Ruth Shapiro, Social Entrepreneur in Residence, The Commonwealth Club – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging By the Book 55mins – “Ottawa librarian Wendy Robbins looks at the growing popularity of a narrative approach to aging, even for individuals with dementia.” At the link find the title, “Aging by the Book,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150216_56442.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Prevention 47 mins – “Reporter Bill Gifford hit 40 and decided that was about enough aging for him.  Decided he’d rather stay young, or as young as lifestyle and science would allow.  So he plunged into that world of age-defiance to see what he could find.  There is a lot out there, both fantasy and fact.  Starvation diets and manageable diets.  Wild exercise, and routines that work.  Voodoo science and real science that is pretty astonishing in its implications.  He’s put it all together for anyone interested in staying forever young.  This hour On Point:  reporter Bill Gifford looks to put the brakes on aging.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bats  47 mins – “Bats are totally amazing.  The only flying mammal.  Incredible consumers of insects.  They save the crops that feed us.  The most attentive parents.  Incredible immune systems.  Bats are also incredible carriers of diseases that can hit humans.  Rabies, of course.  But also measles, mumps, SARS, MERS — Ebola.  That Ebola piece is getting a lot of attention right now.  West Africans being warned not to eat bat soup.  But understanding bats may also be a way out of disease. This hour On Point:  the world of bats, vulnerability and immunity.  Plus, the very latest on Ebola. “ At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Journalist Story 66 mins – “From being the first black TV journalist in the West to one of the most respected media figures in the nation, Davis has indisputably changed the face of American journalism. In her book Never in My Wildest Dreams, Davis recounts a harrowing personal history interwoven with the volatile cultural upheaval of the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s. In her five decades of reporting, Davis covered the most explosive local and national stories of the last half-century, including the Berkeley student protests, the rise of feminism, the birth of the Black Panthers, the Moscone/Milk murders, the onset of the AIDS epidemic and the terrorist attacks of 9/11. Join us as this extraordinary woman shares her story of courage, grace, and determination as she witnessed and reported on many of the most transformative events of her generation. Having won eight local Emmys and a number of lifetime achievement awards, Davis has established herself as a cultural icon intimately tied to American history.” Belva Davis, Emmy Award-winning TV Journalist/Anchor; Host, This Week in Northern California, KQED TV; Author, Never in My Wildest Dreams: A Black Woman’s Life in Journalism At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Pasticity 67 mins – “It is now known that our brain changes structurally and functionally in response to our interactions with our environment throughout our lives, not just during critical times like childhood. This modern perspective is called neuroplasticity and scientists are actively exploring the intricacies of this phenomenon. Gazzaley discusses new theories on the topic, such as cognitive reserve, use-it-or-lose-it, and neural efficiency. He will also tackle the hotly debated topic of the impact of brain training and cognitive exercises.” Adam Gazzaley, Professor, UCSF At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burning Man 61 mins – “A first-time Burning Man attendee once said, “I walked through the gates, looked around, and asked myself, ‘What is this place? Is it real?’” Every year up to 50,000 ‘burners’ make the pilgrimage to Black Rock City for eight days of commerce-free, debauchery-filled expression of human imagination. Leaving no trace of the party behind them, this diverse group of international artists, CEOs, technologists, intellectuals, families and bohemians alike carry on Burning Man founder Harvey’s world – one of mutant cars, themed villages and a 40-foot fiery effigy. Join us as we speak to the founder himself, and find out what Burning Man’s new HQ in SF will mean for that fair city.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome 47 mins – “As many as two and a half million Americans suffer from chronic fatigue syndrome. There is no formal diagnosis – but there is a huge debate about what it is and what to call it.  Many who suffer from it say the name, chronic fatigue syndrome, trivializes the illness.  So now, the Institute of Medicine has come up with a new diagnosis, and a new name:  Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease, to better describe its debilitating effects.  This hour, On Point: what’s in a name? The debate over chronic fatigue syndrome.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate and Disease 29 mins – “Climate change is affecting the spread of infectious diseases like Malaria, Chikungunya, Dengue fever and West Nile Virus. Scientists are using a host of techniques to try to understand what is happening.” At the link find the title, “SciA: Climate change and infectious diseases….,” right-click “Media files scia_20150219-2030a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cloud Computing Defined 72 mins – “A panel of tech insiders explores the various forms of cloud computing, the economics of the cloud, and the key technology of virtualization, which enables the abstraction of resources into massive pools that can be tapped on demand. Come explore the challenges of security, privacy, accessibility and the opportunities for efficient resource utilization toward a greener planet. Will the cloud be an on-demand instant gratification engine, the ultimate equalizer bringing the power of the infinite into the hands of a single person, or just the ubiquitous computing model of our increasingly digital life? Will it rain? Will cloud computing become fully adopted as part of everyday computing?” Timothy Chou, Pioneer in Software on Demand; Author; Former CEO, Oracle On-Demand; Simon Crosby, Founder and CTO, Bromium Inc., Former CTO, Citrix Systems;Gina Tomlinson, CTO, City and County of San Francisco, Department of Technology; Abhijit Phanse, CEO, UnitedLayer, Managing Partner, Accelon Capital – Moderator At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cloud Computing Strategies 67 mins – “Without massive customer adoption, any cloud strategy is prone to failure. Jones and McFarland posit that we need to shift our thinking from pushing computation to pulling demand. Learn from two industry insiders about this newly emerging field and how to make it work for you, your company and your customers.” Chris Jones, Principal, Engineering and Strategy, Hot Studio; Ian McFarland, Vice President of Technology, Principal, Pivotal Labs, MLF: Business & Leadership At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cloud Computing Value 61 mins – “Arch rivals Microsoft and Google find common cause at Climate One promoting the energy efficiency of the cloud. Efficiency alone won’t solve the climate crisis, Rob Bernard of Microsoft and Google’s William Weihl say, but smart IT can reduce emissions, help green the grid, and save money companies and consumers money….” Rob Bernard, Chief Environmental Strategist, Microsoft; William Weihl, Green Energy Czar, Google; Greg Dalton, Climate One Founder, Moderator At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communicating Vividly 60 mins – “In business, politics and life, we’re surrounded by “blah” – misleading and unintelligible words. And with the more words we hear, says Roam, the less we understand. Learn his method for becoming a better communicator through “vivid thinking” techniques. When words are accompanied by the right pictures, we will start to see and understand each other like never before.” Dan Roam, Founder and President, Digital Roam Inc.; Author, The Back of the Napkin and Blah, Blah, Blah: What to Do When Words Don’t Work. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creative Diversity 83mins – “What is your creative style, and when might it be most effective? We talk about creative diversity with electrical engineer Kathryn Jablokow in this episode of The Engineering Commons podcast… Our guest is Kathryn Jablokow, an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Design at Penn State University. Her teaching and research interests include problem solving, invention, and creativity in science and engineering, as well as robotics and computational dynamics… A well-known model of cognitive style is Kirton’s Adaption-Innovation theory. A normal distribution exists across this continuum, both for the general public and for engineering professionals…Inventive problem-solving techniques such as TRIZ and SIT can lead to new solutions, regardless of one’s creative style. Kathryn recently helped teach a free massively open online course (MOOC) titled “Creativity, Innovation, and Change.’….” At the link right “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crisis Responses 63 mins – “In a world beset with global financial, climate and poverty crises, getting a good handle on the problems is as important as finding good solutions. What steps can we take to better anticipate and manage mega-crises, such as Haiti, Katrina and 9/11? Engaging with one of the fathers of modern crisis management, this panel will offer tools and frameworks you and your organization can use to more effectively deal with the interconnected “messes” and crises of today and tomorrow.” Ian Mitroff, Professor Emeritus, USC; Adjunct Professor, UC Berkeley; Author, Why Some Companies Emerge Stronger and Better from a Crisis; Can M. Alpasian, Professor, College of Business and Economics, California State University, Northridge; Kevin O’Malley, President, TechTalk / Studio – Moderator At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security 115 mins – “Hosts: Steve Gibson with Leo Laporte catch up with several VERY interesting security events and stories of the week, then we take a close look and a deep dive into the operation of the industry’s first change in the official HTTP protocol in 15 years — the finalization and emergence of the HTTP/2 IETF specification which significantly streamlines web browser and web server interaction.” Briefly mentioned is a site/service that can freeze credit activities at Equifax, Experian and TransUnion to stop criminals from opening new credit in yourname. The link is http://bit.ly/freezecredit At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Duke Energy CEO 63 mins – “Jim Rogers, Chairman and CEO, Duke Energy Outside of the Oval Office, one of the most influential voices in the energy debate is Jim Rogers, Chairman and CEO of Duke Energy. Here Rogers talks about the future of energy policy in the United States in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear plant disaster… Rogers prefers that Congress, not the EPA, show companies the way forward.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Policy in U.S. 64 mins – “The United States does not have a national energy policy. In this panel convened by Climate One three experts long involved in the US energy debate conspire to shape their own… Knowles and T.J. Glauthier, a former Deputy Secretary at the US Department of Energy, advocate for retrofitting the country’s heavy trucking fleet to run on domestic liquefied natural gas (LNG)….  Knowles and Glauthier also recommend that shale gas be a part of the energy mix. “It’s great for the American public, it’s great for the energy sector, to have natural gas supplies that are much larger, and they’re all domestic,” says Glauthier.” T.J. Glauthier, Former Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy ; James Sweeney, Director, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center, Stanford; Tony Knowles, Chair, National Energy Policy Institute; Former Governor, Alaska. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evolutionary Biologist 64 mins – “Dawkins has been central to the debates surrounding creationism, intelligent design and religion. He coined the word meme, and his gene-centric view of evolution helped popularize the radical new understanding of Darwinism. From his early childhood in Africa to his educational awakening at Oxford, Dawkins shares his personal experiences that shaped his remarkable life and intellectual development.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fishless World 71 mins – “Former commercial fisherman and best-selling author Kurlansky examines the devastating effects of industrialized fishing and shares simple rules that families can use to help support sustainable fishing. In his new children’s book, he depicts what’s happening to the fish we commonly eat – tuna, salmon, cod and swordfish – and the domino effect it would have if it all disappeared in the next 50 years.” Author, Cod, Salt and The World Without Fish; Alison van Diggelen, Host, Fresh Dialogues – Moderator. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fukushima Aftermath 70 mins “The media an – d public reaction to the nuclear accident at Fukushima involving light water reactors and their associated spent-fuel storage pools threaten to cripple the nuclear renaissance that is humanity’s best hope for mitigating climate disruption, Shu contends. He will review how light water reactors and the “once-through” fuel cycle came to dominate the landscape for generating nuclear power today and assess options for the future.” Frank H. Shu, University Professor Emeritus, UC Berkeley and UC San Diego. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gay and Lesbian Rights 66 mins – “Equal parts investigative legal history and compelling detective tale, Flagrant Conduct is the still-untold story of Lawrence v. Texas, the landmark Supreme Court. Drawing from dozens of new interviews that yield surprising new evidence, Carpenter reexamines the motives of almost every character involved, from the arresting police officers to the gay-rights attorneys, to the nine Supreme Court justices. This is the first complete history of the case, which expanded the legal rights of millions of gay and lesbian Americans.” Dale Carpenter: Flagrant Conduct- The Untold Story of Lawrence v. Texas; Earl R. Larson Professor of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties Law,University of Minnesota Law School. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ghettoside 7 mins – “The big hashtag and signs on the streets for months now have read “Black Lives Matter.”  There are many ways to think about that.  Los Angeles Times reporter Jill Leovy has gone very deep on one.  When young black men are killed – murdered – in Los Angeles, their killers don’t get arrested.  Only 38 percent of the time in the thousands of killings of black male victims in LA.  In other cities, it’s been even lower.  Thirty five percent in Chicago.  Twenty two percent in New Orleans.  Twenty one percent in Detroit.  Jill Leovy tells us why.  This hour On Point:  Black lives. Unsolved murders.” At the link right-click “Listen to this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Myths 66 mins – “Your low-carbon lifestyle might be dirtier than you think. A new study by the Union of Concerned Scientists, Cooler Smarter: Practical Steps for Low-Carbon Living, debunks many cherished facets of sustainable consumption. Among their conclusions:  Buying local food is not the most effective way to combat global warming; it’s not always best to just keep reusing products like refrigerators and cars; just turning off the lights is not the best way to conserve energy; hybrid cars are not always the best choice; and consumers do not have to sacrifice comfort to reduce their emissions. What’s a well-intentioned consumer to do?….” Diana Donlon, Cool Foods Campaign Director, The Center For Food Safety; David Friedman, Deputy Director, Union of Concerned Scientists; Betsy Rosenberg, Radio Host, On The Green Front. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Trafficking 62 mins – “The distinguished panel of activists and experts will discuss the tragedy of human trafficking and efforts to combat what has been described as the fastest growing criminal industry, second only to drug trafficking in profitability, in the world. Human trafficking, considered a modern form of slavery, has historical roots in the Middle East, where it still thrives.” David Batstone, Founder & CEO, Not For Sale; Professor of Business, USF; Mimi Chakarova, Photo Journalist, Filmmaker, Price of Sex 2011; Correspondent, Center for Investigative Reporting; Dr. Dolores Donovan, Professor & Director of International Programming, USF School of Law; Author, Law Review & Journal Articles on Human Rights, Developing Law Systems and Criminal Justice Systems; Joel Brinkley, Professor of Journalism, Stanford University; Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist. Authour, Cambodia’s Curse – Moderator. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Innovation 54 mins – “India’s pervasive resource and capital scarcity combined with massive diversity and growing connectivity are turning the country into a large-scale, living laboratory where grassroots entrepreneurs and corporations are coming up with frugal inventions that are both affordable and sustainable. Radjou explains how “indovations” have relevance not only within India but worldwide.” Navi Radjou, Independent Consultant and Fellow, Cambridge Judge Business School; Former Executive Director, Centre for India & Global Business, University of Cambridge. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Control  51 mins – “Kurdish fighters in northern Iraq have reportedly, for now, beaten back an assault by ISIS. Earlier this week Egyptian warplanes dropped bombs on Islamic state targets in Libya. That attack was in retaliation for the apparent beheading of 21 Egyptian Coptic Christians. The video which allegedly verifies these murders suggests that the extremist group is expanding its reach beyond territory it already controls in Iraq and Syria. Many say the U-S and other western nations are failing to appreciate the growing threat of ISIS and the need for a strong military response. Please join us [4 guests] to discuss the threat of ISIS.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

ISIS Shock and Awe 48 mins – “…violent extremism.  Europe has recently had a front row seat on the issue. The Charlie Hebdo killings in Paris.  Seventeen dead.  The killings this weekend in Copenhagen.  And right across the water, in North Africa – Libya – ISIS video of 21 Coptic Christians being beheaded on the shore of the Mediterranean.   With an ISIS killer pointing a bloody dagger north, vowing to “take Rome.”  It’s grotesque theater.  And a vivid threat.  This hour On Point:  Europe and ISIS, from North Africa to Copenhagen” At the link right-click “Listen to this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

LGBT Community 73 mins – “Reverend Lee was among the first voices to speak out against the passage of Prop. 8, and he continues to support LGBT equality. As a longtime civil rights activist, he advocates supporting all disenfranchised communities unequivocally and tells us that the LGBT community’s struggle is part of a larger struggle for justice that includes immigration reform and economic and racial justice. An LGBT leader, Reverend Johnson is known for bringing clarity to complex and emotionally charged issues and for her hard work in building solidarity in the intersections of social justice. Reverends Lee and Johnson will discuss their work in the multiple communities they serve.” Reverend Eric Lee, President and CEO, Southern Christian Leadership Conference of Greater Los Angeles; Chairman and President, the California Christian Leadership Conference; Reverend Deborah Johnson, Founding Minister and President, Inner Light Ministries. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Longshoremen 51 mins – “Now, a labor dispute between dockworkers and shipping companies threatens to shut down the ports. Some economists estimate this would cost the U.S. economy $2 billion a day. President Barack Obama has sent Labor Secretary Thomas Perez to San Francisco this week to try to broker a deal. But the two sides remain deadlocked. Diane and [3] guests discuss what’s behind the West Coast port slowdown and what it could mean for the U.S. economy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Medical Concepts 63 mins – “Despite advances in modern medicine, Agus asks why we aren’t better at curing illness. Agus insists that we must embrace a totally new view of looking at our health to prevent and combat hearth disease, cancer and autoimmune disorder. He offers a practical health guide to better understand the human body and takes on some myths and misconceptions about the benefits of vitamins and supplements, foods, and the role of DNA. He also will discuss exciting breakthrough technologies that promise to transform medicine in our generation.” Director, USC’s Westside Cancer Center; Professor of Medicine, USC Keck School of Medicine; Co Founder, Navigenics; Author, The End of Illness. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicine and Money 65 mins – “Finance, Brawley asserts, is inextricably linked to health care in America’s current system. Even the very procedures patients undergo, he says, are frequently determined more by doctors’ expected payment for performing them than their actual appropriateness in mitigating the ailment with which the patient is afflicted. Brawley will discuss the extent of this problem as well as possible solutions.” Dr. Otis Brawley: Fighting Patient Mistreatment in America; Otis Brawley, Chief Medical Officer and Executive Vice President, American Cancer Society; Co-author, How We Do Harm: A Doctor Breaks Ranks About Being Sick in America; Lisa Aliferis, KQED Health Editor – Moderator. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexico’s Drug War 63 mins – “Ciudad Juárez lies just across the Rio Grande from El Paso, Texas. A once-thriving border town, it now resembles a failed state, with the city’s murder rate exceeding that of Baghdad. This is just one of thousands of sites of Mexico’s drug war, which has claimed more than 30,000 lives since December 2006, when a U.S.-backed military crackdown on cartels began. Bowden will take you inside Mexico’s drug war, which he says demonstrates the consequences of U.S. drug policy, free trade policy and immigration policy.” Charles Bowden, Author, Murder City: Ciudad Juárez and the Global Economy’s New Killing Fields. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muslim Comic 47 mins – “Maz Jobrani’s memoir is called, “I’m Not a Terrorist, But I’ve Played One on TV. And he has. Born in Iran, Jobrani came to the U.S. as a kid during the Iranian Revolution. But it was tough getting used to his adopted culture: baseball didn’t make sense and kids blamed him for the Iranian hostage crisis. And when casting directors came calling, they only wanted him to play kebab-eating, bomb-toting, terrorists.  So he did. But no more. Now, in the age of Charlie Hebdo and Muslim killings in North Carolina, he does comedy. This hour, On Point: Middle Eastern funny man, Maz Jobrani.” At the link right-click “Listen to this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muslims In America 66 mins – “A panel of five leading Silicon Valley executives, educators and entrepreneurs will share their stories and perspectives surrounding the experience of growing up Muslim in the American context. Both anecdotally and analytically, panelists will explore the impact that their Muslim identity has had on their personal and professional assimilation into American society. The speakers will provide insight into some of the nuances of the Islamic faith and will discuss many of the misconceptions commonly associated with their religion.” Muhammed Chaudhry, President & CEO, Silicon Valley Education Foundation; Sumbul ali-Karamali, Lawyer; Author, The Muslim Next Door: The Qur’an, the Media, and that Veil Thing; Raaina Mohsen, Executive Director, Cities Association of Santa Clara County; Barbara Marshman, Opinion Pages Editor, San Jose Mercury News – Moderator. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Net Neutrality Impact 31 mins – “Michael Powell, president and CEO of the National Cable and Telecommunications Association, discusses his opposition to FCC Chair Tom Wheeler’s proposed new rules to ensure net neutrality.” At the link find the title, “The Communicators: Michael Powell,” right-click “Media files program.388251.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Net Neutrality Status 28 mins – “Federal Communications Commission (FCC) counsel Gigi Sohn discusses FCC Chair Tom Wheeler’s proposed rules to ensure net neutrality. The proposal would strengthen the FCC’s regulation of the internet and extend the rules to mobile phones and devices.” At the link find the title, “The Communicators: Gigi Sohn,” right-click “Media files program.387510.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuroplasticity 38 mins ­ “ Norman Doidge talks about the implications of neuroplasticity and his new book ‘The Brain’s Way of Healing’, and from San Jose in California Ian Sample gives a roundup of key issues discussed at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Norman Doidge is a Canadian psychiatrist on the faculty of both the University of Toronto and of Columbia University in New York.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Power Future 67 mins – “Two new nuclear plants are moving forward for the first time in nearly 30 years. Boosters of atomic power say that’s an indication an American atomic revival is back on track after the radioactive disaster in Fukushima. But the cost of the new U.S. plants are a staggering $10 billion a piece, raising questions of whether new nukes can stand on their own legs without government crutches. Abundant and cheap natural gas is also undercutting new nuclear, coal and renewable sources of electricity. What other sources of low carbon energy could supply the 20 percent of electricity now generated by splitting atoms? Join us for a discussion about a critical juncture in powering America’s future.” Jim Boyd, Former Commissioner, California Energy Commission; Marv Fertel, CEO, Nuclear Energy Institute; Joe Rubin, Reporter, Capital Public Radio/Center for Investigative Journalism. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Plastic Load 56 mins – The first eleven minutes of this multi-topic episode concerns plastic accumulation in the ocean. At the link the entire program must be downloaded by right-clicking “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Omega-3 Concern 71 mins – “Unsaturated fats (Omega 3, Omega 6) are in our food, supplements and body – for better and for worse. Tel-Oren demonstrates that most omega-3 products are not ecological and contain rancid, polluted oil and have side-effects. Experts quote the literature which some believe has been heavily EPA/DHA-biased and largely ignore the rancidity issue. Tel-Oren discusses naturally stable plant-based Omega-3 and its proven health impact and reveals what the popular omega 3 oil industries don’t want you to know. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pebble Mine Impact 59 mins – “The proposed Pebble Mine would be one of the largest gold and copper mines in the world, located at the headwaters of the Bristol Bay watershed in southwest Alaska. Proposed by a consortium of international mining giants – including Anglo American, Rio Tinto and Northern Dynasty Minerals – the mine would include an open pit 2,000 feet deep and two miles wide and an underground mine 5,000 feet deep. Opponents argue that it would generate an estimated 10 billion tons of waste, laced with toxic contaminants, stored in perpetuity behind giant earthen dams taller than the Three Gorges Dam in China – all within an active earthquake zone. It would require construction of major power plants, slurry pipelines, heavy industrial traffic-bearing roads across the mountains, and a deep-water port in Cook Inlet, home to a federally protected population of endangered Beluga whales. Some 50 leading jewelry companies, including Tiffany & Co., have taken the “No Pebble Pledge,” committing not to source minerals from the mine. They join Alaskan natives, commercial and recreational fishermen, conservationists, sportsmen, and local and regional businesses in an unprecedented coalition opposed to the mine. Come hear a panel of opponents of the mine discuss this project that has the potential to re-shape the land, wildlife and people in its path.” Michael Kowalski, Chairman and CEO, Tiffany & Co.; Joel Reynolds, Senior Attorney, Natural Resources Defense Council; Kimberly Williams, Executive Director, Nunamta Aulukestai; Wendy Schmidt, The Schmidt Family Foundation – Moderator. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pope of Wine 53 mins – “Salesman, self-promoter, journalist, author, ladies man, connoisseur, war veteran, chateau-owner and – above all – French wine enthusiastic, Alexis Lichine led a fascinating life and is credited with creating the American market for French wine. In honor of the 60th anniversary of his publication The Wines of France, Lichine’s biographer Hennessy will discuss the wine enthusiast’s intriguing existence and his impact on wine.” Leslie A. Hennessy Jr., Author, The Pope of Wine: The Biography of Alexis Lichine. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Slavery 63 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy investigates one aspect of the future of work, and finds a resurgence, in different dress, of the institution of human slavery. We’ll look at the controversial topic of prison populations in the U.S., which are continuing to surge; the labor of many of those forcibly idled inmates is being put to use. Are long prison terms for petty crimes a recruiting tool? Hear Cantor’s arguments and concerns about the re-emergence and social acceptance of this ancient form of exploitation.” Matt Cantor, Columnist, Berkeley Daily Planet. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PTSD Impact 62 mins – “Just as polio loomed over the 1950s, and AIDS stalked the 1980s and ’90s, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) haunts us in the early years of the twenty-first century. Over a decade into the United States’ “global war on terror,” PTSD afflicts as many as 30 percent of the conflict’s veterans. But the disorder’s reach extends far beyond the armed forces. In total, some twenty-seven million Americans are believed to be PTSD survivors. Yet to many of us, the disorder remains shrouded in mystery, secrecy, and shame. This week we speak with David Morris, former Marine turned war correspondent. While on assignment, David’s humvee was hit by an IED (improvised explosive device) and his life was forever changed.  In this episode we discuss America’s hunger for violence, the effect of war movies on our nation (specifically we discuss the newest blockbuster – American Sniper), the truth about PTSD, and much more. David is the author of the brand new best-selling book, The Evil Hours: A Biography of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

San Francisco Silver 62 mins – “The discovery of silver in 1859 propelled San Francisco from a dusty mining boomtown into a world-class metropolis. Director Lynch shares the subject and story of his historical documentary film, City of White Gold, which tells of epic struggle for wealth and power in the Wild West, beginning with the fateful unearthing of the legendary Comstock Lode. Lynch intersperses video clips from the film-in-progress and readings from letters of the era with a fascinating account of how silver shaped San Francisco in the 19th century Gilded Age.” Geordie Lynch, Director, City of White Gold. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Networking Impact 65mins – “More than a billion people around the world are engaged in a massive and unprecedented experiment in how social media technologies are changing society, commerce, politics, health, innovation, love, work, the arts and more. But what is this new tech literally doing to our brains? How is it impacting who we are as humans, and how is it making us different from previous generations in how we interact with information, our environment and each other? This provocative panel will feature a neuroscientist who studies the impact of multitasking on our gray matter and those who believe new social networking may be leading us to a more connected and even better world, as well as those who are wary of the physiological and societal impact that social media has on humanity….” Adam Gazzaley, Associate Professor of Neurology, Physiology and Psychiatry and Director, Neuroscience Imaging Center, UCSF; Josh McHugh, CEO, Attention Span Media; Tiffany Shlain, Founder, Webby Awards; Filmmaker, Connected: An Autobiography about Love, Death and Technology; David Ewing Duncan, Author, Experimental Man; Co-host, Tech Talk Radio – Moderator. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Farms 66 mins – “California’s desert offers abundant solar energy, but locating large installations often triggers a good old Western dust-up among neighbors, environmentalists and investors. Federal and state officials have identified preferred solar zones to provide clarity and predictability. Are they all on the same page? Can different levels of government work with businesses and environmentalists to speed the production of clean energy in the desert while improving the habitat for wildlife? We’ll discuss ambitious plans to soak up the sun in the American West with the voices leading the debate.” David Hayes, Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department of Interior; John Laird, Secretary, California Resources Agency; David Festa, West Coast Vice President, Environmental Defense Fund; Michael Hatfield, Director of Development, First Solar. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Standardized Testing 51 mins – “Thirteen years ago, Congress passed No Child Left Behind. It mandated annual standardized testing as a way to ensure that students did not fall through the cracks. Over the years, programs like Race to the Top ratcheted up the stakes, increasing pressure on teachers, schools and districts to perform. Now No Child Left Behind is up for reauthorization and some lawmakers are calling for a removal of the mandate. This would allow states more wiggle room to design their own assessment methods. Meanwhile, parents and educators are increasingly questioning the number of tests students take and what the focus on testing is doing to our school system. An update on the debate over the way we use standardized testing in America’s schools.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Startup Beginnings 58 mins – “John Collison, co-founder and president of the online payment system Stripe, explains how even the most celebrated startups repeatedly encountered uncertainty and failures along the way. In conversation with Stanford Professor of the Practice Tina Seelig, Collison shares his thoughts on how a venture’s path can evolve after its early days, even as the vision holds constant.” At the link hover over “Download,” then right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sufism 55 mins – “Don’t miss this chance to learn about Sufism – the inner, mystical interpretation and expression of Islam – from an internationally esteemed Persian Sufi scholar, author and lecturer. Dr. Angha will discuss Sufi history and Sufi literature, with an emphasis on the poetry of Rumi and Omar Khayam, considered by many to be among the highest literary expressions of spirituality. Angha, a human rights activist, women’s rights and interfaith activist will also discuss the rights of women in Islam.” Nahid Angha, Ph.D. , Co-director, The International Association of Sufism; Director, Sufi Women Organization; Michael Pappas, Executive Director, SF Interfaith Council – Moderator. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syria Town Hall 65 mins – “The crisis in Syria has created global tension since the recent poison gas attack that killed some 1,400 people. How should the United States and other world leaders respond? Should the U.S. Congress grant President Obama “limited” authority to launch a military strike on Syria? Would a limited military intervention be effective or would it cause more problems than it solves? What would military intervention look like? Cruise missiles? Drones? What are the targets and what is the goal if not regime change? Would it deter Syrian President Bashar al-Assad from more attacks on civilians – or provoke him to launch more attacks? Would it trigger regional havoc in the Middle East possibly involving Iran, Israel, Lebanon and others? What are the repercussions if the U.S. does not strike? How might diplomacy and negotiation work to bring peace to the region?” Zubair Jandali, Member, Northern California Chapter, Syrian American Council; Head of Mobile App Developer Sales, Google; Graduate, UC Berkeley, B.S., Business Administration; Fred H. Lawson, Ph.D., Professor of Government, Mills College; Tareq Al Samman, Graphic Artist/Web Designer; Syrian activist; Kori Schake, Research Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University; Former Policy Expert, the Pentagon, U.S. State Department and National Security Council; Former Distinguished Chair in International Security Studies, West Point; Keith David Watenpaugh, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Modern Islam, Human Rights and Peace, and Director, Human Rights Initiative, UC Davis; Robert Rosenthal, Executive Director, Center for Investigative Reporting. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Talent Gap 43 mins – “Tiffani Lennon – Are women better? Although we like to think that we are an equal opportunity economy, the glass ceiling still very much exists.  As a matter of fact, in 2011, women ran only 12 of the Fortune 500 companies. So how does this impact our ability to compete in a global environment? If women aren’t given an equal chance to succeed, aren’t we missing out on half of the talented people in the country? As a matter of fact, it’s worse than that. According to our guest this week, the data shows that women are outperforming men across the board – and it’s time we recognize them for it. This week we speak with Tiffani Lennon, author of the new book, Recognizing Women’s Leadership: Strategies and Best Practices for Employing Excellence.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Revolution 41 mins – “Few people have had a better perspective on the rise of the “technology revolution” than our guest this week, Kevin Kelly. As a young hippie backpacking his way around the world, Kevin aspired to make art and to learn about the world. By his own admission, he disliked most technologies, especially the computer – which was a large, clunky, useless machine. However, when he snuck his way into one of the earliest groups to try out the internet, he realized that the world was about to change in a big way and he wanted a front row ticket. Soon after, in 1993 Kevin co-founded Wired Magazine and they have been predicting the future ever since. Kevin is the author of the new book, Cool Tools: A Catalog of Possibilities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorists Viewpoints 65 mins – “A veteran journalist will take you inside the U.S.-led war on terror. Drawing on firsthand reporting in Northern Ireland, Columbia, Spain and the Middle East, Erlich challenges the definition of “terrorist” and argues that yesterday’s terrorist may be today’s national leader, and today’s freedom fighter might be tomorrow’s terrorist.” Reese Erlich, Foreign Correspondent; Author, Conversations with Terrorists. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Through a Lens Darkly 59 mins – “Thomas Allen Harris discusses his film, [Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People], in which he explores how African-Americans have been portrayed in photographic images from the time of slavery up through today.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Thomas Allen Harris,” right-click “Media files program.383609.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

University Reform 48 mis – “Sometimes a state debate gets the whole country’s attention.  For Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin, that seemed to part of the idea:  to take on Wisconsin’s public university system and its time-honored ideals as a sign to conservative Republican primary voters that he should be their hard-nosed man in the White House.  He proposed a $300 million cut to the university system, and draft language that would have cut the “search for truth” out of its mission statement.  Would gut, say critics, the “Wisconsin Idea” of great higher ed for all.  This hour On Point:  the battle over higher education and the Wisconsin Idea.” At the link right-click “Listen to this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban Agriculture Case Study 59 mins – “Hosts: Dickson Despommier and Vincent Racaniello talk with Dan Albert, founder of Farmbox Greens, a commercial urban farm in Seattle, Washington.” At the link right-click “Download UrbAg 13,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban Wine Making 65 mins – “Move over, Napa and Sonoma. Wine producing is making a huge shift from rural wineries to urban producers. For the past five years, wine has been making its way downtown, ditching Napa and taking root in the East Bay. Urban winemakers in Oakland and San Francisco source their fruit from the best vineyards in California and around the globe, turning the grapes into world-class juice in their metropolitan facilities. Not being tied to the land gives these urban artisans the freedom to experiment, producing small batches of lovingly crafted wines that are original, local and affordable. Drink up and indulge your inner oenophile and locavore as our panel of wine wizards explores this growing urban trend.” Jim Mirowski, Co-founder and Owner, Treasure Island Wines; Derek Rohlffs, Proprietor and Winemaker, Bravium Wines; Sasha Verhage, Winemaker and Proprietor, Eno Wines; Kathryn Cohen, Proprietor, Stomping Girl Wines; Ryan Flinn, Reporter, Bloomberg News; Wine Reviewer – Moderator. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wall Street Culpability 62 mins – “Could the global economic meltdown of the last few years have been prevented? Ferguson believes the crisis was no accident. After Inside Job won the 2011 Academy Award for Best Documentary Film, Ferguson started his acceptance speech by charging that there was a lack of accountability of the finance industry and Wall Street, pointing out that three years after the horrific crisis started not a single financial executive had gone to jail. Predator Nation continues to examine the important issues raised in Inside Job, arguing that an out-of-control finance industry took advantage of a deregulated atmosphere and purposely got rich at the expense of others. Through his extensive interviews with financial insiders and government officials, Ferguson exposes the “corrupted networks” that caused the economic collapse and offers a plan of action to help our country get back on track.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water in India 68 mins – “As India’s urban population and income grow in unprecedented numbers, supplying water reliably to the community has become a growing concern. Faced with limited reservoir storage, aging piped infrastructure, and rapidly growing demand, no Indian city today has a 24/7 water supply. India’s rapidly growing cities represent both a challenge and an opportunity. Because much of the infrastructure is still being built, there is the opportunity to follow a different development path than has been followed elsewhere in the world. Join Srinivasan for a discussion on possible pathways to build a sustainable water supply system in India.” Veena Srinivasan: Ph.D., Research Associate, Pacific Institute. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Weavers of Oaxaca 62 mins – “The Chavez Santiago family of the famed weaving village of Teotitlan de Valle presents its story of this ancient art form, a family, a culture and preserving a way of life across generations. Critics have recognized their work for its combination of traditional patterns and weaving techniques with modern colors and sensibilities. As weavers and educators, they are working both within and outside Mexico to bring together the members of local villages and national and international organizations to promote an economic base that continues to support traditional Zapotec culture.” Federico Chavez Sosa, Master Weaver in the Zapotec tradition; Eric Chavez Santiago, Coordinator of the Education Department, Textile Museum of Oaxaca; Janet Chavez Santiago, Coordinator of Education, San Pablo Center for Academics and Culture, Oaxaca. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wine in California 60 mins -“In The New California Wine, James Beard Award-winning wine editor Jon Bonné brings us the untold story of the innovative producers who are rewriting the rules of contemporary winemaking and transforming the California wine industry. Uncovering vintners’ quest to express the uniqueness of California terroir and revealing the continuing battle to move the state away from the overly technocratic, reactionary practices of the recent past, Bonné takes us to the front lines of the California wine revolution. Join us as he shares the fascinating stories, philosophies and techniques of the iconoclastic young winemakers who are changing the face of California viticulture.”Jon Bonné, Wine Editor, San Francisco Chronicle; Author, The New California Wine: A Guide to the Producers and Wines Behind a Revolution in Taste; in conversation with Fred Swan, Wine Writer, NorCalWine; Educator, The San Francisco Wine School. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

You Tube  47 mins – “YouTube is ten years old this month.  The novelty of people uploading home videos and cute cats a decade ago has turned into something much, much bigger.  Six billion hours of You Tube video watched globally every month, with everything under the sun available.  Sports.  Pranks.  Music.  Beauty tips.  Terrorists.  High-minded lectures and how-to clips on trimming shrubs.  Now Hollywood is buying in.  Channels, networks, are rising up.  And so are competitors, taking video times from six minutes to six seconds.  This hour On Point:  YouTube at ten, and the world on video.” At the link right-click “Listen to this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

=======================================================================

ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 5000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 30+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here MP3

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 171 – Feb 20, 2015: African Filmmaker Kasujja, Agriculture Subsidies, Alzheimer’s Prevention, Appalachian Coal Mining, Atul Gawande, Beer History, Bread Making, Cisco Take on Future, Climate Change Snow, Cruelty Solution, Cybersecurity, Dating, Dating Science, Debtor Prisons, Drunken Botanist, Dry Farming Wine, Egyptian Justice, Engine Cooling, Extreme Weather, Farm Innovation, Female Talent, First Nations Sorrows, Forest Management, Freakonomics, Glasgow’s Digital Creativity, Harper Lee, Hubble and Humason, Human Upgrade, Hybrid Car History, Immigrant Skills, Indian Classics, Indian Growth, ISIS Control, Jail Use, Lead and Aggression, Learning Tips, Love, Lysosome Biology, Maidan Killings, March: Book Two, Marijuana Business, Miami, Minimum Wage, Mountain Connect, Nuclear Threat, Opiate Addiction, Paleo Diet Help, Patient Spotlight, Polar People, Police Issues, Poverty Fixes, Prison Gangs, PTSD Issues, Ralph Nader, Robert Reich, Sal Khan, Science History, SEAL Training, Senior Cohousing, Shepherd Center, Sky Color, Smart TV’s, Stalin Archives, Syrian War, Terrorism Solutions, Tolerance, Truth Spin, Turing Book, Vaccination Regulation, Visualizing Molecular Structures, War Unending, Women at Work

The following audio files come from a larger group of 182 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 75 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

African Filmmaker Kasujja 27 mins – “My Africa offers a series of inspiring snapshots of a continent working towards future prosperity. As part of the BBC’s Richer World season, Alan Kasujja travels to three countries in his native east Africa to meet young Africans determined to build a better future.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: My Africa – Uganda,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150210-0315b.mp3” and select “SaveLink As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Subsidies 69 mins – “Daniel Sumner of the University of California talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about agricultural subsidies in the United States, the winners and losers from those subsidies, and how the structure of subsidies has changed from the New Deal to the present. Sumner also explains how American policies have affected foreign farmers. “ At the link right-click ‘Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’s Prevention 57 mins – “Patricia Renaut Spilman, M.S., Senior Scientist, Buck Institute As a growing portion of the American population ages into its golden years, there will inevitably be a greater number of those suffering from Alzheimer’s, a degenerative disease for which there is currently no effective reversing treatment. At the forefront of the effort to find a breakthrough cure is the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, CA, a facility dedicated to confronting Alzheimer’s and other chronic age-related illnesses. While researchers continue to press for a reversing process, all of us can make health and lifestyle changes that greatly reduce the chance of developing this devastating disease. Spilman, a senior scientist at the Buck Institute, will share with us proactive “healthstyle” choices that encourage a healthy mind and body far into one’s later years, choices that encourage a healthy mind and body far into one’s later years.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Appalachian Coal Mining 56 mins – “Gilomen and Rubin discuss their new film, Mine, based on the mining practices and impacts on local ecologies and communities in Appalachia. Gilomen and Rubin’s precedent-setting documentary is about families and the decisions they must make to preserve their generational lands and survive economically.  Gilomen and Rubin will also discuss recent action by the EPA to place holds on permits for mountaintop coal mining.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atul Gawande 65 mins – “Atul Gawande, Author, The Checklist Manifesto and Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End; Staff Writer, The New Yorker; Professor, Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health. Gawande tackles the question of how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending. Modern medicine, dedicated to prolonging life, inevitably runs counter to the natural condition of aging and death. Nursing homes, hospitals and doctors, in the process of provide the aging and dying with the best care, continue to pin patients to railed beds and carry out devastating procedures that ultimately extend suffering. A practicing surgeon and MacArthur fellow, Gawande addresses his profession’s ultimate limitation, arguing that quality of life is the desired goal for patients and families. Gawande offers examples of more socially fulfilling models for assisting the infirm and dependent elderly, and he explores the varieties of hospice care to demonstrate that a person’s last weeks or months may be rich and dignified. Gawande asserts that medicine can comfort and enhance our experience even to the end, providing not only a good life but also a good end.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beer History 64 mins -“Ever wonder when the first beer was brewed? Or, better yet, how it tasted? In his latest book, The Brewer’s Tale, home-brewer and beer critic William Bostwick uncovers the stories of brewers past – the unknown recipes, the odd ingredients, and the long-lost flavors – telling a history of the world through the eyes of brewers throughout the centuries. Join Bostwick as he celebrates the beers of ages past and raise a glass to the fermented magic we all know and love.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bread Making 42 mins -“In this discussion, journalist Fromartz and renowned baker Robertson will delve deep into bread, attempting to define a great loaf and what it takes to make it. Fromartz, a home baker for more than 17 years, traveled through the U.S. and to Europe to meet bakers, millers and sourdough microbiologists and translate their lessons to his kitchen. Robertson, the owner of Tartine Bakery, travelled to countries, including Denmark, bringing a new understanding of whole grain loaves into his repertoire. The two will riff off themes in Fromartz’s book, touching on everything from the art of fermentation to the craft of the baker.” Samuel Fromartz, Author, In Search of the Perfect Loaf: A Home Baker’s Odyssey; Blogger, ChewsWise; Twitter @fromartz, In conversation with Chad Robertson, owner Tartine, Bar Tartine; Author, Tartine Book No. 3: Modern, Ancient, Classic, Whole; Twitter @tartinebaker.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Cisco Take on Future 63 mins – “Today’s innovation and success landscape is much different than just 10 years ago. Major technology trends are converging and shaping how we live, how we work, how we learn and how we play. In turn, there are business imperatives that result and Warrior says that only those who can encourage and ride this wave of ongoing innovation will thrive. Join Padmasree Warrior to talk about the future of technology and the opportunities that result for businesses, governments and education. It’s an era of the Internet of Everything with $14.4 trillion of value at stake – how will you realize the value?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Snow 3 mins – “I haven’t told my 5-year-old daughter about global warming. There are some obvious reasons for that but one purely practical one is that she’d just be damn confused. Especially these last couple of weeks. The snowbanks outside our house in Boston right now are high enough for her to climb up into our cherry tree and sled down onto the sidewalk. How would she square that with her dad telling her the world is warming up? And it’s not just confusing to five year-olds. The unrelenting blasts of snow that have hit Boston over the past few weeks are enough to give even those most well-schooled in climate science a bad case of cognitive dissonance. Distilled into a Tweet, the question might simply be, “WTF?’” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cruelty Solution 72 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy explains the sources of cruelty and how deeply embedded they are in our personal pursuit of happiness. This starkly clear understanding of how and why we have an unnecessary and counter-productive fondness for inflicting pain on others also demonstrates that it is in your own self-interest to transcend this destructive (and self-destructive) desire and to learn how to disarm and dissuade others from being cruel to you.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cybersecurity 52 mins – “President Barack Obama will meet with business leaders in California later this week to discuss new efforts to boost cyber security. Recent high profile attacks on Anthem Health Insurance and Sony underscore the ongoing risks to both U.S. consumers and companies. Some say government strategy should be more forceful, but others argue “offensive” action against perpetrators could have unintended and negative consequences. A look at how cyber security threats are shifting and new efforts to reduce the risks.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Dating 18 mins – “…Online dating makes the whole thing easier, or at least, it’s supposed to. It presents users with a multitude of options: bearded hipsters, guys who go kayaking, nurses who are totally over drama, and countless more. So you evaluate people based on your exact specifications, fill out quizzes and tests to find matches, swipe left or right based on someone’s picture – all to find love. But all this searching doesn’t just get you a date to sip overpriced cocktails with, it also says something about you….” At the link click “Download” and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Dating Science 13 mins – “Neuroscientist Indre Viskontas and her friends turn to science to find the right way to date. Indre Viskontas is a neuroscientist and opera singer. She is also the host of Inquiring Minds, an in-depth exploration of the place where science, politics, and society collide.” At the link click “Download” and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Debtor Prisons 46 mins – “Six months ago this week, Michael Brown was shot dead in Ferguson, Missouri.  Around the world, people wondered at the depth of anger and frustration that poured into Ferguson’s streets.  There are many strands to follow.  One goes to the municipal courts around St. Louis.  They are major money-makers for little cities like Ferguson.  Traffic fees and fines on many who are black and poor.  Jail time.  Lost jobs.  A sense of systematic oppression.  Debtors’ prison.  Now there’s reform talk.  It’s a national issue.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drunken Botanist 65 mins – “Amy Stewart, Author, The Drunken Botanist: The Plants That Create the World’s Great Drinks — Wondering how to enhance your garden and become a better bartender? Enter Amy Stewart, New York Times best-selling author of Wicked Bugs, Wicked Plants and, most recently, The Drunken Botanist, a guide to the most interesting, unusual and delicious herbs, flowers, trees, fruits and fungi that have helped create the world’s most intoxicating spirits. Join Amy as she blends together one part science, one part history and just a splash of mixology to explore the fascinating world of botany and booze – with a few gardening tips and drink recipes along the way..” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dry Farming Wine 69 mins -“Join us for a panel discussion to learn first-hand from wine growers the history of dry farming to produce quality grapes. Dry farming refers to growing wine grapes without irrigation, instead using residual moisture from the rainy season to sustain them through the dry season. It has had a long history of use, particularly in the Mediterranean region. Prior to the 1970s, dry farming was standard practice in premium wine regions in California as well, but fell out of favor with the invention of drip irrigation. Today, there are still dry-farmed vineyards across the state, and growers agree: dry farming produces quality wine. Learn how this time-tested growing method produces top-quality wines and promotes environmental and water stewardship. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Egyptian Justice 27 mins – “Claire Read has spent the last six months following a court case in Egypt and trying to get to grips with how the country’s justice system operates under the government of President Sisi.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Egypt – Searching for Justice,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150211-1501a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engine Cooling 4 mins – “…Let’s imagine that we’re late 19th-century engineers and we’ve just created a new internal combustion engine. So: how to cool the cylinders? The temperature reaches, maybe, 3000 degrees Fahrenheit inside them. They’ll be ruined if we don’t cool them. We can put cooling fins on them, then force cool air to flow around them. Or we can jacket the cylinders and force cool water through the jacket. That gives better cooling but the water’s hot when it leaves the jacket. Now we need a radiator to cool it before it recirculates. (Ah, this world of engineering compromise!)….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Extreme Weather 49 mins – “Winter storms, now costing the economy billions. Summer storms, too. And spring. And fall. And drought. We’ll look at the economics of extreme weather. Epic snows in my backyard lately, in Boston.  Six feet-plus in a month, and it’s still coming.  The most ever recorded coming down that fast.  It’s been paralyzing.  And very costly.  Exposing all kinds of infrastructure problems you would never think of on a gentle day in May.  That’s what extreme weather does, whether it’s blizzard or drought or hurricane or deluge.  Paralyzes.  Costs a lot.  And can take apart an economy.  Now American business is paying attention.  To climate change.  This hour On Point:  extreme weather and its mounting consequences for the economic bottom line.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Innovation 17 mins – “What if human consciousness isn’t the end-all and be-all of Darwinism? What if we are all just pawns in corn’s clever strategy game to rule the Earth? Author Michael Pollan asks us to see the world from a plant’s-eye view.“ At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Talent 43 mins – “Tiffani Lennon – Are women better? Although we like to think that we are an equal opportunity economy, the glass ceiling still very much exists.  As a matter of fact, in 2011, women ran only 12 of the Fortune 500 companies. So how does this impact our ability to compete in a global environment? If women aren’t given an equal chance to succeed, aren’t we missing out on half of the talented people in the country? As a matter of fact, it’s worse than that. According to our guest this week, the data shows that women are outperforming men across the board – and it’s time we recognize them for it. This week we speak with Tiffani Lennon, author of the new book, Recognizing Women’s Leadership: Strategies and Best Practices for Employing Excellence.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Nations Sorrows 54 mins – “In the wake of the Idle No More protest movement, John Ralston Saul decided to write a book about Canada’s difficult relationship with the First Nations. Paul Kennedy explores the thesis with Saul and Hayden King of Ryerson University.” At the link find the title, “The Comeback,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150210_36182.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forest Management 60 mins – “Frank welcomes guest Carlton Owen of the US Endowment for Forestry and Communities. With 30% of the United States in forest, and many of those forests suffering from decades of fire suppression, insect attacks, and drought, the need has never been greater for the creation of markets for small diameter wood products. Carlton explains the efforts of the US Endowment to help develop these markets, with a particular focus on wood biomass energy. He explains the reason why the market seems dominated largely by government projects, and breaks down the nature of the economic “valley of death” the industry currently finds itself in. He concludes with a call for a new method for collaboration to prevent the loss of large extensions of land and wood resources to catastrophic wildfire.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freakonomics 64 mins – “Steven Levitt, Author, Think Like a Freak, Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics; Stephen Dubner, Author, Think Like a Freak, Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics. In conversation with Kishore Hari, Director, Bay Area Science Festival – Now, it’s time for you to think like a “freak.” Levitt and Dubner’s newest masterpiece helps us get wacky to analyze the decisions we make, the plans we create and even the morals we chose. Get freaky – and these statistic gurus will teach you how to make smarter, harder and better decisions. With practical insights from “The Upside of Quitting” to “How to Succeed – With No Talent,” Levitt and Dubner have again turned our brains inside out and made statistics sexy. There’s a hidden side to everything.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Glasgow’s Digital Creativity 48 mins – “A report on how technology is making Glasgow smarter and healthier.” At the link find the title, “DigitalP: Glasgow’s Digital Creativity,” right-click “Media files digitalp_20150210-2115a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Harper Lee 51 mins – “The novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee came out in 1960. It won a Pulitzer Prize and was made into a major Hollywood movie. The book has sold more than 40 million copies worldwide and is still taught in classrooms across America. But author Harper Lee faded into the background, never publishing another novel — until now. Last week, word of a newly discovered manuscript, to be published in July, became the biggest literary story in some time. Questions quickly followed about the reclusive 88-year-old author’s health and the role of her lawyer and publishing company. We explore the intrigue over Harper Lee’s first novel in more than a half century.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Hubble and Humason 4 mins – “…Edwin Hubble is without question one of the most famous astronomers in history. With stellar credentials from the University of Chicago, Hubble not only discovered the universe is expanding — leading to the Big Bang Theory — but he quantified the rate of expansion through a law that bears his name. Today, however, we don’t focus our sights on the luminary Hubble, but instead on his collaborator, Milton Humason. …” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Upgrade 47 mins – “Humans – homo sapiens – rule the world.  For better or worse, some might say.  My guest today looks at how that happened – why – and where we’re headed next.  It’s us and not others, he says, because of our affinity for myth-making and stories.  We buy into big ideas that bind us together and have given us power.  Religion.  Money.  Nation states.  Now that power may threaten the planet.  But evolution isn’t over.  Homo sapiens may be in their last few hundred years, he says.  Ready to merge with machines.  This hour On Point:  historian Yuval Noah Harari on the rise and maybe end of us, homo sapiens .” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hybrid Car History 4 mins – “…Auto makers had been considering hybrid cars from the beginning. The one in my book is the 1917 Dual Power car built by the Woods Motor Vehicle Company. Both the engine and brakes drove an electric generator that charged batteries. The batteries could either supplement the modest 12-horsepower engine at higher speeds, or they could power the car by themselves….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Skills 91 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute event marks the launch of the report Through an Immigrant Lens: PIAAC Assessment of the Competencies of Adults in the United States, which uses data from the 2012 Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) to describe the literacy, numeracy, and computer skills of adults in the United States, including both immigrants and the native born. Report authors Jeanne Batalova and Michael Fix of MPI present their findings and discuss what their analysis reveals about the literacy of the first- and second-generation immigrant population in the United States, the U.S. education and workforce training system, and the implications for the future of the U.S. labor market and its role in the global economy. Panelists Demetra Smith Nightingale of the U.S. Department of Labor and Andy Van Kleunen of the National Skills Coalition present commentaries setting the results in the context of the United States workforce and education policies. Finally, MPI’s Demetrios G. Papademetriou sets the results in the global context.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Classics 47 mins – “Talk of the classics, classical literature, and minds quickly go to ancient Greece and Rome.  To Greek and Latin.  Homer and Virgil.  But there are other, giant classical traditions, of course.  One of the greatest, out of India.  Essentially unknown in the West until 200 years ago.  Its surface still barely scratched in English translation.  A huge new project aims to change that, with 500 new volumes.  The first five are out.  It’s a different setting:  elephants, blood rice, moonbirds.  And a different way of seeing human life.  This hour On Point: we’re dipping into the new Murty Classical Library of India.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Growth 66 mins – “Gurcharan Das, Columnist, The Times of India; Contributor, The New York Times; Author, India Grows at Night, in conversation with Lata Krishnan, Chair, American India Foundation – How could a nation become the world’s second fastest growing economy despite a weak, flailing state? Its recent economic slowdown is a sign that India may have begun to experience the limits of growing at “night” – private growth outside the scope of government involvement. What India needs, Das says, is a strong liberal state. Such a state would have the authority to take quick, decisive action; it would have the rule of law to ensure those actions are legitimate; and finally, it would be accountable to the people. But achieving this will not be easy, says Das, because India has historically had a weak state and a strong society.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Control 45 mins – “Barack Obama has directed nearly 2000 US airstrikes against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria over the last six months.  Now, he wants formal Congressional authorization.  War powers.  What should Congress give him?  The White House request says no “enduring offensive ground operations.”  It imposes a three-year limit on the green light.  But what is the right thing here?  More, say Washington hawks.  No holds barred to get ISIS.  Less, say skeptics.  War is not working.  It may be the problem. This hour On Point:  the war powers request, and what’s needed to deal with the Islamic State.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jail Use 52 mins – “While convicted criminals are usually sent to do their time in prisons, U.S. jails are typically for those awaiting trial, and those who have been deemed dangerous or a flight risk. But according to a new report, U.S. jails have today become overcrowded warehouses for vulnerable members of society. Many are too poor to post bail, or are suffering from mental illness or addiction. Nearly 75 percent of those in jail are there for non-violent crimes, some as minor as traffic violations. Now there are new calls to re-think who we put in our jails, and how long we keep them there. A conversation about reforming our local criminal justice systems.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Lead and Aggression 28 mins – “Could lead exposure in childhood lead to an adult life marked by violent crime? In the latter half of the 20th century, violent crime soared in many countries. Recent research suggests leaded petrol emissions may be behind the epidemic. Anja Taylor investigates current sources of lead exposure and its developmental effects on children.” At the link right-click “Download MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Learning Tips 55 mins – “My guest for today is fellow podcaster and blogger Thomas Frank of CollegeInfoGeek.com, which is dedicated to helping undergrads be AWESOME at college. He covers studying more efficiently and effectively, how to land the most awesome jobs, and paying off your loans the soonest possible. He paid off his loans while he was still a student. In today’s episode, Thomas shares about his new [free] eBook, 10 Steps to Earning Awesome Grades (While Studying Less)  and how as a premed you can take this information to improve your chances of getting into medical school. “At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Love 51 mins – “ A recent column in The New York Times described one woman’s experiment with finding love: Mandy Len Catron wondered whether it was possible to find the perfect match just by asking the right questions. Catron and a man she didn’t know that well met for dinner and asked each other a series of 36 probing questions, based on the work of psychologist Arthur Aron. Topics included whether they would like to be famous, and their most treasured memories. The result was a committed relationship that continues to this day. Diane and [3] guests discuss whether there’s a “science” to falling in love.“ At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Lysosome Biology 39 mins – “Leading scientists discuss the latest breakthroughs in lysosome biology and what they mean for treating Batten disease, and more common conditions such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and cancer.” At the link find the title, “Curing Human Diseases: Targeting the Lysosome,” right-click “Media files 150213lysosome.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maidan Killinsgs 27 mins – “One year on from the massacre in Kiev’s Maidan square, when more than fifty protestors were killed. It was the events on Maidan that led to Ukraine’s pro-Russian president fleeing the country, sparking a confrontation over Crimea and now in the east of the country. So what did happen on Maidan square, an event that has pushed the world to the brink of a new cold war? Gabriel Gatehouse investigates.” At the link find the title, “Ukraine: The Untold Story of the Maidan Killings,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150212-0500a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

March: Book Two 51 mins “Most Americans alive today were either not yet born or were small children when the civil rights movement took place. Congressman John Lewis, who turns 75 next week, was a student leader of the movement. He, along with Martin Luther King Jr. and others, risked their lives many times over to fight for equality for all races. To help younger generations better understand that critical period in American history, Congressman Lewis and a young co-author have embarked on a trilogy of graphic novels. They join us to talk about the trilogy and what they hope to accomplish.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Marijuana Business P2 20 mins – “Pot is now legal in some states. But on the federal level, it’s illegal. The legal gray area means banks in the U.S. are wary to give pot businesses access to basic financial instruments – like checking accounts. Today on the show, we visit a country where medical marijuana is fully legal. And we see how bank accounts, loans, and investors can transform an industry.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Miami 51 mins – “Famous for its beaches and clubs, Miami is also the 3rd poorest city in the nation. If you own a store in South Beach, your customers are equally likely to be billionaires or homeless people. And, on top of that, they’re very likely to have started life somewhere else.  Miami is an incredibly international city—but not in the way many others are. Here, instead of working towards assimilation and blending with one another, ethnic communities exist as a patchwork, remaining like isolated microcosms of their homeland.” At the link find the title, “Miami: Bridging the Divide [May 2011]” and select “Media files miami_fl.mp3” then right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minimum Wage 17 mins – “For most of U.S. history, there was no minimum wage. A few times, politicians passed laws tiptoeing toward a minimum. But the Supreme Court struck those laws down. On today’s show: how the U.S. finally got a minimum wage. It’s a story of exploding bakeries, a blue eagle, and a guy who may or may not have been drunk.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mountain Connect 18 mins – “Last year was the first year I attended Mountain Connect, an event in the Rockies west of Denver that discusses approaches to improving Internet access. Historically, they focused on rural communities but as co-chair of the event Jeff Gavlinski notes in our discussion this week, they are expanding it to include more urban issues as well. Mountain Connect is growing in many ways and I am excited to return to it in early June. As Jeff and I discuss, it is focused on all solutions to expanding access – whether private sector, coop, muni, partnership, etc….” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3 directly…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Threat 60 mins – “Famous anti-nuclear activist Dr. Helen Caldicott warns nuclear extinction still looms – a threat as great as climate change. Then author David Bollier explains the new Commons on the ground and in cyber-space.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opiate Addiction 24 mins – “Targeting nursing fatigue, taking another look at statin effectiveness, getting U.S. girls the HPV vaccine and we’ll take a look at treatment options for opiate addictions with a special segment on buprenorphine management. If that’s what you’re looking for, you found it. It’s the Nursing Show.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paleo Diet Help 120 mins – “On this episode: Fair food in Australia & via Michael Pollan; a Heart Healthy Paleo Diet study, plus more Paleo Diet in the news; why standing may not necessarily be the solution to too much sitting. In the Listener Mail segment: why I’m trying to get fats from whole foods only; whether I’m concerned about vitamin B12 & K2 levels; and tips on how to get kids to eat healthy. We discuss the role of willpower in the Moment of Paleo. After the Bell, it’s David McRaney explaining how we miss what’s missing.” At the link find the title, “129: Heart Healthy Paleo,” right-click “Media files paleo-129.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patient Spotlight 77 mins – “ Participants in our discussion on person centered care in January agreed that a change in culture and better use of technology could benefit both patients and doctors.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Polar People 16 mins – “Wanted Antarctic workers – positions available, apply within. Would you apply? Each year, over 2000 people apply for jobs in Antarctica, few are successful. So what are the physical and psychological attributes required to work in the most remote location on Earth? To find out, Mark Horstman follows two successful applicants – Jan is the lone station doctor, responsible for keeping the small isolated community alive and well for fourteen months; and Cliff is one of the tradies looking after the station’s buildings and infrastructure.” At the link right-click “Download MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Issues P1 60 mins – “There are so many cops who look at the killing of Eric Garner or Mike Brown and say race didn’t play a factor. And there are tons of black people who say that’s insane. There’s a division between people who distrust the police — even fear them — and people who see cops as a force for good. Stories of people living on both sides of that divide, and people trying to bridge it.” Problems here seem much like those faced by the disabled, discussed in the Shepherd Center podcast. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty Fixes 63 mins – “Thomas A. Nazario, Assistant Professor, University of San Francisco School of Law; Author Living on a Dollar A Day: The Lives and Faces of the World’s Poor; Founder & President, The Forgotten International – People often spend too much time discounting one proposal aimed at tackling a problem in order to shore up or push another. As with many of the world’s great problems, however, there is no silver bullet that will resolve them all, but advocates insist that solutions do exist. After traveling around the world and visiting with some of the world’s poor, Nazario,… will present some strategies he believes can help to end a great deal of the poverty and suffering presently experienced by one-sixth of the world’s people. Nazario’s expertise lies in the area of children’s rights and global poverty.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Gangs 88 mins – “Though only about 2,000 members are currently housed in the state’s prisons, California prison gangs have tens of thousands of associates and members in cities statewide, and their influence on crime is enormous. Lt. Robinson is an authority on prison gangs and will talk about recruitment and retention practices, the gangs’ own peculiar ethos, and the methods the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation use to protect both other prisoners and California communities from prison-gang influence.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

PTSD Issues 58 mins – “On the show this week we talk to David J Morris, former Marine infantry officer, war correspondent, and author of The Evil Hours: A Biography of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. We explore the history of PTSD and the science that surrounds it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ralph Nader 30 mins – “Ralph Nader has fought for decades on behalf of American citizens against what he sees as the pervasive influence of corporations on our society. Large majorities tell pollsters that big corporations have too much political power, and Nader believes that the ever-tightening influence of big business on the mainstream media, elections and our government have caused many Americans to believe they have no political voice. Nader draws on a half century of his own experience working with the grassroots and Congress and tells of many surprising victories that have united progressive and conservative forces. Far from espousing compromises that meet halfway, Nader argues that citizens of different political labels must join in the struggle against the corporate state, because if left unchecked, that corporate state will ruin the republic, shred the Constitution, and stampede over the rights of the American people.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robert Reich 68 mins – “Time magazine named Reich one of the 10 most effective Cabinet secretaries of the 20th century. He is a founding editor of the American Prospect magazine and chairman of Common Cause. Come hear his provocative thoughts on the future of the U.S. economy.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sal Khan 58 mins – “Sal Khan, Founder, Khan Academy; Author, The One World Schoolhouse: Education Reimagined – When Sal Khan started helping his teenage cousin with algebra from across the country, he didn’t set out to change the world. Starting only with an office in his Bay Area apartment, he now has over 4,000 video lessons in his online library, ranging from chemistry to history to finance. Khan is truly an educational pioneer, reaching millions of students, teachers and individuals. Khan Academy’s mission to give a free, world-class education to anyone, anywhere has breached the educational divide between poor and privileged and pioneered a transformation at the intersection of learning and technology. INFORUM will award this educational innovator with our 21st Century Visionary Award.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science History 29 mins – “Nobel laureate and theoretical physicist Steven Weinberg is one of the world’s most respected scientists. His new book To Explain The World conveys just how hard scientific understanding has been for us to arrive at as a civilisation, and why modern science should retain a sense of history to avoid repeating past mistakes. Professor Weinberg tells Ian Sample about his life’s quest being a desire to create a universal textbook: a single volume explaining the laws of nature in a few basic principle.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

SEAL Training 62 mins – “Lieutenant Commander Denver has run every phase of training for the U.S. Navy SEALs and led special-forces missions in the Middle East, Africa, Latin America and other international hot spots. He starred in the 2012 hit film Act of Valor, based on real-life SEAL missions. Don’t miss this chance to go inside the personal story and the fascinating, demanding SEAL training program of a veteran of the front lines. Denver will share lessons learned from the intensity and struggle of war, and his time directing SEAL instruction. Denver’s experiences are conveyed in the new book he co-authored, Damn Few: Making the Modern SEAL Warrior.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Senior Cohousing 75 mins – “Today we can text our sibling to find out what they are having for lunch in Paris, but we don’t know the name of our next-door neighbor nor his or her birthday – unless you’ve looked up him or her on PoliceReport.com – because shouldn’t we know who our neighbor is? It’s only prudent to be precautious. Learn how seniors are countering the pathologies in our society today by affecting their personal lives and collective lives and affecting society positively by planning new cohousing communities. They bring environmental ethics, justice, village life – community to the table. A real work by real people with real values and real lives who make an environment that responds to their real needs. How romantic is community? Very; everyone is talking about it in the abstract. How realistic is community? Very; there are lots of folks around North America who have decided that this important complement in our lives – community – needs to be revived.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shepherd Center 54 mins – “Joyce welcomes Mark Johnson, director of the Shepherd Center. Located in Atlanta, Georgia, Shepherd Center is a private, not-for-profit hospital specializing in medical treatment, research and rehabilitation for people with spinal cord and brain injury. Founded in 1975, Shepherd Center is ranked by U.S. News & World Report among the top 10 rehabilitation hospitals in the nation. Mr. Johnson will discuss the programs and services of this facility, in depth.” Problems here seem much like those faced by the police, disc used in the Police Issues podcast. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sky Color 4 mins – “…The blue color of the sky is due to a phenomenon known as Rayleigh scattering. As sunlight passes through the earth’s atmosphere, the shorter wavelengths of blue are scattered more by oxygen and nitrogen molecules than the higher wavelengths of orange and red. This highly scattered blue light bounces around the atmosphere, giving it its blue color. In winter and at higher latitudes, sunlight passes more tangentially through the earth’s atmosphere and travels a greater distance. As a result, some of the blue light is scattered away and more of the orange light reaches our eyes….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smart TV’s 29 mins – “TV watches the watchers by Ian Woolf, Garrick Bercero describes La Pallaise Manila’s biohacker group, Peter Simpson-Young gives us a taste of his brain stimulating device…” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stalin Archives 27 mins – “For Stalin, privacy was key. So how would he feel about his secrets being revealed? The Stalin Digital Archive aims to release 400,000 pages of Soviet secrets from 1890 through to 1952, and may give us a new way of looking at this period, and at Stalin.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Digitising Stalin,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20150211-1654a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian War 69 mins – “As the death toll tops 190,000, over three million refugees have fled from Syria into neighboring countries. Avi Melamed, a former Israeli official for Arab affairs, will discuss the history of the war in Syria, offering his thoughts on why the conflict is considered one of the most dramatic events in the history of the Middle East. He will also discuss the possible global ramifications of this war and how its outcome will shape the region for decades to come.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Solutions 43 mins – “The White House is hosting an anti-terror summit next week. Summits being what they are, we try to offer some useful advice.” At the link find the title, “Is There a Better Way to Fight Terrorism?”right-click “freakonomics_podcast021215.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tolerance 54 mins – “Is Canada too tolerant for its own good? Should we tolerate intolerant people? Michael Blake, Genevieve Chornenki, Sunny Yi and producer Sara Wolch tackle the nature and meaning of tolerance in our diverse and seemingly tolerant society.” At the link find the title, “The Trouble with Tolerance, Part 3,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150211_99740.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Truth and Spin 65mins – “Charles Lewis, Reporter; Founder, Center for Public Integrity; Author, 935 Lies: The Future of Truth and the Decline of America’s Moral Integrity – A government “of the people, by the people, for the people” assumes some sort of informed citizenry, but how many citizens feel accurately informed about what our leaders are up to? Unfortunately for citizens of the United States and throughout the world, distinguishing fact from fiction is more confusing than ever. In our present age, the line between truth and spin continues to blur dramatically. Addressing hot-button issues about the control, manipulation and misuse of information, Lewis reveals the many ways in which truth can be distorted by those groups and individuals wielding power.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turing Book 60 mins – “This week, we’re learning more about the groundbreaking work and too-short life of Alan Turing, the brilliant mathematician, codebreaker and philosopher who laid the groundwork for the modern age of computing. We’ll spend the hour with Oxford University Senior Research Fellow Andrew Hodges, talking about his book “Alan Turing: The Enigma.’” At the link right-click “Listen now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccination Regulation 46 mins – “In the year 2000, measles was eliminated from the United States.  Gone. This year and last?  It’s back with a vengeance.  An outbreak in Disneyland, and it threatens the country.  Why the return?  The vulnerability?  American vaccination rates.  They are down.  Lower now than in Zimbabwe.  Bangladesh.  Tanzania.  Anti-vaccination Americans have opted out, leaving everyone more exposed.  Now there is pushback.  State legislators saying “enough.”  Proposing mandatory vaccination to get back our “herd immunity.’” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Visualizing Molecular Structures 23 mins – “Our guest this week is scientist and artist Dr. David Goodsell.  As Associate Professor at the Scripps Research Institute, Dr. Goodsell splits his time on research and science outreach.  His science outreach includes artwork featured online, in a variety of media and even in science museums.  Listen to the show to learn how Dr. Goodsell makes his art, how accurate science is reflected in this art, and how you can use it to teach molecular structure and function.“ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Unending 55 mins – “Pulitzer Prize winner Christopher Hedges spent decades as a war correspondent before the suffering he witnessed became too much to bear. In the fall of 2014, he gave a lecture at Ryerson University in Toronto. He later joined Paul Kennedy in conversation.” At the link find the title, “Chris Hedges: War is a drug,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150209_82879.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women at Work 52 mins – “This time on BackStory, we look at women in the workforce, from 19th century domestic workers, to the Rosies of World War II, to the labs of Silicon Valley — where programming a computer was once very much a woman’s job. Find out how sexual harassment claims came into being, and why “protective” labor laws regarding women often amounted to discriminatory exclusion from certain jobs.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

=======================================================================

ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 5000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 30+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here MP3

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 170 – Feb 13, 2015: Advertising History, A.I. Threat, Australian Economics, Big Burn 1910, Big Data Impact, Bipolar Insights, Cancer Test, Cash to Poor, Cocoa Trees, Columbia Guerrillas, Corruption Control Crop Insurance, Cuban Medical School, Data Flood, Death, Deforestation Control Drug War Failure, Dying Needs, Ebola Finances, Electronet, Environmental Economist, ER Momentum Breakers, Evil, Financial Performance, Financial Sector Value, Flying Cameras, Frugal Innovation,Ham College, Human Waste, Independent Media, Infrastructure, Innovation Renaissance, ISIS Control, Machiavelli, McDonald’s, Measles, Mechanical Turk, Medical Students, Mengele Twins, Micro Robots, Microbiology Breakthroughs, Microbiome Parts, Nicaragua Canal, Online Ethics, Open Access, P.J. O’Rourke, PEDOT, Pesticide Resistance, Precision Medicine, Privacy Issues, Publishing E-Formats, Ransom Policy, Raspberry Pi, Reforestation with Drones, Second Machine Age, Silk Road Trial, Social Media Medicine, Soup, Stevens Johnson Syndrome, Sustainable Materials, Tata Industry, Teenage Brain, The Martian, Trans-Pacific Partnership, Trolly Problems, Troubled Shores, Vatican Bank, Vietnam, William Burroughs, Wound Patch

The following audio files come from a larger group of 190 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 72 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Advertising History 60 mins – “…on this episode, the Guys tackle the history of advertising in the United States. When did the industry come into being? What makes a great commercial jingle? And how do you sell America on the idea of lunar exploration? We have stories that answer these questions and more. Plus, a special treat — ads for BackStory in bygone styles, suggested by our faithful listeners….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Threat 10 mins – “…We’ve all seen science fiction movies like 2001: A Space Odyssey and The Matrix, where the villain is an artificial intelligence program that has gone rogue. These killer AI scenarios have provided entertainment at the cinema for decades, but some scientists are now warning that we need to take the AI threat very seriously. There’s a new book out by the Oxford University philosopher Nick Bostrom that explores this threat in great detail. Bostrom directs Oxford’s Future of Humanity Institute, and he studies all the ways the human species could be wiped off the planet. In his book, called Superintelligence, he explains how a supersmart AI could arise and destroy us. Now, the book’s a bit dense—Bostrom is a philosopher, after all….” At the link right-click “Download podcast” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Australian Economics 62 mins – “Prime Minister Tony Abbott addresses the National Press Club in Canberra on the Federal Government’s policies.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Prime Minister Tony Abbott,” right-click “NPCc_TonyAbbott_0202_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Burn 1910 52 mins – “In the summer of 1910, hundreds of wildfires raged across the Northern Rockies. By the time it was all over, more than three million acres had burned and at least 78 firefighters were dead. “The Big Burn” was the largest fire in American history, and it changed fundamentally how the country managed its public lands. PBS is showing a new documentary Tuesday night about the history and ramifications of the Great Fire of 1910, and director Stephen Ives and writer Timothy Egan will join us to talk about it….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Data Impact 57 mins – “I’m pleased to post the first show of the winter quarter, Show # 227, January 14, 2015, my interview with Solon Barocas, Postdoctoral Research Associate at Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy, co-author of the article Big Data’s Disparate Impact (with Andrew D. Selbst). Algorithmic computing and decision-making have entered our world much faster than our understanding of it. In Solon’s article, he takes a close look at the massively under-explored impact of algorithms on traditional forms of employment discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act (think discrimination on the basis of race or gender). Identifying both the technical and legal issues involved is a challenge, but this article does a wonderful job exposing the risks of algorithms in this space, which often (although not exclusively) includes embedding human prejudices in the code itself. We examined these and other ramifications of algorithmic computing and civil rights discrimination in our discussion.” At the link right-click “Show #227…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bipolar Insights 51 mins – “From a young age, Actress Glenn Close and her sister Jessie led different lives. In the 1950s, their parents joined a religious cult and the family splintered apart. While Glenn pursued acting in New York, Jessie started hearing voices and ended up in Montana on a path of self-destruction. The sisters grew distant. But after Jessie’s son became suicidal, Jessie reached out to Glenn for help. Join Diane for a discussion with Glenn and Jessie Close about their family’s struggle with mental illness and their work to end the stigma surrounding psychological disorders.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Cancer Test  11 mins – “Along with a crew of technologists and scientists, Jorge Soto is developing a simple, noninvasive, open-source test that looks for early signs of multiple forms of cancer. Onstage at TEDGlobal 2014, he demonstrates a working prototype of the mobile platform for the first time.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cash to Poor  7 mins – “Technology allows us to give cash directly to the poorest people on the planet. Should we do it? In this thought-provoking talk, veteran aid worker Joy Sun explores two ways to help the poor.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cocoa Trees 18 mins – “­The world is running out of chocolate. Cocoa is in short supply. Demand is way up, thanks to China and India developing a taste for the sweet stuff. Producing more cocoa isn’t so easy. Cocoa is a fussy plant. It doesn’t grow in very many places and it gets diseases really easily. Today on the show, we learn about one man in Ecuador who came up with an answer to the global cocoa shortage. A warning here; if you’re a die-hard chocolate lover, you might not like it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Columbia Guerrillas 14 mins – “In my lifetime, I have never lived one day of peace in my country,” says Jose Miguel Sokoloff. This ad executive from Colombia saw a chance to help guerrilla fighters choose to come home — with smart marketing. He shares how some creative, welcoming messages have helped thousands of guerrillas decide to put down their weapons — and the key insights behind these surprising tactics.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption Control 83 mins – “Zephyr Teachout, author of Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin’s Snuff Box to Citizens United, and Janine Wedel, author of Unaccountable: How Elite Power Brokers Corrupt our Finances, Freedom, and Security, talked about curbing corruption. They spoke at the New America Foundation in New York City.” At the link you can listen and buy a copy, but not download it; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Crop Insurance 27 mins – “In this second part of an interview with James Robinson of the Rural Advancement Foundation International, Frank and James discuss the importance of crop insurance to the farmer, both as a risk management tool and as a mechanism for gaining greater access to credit. James then explains how changes to the 2014 Farm Bill provide for innovative insurance products that have the potential to improve the attractiveness of crop insurance for the sustainable, diversified producer. The products, moreover, provide incentives for further crop diversification, and may pave the way to incentivize other sustainable production techniques like cover crops, no-till, and green manures. Please take the time to educate yourself about this most critical topic.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Medical School 17 mins – “Big problems need big solutions, sparked by big ideas, imagination and audacity. In this talk, journalist Gail Reed profiles one big solution worth noting: Havana’s Latin American Medical School, which trains global physicians to serve the local communities that need them most.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Flood 11 mins – “…It’s easy to get lost in the Internet. Just ask anyone who went to Wikipedia to quickly determine how many years Putin has been in power and then found themselves, three hours later, staring bleary eyed at a biography of Momofuko Ando, the inventor of instant noodles. (Just to clarify, the ‘anyone’ in that scenario is me). This avalanche of online content can be a problem, especially for news organizations trying to do their primary job — namely, informing their (increasingly busy and distracted) audience. Listicles are one solution, but they don’t solve the whole ‘I never get to the last paragraph of a really good article’ thing…..” At the link find the title, “More Easily Digestible Media,” right-click “IHUB-020715-A.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death P3 55 mins – “Mary O’Connell concludes her three-part series with a look at the burgeoning green burial movement and its message of de-corporatizing death.” At the link find the title, “Death Becomes Us, Part 3,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150205_93276.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deforestation Control 15 mins – “”Save the rainforest” is an environmental slogan as old as time — but Tasso Azevedo catches us up on how the fight is actually going these days. Spurred by the jaw-dropping losses of the 1990s, new laws (and transparent data) are helping slow the rate of deforestation in Brazil. Is it enough? Not yet. He has five ideas about what we should do next. And he asks if the lessons learned in Brazil could be applied to an even bigger problem: global climate change.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug War Failure 17 mins – “Is the War on Drugs doing more harm than good? In a bold talk, drug policy reformist Ethan Nadelmann makes an impassioned plea to end the “backward, heartless, disastrous” movement to stamp out the drug trade. He gives two big reasons we should focus on intelligent regulation instead.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dying Needs 6 mins – “Matthew O’Reilly is a veteran emergency medical technician on Long Island, New York. In this talk, O’Reilly describes what happens next when a gravely hurt patient asks him: “Am I going to die?” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Finances 15 mins – “Karen Grépin, assistant professor of global health policy at New York University, has been examining the pledges made by the international community to help fight the ebola virus outbreak – was it really too little, too late? Read her full analysis.” At the link find the title, “International donations to the Ebola virus outbreak: too little, too late?” right-click “Media files 189431002-bmjgroup-ebola-donations-too-little-too-late.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronet 11 mins – “Hi, I’m Jean Kumagai, and welcome to IEEE Spectrum’s “Techwise Conversations.” What will the power grid look like 50 years from now? More importantly, what do we want it to look like, and how will we supply reliable, affordable, and sustainable electricity to a global population that may reach 10 billion by midcentury? IEEE Spectrum considered those important questions as part of its recent special report “The Future We Deserve.” Clark Gellings is one of the world’s leading experts on the electricity system. He’s a Fellow of the Electric Power Research Institute in Palo Alto, California, and also a Life Fellow of the IEEE. During the course of his 46-year career, his ideas, his writing, and his testimony have really helped propel the electricity industry toward greater energy efficiency, more widespread adoption of the smart grid, and more integration of renewable energy and other clean technologies.” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Economist 33 mins – “We discuss Levinson’s new working paper “How Much Energy Do Building Energy Codes Really Save? Evidence From California” (and a related Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization paper, called “California Energy Efficiency: Lessons for the Rest of the World, or Not?). The evidence from California may surprise you: “There is no evidence,” Levinson writes, “that homes constructed since California instituted its building energy codes use less electricity today than homes built before the codes came into effect.” At the link find the title, “How Efficient Is Energy Efficiency?” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ER Momentum Breakers 24 mins – “In Part 2, Joseph Cruz (@CruzaderJC)presents his top 5 on shift momentum breakers for EM residents. Think about them ahead of time, so you can be ready when they show up on shift! “ At the link right-click beside “Direct Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-menu.

Evil P1 14 mins – “Plotinus, who lived in the 3rd Century A.D., was the founder of neo-platonism. In this episode of Philosophy Bites Peter Adamson explains what Plotinus had to say about evil.” At the link right-click “Listen to Peter Adamson on Plotinus on Evil” and select “Save link As” from thepop-up menu.

Evil P2 14 mins – “What is evil? Is it consistent with the existence of a benevolent God? In this interview Stephen Law gives an original take on this traditional philosophical problem.” At the link right-click “Listen to Stephen Law on The Problem of Evil” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evil P3 14 mins – “The Problem of Evil is usually presented as a problem for believers. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Marilyn McCord Adams suggests that it is a problem for optimistic non-believers.” At the link find right-click “Listen to Marilyn McCord Adams on Evil“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Performance 40 mins – “What are the most important things investors should know about the performance of their investments? This is the first in a series of podcasts about performance to give investors an in-depth knowledge of the asset classes Paul encourages investors to hold in their portfolios. This podcast covers many of the misleading aspects of performance including one Paul calls “the big fat lie.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Financial Sector Value 62 mins – “Luigi Zingales of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts on whether the financial sector is good for society and about the gap between how banks and bankers are perceived by the public vs. finance professors. Zingales discusses the costs and benefits of financial innovation, compares the finance sector to the health sector, and suggests how business education should talk about finance to create better behavior.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flying Cameras  6 mins – “Let’s admit it: aerial photo drones and UAVs are a little creepy, and they come with big regulatory and safety problems. But aerial photos can be a powerful way of telling the truth about the world: the size of a protest, the spread of an oil spill, the wildlife hidden in a delta. Sergei Lupashin demos Fotokite, a nifty new way to see the world from on high, safely and under control.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Frugal Innovation 16 mins – “Navi Radjou has spent years studying “jugaad,” also known as frugal innovation. Pioneered by entrepreneurs in emerging markets who figured out how to get spectacular value from limited resources, the practice has now caught on globally. Peppering his talk with a wealth of examples of human ingenuity at work, Radjou also shares three principles for how we can all do more with less. “ Reference is made during this talk to M-Kopa, Be-Bound, Quelle Banque, and Megaffic solutions. At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ham College 66 mins – “Ham College, the new show for those new to the hobby and those wishing to get into Amateur Radio. In episode 1 we bring you some news, discuss what an ‘Elmer’ is, talk about early radio history, build a spark gap transmitter, present 10 more questions and answers from the Technical class question pool, and more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Waste  12 mins – “In rural India, the lack of toilets creates a big, stinking problem. It leads to poor quality water, one of the leading causes of disease in India, and has a disproportionately negative effect on women. Joe Madiath introduces a program to help villagers help themselves, by building clean, protected water and sanitation systems and requiring everyone in the village to collaborate — with significant benefits that ripple across health, education and even government.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Independent Media 14 mins – “In 2011, journalist Bruno Torturra covered a protest in São Paulo which turned ugly. His experience of being teargassed had a profound effect on the way he thought about his work, and he quit his job to focus on broadcasting raw, unedited experiences online. In this fascinating talk, he shares some of the ways in which he’s experimented with livestreaming on the web, and how in the process he has helped to create a very modern media network.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infrastructure 47 mins – “American roads, rails and bridges are in need of massive repair. President Obama wants to tax American companies’ overseas profits to pay the bill. Is that the way to go?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Renaissance 10 mins – “The Sistine Chapel, Galileo’s scientific discoveries, Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, and Machiavelli’s political writings were all great achievements of the Renaissance. But what were the essential ingredients of that famous era of art and innovation? And can Italy recreate its winning recipe today? …Kick-starting a 21st century Renaissance may require a primal model. “You have to be inspired by evolution. Nature never had any separation among disciplines like physics, chemistry, biology. I think the interdisciplinarity of science at the moment is the key factor for success in innovation,” says Roberto Cingolani, the scientific director at the Italian Institute of Technology. Finding that delicate balance is the key if there’s any hope for a Renaissance reboot.” AT the link find the title, “Can the Renaissance Be Recreated?” right-click “IHUB-020715-D.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Control 51 mins – “Jordan carried out airstrikes against ISIS targets in Syria early this morning, following the group’s gruesome killing of a Jordanian pilot. Jordan’s King Abdullah has vowed “relentless war” against the so-called Islamic State. The leader took swift initial action in retaliation for the pilot’s death, hanging two Iraqi prisoners with ties to ISIS. Now, he is weighing what would be a major escalation in Jordan’s involvement with the U.S.-led coalition against the terror group. This raises questions about the future of a coalition many fear is too weak to meet its goals of defeating the Islamic State. We look at Jordan’s role in the fight against ISIS, reaction from the Muslim world and what’s next for the U.S.-led coalition.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Machiavelli 26 mins – “In this episode of the podcast Philosophy Bites Quentin Skinner discusses Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince, one of the most notorious works of political philosophy. Skinner sets the book in its historical context and explains its key themes.” At the link right-click “Listen to Quentin Skinner on Machiavelli’s The Prince” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.”

McDonald’s 48 mins – “Mighty McDonald’s is in big trouble. Sales are plummeting. We look at the future of a fast food legend, and what Americans eat.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Measles 52 mins – “Fifteen years ago, the U.S. was declared measles-free thanks to a vaccine developed in the 1960s. But last year, there were more than 600 new measles cases, the highest number in a quarter century. And a measles outbreak that began in Disneyland last month has now infected more than 80 people in seven states. Health officials say most of those who got sick were not vaccinated. Parents opting out of vaccines for their children say they are afraid of harmful side effects, especially autism. But most doctors continue to stress that the vaccines are completely safe. Diane and guests discuss a surge in measles cases, the anti-vaccine movement and implications for public health nationwide.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Mechanical Turk 23 mins – “They are hundreds of thousands of people out there doing stuff to your internet that you probably think is automatic. They aren’t computer programmers, they’re just regular people working from their offices, homes and bedrooms. They are the people of Amazon Mechanical Turk. Amazon Mechanical Turk is an online marketplace for work. Businesses use it to farm out tiny little tasks like counting the number of people in a photo, and people around the world race to perform those tasks, sometimes for pennies. Today on the show, we sneak into the land of Mechanical Turk to meet the people inside.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Students 44 mins – “This week I am bringing back Richard Levy. He is the Executive Director of the National Society for Non Traditional Premedical and Medical Students, better known as OldPremeds.org. Rich is the go-to guy for nontraditional students, for which I know comprise a large majority of you listening right now. In this episode, he talks about what’s going in the non-traditional world and healthcare in general. He shares with us his pieces of advice to those who might want to pursue the medical path as a non-traditional student, how to start, where to start, and where to find advisers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mengele Twins 26 mins – “The testimonies of twins who survived the brutal medical experiments of Dr Josef Mengele during the second world war in Auschwitz.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Mengele Twins 31 Jan 15,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150131-1700a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Micro Robots 6 mins – “By studying the movement and bodies of insects such as ants, Sarah Bergbreiter and her team build incredibly robust, super teeny, mechanical versions of creepy crawlies … and then they add rockets. See their jaw-dropping developments in micro-robotics, and hear about three ways we might use these little helpers in the future.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbiology Breakthroughs 74 mins – “Hosts  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Elio Schaechter and Michele Swanson …reveal how bacteria in a shipworm’s gills help digest wood in the gut, and an approach that identifies a new antibiotic from the soil.” At the link right-click “download TWiM#97” and select “Save ink As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbiome Parts 25 mins – “Do you consider yourself human? We hate to break it to you, but your human cells are considerably outnumbered by the millions of microbes living in you and on you. They’re what are known as our microbiome, and recently researchers have started to realise that these multitudes may be having an effect on our health, weight and even mood. To learn more about these microbial friends, how they get there and what they’re doing, Kat Arney spoke to science writer Ed Yong to get the basics…” At the link right-click the parts of interest then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menus.

Nicaragua Canal 47 mins – “Nicaragua breaks ground on a massive new Atlantic-to-Pacific canal. Big Chinese money – and big environmental concerns – in Central America.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online Ethics 74 mins – “Fresh from a party, a teen posts a photo on Facebook of a friend drinking a beer. A college student repurposes an article from Wikipedia for a paper. A group of players in a multiplayer online game routinely cheat new players by selling them worthless virtual accessories for high prices. How do youth, and the adults in their lives, think about the moral and ethical dimensions of their participation in online communities? In this talk Carrie James — Lecturer on Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and author of “Disconnected: Youth, New Media, and the Ethics Gap” — explores how young people approach questionable situations online as well as more dramatic ethical dilemmas that arise in digital contexts.” At the link right-click MP3 audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Access 41 mins – “For scholarly and scientific publishing, business models are shifting and changing dramatically. Research funding organizations primarily in the UK and US, but elsewhere in Europe and Asia as well, increasingly require unfettered access for the public to the research they have funded in academic laboratories. Failure to comply with such mandates puts future funding at risk. Yet without a flexible and friction-free infrastructure to collect article processing charges – so-called APCs – and deliver detailed reporting on those, authors and publishers face significant challenges.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

P.J. O’Rourke 35 mins – “Author P.J. O’Rourke reflects on life in the sixties to today with nostalgia and humor.” At the link find the title, “Author P.J. O’Rourke…” right-click “Media files 20150204.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PEDOT 6 mins – “Thankfully for everyone’s sanity, poly 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene is also known as PEDOT, which I gather means ‘beasts’, ‘brutes’ or ‘ogres’ in Finnish. In reality, the molecule that is repeated to make up this long chain looks rather more like two confused mating beetles, with a linked pair of shapes, each consisting of a benzene ring with two of the carbons replaced by oxygen, and a pentagonal ring featuring a sulfur atom. What sets PEDOT apart from many other polymers (and for that matter many other substances) is that it is both a conductor and transparent. The free electrons that make, for instance, metals good conductors tend also to make for easy absorption of photons, so by far the majority of conductors are opaque. But PEDOT lets the light through, making it ideal for applications that bring light and electrical circuitry together, notably light emitting diodes, or LEDs, and solar cells.” At the link right-click “Download: CIIE_Pedot.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pesticide Resistance 51 mins – “The cycle is ongoing: We develop ways to control pests and weeds, they adapt accordingly. Resistance to pesticides is an urgent concern for agriculture, and experts are divided on the way forward. Some say chemicals are still the best solution. The EPA this fall approved “Enlist Duo,” a new combination of herbicides meant to fight chemical-resistant “super weeds.” But the NRDC and other groups filed suit to block it, citing risks to the environment and human health and concerns that we are on a dangerous path toward increased chemical use. For this month’s Environmental Outlook, what’s at stake and what’s ahead in the race against pests and weeds.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Precision Medicine  48 mins – “Precision medicine, tailored to your genes. President Obama announces a big push. We’ll take a look at the track record and potential. Plus: we’ll look at the growing measles outbreak around the United States.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Privacy Issues  21 mins – “Glenn Greenwald was one of the first reporters to see — and write about — the Edward Snowden files, with their revelations about the United States’ extensive surveillance of private citizens. In this searing talk, Greenwald makes the case for why you need to care about privacy, even if you’re “not doing anything you need to hide.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Publishing E-Formats 21 mins – “In books and across all media, mobile matters.  Yet for many publishers and authors, mobile is something of a foreign country inhabited by unfathomable digital natives and littered with devices and technologies.  Published by F+W Media and released in conjunction with this year’s Digital Book World Conference, Mobile Strategies for Digital Publishing offers a snapshot of the fast developing mobile landscape and the range of mobile strategies for book publishers, both print and digital. “Mobile is no longer an add-on to a desktop computer. Publishers may think they don’t have to prioritize it, but the statistics show repeatedly that the universe is no longer desktop-to-mobile. Mobile is the universe,” says Thad McIlroy, the report author and an electronic publishing analyst based in San Francisco.  “And this realization means it’s not business as usual anymore….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ransom Policy 51 mins – “The U.S., Japan and other nations strongly condemned the apparent beheading of a Japanese journalist by the extremist group known as the Islamic State or ISIS. ISIS had demanded millions of dollars for his release. Japan and Jordan were trying to arrange a prisoner swap to secure the journalist’s freedom. The murder was announced by ISIS in a video over the weekend. Recent kidnappings underscore the dilemma faced by nations whose citizens are captured by extremists. The U.S. policy is that it does not pay ransom. But other nations do, usually through intermediaries. Diane and her guests discuss hostage policy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Raspberry Pi 64 mins – “Welcome Matt Richardson, the first US member of the Raspberry Pi Foundation! The foundation has about 15 people in various roles (hardware, admin, education, outreach). There are now approximately 4.5 million Raspberry Pi’s in the world! Dave was curious how many were orphaned but Matt says “they don’t expire”. The official add-on boards are called HATs. Adafruit coined the term “Plates” for a similar concept. The Model B+ moved from a smaller connector to a 40 pin connector, with much more pin fanout from the chip.  Each HAT has an EEPROM onboard to tell the Broadcom chip how to configure the pins. Matt has published a wide range of projects on his portfolio site. Some of the best known are the awesome button and the enough already projects….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reforestation With Drones 34 mins – “Lauren Fletcher discusses using drones to precisely drop seeds to aid reforestation; Patrick Thevoz talks about rescue drones that can bump into people without hurting them; A report on the risks of identifying people through credit card transactions; Sylvia Smith reports on the technology allowing for virtual bell ringing.” At the link find the title, “DigitalP: Drones for Good Part 1; Drones for Good Part 2; Credit Cards Anonymous; Virtual Bell Ringing” aright-click “Media files digitalp_20150203-2030a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Second Machine Age 8 mins – “Historically, technological innovation has been the most reliable foundation of improved standards of living around the world. Despite dismal beginnings, the Industrial Revolution ultimately created a huge rise in the income of workers, which in turn permitted huge improvements in nutrition, sanitation, health care, and education. Electrification then accelerated these industrial trends, allowing for safer and cleaner factories and homes. My guest today, director of the MIT Center for Digital Business, Erik Brynjolfsson, and his coauthor, Andrew McAfee, also at the MIT Center for Digital Business, refer to the automation of physical labor begun by steam power as the first machine age. Their latest book, The Second Machine Age, explores the impacts of the recent acceleration in the automation of mental labor due to digital technology, and how we might avoid having technology, for the first time, lead to long-term reductions in the quality of life for a significant portion of the population.” At the link right-click “Download podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Silk Road Trial 121 mins – Hosts Leo Laporte, Nick Bilton, and Baratunde Thurston talk about the Silk Road trial in the first twenty minutes of this show. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Medicine 36 mins – “So Brent Thoma and I made a video as an introduction to Social Media and FOAM. Emergency Medicine Australasia was kind enough to publish it (Thank you Geof and Anthony!!). Here is the official published version.” Excellent talk about how and why professionals need to use social media. At the link you can see the video and notes and/or right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the program.

Soup 48 mins – “Is it soup yet? Grab your big spoons. Bone broth and more. We have the latest in hot soups for a cold winter.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stevens Johnson Syndrome 52 mins – “Joyce welcomes Julie McCawley founder of SJS Kids Support group, a branch of the Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Foundation. She is presently a junior at Metropolitan State University of Denver where she is majoring in human development and minoring in education. During the show, Julie will explain the mission of the Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Foundation, share why she has become a strong advocate for the organization, update everyone on her advocacy efforts against bullying and share her insight as to what students who face bullying today can do to overcome it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainable Materials 29 mins – “Keith & Russ welcome Michelle Dolgos of the Oregon State University Department of Chemistry.  She discusses her research into creating materials that contribute to the sustainability of the planet.  Her lab uses nontoxic starting materials and low-energy inputs in their research.   She also the interesting features of the piezoelectric effect, which can create materials that act as either actuators or sensors.  We can find many of these materials in our own phones or in our car’s brake systems. http://dolgosgroup.chem.oregonstate.edu/” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tata Industry 27 mins – “Tata is the biggest industrial employer in the UK, owning Jaguar, Land Rover & Tetley. Now, the Tata family no longer controls the companies which bear its name. Can this powerful organisation hold onto its historic values in a world of the ruthless multinationals?” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Tata: India’s Global Giant,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150203-0255a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teenage Brain 59 mins – “Neuroscientist Dr. Frances Jensen talks about her book [The Teenage Brain], the most recent work in the study of the human brain, adolescent development, and the issues of alcohol and drug abuse among teens.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Dr. Frances Jensen,” right-click “Media files program.385988.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

The Martian 65 mins – “On the show this week we talk to author Andy Weir about The Martian, his hit science fiction novel about a man stranded on Mars—which is now being made into a film directed by Ridley Scott and starring Matt Damon. The Martian is not only packed full of science, it’s packed full of science that makes sense.“ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans-Pacific Partnership 51 mins – “Negotiators from 12 countries have been meeting for more than a decade on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Trade experts say the deal could boost U.S. exports by more than $100 billion dollars annually and add 600,000 jobs. As the meetings near the end, key sticking points remain on intellectual property and food imports. Critics of the TPP say the process is too secretive and favors big businesses. Supporters argue the deal would even the playing field for American manufacturers by eliminating most tariffs. Diane and guests discuss debate over the Trans-Pacific Partnership and what it could mean for the U.S. economy and American workers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Trolly Problems 17 mins – “Is it ever morally acceptable to kill one person to save many? Most people agree that in some extreme circumstances this, though psychologically difficult, can be the right action to take. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast, Nigel Warburton interviews David Edmonds (co-creator of the Philosophy Bites podcast) about the life and death thought experiments known as Trolley Problems. David Edmonds book about  Trolley Problems Would You Kill the Fat Man? will be published in Autumn 2013 by Princeton University Press.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download: “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Troubled Shores 58 mins – [2 parts] “With so much focus on the BP oil spill and the havoc it has wrought on the Gulf Coast, it’s easy to overlook the broader, more long-term environmental dilemma that serves as the backdrop for that catastrophe: Louisiana’s coastline is shrinking at an alarming rate. This week on Sea Change Radio, we welcome Pulitzer prize-winning journalist Bob Marshall of the New Orleans-based The Lens. In conjunction with Pro Publica, The Lens recently published Marshall’s in-depth piece on Louisiana’s imperiled shores. In the first part of our two-part discussion, Marshall recounts the history of the region’s struggle to keep dry, and delves into the reasons why human efforts to harness Mother Nature so often have gone awry…[In Part 2]…we focus on the massive undertaking of reversing a century and a half of policies that have left the Mississippi River Delta region battered.Marshall will tell us about the struggle to raise funds and political will in a part of the country where oil and gas are king. Then, from the deep South we go “Down East” to talk with former Maine State Representative Seth Berry about his state’s coastal problems — ocean acidifcation and rising sea temperatures are putting much of Maine’s fishing economy at risk. Like Louisiana, Maine has a Republican Governor, who has been throwing up obstacles for environmental groups who are trying to address the issue. Berry discusses what it will take to win the battle against the governor Politico dubbed, “America’s Craziest.” At the link right-click “Download” for Part 1 and here for Part 2, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vatican Bank 51 mins – “For centuries, the Roman Catholic Church relied mostly on taxes and donations to finance operations. But during World War II, Pope Pius created The Institute for the Works of Religion. Commonly known as the Vatican Bank, it now holds billions of dollars in assets. For decades, the Bank has been plagued by a series of scandals, including bribery and money laundering. And the author of a new book says the Bank collaborated with the Nazis and tried to hide that fact for years. Pope Francis has enacted a series of reforms to end the scandals and increase transparency. Diane and guests discuss the history of the Vatican Bank and the current pope’s efforts to make lasting changes.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Vietnam 27 mins – “A Vietnamese woman’s perspective of the Vietnam War. Her memoirs have inspired film director Oliver Stone and given an essential insight into the conflict between Vietnam and the US.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Heaven and Earth: Le Ly Hayslip,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150204-0300b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

William Burroughs 61 mins – “This American Life host Ira Glass was never into William Burroughs. Didn’t get why people love his writing so much. Then he heard this radio story that changed all that, partly because it wasn’t very reverential about Burroughs. For Burroughs 101st birthday, we hear that story.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Wound Sealant 5 mins – “Forget stitches — there’s a better way to close wounds. In this talk, TED Fellow Joe Landolina talks about his invention — a medical gel that can instantly stop traumatic bleeding without the need to apply pressure. (Contains medical images.)” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wound Patch 5 mins – “Forget stitches — there’s a better way to close wounds. In this talk, TED Fellow Joe Landolina talks about his invention — a medical gel that can instantly stop traumatic bleeding without the need to apply pressure. (Contains medical images.)” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” (or video) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

=======================================================================

ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 5000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 30+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 169 – Feb 6, 2015: Alien Contact, Arc Lighting, Bartering, Body Armor, Botanic World, Brain Inflation, Brazil, Buckley vs Vidal, Bumblebees, Christopher Columbus, Climate Red Zone, Coal Industry, Community Colleges, Computer History, Computing Universe, Consciousness, Crashes, Creative Destruction, Data-driven Design, Decarbonization, Deep Web Operation, Desertification, Educational Reform, Failure Cult, Farm Debt, Fuel Concerns, Fusion Research, Growing a Company, Managing Scandal, Marketplace Forces, Medicine by Gawande, Memory Formation, Michael J Fox Case, Microwave Oven Inventor, Munition Storage Problems, Net Smart, Ocean Plastic, Oliver Sacks Interview, Patient to Doctor, Plastics Processing, Private Cities, Robot Futures, Salmonella Summary, Sex Problems, Suicide Bombers, Synthetic Biology, Teamwork, Technology Benefits, Terror Management Theory, Textbook Costs, Vaccines, Video Games, Virus Research issues, Water Needs, Water Shortage, Women Scientists

The following audio files come from a larger group of 145 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 62 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Alien Contact 52 mins – “Ever since the invention of radio and television, humans have been sending signals into outer space, announcing their existence to other civilizations and waiting for a reply, waiting for contact with intelligent extraterrestrial life. In a new documentary called The Visit, Danish filmmaker Michael Madsen constructs a believable scenario of first contact on Earth. Ultimately, the film is an exploration of humanity’s fear of strangers and the unknown.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arc Lighting 18 mins – “In 1885, Austin, Texas was terrorized by a serial killer known as the Servant Girl Annihilator.  The murderer was never actually found, but he claimed eight victims, mostly black servant girls, all attacked in the dark of night. The very, very dark night of Austin in 1885. Back then, once night fell, Austin had only moonlight.  The city had no outdoor lighting until 1894, when Austin decided to buy more moonlight, in the form of towers. They were fifteen stories tall, each crowned with a circle of six lights, soaring way up above the city….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bartering 27 mins – “Bartering is an ancient practice. With the emergence of money-based transactions, it’s no wonder that people might think bartering is a thing of the past. Tune in to learn more about the bartering process — and where it’s still used today.” AT the link find the title, “How Bartering Works,” right-click “Media files 2011-02-08-sysk-bartering.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Body Armor 18 mins – “Body armor has used by bodyguards, celebrities and soldiers for thousands of years. Tune into this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn how the constant innovation in weaponry has led to a similar evolution in defense and armor.” At the link find the title, “How Body Armor Works: A Special Request,” right-click “Media files 2009-01-08-sysk-body-armor.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Botanic World P2 57 mins – “Prof Kathy Willis, Director of Science at the Royal Botanic Garden, Kew, examines the race to culture the prized Amazonian water lily; smuggling of rubber seeds out of Brazil; orchid cultivation; invasive species; and how the behaviour of hybrids led to the birth of modern genetics.” At the link find the title, “plantsfrtr: Omnibus, 2 of 5 17 Oct 14,” right-click “Media files plantsfrtr_20141118-1531a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Botanic World P3 57 mins – “Prof Kathy Willis, Director of Science at the Royal Botanic Garden, Kew, examines how the complete picture of photosynthesis led to new opportunities to manipulate plant growth; legacy of tree diseases; wild crops; and botanical medicines.” At the link find the title, “plantsfrtr: Omnibus, 3 of 5 24 Oct 14,” right-click “Media files plantsfrtr_20141118-1546b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Botanic World P4 57 mins – “Prof Kathy Willis, Director of Science at Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, examines new insights into plant hormones; unlocking biodiversity; surprising benefits of the 1987 storm; seed banking; and sequencing of the first plant genome.” At the link find the title, “plantsfrtr: Omnibus, 4 of 5 31 Oct 14,” right-click “Media files plantsfrtr_20141118-1602b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Botanic World P5 57 mins – “Prof Kathy Willis, Director of Science at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, examines how the technology that helped map whole genomes in plants and animals was to revolutionise the classification of flowering plants; evolution of rain forests; and the future role of plants as providers of food.” At the link find the title, “plantsfrtr: Omnibus, 5 of 5 07 Nov 14,” rp-up menu.ight-click “Media files plantsfrtr_20141118-1632a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Inflation 50 mins – “Ed Boyden is the head of the MIT Media Lab’s Synthetic Neurobiology research group and he wants blow up the brain. Sort of. He and his team have discovered a way to examine brain tissue by physically expanding it—a process that lets them look at tissue which would normally be extremely difficult to see even under a microscope. Boyden explains how it all works—and a lot more—on this week’s episode.” At the link find the title, “71 Ed Boyden – Blowing Up the Brain,” right-click “Media files 188593234-inquiringminds-71-ed-boyden-blowing-up-the-brain.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazil 9 mins – A special report from “The Economist” about economic and social conditions in the country. At the link find the titlek “Special report: Brazil,” right-click “Media files 20130926_sr_brazil.mp3” and select “Savelink As” from the pop-up menu.

Buckley vs Vidal 52 mins – “…director Robert Gordon joins us to discuss his documentary film Best of Enemies, which profiles the caustic rivalry between Gore Vidal and William F. Buckley Jr. Two brilliant and eloquent men who represented two wholly opposite ideologies, they engaged in a first-of-its kind series of debates on the ABC network in 1968 during the political national conventions. The broadcasts burned with the fire of the men’s mutual hatred for one another and it laid the groundwork for the future of TV.

Bumblebees 60 mins – “…we’re learning about the fascinating lives of bees, and the important role they play in our global ecosystem. We’ll speak to University of Sussex biology professor Dave Goulson about his book “A Sting in the Tale: My Adventures with Bumblebees.” And we’ll talk to Jocelyn Crocker, founding member of YEG Bees, about the rewards and challenges of urban beekeeping.” At the link right-click “Listen now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Christopher Columbus 52 mins – “Christopher Columbus’ name has been worked into numerous cities across the United States, the names of ships and universities – even a space shuttle. And from an early age, schoolchildren learn about the voyages of the Niña, Pinta, and Santa María and the man who “discovered” the American continent. But many Americans have also questioned Columbus’ legacy – should we venerate a man who symbolizes European colonization, and began the decimation of native American populations that would continue for centuries? So on this episode of BackStory, Peter, Ed, and Brian explore the controversial Columbian legacy, diving into current debates, and looking back on how earlier generations have understood America’s purported discoverer.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Red Zone 60 mins – “According to one climate scientist, “We are at the extreme weather stage and rapidly heading into the red zone.” That is when “all hell breaks loose”. Who else says so? Your insurance company. Both Lloyd’s of London and Zurich Insurance in Switzerland just warned of extreme weather events coming this year of 2015. The climate scientist is Paul Beckwith from the University of Ottawa. He has two Masters Degrees, and is working on his PHD in climate science. Paul lives out the late Steven Schneider’s call for scientists that communicate.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Industry 14 mins – “We will not find “exposure to burning coal” listed as the cause of death on a single death certificate, but tens of thousands of deaths from asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer, heart attacks, strokes, and other illnesses are clearly linked to coal-derived pollution. As politicians and advertising campaigns extol the virtues of “clean coal,” the dirty secret is that coal kills. In The Silent Epidemic, Alan Lockwood, a physician, describes and documents the adverse health effects of burning coal. Lockwood’s comprehensive treatment examines every aspect of coal, from its complex chemical makeup to details of mining, transporting, burning, and disposal–each of which generates significant health concerns. He describes coal pollution’s effects on the respiratory, cardiovascular, and nervous systems, and how these problems will only get worse; explains the impact of global warming on coal-related health problems; and discusses possible policy approaches to combat coal pollution….” At the link right-click “Listen to Interview” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Community Colleges 47 mins – “An awful lot of America’s biggest challenges these days run through the humble institution of America’s community colleges.  K-12 education falling short?  Let community colleges retrofit.  Industry needs job training?  Call the community college.  Higher education too expensive?  Go to a community college.  Worried about inequality?  Pray community colleges will build a floor under the workforce.  Where America unravels, community colleges knit, or try to.  This hour On Point:  community college leaders from across the country on their “hold it together” role now.” At the link right-click ‘Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer History 33 mins – “Ian Sample talks to Tony Hey about The Computing Universe, his book with Gyuri Papay charting the evolution of computers from Babbage, Lovelace and Turing, throwing forward to the potential of AI and computational thinking. Tony Hey is a prolific writer and academic who spent the first part of his career working in particle physics, before switching to computer science. Until last year he was Microsoft Research’s vice president, responsible for the company’s worldwide university research collaborations….” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computing Universe 33 mins – “Ian Sample talks to Tony Hey about The Computing Universe, his book with Gyuri Papay charting the evolution of computers from Babbage, Lovelace and Turing, throwing forward to the potential of AI and computational thinking. Tony Hey is a prolific writer and academic who spent the first part of his career working in particle physics, before switching to computer science. Until last year he was Microsoft Research’s vice president, responsible for the company’s worldwide university research collaborations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness 17 mins – “What links conscious experience of pain, joy, color, and smell to bioelectrical activity in the brain? How can anything physical give rise to nonphysical, subjective, conscious states? Christof Koch has devoted much of his career to bridging the seemingly unbridgeable gap between the physics of the brain and phenomenal experience. This engaging book—part scientific overview, part memoir, part futurist speculation—describes Koch’s search for an empirical explanation for consciousness. Koch recounts not only the birth of the modern science of consciousness but also the subterranean motivation for his quest—his instinctual (if “romantic”) belief that life is meaningful….” At the link right-click “Listen to interview” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crashes 49 mins – “This weekend, we focus on crashes, in the global economy, in our personal finances, and even in our cars. Marketplace’s Paddy Hirsch and guest host David Lazarus discuss what happens when a country crashes. Meteorologist Gary Dobbs tells his story of what happened when his world came literally crashing down around him. David talks with Patrick Markee about homelessness, and Darlene Bel Grayson talks about what it feels like to be homeless temporarily for the first time. David talks with Bloomberg’s Katie Benner about tech bubbles and bursts. We talk about crashes and recoveries — in Atlantic City, and for former professional gambler Josh Axelrad. On next week’s show, we’re talking about cheating. If you have a story about about how your personal economy changed because of cheating — financial cheating, romantic cheating, or even a time you cheated yourself — tell us. What happened? How did you make it through? Write to us here, on the web, or tweet us @MarketplaceWKND.” At the link find the title, “01/30/2015 Marketplace Weekend – Crashes,” right-click “Media files weekend_20150130_pod_64.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creative Destruction 34 mins – “Economists preach the gospel of “creative destruction,” whereby new industries — and jobs — replace the old ones. But has creative destruction become too destructive?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data-driven Design 17 mins – “This week on the O’Reilly Radar Podcast, O’Reilly’s Roger Magoulas talks with Arianna McClain, a senior hybrid design researcher at IDEO, about storytelling through data; the interdependent nature of qualitative and quantitative data; and the human-centered, data-driven design approach at IDEO….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Decarbonization 16 mins – “The global economy has become increasingly, perhaps chronically, unstable. Since 2008, we have heard about the housing bubble, subprime mortgages, banks “too big to fail,” financial regulation (or the lack of it), and the European debt crisis. Wall Street has discovered that it is more profitable to make money from other people’s money than by investing in the real economy, which has limited access to capital–resulting in slow growth and rising inequality. What we haven’t heard much about is the role of natural resources–energy in particular–as drivers of economic growth, or the connection of “global warming” to the economic crisis. In The Bubble Economy, Robert Ayres–an economist and physicist–connects economic instability to the economics of energy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep Web Operation 33 mins – “Perhaps you didn’t realize that when you search the web you’re only skimming the surface. In fact, the types of web pages that turn up in your search engine results represent only a mere fraction of the total web. Immerse yourself in the Deep web and its dark corners in this episode.” At the link find the title, “How the Deep Web Works,” right-click “Media files 2014-01-23-sysk-deep-web.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Desertification 23 mins – “Josh and Chuck discuss the problem of desertification, from what causes serious degradation of dryland ecosystems to possible ways to repair the damage, in this episode.” At the link find the title, “How Desertification Works,” right-click “Media files 2010-04-06-sysk-desertification.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Reform 16 mins – “Behind the lectern stands the professor, deploying course management systems, online quizzes, wireless clickers, PowerPoint slides, podcasts, and plagiarism-detection software. In the seats are the students, armed with smartphones, laptops, tablets, music players, and social networking. Although these two forces seem poised to do battle with each other, they are really both taking part in a war on learning itself. In this book, Elizabeth Losh examines current efforts to “reform” higher education by applying technological solutions to problems in teaching and learning. She finds that many of these initiatives fail because they treat education as a product rather than a process. Highly touted schemes—video games for the classroom, for example, or the distribution of iPads—let students down because they promote consumption rather than intellectual development.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Failure Cult 60 mins – “Author Andrew Keen discusses his book, [The Internet is Not the Answer],” about his objections to the overuse of technology in our society and the creation of what he says are false communities through social networking.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Andrew Keen,” right-click “Media files program.384978.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Debt 31 mins – “Frank is joined by James Robinson of the Rural Advancement Foundation International (RAFI) to discuss the ongoing transition from tobacco to diversified agriculture as price supports through acreage quotas have slowly been phased out in the Southeastern United States. Also discussed is RAFI’s efforts to assist farmers on the brink of bankruptcy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fuel Concerns 30 mins – “It comes as little surprise that the author of a book entitled Snake Oil: How Fracking’s False Promise of Plenty Imperils Our Future is a critic of the natural gas industry and a proponent of peak oil theory. With the recent plunge in oil prices, it feels like the right time to check back in with Richard Heinberg of the Post-Carbon Institute and get his perspective on how plunging oil prices will affect the energy and transportation industries. Heinberg and host Alex Wise discuss the impact of cheap oil on the North American natural gas boom, how it may alter consumer behavior in the near term, and the need for sound policy to guide us through the long-term challenge of living in a post-carbon world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” fro he pop-up menu.

Fusion Research 38 mins – “At Iter in the south of France, seven international partners have pooled their financial and scientific resources to build the biggest fusion reactor in history. Their aim is to resolve critical scientific and technical issues, and take fusion to the point where industrial applications can be designed. In the Observer this week, Alok Jha writes from the Iter construction site. But concerns have been voiced about the large number of unsolved technological problems relating to fusion, and the huge efforts necessary before a large commercial breeder prototype can be designed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Growing a Company 59 mins – “Visionary architect and MacArthur Fellow Jeanne Gang discusses how the process of co-creation with clients and diverse teams leads to uniquely designed works that achieve aesthetic beauty and, at the same time, make bold statements. Founder and principal of Studio Gang Architects, Gang describes growing her firm without diluting creativity or camaraderie.” At the link click “Podcast,” then right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Managing Scandal 48 mins – “Eric Dezenhall, who heads one of the nation’s leading crisis management firms, talks about his new book, “Glass Jaw: A Manifest for Defending Fragile Reputations in an Age of Instant Scandal.” At the link find the title, “Managing Scandal in a 24-Hour News Cycle,” right-click “IM_20150124.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marketplace Forces 19 mins – “Feature films, television shows, homemade videos, tweets, blogs, and breaking news: digital media offer an always-accessible, apparently inexhaustible supply of entertainment and information. Although choices seems endless, public attention is not. How do digital media find the audiences they need in an era of infinite choice? In The Marketplace of Attention, James Webster explains how audiences take shape in the digital age. Webster describes the factors that create audiences, including the preferences and habits of media users, the role of social networks, the resources and strategies of media providers, and the growing impact of media measures—from ratings to user recommendations. He incorporates these factors into one comprehensive framework: the marketplace of attention. In doing so, he shows that the marketplace works in ways that belie our greatest hopes and fears about digital media.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicine by Gawande 2 parts 108 mins – “In the 2014 BBC Reith Lectures, surgeon, professor and author Atul Gawande dissects a field defined by what he calls “the messy intersection of science and human fallibility.” At the link find the titles ”The 2014 BBC Reith Lectures by Dr. Atul Gawande, Part 1 [and 2],” right-click “Download The 2014 BBC Reith Lectures by Dr. Atul Gawande, Part 2” and “Download The 2014 BBC Reith Lectures by Dr. Atul Gawande, Part 1” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menus.

Memory Formation 15 mins – “Imagine the astonishment felt by neuroscientist Rodrigo Quian Quiroga when he found a fantastically precise interpretation of his research findings in a story written by the great Argentinian fabulist Jorge Luis Borges fifty years earlier. Quian Quiroga studies the workings of the brain—in particular how memory works—one of the most complex and elusive mysteries of science. He and his fellow neuroscientists have at their disposal sophisticated imaging equipment and access to information not available just twenty years ago. And yet Borges seemed to have imagined the gist of Quian Quiroga’s discoveries decades before he made them….” At the link right-click “Listen to Interveiw” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Michael J. Fox Case 13 mins – “Michael J Fox, star of the Back to the Future trilogy, was born in 1961, moved to Hollywood aged 18 and while avidly lapping up the customary attention and refreshments, he developed Parkinson’s disease. He has now authored a memoir describing his experience of the disease alongside his career as an actor. PN editor Phil Smith gathered the PN book club to discuss the memoir with Fox’s neurologist from the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Allan Ropper, and in this podcast you can hear his thoughts, as well as contributions from book club lead Katherine Harding, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Wales, and Huw Morris, expert in early onset Parkinson’s, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microwave Oven Inventor 3 mins – “Percy Spencer was naturally inquisitive. In 1910, he was just a teenager when electricity came to his community in rural Maine; he quickly figured out how it worked and installed it in a local factory. When he grew up, Spencer worked to pump out radar equipment for Raytheon during World War II. He worked seven days a week as he kept trying to make improvements to the systems. One day, as Spencer worked with a part of a radar called the magnetron, he noticed the candy bar in his pocket getting hot. This tiny detail led him to ask the fateful question: Would this happen to other foods? He began experimenting with popcorn kernels, which started popping all over the room. Then he moved on to an egg. Inevitably, it exploded on a co-worker’s face. Early microwave ovens – like other early technology – were not exactly consumer-friendly. They weighed 750 pounds, clocked in at six feet tall, and cost thousands of dollars. Although microwaves were presented as a futuristic convenience in the late 1960s, they didn’t become household fixtures until the 1980s, after Spencer had passed away.” At the link click “Download,” then select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Munition Storage Problems 7 mins – “Unplanned explosions at munitions sites (UEMS) are a significant safety concern for governments and a major security challenge for the international community. The Small Arms Survey has documented more than 500 such incidents in 100 countries over the 35-year period from 1979 to 2013. The Handbook ‘Unplanned Explosions at Munitions Sites (UEMS): Excess Stockpiles as Liabilities rather than Assets’, published in June 2014, is a reference and training tool that provides contextual information and analysis .useful for policy makers, programmers, and practitioners addressing stockpile management and surplus destruction concerns….” At the link find the title, “The Dangers of Excess Munitions Stockpiles: the UEMS Handbook,” right-click “Media files SAS-Podcast-23-The-Dangers-of-Excess-Munitions-Stockpiles-the-UEMS-Handbook.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Net Smart 15 mins – “Like it or not, knowing how to make use of online tools without being overloaded with too much information is an essential ingredient to personal success in the twenty-first century. But how can we use digital media so that they make us empowered participants rather than passive receivers, grounded, well-rounded people rather than multitasking basket cases? In Net Smart, cyberculture expert Howard Rheingold shows us how to use social media intelligently, humanely, and, above all, mindfully….” At the link right-click “Listen to Interview” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Plastic 30 mins – “Doug Woodring is the founder of the Ocean Recovery Alliance. His name may sound familiar to long-time listeners of Sea Change Radio because we featured Woodring back in 2010, when he was leading Project Kaisei, a mission to gather information on and document the massive repository of plastic that has accumulated in the North Pacific Gyre. The Ocean Recovery Alliance is the next logical step on Woodring’s path. The organization focuses on advocacy, raising awareness, and actually cleaning up the plastic floating in our world’s oceans and interfering with marine ecosystems. Woodring provides a status update on oceanic health, walks us through some of the cost incurred by our global plastic habit, and tells us about what the Alliance and its projects are accomplishing to help us clean up our act and our oceans.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oliver Sacks Interview 15 mins – “Listen to Oliver Sacks, professor of neurology and NYU School of Medicine, discuss the role of narrative in neurology, and the parallels between the skills of detectives and clinicians in the specialty. This interview is part of a Practical Neurology package on neurology and detective writing. For more information, and the other interviews in the set, see bit.ly/19YiaEM.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patient to Doctor 19 mins – “Welcome to the The Checkup. Our sixth episode “Talking Back to Your Doctor,” opens with a question: Why do so many of us find it so hellishly hard to speak freely with our doctors? What is it about a white coat that makes even normally assertive people clam up? We begin with the dramatic story of Alicair Peltonen, an administrative assistant diagnosed with a rare cancer who had to have a chunk the size of a baseball removed from her thigh. Throughout her medical saga, she found that she often had urgent questions echoing in her mind, but felt too inhibited to voice them. She set out to find out why.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plastics Processing 58 mins – “Last year, 100 million tonnes of plastic were produced by industry. At the same time sufficient waste plastic was found floating in the world’s oceans to make a string of bottles long enough to make it to the Moon. This week we find out what plastic is, how it is made, how to recycle it and why, in the future, it might literally grow on trees. Plus, reading Roman scrolls buried 2000 years by a volcano, how the magnetic history of a meteorite sheds light on the early Solar system, and an antidote to radiation.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Private Cities 68 mins – “Alex Tabarrok of George Mason University talks to EconTalk host Russ Roberts about a recent paper Tabarrok co-authored with Shruti Rajagopalan on Gurgaon, a city in India that until recently had little or no municipal government. The two discuss the successes and failures of this private city, the tendency to romanticize the outcomes of market and government action, and the potential for private cities to meet growing demand for urban living in India and China.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Futures 15 mins – “With robots, we are inventing a new species that is part material and part digital. The ambition of modern robotics goes beyond copying humans, beyond the effort to make walking, talking androids that are indistinguishable from people. Future robots will have superhuman abilities in both the physical and digital realms. They will be embedded in our physical spaces, with the ability to go where we cannot, and will have minds of their own, thanks to artificial intelligence. They will be fully connected to the digital world, far better at carrying out online tasks than we are. In Robot Futures, the roboticist Illah Reza Nourbakhsh considers how we will share our world with these creatures, and how our society could change as it incorporates a race of stronger, smarter beings.” At the link right-click “Listen to Interview” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salmonella Summary 67 mins – “Hosts Vincent Racaniello up with special guest: Stanley Maloy on the campus of San Diego State University to talk about his career in microbiology and his work as Dean of Sciences.” At the link right-click “TWIM#95” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Problems 20 mins – “A while back we wrote about a national sex survey that found one-third of women experienced pain during sex. There were skeptics back then who thought, nah, that can’t be possible, otherwise we’d be having a nationwide conversation about how to fix such a huge problem. But now, the lead author of that study, Debby Herbenick, a researcher at Indiana University, co-director of the Center for Sexual Health Promotion, and a sexual health educator at the Kinsey Institute, confirms those numbers in a follow-up survey.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow t the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide Bombers 27 mins – “It 1981 the first modern suicide bomber blew himself up. But this was by no means the first suicide bombing. Israeli psychologists evaluated the motivations of suicide bombers and found a number of commonalities. Join Josh and Chuck to learn more.” At the link find the title, “How Suicide Bombers Work,” right-click “Media files 2011-06-21-sysk-suicide-bombers.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Synthetic Biology 34 mins – “In 2014, the European Commission defined synthetic biology as, “the application of science, technology and engineering to facilitate and accelerate the design, manufacture and modification of genetic materials in living organisms”. It was followed last month by a draft opinion from the commission’s scientific committees that focuses on risks in synthetic biology. Specifically, it asked whether the methods used to assess the potential risks of the field were sufficient. To discuss the implications, Ian Sample is joined by Nicola Davis, commissioning editor of Observer Tech Monthly, and Professor Paul Freemont from Imperial College, London, who is co-director of its Centre for Synthetic Biology and Innovation. Dr Filippa Lentzos from King’s College London also joins us down the line from Switzerland.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teamwork 47 mins – “The world is going to teamwork.  In the 1950s, about half of our work was done in teams.  Today, by one measure, it’s more like 90 percent.  Maybe it’s at the office.  Maybe it’s on Google Hangout.  Maybe it’s at the PTA.  But what makes a good team?  A smart team?  It’s not just a bunch of smart people, says a big new study.  It’s a crew that shares the floor, the talking time, it claims.  It’s a team that has high social sensitivity.  And it’s often, it says, a team with more women.  We need a cultural revolution, they say, to optimize our teams.  This hour On Point:  Are you onboard?  We’re talking teamwork.” At the link right-click ‘Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Benefits 11 mins – “We’re living in an unprecedented technological age. If you want proof, pull that powerful computer out of your pocket and take a closer look at it. A 64 gigabyte smartphone “has one million times more digital storage capacity than the computer that went to the moon on board Apollo 11 in 1969,” says Robert Bryce, author of Smaller Faster Lighter Denser Cheaper: How Innovation Keeps Proving the Catastrophists Wrong. And it’s not just computers and other gadgets. …For decades, he explains, the peak oil movement has predicted that oil supplies would run dry, but today markets are flooded with cheap oil. “Better technology is allowing us to produce more oil than ever before, but it’s not just a supply story. It’s also a consumption story and we’re getting better and better at using that oil,” he adds. …“We will impose costs on the planet, we will impose costs on each other, but we are improving living standards more than any other time in human history. More people are living longer, healthier, freer lives than at any other time in human history.” One more note of optimism for the road: Bryce also believes that America will continue to be the premier innovation hotspot. “This idea about starting your own company – being an entrepreneur – it’s very deeply rooted in how Americans view themselves.” At the link click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Terror Management Theory 26 mins – “Terror management theory isn’t about mid-level bureaucrats in Al-Qaeda — so what exactly is it, and what does it say about human culture and our perception of mortality? Join Chuck and Josh as they explore the implications of terror management theory.” At the link find the title, “What is terror management theory?” right-click “Media files 2011-05-24-sysk-terror-management-theory.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Textbook Costs 14 mins – “Lugging around a massive Norton Anthology or Campbell Biology textbook is a long-standing rite of passage for each successive crop of college freshman in the U.S. But it might not be that way for much longer. “Textbook costs have risen so astronomically, as compared to the cost of everything else – including housing and medical care – that it now becomes cost prohibitive,” explains Linda Williams, a business administration professor at Tidewater Community College. Williams has even seen cases where the cost of a course textbook exceeds the cost of tuition, especially at the community college level.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccines 22 mins – “Somehow, over the last few years, one of modern medicine’s greatest achievements has turned into one of modern American parents’ most fraught subjects. In this episode of The Checkup, our podcast on Slate, we offer Shots: Vaccine Facts And Fictions, in which we attempt to have a rational, fact-based discussion about some of the vaccines you may encounter in the immediate future: the flu vaccine and, if you have pre-adolescent children, the HPV vaccine….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Games P1 mins – “Video games are a ubiquitous component of modern life and pop culture. But is there more to them than entertainment? In Part 1, Neil deGrasse Tyson finds out if video games breed violence and what kids actually learn from shooter games with guests Jeffrey Ryan, author of “Super Mario – How Nintendo Conquered America” and Will Wright, creator of The Sims and Spore. They chat about the evolution of choice and moral dilemma in video games; Moore’s Law of processing speed; and computer game graphics, verisimilitude and the cartoon laws of physics. You’ll also find out why Space Invaders sped up as you played it, what inspired Will Wright to create SimAnt and why co-host Eugene Mirman thinks Happy Days started the U.S./Iran conflict.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Games P2 mins – “In Part 2 of The Science of Video Games, Neil and Will Wright discuss artificial intelligence, the Turing Test, IBM’s Watson and how Spore ascends in scale from a microscopic organism to a multi-player galaxy where everyone can encounter the life forms you create. Jeffrey Ryan explains the secret origin of Lara Croft to co-host Eugene Mirman and how fear is built into the mechanics of survival horror games like Resident Evil. You’ll also learn how the lines between the virtual and real world are blurring, from “Gold Farmers” in China who support online economies in World of Warcraft, to military drone pilots who grew up on video games, to soldiers in Iraq who return from patrol and play Counter-Strike on Xbox in their tents.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Research Issues 100 mins – “Guest Paul Duprex joins the TWiV team, Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, and Kathy Spindler, to discuss the current moratorium on viral research to alter transmission, range and resistance, infectivity and immunity, and pathogenesis.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 321,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Needs P1 51 mins – “Join StarTalk Live! as we explore the world of water: from Earth, to the ancient subsurface sea of Jupiter’s icy moon Europa, to the comets that first brought water to our planet. Recorded live at New York’s Beacon Theater, host Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-host Eugene Mirman dive into science, humanitarian issues, economics, politics, and of course comedy, with the help of Waterkeeper Alliance founder Robert F. Kennedy Jr.; His Holiness the Gyalwang Drukpa, “Guardian of the Himalayas”; hydrogeologist Dr. Tess Russo and actor Jason Sudeikis. In Part 1, we investigate the physical properties of water, one of the most common 3-atom molecules in the universe. Discover how we know which comets have “our” kind of water (it’s all about the Deuterium) and how on Mars, water can exist side-by-side as a gas, a liquid and a solid (water’s “triple point”). Listen to RFK Jr. attack the “energy incumbents… and the big polluters: the Koch Brothers and their indentured servants in our political process.” You’ll learn about The Gyalwang Drukpa’s efforts to protect the water supply for half the world’s population, and find out what Kung Fu Nuns have to do with the fight for gender equality. And that’s just Part 1.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Needs P2 54 mins – “In the conclusion to our show from the Beacon Theater in NYC, Neil deGrasse Tyson and Eugene Mirman navigate the waters of greed, bad science and a lack of basic understanding about water, with the help of their guests Robert F. Kennedy Jr., His Holiness the Gyalwang Drukpa, hydrogeologist Dr. Tess Russo and Jason Sudeikis. You’ll hear His Holiness explain how he ended disease in a Himalayan village by convincing people to stop throwing dead bodies – human and animal – into their local lake. Find out why depleting ground water can reduce the available surface water, and how both fracking and rising sea levels can lead to the contamination of aquifers. RFK Jr. explains that the most important environmental issue we face is having livable cities so we can preserve the wilderness to protect the water supply. You’ll learn about desalinization plants, managed recharge, and other water technologies, including drip agriculture that can reduce water use in farming by 95%. And you’ll discover the dangers of the trillion-dollar water privatization industry, and why the Pentagon says global warming and water shortages are the principal threat to US security (and have already lead to wars over water in Bolivia and Belize).” t the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Shortage 13 mins – “In 1995, World Bank vice president Ismail Serageldin declared that “the wars of the next century will be about water.” Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn what happens once we run out of water.” At the link find the title, “Exactly what happens if we run out of water?” right-click “Media files 2008-07-31-sysk-run-out-water.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women Scientists 19 mins – “Ten years ago, Larry Summers made a few, off-the-record remarks. It was at the most benign of settings: a National Bureau of Economic Research conference. But amidst a sea of black and grey suits, Summers put forth some ideas about why so few women hold elite professorships in science and math – ideas that sparked a national controversy. One possibility, he said, is that women don’t want to devote the same kind of time to demanding jobs as male colleagues. Or it could be natural aptitude – men may just be more genetically predisposed to be geniuses. Eileen Pollack remembers the moment well…. She set out to research why other women had similar issues – and why things haven’t changed much since the 1970s. Some of what Pollack discovered shouldn’t be surprising: Women often lack encouragement. “A lot of scientists say, ‘Well, we don’t encourage anybody, male or female, to go on in the field because it’s so difficult.’ But what they don’t understand is that the entire society is encouraging men to go on in science, and discouraging women.” …Now after years of research, Pollack’s book is on the way – featuring a response by Larry Summers himself, who Pollack says has been very supportive. “In a strange way, Larry may have done a service to women in science by raising these questions, and getting so many women so angry that they went out and did the studies.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

 

=======================================================================

ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 5000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 30+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

 

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 168 – 30 Jan 2015: 3D Printing, 3D Scanner, Activist Technology, ALS Activism, Anthony Fauci, Ants Are Clean, Belafonte on King, Black Bias Cure, Blood History, Botanic World, Broadband by Tucows, Catadores, Computational Biology, Costa Rican Rainforest, Cryptographic Backdoors, CT and MRI Imaging, Deep Learning, E-book Insights, Earth Observations, Earthquakes, Engineer Drawings, ER Momentum Breakers, Ethnic Unrest, Food Hub, Forensic Pathology, Free Expression, Grateful Dead, Greenpeace, Helicopter Pilot, HoloLens, India Sex Assaults, Indian Point Reactor, Isomics, Justice Defender, Linux Troubleshooting, Mercenary Trends, Middle East History, Minority Coalitions, Murder Board, Ocean Research, Paleo Diet News, Podcast Trends, Political Funding, Practice Deliberately, Precautionary Principle, Primary Care Issues, Quantum Mechanic Terms, Rabies in Animals, Rabies in Humans, Race Relations, Ransomeware, Ron Rash, Selma, Shorting Stocks, Sialic Acid, Solar Energy History, Spanish Inquisition, Survival, Synthetic Biology, Temple Grandin, Texas Entrepreneurial Network, Tiny Movements Value, Titanium Nitride, Turing, War of 1812, Waste Trends, Wealth, Weather Issues, Women in Aviation

The following audio files come from a larger group of 208 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 69 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

3D Printer and Tumors 52 mins – The second half of this interview is with Mike Molitch-Hou and how he helped doctors determine how best to remove his wife’s brain tumor using 3D printing. Here’s an article about the process. At the link fright-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. The blog archive only contains this second half.

3D Printing Body Parts 50 mins – “In this episode we talk with Professor Paul McMenamin of Monash University — you know the school down under — about his rather unique collection of body parts.  You see there made of out plastic and colored with ink jet ink to look like actual cadaver body parts.  Join us as we find out how his team at Monash accomplished this and who may benefit. This episode was recorded on the 29th of July, 2014. And if you aren’t squeamish, come check out the video of this interview out on our YouTube channel. “All Things 3D”… If you dare?” Here’s a link to related medical video material. At the link fright-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

3D Printing Education 83 mins – “…In this episode our [5] guests from the US, Canada and the Netherlands about how 3D is being used in education, from the kindergartens to our universities.  We also look at how 3D fabrication and scanning products are being used and how the manufactures are helping to bring these into the classroom. Is it real or do we still have a long way to go?” Here’s a beginner’s guide of seventy-seven pages. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

3D Printing Medicine 66 mins – “In this episode we talk about how 3D technology is changing the medical industry with some of the leading developers and researchers in the field of 3D image processing for extracting and isolating components of the human body and producing files that can used to print the body part in exact measurements and features. We also look at how 3D scanning is allowing noninvasive topical examinations for burn victims and the contagious.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

3D Scanner 35 mins – “In this episode we interview Stephen Crossland, Chief Marketing Office from Fuel3D and take an inside look at a the fully funded KickStarter 3D scanner project based on a unique and patented process that gives you high resolution meshes for a fraction of the cost of similar products already on the market.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Activist Technology 14 mins – “To see is to believe, says Oren Yakobovich — which is why he helps everyday people use hidden cameras to film dangerous situations of violence, political fraud and abuse. His organization, Videre, uncovers, verifies and publicizes human-rights abuses that the world needs to witness.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ALS Activism 19 mins – “Remember the Ice Bucket Challenge craze this summer? Meet the mom who started it all. When Nancy Frates’s son Pete hurt his wrist in a baseball game, he got an unexpected diagnosis: it wasn’t a broken bone, it was ALS, and there is no cure. In this inspiring talk, Nancy tells the story of what happened next.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anthony Fauci 59mins – “Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, talks about growing up in Brroklyn, his career at the agency, and how he has navigated the world of politics during his tenure.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Dr. Anthony Fauci,” right-click “Media files program.384014.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ants Are Clean 6 mins – “Ants. Just the word sends people running from the picnic blanket. But Elsa Youngsteadt, a researcher at North Carolina State, says they aren’t villains. These insects are actually heroes in the fight against global warming, and that’s not all. Ants don’t spread disease – unlike cockroaches and rats – and they clean up the streets, eating scraps of dropped food that would otherwise attract the real pests….” At the link find the title, “Ants Clean Up the Big Apple,” right-click “ “IHUB-012415-D.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Belafonte on King 54 mins – “A feature inteview with Harry Belafonte talking about his close friendship with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. At 87, Harry Belafonte remains one of America’s most eloquent and impassioned voices for human rights and social justice.” At the link find the title, “Tapping into Martin Luther King, Jr.,” right-click “Download Tapping into Martin Luther King, Jr.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Bias Cure 18 mins – “Our biases can be dangerous, even deadly — as we’ve seen in the cases of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and Eric Garner, in Staten Island, New York. Diversity advocate Vernā Myers looks closely at some of the subconscious attitudes we hold toward out-groups. She makes a plea to all people: Acknowledge your biases. Then move toward, not away from, the groups that make you uncomfortable. In a funny, impassioned, important talk, she shows us how.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blood History 29 mins -“Human blood has been compared historically and sociologically to a river that defines human society over the millennia. That river has been charted in a recent book and television series entitled, “Blood, an Epic History of Medicine and Commerce,” by Douglas Starr. This work traces the history of blood in medical, political and economic terms, from the earliest days of bloodletting to the era of AIDS. Douglas Starr recommends “Instance of the Finger Post,” by Ian Beers.” At the link find the title, “Douglas Starr – Blood: A History,” right-click “Click here to begin listening” and select “Save link As” fromt hepoop-up menu.

Botanic World P1 54 mins – “From the birth of modern plant classification, harnessing botany and imperial progress in furthering Britain’s destiny as the major civilising power in the world, to establishing the laws of what grows where and why, Professor Kathy Willis, Director of Science at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, examines new attitudes to plants during the 18th and early 19th century. From plants as tools to exploit to flowers as objects of beauty, Kathy Willis draws upon Kew’s archives and its herbarium collection of pressed plants that was to play a pivotal role in establishing insights into plant relationships and their distribution around the world. It helped establish the first accurate maps of the world’s flora by the mid-19th century.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband by Tucows 27 mins – “In recent weeks, we have been excited to see announcements from Ting, a company long known for being a great wireless provider (both Lisa and I are customers), that is now getting into FTTH deployments. The first announcement was from Charlottesville where it acquired another company. Last week they announced a partnership with Westminster, Maryland. This week we interview Elliot Noss, CEO of Tucows, which is the parent of Ting. Elliot has long been active in preserving and expanding the open Internet. We discuss many issues from Ting’s success in wireless to cities dealing with permitting and access in rights-of-way to Ting’s willingness and enthusiasm to operate on municipal fiber open access networks. We finish with some musings on upcoming over the top video technologies like SlingTV from Dish….” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3 directly….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Catadores 5 mins – “In Brazil, “catadores” collect junk and recyclables. But while they provide a vital service that benefits all, they are nearly invisible as they roam the streets. Enter graffiti artist Mundano, a TED Fellow. In a spirited talk, he describes his project “Pimp My Carroça,” which has transformed these heroic workers’ carts into things of beauty and infused them with a sense of humor. It’s a movement that is going global.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computational Biology 55 mins -“Host Vincent Racaniello meets up with special guest Rob Knight to talk about the technology that has fueled his drive to sequence the Earth and its inhabitants.” At the link right-click “download TWiM#96” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Costa Rican Rainforest 27 mins – “In the middle of the Costa Rican rain forest, about an hour west of San Jose, Costa Rica, on the east side of the continental divide, you can find the Rain Forest Aerial Tram located on a private rain forest reserve. It’s a series of small, open-air cars that hold about five people each held together by a three kilometers long cable. The tramcars carry visitors through, above and below this portion of the Central American rainforest canopy. The Rain Forest Aerial Tram was the brainchild of Dr. Donald Perry, a biologist trained at the University of California at Los Angeles, who, beginning in 1970, has specialized in the study of the flora and fauna of the Central American Rainforest. In April of 1995, I visited the Rain Forest Aerial Tram with Dr. Perry. “ At the link right-click “Click here to begin listening” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cryptographic Backdoors 72 mins – “Hosts Steve Gibson with Leo Laporte: Why the President was sure it was North Korea, a few Sci-Fi recommendations from Steve, and separating fact from fiction about Cryptographic Backdoors.” Reference is made to a three-page PDF that defines “Fourth and Fifth Party Collection” at bit.ly/sn-491. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CT and MRI Imaging 58 mins – “We talk with Dr. Scott Klioze, a board certified radiologist from Saint Augustine, Florida who is using social media and YouTube to inform the public about the theory and practical applications of MRI and CT scanning, about his views on 3D in Medicine and the role radiology has played in bringing 3D visualization and fabrication to forefront of the media’s attention on the 3D. Dr. Klioze’s YouTube videos can be found on his channel “Doctor Klioze’” At the link fright-clcik “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link fright-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep Learning 20 mins – “What happens when we teach a computer how to learn? Technologist Jeremy Howard shares some surprising new developments in the fast-moving field of deep learning, a technique that can give computers the ability to learn Chinese, or to recognize objects in photos, or to help think through a medical diagnosis. (One deep learning tool, after watching hours of YouTube, taught itself the concept of “cats.”) Get caught up on a field that will change the way the computers around you behave … sooner than you probably think.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

E-book Insights 50 mins – “The owners of ebook platforms now have unprecedented and previously unattainable knowledge about how people read. They literally see every time an ebook is opened; on what device it is being opened; how fast it is read; and whether passages or entire works are re-read. Perhaps most dismaying of all for authors and publishers alike, they even know many ebooks that are bought are never “cracked,” let alone finished. Recorded at last week’s Digital Book World Conference + Expo 2015 representatives of global ebook platforms offered revealing insights into what they know abut what you read. Panelists told CCC’s Chris Kenneally about consumer reading behavior across multiple devices, and whether fans of fiction read differently than non-fiction aficionados. They also discussed how much reading of English goes on in non-English-speaking countries.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Earth Observations 129 mins – “This episode is a conversation with Ruud Hoogeveen from the Netherlands Institute for Space Research about satellite-based Earth observation, and primarily about measuring the concentration of gases such as CO2 or Ozone from space. We talk about the effects of these gases on the atmosphere, how the sensors work in principle, and about the history and evolution of the sensors over the various missions. We conclude with a look on detecting and measuring aerosols and at the future challenges and current research for satellite-based earth observation.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Earthquakes 29 mins – “To many of us who live along the coast of California, earthquakes are a living legend. That legend is closely associated with the San Andreas Fault, an earthquake line which runs roughly 800 miles through California forming the tectonic boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate.  More than just a legend, earthquakes over the millennia have rattled the world in multiple events close in time are referred to as “earthquake storms.”  These storms are close in geological time, not so much in human time. As you might expect, this edition of Radio Curious is about earthquakes.  Our guest is John Dvorak, Ph.D., a geophysicist and author of “Earthquake Storms:  The Fascinating History and Volatile Future of the San Andreas Fault.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineer Drawings 78 mins – “Electrical engineer Bob Schmidt joins the discussion of how engineers convey important concepts without using words. Beyond writing down a few words to remind him of key details, Brian likes to dive straight into analysis or development when he has a new design idea. Brian often uses LTSpice to analyze electrical circuits….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ER Momentum Breakers P1 22 mins – ”In Epsiode 26, we have a new EM Resident contributors to the EM Res Podcast.  In Part one of a two part episode, Dr. Joseph Cruz of edocc.com discusses 5 of his 10 ED shift momentum breakers.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Momentum breakers episode 1.m4a” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethnic Unrest 48 mins – “Europe is so on edge right now.  And in a way that is bigger than the Charlie Hebdo killings, as big as those are.  Years of immigration have not led to integration.  Unhappy native and immigrant populations are nervous, worried, angry.  Huge crowds march for unity.  Others march for separation, rejection.  We’re talking today with two big thinkers with investments of past and future here.  Roger Cohen, whose Jewish family has walked the immigrant path.  And Tariq Ramadan, whose Muslim family has done the same.  This hour On Point:  Tariq Ramadan, Roger Cohen and Europe’s future.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Hubs 50 mins – “Frank welcomes writer and photojournalist Erik Hoffner to talk about his writings and observations of the local food movement.  Erik shares the exciting development of food hubs as they spring up across the country, and describes the opportunities of scale and collaboration these interesting innovations are providing for local food entrepreneurs.  Also discussed are energy cooperatives, Fair Trade, and the prospects for sustainable agriculture to replace the industrial model.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Pathology 2 parts 57 mins – “Radio Curious brings you an archived, 2-part conversation about death and forensics with Dr. Michael Baden, the Chief Medical Examiner for the New York State Police and author of “Dead Reckoning, the New Science of Catching Killers.’” At the link find the title, “Baden, Michael Ph.D. — How Did That Person Die? Part 1″ right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2.

Free Expression 55 mins – “In the wake of the attack on the satirical French newspaper Charlie Hebdo, U.S. director of Reporters Without Borders, Delphine Halgand, joins the Newseum and Nikahang Kowsar, a member of the board of directors of Cartoonists Rights Network International, for a timely discussion about free expression and the dangers journalists face worldwide.” At the link find the title, “Journalists Under Attack,” right-click “Media files IM_20150111.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grateful Dead 48 mins – “Huge news just out for Deadheads. The Grateful Dead will play one more time, their last big blowout, in Chicago this summer. A 50th anniversary finale, most guess. And, of course, everyone will note what a “long, strange trip it’s been.” It’s more than that, says my guest Peter Richardson. It’s a classic American story of seeking rapture and utopia. A deeper freedom. He’s out with a new telling of the story of the Dead. And what a story. This hour On Point: a cultural history of the Grateful Dead.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greenpeace 52 mins – “Thursday, we begin our Sundance Film Festival coverage with the story of the eccentric and passionate creation of Greenpeace. Founder Bob Hunter was a journalist with a vision for winning public sympathy. His idea was to plant “mind bombs,” actions that would go viral. So they brought cameras and made sure images of factory-like whaling ships and dead baby seals reached the public. That archival footage anchors the new documentary, and we’re joined by director Jerry Rothwell. It’s called “How to Change the World.” At the link right-click the paly button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Helicopter Pilot 66 mins – “Welcome to episode 39. Today I have with me former Coast Guard helicopter pilot and Navy flight instructor Steve Vigus. Steve has a varied background and many interests including a passion for automobiles. I am really excited to listen as Steve takes us inside the cockpit of a Coast Guard Helicopter pilot on a rescue mission.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HoloLens 1 min – “Microsoft unwrapped a new version of Windows and a revolutionary product calls HoloLens that superimposes holograms into your real world. The story is today’s TECH TALK.” At the link you can listen, but the second link is to a more useful two-minute video explanation.

India Sex Assaults 14 mins – “ This talk begins with a personal story of sexual violence that may be difficult to listen to. But that’s the point, says citizen journalist Meera Vijayann: Speaking out on tough, taboo topics is the spark for change. Vijayann uses digital media to speak honestly about her experience of gender violence in her home country of India — and calls on others to speak out too.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Point Reactor 60 mins – “The hub of world financial activity, Wall Street and all, is gambling every day that two old reactors just 25 miles away won’t finally melt-down, Fukushima-style. Even the Nuclear Regulatory Commission thinks Indian Point has the most at-risk-for-an-earthquake reactors in the country. Later in this program we’ll talk with environmental lawyer, activist and local resident Susan Hito-Shapiro about the real threat. But first, I found another jaw-dropping, gasp-for-breath story in climate science. Is two degrees Centigrade of warming safe? What about 17 or 20 degrees hotter? That’s right. The United Nations panel on climate change doesn’t tell you the ultimate destination. When our current emissions at 400 parts per million finally stabilizes, London will be a tropical swamp with hippos and crocodiles – again.” At the link right-click “Download Lo-Fi” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Isomics 43 mins – “In this episode we talk to Dr. Steve Pieper, CEO of Isomics and Engineering Core Pi at the Neuroimage Anaylsis Center about how 3D and 3D visualization is changing the way surgery is analyzed, planned and performed with the research he has done of the last two decades and a little tool called ‘3D slicer’, that is a BSD style open source project that allows researchers and medical staff to use this Swiss army knife of DICOM image analysis for 3d reconstruction and for me personally to a create 3D printed model of someone close to me inflicted with golf ball sized bone tumor in their skull and allow her surgeon to the opportunity actually see and touch the diseased area before even using a scalpel.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Justice Defender 14 mins – “Every human deserves protection under their country’s laws — even when that law is forgotten or ignored. Sharing three cases from her international legal practice, Kimberley Motley, an American litigator practicing in Afghanistan and elsewhere, shows how a country’s own laws can bring both justice and “justness”: using the law for its intended purpose, to protect..” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linux Troubleshooting P1 40 mins – “Listener Dave suggested this topic. We detail how to recover from a crashed or frozen system. The topics we outline are: How to restart the Cinnamon desktop environment, how to restart the display server, how to restart and how to shut down a partially crashed responsive computer, and how to restart and shut down a completely unresponsive computer. We also walk through recovering accidentally deleted files from your hard drive or removable drive. I mistakenly said, “Alt+F3″ to start a full-screen terminal session. That is not correct. It’s “Ctrl+Alt+F3″ that you press.” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mercenary Trends 51 mins – “In World War II, contractors made up just 10 percent of the military workforce; by the Iraq war, that number had risen to 50 percent. And that number is climbing – not just in the U.S. but worldwide, as governments look to save money and keep casualty numbers down for their own militaries. But what does this trend toward private-run warfare mean for the future of international relations? One former contractor warns that armies-for-hire will soon be the norm, making it easier than ever to wage war. What an increased reliance on private armies could mean for modern warfare and global security.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Middle East History 65 mins – “The Middle East seems to be imploding. Dan thinks this is likely all part of a natural process of redrawing artificial borders and re-balancing power relationships. But that doesn’t mean it’s going to be fun to live through.” At the link find the title, “Common Sense 277 – Riding Chaos to Stasis,” right-click “download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minority Coalitions 54 mins – “This week we have a panel discussion presented by the Boston University African American Studies Program, titled “Black and Latino Coalitions from the 1960s to Today.”  Our speakers are: Babson College Professor of History and Foodways, Frederick Douglass Opie; and Boston Chief of Health and Human Services, Felix Arroyo.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Murder Board 12 mins – “When a city’s murder rate goes up and stays high for years, what do community activists working against violence do? How do they keep from losing hope? Back in 2010, State of the Re:Union visited New Orleans, Louisiana, and reported on community responses to urban violence. Among the places SOTRU visited was St. Anna’s Episcopal Church in the Treme neighborhood, which had come up with a novel way of documenting the city’s violence: something they called the Murder Board. This year, we sent reporter Nina Feldman back to St. Anna’s to see how the project is maintaining, these years later.” At the link find the title, “SOTRU Short: A New Orleans Church Memorializes Murder Victims,” right-click “podcast_NOLAMurderBoard.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Research 11 mins – “In 1963, Jacques Cousteau lived for 30 days in an underwater laboratory positioned on the floor of the Red Sea, and set a world record in the process. This summer, his grandson Fabien Cousteau broke that record. Cousteau the younger lived for 31 days aboard the Aquarius, an underwater research laboratory nine miles off the coast of Florida…to research how climate change and pollution are affecting the oceans.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paleo Diet News 147 mins – “On this episode, we dig into a popular recent study that tells us eating whole grains increases life expectancy; we look at whether there is validity to a claim that the Paleo diet erases the benefits of exercise, as explained by Dr. Michael Greger; I recap my 4 1/2 years of eating Paleo, offer a critique of the current direction of Paleo, and I answer a listener’s questions about my current Paleo eating framework. After the Bell, it’s a diet debate between three doctors: low-carb/high-fat, plant-based whole food, and Vegan.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcast Trends 47 mins – “Top podcast on iTunes today:  NPR’s new “Invisibilia” – about the invisible forces that control human behavior.  But you don’t have to go to NPR or even iTunes to get in on the podcast surge these days.  After ten years of downloading and experimentation and growth, podcasts are now all over the place.  No radio tower required.  No broadcast.  Just you and your smartphone and a million options.  Well, lots of options.  Updated all the time.  “Serial.”  Snooki.  Sports.  This hour On Point:  the podcast surge, and what it means for the future of listening – of news, of entertainment — of public radio.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Funding 52 mins – “This week marks the fifth anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission. Many decried the ruling as a blow to democracy because it loosened restrictions on campaign spending and gave corporations status as people. Opponents continue their push to overturn it – or at least lessen its impact through greater transparency. But supporters argue that the 2010 decision did not unleash a flood of money in politics. They say corporate spending on elections remains a small percentage of the total, and dark predictions about political influence have not played out. We look at the legacy of Citizens United five years out. [4 guests]” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Practice Deliberately 15 mins – “…Deliberate practice, suggests Colvin, separates the elite from everybody else. It’s about a lot more than sitting in a chair for hours a day: Colvin explains there are four components that make up deliberate practice:….”At the link find the title, “Why You Don’t Need Talent,”right-click “IHUB-012415-A.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Precautionary Principle 68 mins – “Nassim Nicholas Taleb, author of Antifragile, Black Swan, and Fooled by Randomness, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about a recent co-authored paper on the risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and the use of the Precautionary Principle. Taleb contrasts harm with ruin and explains how the differences imply different rules of behavior when dealing with the risk of each. Taleb argues that when considering the riskiness of GMOs, the right understanding of statistics is more valuable than expertise in biology or genetics. The central issue that pervades the conversation is how to cope with a small non-negligible risk of catastrophe.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Primary Care Issues 19 mins – “It’s been an epic flu season, and that means lots of visits to the doctor – involving vintage magazines, long waits, and short appointments. No surprise, the current system doesn’t work well for doctors, either. Rushika Fernandopulle, a doctor at Mass General Hospital and CEO of Iora Health, says a colleague once described to him the stress of being a practitioner. “She said, ‘Every day I lose a little piece of my soul. I went into this to try and take care of people and be able to meet their needs, and in the current system with seven-minute visits…and all this junk we’ve piled on, I just can’t do my job.’” The hurried visits and paperwork aren’t the only issues impeding innovation….” At the link find the title, “Fixing Primary Care,” right-click “IHUB-012415-B.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quantum Mechanic Terms 32 mins – “Since the theory of quantum mechanics became accepted, almost a century ago, we’ve had to get used to living in a world of quantum leaps, Schrodinger’s cats and uncertainty principles. But how well do we really understand the major philosophical implications of quantum mechanics? On this episode, we talked with Dr. Robert Crease, professor of philosophy at Stony Brook University, about how terms from quantum mechanics have found their way into everyday discourse and provided a new set of metaphors for life. He tells us how various groups, from physicists to politicians, have integrated the laws of quantum mechanics into their world view… or at least attempted to.” At the link right—click “Listen to Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rabies in Animals 15 mins – “Rabies is the archytypical zoonotic disease, and only by vaccination in animals will we prevent infections in people. In two podcasts linked to our latest clinical review “The prevention and management of rabies”​ we’ll be discussing how we can get there. In this podcast Sarah Cleaveland, professor of comparative epidemiology at the University of Glasgow discusses control​ling the disease in animals​.​ To find out about the clincial presentation listen to the accompanying podcast with ​Natasha Crowcroft, chief of infectious disease at Public Health Ontario.” At the link find the title, “Rabies in animals,” right-click “Media files 186367306-bmjgroup-rabies-in-animals.mp3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rabies in Humans 20 mins – “Rabies is the archytypical zoonotic disease, and only by vaccination in animals will we prevent infections in people. In two podcasts linked to our latest clinical review “The prevention and management of rabies”​ we’ll be discussing how we can get there. In this podcast Natasha Crowcroft, chief of infectious disease at Public Health Ontario to discuss the human aspect of the disease, and in the second Sarah Cleaveland, professor of comparative epidemiology at the University of Glasgow explains animal control.” At the link find the title, “Rabies in Humans,” right-click “Media files 186366686-bmjgroup-rabies-in-humans.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Race Relations 47 mins – “It’s Martin Luther King Day, and racial protest and politics in America are hotter than they’ve been in many years.  Fifty years after Selma. After Ferguson and Eric Garner and Trayvon Martin, after years of snoozey acquiescence and lots of people looking the other way, there is protest in the streets again.  About race.  Not everybody gets it.  Some prominent black figures are saying “What’s the goal?  Who’s the leader?”  But look at our prisons.  Look at our schools.  Look at who has jobs.  And it’s not hard to figure out.  This hour On Point:  On this MLK Day – racial reality in America, front and center, again. “ At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ransomeware 51 mins – “Imagine opening your computer and a ransom note appears on your screen. All of your files are encrypted. To get your files back you must pay hundreds of dollars within one week or all of your data will be lost. Welcome to the shadowy world of ransomware. More than one million personal computers worldwide have been hit by this new type of virus, according to some estimates. Cities and counties, including Detroit and Dickson County, Tennessee, have also been victims. Join guest host Steve Roberts and a panel of [4] guests for a discussion on ransomware viruses, who is at risk, and how to protect your data.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Ron Rash 47 mins – “Writer Ron Rash, out of the Carolinas, knows Appalachia well.  Very well or too well, you might think after reading his latest collection of powerful short stories.  The beauty, the dreams, the moments of tenderness and grit.  The poverty, the meth, the despair, the wreckage.  Ron Rash does not deliver the clichés of Appalachian life.  He’s both deeper and more up to date than that.  He takes the particularities of this often tough life and finds the universal.  “Something Rich and Strange” is the name of his collection.  This hour On Point:  we’re talking with Appalachia’s Ron Rash.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Selma 49 mins – “On the opening weekend of the Newseum exhibit, “1965: Civil Rights at 50,” Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton and CBS News White House correspondent Bill Plante talk about their memories of the civil rights movement.” At the link find the title, “1965: Civil Rights at 50,” right-click “Media files IM_20150117.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shorting Stocks 2 parts 38 mins – “[p1] If you own a house, stock, bonds, or a retirement account, you’re betting that things are going to get better — that the lines on the chart will keep going up. Historically, this is a reasonable bet. But you can place a bet in the opposite direction. You can make a bet that things will go down: a short. For example, if you short Apple stock and the stock price drops, you make money. While all the normal shareholders are consoling themselves, you can celebrate. But for the most part, people don’t do it. Experts warn us that we shouldn’t either. Today on the show, we ignore the advice of some very smart people, and we put our own money down on a bet against something people love. We short America. [p2] There have been short sellers throughout history. Today, the story of a man who was the very first short seller. The first person to bet that a stock will go down. It doesn’t go well for him.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from thepop-up menu. Do the same for P2, here.

Sialic Acid 26 mins – “Up next is an extended interview with University of California in San Diego scientist Ajit Varki  about his team’s new mouse study that indicates that a “sugar” in red meat, called sialic acid, can trigger inflammation when fed to mice.  This sugar is intriguing because it’s a molecule that two million years ago, our human bodies made on their own.  It differs from the current sialic acid made in our bodies by just one atom of oxygen.  Yet the mouse studies indicate that might be enough to cause an immune system reaction in the lab mice.  More research and human studies will be needed, to determine whether or not a similar reaction occurs in susceptible humans.  Now here’s Ajit Varki.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Energy History 56 mins – “Western man has been using the sun’s rays for useful purposes since the days of ancient China, as this comprehensive, carefully researched, clearly written history of solar architecture and technology makes abundantly clear,” says The New York Times about John Perlin’s book, Let it Shine: The 6000-Year Story of Solar Energy. Let it Shine presents the step-by-step development of solar architecture and technology and pertinent energy policies. By providing the background for today’s vibrant solar industry, a deeper understanding emerges of how solar energy applications have evolved and performed and their promise for today’s world.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spanish Inquisition 54 mins – “Christians, Muslims and Jews lived together in relative harmony in medieval Spain. Then the Spanish Inquisition came along with its use of terror and racism, turning a pluralistic society into a police state. Writer Erna Paris calls what happened in Spain.” At the link find the title, “From Tolerance to Tyranny,” right-click “Download From Tolerance to Tyranny” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Survival 29 mins -“ Why do smart people do stupid things? This is the question asked by Laurence Gonzales, author of “Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why” and “Everyday Survival: Why Smart People Do Stupid Things.” Gonzales examines the mental scripts we follow as we live our lives and how these scripts prescribe our response to a situation based upon our past experiences. The problem is that sometimes these scripts result in wrong and possibly dangerous actions based on insufficient evidence or memory in our past experience. Gonzales’ work demonstrates how these scripts can sometimes lead to us being our own worst enemy. To break from this cycle and encourage full understanding of a situation and wise decision making, Gonzales encourages “curiosity, awareness, and attention.” He writes, “Those are the tools of our everyday survival… we must all be scientists at heart, or be victims of forces that we don’t understand.” …The book he recommends is “Survival in Auschwitz” by Primo Levi.” At the link find the title, “Gonzales, Laurence — Why Do Smart People Do Stupid Things” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Synthetic Biology 33 mins – “Editor’s note: this podcast is part of our investigation into synthetic biology and bioengineering. For more on these topics, download a free copy of the new edition of BioCoder, our quarterly publication covering the biological revolution. Free downloads for all past editions are also available. Tim Gardner, founder of Riffyn, has recently been working with the Synthetic Biology Working Group of the European Commission Scientific Committees to define synthetic biology, assess the risk assessment methodologies, and then describe research areas. I caught up with Gardner for this Radar Podcast episode to talk about the synthetic biology landscape and issues in research and experimentation that he’s addressing at Riffyn.”

Temple Grandin 29 mins – “Do animals think? The book, “Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior,” by Professor Temple Grandin, gives us some clues. Temple Grandin is a person with autism who teaches animal science at Colorado State University in Ft. Collins, Colorado. Autistic people can often think the way animals think, putting autistic people in the perfect position to translate, “animal talk.” Grandin explores the world of animals – their pain, fear, aggression, relationships and communication. When I spoke with Professor Grandin from her office in Ft. Collins, Colorado, we began with her definition of autism.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click the medial and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Texas Entrepreneurial Network 2 mins – “…Hall T. Martin is the founder of  the Texas Entrepreneur Network also called T.E.N., which is at the URL of: http://www.TexasEnetworks.com. What does T.E.N. do? In helping Entrepreneurs, Hall Martin describes it very simply:  “We help Texans raise funding.” …Traditional funding sources such as banks no longer lend to early stage companies especially to startups that are pre-revenue. T.E.N.  has over 1000 investors in its network, and helps entrepreneurs find funding to grow their business. ..In addition, the state of Texas recently passed an intrastate crowdfunding law which lets anyone in the state of Texas invest in startups.  This opens up a new source of capital to entrepreneurs… If you’re seeking funding, you can sign up to learn more about how you can raise funding by visiting the T.E.N. portal .” At the link find the title, “ 260- Entrepreneur funding via Portal from Hall Martin of T.E.N.,” right-click “Select this link to access the brief 2-minute video as an mp4 file” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tiny Movements Value 13 mins – “Meet the “motion microscope,” a video-processing tool that plays up tiny changes in motion and color impossible to see with the naked eye. Video researcher Michael Rubinstein plays us clip after jaw-dropping clip showing how this tech can track an individual’s pulse and heartbeat simply from a piece of footage. Watch him re-create a conversation by amplifying the movements from sound waves bouncing off a bag of chips. The wow-inspiring and sinister applications of this tech you have to see to believe.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Titanium Nitride 5 mins – “Titanium is something of a byword for strength in popular culture, as witness the eponymous song ‘titanium’ by David Guetta. (I am told that the pronunciation tye-tanium is the American version, rather than an attempt to stifle schoolyard sniggers, as happened when the planet Uranus had its pronunciation changed.) If Marvel comics had not come up with the fictional adamantium for Wolverine’s claws, they almost certainly would have been made of titanium. So it is appropriate that a material that is primarily used for its hardness is titanium nitride. “ At the link right-click “Download: CIIE_TitaniumNitride.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turing 52mins – “…we’re talking about mathematician and computer pioneer Alan Turing. Our guest is biographer Andrew Hodges, whose book inspired the Academy Award-nominated film “The Imitation Game.” Turing’s code-breaking during World War II was a key to saving the Allies from the Nazis. But, he had a secret of his own, and was eventually arrested and persecuted for being gay. We’ll talk to Hodges about Turing’s extraordinary mind, his service and the life he couldn’t live. Andrew Hodges is the author of Alan Turing: The Enigma [Indiebound|Amazon]” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War of 1812 53 mins – “The concluding episode of IDEAS’ commemoration of the bicentennial of the War of 1812 takes us ‘down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico’, for the Battle of New Orleans.” At the link find the title, “The Battle of New Orleans,” right-click “Download The Battle of New Orleans” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Waste Trends 40 mins – “In case you hadn’t noticed, during our short time on Earth we humans have created a lot of stuff. Some of it is life-altering, like the device you’re looking at right now, and some of it is pretty silly, like those plastic, banana-shaped containers made for holding bananas. Regardless of their value, these objects all have one thing in common: one day they will become trash. For all the time we spend creating these wonders, we don’t devote much energy to thinking about what happens when their intended life-cycles run out….” At the link right-click “Download” from the poop-up menu.

Wealth 10 mins – “There’s perhaps no job more mundane in our imaginations than accountant. Even if it’s what your mom thinks of as a good, solid career. But how many kids – who tend to imagine themselves as future Tom Bradys or Beyonces – harbor dreams of working for Ernst and Young? Funny thing, though: Accountants may be poised to change the world….” At the link find the title, “Accountants, the Real Revolutionaries,” right-click “IHUB-012415-C.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Weather Issues 58 mins – “In her new book, SUPERSTORM: Nine Days Inside Hurricane Sandy (Dutton), investigative journalist and graduate professor of environmental studies Kathryn Miles discusses how mounting inadequacies of our national weather service infrastructure may compound the danger to public safety posed by extreme weather events. The Washington Post said the book is “what you might expect from Stephen King if he wrote nonfiction: a gripping plot with flashes of pure terror. Most astonishing, everything Miles describes actually happened.” At the link right-click “Download m3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Aviation 64 mins – “Can you have a successful flying career and a family life? Are you concerned you will not have time to enjoy your family and fly the world as an international airline pilot? I know many of you have these concerns when determining if a career as an airline pilot is for you.“ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

=======================================================================

ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 5000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 30+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

 

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 167 – 23 Jan 2015: Atrial Fibrillation, avTag App, Ballistic Entry, Birth of a Nation, Black Migration, Black Panthers, Blind Capabilities, Blind Shooting, Blind Traveler, Boko Haram, California Railroads, Carnism, Chanel, Chinese Internet, Climate Change, Climate Debate, Community Radio, Computer Repairmen, Cost of Civilization, Crypto-Gram Newsletter, Cyber and National Security, Death Row Doctorate, Dengue Vaccine, Drug Death, Earthquakes, Emancipation, Equal Rights, Fish Farming, Food and climate, Free Speech, Government Web Sites, Greek Austerity, Green Illusions, Group Think Issues, Hospice for Profit, Immigrant Submariners, Islamic Machinations, Job Woes, Johnny Mnemonic, Living with Nature, Marijuana Components, Mars Mission, Memetics, Midwives, Migrants by County, Migrants in Britain, Mingle App Story, Navajo Elder, Nose Temperature, Outdoor Education, Paperback vs E-Readers, Peopling the World, San Quentin Insider, Selma, Sitting Hazard, Solitary Confinement, Sound Signatures, Spectrum Management, Synthetic Biology, Teacher Wars, Torture, Toxicology Conflicts, Tracker, Tungsten Carbide, Urban Agriculture, Urban Planning, Vertical Farms, Wireless Pros and Cons,

The following audio files come from a larger group of 203 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 75 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Atrial Fibrillation 32 mins – “Atrial Fibrillation: Admit? Or treat and street?” At the link right-click “2010-3-A-1130 Atrial Fibrillation – Mossallam” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atrial Fibrillation Management 26 mins – “Emergency Department Management of Recent Onset Atrial Fibrillation – What Is the Evidence”At the link right-click “2012-06-27 D1T4 1130 ED Management of Recent Onset Atrial Fibrillation – What Is the Evidence” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

avTag App 41 mins – “Simon Wolf joins me to talk about creating his media tagging and annotation app, avTag. We discuss major redesigns for iOS 7 and dip into marketing woes, and even do a little brainstorming regarding Simon’s future plans for the app, and spinning it off to it’s own company….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ballistic Entry 23 mins – “Everybody wonders what it’s like to be an astronaut, but fewer wonder what it’s like to be an astronaut’s spouse. Don and Micki Pettit were about to find out the answers to both those questions. This is the story of their first mission together … and apart. After you’re done listening, be sure to check out Don’s “Saturday Morning Science” videos he made while on the space station. And for a lot more on this story, including Don’s crewmates on the Space Station, check out Chris Jones’s book, Out of Orbit. “ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Birth of a Nation 60 mins – “Dick Lehr discusses his book, [The Birth of a Nation], about the 1915 movie of the same title. The film was shown to President Woodrow Wilson and across the nation despite attempts by newspaper publisher William Monroe Trotter and others to stop it.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Dick Lehr,” right-click “Media files program.382449.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Migration 28 mins – “In the years between 1915 and 1970 almost six million black American citizens from the south migrated to northern and western cities seeking freedom and a better life. Our guest is Pulitzer Prize winner, Isabel Wilkerson author of “The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration.” Her book tells the untold experiences of the African-Americans who fled the south over three generations. Wilkerson interviewed more than 1,000 people for her book. She is the first black woman to win the Pulitzer Prize and is a recipient of the George Polk Award and a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow. Her parents were part of the great migration, journeying from Georgia and southern Virginia to Washington D.C. In the first of two interviews recorded from Isabel Wilkerson’s home near Atlanta, Georgia, on September 28, 2012, she begins with a description of the “biggest untold story of the 20th century.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Panthers 28 mins – “The exodus of approximately six million black people from the American South between 1915 and 1970 had a significant role in setting the stage of the civil rights movement of the early 1960s. Many of the children of those who left the south participated in desegregation efforts which included the Freedom Rides and lunch counter sit-ins. The Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and 1965 which attempted to resolve employment discrimination and define voting rights, only changed the law. Many young blacks however did not see changes in their everyday life. The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense was born out of this disillusionment. Although infiltrated and feared by the F.B.I., the Black Panther Party pioneered social and community programs, including free medical clinics, free meals, and educational programs. Our guest in this edition of Radio Curious is Columbia University Sociology and Gender Studies Professor Alondra Nelson, author of “Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Capabilities 54 mins – “NPR Science reporters Alix Spiegel and Lulu Miller explain to Ira Glass how they smuggled a rat into NPR headquarters in Washington, and ran an unscientific version of a famous experiment first done by Psychology Professor Robert Rosenthal. It showed how people’s thoughts about rats could affect their behavior…(6 minutes) Lulu tells the story of Daniel Kish, who’s blind, but can navigate the world by clicking with his tongue. This gives him so much information about what’s around him, he does all sorts of things most blind people don’t. Most famously, he rides a bike. We learn why he was raised so differently from the way most blind kids are brought up, and how the book The Making of Blind Men by Robert Scott changes everything for him. (25 minutes) Daniel Kish says that through clicking, he forms mental pictures. He actually sees. A neuroscientist Lore Thaler explains how that might be possible. Daniel goes on a mission to teach other blind people to see the way he does. (23 minutes)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive

Blind Shooting 20 mins – “Peter White talks to Ted Ellerton about living alone in a small village. Ted lost his sight overnight, whilst still working as a driver. Now nearly 90, he is nevertheless highly organised with cooking, washing and even with labeling his cassettes. Also, Tony Shearman travels to Cornwall to find out about acoustic target shooting, one of the most popular sports for blind and partially-sighted people.” At the link find the title, “InTouch 13 Jan 15: Living Alone –Access to Work – Acoustic Shooting,” right-click “Download 9MB” but only for a limited time; however, a copy of the file is included in this blog’s archive.

Blind Traveler 29 mins – “The ways different creatures, especially us humans, use our senses to guide ourselves through life has long attracted my curiosity. I’ve often wondered how blind people seem able to orient themselves, and also wondered about their dreams. From time to time, over the years, I would see an attentive woman walk past my office window next to a young person of student age.  They would walk together talk, and the young person almost always carried a white cane with a red tip. Laura Fogg is this woman, the author of “Traveling Blind:  Life Lessons from Unlikely Teachers,” and our guest in this archive edition of Radio Curious. Laura Fogg worked as a Mobility and Orientation Instructor for the Blind in Mendocino County for over 35 years beginning 1971.  She pioneered the use of the red tipped white cane with very young blind students some of whom had multiple impairments… I asked her about the lessons that she learned that have changed her life. The book Laura Fogg recommends is “My Year of Meats,” by Ruth Ozeki. Published in 1999.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boko Haram 51 mins – “The militant group Boko Haram has escalated its campaign of terror in northern Nigeria. Last year the Islamist fighters abducted nearly 300 school girls. Early this month they massacred hundreds in a border town near Chad in what Amnesty International says might be the group’s “deadliest act” so far. This week soldiers in the neighboring nation of Cameroon fought off a Boko Haram raid, raising fears of regional instability. The Nigerian government has been unable to quell the violence. We discuss Boko Haram, the roots of the insurgency and what can be done. [4 guests]” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the file is in the blog archive.

California Railroad 29 mins – “Local railroad systems were once the primary, if not the exclusive means of shipping and travel between nearby communities as well as links to those far away.  The California Western Railroad and the Northwestern Pacific Railroad met in Willits in rural Mendocino County in northern California, about 135 miles north of San Francisco.  Virgin old growth redwood trees were logged in the forests along the 40 miles of track to the coastal town Ft. Bragg.  Rail Villages, those isolated communities accessible only by train track prospered and grew.  Then came the automobile and trucks. In this edition of Radio Curious we visit with Richard Jergensen, president of the Mendocino Country Railroad Society, about the history of the California Western and the Northwestern Pacific Railroads, and what their presence did and can do in the future.  He is also the co-author of “How to Build with Grid Beam: A Fast, Easy and Affordable System for Constructing Almost Anything.”  Among a small part of his vast collection of maps, books, histories, posters and other memorabilia laid out throughout his home in Willits for our visit, Richard Jergensen shared a small part of this long story on January 20, 2013.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carnism 27 mins – “Carnism is the invisible belief system, or ideology, that conditions people to eat certain animals. It is the opposite of vegetarianism or veganism; “carn” means “flesh” or “of the flesh” and “ism” denotes a belief system. Most people view eating animals as a given, rather than a choice; in meat-eating cultures around the world people typically don’t think about why they find the meat of some animals disgusting and the meat of other animals appetizing, or why they eat any animals at all.  This is the topic of a conversation with Melanie Joy, Ph.D., author of , “Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs and Wear Cows, an Introduction to Carnism.” The interview with Melanie Joy, Ph.D. was recorded in Ukiah, California on November 29, 2010.  Joy’s website is www.carnism.com The book she recommends is, “Food Revolution: How your diet can save your life and our world,” by John Robbins.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chanel 14 mins – “It was the end of World War II, the American military had entered Paris, and soldiers lined up in droves outside one Paris store, hoping to get their hands on the ultimate luxury product: Chanel No. 5. It’s been the bestselling perfume in the world for the last 90 years, says Tilar Mazzeo, author of The Secret of Chanel No. 5: The Intimate History of the World’s Most Famous Perfume. And, she says, it took much more than marketing to get it to the top. “It turns out that, Chanel No. 5… is an amazing accomplishment in perfume,” Mazzeo adds. In the 1910s and 20s, perfumers were just starting to introduce synthetic scent compounds – and one synthetic in particular, an aldehyde, was used in Chanel No. 5 to “represent a bouquet of flowers that does not really exist in the world.” Of course, the woman behind the iconic brand, Coco Chanel, was full of contradictions – and beneath the veil of success was a darker side….” At the link find the title, “The Creations of Coco Chanel,” right-click “IHUB-011715-A.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Internet 65 mins – “The world is witnessing a massive expansion of Chinese telecommunications reach and influence, powered entirely by users choosing to participate in it. In Usage of the mobile messaging app WeChat (微信 Weixin), for example, has skyrocketed not only inside China, but outside, as well. Due to these systems being built upon proprietary protocols and software, their inner workings are largely opaque and mostly insecure. (WeChat has full permission to activate microphones and cameras, track GPS, access user contacts and photos, and copy all of this data at any time to their servers.) In this talk, Nathan Freitas — Berkman Fellow, director of technology strategy and training at the Tibet Action Institute. and leader of the Guardian Project — questions the risks to privacy and security foreign users engage in when adopting apps from Chinese companies. …is there any fundamental difference in the impact on privacy freedom for an American citizen using WeChat versus a Chinese citizen using WhatsApp or Google?” At the link right-click “Download the MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 49 mins – “Climate change. Floods and droughts. Plummeting biodiversity. Malnutrition and obesity. Rising rates of cancer and other diseases. This program continues our series Changing Climate – Changing World, and takes a look at how our changing climate is changing the world we live in, locally and globally.  Part 3 continues to look at how climate change and a growing scarcity of fossil fuels will impact our food system and features two examples of adaption to these coming changes. I talk with Eric Toensmeier, permaculture pioneer and author of Paradise Lot -the story of two plant geeks who created an edible garden oasis on a tenth of an acre in the city of Holyoke, Massachusetts and found their sweethearts along the way.” At the link right-click the start button for the sound bar half hidden at the bottom of the book cover and select “Save Link As” from the pop-menu.

Climate Debate 25 mins – “The rightful place of science (starts at 6:22): In 2014, the world certainly saw more than a few costly weather disasters.  Flooding in India and Pakistan in September killed more than 600 people and resulted in economic losses of more than $18 billion.  Super Typhoon Rammasum, which hit the Philippines, China and Vietnam in July caused more than 200 deaths and losses of $6.5 billion. And, closer to home, in August, rainfall and flooding in Detroit, Baltimore and Long Island damaged homes and cities leading to economic losses of about $2 billion. At the same time, the United Nations Weather Agency states that 2014 was the warmest year on record. So, the question is: Are these natural disasters related to the warming climate?  And are natural disasters becoming more costly because of climate change? These are questions that Roger Pielke Jr., an environmental sciences professor at the University of Colorado, addresses in his new book “The Rightful Place of Science: Disasters and Climate Change.”  He talks with HOE’s Jane Palmer about his book and why he believes it is important to maintain scientific integrity while engaging in the climate debate.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Community Radio 27 mins – “Radio Curious host and producer Barry Vogel and associate producer Janet Mendell attended the 10th international congress of the World Association of Community Broadcasters, known as AMARC.  AMARC is a network of more than 4,000 community radio stations, in more than 100 countries. Founded in 1983, its goal is to democratize the media sector. AMARC advocates for the right to communicate at the international, national, local and neighborhood levels. It defends and promotes the interests of the community radio movement through global solidarity, networking and cooperation. The 10th AMARC congress was held near Buenos Aires, Argentina the second week of November 2010, with 500 delegates from 86 countries present. In addition to presenting a workshop on interviewing skills, Radio Curious interviewed conference delegates from several different countries. In this edition of Radio Curious, the first in a series about local community radio around the world, we visit with Fadi Abuzada, a community radio activist in Palestine and AHM Bazlur Rahman, the CEO of the Bangladesh NGO’s Network for Radio and Communication. The interviews were recorded in November 2010, in La Plata, Argentina.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Computer Repairmen 126 mins – A long discussion about the background, insights and practices of two computer repairmen who created and run their own businesses. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cost of Civilization 29 mins – “In this edition of Radio Curious we visit again with Spencer Wells and discuss his new book, “Pandora’s Seed: The Unforeseen Cost of Civilization,” published in 2010.  Our interview is a follow-up to a 2004 conversation about his book, “The Journey of Man: A Genetic Odyssey, … Our 2004 interview may be found here. “Pandora’s Seed” tells the story of what we humans, with our hunter-gatherer biological construct have created in the past 10,000 years. These multiple live style changes have produced what we call “civilization,” with systems and mechanisms that will not allow us to continue the life-styles to are emulated by many people world-wide, and exploited by those who have access to them. In other words we can’t last much longer doing what we are doing without radically reducing the way we all live, if not outright killing our species. Spencer Well is an Explorer-in-Residence at the National Geographic Society in Washington, D.C., where he leads the Genographic Project, which is collecting and analyzing hundreds of thousands of DNA samples from people around the world in order to decipher how our ancestors populated the world….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crypto-Gram Newsletter 22 mins – “In this issue: Regin ; FBI Agents Pose as Repairmen to Bypass Warrant Process ; NSA Hacking of Cell Phone Networks ; Comments on the Sony Hack ; Over 700 Million People Taking Steps to Avoid NSA Surveillance; Corporations Misusing Our Data – from the December 15, 2014 Crypto-Gram Newsletter by Bruce Schneier read by Dan Henage” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-14-12.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber and National Security 47 mins – “A whole lot of the country runs on the Internet now, from the Pentagon to the power grid to our personal finances.  And we know – from hacks on Sony and Centcom and Target and JP Morgan – that the Internet has enormous vulnerabilities.  Tightening web security has been challenging.  Corporations and privacy advocates and government spies can all have reasons to resist.  Now the President is pushing a new package of legislation.  Is it the right stuff?  Will it work?  Can it pass?  This hour On Point:  cybersecurity, vested interests, vulnerability and you.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death Row Doctorate 29 mins – “Consider spending time on death row and turning that experience into the drive to get a doctorate? In this edition of Radio Curious we visit with Professor Rudolph Alexander Jr. Ph.D., author of “To Ascend Into The Shining World Again”. As a 17 year old student Rudolph Alexander found himself in a threatening situation in which he felt compelled to shoot another man. In his trial he felt he was badly misrepresented by his attorney and was convicted and sentenced to death by the electric chair in the State of Georgia. Following a U.S. Supreme Court decision in 1968, Rudolph’s sentence was changed to life imprisonment. He was later granted trusty status, which aided him in securing parole in 1975. Rebounding from his ordeal, Alexander began college, earning four degrees, including a Ph.D. in Social Work from the University of Minnesota. Presently Alexander is a full Professor at Ohio State University. We spoke with Rudolph Alexander from his home in Ohio on October 26, 2009 and began by asking him to reflect on the extremes he has experienced in his life.” At the link click “Click here to download podcast, then right-click “1197-1-alexander_interview_10-26-09_hb_mono.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dengue Vaccine 102 mins – “Hosts  Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler review the outcomes of two recent phase 3 clinical trials of a quadrivalent dengue virus vaccine in Asia and Latin America.” At the link right-click “TWIV 319” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Death 12 mins – “Lost after arriving at grad school, Bethany Brookshire is happy to finally find a perfect mentor. Bethany Brookshire has a B.S. in Biology and a B.A. in Philosophy from The College of William and Mary, a Ph.D. in Physiology and Pharmacology from Wake Forest University School of Medicine. She is the guest Editor of the Open Laboratory Anthology of Science Blogging, 2009, and the winner of the Society for Neuroscience Next Generation Award and the Three Quarks Daily Science Writing Award, among others. She is currently the Science Education Writer for Science News for Students. She blogs at Eureka!Lab and at Scicurious. You can follow her on Twitter as @scicurious.” AT the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Earthquakes 28 mins – “In a rebroadcast from Nov. 14, 2010, Keith talks with seismology professor Brian Stump, Albritton Professor of Earth Sciences, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, with SMU.  Stump explains why the earth’s crust differs around the world, and why there is an increasing detection of smaller quakes worldwide.  An interesting question arises during the interview: Could nuclear weapons be used to relieve pressure along fault lines?  Plus, Stump explains how earthquakes cause low frequency acoustic waves in the atmosphere.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emancipation 52 mins – “This month marks the 150th anniversary of the 13th amendment’s passage through Congress. That was the amendment that did away with slavery once and for all. But on January 1, 1863, two years before, President Lincoln had issued the Emancipation Proclamation. It declared that all slaves in the rebellious states “shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free.” Today, Lincoln is remembered as “The Great Emancipator,” but the story of emancipation is complex and contradictory. And the question of how we choose to commemorate this anniversary can be touchy. On this episode, we set out to understand the way Americans thought about emancipation in 1862, and reflect on its shifting meanings since then. Along the way, we make stops at the Emancipation Memorial in Washington D.C., the Civil War centennial commemorations in the height of the Civil Rights Era, and the former capital of the Confederacy today. And we hear the voices of former slaves themselves, remembering their first experiences of freedom.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equal Rights 51 mins – “Congress passed an Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution in the early 1970s. But after a 10-year lobbying effort on both sides, the amendment fell three states short of ratification. Since then, the ERA has been reintroduced in every session of Congress but hasn’t gone anywhere. Polls continue to show widespread support for a constitutional guarantee of women’s rights. But a series of decisions by the Supreme Court have denied claims of sex discrimination by women. A legal scholar on how an Equal Rights Amendment would address ongoing pay inequity, workplace discrimination and violence against women.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the file is in the blog archive.

Fish Farming 23 mins – “ …According to Paul Greenberg, author of American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood, today about 50 percent of our fish are now raised on farms, as opposed to in the wild. With a lot of fears about factory-farmed animals swarming around, Greenberg is quick to add that farm-raised fish have an important distinction from their land-based friends: “The vast majority of the fish that we’re eating has not been selectively bred. There’s not a lot of genetic difference between the wild animal and the farmed animal.” (Salmon and tilapia are notable exceptions to this rule.)…Americans love shrimp: It’s the most consumed seafood in the country. But around 90 percent of that shrimp actually comes from Southeast Asia and other foreign markets – places where aquaculture is booming. And where rules for fish farming aren’t nearly as stringent… In an attempt to make our food more affordable, fish production undergoes a seemingly inefficient process. Part of the fish that we eat in America was actually caught on our shores. But to save labor costs, companies freeze fish and send them via boat to processing plants in Asia, where they are defrosted, boned, processed and refrozen. “ At the link find the title, “The Story of Our Seafood,” right-click “IHUB-011715-B.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food and Climate P2 53 mins – “Part 2 takes a look at the impact of climate change on food – how we may create a food system that is resilient enough if fuel grows scarce, weather gets more severe, and traditional supply chains are hampered. I talk with Philip Ackerman-Leist, farmer, college professor and author of Rebuilding the Foodshed: How to Create Local,  Sustainable and Secure Food Systems. In this Community Resilience Guide, Philip Ackerman shares some of the most promising, replicable models for growing, processing, and distributing sustainably grown food, and points us toward the next stages of the food revolution. At the link right-click the play button at the base of the book cover picture and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Speech 47 mins – “Islam and blasphemy. What it is and how it’s used and abused, from Charlie Hebdo in France to Saudi Arabia and beyond. The killers at Charlie Hebdo in Paris shouted they had avenged the Prophet Mohammed.  Against the insult, the blasphemy, of Charlie Hebdo’s cartoons.  Blasphemy can sound like a very old idea in much of the world.  But in the Islamic world, blasphemy is hot and very political.  In Pakistan, you can get a beating or worse in a hurry.  Saudi Arabia just sentenced a critic to 1000 lashes.  Mauritania has sentenced a blogger to death by firing squad for insulting the prophet.  And then there’s Charlie Hebdo.  This hour On Point:  the blasphemy charge, inside the Islamic world and beyond.”” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Speech 51 mins – “Yesterday the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo published a new issue with another caricature of the Prophet Muhammad on its cover. More than a million copies were sold in Paris and additional printings have been promised as demand surges. While Muslims worldwide have condemned the terror attacks last week that killed twelve people, many have called the depictions of Muhammad offensive, and object to news organizations reprinting them. Guest host Frank Sesno and our [5] panelists discuss the latest on the investigation into the attacks and the ongoing debate over balancing free speech with religious sensitivity.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the file is in the blog archive.

Government Web Sites 58 mins – “Jennifer Pahlka, founder and executive director of Code for America, explains how governments, from the federal level to the local, need individuals with the skills to harness technology and design principles to make the everyday user’s experience simpler and more elegant. Recently the U.S. Deputy Chief Technology Officer at the White House, Pahlka also discusses the hunger within government for “creative hacks” that improve their platforms.” At the link hover over “Download,” then right-click “Download MP3 Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Greek Austerity 27mins – “The protest by cleaners, laid off from tax offices and the Greek Finance Ministry, which has captured the imagination of those opposed to the country’s harsh austerity programme.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Greece – The Rubber Glove Rebellion 15 Jan 2015,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150115-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Illusions P3 60 mins – “We will switch away from fossil fuels sooner or later, because they will run out. If it’s later, our kids get a wrecked civilization trying to cope with a wrecked climate. This week on Radio Ecoshock we finish out a three-part series on alternative energy, what it can do, and what it can’t. The take-home from green energy lovers and haters alike is simple: we can’t have this crazy civilization running just on the sun and wind. When we stop milking the billion year-pile of concentrated solar, known as oil, gas and coal – something has to change. That’s all in this rebroadcast of a podcast out of Britain, called Legalise-Freedom.com. Host Greg Moffit interviews David Fridley, a long-term energy expert working with both the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and the Post Carbon Institute. Pull up an ear, and let’s listen in.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” beise “Download or listen…” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Group Think Issues 59 mins – “ Harvard Law School professor Cass Sunstein discusses his book, [Wiser: Getting Beyond Groupthink to Make Groups Smarter], about the pitfalls of group decision-making and how to avoid them.” At the link find the title, “After Words: Cass Sunstein,” right-click “Media files program.383766.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hospice for Profit 51 mins – “About half of Americans of retirement age will receive end-of-life care from a hospice. Most hospices used to be nonprofits run by community or religious groups. But the number of for-profit hospice firms has tripled in the last 15 years. A new analysis by the Washington Post says that for-profit hospices often provide less nursing and crisis care. Join guest host Frank Sesno and a panel of [4] guests for a discussion on the rise of the for-profit hospice industry and what it means for patients.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the file is in the blog archive.

Immigrant Submariners P2 51 mins – “In 2004, four Latino high school students won an underwater robotics competition sponsored by NASA and the Office of Naval Research. With little funding or experience, they beat out a field of college teams, including one from MIT. It was a classic underdog story with a made-for-Hollywood ending. In fact, a major motion picture recounting their victory will be released later this week. Yet, the reality was much more complicated. The teenagers from Phoenix lived in the United States illegally. Though clearly talented, they faced a future with limited options. A new book called “Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream” tells their story.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the file is in the blog archive.

Islamic Machinations 27 mins – “Former jihadi Aimen Dean gives a unique insight into the workings of Islamic State. Dean left school in Saudi Arabia to fight jihad in Bosnia in the 1990s. But with the rise of al-Qaeda he became disillusioned with his comrades’ drift towards terrorism. He joined al-Qaeda – but working undercover for the British government.” At the link find the titl,e “DocArchive: Bureaucracy and Brutality,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150110-1932a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Woes 47 mins – “Best jobs numbers since 1999 out last week.  Official unemployment down to 5.6 percent.  But wages?  Going nowhere. “Paltry,” said The Wall Street Journal.  And the jobs?  How good can they be when average hourly earnings – weak for a long time now – actually fell by a nickel.  While headline writers wait for the economy to roar again, a lot of thinkers are wondering if the US economic engine needs to be fundamentally retooled. Rebuilt.  Reimagined.  This hour On Point:  No holds barred.  How do we make the American economy work for all of America? “ At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Johnny Mnemonic 18 mins – “Every time there is a big new release of some software, an operating system or a new browser, hackers get to work. Each new release is the start of a race because there are all these giant players who desperately want to find the new flaw in the software.Today on the show, the story of one man who stumbled into a flaw in Apple’s operating system, a way to hack the phone you might have in your hands right now – the iPhone 5s. It was a flaw that was worth a million dollars to the first person who could exploit it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Living with Nature 49 mins – “…This series looks at how our changing climate is changing the world we live in, locally and globally. ..This series is part of my contribution to education about climate change… Recent research and books like ‘Tending the Wild‘ by Kat Anderson are dispelling the hunter-gatherer stereotype long perpetuated  in anthropological and historical literature. We are now coming to see California’s indigenous people as active agents of environmental change and stewardship. Their traditional ecological knowledge is essential if we are to successfully meet the challenge of living sustainably. I talk with Sherrie Smith-Ferri (Dry Creek Pomo/Bodega Miwok), Executive Director at the Grace Hudson Museum in Ukiah, California. Sherrie is also the author of Pomo Indian Basketry and was a project advisor on the California’s “Lost” Tribes Film Series. I also talk with nature writer Kate Marianchild. She is writing Secrets of the Oak Woodlands, a book full of little-known information about the plants and animals that live among California’s oaks. Oak habitats collectively support more diversity of life than any other terrestrial ecosystems in California….” At the link right-click the play button at the bottom of the book jacket and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Components 29 mins – “Cannabis, commonly known as marijuana has caused considerable debate and political discussion, but just what is in this plant which creates such controversy? In this edition of Radio Curious we visit with Dr. William Courtney, a cannabis Medical Consultant based in Mendocino County, California. Dr. Courtney has studied the compounds of the cannabis plant known as “cannabinoids,” their various health effects, and the United States government patents held on these compounds. Further details on the legal status and current research relating to cannabis may be found on Dr. Courtney’s website www.leavesofgrass.info This conversation with Dr. Courtney was recorded in the studios of Radio Curious, Ukiah, California on March 23, 2009. We began when I asked him to describe the compounds in marijuana.” At the link click “Click here to download podcast, then right-click “1197-1-courtney_interview_3-23-09_hb.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mars Mission 60 mins – “This week we’re learning how private enterprise has jumped in to fill the gap left by shrinking government budgets for space exploration. We’re joined by journalist Elmo Keep, to talk about her article on Mars One, a nonprofit planning to make a reality show out of a one-way trip to colonize the red planet.  And we’ll get an update on the state of the for-profit space industry with Space News Senior Editor Jeff Foust.” At the link right-click “Listen Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memetics 29 mins – “The developing field of science called the science of memetics is based on evolution, studies memes: how they interact, replicate, and evolve. The biological definition of a meme is a basic unit of cultural transmission. The psychological definition of a meme is a unit of cultural heredity analogous to the gene, the internal representation of knowledge. A working definition of a meme is a unit of information in a mind whose existence influences events such that more copies of itself get created in other minds. “The Virus of the Mind” is a book devoted to the study of memetics and memes and was written by Richard Brodie, who also was a writer of the first version of Microsoft Word. He was our guest for this edition of Radio Curious that was originally broadcast in July of 1996. We began when I asked him what is the importance of studying memetics.” At the link right-click “Click here to begin listening.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Midwives 51 mins – According to a new study by Britain’s National Health Service, it’s safer for women with low risk pregnancies to deliver under the supervision of a midwife than in a hospital maternity ward. According to the study, mothers expected to have uncomplicated deliveries, and their babies, did better with midwives compared to doctors except in one circumstance: first time mothers delivering at home. Of the 3.9 million babies born in the U.S last year, only about 9 percent were delivered by midwives and most of these in a hospital. But this may be changing. Join us [4 guests] to talk about best practices in maternity care.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the file is in the blog archive.

Migrants by County 61 mins – “This Migration Policy Institute (MPI) webinar marks the release of new data profiles of unauthorized immigrants for counties in the United States with the largest populations potentially eligible for the expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program or the new Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents program (known as DAPA). Experts from MPI discuss some of the interesting county-level findings, and top officials from Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. and the National Council of La Raza talk about the implications of the data for implementation of the DACA and DAPA programs. The 94 detailed county-level profiles, along with top line estimates of unauthorized immigrant population size for 117 counties, are available here.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download” and select” Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrants in Britain 50 mins – “In the 1950s and 1960s tens of thousands of migrants came to Britain from the Indian subcontinent. Many arrived with no more than £3 in their pocket – the limit set by the Indian authorities. They came to work in Britain’s factories, foundries, and new public services. Kavita Puri hears their stories.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Three Pounds in my Pocket,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150111-2005a.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mingle App Story  30 mins – “19 year old self taught developer, Sam Ghobril, joins me to discuss creating his action based contact app Mingle, teaching himself to code and being the only coder he knew growing up around his home in Lebanon.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Navajo Elder 28 mins – “In this edition of Radio Curious assistant producer Christina Aanestad speaks with Leonard Benally, a Dine’ elder. Dine is the indigenous name for the Navajo people. Leonard Benally lived in an area called Big Mountain on the Navajo and Hopi reservations close to the Arizona-New Mexico border. He died on October 11, 2013 from cancer. In the 1970′s a Hopi – Navajo land dispute erupted on Big Mountain; some claim it was devised to move the Navajo out of the area because Peabody Coal wanted the coal rich land below their feet. As a result, an estimated 20,000 Dine’ were displaced. A few hundred remain to this day-refusing to leave. Leonard Benally was one of them.In August, 2012 Leonard Benally agreed to talk about his life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nose Temperature 6 mins – ”It was dismissed by doctors for decades as a myth. But now, scientists have proved that the winter weather really can increase your chances of catching a cold. Yale University’s Akiko Iwasaki has found that when the cells in our noses are infected with viruses, they sound a chemical alarm to help other cells to fend off infection. But at lower temperatures, this doesn’t work so well, giving an attacking virus an advantage and partly explaining why colds are much more common in winter, as she explained to Chris Smith. “ At the link right-click “Download as mp3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Outdoor Education 29 mins – “In this edition of Radio Curious we visit with Helen Menasian, director of the Redwood Valley Outdoor Education Project, located north of Ukiah, California. Ukiah is a small town in a long narrow valley that has been occupied by the Pomo People for about 11,000 years. About 150 years ago when Europeans and other foreign settlers arrived  the wilderness of the Ukiah valley was interrupted by pavement, waterworks and mechanical noise. The book “The Last Child In The Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature Deficit Disorder,” by Richard Louv describes some of the central ethos behind outdoor education for children. The book reminds us that parents have the power to ensure that their son or daughter will not be “the last child in the woods,” and discusses the importance of the nature-child reunion. During this conversation we hear how the Redwood Valley Outdoor Education Project seeks to regain that connection. We began by asking Helen Menasian to explain just what the project does.” At the link right-click “Click here to begin listening.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paperback vs E-Readers (2 parts) 106 mins – “eReaders have many advantages over paperbacks and although Amazon would have you believe that eBooks are leading the way, the paperback is far from dead and we look at both sides of the debate….Follow up (Part A) to Hopefully They Don’t Burn It where Vic and John touch briefly on DRM, looking at kill switches and when it’s right/wrong to use them confirm that Chapters is still open, touch on libraries already lending books via Kindles and more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for part two here.

Peopling the World 28 mins – “Around 60,000 years ago, a man – identical to us in all important genetic respects – lived in Africa. Every person alive today is descended from him. This is known because the secrets of human evolution are hidden in our genetic code. In this edition of Radio Curious, we visit with geneticist Spencer Wells, author of the book and movie, “Journey of Man, A Genetic Odyssey.” Spencer Well is an Explorer-in-Residence at the National Geographic Society in Washington, D.C., where he leads the Genographic Project, which is collecting and analyzing hundreds of thousands of DNA samples from people around the wold in order to decipher how our ancestors populated the world. He is also a professor a Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. The book Spencer Wells recommends is “No Logo,” by Naomi Klein.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

San Quentin Insider 29 mins – “Buzzy Martin began teaching music to at risk kids in Juvenile Hall.  He then taught guitar in San Quentin Prison for three and a half years, where he gained a unique “insiders” perspective about prison life, prisoners, and the guards.  His book, “Don’t Shoot!  I’m the Guitar Man,” chronicles his experiences teaching prison inmates, including rapists, child molesters and murderers how to play the guitar.  Martin shares his experiences with incarcerated youth, to teach them that prison is not a “badge of honor,” and he reveals how music can be a universal language to open the hearts of people who may think they don’t have one. Buzzy Martin’s memoir will be made into a movie.  His website is http://buzzymartin.com/ The interview with Buzzy Martin was recorded on October 11th, 2010.  The book he recommends is, “The Four Agreements: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom, A Toltec Wisdom Book,” by don Miguel Ruiz.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Selma 47 mins – “Fifty years ago this spring, it was billy clubs and blood and high stakes politics – moral reckoning – in Selma, Alabama.  The heart of the civil rights movement.  A high-wire act between Martin Luther King, Jr. and Lyndon Johnson.  Brutal repression.  Readiness to be clubbed for a cause.  High strategy in the streets.  The new movie “Selma” brings that story back, powerfully, into the midst of Ferguson and “I Can’t Breathe.”  At a time when we know, a half century on, this isn’t over.  This hour On Point:  we’re traveling back with Selma, the movie, and bringing it right up to date.

Sitting Hazard 5 mins – “Are you sitting comfortably? You may want to stand up after reading this. People are spending so much time on their derrieres it could be shortening their lifespans by up to six years, research suggests. This sedentary lifestyle and lack of exercise is one of the contributing factors to the current obesity crisis….” At the link right-click “Download as mp3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solitary Confinement 29 mins – “This is our second interview with Steven Czifra, a 38 year old undergraduate student at the University of California at Berkeley who spent almost 16 years in prison beginning when he was 14 years old.  For almost eight of those years he was held in solitary confinement. Having been held in a solitary confinement facility known as the SHU, security housing units of California’s juvenile and adult prisons, for almost eight years, he recently participated in the hunger strikes in solidarity with current prisoners to end the use of those facilities. In the first of a two-part series on prisons from the prisoner’s perspective, Steven Czifra shared his story and experiences.  Our first conversation ended when he was about to explain his desire to give a voice to the segment of the population which ends up in prison, and is otherwise not heard.  Who they are and why they are there. In this second conversation recorded from his home in Berkeley, California in September 14, 2013, Steven Czifra tells more of his personal story, his background and reflections and how he chose to turn his life around.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Part 1 can also be downloaded.

Sound Signatures 16 mins – “The first trademark for a sound in the United States was issued in 1978 to NBC for their chimes. MGM has a sound trademark for their roaring lion, as does 20th Century Fox for their trumpet fanfare. Harley Davidson tried to trademark the sound of their motorcycles, but after years of litigation, they finally withdrew their application. Right now there are fewer than two hundred active trademarks for sounds. A surprisingly small number, considering sound has the power make—or break—a brand. Consider, for instance, the fajita. Specifically, the”sizzling fajitas”of the restaurant chain Chili’s.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spectrum Management 32 mins – “Martin Cooper, regarded as the inventor of the cellular phone, talks about wireless spectrum needs. Mr. Cooper invented the first portable cell phone in 1973, and is currently a member of the Commerce Spectrum Management Advisory Committee.” At the link find the title, “The Communicators: Martin Cooper,” right-click “Media files program.378727.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Synthetic Biology 34 mins – “an editorial in the journal Science raised important questions about the safety of synthetic biology. In particular, it asked whether we can ensure safe practices in the more shady research arenas, such as the DIY synthetic biology movements… To discuss the implications, Ian Sample is joined by Nicola Davis, commissioning editor of Observer Tech Monthly, and Professor Paul Freemont from Imperial College, London, who is co-director of its Centre for Synthetic Biology and Innovation. Dr Filippa Lentzos from King’s College London also joins us down the line from Switzerland.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teacher Wars 52 mins – “There are many ideas about improving education, but journalist Dana Goldstein says most of them have been tried, and many of them have already failed. Goldstein has written a book that chronicles the history of what she calls America’s most embattled profession – teaching. She joins us to tell stories of what it’s been like to be a teacher throughout our nation’s history and to talk about the questions we’ve always wrestled with: who should be teaching and what should our children be learning?” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Torture 28 mins – “Radio Curious brings you an interview about torture from our archives in 2006.  Our guest is Dr. Steven Miles, author of “Oath Betrayed: Torture, Medical Complicity and the War On Terror,” a book based in part on eyewitness accounts of actual victims of prison abuse in Iraq and Afghanistan and more than thirty-five thousand pages of documents, autopsy reports and medical records.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Toxicology Conflicts 51 mins – “ Controversies in medical toxicology: gaps between evidence and practice.” At the link right-click “Controversies in Medical Toxicology – Gaps Between Evidence & Practice“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tracker 15 mins – “When a little girl goes missing in the desert, one woman is driven to find her, no matter what. Find out all about Hannah’s amazing story, and find resources for domestic abuse survivors on her website pointlastseen.com “ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right side of the sound bar and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Tungsten Carbide 6 mins – “Richard Feynman once said there was a ‘sleeping dragon’ lying dormant in the bowels of the Los Alamos Laboratory. And there were a few scientists who decided to tickle its tail, with fatal consequences. Harry Daghlian Jr., a physicist from MIT, was looking at neutron reflection as part of the Critical Assemblies Group in 1946. He surrounded a Pu-239 core with metal reflection bricks to see how many would be needed, and in what position, to make the core go critical. As he was positioning the bricks around the spherical metal core, Daghlian noticed it was about to go super-critical and tried to remove a brick. It fell into the Pu, which immediately set-off a runaway chain reaction. Exposed to a lethal dose of gamma radiation, Daghlian was the first peacetime casualty in a nuclear incident. The ultra-hard metal composite that landed on the dragon was, in fact, one of the toughest materials on Earth: Tungsten carbide.” At the link right-click “Download: CIIE_TungstenCarbide.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban Agriculture 51 mins – “Hosts Dickson Despommier and Vincent Racaniello Chris Hammelef and Paul Grey of Illumitex to learn about their revolutionary approach to designing horticultural LED lighting.” At the link right-slick “UrbAg11” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban Agriculture 80 mins – Dickson Despommier and Vincent Racaniello read listener email about urban agriculture, hydroponics, aquaponics, underground vertical farms, climate change, and more. At the link right-click “UrbAg 10” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Urban Agriculture Science 92 mins – Hosts:Dickson Despommier and Vincent Racaniello continue their discussion of the science of indoor farming. At the link right-click UrbAg7” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban Planning 29 mins – “Many planners agree that a more centralized population is a good thing for long-term environmental responsibility. But as people all over the world continue to flock to urban centers, the challenge of creating sustainable cities becomes more pressing. How can cities be improved to ensure that their billions of residents have energy-efficient transportation, housing, waste-stream management, as well as clean air and water? This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to Melanie Nutter, a consultant and Presidio Graduate School Expert-in-Residence, who has worked independently and as a part of city government to use technology and data to make smart and practical advances toward ecological urban planning. She walks us through some of the emerging policies and practices to promote smart, sustainable and resilient cities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vertical Farm in Indiana 78 mins – “Hosts Dickson Despommier and Vincent Racaniello speak with guest James Cannon. Chief of Horticulture at Green Farms A&M, about how his company produces food indoors.” “Green Farms Agronomics & Mycology (Green Farms A&M) is a Porter County, Indiana, indoor, vertical farm, located in Valparaiso.   Founded in the fall of 2010, Green Farms is a new farming concept focusing on quality, the environment, and the community.” At the link right-click “UrbAg 8” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vertical Farm in Michigan 80 mins – “Hosts Dickson Despommier and Vincent Racaniello interview guests Milan Kluko and Daniel Kluko, owners of Green Spirit Farms, a sustainable vertical farm in New Buffalo, Michigan.” “We grow our local high quality vegetables year round, which reduces the  “carbon footprint” associated with traditional food supply while increasing ecosystem performance.  Our approach eliminates unforeseen and uncontrollable severe weather events that negatively impact yields of these specialty vegetable crops (such as drought, flood, and early frost) resulting in more stable production, predictable harvest schedules that increase the amount of food that is consumed locally while providing maximum food transparency and a secure local food supply year round.  This is vertical farm-to-table.” At the link right-click “Download UrbAg9” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wireless Pros and Cons 86 mins – “There is a growing trend to eliminate the wires and go wireless for data and for power. Can it work? It is practical? Dive in.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

=======================================================================

ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 5000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 30+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thanks for stopping by.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Media Mining Digest 166 – 16 Jan 2015: Aging, Agroinnovations, Air and Water Drones, Benjamin Franklin, Broadband Public vs Private,Carbon Capture Tactics, Carbon Shock, Climate and Health, Climate Change Cows, Climate Reality Project, Climate Warming, Colored Bunnies, Common Resources, Consumer Price Index, DACA Program Impact, Electric Cars, Energy Production, Farming in Town, Ferguson Grand Jury, Fermentation, Food and Climate, Food Wastage, Frogs, Grief Managemenet, Guantanamo, Honeybee Status, Human Guinea Pig, Indigenous Tribe Value, La Raza, Living with Nature, Mapping Markets, Military Accountability, Money and Love, Muslim Spy, Ocean Monitoring, Paraquat, Penn Station Sucks, Physical Therapy, Pig Farm Photos, Prison Population, Racial Demographics, Rainwater Harvesting, Ransomware Story, Richard III Grave, Skydiver Pilot, Slow Television, Suicide Prevention, Vertical Farm in Chicago

The following audio files come from a larger group of 198 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 52 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Aging 50 mins – “‎Dive into how life is changing for everyone — from toddlers to octogenarians. First, Leslie Martin and Howard Friedman discuss a decades-long study that tracked a group of people as they aged, and the surprising trends they saw about who really lives the longest. Then, Dane Stangler and Elizabeth Isele push us beyond the “25-year-old in a hoodie” stereotype to look at the growing number of entrepreneurs over 50 — and what they’re creating. Plus, UC Berkeley professor Alison Gopnik explains why children can be much better problem solvers than their parents.” At the link find the title, “1.10.15 – Through the Ages,” right-click “IHUB-011015-FullShow.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agroinnovations 40 mins – “Frank summarizes many of the interesting ongoing projects in the arduino for agriculture space, and expands the horizons of the topic to include other hardware/software suites with the potential to improve our ability to monitor the natural world.  These include Google’s modular smartphone Project Ara, Apitronics, Ninja Blocks, ManyLabs, and SODAQ.  Also included is a breakdown of Public Lab projects Infragram, Spectral Workbench, and Mapknitter.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Air and Water Drones 30 mins – “Biohackers modify their vision to see more colours by Ian Woolf. Ian Lyons explains how to start flying quadcopter drones, Dominic Fretz talks about OpenROV underwater drones….” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Benjamin Franklin (2 parts) 58 mins – “Benjamin Franklin, through the person of Ralph Archbold, met with me in Franklin Court where his home and printshop were located, in Philadelphia. We met on July 18, 1994. We discussed his early life, his inventions and his role in the cessation from England and the formation of the United States. We began our conversation when I first asked him when he first came to Philadelphia. The book Benjamin Franklin and Ralph Archbold recommend is “The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin.;” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for part 2 here.

Broadband Public vs Private 37 mins – “ver since the last time I spoke with Blair Levin on Episode 37, I have wanted to have him back for a friendly discussion about public or private ownership of next generation networks. Though Blair and I entirely agree that local governments should be free to decide locally whether a community broadband network investment is a wise choice, he tends to see more promise in partnerships or other private approaches whereas we at ILSR tend to be concerned about the long term implications of private ownership of essential infrastructure. In what may be the longest interview we have done, Blair and I discuss where we agree and how we differ. We weren’t looking to prove the other wrong so much as illustrate our different points of view so listeners can evaluate our sides. Ultimately, we both believe in a United States where communities can choose between both models — and some may even seek solutions that incorporate both. Blair Levin was the FCC Chief of Staff when Reed Hundt was Chair and was instrumental in forming Gig.U. In between, he did a lot of things, including being Executive Director for the FCC’s National Broadband Plan. He is currently with the Metropolitan Project at Brookings.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Capture Tactics 51 mins – “Changing Climate – Changing World looks at how our changing climate is changing the world we live in, locally and globally. In Part 4 of this series, climate leader Dr. Peter Joseph of the Climate Reality Project returns to give us an update about concepts that aim to fight global warming and climate change by putting a price on carbon emissions and offering rewards for reducing carbon pollution….” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.
Carbon Shock 43 mins – Mark Shapiro, author of Carbon Shock, discusses the impact, solutions and related costs of each in this interview. At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Shock 43 mins – Mark Shapiro, author of Carbon Shock, discusses the impact, solutions and related costs of each in this interview. At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate and Health 51 mins – “I talk with Linda Marsa, award-winning health and science journalist and the author of a new book: Fevered: Why a Hotter Planet Will Hurt Our Health  — And How We Can Save Ourselves. In Fevered… Linda Marsa reveals how some of today’s most pressing public health issues are related to climate change — and are only going to get worse in coming years….” At the link right-click the play button at the bottom of the book cover and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Cows 35 mins – “…Part 6 of Changing Climate – Changing World: CAN COWS HELP REVERSE CLIMATE CHANGE? …My guest is veteran journalist Judith Schwartz, author of Cows Save the Planet: And Other Improbable Ways of Restoring Soil to Heal the Earth. Judith is at the leading edge of the movement that recognizes the importance of soil— for issues as close to home as our nutrition and as vast and global as climate change—as well as the potentially positive role of cows in that equation. Could it be that the answers to some of our most challenging global problems involve neither advanced technologies nor the lion’s share of our national treasuries, but the humble layer of soil beneath our feet? In Cows Save the Planet, Schwartz responds with an informed and enthusiastic “yes.” The problem, however, is that we’re losing topsoil somewhere between ten—in the United States—and forty—in China and India—times faster than we’re regenerating it. Schwartz illustrates how focusing on soil restoration will allow us to chip away at the seemingly insurmountable problems we currently face.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Reality Project 26 mins – “I speak with Dr. Peter Joseph, an emergency physician trained by Al Gore to educate the public about global warming as a Climate Reality Project presenter… just after Three Mile Island nuclear accident, he co-founded the San Francisco Bay Area chapter of Physicians for Social Responsibility, an organization of doctors dedicated to educating the public and world leaders about the horrendous medical consequences of nuclear war. He served as president of the chapter and on the National Board of Directors for 6 years, helping to start chapters in California and New York. PSR later participated in the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize as the US affiliate of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming 4 mins – “ You don’t have to look hard to find evidence that the earth is warming up. In fact, you have to look pretty hard to find something that suggests that the earth isn’t warming up.,, “Contrarians will often point to 1998, which was by some estimates the warmest year on record prior to 2014,” says Michael Mann, a leading climate researcher at Penn State University. “And they’ll say ‘look, we haven’t broken a record in more than 15 years, global warming must’ve stopped.’” Of course, that argument goes out of its way to ignore all the other evidence on climate change. It also ignores the many well-understood reasons why surface temperatures aren’t just going up in a smooth, unbroken line. But this week’s news from the Japanese Meteorological Agency makes it even harder to make the argument that the earth isn’t warming.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Colored Bunnies 52 mins – “How could a children’s story about two fluffy bunnies cause uproar? In 1958, author and illustrator Garth Williams published The Rabbits’ Wedding, about a black rabbit and a white rabbit who love each other. Segregationists in Alabama, championed by a state senator, demanded the book be banned. But the state library director held her ground. The battle is at the center of a new play premiering at Pioneer Theatre Company. Thursday, playwright Kenneth Jones and others join us to talk about Alabama Story.” At the link right-click the play button beside the “Listen” button a d select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Common Resources 36 mins – “I am so very honored to have interviewed Elinor Ostrom. In 2009, Ostrom became the first woman to receive the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences cited Ostrom “for her analysis of economic governance,” saying her work had demonstrated how common property could be successfully managed by groups using it.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Consumer Price Index 14 mins – “On today’s Planet Money, we go shopping with George Minichello. George is one of hundreds of federal employees who goes to stores all over the country and record the prices of thousands of different things. A bag of romaine lettuce. A boy’s size-14 collared shirt made of 97 percent cotton. A loaf of white bread. Their work drives the consumer price index, a key economic indicator known to its friends as CPI. The index measures inflation in the U.S., and it influences everything from Social Security checks to the price of school lunches to how big your raise will be next year.” At the link find the title, “#222 Planet Money: Why The Price Of Lettuce In Brooklyn Matters,” right-click “npr_130767171.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DACA Program Impact 67 mins – “Given the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program’s unique position at the convergence of the immigration and education fields, the Migration Policy Institute’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy has sought to capture the ways in which local educational institutions, legal service providers, and youth advocates have responded to DACA’s first phase. ….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Cars 109 mins – “Are electric cars going to save you money? We look at all electric and plugin hybrids, charging habits and being energy independent.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Energy Production 50 min – “From WOMAD 2014, Robyn Williams chairs a discussion about the generation of energy. A massive worldwide change is underway. The economics and structure of energy generation is being transformed from one of expensive, wasteful, polluting, distributed power under the control of large utilities, to cheaper, efficient, clean power generated locally and sometimes owned by the community….” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Production 50 min – “From WOMAD 2014, Robyn Williams chairs a discussion about the generation of energy. A massive worldwide change is underway. The economics and structure of energy generation is being transformed from one of expensive, wasteful, polluting, distributed power under the control of large utilities, to cheaper, efficient, clean power generated locally and sometimes owned by the community….” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in Town 49 mins – “Climate change. Floods and droughts. Plummeting biodiversity. Malnutrition and obesity. Rising rates of cancer and other diseases. This program continues our series Changing Climate – Changing World, and takes a look at how our changing climate is changing the world we live in, locally and globally. Part 3 continues to look at how climate change and a growing scarcity of fossil fuels will impact our food system and features two examples of adaption to these coming changes. I talk with Eric Toensmeier, permaculture pioneer and author of Paradise Lot -the story of two plant geeks who created an edible garden oasis on a tenth of an acre in the city of Holyoke, Massachusetts and found their sweethearts along the way.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Ferguson Grand Jury (2 parts) 58 mins – “The shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed 18 year old black teenager, in Ferguson, Missouri, on August 9, 2014, by a since retired white Ferguson, Missouri, police office, Darren Wilson, is the subject of…two Radio Curious interviews devoted to this topic. Our guest is Law Professor James A. Cohen, who has tried over 100 criminal jury trials and teaches criminal law and related topics at Fordham University Law School in New York City.  Professor Cohen and I review the evidence, including Wilson’s spoken testimony, the written police reports and medical reports presented to the St. Louis, Missouri, grand jury, by District Attorney Robert McCulloch.  His office exclusively organized and presented that evidence, which “with some exceptions,” according to Prosecutor McCulloch, was “made public” shortly after he announced that the grand jury failed to return criminal charges against former Officer Wilson, on November 24, 2014…We began our conversation with a brief history of grand juries, originally organized in England to protect the people from wonton acts of the King…The books that Professor Cohen recommends are those written by Anders Ericsson: “The Road To Excellence: The Acquisition of Expert Performance in the Arts and Sciences, Sports, and Games” and “Development of Professional Expertise: Toward Measurement of Expert Performance and Design of Optimal Learning Environments.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu for Part 1. For Part 2 do the same here.

Fermentation (2 prts) 69 mins- “Many of your favorite foods and drinks are probably fermented. For instance: Bread, Cheese, Wine, Beer, Mead, Cider, Chocolate, Coffee, Tea, Pickles, Sauerkraut, Kimchi, Salami, Miso, Tempeh, Soy Sauce, Vinegar, Yogurt, Kefir, Kombucha. A few years ago, when Sandor Katz’s first book, “Wild Fermentation” came out, I interviewed Sandor on Wildoak Living. The book galvanized and fueled a revival of the ancient art of fermenting foods. Since then, Sandor Katz has continued to practice, study and teach about fermentation around the globe and this year, published what’s likely to become the fermentation bible: The Art of Fermentation – An in-depth exploration of essential concepts and processes from around the world. Sandor is the major force behind a national revival of an almost lost culinary art form.  He is also profoundly changing the way that we think about food, health and food safety. Fermentation makes foods more nutritious, as well as delicious. Microscopic organisms – our ancestors and allies – transform food and extend its usefulness. Fermentation is found throughout human cultures. Hundreds of medical and scientific studies confirm what folklore has always known: Fermented foods help people stay healthy.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu for Part 1. Do the same for Part 2, here.

Food and Climate 53 mins – “…a look at the impact of climate change on food – how we may create a food system that is resilient enough if fuel grows scarce, weather gets more severe, and traditional supply chains are hampered. I talk with Philip Ackerman-Leist, farmer, college professor and author of Rebuilding the Foodshed: How to Create Local,  Sustainable and Secure Food Systems.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Wastage 51 mins – “Up to 40 percent of food in the United States today goes uneaten. With it, we throw away more than $ 160 billion and huge quantities of natural resources. But while wasted food rots in landfills and emits greenhouse gases, millions of Americans face hunger and global demand for food continues to rise. From farming and distribution to restaurants and homes, experts say there are opportunities for improvement at every level of the food supply chain. For this month’s Environmental Outlook: the causes and consequences of food waste, and how to change our path.[4 guests]” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Frogs 29 mins – “In a rebroadcast from Nov. 7, 2010, Keith and guest co-host Eli Greenbaum of the UTEP Department of Biological Sciences, talk with David Blackburn, an evolutionary biologist from the University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute.   Blackburn studies the vast diversity of frogs and amphibians, including of the fragmentation of frog species in the Sahara.  It’s a fascinating conversation!” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grief Management 48 mins – “One thing we know about life that is terrible and true:  it ends.  We don’t get a choice about that.  And sooner or later, that end comes to people that we love.  And then, we grieve.  In the past two months, that’s been my path.  A much-loved partner, lost.  And plenty of grief.  But for all the personal pain of it, grieving is an utterly universal experience.  It comes to us all, essentially, at some point, over a parent, a lover, a friend, a child.  It is one of the most human experiences.  We are looking for some wisdom in this hour on how to make it through.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guantanamo 55 mins – “The American prison at Guantanamo has come to stand for so many moral trade-offs the United States has made in the years since 9/11. George Bush filled it but did not empty it. Barack Obama promised to close it but has not followed through. Congress has made it complicated. Even prisoners cleared for exit have been going nowhere. Now, inmates at Guantanamo have turned again to hunger strike. In return, they are force-fed. Held without charges. It needs to end, to close, said the president again last week. But how?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honeybee Status 58 mins – “The Wall Street Journal reports that U.S. beekeepers lost 1 in 3 honeybees during the winter of 2012, and this is cause for alarm. Declining bee populations have been making news recently, and this is much more than an endangered species story. Certain crops we take for granted are dependent upon bee pollination to grow. Among these are: apples, almonds, blueberries, watermelon, cherries, peaches, avocados, cucumbers, cranberries, onions, blackberries, grapefruit, oranges, raspberries, cantaloupe, pumpkins, pears, and plums. If you want to help ensure these crops remain bountiful (and, hence, affordable), tune in today as Ted Dennard, CEO of Savannah Bee Company, joins us to discuss this crucial topic.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Guinea Pig 9 mins – “Drug development happens in stages – pre-clinical, phase I, II, III, and so on. But how much do trial participants know about what has happened before their enrolment to test for safety, and how much should they be told? Holger Pedersen from Denmark was one trial participant who tried to find information about the drug he was on, and was…” At the link find the title, “Being a human guinea pig,” right-click “Media files 185075625-bmjgroup-being-a-human-guinea-pig.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous Tribe Value 18 mins – “’The greatest and most endangered species in the Amazon rainforest is not the jaguar or the harpy eagle,” says Mark Plotkin, “It’s the isolated and uncontacted tribes.” In an energetic and sobering talk, the ethnobotanist brings us into the world of the forest’s indigenous tribes and the incredible medicinal plants that their shamans use to heal. He outlines the challenges and perils that are endangering them — and their wisdom — and urges us to protect this irreplaceable repository of knowledge.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and elect “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

La Raza 60 mins – “Janet Murguia, president and CEO of the National Council of La Raza, talks about the state of Hispanics in America and possible changes to U.S. immigration policy. She also discusses her background growing up in a working-class family in Kansas City.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Janet Murguia,” right-click “Media files program.378680.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Living with Nature 49 mins – “Part 1 of Changing Climate – Changing World is called Learning from Those Who Came Before Us. It takes a look at what we can learn from peoples who not only lived in harmony with nature for 1000s of years right here, in Northern California, but who learned to shape their environment to thrive sustainably. Recent research and books like ‘Tending the Wild’ by Kat Anderson are dispelling the hunter-gatherer stereotype long perpetuated in anthropological and historical literature. We are now coming to see California’s indigenous people as active agents of environmental change and stewardship. Their traditional ecological knowledge is essential if we are to successfully meet the challenge of living sustainably.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Mapping Markets 16 mins – “Matt Kueny, senior business analyst for Miele, Inc., explains how his company uses Esri Tapestry Segmentation data to find niche markets for its high-end appliances.” Services available through ESRI are described here. At the link find the title, “Looking for Customers in All the Right Places,” right-click “Media files user_kueny.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Accountability 51 mins – “America has been at war for the last 13 years, the longest period of warfare in American history. Since 2002, around 2.5 million men and women have served in Iraq or Afghanistan, which is about three quarters of 1 percent of the U.S. population. Many Americans are quick to say they respect the sacrifice our soldiers are making, but most have no real contact or interest in the military. In a cover story for Atlantic Magazine, journalist Jim Fallows argues that this disconnect has led to careless spending, strategic errors and endless wars we can’t win. Please join us [3 guests] for debate over holding our military accountable.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Money and Love 27 mins – “We like to think of our romantic lives as pure and unbothered by the cold business of spreadsheets and tax documents. But serious relationships are both romantic and financial partnerships.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Death, Sex and Money,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150106-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muslim Spy 27 mins – “Noor Inayat Khan was one of the most courageous, unusual secret agents of World War Two. She was determined that even as a Muslim of mixed origin and as someone with Sufi pacifist beliefs, she would commit to the British war effort. Shahidha Bari uncovers Khan’s story.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Codename: Madeleine,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150107-0232a.mp3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Monitoring 10 mins – “’Argo” is a system for observing the temperature, salinity, and currents in the Earth’s oceans. Operational since the early 2000s, the data it provides are used in climate and oceanographic research and a special research interest is to quantify the ocean heat content (OHC). It consists of a fleet of 3600 drifting profiling floats deployed worldwide. Each Argo float weighs 20–30 kg, as oceanographer Philip Sutton, from New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, explains to Chris Smith and Simon Morton… “ At the link right-click “Download as mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paraquat 7 mins – “Brian Clegg introduces a weedkiller whose name has entered public consciousness – Paraquat.” At the link find the title, “Paraquat: Chemistry in its element,” right-click “CIIE_Paraquat.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Penn Station Sucks 18 mins – “New Yorkers are known to disagree about a lot of things. Who’s got the best pizza? What’s the fastest subway route? Yankees or Mets?  But all 8.5 million New Yorkers are likely to agree on one thing: Penn Station sucks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physical Therapy 29 mins – “Bill Bracewell, a doctor of physical therapy practicing in Ukiah, California, for over 35 years, is our guest on this edition of Radio Curious.  He and I visited in the Radio Curious studios on December 15, 2014.  We begin with Dr. Bracewell’s description of physical therapy:  maximize, restore and maintain range of movement. The book Dr. Bill Bracewell recommends is “The Thinking Body,” by Mable Elsworth Todd.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pig Farm Photos 2 mins – “Four California activists are pleading not guilty to charges that they violated Utah’s controversial ag-gag law when they took pictures of a pig farm in Milford. They may be the first defendants prosecuted under the law. The activists with the group Farm Animal Rights Movement were charged in Iron County Justice Court with criminal trespassing and interference with an agricultural operation – class B misdemeanors. Professional photographer Sarah Jane Hardt is one of the defendants. She says she did take photos and video at Circle Four pig farms in September last year, but she contends that she did so from public land. Hardt says she hopes the case goes to trial….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Population 51 mins – “The past 40 years have seen unprecedented growth in the United States prison system. Today, one in 31 adults are either behind bars or on parole or probation. These numbers have led to issues with overcrowding, fostered a boom in the private prison industry, and altered communities around the country. Bipartisan reform efforts have begun to reverse the trend in incarceration. However, at current rates it would take 90 years to bring the prison population back in line with other democracies around the world. We look at mass incarceration in the United States – what’s behind it and why it’s so difficult to address.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Racial Demographics 51 mins – “America is becoming a country with no racial majority. In 2009, for the first time in U.S. history, more minority than white babies were born in a year. Soon, most American children will be racial minorities. The nation’s diversity surge played a key role in Barack Obama’s election as president. Many see these trends as necessary as a much-needed younger minority labor force is already boosting an aging baby boom population. But challenges loom, including clashes over public resources, overcoming a cultural generation gap, and fears over losing privileged status. Diane and her guests discuss how new racial demographics are remaking America.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Rainwater Harvesting 59 mins – Brad Lancaster, author of Rainwater Harvesting, talks about how to save water, prevent erosion and flooding in a sustainable way. At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Ransomware Story 4 mins – “What I’ve learned after my Mom got hacked (and her data held for ransom)” At the link right-click the down-pointing soundbar at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Richard III Grave 15 mins – “How One Woman’s Parking Lot Discovery Changed 500 Years of History / Snap Judgment “Underground’” At the link click “Download” and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Skydiver Pilot 32 mins – “Welcome to episode 76. I have received many questions regarding the career of skydive pilot so we thought we would dedicate this episode to the job of skydive pilot. Joining me for this episode is Dennis Downing, a pilot flying skydivers in Zephyrhills, Florida. It seems to be an exciting job and along with my listeners I am very interested in discovering more about career opportunities and what it is like to be a skydive pilot.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slow Television 18 mins – “You’ve heard about slow food. Now here’s slow … TV? In this very funny talk, Norwegian television producer Thomas Hellum shares how he and his team began to broadcast long, boring events, often live — and found a rapt audience. Shows include a 7-hour train journey, an 18-hour fishing expedition and a 5.5-day ferry voyage along the coast of Norway. The results are both beautiful and fascinating. Really.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” or video and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide Prevention 47 mins – “Every year over 1 million people worldwide die from suicide – one about every 40 seconds – according to the World Health Organization – More people die from suicide than from homicide and war combined. The psychological pain leading individuals to take their lives is unimaginable. Their deaths leave families and friends bereft, and often have major ripple effects on communities.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Vertical Farm in Chicago 60 mins – “Hosts Dickson Despommier and Vincent Racaniello speak with Paul Hardej, founder of Farmed Here, a commercial vertical farm in Chicago, Illinois.” At the link right-click “UrbAg 12” beside “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

=======================================================================

ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 5000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 30+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment