Mining Digest 378 – Feb 15, 2019: 9-11 Memorial, Abstract Art, Abuse from R. Kelly, Algerian War, Algorithm Impact, Alzheimer’s, Arterial Plaques, Bill Browder, Bioprospecting, Character Lab, Cholera Vaccine, Crisis Texting, Cuban Voices, Curts Cafe, Dean Stan Maloy, Director Michael Bay, Drones in Africa, Euthanasia, Evidence Based Medicine, Facebook Impact, Family Leave in Denmark, Financial Concepts, Game Changers, Growth Hormone and Alzheimer’s, Human Potential, John Bogle, Lie Detection, Limbs International, Migrant Myths, Millennial Burnout, Rapid SOS, Sen Kamala Harris, Serbia and Kosovo War, Solzhenitsyn Impact, Surveillance Capitalism, Terrorism Discussion, Trump Analysis, Uganda Refugees, Uranium One

Exercise your ears: the 54 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 550 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,198 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 157GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 496 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

9/11 Memorial 46 mins – “On September 11, 2001, The United States was hit by the biggest terrorist attack in our nation’s history. Now, ten years later, we take a look back at the events of the day, talking to people from different professions — from a New York City firefighter to the creator of a TV comedy show — to discuss how the event affected them then and now.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

9/11 Memorial 46 mins – “On September 11, 2001, The United States was hit by the biggest terrorist attack in our nation’s history. Now, ten years later, we take a look back at the events of the day, talking to people from different professions — from a New York City firefighter to the creator of a TV comedy show — to discuss how the event affected them then and now.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Abstract Art 48 mins – “Thanks to a new exhibit at the Guggenheim, the art world is rediscovering Hilma af Klint. How was this Swede so ahead of her time, and will she finally get her due? Lee Israel’s memoir about forging letters by famous writers, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?,” is now a terrific movie starring Melissa McCarthy. Israel died in 2014, but here she is in an interview with Kurt Andersen in 2008, where she talks about how — and why — she decided to start impersonating the likes of Dorothy Parker and Noël Coward. When Shane McCrae was a depressed teen in the ’90s, he found inspiration and hope in the strangest of places: the poetry of the famously tragic Sylvia Plath. At the link find the title, “The mother of all abstraction, Jan 2019,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Abuse from R. Kelly 47 mins – “Allegations against R&B singer R. Kelly have been circulating for decades. Why did it take a TV documentary to get people to pay attention?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Algerian War 27 mins – “President Emmanuel Macron has recently done something unusual for a French President – he made a declaration recognising that torture was used by the French military during the Algerian War of Independence. He described a system that allowed people to be arrested, interrogated and sometimes killed. Many families still don’t know what happened to their loved ones. At 87, Josette Audin, has campaigned for more than 60 years for the French state to take responsibility for the disappearance of her husband, Maurice Audin, during the Algerian War. Charlotte McDonald hears Josette’s story and discovers that the Algerian War has had a lasting impact on many more in France. She speaks to historians Malika Rahal and Fabrice Riceputi about their website 1000autres.org, and to war veteran Rémi Serres about his association 4ACG.“ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Algorithm Impact 23 mins – “Dr Hannah Fry won the Christopher Zeeman medal in August for her contributions to the public understanding of the mathematical sciences. Ian Sample has invited her on the podcast to discuss her love of numbers. Plus, he asks, can we really use this discipline to predict human behaviour?Maths probably isn’t something you’re thinking about in the build-up to the new year. If anything, it’s the nth thing on your mind, where n equals a centillion. But for UCL’s Dr Hannah Fry, mathematics is often at the forefront of her thinking. For instance, she’s worked out whether Santa would get fatter from eating all the mince pies, or thinner, from having to shimmy up and down chimneys all night long. She’s thought about how game theory could help you beat your uncle at monopoly, and even the optimal length of tinsel you should have used on your Christmas tree.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’s P1 26 mins – “Few of us will escape the impact of Alzheimer’s Disease. The grim pay-back from being healthy, wealthy or lucky enough to live into our late 80s and beyond is dementia. One in three – maybe even one in two of us – will then get dementia and forget almost everything we ever knew. And the lucky others? They will probably end up caring for someone with Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia. But it is far more than just a personal family tragedy. It is a major economic challenge to governments and health-care providers around the world, and will force some fundamental rethinking on how we care for sufferers. The costs are already immense. Dementia is now a trillion-dollar disease, and with the numbers of patients doubling every 20 years, the burden will fall unevenly on developing countries where the growth rate is fastest. In this first episode of the series, we explore how fear in some parts of the world is stigmatising those who have it, and denying help to those who need it. But also how to overcome the fear.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’s P2 26 mins – “Dementia is now a trillion-dollar disease, and with the numbers of people living with the condition doubling every 20 years, the burden will fall unevenly on developing countries where the growth rate is fastest. We travel to South Korea, the fastest ageing country in the world, where the country’s president has declared the challenge of Alzheimer’s to be a national crisis. We meet families struggling to look after loved ones with Alzheimer’s and question whether countries in both the developed and developing world can afford to provide care for patients. We also visit the Netherlands, where an innovative approach to Alzheimer’s care offers hope for the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’z P3 26 mins – “In the final episode of this three-part series we explore the difficult choices people have to make. In the Netherlands, people with dementia can legally chose euthanasia but the debate is going back and forth there. When can dementia patients consent to euthanasia? The answer it turns out – is ethically very complicated and a Dutch doctor is now being prosecuted for performing euthanasia on a patient with advanced Alzheimer’s. But if we didn’t fear Alzheimer’s so much, couldn’t we find ways to live a happy, fulfilled life – even with dementia? We travel to South Korea and the UK to hear from some of the most promising initiatives; and how a dementia friendly society is possible, with action not just from governments and NGOs but crucially from all of us.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arterial Plaques 71 mins – “Vincent, Michael, and Michele discuss how iron might disperse bacterial biofilms in carotid arterial plaques, and controlling Salmonella by modulating host iron homeostasis.” At the link “Right click to download TWiM#81” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Benazir Bhutto Assassination P1 51 mins – “It is one of the world’s great unsolved murders. Ten years ago, Pakistan’s most prominent politician, a woman people would form human chains to protect from assassins, died in a suicide blast. The intervening years have brought allegations, arrests and a UN inquiry – but not one murder conviction. The victim was Benazir Bhutto.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Benazir Bhutto Assassination P2 50 mins – “It is one of the world’s great unsolved murders. Ten years ago, Pakistan’s most prominent politician, a woman people would form human chains to protect from assassins, died in a suicide blast. The intervening years have brought allegations, arrests and a UN inquiry – but not one murder conviction. The victim was Benazir Bhutto. The Bhuttos are to Pakistan what the Kennedys are to the US: a powerful political dynasty, a family that inspire love and hate; a name that carries glamour and intrigue – Benazir was just the latest in a long line of Bhuttos to be murdered. With exclusive inside access to the official investigation and a shelf load of leaked, secret documents, The Assassination looks at what happened and why; what we know and what we don’t. The story spans the globe, from Pakistan to the US, to the Gulf and the UK, and hears from the victim, her family and the accused. The series was first released as a podcast. It won gold at the 2018 British Podcast Awards. It made the iTunes charts in seven countries, reaching number one in the UK. Listeners have left hundreds of glowing online reviews: “brilliant” … “fascinating” … “gripping.” Through the mystery of this murder we reveal a little of how Pakistan works. The Assassination is a portrait of a woman and the country she would rule by a man who knows both as well as any British journalist, Owen Bennett Jones.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bill Browder 32 mins – “Jacob Weisberg and Virginia Heffernan are joined by Bill Browder to chat about the latest developments surrounding the Magnitsky Act, corruption, and the people seeking to discredit his efforts worldwide.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the popup menu.

Bill Browder 45 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Bill Browder, financier and author of Red Notice, about Natalia Veselnitskaya, how the Kremlin influences even well-intentioned U.S. civil servants, the origins of the Magnitsky Act, the evolution of Russian oligarchs, and what Putin might be doing next.” At the link left-click “Share” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bioprospecting 15 mins – “Will a cure for cancer be found in the North Pole? A group of Norwegian scientists are scouring the sea and shore in one of the harshest climates on earth, looking for wonder drugs. Writer Kea Krause experienced their search when she spent twelve days aboard a research vessel in the Arctic Ocean. In this episode, she talks about her journey and why this part of the world may unlock answers to some of our most difficult health problems. Krause was a speaker at Spotlight Health. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar, select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Fate 47 mins – “The make-or-break vote on the Brexit deal with Britain’s future hanging in the balance. We’ll turn to London for reaction and what’s next.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Character Lab 35 mins – “Why is it so hard to watch our children fail? Why might a highly structured life for a child be a bad thing? And how important is our behavior, as adults, in the development of a child? In this episode, psychologist Angela Duckworth explains how to raise a child with strong character. Duckworth, who’s the author of Grit and a MacArthur “Genius,” talks with Jackie Bezos about how young people learn to be grateful, vulnerable, and fearless by modeling the adults in their lives. Bezos is the co-founder and president of the Bezos Family Foundation.” At the link find the title, “Can Character be Learned? 11/20/2018,” left-click the box with three dots, double-click “Download file,” then select “Safe File” and “OK” to download the file.

Cholera Vaccine 72 mins – “The professors of TWiM discuss a University of Wisconsin plan for rescuing biomedical research in the US, and results of a clinical trial in Bangladesh of an oral cholera vaccine.” At the link right-click “Right click to download TWiM#108” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Columbia Bicycle Race 27 mins – “Colombia is a country of passionate cyclists. The first bike races took place in Bogota in 1894 and by 1898 it was one of the first countries to have two purpose built velodromes. In the 1950s the great Vuelta a Colombia, a tour of Colombia, was born – 35 cyclists covered an extraordinary 779 miles in 10 stages. All over the country people listened to the commentary on radios and it began to link up Colombians in a common cause. This is more than just a sporting event. The first Tour took place just two years after the assassination in 1948 of Liberal party leader Jorge Eliécer Gaitán, which was the catalyst for a bloody sectarian conflict between Liberals and Conservatives, creating deep, violent divisions especially in rural areas. The first Tour was thus promoted as a sign of peace and goodwill, reconnecting the country and reaching into rural communities. Through the turbulent decades that have followed, the Tour has continued to go through parts of Colombia that rarely receive any attention. We join the annual Vuelta a Colombia, cycling the mountains, cities and villages, to find a totally different perspective on the country. This is an event which brings Colombia to a standstill – that is unless you are on two wheels.”At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Crisis Texting 32 mins – “In a time of crisis, would you text someone for help? Millions turn to Crisis Text Line and find life-saving support. Founder and CEO Lublin explains why.” At the link left-click “Download this episode” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Voices 27 mins – “Ordinary Cubans reveal what their lives have really been like under Castro’s socialism and, more recently, its transformation into a more capitalistic economy. For some, the Cuban Revolution was the last bastion of the communist dream; for others, a repressive, authoritarian regime. Largely missing from those debates were the voices of ordinary Cubans. Almost 60 years on from the Revolution, professor Elizabeth Dore discovers how people from different walks of life and generations have experienced life, work, housing, racism, sexism and corruption on the island. “Cuban Voices” is based on the first large oral history project permitted by their government in more than 30 years. Professor Dore and her team of researchers got unprecedented access to ordinary people for over 15 years, and she has now returned for the BBC, visiting small villages and rural enclaves as well as the bustling metropolis of Havana, to hear how those same people’s ideas have changed about the achievements and failures of socialism in Cuba. What she discovers frequently defies the official narrative of the Revolution. While many welcomed the State’s provision of basic food, health care and housing, now they increasingly bemoan the widening gap between rich and poor. You will hear the Communist party member whose State salary barely allows him to survive in the damp one-room flat he shares with his sister, while others make a fortune earning hard currency from hiring out rooms to tourists or, in the case of one petty entrepreneur, by running a small computer business using software smuggled in from the US. While once ‘egalitarianism’ was seen as central to socialist society, that has been replaced by ‘equal rights and opportunities’, so has the Revolution, as some would say, abandoned its ideals?“ At the link you can listen, but not download: however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Curts Cafe 33 mins – “Most juvenile offenders end up back in prison — but not at Curt’s Cafe, a coffee shop offers a path to a better life. It could save taxpayers billions.” At the link left-click “Download this episode” from the pop-up menu.

Dean Stan Maloy 67 mins – “Vincent meets up with Stan Maloy on the campus of San Diego State University to talk about his career in microbiology and his work as Dean of Sciences.[ including Salmonella research]” At the link “Right click to download TWiM#95” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Director Michael Bay 19 mins – “In 2001, director Michael Bay was one of Hollywood’s most successful commercial filmmakers when he took on the daunting task of directing an epic about Pearl Harbor. How would his testosterone-laden, explosive-style adapt to a serious subject? (Hint: the critics hated it but the movie made $450 million at the box office.) Jeanne Marie Laskas joins host David Brancaccio this week to discuss her sympathetic but piercing—and often hilarious—profile of Bay, who rages at his critics, complains about his agents and studio executives, and attempts, often unsuccessfully, to conduct life at the top without becoming a total…jerk.” At the link find the title, “Michael Bay, by Jeanne Marie Laskas, 27 Jun 2016,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drones in Africa 27 min – “While the idea of retail giants like Amazon dropping parcels from the sky via drone may be a long way off, in East Africa momentum is building over the idea of drone delivery in hard to reach places. In the island of Juma near Mwanza, one of hundreds of remote inhabited islands in the vast expanse of Lake Victoria, an ambitious new drone project called the Lake Victoria Challenge (backed by international organisations like The World Bank and the private sector) is taking place. Technology reporter Jane Wakefield visits Juma to see first-hand how the concept could work. Are they a cost-effective solution for getting goods quickly to rural areas? Jane interviews Zipline, currently the only commercial drone delivery company operating in Africa. A year on from announcing a deal with the Tanzanian government, Zipline is still nowhere near setting up in the country. Why? Do drones bring insurmountable regulatory and security issues, or are they going to be a lifeline for Africa’s neglected rural communities? Jane also speaks to Tanzanian drone pilot and entrepreneur Frederick Mbuya of Uhurulabs about why technology needs to work in an African context, and to The World Bank’s Edward Anderson, who is running the Lake Victoria challenge project, about what drones could bring in terms of economic development opportunities.“ At the link you can listen, but not download: however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Euthanasia 28 mins – “In January, Aurelia Brouwers – a 29 year old Dutch woman, with a history of severe mental illness – lay down on her bed to die. She had been declared eligible for euthanasia a month earlier – Dutch law permits the ending of a life where there is, ‘unbearable suffering’ without hope of relief. Aurelia’s death provoked an outpouring on social media, and widespread discussion within the Netherlands… What if a death wish is part of someone’s illness? And does someone with serious mental health challenges have the capacity to make a decision about their own demise? These are questions now being debated in the Netherlands as a result of Aurelia’s death. Crossing Continents features recordings of Aurelia made in the two weeks before she died, hears from some of the friends closest to her, and explores the complex terrain of euthanasia for people with psychiatric problems in Holland.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evidence Based Medicine 44 mins – “Too many research studies are poorly designed or executed. Too much of the resulting research evidence is withheld or disseminated piecemeal. As the volume of clinical research activity has grown the quality of evidence has often worsened, which has compromised the ability of all health professionals to provide affordable, effective, high value care for patients.” Evidence is in crisis, and Carl Heneghan, director for the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine, and Fiona Godlee, editor in chief of The BMJ set out the 9 points of the Evidence manifesto, which tries to set a road map for strengthening the evidence base. 1) Expand the role of patients, health professionals and policy makers in research 2) Increase the systematic use of existing evidence 3) Make research evidence relevant, replicable and accessible to end users. 4) Reduce questionable research practices, bias, and conflicts of interests 5) Ensure drug and device regulation is robust, transparent and independent 6) Produce better usable clinical guidelines. 7) Support innovation, quality improvement, and safety through the better use of real world data. 8) Educate professionals, policy makers and the public in evidence-based healthcare to make informed choices. 9) Encourage the next generation of leaders in evidence-based medicine.” At the link find the title, “The Evidence Manifesto – it’s time to fix the E in EBM, Jun 2017,” right-click “Play Now” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Impact 28 mins – “How did Facebook get to be so powerful and what, if anything, can we do to take some of that power back? David talks to John Naughton about the rise and possible fall of Mark Zuckerberg’s social media monolith.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Family Leave in Denmark 34 mins – “For progressives in the United States, Denmark seems like a socialist paradise. Danes pay a significant portion of their income in taxes, and their government provides a wide range of services in return, including health care, child care, education, and paid parental leave.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Financial Concepts 109 mins – “Peter Mallouk (@PeterMallouk) is the President of Creative Planning, one of the largest independent wealth management firms in America. Creative Planning provides wealth management services to clients, manages over $36 billion for clients in all 50 states and abroad, and has been featured as the number one independent wealth management firm in America by Barron’s (2017). Peter is featured in Worth magazine’s Power 100, featuring the most powerful men and women in global finance, the only financial planner on the list (2017 and 2018). Creative Planning was featured in Forbes in 2016 as the number one RIA for growth over the last 10 years. Peter is the co-author (with Tony Robbins) of Unshakeable: Your Financial Freedom PlaybookAt the link “Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “Save As.”

Forensic Entymologist 28 mins – “Jim Al-Khalili talks to Amoret Whitaker, an entomologist at the Natural History Museum in London. Her intricate understanding of the life cycles of the flies, beetles and the other insects’ which feed on decomposing bodies means she is regularly called by the Police to the scene of a crime or a murder investigation. There she collects and analyses any insect evidence to help them pin point the most likely time of death. In some instances, this can be accurate to within hours. She is just one of only a handful of forensic entomologists working in the UK. She talks to Jim about her life as a research scientist, breeding flies in the far flung towers of the Natural History Museum and her work as a forensic expert with police services across the country. Dropping her work at a moment’s notice she can be called any time of day to anywhere in the country to attend a crime scene. She also talks about her regular trips to a research facility at the ‘Body Farm’ at the University of Tennesee in Knoxville in Ameria to get a better understanding of how real human bodies decompose. Her passion is insects and while our instinctive reaction to flies and maggots may be one of revulsion – when you take time look at them properly, and in detail, she says you can see what truly incredible creatures they are.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freakonomics Live in NY 55 mins – “Our co-host is comedian Christian Finnegan, and we learn: the difference between danger and fear; the role of clouds in climate change; and why (and when) politicians are bad at math. Washington Post columnist Alexandra Petri is our real-time fact-checker. This is a bonus episode of Freakonomics Radio Live. It’s the non-fiction game show we call Tell Me Something I Don’t Know.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Game Changers 50 mins – “Jack Canfield, a psychotherapist, educational consultant, award-winning speaker and internationally recognized leader in personal development and transformation, as well as an internationally renowned corporate trainer and keynote speaker. He’s also the originator and co-creator of the worldwide phenomenon Chicken Soup for the Soul® book series. The first book published 25 years ago in 1993; there now are over 500 million copies in print worldwide. 40 of the books have been New York Times bestsellers. He’s credited with ushering in the genre of inspirational anthologies. Jack was a guest on Bulletproof Radio back in episode #471 “Go Beyond Chicken Soup & Confront Your Fears.” Our conversation during that episode became the focal point of Law #3 in my new book, “Game Changers.” And that is what Jack gets in to in this episode.” At the link right-click “Download” on the soundbar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Growth Hormone and Alzheimer’s 11 mins – “Ali Jennings tells the story of how a contaminated medical treatment led researchers to suspect that a key protein involved in Alzheimer’s disease could be transferred between people, although only under rare circumstances.” At the link left-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hanoi Culture 27 mins – “An interrupted journey is like a portal into somebody else’s life. In this programme, Catherine Carr invites strangers to pause on their way from A to B and asks them one simple question: ‘Where Are You Going?’ In the Vietnamese capital, Hanoi, Catherine meets the feminist teenagers who dream of equality and a jet-setting seven-year-old who is already worried about college. She meets a depressed new mother struggling to cope, and a teenager praying for good exam grades. The exchanges can be funny, sad or sweet or simply unforgettable. Mixed with the sounds of the city, the stories create a poetic and unpredictable listen.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Human Potential 56 mins – “This week, we speak with James Clear. Yup, that’s right. James Clear!!! James is an author an entrepreneur and you might know him best for his fantastic newsletter. He writes about habits and human potential. His focus is on self-improvement tips based on proven scientific research, and he has new book called, Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones. To learn more about James, sign up for his awesome newsletter, or download a free chapter of his book, head over to https://jamesclear.com.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

John Bogle 45 mins – “On this week’s episode Slate Money talks about Vanguard’s founder, discusses the latest in Brexit woes, and takes a look at Trump’s bad deal-making skills.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lie Detection 27 mins – “Liar liar, pants on fire? In this collaboration between the Guardian’s Science Weekly and Chips with Everything podcasts, we explore whether it will ever be possible to build intelligent machines to detect porky pies.” At the link left-click the square witht three dots, left click “Download File,” then “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Limbs International 33 mins – “Of the 30 Million amputees worldwide, only 5 percent have access to prosthetics. A professor in Texas sets out to change that, one step at a time.” At the link left-click “Download this episode” from the pop-up menu.

Lobotomies 34 mins – “Lobotomies — brain surgeries to relieve psychiatric problems — are rarely performed today, but they were once fairly common. Tune in to learn more about the controversial history and practice of lobotomies in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com.Learn more about advertising on the HowStuffWorks podcasts at http://www.howstuffworks.com/advertisers.htm And to learn about your ad choices when listening to podcasts, visit https://www.howstuffworks.com/privacy.htm#ad-choices “ At the link you can listen, but not download: however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Migrant Myths 16 mins – “This week: The UCL–Lancet Commission on Migration and Heath released a new report that busts some common migration myths; and a scientist at Oxford University has come up with an alteration to Einstein’s general theory of relativity that could have some interesting effects on our understanding of our universe: negative mass.” At the link find the title, “Up To Date | Migration Myths and Negative Mass, Dec 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Millennial Burnout 47 mins – “Debt, uncertain work, unrealistic expectations – are millennials turning into the burnout generation?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mixed Martial Arts 50 mins – “Why do we fight? Is sensory deprivation a viable mental health option? Isn’t it weird we’re all floating in space right now? On this episode of StarTalk Radio, we answer these eclectic questions and a lot more as Neil deGrasse Tyson sits down Joe Rogan, comedian, MMA commentator, and host of The Joe Rogan Experience. In-studio, Neil is joined by comic co-host Sasheer Zamata, and Jonathan Gottschall, literary scholar and author of The Professor in the Cage: Why Men Fight and Why We Like to Watch. You’ll learn about Joe’s early science and martial arts influences that shaped his worldview. Jonathan tells us about his experience joining a cage fighting gym and explains why storytelling is a good device for spreading science. Dive into the philosophy of the different teaching forms of marital arts. Ponder the “riddle of the duel” and why Brazilian jiu-jitsu is the most scientific form of fighting. Jonathan takes us inside the ring as he shares what it was like to be knocked unconscious. Find out if fighters think about physics during a fight. Investigate the physics and kinetic energy transfer that take place during a punch. Join us as we debate the effectiveness of a punch vs a kick. Discover why the introduction of gloves made fighting more dangerous. You’ll hear StarTalk correspondent Chuck Nice visit an MMA gym to get choked out in the name of science. Shifting gears, we step inside the brain to explore mental health. We also discuss the underappreciation of teachers and why Joe thinks society over-values celebrities. Sasheer leads the panel in handing out “Teachies” to influential teachers. All that, plus Joe shares his love for sensory deprivation therapy, Dr. Leah Lagos stops by to share techniques to help us connect and feel the world more deeply, Joe gets to ask Neil his own Cosmic Query about the beginning and end of the universe, and Neil ponders the future of fighting against the backdrop of the cosmic perspective.: At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Populism 54 mins -”Once relegated to the political fringes, political populism has exploded across the world in recent years. Most of the populist leaders who have emerged so far — figures like Matteo Salvini and Marine Le Pen — have been defined, in part, by their xenophobic rhetoric. Some populist parties, like the Sweden Democrats, even have roots in Neo-Nazism. But what if ultra-nationalism and xenophobia aren’t necessarily a part of populism’s DNA? What if populism is actually a logical, if at times convoluted, response to decades of frustration with our democratic institutions?  Political scientist Matthew Goodwin thinks it is. Contrary to the belief held by many “progressive” intellectuals, Goodwin argues populism is not simply an attempt by a generation of older, white men to cling to their social and political power. Instead, he argues that the rise of populism is the result of a citizenry who are thoroughly disenfranchised with traditional political ideologies, on both the left and the right.” At the link find the title, “The Case for Populism,” right-click Download The Case for Populism” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Professor Roland R. Rueckert 76 mins – “At the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Vincent meets up with one of his virology heroes, Roland R. Rueckert, to talk about his research and his second career as a forest manager.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 529” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rapid SOS 27 mins – “A team of  “computer nerds” spot a huge hole in emergency services. Their solution may save 10,000 lives a year (or more!).” At the link left-click “Download this episode” from the pop-up menu. 

Sen Kamala Harris 67 mins – “On this episode of Live at Politics and Prose, Sen. Kamala Harris discusses her book The Truths We Hold.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Serbia and Kosovo War 27 mins – “Old enemies Serbia and Kosovo discuss what for some is unthinkable – an ethnic land swap. This dramatic proposal is one of those being talked about as a means of normalising relations between these former foes. Since the bloody Kosovo war ended with NATO intervention in 1999, civility between Belgrade and Pristina has been in short supply. Redrawing borders along ethnic lines is anathema to many, but politicians in Serbia and Kosovo have their eyes on a bigger prize… For Serbia, that is membership of the European Union. But the EU will not accept Serbia until it makes an accommodation with its neighbour. Kosovo wants to join the EU too, but its immediate priority is recognition at the United Nations, and that is unlikely while Serbia’s ally, Russia, continues to thwart Kosovo’s ambitions there. Both of these Balkan nations want to exit this impasse. And a land-swap, giving each of them much-coveted territory, might just do it. For Assignment, Linda Pressly and producer, Albana Kasapi, visit the two regions at the heart of the proposal – the ethnically Albanian-majority Presevo Valley in Serbia, and the mostly Serb region north of Mitrovica in Kosovo.“ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solzhenitsyn Impact 60 mins – “Historian and author Stephen Kotkin of Princeton University and Stanford University’s Hoover Institution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the historical significance of the life and work of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of Solzhenitsyn’s birth.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup Businesses 38 mins – “Rohan Oza is a global pioneer in celebrity equity deals and is known for transforming groundbreaking consumer products into household names. His revolutionary expertise has led him to appear on numerous national television shows, including as a Guest Shark on Shark Tank. Rohan’s unique philosophy, ideas and strategy have earned billions for corporations, brands and celebrities alike. His strong track record and consistent success have enabled him to identify key trends and leverage those insights to build iconic brands. On this episode of Bulletproof Radio, Rohan shares with us how they can be their own “brand messiah” and also gets into what makes me (Dave) a good and bad founder.” At the link right-click “Download” on the soundbar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Capitalism 72 mins – “Shoshana Zuboff is the author of The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power. She talks with Leo Laporte about how social media is being used to influence people. “ At the link left-click “Download options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Discussion 43 mins – “Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is Dame Eliza Manningham-Buller. She has recently stepped down as Britain’s top spy-master – or more correctly, the Director-General of MI5. She took the helm in the months after the attacks of 11th September 2001 in America and steered the service through a time when the nature of the terrorist threat facing Britain changed enormously and new measures were introduced to counteract it. She concedes that MI5 has to rely, in large part, on information that is ‘patchy and incomplete’ and that ultimately the service will always be judged ‘by what we do not know and did not prevent’. In her first ever interview, Dame Eliza talks gives her recollections about the day when Britain was targeted by suicide bombers, describes what lay behind her own departure from the service and reveals how her mother’s role during World War II fuelled her own interest in public service.“ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Analysis 37 mins – “A break from Brexit! This week we talk to one of the world’s leading moral philosophers Martha Nussbaum about the really big stuff: anger and disgust, trust and hope, childhood and experience. Can contemporary democracy cope with the growing fears of its citizens? What are we so afraid of? And what does Trump’s election tell us about where we should look to rebuild faith in politics?  Martha Nussbaum’s latest book is The Monarchy of Fear: https://bit.ly/2zwpLR9” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive where it can be downloaded.

Uganda Refugees 27 mins – “Last year Uganda took in more refugees than any other country. But how do the South Sudanese, fleeing civil war, transform the African Bush into a new home? Ruth Alexander reports “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uranium One 32 mins – “What are the limitations of a president’s influence on the Justice Dept? Reporter Devlin Barrett offers the latest news, fact checker Glenn Kessler unpacks Uranium One, and a once dep. special counsel explains risks for politicizing the Justice Dept.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

 

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Mining Digest 377 – Feb 8, 2019: Amazon Threat, Andrew Yang for President, Animal Extinctions, Anxiety in America, Asian Americans, Black School Girl Activism, Cellphone Privacy Discussion, Climate Change and Gender Equality, Congressional Violence, Conversion Therapy, Digital Print Disruption, Edward Burtynsky, Emoluments, Global Warming, Government Finances, Government Staff Operations, Hasidic Jews Documentary, Hate Speech, Hong Kong, Horseshoe Crab Blood, Infectious Disease Insights, Jellyfish Book, John Lewis Reflects, John Wayne Movies, Journalism Experiment, Labor Market in U.S., Lake Success, Life Value, Local News Death, Lolita Book Background, Magnitsky Act, Mark Pincus, Methylene Blue, Nobel Prize, Partisan Dysfunction, Patient Spotlight, Phage Therapy, Photographer Lynsey Addario, Prejudice Patterns, Price of a Life, Rosanne Cash, Rules for a Flat World, S&P 500 Index Underperforms, Samuel Beckett, Sexual Reproduction, Sit-ins and Civil Rights, Slants Issue, Solitude, Sports Contributions, Surveillance Economy, Tariffs and Trade, Technology Acceleration, Trade and Treaty Law, Virtual Reality Treatment, War Reporting

Exercise your ears: the 74 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 676 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,198 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 157GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 496 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Amazon Threat 21 mins – “Some time later this year, Amazon could become the first trillion-dollar company in American history. Its valuation has already doubled in the last 14 months to about $800 billion, and Jeff Bezos, its founder and CEO, is officially the richest man on the planet. There are ways in which Amazon seems to be the greatest company in American history. It’s revolutionized the global shopping experience and expanded into media and hardware, while operating on razor-thin margins that have astonished critics. But some now consider it the modern incarnation of a railroad monopoly, a logistics behemoth using its scale to destroy competition.So what is Amazon: brilliant, dangerous, or both? That’s the subject of the latest episode of Crazy/Genius, our new podcast on technology and culture.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Andrew Yang for President 52 mins – “In the American Dream sweepstakes, Andrew Yang was a pretty big winner. But for every winner, he came to realize, there are thousands upon thousands of losers — a “war on normal people,” he calls it. Here’s what he plans to do about it.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Animal Extinctions 54 mins – “How we make decisions about what to save, and how we explore the idea of “conservation triage.” So do we choose pipelines or killer whales? And is this an argument about money – or about values that transcend it?” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive and can be downloaded.

Anthropocene Age 10 mins – “Geologists are now hotly debating – though, when it comes to geologists, that’s probably a relative term – whether humans have altered the planet so radically that we’ve ushered in a new epoch. The last epoch began about 12,000 years ago, when the Pleistocene ended and glaciers slid away from much of North America, Europe, and Asia. Now, scientists face the question of whether one species could possibly have changed the geology of the Earth as much as continent-shaping glaciers, cooling oceans, and mass extinctions. Author Diane Ackerman, who has spent much of her career exploring humans’ relationship with nature, says that much of what we create – and then toss in landfills – will indeed change Earth’s geology….” At the link you can listen, but not download the file; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Anxiety in America 48 mins – “Modern anxiety cuts across national borders and social classes, but in America right now its artisanal flavor is a blend of soaring, media-driven dreams and dwindling probabilities of making a living while pursuing them. And nobody’s more eloquent or wickedly funny about this reality than Ruth Whippman, the author of AMERICA THE ANXIOUS. I’m genuinely, sustainably happy that she’s here with me today.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asian Americans 56 mins – “…My guest today doesn’t suffer fools gladly. His pen is sharp and uncompromising, even when he turns it on himself. Wesley Yang writes essays mostly about outsiders and outliers. Some try to fit in. Some try not to. Some succeed. Some fail by succeeding. His new book of essays, which contains some of the best writing I’ve ever read, is called THE SOULS OF YELLOW FOLK. It was just justly named one of NY Times 100 notable books of the year. And I’m so glad it’s brought him to Think Again.” At the link you can listen, but can’t download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Autonomous Vehicles 29 mins – “Earlier this summer, I went to Mountain View, California, to visit the headquarters of Waymo, the autonomous vehicle company that spun off from Google, and get driven around in one of its cutting-edge cars. The model waiting for me in the parking lot was deceptively fuddy-duddy: a white Chrysler Pacifica, outwardly distinguished from the typical minivan by a small black dome on the roof, which houses a family of cameras, sensors, radars, and lasers. Rarely is an experience made more boring by the presence of lasers, but this is that rare experience: The ride itself was astonishingly tranquil. Making use of technology that’s a bit like a multi-sensory echolocation, the car turned smoothly out of the parking lot. It navigated through several wide intersections. It decelerated calmly. It stopped politely for pedestrians. When I got out of the car, it seemed almost tedious to point out that a minivan drove itself pretty much perfectly. It was only later, upon reflection, that the sentence returned to me with proper emphasis: The minivan … drove itself … pretty much perfectly. And that means it’s time to start thinking about what happens when cars just like it can drive millions of other people perfectly, too.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bisbee Mine Strike 52 mins – “In July 1917, striking miners in Bisbee, Arizona, were rounded up, loaded into cattle cars, and left in the desert to die. Known as the Bisbee Deportation, it split the community along political, class, and racial lines. It’s a traumatic story that rattled filmmaker Robert Greene, who created a unique documentary called Bisbee 17 that explores the town and its ghosts. Tuesday, we’re rebroadcasting our conversation with Greene about Bisbee’s past and what it can teach us today.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black School Girl Activisim 13 mins – “Around the world, black girls are being pushed out of schools because of policies that target them for punishment, says author and social justice scholar Monique W. Morris. The result: countless girls are forced into unsafe futures with restricted opportunities. How can we put an end to this crisis? In an impassioned talk, Morris uncovers the causes of “pushout” and shows how we can work to turn all schools into spaces where black girls can heal and thrive.” At the link left-click “Share,” left-click the down-pointing arrow, right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Border Wall Solution 52 mins – “…we’re talking about the central sticking point in the ongoing federal shutdown: The wall. Hundreds of miles of physical barriers already separate the United States and Mexico, and former Border Patrol Chief Mark Morgan says they are so effective it’d be irresponsible not to build more of them. But do walls actually work to keep people and drugs from entering America? Or would the country be better served if Washington addressed other problems with our immigration policy? GUESTS Mark Morgan is the former chief of the US Border Patrol. He’s a former US Marine and spent 20 years at the FBI before joining Customs and Border Protection.

Cartoonist 63 mins – “…My guest today is Jessica Abel. She’s an accomplished artist herself—a graphic novelist who did a kind of graphic docu-novel called OUT ON THE WIRE about how some of the greatest radio shows and podcasts are made, including Snap Judgment, Radiolab, and This American Life. In the course of figuring out how to steer her own creative ship she’s learned invaluable lessons about how to help others do the same. Her most recent book GROWING GILLS and her Creative Focus Workshops offer creatives a personalized process for figuring out what they want to make and how to balance those goals with the rest of their busy lives.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cellphone Privacy Discussion 26 mins – “In the wake of the terrorist attacks in Paris, the battle between privacy versus public safety has become ever more relevant. Law enforcement agencies maintain that the same encryption you use on your cell phone to keep your private information safe has become a tool for criminals and terrorists. Scripps News and the Toronto Star teamed up over the past several months, investigating how law enforcement are losing the war over access to information they need to solve crimes. (Read their full investigation here.) On the latest DecodeDC podcast, we go inside the battle between those who say law enforcement needs access to private information and those who argue encryption is essential for privacy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change and Gender Equality 14 mins – “If we really want to address climate change, we need to make gender equity a reality, says writer and environmentalist Katharine Wilkinson. As part of Project Drawdown, Wilkinson has helped scour humanity’s wisdom for solutions to draw down heat-trapping, climate-changing emissions: obvious things like renewable energy and sustainable diets and not so obvious ones, like the education and empowerment of women. In this informative, bold talk, she shares three key ways that equity for women and girls can help stop global warming. “Drawing down emissions depends on rising up,” Wilkinson says.” At the link left-click “Share,” click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Audio” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File” and “OK” from the next pop-up menu to get the podcast. David Bier is an immigration policy analyst at the Cato Institute‘s Center for Global Liberty and Prosperity.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cold War Science 60 mins – “This week we’re looking back at where some of our modern ideas about science being objective, independent, and apolitical come from. We journey back to the Cold War with historian and writer Audra Wolfe, talking about her newest book ‘Freedom’s Laboratory: The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science’.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar, then select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Congressional Violence 58 mins – “If you think our country is fractured now, Yale historian Joanne Freeman’s latest book will shock you. She’s chronicled the pandemonium that was Congress in the decades before the Civil War. And it wasn’t just rhetoric flying. There was bullying, fist fights and canings. In 1838, a Kentucky representative actually killed a Maine congressman in a duel. Freeman joins us to talk about Congressional violence and the public’s demand for politicians who would literally fight for their rights.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conversion Therapy 51 mins – “A study shows that after certain conversion therapy efforts, LGBTQ kids are nearly three times more likely to attempt suicide. Monday, we’re talking about it and about efforts to ban conversion therapy for youth in Utah.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep Networks 26 mins – “Even as machines known as “deep neural networks” have learned to converse, drive cars, beat video games and Go champions, dream, paint pictures and help make scientific discoveries, they have also confounded their human creators, who never expected so-called “deep-learning” algorithms to work so well. No underlying principle has guided the design of these learning systems, other than vague inspiration drawn from the architecture of the brain (and no one really understands how that operates either)….”At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Print Disruption 12 mins – “Holiday book sales for 2018 helped the publishing industry to enjoy a small sales bump over 2017, according to numbers reported this week by NPD BookScan. And while bestsellers enjoyed the lion’s share of notoriety in the media as well as in bookstores, the reign of individual titles lasted only briefly. “If there is one takeaway, writes PW contributor Liz Hartman, it is what she calls, ‘an electoral college vs. the popular vote discrepancy,’ when it comes to the noise surrounding certain books and the actual sales numbers. Many of the books that one would expect to command top-of-the-list status, or to last longest, did not,” reports Andrew AlbanesePW senior writer. For example, “the political Trump-inspired books that grabbed the lion’s share of media attention—and sold very well—had plenty of time to stick to the lists, but didn’t,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. Fire and Fury by Michael Wolff, Fear by Bob Woodward, and James Comey’s A Higher Loyalty, were all on the hardcover bestseller list for less than 15 weeks. Fire and Fury performed the best—it lasted 14 weeks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As”’ from the pop-up menu.

Edward Burtynsky 55 mins – “World-famous environmental photographer Edward Burtynsky and IDEAS host Paul Kennedy both grew up in St. Catharines, Ontario. In fact, their childhood homes were less than 300 metres apart, and paper-boy Paul delivered a daily dose of newspaper comic strips to eventual visual artist Ed. They return to their old home town and revisit their roots, including the site of the now-dismantled GM Plant # 1, where both of their fathers worked; and the new subdivision that’s recently replaced Meadowvale School, where they both started kindergarten, so many decades ago “ At the link find the title, “Paul and Ed’s Excellent Adventure,” right-click “Download Paul and Ed’s Excellent Adventure” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emoluments 41 mins – “This week Attorneys General from DC and Maryland alleged in a lawsuit that payments by foreign governments to President Trump’s businesses violate anti-corruption clauses in the Constitution. With a president who is also a real estate tycoon, reality TV star, and personal brand — and who actively receives revenue via each of these personae — the possibilities seem endless for political corruption, particularly in light of the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution, which forbids the receiving of gifts, titles, and emoluments from foreign countries without Congress’s consent. The problem, according to law professor Jed Shugerman, is that without access to Donald Trump’s tax documents, it’s impossible to know the full extent of his financial dealings — and thus difficult to move forward on any potential corruption charges. Bob talks with Shugerman about a legal strategy that could bring Trump’s entanglements into the light. But Trump’s taxes are only necessary if we define “corruption” as the explicit exchange of payments for favor, or “quid pro quo.” This definition, which the Supreme Court used in the controversial Citizens United ruling and which countless politicians have leaned on ever since, argues that unless you can demonstrate explicit exchange, you can’t prove, or prosecute, corruption. But according to Zephyr Teachout, author of Corruption in America, this was never what America’s founders envisioned when they set out to fight corruption. Brooke talks with Teachout about the overwhelming passion for anti-corruption present at the founding of the nation, the “bright line” rules it inspired, and how we have drifted so far from our original understanding of the concept.” At the link find the title, “No One Is Above the Law, Jun 2017,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Glaciers 29 mins – “Have you ever noticed that scientists historically are mostly white men? Do you think that this fact has skewed some scientific findings? Well, our guest today on Sea Change Radio has certainly noticed. This week, we speak to glaciologist M Jackson, who’s drawn attention from the right wing for the feminist perspective she applies to her research. We discuss her new book, The Secret Lives of Glaciers, dive into her research, and examine how and why science has been influenced by centuries of white male dominance.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Warming 27 mins – “Is 2018 the warmest year on record? We look at the evidence behind that claim. What part do the global oceans play in regulating the planets temperatures and what are the prospects for future extreme weather. We look at how climate change is ocean systems affecting storms and ocean waves, and the implications this could have for those of us living in coastal regions. And wild coffee species are facing extinction. This could affect commercial production of the coffee we drink. However rediscovering the coffee of the past might offer a solution.” At the link left-click “Download” and select the audio quality by right-clicking and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Finances 59 mins – “Author and columnist James Grant talks about the state of the U.S. economy and the threat posed by our ever-expanding national debt.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with James Grant,” right-click that title, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Shutdown and Walls 34 mins – “The partial shutdown of the federal government has hit day 21, equaling the longest in U.S. history. This third week of the stalemate between congressional Democrats and President Trump brought an address from the oval office, talk of declaring a state of emergency at the border and the first missed payday for federal workers. Jonah Goldberg of National Review joined Diane on the podcast to discuss how we got here and why it is so hard to move on.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Government Staff Operations 27 mins – “Dana Stroul, The Washington Institute’s newest research fellow, is a veteran Pentagon and U.S. Senate foreign policy staffer. In this podcast, Dana shares her insights about Capitol Hill’s role in making foreign policy, from the fraying bipartisan consensus on vital Middle East issues to the conflicts between the legislative and executive branches that transcend administrations. Near East PolicyCast: Conversations on Middle East issues from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.At the link right-click the square with three dots, then click “Download file,” select “Save File,” and ”OK” to get the podcast.

Hasidic Jews Documentary 56 mins – “When you’re a Hasidic woman in Borough Park, Brooklyn, starting an ambulance corps is a radical act. Documentary filmmaker Paula Eiselt on the push-pull of identity and cultural change in her film 93Queen.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Speech 52 mins – “Nadine Strossen says we should protect hate speech. Strossen is a constitutional law professor and the former president of the ACLU, and she gets why people react so viscerally to racist, sexist, and other hateful language. She says she’s been a target of anti-Semitic and misogynist speech herself. The problem though, she argues in her latest book, is that censorship simply doesn’t work. Strossen joins us Wednesday to explain why the best way to resist hate speech is with more free speech.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hong Kong 74 mins – “Neil Monnery, author of Architect of Prosperity, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book–a biography of John Cowperthwaite, the man often credited with the economic success of Hong Kong. Monnery describes the policies that Cowperthwaite championed and the role they played in the evolution of Hong Kong’s economy. How much those policies mattered is the focus of the conversation. Other topics include the relationship between Hong Kong and China and the irony of the challenges Hong Kong faced from U.S. and British protectionism.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Horseshoe Crab Blood 62 mins – “Horseshoe crabs are not much to look at.  But beneath their unassuming catcher’s-mitt shell, they harbor a half-billion-year-old secret: a superpower that helped them outlive the dinosaurs and survive all the Earth’s mass extinctions.  And what is that secret superpower? Their blood. Their baby blue blood.  And it’s so miraculous that for decades, it hasn’t just been saving their butts, it’s been saving ours too. But that all might be about to change.  Follow us as we follow these ancient critters – from a raunchy beach orgy to a marine blood drive to the most secluded waterslide – and learn a thing or two from them about how much we depend on nature and how much it depends on us.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infectious Disease Insights 29 mins – “January 1 to 15, 2019. The 4 moments of antibiotics. ID Consults save lifes/money. Pneumococcus deaths stable over time. Salmonella from backyard And more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Jellyfish Book 50 mins – “Chances are you’ve never given jellyfish a second thought. The science writer Juli Berwald gets it. They’re not cuddly, they just bob along in the ocean, and they sting. Nevertheless, she loves them. In fact, she’s so fascinated, she’s written a book about how complicated they are, how beautiful. To her, they’re like aquatic angels, with a  demonic side: that sting. Studying jellyfish and writing about them even helped Berwald grow a spine of her own. She joins us to talk about it.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

John Lewis Reflects 33 mins – “Before he became a U.S. congressman, John Lewis was one of the pioneers of the civil rights movement. John reflects on his life of activism, his friendship with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and offers wisdom for the ongoing fight for justice and equality. By the time he was 18, John was participating in lunch-counter sit-ins to protest segregation. Eventually, John rode with the brave Freedom Riders on buses through the deep South, spoke at the famous March on Washington, led the historic Selma to Montgomery march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge and was in the room when President Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Today, John is a congressman from Georgia who continues his fight for civil rights, most recently leading sit-ins on the House of Representatives floor in favor of immigration reform and gun control. John says he still believes in non-violence, and says it is his obligation to pass on this tradition to a new generation of young activists, so that we may never go backward and repeat the mistakes of the past.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link Asfrom the pop-up menu.

John Wayne Movies 49 mins – “An American Icons segment about “The Searchers,” John Ford’s problematic masterpiece featuring John Wayne. Kurt Andersen talks with Carol Stabile about an aspect of the Red Scare that’s received scant attention: the 41 women who were blacklisted from radio and television. And how Mariame Kaba, a prison activist who’s black and Muslim, falls hard for something very white and very Christian: Hallmark Christmas movies.” At the link find the title, “A movie hallmark, and Hallmark movies, 20 Dec 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select ”Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism Changes 14 mins – “For the last decade, newspaper circulation has seen a staggering drop. Meanwhile, more than 90 percent of today’s adults get their news online.  So how are journalism outlets adjusting to a digital world? We talk with Franklin Foer, author of the book, “World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech,” about how social media and CEOs like Jeff Bezos have changed the journalism game.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism Experiment 50 mins – “Why would two intelligent women running a hugely successful podcast at one of the most respected studios in the audio world, quit to start a small journalism company built on blockchain, a technology very few people have ever heard of? To quote someone on Twitter yesterday paraphrasing Bill Clinton sounding pretty harsh, actually: “It’s the business model, stupid.” As we keep learning the hard way, as long as we get our journalism from Facebook and 24 hour cable news, we’re suckers for infotainment, propaganda, and actual fake news—not the real news Trump is always calling fake, but the real fake news trolls cook up to polarize American culture. And in these raging digital waters, non-profits and public media struggle just to stay afloat. There’s got to be a better way, right? Manoush Zomorodi and Jen Poyant thought so. Partners on the podcast Note to Self, they left to start Stable Genius Productions. It’s part of Civil, a new blockchain journalism platform. For reasons we’ll try to explain, blockchain has the potential to bring us better, more independent media. Better, more independent everything, maybe. That’s what Jen and Manoush were betting on, anyway. They document the twists and turns since that fateful decision with refreshing vulnerability on their podcast ZigZag. Its second season started on October 11th.” At the link you can listen, but can’t download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Labor Market in U.S. 71 mins – “Erik Hurst of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the state of the labor market in the United States. Hurst notes dramatic changes in employment rates for men and speculates about the causes. Two factors discussed in detail are declines in the manufacturing sector and the rise of high-end video games as a form of leisure.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lake Success 46 mins – “Gary Shteyngart‘s new novel Lake Success is the evil doppelgänger of the Simon and Garfunkel song ‘America‘. In what is surely destined to become one of those legendary novel openings, right up there with “it was the best of times, it was the worst of times,” we meet Barry Cohen, “a man with 2.4 billion dollars of assets under management . . .” in a Greyhound Bus Terminal at 3:20 am, bleeding from his face and drunk on $20,000 of Japanese whiskey.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Life Value 75 mins – “This episode, we make three earnest, possibly foolhardy, attempts to put a price on the priceless. We figure out the dollar value for an accidental death, another day of life, and the work of bats and bees as we try to keep our careful calculations from falling apart in the face of the realities of life, and love, and loss.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Local News Death 22 mins – “Since the Internet exploded journalism’s business revenue, local newsrooms around the country have been in free fall. We speak to The Denver Post’s former managing editor and other experts to debate how to save the news—and, just possibly, democracy itself.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lolita Book Background 51 mins – “Behind Vladimir Nabokov’s brilliant and disturbing novel Lolita is a true story of a girl who was kidnapped and abused by a middle-aged man. Journalist Sarah Weinman’s book is about The Real Lolita.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Magnitsky Act 45 mins – “Jacob Weisberg talks to Bill Browder, head of the global Magnitsky Justice campaign (including the campaign that led to the Magnitsky Act), about the moment his name came up during the Trump–Putin summit in Helsinki and why Vladimir Putin wants him more than just about anybody else in the world.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mark Pincus 12 mins – “Before Mark Pincus made it big with Zynga, he made it even bigger by investing in a couple of little companies called Napster and Facebook. He talks about those early days, and what Mark Zuckerberg was really like back then.” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Methylene Blue 47 mins – “When you think of cognitive enhancers, what comes to mind?  Caffeine, herbs like Bacopa Monnieri, maybe Modafinil…  but probably not a substance that has been used as a textile dye or a parasite treatment for fish, right? Meet Methylene Blue, a memory enhancer, antioxidant, and neuroprotectant. Jesse talks to Dr. Francisco Gonzalez-Lima of the University of Texas at Austin about his work studying the benefits of methylene blue and why this impressive smart drug isn’t more widely known.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Nobel Prize 60 mins – “The Nobel prizes are, well, the Nobel prize of prizes! One of the most elite prizes in the world. But where did they come from, why do they matter, and how do they influence the practice of science? This week we speak with medical historian Nils Hansson and sociologist of science Harriet Zuckerman about the origin and legacy of the Nobel Prizes, and what might help them be more representative of science in the future. And then we talk with Marc Abrahams about another prize, the Ig Nobel prizes, which are supposed to make us laugh, and then think.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar, then select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Partisan Dysfunction 31 mins – “As the federal government limped along this week, the Trump administration forced thousands of furloughed workers to return to their jobs – without pay. Tensions between the president and House Leader Nancy Pelosi escalated as she urged the cancellation of the State of the Union address and the president retaliated by canceling her planned trip overseas. And a White House economic adviser said the shutdown’s impact on the economy will be worse than predicted. On today’s podcast, Diane talks to longtime political analyst Norm Ornstein, one of the most prolific chroniclers of Washington’s descent into partisan dysfunction.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in this blog archive.

Patient Spotlight 77 mins– “Participants in our discussion on person centred care in January agreed that a change in culture and better use of technology could benefit both patients and doctors.” At the link right-click the square with three dots, then click “Download file,” select “Save File,” and ”OK” to get the podcast.

Perverse Laws 75 mins – “Leo Katz, professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book, Why the Law Is So Perverse. Katz argues that certain seemingly inexplicable features of the law are the result of conflicts between multiple objectives that the law or the courts must trade off against each other. Katz also argues that structure of the law and how it is enforced are analogous to certain inevitable ambiguities of collective choice and voting theory.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phage Therapy  46 mins – “Can we fight superbugs with viruses?” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive and can be downloaded.

Photographer Lynsey Addario 58 mins – “My guest today, photographer Lynsey Addario, has spent over two decades traveling the world taking intimate and dramatic portraits, often of lives in crisis—the perpetrators and victims of tyranny, revolution, famine, and rape. Her work spans over 70 countries and has won her a MacArthur Fellowship and a Pulitzer Prize, but has never been gathered into a book until now. Of Love and War gives her most compelling photos the space they deserve, along with essays, interview excerpts, and letters she wrote home to process the things she was witnessing. Lynsey’s pictures offer people like myself, living out our lives in privileged circumstances, a window into the beauty, suffering, and everyday humanity of our contemporaries across the world. And like it or not, ready or not, when you stop scrolling long enough look into one of these images, it looks back into you” At the link left-click the “Square,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prejudice Patterns 41 mins – “We talk to David Amodia, a social neuroscientist and psychology professor at NYU and the University of Amsterdam, about the science of prejudice.” At the link find the title, “The Neuroscience of Prejudice, Jan 2019,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Price of a Life 75 mins – “This episode, we make three earnest, possibly foolhardy, attempts to put a price on the priceless. We figure out the dollar value for an accidental death, another day of life, and the work of bats and bees as we try to keep our careful calculations from falling apart in the face of the realities of life, and love, and loss.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reproductive Rights 16 mins – “Groups who oppose abortion have used fetal personhood laws to chip away at Roe v. Wade. But these laws affect women with wanted pregnancies, as well.” At the link find the title, “January 15, 2019, What Fetal Personhood Laws Mean For Abortion Rights And Beyond,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rosanne Cash 40 mins – “Rosanne’s Cash’s new album features 10 new songs, all written and co-written by Cash, that find her “speaking out and looking inward” (The Boston Globe) from a uniquely female perspective. It features contributions from Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Colin Meloy and Sam Phillips, plus three extra tracks that appear on the deluxe edition of the record. The album’s title track was just named one of the Top 5 songs of 2018 by The New York Times.  She sat down with Brooke for an evening of talk and music at WNYC’s very own theater, The Greene Space.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rules for a Flat World 67 mins – “Law professor Gillian Hadfield of the University of Southern California and author of Rules for a Flat World talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in her book for regulating the digital future. Hadfield suggests the competitive provision of regulation with government oversight as a way to improve the flexibility and effectiveness of regulation in the dynamic digital world we are living in.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

S&P 500 Index Underperforms 44 mins – “Paul analyzes the 20-year returns of 10 major equity- and fixed-income asset classes. What do we have to learn?  Returns can be totally unexpected but the relationship between asset classes remain the same as they have for almost 90 years. The table below allows investors to examine the year-by-year returns of large and small U.S. equity asset classes, REITS, international large-cap blend and U.S. and international bond asset classes. This podcast examines past results as well as predictions for the next decade from both the largest investment management companies and major financial institutions (Vanguard, J. P. Morgan , GMO, Blackrock, and John Bogle). I think it’s fair to say the Callan Periodic Table is one of the best teaching tools for investors trying to come to the realization that 1. Investing includes a lot of short-term risk 2. Last year’s winner is not likely to become next year’s big winner  3. Owning many asset classes may not make you more money in the long run but it protects you from making big mistakes. 4.  You may not make the kind of returns you expect. Paul also references an article by Christine Benz, Morningstar’s Director of Personal Finance, “Experts Forecast Long-term Stock and Bond ReturnsAt the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Samuel Beckett 49 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Samuel Beckett (1906 – 1989), who lived in Paris and wrote his plays and novels in French, not because his French was better than his English, but because it was worse. In works such as Waiting for Godot, Endgame, Molloy and Malone Dies, he wanted to show the limitations of language, what words could not do, together with the absurdity and humour of the human condition. In part he was reacting to the verbal omnipotence of James Joyce, with whom he’d worked in Paris, and in part to his experience in the French Resistance during World War 2, when he used code, writing not to reveal meaning but to conceal it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Reproduction 60 mins – “This week we discuss how the sperm and egg came to be, and how a difference of reproductive interest has led to sexual conflict in bed bugs. We’ll be speaking with Dr. Geoff Parker, an evolutionary biologist credited with developing a theory to explain the evolution of two sexes, about anisogamy, sexual reproduction through the fusion of two different gametes: the egg and the sperm. Then we’ll speak with Dr. Roberto Pereira, research scientist in urban entomology at the University of Florida, about traumatic insemination in bed bugs. At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar, then select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Sit-ins and Civil Rights 72 mins – “University of Massachusetts Amherst professor Traci Parker talks about the lunch counter sit-ins that took place in the early 1960s as part of the civil rights movement.” At the link find the title, “Sit-ins and the Civil Rights Movement,” right-click that title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slants Issue 9 mins -”On Monday, the Supreme Court ruled that a law denying federal trademark protection to names deemed disparaging is unconstitutional. Justice Samuel Alito wrote in the unanimous decision that “it offends a bedrock First Amendment principle: speech may not be banned on the ground that it expresses ideas that offend.” The suit was brought by the Portland dance-rock band The Slants, a group of Asian-American musicians who have taken their name from an ethnic slur and worn it with pride. The musicians sued because when they tried to register trademark for their name, the US Patent and Trademark Office said, “The Slants? No no no no no no.” Bob spoke to the founder of The Slants, Simon Tam, exactly 2 years ago, when the band had just lost its appeal at the Federal Circuit Court.” At the link find the title,”The Slants Win the Day! Jun 2017,” right-click “Play Now”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solitude 56 mins– “We all have times when we want to be alone, but what is the history of solitude in America? How are experiments on dolphins connected with consciousness raising and isolation tanks? And what does Thoreau’s solitary experiment at Walden Pond have to teach us all in the digital age?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sports Contributions 57 mins – “Great athletes aren’t just great at the physical stuff. They’ve also learned how to handle pressure, overcome fear, and stay focused. Here’s the good news: you don’t have to be an athlete to use what they know. (Ep. 4 of “The Hidden Side of Sports” series.)” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Stories Value 57 mins – “A listener commented the other day on Twitter that on two completely different recent episodes of this show – one about technology and the other one about jellyfish, the same idea came up. That stories play a powerful role in shaping our real lives. This idea comes up so often, in so many different forms and contexts, that I’ve begun to think of it as maybe the crucial truth for understanding why people do the things we do. The stories we wrap around ourselves, our neighbors. our children. The invisible stories we struggle against. Nobody I know of understands this better, nor writes more cleanly and poetically about these struggles than my guest today Daniel Alarcón. He’s the co-founder of Radio Ambulante, a Spanish-language podcast now on NPR, and he’s the celebrated author of novels and short stories including his newly published collection The King is Always Above the People.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Surveillance Capitalism 47 mins – “There are new calls for tech companies to stop selling your location to third parties. We’ll look at the economics and perils of “surveillance capitalism.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Economy 28 mins – “In her new book, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, Harvard Business School’s Shoshana Zuboff argues that tech companies — like Google and Facebook — collect so much personal data for profit, that they’re changing the fundamentals of our economy and way of life. And now these companies are learning to shape our behavior to better serve their business goals. Shoshana joins Manoush Zomorodi to explain what this all means for us. We then explore whether or not it’s time to end our relationship with corporate spies. OG advice columnist Dear Abby gives us some tips to start with. We chat with philosopher S. Matthew Liao. He asks if we have a moral duty to quit Facebook. Alice Marwick explains why most people won’t leave the social network. And journalist Nithin Coca tells us what it was like for him to quit both Facebook and Google. Spoiler alert: it wasn’t easy, but he has no regrets.”” At the ink right-click “MP3” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tariffs and Trade 48 mins – “Over the past few months, President Trump has announced new tariffs on imported goods from solar panels and washing machines to steel and aluminum. He has also taken swift executive action to block international mergers that he has deemed harmful to U.S. interests from occurring, and has even said he would consider withdrawing from NAFTA and related trade agreements. President Trump’s protectionist policies are a reversal of mostly free-trade orientated policies of past administrations, and his actions raise important constitutional questions about the extent of executive power over trade policy, separation of powers and the non-delegation doctrine, as well as the future of U.S. and global trade.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Acceleration 15 mins – “3-D printed food, self-driving cars, and robots everywhere. Technology is g3-D printed food, self-driving cars, and robots everywhere. Technology is going to radically alter our lives in the next fifteen years, at least according to entrepreneur Vivek Wadhwa. And immigration might be the key to that change. oing to radically alter our lives in the next fifteen years, at least according to entrepreneur Vivek Wadhwa. And immigration might be the key to that change.” At the link left-click the square with three dots, left-click “Download file,” select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Terrorism in Moscow Theater 26 mins – “For the month of August we’ll be running a series of interviews Bob has done over the years with documentary filmmakers. In the OTM office, the producers have been referring to the collection as “Bob’s docs.” Over the next few weeks we’ll go through some themes of documentary film-making, from prurience to access to the personal journey. This episode is about the gift of access. This episode features Bob’s interview with the filmmaker Dan Reed about his 2003 documentary “Terror in Moscow”, about the 2002 attack by Chechen terrorists on a Moscow Theater. Reed had access to remarkable footage filmed by the terrorists themselves and used it to present an extraordinary view of the crisis. Then, Bob revisits his interview with Matthew Heineman about his documentary “Cartel Land” in 2015. Heineman’s relationship with his subjects allowed him to capture moments of violence, corruption, and even adultery — all recorded with the subjects’ full participation.” At the link find the title, “Bob’s Docs Episode Two: Access , Aug 2017” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Timing Selection 41 mins – “We talk to bestselling author Daniel Pink about his latest book When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing.” At the link find the title, “The Science of Perfect Timing, Jan 2019,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As the pop-up menu.

Tracking Concepts 29 mins – “Our lives are being tracked and sold to companies. It has become second nature to share this info with the app, but did you ever stop to think: Where does all this data go? In this podcast, you will learn who is tracking you, how they can get to your personal information and, most importantly, where your data is being sent.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Trade and Treaty Law 48 mins – “Over the past few months, President Trump has announced new tariffs on imported goods from solar panels and washing machines to steel and aluminum. He has also taken swift executive action to block international mergers that he has deemed harmful to U.S. interests from occurring, and has even said he would consider withdrawing from NAFTA and related trade agreements. President Trump’s protectionist policies are a reversal of mostly free-trade orientated policies of past administrations, and his actions raise important constitutional questions about the extent of executive power over trade policy, separation of powers and the non-delegation doctrine, as well as the future of U.S. and global trade.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Virtual Reality Treatment 31 mins – ““If you think about this kind of treatment, there’s one important component you have to consider: there’s a difference between wanting and liking” says Dr. Robert Reiner. The topic under discussion is Virtual Reality Therapy, a method for treating phobias and anxiety that Reiner has been on the forefront of for nearly three decades.  He and Jesse discuss the evolution of the treatment modality and its use in modern psychology. Also in this episode, Jesse reveals his own personal phobia — something that’s been haunting him since he was a barefoot four-year-old in a soggy Oregonian garden patch…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

War Reporting 55 mins – “War reporter Janine di Giovanni approaches her work like an anthropologist by embedding herself in conflict zones. Her goal is to understand how war, disease, and poverty have impacted human lives in war torn communities. In the 2018 Peter Stursberg Foreign Correspondents lecture, she details her experiences covering disease outbreaks, genocides and sieges in the Balkans, Africa and the Middle East.” At the link find the title, “Reporting from War: Janine di Giovanni,” right-click “Download Reporting from War: Janine di Giovanni” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wittiness 55 mins – “…a conversation about wit and wittiness. Our guest is the author James Geary, who says that wit is more than just a knack for snappy comebacks. He calls it a “fundamental operating system of human creativity.” It helps reshape the world as we know it, often with an implied punch line. Wit is wise and frisky and honest, and without it, life would be pretty boring. Geary joins us to explore the various forms of wit, how it works, and why we need it.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Bank President 37 mins – “Jim Yong Kim has an unorthodox background for a World Bank president — and his reign has been just as unorthodox. He has just announced he’s stepping down, well before his term is over; we recorded this interview with him in 2015.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 376 – Feb 1, 2019: Acid Rain, Ambulance Strike Teams, Border Wall Discussion, Brexit Discussion, Broadband Networking Concepts, Burkina Faso Murder, Cancer Bone Pain, Coal Company Compensation, Communicating on the Internet, Controversial Western Monuments, Crimes Against Humanity, Democracy Subversion, Digital Journalism History, Drinking Water in Canada, Ebola Research, Falling Man Photo, Government Shutdown Impact, Guantanamo Bay Operations, Gun Violence in Canada, Hate Speech Control, Keto Diet Discussion, Mao’s Great Famine, MDMA Discussion, Millennial Burnout, Money Issues, Opioid Experience, Polygamy in Canada, Presidential Criticism by Intelligence Community, Preventive Medicine, Taser Death Case, Tax Rate Discussion, Technological Trends, Toxic Politics, Trans Mountain Pipeline, Vaccine Safety, Work Improvement, Zero Energy Homes, Zip Building System

Exercise your ears: the 62 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 504 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,135 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 157GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 496 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Acid Rain 33 mins – “Remember acid rain? If you were a kid in the 1980s like our hosts were, the threat of poison falling from the sky probably made some kind of impression on your consciousness. But thanks to the work of scientists, government, the media, and the pope—that’s right, the pope—the problem was fixed! Well, mostly fixed is probably more accurate. This complicated story spans 27 years, six U.S. presidents, and ecologist Gene Likens’s entire career. Discover the insidious details in the second chapter of our three-part series on environmental success stories.At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Ambulance Strike Teams 39 mins – “In 2018, Paramedics Plus, the 911 ambulance provider for Alameda County, sent resources to Paradise to assist with emergency medical services and the search and rescue task force. The strike team provided mutual aid and helped with evacuations, including hospitals and nursing facilities during the most devastating fire in loss of life and property in California wildfire history. On the show with co-hosts Sam Bradley and Jamie Davis are Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group and paramedic Mike Marsh, director of operations for Paramedics Plus, Alameda County, California. Mike comes on the show to discuss the use of ambulance strike teams in mutual aid response to the Camp forest fires in northern California late last year.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Americans and Bolshevik Revolution 44 mins – “One hundred years ago, Vladimir Lenin and his Bolshevik Party seized power in a revolution that would change the world. They would establish the world’s first Marxist state, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, a few years later. As the 20th century wore on, the USSR became the United States’s chief military and ideological foe. On this episode of BackStory, Brian, Joanne, and Nathan explore how that distant revolution had an immediate impact in the United States.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Border Wall Discussion 47 mins – “There is growing chaos at the southern border, as some officials say the Trump administration’s focus on deterrence at the border has left them unable to handle and properly house thousands of families. We’ll get a reality check on the ground.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Discussion 11 minsIn Britain this week, a divided House of Commons will vote on Theresa May’s Brexit deal. We take a look at what’s at stake.” At the link find the title, “‘Moment of truth’ nears for Brexit, but not everyone is worried, says academic,” right-click “Download ‘Moment of truth’ nears for Brexit, but not everyone is worried, says academic” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Networking Concepts 38 mins – “Many of us are accustomed to Internet access from companies that own the infrastructure, offer only a few options, and are one of a small number of providers. For the most part, we’ve learned to accept that model, but will it ever change? This week’s guest, President of EntryPoint Networks Jeff Christensen, explains why that model is broken and how we can fix it through software defined networks (SDNs). We can turn that model around to put control in the hands of users. EntryPoint works primarily with municipalities to develop open access networks that separate infrastructure from services. As you’ll hear from Jeff, this approach takes the open nature of the Internet even further to encourage innovation, competition, access to goods, services, information, and ideas. EntryPoint’s approach turns the traditional closed system most American’s are used to on its head….” [“Ammon, Idaho, is treating fiber network infrastructure as a utility – to the benefit of residents, providers and the municipality itself. Is this small town demonstrating the future of broadband…..Using standard utility financing mechanisms results in annual payments of less than $200 (less than $17 per month) for properties receiving fiber….”] At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Planning Tool 30 mins – “In September 2018, we announced that we would begin working with NEO Partners LLC to bring the Community Networks Quickstart Program to local communities interested in exploring the possibilities of publicly owned broadband networks. For this week’s podcast, Christopher talks with the people behind the program, Glenn Fishbine and Nancy DeGidio. Glenn and Nancy have combined their talents to create the CN Quickstart Program as a way for local communities to focus on realistic possibilities early in the long process toward better connectivity through public investment. Christopher, Glenn, and Nancy discuss some of the insights communities gain with the program. In addition to discovering which incumbents already operate in the region and where, Glenn and Nancy have the data to provide information about what fiber resources are already in place. Both elements help communities considering networks look at the possibilities of competition. With data from each unique community, the CN Quickstart Program can provide information about potential fiber, wireless, and hybrid community networks and where those routes could travel. The program can provide cost estimates to help local leaders determine which options would be affordable for their community. Not than a replacement for a feasibility study, but a complement, a community that begins their feasibility study with results from the program will be able to direct a consultant toward the vision that they’ve been able to more accurately fine tune. Glenn and Nancy also talk about why they decided to develop this tool and what they hope to accomplish, along with hopes for communities that use the CN Quickstart Program.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burkina Faso Murder 20 mins – “Canadian citizen Kirk Woodman was abducted and killed in Burkina Faso this week, while Quebec woman Edith Blais went missing in the country weeks ago. We speak to two experts about who is behind the violence, and why.” At the link find the title, “Fear a ‘prominent feature’ in Burkina Faso, as armed presence grows, says expert,” right-click “Download Fear a ‘prominent feature’ in Burkina Faso, as armed presence grows, says expert” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Bone Pain 19 mins – “Bone pain is the most common type of pain from cancer and is present in around one third of patients with bone metastases, currently, improvements in cancer treatments mean that many patients are living with metastatic cancer for several years. Christopher Kane, NIHR academic clinical fellow in palliative medicine at Leeds University School of Medicine, and Michael Bennett, St Gemma’s professor of palliative medicine at University College London join us to discuss the management of cancer induced bone pain.” At the link find the title, “Management of cancer induced bone pain, 30 Jan 2015,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Story 33 mins – “New York Times best-selling author and co-founder of the Omega Institute Elizabeth Lesser returns to “SuperSoul Conversations” to further discuss her sister’s battle with cancer and their two-year spiritual quest to reconnect. Elizabeth talks about the spiritual journey she and her sister, Maggie, shared as they built an eternal sacred bond during Maggie’s final days. In her book “Marrow: A Love Story,” Elizabeth writes about the importance of knowing ourselves down to the “marrow” of who we are in order to love with greater depth and courage. Elizabeth also shares how observing Maggie, as she prepared for death, made her believe more strongly in an afterlife.” At the link find the title, “Elizabeth Lesser: The Marrow of Who We Are 2019-01-16,” left-click the down-pointing arrow, then click “Download” to get the podcast.

Coal Company Compensation 20 mins – “Canadian plans to stop using coal have left one U.S. company crying foul. Westmoreland Coal owns seven Canadian coal mines, and claims that it should be receiving part of the $2 billion in government compensation being offered to the Canadian companies being told to phase out operations.” At the link find the title, “U.S. company trying to sue Canada over coal phase-out made a bad bet, says academic,” right-click Download U.S. company trying to sue Canada over coal phase-out made a bad bet, says academic” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communicating on the Internet 27 mins – “Tarleton Gillespie, author of [Custodians of the Internet], talks about his book that explores content moderation on social media platforms. He also discusses the role that Congress could play.” At the link find the link, “Communicators with Tarleton Gillespie (28 min. 53 sec. – December 28, 2018),” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Commuting in America 36 mins – “The average American commute in 2016 was 26 minutes and 36 seconds.  It’s less than a minute longer than the previous year, but multiplied over a year, it means the typical American spent more than 9 full days getting to and from work.  Brian, Joanne and Ed discuss the rise of commuting in the 19th century with the advent of the streetcar, and then the explosion of the suburbs in the mid 20th century.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Confederate Statues 45 mins – “Communities from New Orleans to Charlottesville, Virginia have been debating the presence of Confederate monuments. On this episode of BackStory, Ed, Nathan and Brian discuss when and why many of the nation’s Confederate statues were erected, and what they stood for. They’ll examine the many meanings of the Confederate flag and hear a Civil War re-enactor take a closer look at his Southern heritage.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consumer Culture 52 mins – “It’s the most wonderful time of the year! Or is it? The holiday season is notorious for bringing out the beast in shoppers. On this episode of BackStory, the Guys plunge into the history of shopping in America—the glitz and glamour, the overflowing shelves, and the cheesy Muzak. They’ll consider the role that consumption played in the revolutionary politics of the colonies, look at the curious rash of shoplifting among well-heeled women in the country’s first department stores, and reveal the connection between the Wizard of Oz and window shopping.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Controversial Western Monuments 91 mins – “A panel of historians discussed controversial monuments in the West. Topics included 19th century statues and plaques in the American West that honor missionaries, early settlers, and U.S. military leaders who had a hand in killing and forcing the removal of devastated Indian tribes. They also compared monuments in the American south and west. This talk is part of the Western History Association Annual Meeting.” At the link the material can be viewed and heard, but a download must be purchased; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Crimes Against Humanity 242 mins – “The Asia-Pacific War of 1937-1945 has deep roots. It also involves a Japanese society that’s been called one of the most distinctive on Earth. If there were a Japanese version of Captain America, this would be his origin story.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Protection 42 mins – “Ian Bassin on Protecting Democracy – Ian Bassin served in the White House Counsel’s office under President Obama. At the dawn of the Trump administration, he became the impresario behind the litigating organization Protect Democracy, which has become an increasingly cross-ideological mechanism for using litigation to protect democratic values. Benjamin Wittes sat down with Ian to talk about the differences between Protect Democracy and more traditional litigating organizations, what sort of projects they do take on, and what sort of projects they don’t take on. And they talked about the role litigation can and cannot play in preserving the norms that make democracy vibrant.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode 384.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Subversion 44 mins – “Greg Miller on “The Apprentice: Trump, Russia and the Subversion of American Democracy” – “Last week, Jack Goldsmith got on the phone with Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post journalist Greg Miller to discuss Miller’s new book, “The Apprentice: Trump, Russia and the Subversion of American Democracy.” Miller’s book chronicles Russia’s efforts to interfere in the 2016 U.S. presidential election and the interactions among members of the Trump campaign, transition, and administration, and officials and representatives of the Russian government. Goldsmith and Miller discussed how Miller approached writing the book, the extraordinary series of apparent connections and contacts between Trump associates and the Russian government, and what Russian President Vladimir Putin might have gained from his brazen interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode 381.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Journalism History 57 mins – “Kara Swisher: Hi, I’m Kara Swisher, editor at large of Recode. You may know me as someone who likes CNN a little better just because Donald Trumps hate it, but in my spare time I talk tech and you’re listening to Recode Decode from the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today in the red chair is Meredith Artley, the editor in chief of CNN.com and the senior vice president of CNN Digital Worldwide. That’s a big title, Meredith. Previously, she worked at the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune and the Los Angeles Times. Meredith, welcome to Recode Decode….” At the link left-click “Share” at the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drinking Water in Canada 25 mins – “CBC’s Connie Walker explains to The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti why many residents in Garden Hill First Nation still do not trust their tap water.” At the link find the title, “Why Garden Hill First Nation is leery of its tap water,” right-click “Download Why Garden Hill First Nation is leery of its tap water” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Ebola Research 15 mins – “Karen Grépin examines the pledges made to the Ebola crisis, how much has actually reached affected countries, and the lessons to be learnt The World Health Organization was first alerted to the current outbreak of Ebola virus disease on 23 March 2014,1 but it was not until 8 August, after a meeting of the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee, that it declared a public health emergency of international concern.2 This official declaration set into motion an international response to contain the outbreak. The international response has been called both too small and too slow, and this may have contributed to the ongoing spread of the disease.3At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Ehrlichs Portrait 30 mins – “Though they lived decades apart, Adolphe Dessauer and Abdelwahhab Azzawi share similar stories. They were both esteemed physicians who faced violence and persecution in their home countries. They both sought refuge abroad and found safety, only to find themselves facing a new struggle—getting permission to practice medicine in their new homes. Dessauer, a Jewish doctor, fled Germany for the United States in 1938. Azzawi, a 36-year-old ophthalmologist from Syria, found asylum in Germany in 2015. Both men’s lives were spared through the generosity of their new countries, but they had to struggle to give back in the most meaningful way they could—by sharing their medical expertise. In 2016 every American Nobel laureate in science was an immigrant. And it wasn’t just that year; U.S. winners often are born abroad. Yet as global an enterprise as science has become, navigating bureaucracy and straddling boundaries seems to be as difficult in the 21st century as during World War II. This podcast was inspired by a painting once owned by Adolphe Dessauer. The painting is now part of the CHF exhibition Things Fall Apart.At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

El Chapo Trial 21 mins – “As the trial of suspected Mexican drug kingpin El Chapo resumes in a New York courtroom, so too does a compelling-yet-bloody story of drug trafficking, cartel warfare and incredible violence. But would a conviction do anything stop the flow of illegal drugs.” At the ink find the title, “Trial of El Chapo won’t resolve the corruption that empowered him, says journalist,” right-click “Download Trial of El Chapo won’t resolve the corruption that empowered him, says journalist” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Express Yourself 17 mins – “The way we’re taught to live has got to change, says author Casey Gerald. Too often, we hide parts of ourselves in order to fit in, win praise, be accepted. But at what cost? In this inspiring talk, Gerald shares the personal sacrifices he made to attain success in the upper echelons of American society — and shows why it’s time for us to have the courage to live in the raw, strange magic of ourselves.” At the link left-click “Share,” left-click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” to get the podcast.

Falling Man Photo 36 mins – “Do you remember this photograph? In the United States, people have taken pains to banish it from the record of September 11, 2001. The story behind it, though, and the search for the man pictured in it, are our most intimate connection to the horror of that day. Thus begins Tom Junod’s “The Falling Man,” which over the past fourteen years has become one of the magazine’s most-read stories of all time. It’s a story that is as enthralling and complicated today as when it was first published in 2003. Inspired by the infamous photograph of one of the people forced to jump from the World Trade Center, captured by Richard Drew on 9/11, Junod reveals why he felt it was his responsibility to bring the photo—and the anonymous falling man pictured—to light.” At the link find the title, “The Falling Man, by Tom Junod, Sep 2016,” right-click “Play Now”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fetal Gene Manipulation 28 mins – “How did a scientist in China pull off his experiment using gene-editing technology on embryos without anyone knowing, and what impact has he had on the ethics of CRISPR research?” At the link find the title, “U.S. scientist says he tried to stop Chinese researcher from making first gene-edited babies,” right-click “Download U.S. scientist says he tried to stop Chinese researcher from making first gene-edited babies” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future Thinker 94 mins – “Duncan Trussell – actor, comedian and the host of Duncan Trussell Family Hour, is back on Future Thinkers for the second time. In this episode we talk about some of the pressing topics of our time, like developing individual and collective consciousness, evolving the structure and functioning of the human society, and the importance of a consistent spiritual practice for understanding ourselves and the world we live in.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gene Editing Control 28 minsGene drive technology, which can introduce and spread a specific genetic trait through an entire species, is near the point where it leaves the lab and enters the real world. Some experts are calling for a global agreement on how the technology should be deployed, which could make for a showdown between scientists and policy makers at a UN meeting on biodiversity later this week.” At the link find the title, “There needs to be a global policy to govern gene editing, says molecular biologist,” right-click “Download There needs to be a global policy to govern gene editing, says molecular biologist” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Shutdown Impact (first item) 37 mins – “US Shutdown effect on tech – As the stand-off between President Trump and the Senate continues life goes on – but with so many services relying on IT how are everyday activities being affected? And what about cybersecurity, according to reports, this is one area that’s been hard hit – Anthony Zurcher the BBC’S Senior North America Reporter tells us more. [then] Ageism in Tech -So is your mid-thirties too old to start a start-up? According to a new survey of 500 US start-up founders, the age at which age bias kicks in by investors is 36! Leah Fessler writes for the tech news website Quartz on work, gender and relationships and tells Click how surprised she was about the findings. [then] Sans Forgetica – a font to remember – Today there are hundreds of thousands of typefaces and fonts in the open market. The latest addition to this rich typography collection is Sans Forgetica, the typeface that was designed and recently launched by the researchers at the Melbourne’s Royal Institute of Technology (RMIT University). Still in its infancy, and with promising results, the project aims to help with memory retention. Snezana Curcic reports. [then] The Big Issue adds AR -How does a print magazine develop if it can’t have an online presence? The UK based magazine “The Big Issue” aims to support homeless people by allowing them to sell the magazine on the streets, having an online presence would significantly impact their returns, so the magazine has just published its first AR issue. As Ben Sullivan, Digital Editor at The Big Issue, explains they can add exclusive content without having a negative impact on their vendors.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guantanamo Bay Operations 74 mins – “This week on the National Security Law Podcast, co-hosts Bobby Chesney and Steve Vladeck are joined by Michel Paradis (lead counsel for the defense in the al-Nashiri military commission case) and Captain Brian Mizer (learned counsel for the defense in that case).  Tune in for an extensive discussion of the upcoming D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals argument (Jan. 22) in the al-Nashiri case, as well as for broader discussion of the state of the military commission system.  As an added bonus after that interview, we also return briefly to the topic of a potential “national emergency” declaration by President Trump, in order to go into the details as just what can and cannot be done with money subject to 10 USC 2808 and 33 USC 2293 if and when such a declaration occurs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence 25 mins – “As part of One Bullet, The Current’s series on gun violence, we speak to two trauma surgeons who are faced with the reality of what bullets do to bodies.” At the link find the title, “Gun violence takes a heavy toll on families of victims, says trauma surgeon,” right-click “Download Gun violence takes a heavy toll on families of victims, says trauma surgeon” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence 43 mins – “Nearly two decades after a promising Toronto high school basketball star was gunned down, police are still waiting for someone to come forward and identify the shooter.” At the link find the title, “Waiting for a witness,” right-click “Download Waiting for a witness” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence in Canada 22 mins – “Eight years after she was shot to death by her spouse, Lynn Kalmring’s homicide still weighs on friends, family and the lawyer who defended her killer. As part of our One Bullet series investigating the impact of gun violence in Canada, we look at the dramatic effect Kalmring’s death continues to have on the people close to her.” At the link find the title, “A heavy burden,” right-click “Download A heavy burden” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence in Canada 23 mins – “On the morning of Aug. 25, 2004, an armed man with a long history of spousal abuse took a stranger hostage in front of Union Station in downtown Toronto. The gunman had just tried to kill his estranged wife at a nearby food court and was cornered by police in a tense standoff that captivated Canadians and ended with a sniper’s bullet.” At the link find the title, “ Fatal sniper bullet was ‘only solution’ to end 2004 Union Station standoff, negotiator says,” right-click “Download Fatal sniper bullet was ‘only solution’ to end 2004 Union Station standoff, negotiator says,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Speech Control 52 mins – “Nadine Strossen says we should protect hate speech. She’s former ACLU president, and she argues that censorship just doesn’t work. The way to resist hate speech, she says, is with more free speech. Nadine Strossen says we should protect hate speech. Strossen is a constitutional law professor and the former president of the ACLU, and she gets why people react so viscerally to racist, sexist, and other hateful language. She says she’s been a target of anti-Semitic and misogynist speech herself. The problem though, she argues in her latest book, is that censorship simply doesn’t work. Strossen joins us Wednesday to explain why the best way to resist hate speech is with more free speech. Nadine Strossen is a scholar of constitutional law and civil rights. She’s a professor at New York Law School, and served as president of the national ACLU for 18 years. Her latest book is called Hate: Why We Should Resist It With Free Speech, Not CensorshipAt the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Future 64 mins – “Are we doing enough to protect our planet? According to world-renowned scientist and Astronomer Royal Martin Rees, humanity has reached a critical moment, and there is no plan B for Earth. With our world changing at a rapid pace, Rees explains why the future of humanity is bound to the future of science. He offers a compelling look at how advancements in biotechnology, robotics and artificial intelligence, if applied wisely, can help address these growing challenges and threats.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kepler’s Snowflake 27 mins – “The Six Cornered Snowflake, a booklet written by Johannes Kepler as a New Year’s gift, sought to explain the intricate and symmetrical shape of winter’s tiny stars of snow. His insightful speculations about minerals and geometry were the beginning of the modern understanding of crystals. Philip Ball tells the story of how Kepler became a key figure in the scientific revolution of the 17th Century. He was a precocious mathematician who became an adviser to Emperor Rudolf II in 1600. Although he contributed to the idea that the sun, not the earth, was the centre of the solar system, his role at the court was to be an astrologer. Philip brings the story of the shape of the snowflakes up to date. It was only 20 years ago with the development of the maths of fractals that we got to understand the formation of the myriad patterns of snowflakes.” At the link right=click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Keto Diet Discussion 10 mins – “A large number of health care professionals are on the Keto diet, and they’re trying to convince their colleagues that it can help fight disease, but not everyone’s convinced.” At the link find the title, “White Coat Black Art’s Dr. Brian Goldman talks about the popular Keto diet,” right-click “Download White Coat Black Aarts Dr. Brian Goldman talks about the popular Keto dietand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mao’s Great Famine 73 mins – “Historian Frank Dikötter of the University of Hong Kong and author of Mao’s Great Famine talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Dikötter chronicles the strategies Mao and the Chinese leadership implemented to increase grain and steel production in the late 1950s leading to a collapse in agricultural output and the deaths of millions by starvation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martin Luther King Jr 30 mins – “In 1968, just hours after Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, the future Pulitzer Prize–winning author Garry Wills—then a young writer for Esquire—rushed to Memphis, Tennessee, where he watched as King’s body was embalmed at the mortuary; later, Wills traveled twelve hours by bus with mourners to King’s funeral in Atlanta. Nearly fifty years after its publication, Wills’s “Martin Luther King Jr. Is Still on the Case!” remains one of the most revealing and lasting portraits of King and his turbulent era ever written. Writer and director John Ridley—who won an Oscar for his screenplay for 12 Years a Slave—joins host David Brancaccio to discuss why Wills’s wrenching profile of King continues to resonate today, what has changed in America since it was written, and, most important, what still needs to change.” At the link find the title,’Martin Luther King Jr Is Still on the Case! by Garry Wills, 14 Nov 2016,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MDMA Discussion 39 mins – “Molly, Ecstasy, MDMA… whatever you want to call it, it’s all the same thing. This week, we’re turning up the bass and checking out what does it do to your brain. Is it bad for you? Could it be a potential medicine? To find out, we talk to public health researcher Prof. Joseph Palamar, DEA special agent James Hunt, and neuroscientist Prof. Harriet de Witt.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Millennial Burnout 27 mins – “A Buzzfeed essay arguing millennials have become the burnout generation has struck a chord with many people since it went viral this month, but one woman says burnout isn’t a new phenomenon solely affecting white, middle-class people.” At the link find the title, “Why one writer says burnout carries ‘a different weight’ for people of colour,” right-click “Download Why one writer says burnout carries ‘a different weight’ for people of colour” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Miscommunications 59 mins -”Based on his recently released, expanded edition of the award-winning Perception and Deception: A Mind-Opening Journey Across Cultures, Joe Lurie will present a spirited and insightful exploration of cross-cultural miscommunications in an increasingly globalized, polarizing world. With YouTube, tweets, refugees and fake news rapidly crossing cultures without context, Lurie shares a timely, intriguing and sometimes tragic array of intercultural encounters gone wrong because of cultural misperceptions across the globe, in the worlds of migration, diplomacy, commerce and technology. David Lennon, former managing editor of the Financial Times, called Lurie’s book “brilliant!” According to Lennon, the book offers: “Terrific and timely insights and tools for understanding culture clashes in a hyper-connecting world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Money Issues 23 mins – “How does one ask their employer for more money? The short answer, according to Refinery29’s Lindsey Stanberry, is just do it. “It’s hard. And it’s not fun,” Stanberry tells Greta this week. “I mean, you just have to ask.” It’s a new year. And now — RIGHT NOW — is the time to get your finances in order. So we’re talking with a financial expert who’s going to tell you to know your numbers, to know your worth, and — most importantly — to get out there and get that money. Stanberry is the author of “Money Diaries: Everything You’ve Ever Wanted To Know About Your Finances… And Everyone Else’s.” She’s also the work and money director at Refinery29, an online magazine. She’s full of invaluable tips for taking charge of your money situation. So get excited: You’re about to be the boss of your bank account.” At the link find the title, ‘Jan 11, 2019, Get That Money.,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nationalism 63 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy investigates why the world is grappling with a fierce resurgence of “us versus them” nationalism. Veteran political reporter and author John Judis analyzes the underlying causes of the nationalist revolt and its global impact, arguing that nationalism is an inescapable aspect of politics that the Left has ceded to the Right. The result: the rise of leaders such as Donald Trump in the United States and Viktor Orbán in Hungary. Judis looks to the future and urges leaders to identify and reclaim what is valid in nationalism while recognizing that it is in a country’s national interest to work together with strong international institutions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Abuse Treatment 20 mins – “Fifty people who use street drugs will be regularly prescribed opioid pills to crush up and inject, as part of a new “safe supply” program launching in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Can the initiative help entrenched addicts avoid overdoses?” At the link find the title, B.C. ‘safe supply’ pilot aims to help entrenched addicts avoid overdoses, says advocate,” At the link right-click “Download B.C. ‘safe supply’ pilot aims to help entrenched addicts avoid overdoses, says advocate” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Experience 37 mins – “America’s got an opioid problem. So where do we go from here? What  can actually help people struggling with opioid addiction? We speak to Dr. Anna Lembke, Dr. Marvin Seppala, and a patient we call Mischa.
UPDATE 04/17: We’ve adjusted a couple of lines of script in this episode to clarify the role of religion in Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. A previous version of this episode incorrectly implied that the 12 step philosophy considers addiction a sin and a “defect of character”. If you or someone you love is struggling with an opioid addiction, in the US you can call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP or visit their website.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Polygamy in Canada 16 mins – “As some women in Canada’s Muslim community are speaking out against polygamous marriages in their community, a CBC reporter investigating the issue for The Fifth Estate says charges and convictions related to the practice are “extremely rare” in Canada.” At the link find the title, “Polygamy is happening in Canada’s Muslim community, but convictions are rare, says reporter,” right-click “Download Polygamy is happening in Canada’s Muslim community, but convictions are rare, says reporter” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Criticism by Intelligence Community 58 mins – “What is Too Far When Former Intelligence Community Leadership Criticizes the President? – This edition of The Lawfare Podcast grows out of an email exchange between David Kris and Jack Goldsmith over a draft article Jack had written about John Brennan and other intelligence community former leaders who were criticizing the president in public and from whom the president was threatening to pull their security clearances in response. What is appropriate for intelligence community leaders to say about the president? What is going too far? What is outside their lane? And what is required by the current moment when intelligence community leaders face a rogue elephant of a president who is violating every norm we know?” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_342.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Preventive Medicine 68 mins – “This program is part of our Food Lit series, underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation. Can lifestyle medicine actually change your health and well-being? In their newest book, UnDo It!, Dean Ornish and his wife Anne present a comprehensive approach to reversing many of the chronic diseases that plague Americans today. Scientifically researched, this plan includes eating well, moving more, stressing less and loving more. Dean and Anne Ornish provide everything you need to succeed in this lifestyle change, including recipes, exercises and stress relievers. Join us to learn more about how you can radically change your health with two pioneers in the health field.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Privacy Discussion 57 mins – “Kara Swisher: Hi, I’m Kara Swisher, editor at large of Recode. You may know me as the new spokesperson for Facebook Portal, but in my spare time I talk tech, and you’re listening to Recode Decode, from the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today, I’m excited to be in the studio with Cindy Cohn, the executive director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and Claire Boyle, the managing editor of “Timothy McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern.” EFF and McSweeney’s teamed up late last year to put out a special issue of the literary journal about privacy, called “The End of Trust.” Cindy and Claire, welcome to Recode Decode.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spy Swaps 36 mins – “John Sipher on Spy Swaps: Past, Present, and Future – The Russian government’s recent arrest of American Paul Whelan and its charges against him have many politicians and pundits speculating about the possibility of an intended spy swap for Maria Butina. There’s a lot going on here, but there’s also a lot of misunderstanding about the history of spy swaps, what they are, and what they aren’t. Earlier this week, David Priess sat down with his former CIA colleague John Sipher to talk about it all. They discussed the history of spy swaps, the current case involving Paul Whelan, and prospects for some kind of a release.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode 379.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taser Death Case 27 mins – “Long-time CBC journalist Curt Petrovich covered the death of Robert Dziekanski in 2007. The Polish immigrant was Tasered by RCMP officers in Vancouver airport, but Petrovich says there’s more to the story than a narrative of “four bad apple cops.” Now he’s written a book about Dziekanski, and the four RCMP officers present that night, and whether justice has been served.” At the link find the title, Reporter who covered Robert Dziekanski’s death says there’s more to the story than ‘four bad-apple cops’,” right-click “Download Reporter who covered Robert Dziekanski’s death says there’s more to the story than ‘four bad-apple cops’” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tax Rate Discussion 47 mins – “Radical? Or the right thing to do? We’ll analyze the numbers behind Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s proposal to push the top tax rate to 70 percent.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technological Trends 43 mins – “Today our guest is Kevnin Kelly, the founding editor of Wired magazine, former publisher of the Whole Earth Review, and author of many books, including his latest one called “The Inevitable“, which forecasts the twelve technological forces that will shape the next thirty years. This episode airs in two parts. In the first, we talk about what technology wants, the new sharing economy, and creating a smart environment. In the second, we look at how artificial intelligence and artificial consciousness will shape the future of work and life, what will make humans uniquely useful in this scenario, and reasons to be optimistic for the future.” At the link find the title, “Future Thinkers Podcast FTP084: Kevin Kelly – What Technology Wants and The World of Superabundan…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Toxic Politics 25 mins – “Alcide Bernard was appointed mayor of Wellington, P.E.I last week – because nobody else wanted the job. Is there a crisis in local politics, where the long hours and little pay are scaring off potential public servants?” At the link find the title, “Are long hours and little pay scaring off potential public servants?,” right-click “Download Are long hours and little pay scaring off potential public servants?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Mountain Pipeline 18 mins – “A group of Indigenous leaders are meeting in Calgary this week with the oil industry to discuss options for purchasing the Trans Mountain pipeline. We hear from those on both sides of the debate.” At the link find the title, “Indigenous ownership won’t solve problems with Trans Mountain pipeline, says Squamish Nation councillor,” right-click “Download Indigenous ownership won’t solve problems with Trans Mountain pipeline, says Squamish Nation councillor” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccine Safety 43 mins – “ Autism, seizures, and overloaded immune systems. Could these really be side effects of vaccines? This week, we dive  into the science to find out how safe vaccines really are. We also talk to public health researchers Prof. Dan Salmon and Prof. Amy Kalkbrenner and neurologist Prof. Ingrid Scheffer. Check out the full transcript of the show with all of the footnotes and links to the science. Credits: This episode has been produced by Heather Rogers, Wendy Zukerman, and Shruti Ravindran. Production help from Rose Rimler. Our senior producer is Kaitlyn Sawrey. We’re edited this week by Blythe Terrell and Annie-Rose Strasser. Fact checking by Michelle Harris, with help from Rose Rimler. Sound design by Martin Peralta. Music written by Bobby Lord. For this episode we also spoke with Dr. Saad Omer, Dr. Neal Halsey, Dr. Paul Offit, Dr. Frank DeStefano, and Prof. Alison Buttenheim. And an extra thanks to Bonnie Stanway,Ivona Stamatoska, Reese and Walter Ludwig, the Zukerman Family, Joseph Lavelle Wilson and – of course! – Leo Rogers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Work Improvement 58 mins – “Books and Ideas is back with an interview with Rhodes Perry, author of Belonging At Work: Everyday Actions You Can Take to Cultivate an Inclusive Organization. Human beings are wired to be social, which means feeling like we belong is actually essential to our physical and emotional health. In this interview we discuss some of the obstacles to “Belonging at Work” and practical steps toward improvement. Rhodes also shares the Platinum Rule: Treating others like THEY want to be treated, which I think should be applied in all aspects of our life.” At the link right-click “Click to play mp3 (right click to download file)” and select “Save Link as’ from the pop-up menu.

WWII Shanghai Ghetto 29 mins – “In this final episode of the series Laszlo introduces the Shanghai Ghetto, the final years of WWII and the aftermath.  Please check the show notes at the web site for all kinds of books and videos from this period.  Thanks to everyone who made it through all six episodes.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zero Energy Homes 18 mins – “So, what exactly is a Zero Energy Home?  To quote the folks at zero energy project. org, “Zero energy homes are just like any home—except better.”  They are air-tight, well-insulated, and extremely energy efficient homes that produce as much energy as they use, over the course of a year. That means that for heating and cooling, electricity, and water heating, your net payment to the power company would be zero, zilch, nothing!   You’d have no net utility bills with a zero energy house. Zero energy houses also have very little negative impact on the environment.  If all that sounds good to you, but you’re weary of looking into a zero energy house because you think that it has to be a super modern, minimalist white box of a house, think again.  These houses can be built in a variety of sizes and styles and for any climate.  If you want a zero energy house that looks very unique and unconventional, that’s fine.  But, you can also build a zero energy house that looks like any other home—like a traditional colonial or craftsman, or a Mediterranean or bungalow.  You could build a large estate house or a tiny house, or something in between, and you could make any one of those a zero energy house.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zip Building System 15 mins – “’Build tight and ventilate right.’  That’s a mantra that I’ve heard since I started educating myself about home design and construction.  A tight house is a house with minimal air leakage.  Building a tight house is important so you can save on energy costs and make your home more comfortable.  A tight house also protects the structure of your home.  Here’s how:  If a house is built tightly, it prevents warm, moist air from entering or exiting the home.  The unwanted flow of warm, moist air can lead to moisture within your home’s walls and roof, causing structural damage. Building tight can alleviate that potential problem.  You’ll also need to ventilate right.  We’ll discuss ventilation systems in a future episode. Today, we’ll concentrate one of the first steps needed to build a tight house, which is adding a continuous air barrier to your house to reduce air leakage. The Zip system by Huber Engineered Woods is a continuous air barrier that many contractors are using to build tight houses.  Most of them agree that the Zip System outperforms traditional building methods using house wrap.  Today, I’ll review Huber’s Zip System.  I’m not affiliated with the product or company, and have no personal experience with it, but I’ve noticed that over the past several years quality builders in my region consistently choose the Zip system over traditional methods, like house wrap.  Plus I’ve read many contractors’ forums and home building websites for a consensus on the Zip System.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 375 – Jan 25, 2019: 3D Printed Guns, 3D Products from Amazon, 5 Guys Restaurant Founder, Aflatoxins in Peanuts, African Trends, Agriculture Software, AI and Chatbot Limitations, AI for Drug Discovery, Bill Barr Testimony, Blockchain Discussion, Blue Thumb DV and Quarter Wave Stubs, Breast Reconstruction, Brexit Impact, China-Coke-Obesity, Claiborne Haughton, Cognitive Psychology, Congo Internet and Benin Incubator, Cool Tools-3D Printing, Drones in Africa, Facial Beauty and Surgery, Financial Q and A, First Government Shutdown, Forensic Anthropologist, Guantanamo Detainees, Hillbilly Elegy, Immigration History, Impeachment, Kindness, Laurel and Hardy, Life Extension, Marmite, Medical Test Concerns, Migrant Reintegration, Physician Loneliness, Pilot Q and A’s, Reporter Dorothy Butler, Saudi Female Refugee, Sexual Health, Software Defined Networks, Transplant Surgeon, Women in Entomology, Women’s Rights, WordPress Developer

Exercise your ears: the 60 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 504 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 23,756 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 157GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 496 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Printed Doorbell 19 mins – “The story of a woman named Grace is something we can all relate to. Grace is an adult living in Texas and she was a first-time homeowner about two years ago. As soon as she signed the mortgage papers, she had every home security company on earth descending on their new home pretty much the day after they moved in. One particular home security system salesperson broke the plastic button that you push on the doorbell after ringing it too many times and frustrated that she’s not answering. Grace was unable to get a replacement after checking out the usual places – Lowe’s, Home Depot, Ace Hardware – and finally thought about having it 3D printed. She takes the whole doorbell unit and dropped it off at this company. Two days later, the doorbell was ready for pickup. It’s fixed, it worked, but it was not what she had expected. This goes to show that having something 3D printed isn’t as simple as finding somebody with a 3D printer and giving them a few bucks. Learn some important points you need to discuss with your 3D print maker to make sure you’re on the same page and getting what you want.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

3D Printed Guns 18 mins – “Any of you following the 3D print industry couldn’t help but see that an awful lot has happened in the courts and in the government with 3D printing, in particular regarding 3D-printed firearms. Cody Wilson was the first person to create a 3D printable gun and the plans for a 3D printable gun way back in 2013 or so. A big part of a documentary movie about 3D printing, Print the Legend, tells the early story of Cody and his 3D-printed gun which he put it out there and made it available for the world to download and print their own guns. Eventually, he was shut down by the government. Putting all the regulatory stuff aside, the bigger concern is the copyright issue. Tom delves into the topic of intellectual property and copyright violation in the 3D printing industry.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

3D Printing Metal 24 mins – “Technologies have truly evolved that something as expensive as a metal 3D printing machine can now be offered as a desktop metal 3D printing machine and be accessible to a number of audience with the help of media. However, this could lead to many people think of the industry lightly. Tom goes deep into the processes of two companies, Desktop Metal and Markforged. He highlights their similarities as well as dissimilarities in order to compare and contrast which one is more admirable. Talking also of the media published of the machines produced, he points out the tendency to gloss over the quality. Going back to Desktop Metal, he shares his words and review on whether it is a breakthrough in the metal 3D printing industry or not.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

3D Printing Myths 23 mins – “We’ve seen 3D printers showing up in more dramatic TV series like Grey’s Anatomy in a recent season and among a lot of other TV shows. The general public has this perception that 3D printing is easy, but that’s just not the reality of it. It’s no surprise that the general public does not understand the amount of time, effort, and work it takes to go and make anything on a 3D printer that is a complete usable item or product design. Unless you do it yourself and you’ve studied it, you’ve been taught it, or you bought your own 3D printer and started learning CAD software on your own the hard way just to explore it, you’re not going to know that it’s going to take hours and hours. Tom debunks some of the 3D printing myths to help illuminate the eyes of the general public about the realities of 3D printing.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

3D Products from Amazon 33 mins – “There are several markets now that are very viable for 3D printing, and that’s what Steve Crimi, CEO of Goldsol, Inc., is looking at right now. Steve, along with his business partner and wife, Brenda, sells lots of different products on Amazon in particular. He has spent his lifetime owning and operating successful businesses in the industries of electrical, energy efficiency, and LED lighting. Steve recognizes that 3D-printed end-use products, not just prototyping, are here to stay, and it’s a very big market in and of itself. Very recently, the US government is charging product importers a tariff of 10% percent, increasing to 25% at the beginning of next year. The vast majority of products purchased in the United States being imported, Steve knows importation may just not be cost effective anymore. Steve takes a look at how import tariffs may accelerate 3D-printed consumer goods.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

5 Guys Restaurant Founder 39 mins – “Jerry Murrell’s mother used to tell him, you can always make money if you know how to make a good burger. In 1986 — after failing at a number of business ideas — Murrell opened a tiny burger joint in Northern Virginia with his four sons. Five Guys now has more than 1,500 locations worldwide and is one of the fastest growing restaurant chains in America.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aflatoxins 32 mins – “Aflatoxins are trace compounds produced by certain fungi, and represent a legitimate food safety risk.  These fungi grow on corn, peanuts and other crops, especially in warm, humid areas that lack fungal control measures.  They have been connected to numerous human diseases, primarily liver cancer, but also cause problems in livestock fed contaminated grain.  Dr. Monica Schmidt of the University of Arizona has a good solution.  Her team has expressed an RNA sequence in corn that matches the genetic sequence in the fungus. Upon invasion, the fungus takes up the RNA from the corn, and it shuts down the genes required for aflatoxin production.  There are no effects on the corn kernel itself.  This work shows that safer food could be produced by arming the plant with genetic defenses it could implement in fighting fungal contamination and the toxins it produces.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Aflatoxins in Peanuts 25 mins – “Groundnut, or peanut, is a major food staple and excellent protein source in many parts of the world.  However, since the nut itself develops in soil, it is prone to fungal infection with Aspergillus flavus, the species that produces aflatoxin. Aflatoxins are some of the most potent naturally-produced carcinogens and are thought to be responsible for liver cancer worldwide.  In the Developing World fungal infection and toxin production are a problem on fresh and stored food products.  Fungicides and other chemical controls are not readily available.  Dr. Dilip Shah from the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center worked with a team of researchers to devise a multi-faceted plan to protect groundnut from fungal infections. In this week’s podcast he describes two approaches, of how genetic engineering can be used to control the fungus, or its production of the toxin.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

African Trends 103 mins – “On January 17, the Africa Growth Initiative hosted a Foresight Africa launch featuring a panel of leading Africa experts to offer insights on regional trends along with recommendations for national governments, regional organizations, multilateral institutions, and civil society actors as they forge ahead in 2019. Subscribe to Brookings Events on iTunes, send feedback email to events@brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. To learn more about upcoming events, visit our website. Brookings Events is part of the Brookings Podcast Network” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Agriculture Software 45 mins – “Sid Gorham is the President & CEO of Granular, a software and analytics platform that aims to improve farming efficiency and help farmers make better, well-informed business decisions. As the leader of Granular, his responsibilities include setting growth strategies and maintaining a rich and diverse entrepreneurial culture as they scale the company. His extensive experience in leading companies in the tech and mobile industries, as well as seeing the needs of the ag industry, has served as one of his primary drivers in starting the company.  Sid joins me today to share how Granular enables farmers to operate and manage their farms better. He shares his passion for tech, his interests in applying tech in farms, and how he got inspired to start Granular. He describes the farming problems their company solves, explains how their business works, and how they integrate new farmers into using their platform. He also discusses some of the current innovations in ag as well as shares his thoughts on the future of farming and agriculture.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, right-click “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

AI and Blockchain 32 mins – “If you combine the hype-factor of both “blockchain” and “artificial intelligence” you often get a supernova of jargon. This week on the AI in Industry podcast, we aim to get beyond the hype to discuss how blockchain might make AI more accessible for small and mid-sized businesses in the years ahead. Dr. Ben Goertzel – CEO of SingularityNET – is our guest this week.” At the link find the title, “Ben Goertzel on How Blockchain Might Make AI More Accessible,” right-click “AI_in_Industry-Ben_Goertzel-Mixdown.mp3,” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

AI and Chatbot Evolution 27 mins – “There’s a lot of hype out there about conversational AI. Although according to our guest, we’re nowhere near the day when AI can generate accurate conversations for the average business to integrate into their customer service, chatbots still have practical applications. In this episode, we interview the head of research at Digital Genius, Yoram Bachrach. Yoram succinctly outlines the current applications of chatbotswhat they can and can’t do—and details how business can best prepare to automate their customer service.” At the link find the title, “How Chatbots Work, and How They Evolve,” right-click “AI_in_Industry-Yoram_Bachrach-Mixdown.m” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI and Chatbot Limitations 22 mins – “In this episode, discover how chatbots and conversational agents can provide you an advantage in the realms of customer support, product, support, lead engagement, and more, and learn the theory behind creating useful chatbots you can use in your own business. Right now, if we intend to find a piece of information or purchase something on the Internet, we might use a search engine that provides us with a list of sites we can browse in order to find ourselves a resolution for that intent. This week’s guest, Chief Scientist at Conversica, Dr. Sid J Reddy, talks about how AI and ML can usher in the next a new era of search software, one that will bring you a faster, more accurate resolution to your intent. Most importantly, Dr. Reddy discusses how chatbot technology can be integrated into areas such as customer service, product support, and lead engagement. By the end of the episode, listeners will have a better idea of the importance of collecting data and how they can use that data to  to build chatbot templates they can use in multiple domains and applications.” At the link find the title, “What Chatbots Can Do, and Cannot Do,” right-click “AI_in_Industry-Sid_J_Reddy-Mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

AI for Drug Discovery 27 mins – “In this episode, we talk to Murali Aravamudan, Founder and CEO of AI-driven drug discovery startup Qrativ, a joint venture by the Mayo Clinic and biotech/data science firm nference. Murali and I discuss the surge of medical information and data in the medical industry, the role of artificial intelligence in developing drugs for treatments to various diseases, and the future of AI in drug discovery.” At the link find the title, Qrativ’s Murali Aravamudan on “What’s Possible” for AI in Drug Discovery,” right-click “AI_in_Industry-Murali_Aravamudan-Mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI for Healthcare Security 21 mins – “In this episode, we talk to Daniel Nigrin, MD, Senior Vice President and CIO at Boston Children’s Hospital. Daniel and I discuss why hackers have come to prey on the healthcare industry, how these hackers benefit from their illicit activities, and what healthcare IT security precautions can be taken to prevent such attacks.” At the link find the title, “AI in Healthcare IT Security – Why Hospitals are Targets,” right-click “AI_in_Industry-Daniel_Nigrin-Mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI for Theft Prevention 21 mins – “In this episode, we speak with Alan O’Herlihy, Founder and CEO of Ireland-based Everseen. Alan speaks to us about how machine vision systems can be used to detect theft or mistakes at a checkout counter (including forgetting to scan items, customers intentionally hiding items, and more). Alan not only explains where these technologies are in use today, but he also breaks down some of his own predictions about what these computer vision systems might make possible in the workplace of tomorrow.” At the link find the title, ‘AI for Theft Prevention and Process Adherence – with Alan O’Herlihy from Everseen,” right-click “AI_in_Industry-Alan_Oherlihy-Mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI in Drug Research 24 mins – “This episode explores the ways in which artificial intelligence has the potential to revolutionize the field of medicine. This week’s guest, Dr. Kristóf Zsolt Szalay speaks to this topic, discussing research that hopes to create automated learning networks and algorithms designed to predict the development of human cells in response to drugs. This technological innovation would make it possible for near-instantaneous simulations to be run, allowing optimal combinations and optimal doses of drugs to be pinpointed and distributed to patients.” At the link find the title, “Modeling Biology with Machine Learning – with Turbine.ai’s CEO Kristóf Zsolt Szalay,” right-click “AI_in_Industry-Kristof_Zsolt_Szalay-Mixdown.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bill Barr Testimony 122 mins – “Bill Barr spent Tuesday testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee on his nomination to take over the reins of the Justice Department as attorney general, a role he previously held during the George H.W. Bush administration. Barr spent more than eight hours before the senators. But on this episode of the Lawfare Podcast, we’re cutting out all the BS. No repeated questions, no repeated answers, no ums, no uhs. And we took out everything except the national security questions, leaving you just the questions and responses from the first round of questioning about Lawfare topics that you want to hear.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Blockchain Discussion 24 mins – “Silicon Valley and Wall Street are obsessed with Bitcoin and its underlying technology called blockchain. Boosters say it’ll fix everything from elections to shipping to identity theft. But what exactly is blockchain, how is it being used, and is the hype really worth it?” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blue Thumb DV and 1/4 Wave Stubs 92 mins – “Tommy reviews the Blue Thumb DV. George and the crew pull out the test equipment and experiment with 1/4 wave stubs. This live demonstration helps clear up some of the mystery. Mike, VE3MIC sits in for the Cheap Old Man to help keep expenses under control.” At the link click “Download” to get the pop-up menu with video and audio download options.

Breast Reconstruction 26 mins – “My friend — with her infectious laugh and keen sense for a good party — was suddenly thrown into a new world of medical terms and trauma: chemotherapy, radiation, mastectomy, and reconstructive surgery. It was that last part of her treatment plan, the breast reconstruction, that caused her terrible pain and mental anguish through her cancer journey. “Everyone just kept telling me that I would have a psychological breakdown if I woke up from surgery and didn’t have breasts,” she recalled. “I certainly had a lot of reservations about it, but all of the medical teams told me repeatedly how hard it would be for me.” “They would just always tell me that, you’ll have chemo and radiation and surgery and reconstructive surgery as well.” Joanna underwent a double mastectomy in 2011. During the same surgery, doctors inserted “expanders” into her chest. The expanders are later inflated to help stretch out the skin and tissue so they can eventually hold up an implant….” At the link find the title, “After breast cancer and failed reconstruction, this mom found beauty by going flat,” right-click “Download After breast cancer and failed reconstruction, this mom found beauty by going flat” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Impact 25 mins – “After British Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal was defeated in parliament Tuesday, what’s next for the troubled process? And what does it all mean for the people living in uncertainty?” At the link find the title, ‘Dark times ahead,’ but Brexit will be worth it in the long term, says financier,” right-click “Download ‘Dark times ahead,’ but Brexit will be worth it in the long term, says financier”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China – Coca Cola – Obesity 24 mins – “Susan Greenhalg is a research professor of chinese society in Harvard’s department of anthropology – not a natural fit for a medical journal you may think, but recently she has been looking at the influence of Coca Cola on obesity policy in China. She has written up her investigation in an article published on bmj.com this week, and joins us in the podcast to talk about why a communist country would embrace a message from an icon of capitalism, and what attitudes toward financial conflicts of interest exist in the country.” At the link find the title, “How Coca-Cola shaped obesity science and policy in China, Jan 2019,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Claiborne Haughton 56 mins – “Joyce welcomes Claiborne Haughton, president and CEO of Haughton Group, LLC to the show. In addition, Mr. Haughton is a motivational speaker and Equal Opportunity Diversity Consultant. He will explain his duties in each capacity and explain why he is known as father of the United States Department of Defense Program for individuals with disabilities.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cognitive Psychology 42 mins – “Researchers and communicators in biotechnology have experienced it for a long time– the people that oppose genetic engineering frequently know the least about it.  This observation was studied formally by a group of cognitive and social psychologists.  Their conclusion: The people with the most extreme attitudes about genetic engineering also have the least working knowledge about the science behind it.  In this week’s podcast Dr. Philip Fernbach from the University of Colorado discusses the results of the study, along with a deeper discussion into the ramifications of these findings as they apply to science communication.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Congo Internet and Benin Incubator 27 mins – “Last week, following the Presidential Elections in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the internet was shutdown. Reports claim this was under instruction from the government, the government in turn denies this. BBC Africa Business Editor Larry Madowo explains why this is happening. [Then]Screen Time for Kids- New guidelines for the amount of time children should use electronic screens everyday have been issued by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health in the UK. The doctors advise that screens are put away an hour before bedtime. Professor Russell Viner, President of the RCPCH joins us in the studio to explain their new advice. [Then] Companies Paying Cyber Ransoms – One of the authors of a new book “Solving Cyber Risk: Protecting Your Company and Society” says that well-known businesses, whose products and services many of us consume, are paying huge ransoms to cyber-criminals having been breached by malware. Andrew Coburn, chief scientist at the Centre for Risk Studies at the University of Cambridge tells Click more. [Finally] Raising Chicks in West Africa – A new incubator for chicks which is operated by a smart phone app, could significantly increase the number of chicks farmers in Benin can produce. As part of drive to import less food into the west African country, developers say their new electronic incubator could help farmers increase the numbers of chicks born from thirty a year to three hundred a month.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cool Tools – 3D Printing 27 mins – “Our guest this week is Jen Schachter. Jen is a multimedia maker and a mastermind of interactive art projects, including a giant light-up sign for the Obama White House, a wooden parking validation robot, and a monumental 3D-printed sculpture of Rosie the Riveter. You can find her product reviews in Make Magazine, her epic collaborations with Adam Savage on Tested.com, and her tool manuals in fabrication shops in Baltimore.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Cool Tools – Ear Plugs and Timing Book 42 mins – “Our guest this week is Daniel Pink. Daniel is the author of four New York Times bestsellers on work, business, and psychology. His books have won multiple awards and have been translated into 39 languages. Dan was also host and co-executive producer of “Crowd Control,” a National Geographic TV series about human behavior. His latest book is When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing. For show notes visit: kk.org/cooltools/daniel-pink…yt-bestselling-author” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Cools Tools 34 mins – “Our guest this week is Zach Supalla. Zach is the CEO and one of the founders of Particle, the most widely-used IoT platform. Particle is used by more than 140,000 developers and 8,500 companies to build IoT products ranging from the smart home to industrial equipment.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Counterintelligence Investigation of Trump 64 mins – “Benjamin Wittes talks to Carrie Cordero, Chuck Rosenberg, David Kris, Jack Goldsmith and Susan Hennessey about the New York Times’s report that the FBI opened a counterintelligence investigation of Donald Trump after the president fired Director James Comey in May 2017.” At the link right-click “NYT_CI_investigation emergency podcast mixdown levelsfixed.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drones in Africa 27 mins – “While the idea of retail giants like Amazon dropping parcels from the sky via drone may be a long way off, in East Africa momentum is building over the idea of drone delivery in hard to reach places. In the island of Juma near Mwanza, one of hundreds of remote inhabited islands in the vast expanse of Lake Victoria, an ambitious new drone project called the Lake Victoria Challenge (backed by international organisations like The World Bank and the private sector) is taking place. Technology reporter Jane Wakefield visits Juma to see first-hand how the concept could work. Are they a cost-effective solution for getting goods quickly to rural areas? Jane interviews Zipline, currently the only commercial drone delivery company operating in Africa. A year on from announcing a deal with the Tanzanian government, Zipline is still nowhere near setting up in the country. Why? Do drones bring insurmountable regulatory and security issues, or are they going to be a lifeline for Africa’s neglected rural communities? Jane also speaks to Tanzanian drone pilot and entrepreneur Frederick Mbuya of Uhurulabs about why technology needs to work in an African context, and to The World Bank’s Edward Anderson, who is running the Lake Victoria challenge project, about what drones could bring in terms of economic development opportunities.” At the link find right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Problems 20 mins – “Facebook has been on the defensive this week, after allegations about how it handled crises like privacy breaches. And one professor of media studies says Facebook is disrupting democracy.” At the link find the title, “We should regulate Facebook just like we did cars, says professor,” right-click “Download We should regulate Facebook just like we did cars, says professor” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facial Beauty and Surgery 74 mins – “Age-related changes in our facial appearance are unavoidable. Drs. Rahul Seth and P. Daniel Knott explore facial plastic and reconstructive surgery including functional and cosmetic rhinoplasty, and rejuvenation and cosmetic surgery of the face, neck, cheek, brow, eyelids, and ears. Recorded on 02/24/2016. (#30689)” At the link right-click “AUDIO MP3” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Q and A 26 mins- “What do silver dollars, Venmo, and Brexit have in common? They’re all on the minds of our listeners. Today on the show, we take listener questions, and hunt for answers. We try to figure out how Venmo makes money, how the tax system really works, why truckers are buying helicopters in England, and more.” At the link find the title, “887: You Asked For It, Yet Again,” right-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Government Shutdown 15 mins – “The government is shut down again. Here at Planet Money, we wondered: just how long has this been going on? The answer is: It started a long time ago, but then it didn’t happen again for nearly a hundred years.Today on the show, we go back in time to 1879. There was a fight between President Rutherford B. Hayes and Congress about African-Americans voting. It ended in the first ever government shutdown.” At the link find the title, “Planet Money #888: The First Shutdown,” right-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food guide 18 mins “We look at the new Canada Food Guide and examine how business interests have influenced our nutrition over the decades, since the first guide in the 1940s.” At the link find the title, “Should the advice in the Canadian Food Guide be taken with a pinch of salt?” right-click “Download Should the advice in the Canadian Food Guide be taken with a pinch of salt?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Anthropologist 20 mins – “As wildfires ravage California and the death toll continues to rise, we talk to a forensic anthropologist about the challenges in identifying victims and the importance of bringing some sense of closure to their loved ones.” At the link find the title, “As death toll rises in California fires, forensic anthropologists face grim task of identifying remains,” right-click Download As death toll rises in California fires, forensic anthropologists face grim task of identifying remains” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guantanamo Detainees 24 mins – “U.S. President Donald Trump made good on a campaign promise to halt the closure of Guantanamo Bay. He did so by closing the office responsible for shutting it down. But that office also tracked released inmates, and now some of them are missing. We look at the risks both to the public, and the former detainees.” At the link find the title, Former Guantanamo inmates who have gone missing are ‘worst nightmare’ for U.S. officials: reporter, right-click “Download Former Guantanamo inmates who have gone missing are ‘worst nightmare’ for U.S. officials: reporter” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hilllbilly Elegy 31 mins- “In his new book “Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis”, author J.D. Vance recounts his experience of growing up poor in the white working class communities of Appalachia. It’s not just a personal story but an examination of the culture from where he comes from, as Vance tries to understand why so many white, working class poor today feel disillusioned and disconnected with American politics. This week on the podcast, Jimmy sits down with J.D. for a personal conversation about his family, community, and the state of American politics.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the soundbar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Immigration History 36 mins – “For many years, U.S. immigration favored immigrants from northern Europe. NPR correspondent Tom Gjelten explains how a 1965 law changed things — and led to the current debate about border security.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment 39 mins – “Jon, Jon, and Crooked Media editor-in-chief Brian Beutler break down the bombshell BuzzFeedNews story that President Trump committed a crime by directing Michael Cohen to lie to Congress about the Trump Tower Moscow deal.” At the link find the title, ““The impeachment eagle soars.” (BONUS episode), Jan 2019,“ right-click “MEDIA ENCLOSURE: https://rss.art19.com/episodes/d08a9735-a455-426b-87e2-3dc1a6800568.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kindness 53 mins – “We often forget to say the words “thank you.” But can those two words change how you — and those around you — look at the world? This hour, TED speakers on the power of gratitude and appreciation. Guests include author AJ Jacobs, author and former baseball player Mike Robbins, Dr. Laura Trice, Professor of Management Christine Porath, and former Danish politician Özlem Cekic.” At the link find the title, “Jan 2019, Approaching With Kindness” left-click the download arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Laurel and Hardy 50 mins – “Growing up, actor John C. Reilly remembers watching the comedy of slapstick duo Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy and feeling very touched. It wasn’t just that the two made him laugh, Reilly says, there was something more. “The brilliant thing about their work when you watch it, it seems so nonchalant,” he says. “It seems like they’re doing it for the first time.” Then Reilly got a role playing Oliver Hardy in the new film Stan & Ollie and he realized just how much planning and precision went into those seemingly effortless physical comedy routines. “It requires this diligence with the timing,” he says. “It’s almost like a ballet or a piece of music that you’re playing when you’re doing it.” The film explores Hardy’s relationship with his partner Stan Laurel (played by Steve Coogan) in the early 1950s, when the men were trying to revive their sagging careers with a stage-show tour in Britain. Reilly notes that the two comedians were very different temperamentally, and in their heyday, didn’t spend that much time socializing outside of work. But at this later time in their lives, during this theatrical tour, they were together in every train car, hotel room and theater backstage.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Life Extension 27 mins – “David Sinclair is an Australian geneticist and a professor at Harvard Medical School. He has a soft-spoken, almost tranquil tone, which has the effect of mellowing the audacity of his proclamations. Like this one: “I don’t see any reason why a child born today couldn’t make it to 150.” Or this: “I actually think it will be possible one day to be immortal.” Sinclair’s forecasts are bold, but his basic research question is prosaic: Why mus+t we grow old? From the outside, the aging process is far from mysterious: Our wrinkles deepen, our spines curve, our energy flags. But beneath the skin, it is a mystery: Every process that has kept us alive for decades slowly begins to go haywire, for no apparent reason whatsoever. “What we’re working on in my lab is trying to understand why those things happen over time,” Sinclair told me. “And I think we’ve solved it.” In the latest episode of Crazy/Genius, produced by Kasia Mychajlowycz and Patricia Yacob, I spoke with Sinclair and several other scientists and technologists about the science of life extension and the allure of immortality.” At the link left-click “Share” and the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow on the pop-up menu and select “Save Link As” to download the podcast.

Marmite 66 mins – “Dave is no scientist, but he is ‘science-adjacent.’  This week, after having read of research involving the benefits to brain function conferred by Marmite consumption, he conducts his own experiment on SCP hosts John Pienta, Kaci McCleary, Aline Sandouk, and Nathan Miller. Will they be able to use their new Marmite-based powers to pass Dave’s Pop Quiz and identify actual Amazing Health Products You Can Get?  Listener Hannah wants to know all about the medical science training program lifestyle, and how it differs from the MD student experience, and since Aline is an MSTP student herself, Hannah’s in luck.  And 23andMe has finally received approval from the FDA to offer genetic screenings for defects that either one already knows about or that knowing about might do more harm than good.   Listeners, if you like what you hear today, please leave us a review on iTunes!.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Test Concerns 29 mins – “Dr. Rita Redberg cautions that some screening test carry risks that far outweigh the benefits. In particular direct-to-consumer medical tests should have clear benefits and good dialog between patient and doctor. She advises that tests without clear evidence of benefit should be regarded with abundance of caution, if not skepticism Recorded on 02/16/2016. (#30670)” At the link right-click “AUDIO MP3” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Reintegration 69 mins- “The highly politicized debate over a U.S.-Mexico border wall and intense focus on Central American caravans traveling across Mexico have elevated tensions about the best methods to manage regional migration while providing humanitarian protection to those who qualify. The composition of regional migration flows has changed significantly during the past five years, with U.S. apprehensions of migrants from the Northern Triangle countries of Central America (El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras) at the U.S.-Mexico border typically outpacing those of Mexican migrants, and migration shifting from predominantly single males to families and unaccompanied children. The Trump administration’s increasing arrests and removals of Mexicans and Central Americans who have lived illegally in the United States for years and its decision to terminate Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Salvadorans and Hondurans are putting pressure on home-country governments to expand reception and reintegration service capacity. This Migration Policy Institute (MPI) webinar focuses on reception and reintegration services for returning migrants, along with the heightened pressure policymakers in Mexico and Central America are facing to design systems and programs that support both returnees and the communities in which they settle. Authors of a year-long study of reception and reintegration services in Mexico and the Northern Triangle discuss the findings of their fieldwork. They focus on the differing reintegration needs of individual migrant groups, promising reception and reintegration programs, and ongoing challenges for origin communities in welcoming returnees. They also unveil short- and long-term policy recommendations to improve reintegration strategies, with the goal that successful reception and reintegration will reduce migration flows from Central America and Mexico.” At the link right click (Download(Loading)” and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

Panera Pay What You Want Test 19 mins – “In 2010, Panera launched several pay-what-you-want cafes. On today’s show: How this charitable experiment worked out.” At the link find the title, “January 18, 2019, #889: The Pay-What-You-Want Experiment” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physician Loneliness 9 mins -”The transition away from routine interaction with patients and colleagues toward more individual activities has contributed to loneliness and burnout. Addressing physicians’ loneliness in the 21st century requires finding innovative ways to interact with each other.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pilot Q and A’s 48 mins – “How to Keep Competitive While Not Flying. Welcome to the inspirational, informational, and transparent aviation careers podcast. Today we answer your questions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reporter Dorothy Butler 47 mins – “Dorothy Butler Gilliam was the first black woman reporter at the Washington Post. She shares her story and her quest to make the media look more like America.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Female Refugee 47 mins – “A Saudi teen who fled her allegedly abusive family is granted asylum in Canada. We’ll look at what’s changing and what’s not for women in Saudi Arabia….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Health 85 mins – “Sexual health is, for many, a fundamental element of life-quality. Dr. Maurice Garcia, Assistant Clinical Professor in Residence, Genital Reconstruction, Neurourology and Sexual Medicine, Department of Urology at UCSF, explores how to maintain sexual function and activity in older age and after cancer. He also talks about transgender and gender-non binary people. Recorded on 02/10/2016. (#30687)” At the link right-click “AUDIO MP3” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Control 29 mins – “Tarleton Gillespie, author of [Custodians of the Internet], talks about his book that explores content moderation on social media platforms. He also discusses the role that Congress could play.”At the link find and right-click the title, “Communicators with Tarleton Gillespie, Dec 2-18,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Software Defined Networks 38 mins – “Many of us are accustomed to Internet access from companies that own the infrastructure, offer only a few options, and are one of a small number of providers. For the most part, we’ve learned to accept that model, but will it ever change? This week’s guest, President of EntryPoint Networks Jeff Christensen, explains why that model is broken and how we can fix it through software defined networks (SDNs). We can turn that model around to put control in the hands of users….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ted Kennedy Challenge to Carter 38 mins – “Journalist Jon Ward talks about the chaos that led Kennedy to challenge Carter for the Democratic nomination — and the long-lasting damage it did to the party. Ward’s new book is Camelot’s End.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transplant Surgeon 36 mins – “When Joshua Mezrich was a medical student on the first day of surgical rotation, he was called into the operating room to witness a kidney transplant. What he saw that day changed him. After the donor kidney came out of ice and the clamps on it were released, he says, “it turned pink and literally, in front of my eyes, this urine just started squirting out onto the field.” Mezrich was blown away: “I just had this sense like, ‘This is so amazing, what we’re doing, and what an incredible gift. And could I ever do this? Could I ever be part of this exchange, this beautiful thing?'” He went on to become a transplant surgeon and has since performed hundreds of kidney, liver and pancreas transplants. He also has assisted in operations involving other organs. Each organ responds to transplant in a different way….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Entomology 89 mins – “Howdy, howdy bug lovers! Today’s show is part two of our series on women in entomology. In this episode Jody has 4 guests she speaks to individually, May Berenbaum, Karen Walker, Marianne Alleyne, and Rebecca Schmidt-Jeffris. They represent a different sectors of our science, different time points in careers, and different passions for insect science. Tune in to hear their stories and perhaps understand a little bit more about the challenges that women have faced in science and issues we all still need to work on.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Womens Rights 63 mins – At the link find the title, “Women’s Rights, Human Rights, and Counterterrorism, 18 Jan 19,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WordPress Developer 52 mins – “Coder, writer, composer, and founding developer of WordPress Matt Mullenweg is Jeffrey Zeldman’s guest. Open Source will save us. The WordPress 5.0 rollout. When Matthew met Jeffrey. Browsers in the age of Blink. AMP & HTML. Gutenberg: blocks and key commands. IE5. Box models. Google: still doing no evil?” At the link right=click “MP3 Audio” and select ‘”Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Mining Digest 373 – Jan 11, 2019: Altruism, American Decline, Andrew Weil, Birthright Citizenship Discussion, Bitcoin Energy Usage, Carbon Control Efforts, Chemical Weapons, China’s Hidden Prison Camps, Climate Assessment Report, Competition Psychology, Conversion Therapy, Cork Industry, Diets Around the World, Eating Questions, Endangered Species, Enlightenment, Facebook Politics, Hasidic Judaism, Health Inequalities, Immigration History, Jamal Khashoggi Murder, James Comey, Michael Flynn and Trump, Mind Wandering, Native American Sovereignty, Networks and Power, Neurological Imaging, Presidential Restraint, Professions Future, Richard Dawkins, Rosanne Cash, Ruby Ridge Incident, Seed Industry, Silk Road Countries, Sport Injuries, Ultra Marathoners, Vanishing Species, Voting Opposition, Volcanologist, Wendell Wilkie

Exercise your ears: the 59 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 345 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 23,756 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 157GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 496 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Altruism 44 mins – “Matthieu Ricard is a molecular biologist, Buddhist monk and best-selling author. He was a guest on The Diane Rehm Show in June 2015 to discuss his book ‘Altruism: The Power Of Compassion To Change Yourself And The World’.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive and can be downloaded from there.

American Decline 42 mins – “In Hollywood movies diplomats always get a bad rap. I’m picturing Claude Rains as “Mr. Dryden” in Lawrence of Arabia looking, as Clyde Rains always does, somewhat reptilian as he hunches over a map of the Middle East with General Allenby, smirking secretively. Hollywood diplomats are slippery. Untrustworthy. More often than not, they turn out to be double agents. On screen, definitive action plays better than careful talk or compromise. This is true of America in general and of our politics in particular—we’re just not comfortable with ambiguity. Leave that to the French. Americans are about gettin’ things done. But the geopolitical world is complex, and allegedly getting more so every day. Meanwhile, over the last several presidencies, America has quietly been shifting its foreign policy approach from diplomacy to military muscle. With the current president, the gutting of the State Department in favor of the Pentagon is starting to look like Friday the 13th part whatever. My guest today is investigative journalist and former State Department official Ronan Farrow. He won the Pulitzer Prize for his his work in the New Yorker on the Harvey Weinstein sexual abuse scandal. His new book is War on Peace, The End of Diplomacy and The Decline of American Influence — and the title is pretty much self-explanatory.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

American Fragmentation 48 mins – “A nation born in revolution will forever struggle against chaos. Jill Lepore, author of THESE TRUTHS, on the political divide, public shaming, and the future of democracy. How the two parties got as ideologically divided as they are now. (Hint: Not the organic will of the people) Public shaming: The dangers of using destructive means to constructive ends.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American History Lessons 36 mins – “In this moment of political discontent, when we talk of deep divides and a growing sense that our democracy has gone off track, historians counsel us to look to our past for guidance. Pulitzer Prize-winning author Joseph Ellis returned to the founding of our country in search of lessons for today. His takeaway? We have lost the ability to argue. In his new book, “American Dialogue: The Founders and Us,” Ellis considers some of the major issues that divided the members of the country’s founding generation -and continue to be fought over 200 years later. He tells Diane that we may not find answers in history, but we can learn how to frame the debate.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive and can be downloaded from there.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive and can be downloaded from there.

Andrew Weil 105 mins – “Andrew Weil, M.D. (@DrWeil) is a world-renowned leader and pioneer in the field of integrative medicine. Dr. Weil received a degree in biology (botany) from Harvard College in 1964 and an M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1968. After completing a medical internship at Mt. Zion Hospital in San Francisco, he worked a year with the National Institute of Mental Health, then wrote his first book, The Natural Mind. From 1971-75, as a Fellow of the Institute of Current World Affairs, Dr. Weil traveled widely in North and South America and Africa collecting information on drug use in other cultures, medicinal plants, and alternative methods of treating disease. From 1971-84 he was on the research staff of the Harvard Botanical Museum and conducted investigations of medicinal and psychoactive plants. Dr. Weil is the founder and Director of the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine, where he also holds the Lovell-Jones Endowed Chair in Integrative Rheumatology and is Clinical Professor of Medicine and Professor of Public Health. Through its Fellowship and Integrative Medicine in Residency curricula, the Center is now training doctors and nurse practitioners around the world. A New York Times best-selling author, Dr. Weil is the author of 15 books on health and well-being, including Mind Over MedsFast Food, Good Food, True Food, Spontaneous Happiness, Healthy Aging, and Eight Weeks to Optimum Health.” At the link “Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”

Astronomer’s Life 29 mins – “Maggie Aderin-Pocock has been fascinated by space since she was a young child. When she was six years old she caught the bug when she saw a picture of an astronaut on the front of a book in her primary school library. As a teenager she built her own telescope. After studying physics and mechanical engineering, Maggie worked in industrial research before returning to her first love, astronomy, when she managed the building of an instrument on a giant telescope in Chile. Now, she spends her time presenting TV programmes, in particular the BBC’s Sky at Night, and inspiring the next generation of schoolchildren to become scientists. Maggie’s come a long way since her own childhood. Her parents separated when she was four years old, and their prolonged custody battle meant she attended 13 schools in as many years. In addition, she was diagnosed as dyslexic and put in remedial classes where she wasn’t ever expected to achieve academically.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Birthright Citizenship Discussion 64 mins – “President Trump’s declaration that he could revoke birthright citizenship with an executive order has set off a firestorm of controversy among legal scholars. On this episode, Akhil Reed Amar and Edward Erler debate whether or not the 14th Amendment requires birthright citizenship for all, and dive into the disputed history and original meaning of the Constitution’s Citizenship Clause. Jeffrey Rosen moderates as Amar argues that birthright citizenship is constitutionally required, while Erler asserts that it is not and that Congress has the power to change it—and should.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin Energy Usage 56 mins – “Bitcoin ‘mining’ is harder on the environment than mining for gold” At the link find the title, Bitcoin mining uses more energy than mining for real gold,” right-click “Download Bitcoin mining uses more energy than mining for real gold” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Trends 27 mins – “Slate Money on GM’s plant closures, Carlos Ghosn in hot water, Trump trash-talking the Fed, and whether or not we should care about Apple and Microsoft’s market caps.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Control Efforts 29 mins – “If you’re someone who’s curious about the geopolitical implications of carbon fuel and the ecological havoc it wreaks, you’ve probably come across some of Richard Heinberg‘s work. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with this senior fellow at the Post Carbon Institute who has authored over 13 books and regularly ponders the past and future of humanity and the earth in his Museletter. We discuss the global debt crunch, the search for tight oil, and the concomitant acceleration of climate change. Heinberg also tells us his thoughts on negative emissions technologies and regenerative agriculture, and explains why he refers to the past ten years as ‘our bonus decade.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cave Pictures in Somaliland 27 mins – “Somaliland’s rich archaeological heritage was practically unknown 15 years ago. Now thanks to Dr. Sada Mire, Somali archaeologist and author, medieval Islamic towns, pre-Islamic Christian burial sites, and pre-historic cave paintings have been uncovered. One of them, Laas Geel, has been described as one of the most important rock-art sites in eastern Africa. Dr Sada Mire takes us there to see astonishing rock paintings more than 5000 years old in near perfect condition. Their remoteness has until recently protected them but there is little security around these sites. There has already been some looting, and the cave paintings are rapidly deteriorating and have lost some of their colour since their discovery. But Somaliland is in a uniquely difficult position; its archaeological sites fit the criteria to receive Unesco world heritage status, but as a country that is not internationally recognised it cannot get Unesco status and the funding that would help protect its sites. What can a place that is not even allowed to be a country do to protect some of the world’s most precious heritage? Dr Sada Mire and Bidhaan Dahir of the BBC Somali Service explore the possibilities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chemical Weapons 38 mins – “Alastair Hay, now Emeritus Professor of Environmental Toxicology at the University of Leeds, is a chemist who’s had a dual career as an academic researcher and an outspoken activist and campaigner. The common theme has been the application of his knowledge to how chemicals affect our lives, in the workplace and during conflicts. Alastair Hay is best known for his work to rid the world of chemical weapons, a concern about this horrific form of warfare that goes back to the use of Agent Orange in the Vietnam War. His work culminated in the Chemical Weapons Convention, which came into force in 1997, outlawing their production, stockpiling and use. He spent his childhood in Zimbabwe and returned to the UK when he won a scholarship from Shell to study chemistry in London in the late 1960s. After a spell working on the biochemistry of animals, including a stint at London Zoo where one of his more difficult jobs was taking blood from penguins, he moved on to studying the effects of chemicals on humans. Jim al-Khalili talks to Alastair Hay about his love of chemistry and his shock to see that chemical weapons are still being used over twenty years after the signing of the Convention.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China’s Hidden Prison Camps 27 mins – “China is accused of locking up as many as a million Muslims in its western region of Xinjiang. The government denies this, claiming people willingly attend special ‘vocational schools’ to combat ‘terrorism and religious extremism’. But a BBC investigation has found evidence of a vast, and rapidly growing, network of detention centres where people are held against their will and often abused and humiliated.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Assessment Report – “Last Friday the U.S. government released a report on climate change that laid out with alarming specificity the impacts of global warming on the country. If you missed the news, that was the point. The Trump White House intentionally released the National Climate Assessment the day after Thanksgiving, when many are busy with family and shopping. Not only has the White House denied that climate change is caused by humans, the administration is also implementing policies that will increase greenhouse gas emissions. New York Times energy and environmental policy reporter Coral Davenport joined Diane on the podcast to talk about the report, and the reaction from President Trump and his administration.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive and can be downloaded from there.”

Competition Psychology 37 mins – “Tiger Woods. Phil Mickelson. 18 Holes. 9 million dollars. Two of the most dominant golfers in the past two decades face off against each other for ultimate bragging rights in their rivalry. How does the brain function in a high-pressure situation like this? Does the course favor a certain golfer? On this episode of Playing with Science, hosts Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice team up with neuroscientist and StarTalk All-Stars host Heather Berlin and sports physicist “The Good Professor” John Eric Goff to investigate the science behind this epic match, both physical and mental.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conversion Theory P1 45 mins – “Today on Radiolab, we’re playing part of a series that Jad worked on called UnErased: The history of conversion therapy in America. The episode we’re playing today, the third in the series, is one of the rarest stories of all: a man who publicly experiences a profound change of heart. This is a profile of one of the gods of psychotherapy, who through a reckoning with his own work (oddly enough in the pages of Playboy magazine), becomes the first domino to fall in science’s ultimate disowning of the “gay cure.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conversion Theory P2 52 mins – “Today on Radiolab, we’re playing the fourth and final episode of a series Jad worked on called UnErased: The history of conversion therapy in America. Imagine… You’re openly gay. Then, you become the leader of the largest ex-gay organization and, under your leadership, many lives are destroyed. You leave that organization, come out as gay – again – and find love. Do you deserve to be happy? This is a story of identity, making amends and John Smid’s reckoning with his life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Cork Industry 30 mins – “What do cork, coffee cups, lettuce, and excessive travel have in common? They are all areas of personal choice that have an environmental impact, and they are all things we will be discussing with our guest today on Sea Change Radio. Lloyd Alter is a design professor as well as an editor at TreeHugger.com. This week he joins us and expounds on the virtues of cork, a surprisingly sustainable alternative to fossil-fuel-based products for sound-proofing, insulation, home-building, and, of course, bottling wine. We also talk about the waste generated by ubiquitous coffee-to-go, the diminishing need for travel in the era of electronic communication, and what Alter posits to be the idiocy of lettuce. As many of us think about making New Year’s resolutions for 2019, Alter gives us some ideas as to what we might put on our lists.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuyana CEO 19 mins – “Seth Stevenson talks to Cuyana CEO Karla Gallardo about her upbringing in Ecuador and how it inspired her to make products that last. Gallardo also explains why she focused on female investors when she started the company and what it was like to see Meghan Markle sporting a Cuyana bag.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dangerous Game 45 mins – “Sheelah Kolhatkar is a staff writer at the New Yorker  and a former “risk arbitrage analyst” for two hedge funds in New York City. For the New Yorker, Sheelah writes about Wall Street, Silicon Valley, economics and national politics, among other things. Her latest book is the New York Times bestseller Black Edge, about the largest insider trading investigation in history and the transformation of Wall Street and the U.S. economy. This week’s episode is a departure for us – a deep dive into the personalities, culture, and ideas driving the big banks and the hedge funds of Wall Street. Jason and Sheelah talk about what it was like for her as a woman in that male-dominated industry, how hedge funds have reshaped the whole Wall Street landscape and with it, the global economy, and why billionaire investors are almost required to collect Picassos.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Democracy Revival 45 mins – “Jason Gots: I want to tell you a story. It’s November 5, 2016, a few days before Election Day. I’m staring at Facebook, promising myself I’m going to delete the app once and for all from my phone, today. Enough of the political echo chamber. Enough of the ranting. Then I’m sucked into a video, because that’s what happens. It’s CNN’s Van Jones sitting in the living room of a family in Pennsylvania. Unlike me and most every other liberal coastal elite I know, he’s talking to people who support Donald Trump for President. Listening. Trying to understand. And pulling no punches in expressing his own anger and anxiety over where our country might be headed. In the year leading up to this moment, I had seen nothing like it. And it gave me hope.  I’m so happy to welcome CNN Contributor and former Obama Administration adviser Van Jones to Think Again. His new book is Beyond the Messy Truth: How We Came Apart, How We Come Together.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Diets Around the World 8 mins – “ How many calories do you consume in a day? Is it more or less than the recommended 2,000? How does it compare to the butter-rich 4,900 of a Tibetan monk — or the scant 800 of a Maasai herder in Kenya? These are the questions asked by photographer Peter Menzel and his wife, Faith D’Aluisio, in their new book, What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.” I want people to understand their own diets better — and their own chemistry and their own biology,” Menzell tells NPR’s Michele Norris. “And make better decisions for themselves.” To do that, he and D’Aluisio decided to lay it all out. Literally. This is not the first project of its kind for Menzel and D’Aluisio. A few years ago, their book Hungry Planet showed what families eat over the course of a week. Before that, Material World displayed the anatomy of household possessions around the world. For their newest project, the duo traveled to 30 countries to document what we humans eat on an average day. And their findings are fascinating. Take Joao Agustinho Cardoso, for example. He’s a Brazilian fisherman who consumes a whopping 5,200 calories a day. But, as Menzel’s photo shows, he has an average build, and the quantity of food on his table seems reasonably healthy: whole milk, an entire freshwater fish, pinto beans and noodles. The secret, Menzel explains, is an active lifestyle and high-fiber foods — and a lot of cooking oil. American truck driver Conrad Tolby, on the other hand, gets his 5,400 calories from cheeseburgers, fried foods and Starbucks. Menzel’s photographs are accompanied by D’Aluisio’s text, which delineates each diet but also gives cultural context. She explains why, for example, Millie Mitra in India drinks her own urine; it’s a practice called shivambu, described in ancient texts as cleansing and curative. For D’Aluisio, the goal is to get readers to compare and contrast — to situate one’s personal diet against that of a 12-year-old runaway in Bangladesh or an acrobat in China.” At the link find the title, “Food Photos: Around The World In 80 Diets, 2010,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eating Questions 45 mins – “This is the first of many episodes that will feature the guys answering listener questions. This episode features questions and answers on topics such as: Juicing; Omad; Counting calories (even if eating healthy) What to do if you have a sweet tooth. Food ingredient to always avoid. How do you make your bone broth. What organ to start with if you’re not used to organs. How to get your kids to eat healthy. Have a Wild Health question? Shoot it over to matt@wildhealthpodcast.com mike@wildhealthpodcast.com or jody@wildhealthpodcast.comAt the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in the blog archive.

Endangered Species 29 mins – “How splendid would it be if humans could somehow find a way to truly co-exist with the rest of the planet’s creatures? This week on Sea Change Radio, we focus on two people doing what they can to protect endangered species around the globe. First, we speak to Brooke Bessesen, an author and wildlife researcher whose new book about a small, rare type of porpoise in the Sea of Cortez called the vaquita is facing possible extinction. Then, we take a look back at our 2017 discussion with Topher White. His organization, Rainforest Connection, up-cycles defunct cell phones with solar charging technology and then places them strategically in rainforests all over the world to monitor human activity like poaching and deforestation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Enlightenment 36 mins – “I admit it. I confess. I’ve got a touch of what my guest today calls “progressophobia”. Ever since Charles Dickens got hold of me back in middle school, and William Blake after that, I’ve been a little suspicious of the Great Onward March of science and technology. Gene therapy, healthier crops, safer, more efficient forms of nuclear energy? Very nice, very nice. But what about eugenics, climate change, and Fukushima?  For every problem human ingenuity solves, doesn’t human nature create a new one, on a bigger scale? Dammit, Spock, can your cold, calculating reason fathom the mysteries of the human heart?  But you know what? After devouring all 453 pages and 75 graphs of psychologist Steven Pinker’s new book ENLIGHTENMENT NOW, I admit defeat. The defeat of defeatism. This man has done the math. Since the 18th century things have been getting better in pretty much every dimension of human well-being. Health, safety, education, happiness, you name it… And we’ve done it with the most reliable tools we have: reason, science, and Enlightenment humanism.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Politics 37 mins – “On If Then, hosts April Glaser and Will Oremus discuss the ongoing fallout at Facebook over the company’s decision to hire a conservative PR firm to surface opposition research in order to attack Facebook’s nonprofit critics by highlighting their funding ties to the liberal financier George Soros, playing into a popular, untrue, and anti-Semitic right-wing trope. As internal and external turmoil continues to rile major American technology companies, their employees are organizing for serious change. The hosts dig into what they’ve accomplished so far and what continued employee pressure and mounting labor actions means down the line. Then, an interview with Antonio Regalado, a senior editor at the MIT Technology Review, on a story he broke Sunday night: the very first efforts to gene-edit babies reportedly born this month in China.* The trio discusses the history of gene-editing technology and the debate about using it on humans. To some, gene-editing is a form of medicine, like a vaccination. To others, it’s a form of enhancement. How easy is this to do? And will we have a future where the health of tomorrow’s children, or those whose parents can afford it, will be determined before they’re even born?” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Problems 27 mins – “It may be an understatement to say 2018 has been a rough year for Facebook. The company has been accused of aggressive tactics that push competitors out of the market. It faces growing concerns over privacy and how it uses – and misuses – personal data. And governments have raised questions about Facebook’s affect on democracy, itself. As online campaigns circulate urging users to shut down their accounts, lawmakers in Washington wonder whether it is time change the way it regulates Facebook and other tech giants.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive and can be downloaded from there.

Fashion Trends and Instagram 33 mins – “It’s hard to sum up who Eva Chen is in one simple title. She’s a former magazine editor. She’s a social media star. She’s a fashion icon – particularly for women in their twenties and thirties. And now, she’s a children’s book author. On Instagram she documents her life in photos– what she wears, the highs and lows of being a mother to two young kids, and her job as director of fashion partnerships at Instagram. Evan Chen’s new children’s book is “Juno Valentine and the Magical Shoes.” Eva stopped by the studio last week on her book tour to talk with Diane.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive and can be downloaded from there.

Formula One Cars 28 mins – “How do you convince Formula One racing drivers that they are speeding round the race track at Le Mans when, in fact, they are sitting in a simulator in the McLaren offices in Woking? Apparently it’s all about getting the vibrations right. Racing drivers really do drive by the seat of their pants. They’re also highly attuned to the sound f the engine and instinctively associate different sounds with different speeds. When Caroline Hargrove started trying to build a driveable model of a Formula One car many thought it just wouldn’t be possible. Today, all the major manufacturers of Formula One cars use simulators to help them design faster cars and improve driver performance. Caroline talks to Jim Al-Khalili about how she stumbled upon a job in Formula One and stayed for twenty years. And why she now wants to build digital twins for human beings.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hasidic Judaism 52 mins – “When I started college at New York University in 1990, nobody lived in Brooklyn. Brooklyn was the dark side of the moon. At least that’s how we NYU students thought about it. Lots of people lived in Brooklyn, of course. Just not us. It’s 2018, and Brooklyn has become an international brand, synonymous with artisanal pickles, gastropubs, and luxury condos. It’s the place even former NYU students can’t afford to live anymore. But in a couple of Brooklyn neighborhoods, people are still dressing and living in many ways like it’s the 18th century, and adhering to laws that date back centuries, even millennia earlier. I’m talking about Hasidic Judaism, and particularly, today, about Borough Park, Brooklyn, where this community thrives. And even more particularly about one woman—Rachel “Ruchie” Frier—who, in spite of being religiously observant as most humans would define it has nonetheless become a thorn in the side of the more conservative elements of this already deeply conservative community. The all-female volunteer ambulance corps she started was a radical move for Borough Park, and it’s the subject of 93Queen, a new documentary by Paula Eiselt.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Health Inequalities 28 mins – “When George Davey-Smith started work as an epidemiologist, he hoped to prove that the cause of coronary disease in South Wales soon after the miner’s strike was Thatcherism. The miners said they thought it was a combination of having a poor constitution and bad fortune. Thirty years later, George admits he would have done well to listen to them. Having spent decades studying the influence on our health of a huge number of variables, from lifestyle factors like car ownership to our genetic inheritance and most recently epi-genetic effects; George has concluded that whether or not individuals get sick is, to a significant extent, down to chance. But that’s not to say that public health interventions are a waste of time.They can boost the overall health of a population, significantly.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Evolution 72 mins – “An update: we revisit our episode about normalcy. Evolution results from the ability of organisms to change. But how do you tell the difference between a sea change and a ripple in the water? Is a peacenik baboon, a man in a dress, or a cuddly fox a sign of things to come? Or just a flukey outlier from the norm? And is there ever really a norm? This episode we return to two stories where choice has challenged destiny to see what’s changed and what has become deeply normal.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Immigration History 52 mins – “Colorado State University-Pueblo professor Matt Harris teaches a class about the anti-slavery movement before the Civil War.” At the link under the title, “Lectures in History,” click “Past Programs,” find the title, “Pre-Civil War Anti-Slavery Movement Sept 1, 2018,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Books 19 mins – “With thousands of publishers working in dozens of languages, India is the seventh-largest book publishing nation on Earth. The English-language book market alone is the world’s second-largest, after the US. In addition, the Indian smartphone market is the fastest-growing on the planet, with 300 million users. While Indian-language news and entertainment available on those devices may be leading a generation away from traditional print media, including books, the Association of Publishers in India (API) considers books to be essential to India’s future – as resources for educational ambitions and as outlets for creative expression.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jamal Khashoggi Murder 30 mins – “It’s been nearly two months since journalist Jamal Khashoggi was murdered inside the Saudi Arabian consulate in Turkey. The CIA concluded that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman ordered the killing, but President Trump has remained steadfast in his support of the U.S. – Saudi relationship. The whole incident has shined a bright light on the behavior of Saudi Arabia on the international stage – particularly in the ongoing brutal war in Yemen. It has also raised questions about President Trump’s financial ties to the Saudi kingdom. New York Times White House correspondent Mark Landler has been following the story closely. As he wrote recently, “For Mr. Trump, it is enough that Prince Mohammed denied any involvement in the killing in phone calls with him.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive and can be downloaded from there.

Jamal Khashoggi Murder 34 mins – “Virginia Heffernan discusses the murder of Jamal Khashoggi with Adam Coogle of Human Rights Watch. It’s a sobering reminder that the current administration seems to be turning a blind eye to human rights abuses.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

James Comey 36 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to analyst Mieke Eoyang, vice president of Third Way’s national security program, about all things James Comey, including his testimony, takes on his role and righteousness, and what we would want to hear from him. Plus, Rex Tillerson, the new U.N. ambassador and how Trump elects women to his Cabinet, and more Trump-Russia.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jeff Flake and Mueller 19 mins – “Sen. Jeff Flake is demanding legislation to protect the Mueller probe. High-profile conservatives are peeling off from the Federalist Society to stand up to the Trump administration. Slate’s Dahlia Lithwick explains why she thinks this is a pivotal moment for the Trump administration and its discontents.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lost Roanoke Colony 51 mins – “…we’re talking about the lost colony of Roanoke. In 1590, some 100 English settlers vanished from present-day North Carolina with little trace. It’s a story that has captured the imagination of Americans, with theories as vastly different as peaceful coexist with indigenous tribes to alien abduction. In a new book, journalist Andrew Lawler looks for traces of the colonists with historians and archaeologists and explores how the story of Roanoke has become part of the myth of America.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Michael Flynn and Trump 33 mins – “This week brings major news from special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into ties between the Trump administration and Russia. As the public learns more from the secretive world of Mueller’s prosecution, it seems people are holding their breath for “the big one” – the thing that cracks it all open. But Ben Wittes says not so fast. Wittes is editor-in-chief of Lawfare and a close follower of the various investigations surrounding President Trump and his associates. Wittes says if there is a moment that will bring down President Trump, it’s not going to be legal – it will be political.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive and can be downloaded from there.

Mind Wandering 58 mins –When was the last time you were bored? I mean really, well and truly, staring at the patterns in the wallpaper bored?  Statistics suggest that you’re probably listening to this show on a smartphone. Which means you own a smartphone. Which means it’s probably always close at hand, full of apps and podcasts to distract you the instant that uncomfortable feeling of boredom creeps in. Which means your brain almost never gets the chance to sit with that restlessness and come up with creative alternatives, from daydreaming to doing something brilliant (or at least less boring) in real life. If that’s not you, awesome. But it’s a lot of us these days.  My guest today, Manoush Zomorodi, is the host of Note to Self – a popular radio show and podcast on how we live with technology. An experiment she did on the show with the eager help of 20,000 fans became the subject of her new book Bored and Brilliant: how spacing out can unlock your most productive and creative self.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Native American Sovereignty 66 mins – “A very packed show. All the Mueller moves with Mimi Rocah, a former federal prosecutor in the Southern District of New York, now a Fellow in Criminal Justice at Pace Law School. Plus Dahlia Lithwick is joined by Riyaz Kanji, an attorney for the Creek Nation, to explore the fascinating questions and disgraceful history involved in Carpenter v. Murphy, a case argued by Kanji before the Supreme Court last week that started with a murder and now involves questions of sovereignty over 3 million acres in Oklahoma.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Networks and Power 90 mins – “ Niall Ferguson is a senior research fellow at Jesus College, Oxford, and at the Hoover Institution, Stanford, as well as visiting professor at the New College of the Humanities, London. His books include The Square and the Tower: Networks and Power, from the Freemasons to Facebook (02018); Civilization: The West and the Rest (02012); and The Ascent of Money (02009). Historian Niall Ferguson: “Globalization is in crisis. Populism is on the march. Authoritarian states are ascendant. Technology meanwhile marches inexorably ahead, threatening to render most human beings redundant or immortal or both. How do we make sense of all this?” Ferguson analyzes the structure and prospects of “Cyberia” as yet another round in the endless battle between hierarchy and networks that has wrought spasms of innovation and chaos throughout history. He examines those previous rounds (including all that was set in motion by the printing press) in light of the current paradoxes of radical networking enabled by digital technology being the engine of massive hierarchical companies (Facebook, Amazon, Google, Twitter, and their equivalents in China) and exploited by populists and authoritarians around the world. He puts the fundamental question this way: “Is our age likely to repeat the experience of the period after 1500, when the printing revolution unleashed wave after wave of revolution? Will the new networks liberate us from the shackles of the administrative state as the revolutionary networks of the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries freed our ancestors from the shackles of spiritual and temporal hierarchy? Or will the established hierarchies of our time succeed more quickly than their imperial predecessors in co-opting the networks, and enlist them in their ancient vice of waging war?” Niall Ferguson is currently a senior research fellow at Jesus College, Oxford, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and visiting professor at the New College of the Humanities. His books include The Square and the Tower: Networks and Power, from the Freemasons to Facebook (2018); Civilization: The West and the Rest (2012); and The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World (2009).” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Audio Podcast” on the pop-up menu and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neural Imaging 90 mins – “With her stunning breakthroughs in neural imaging, Mary Lou Jepsen is making the brain readable (and stimulatable) in real time. That will revolutionize brain study and brain medicine, but what about brain communication? Could a direct high-resolution interface to the brain lead to what might be called practical mental telepathy? What are the prospects for brain enhancement? What are the ethics of direct brain reading and intervention? Mary Lou Jepsen founds programs and companies on the hairy edges of physics, invents solutions and takes them to prototype all the way through to high volume mass production. She’s done this at Intel, MIT’s Media Lab, One Laptop Per Child, Pixel Qi, Google X, and Facebook (Oculus). She is the founder and CEO of Openwater, which is “devising a new generation of imaging technologies, with high resolution and low costs, enabling medical diagnoses and treatments, and a new era of fluid and affordable brain-to-computer communications.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Audio Podcast” on the pop-up menu and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurologist at Work 28 mins – “Suzanne O’Sullivan has been described as “a detective of the mind”. She’s a neurologist who helps some patients with the strangest of symptoms, from so-called ‘Alice in Wonderland’ seizures to those suffering from temporary blindness or paralysis, and that turn out to originate in their subconscious minds. By the time these people get to see Dr Suzanne O’Sullivan they’ll often have been to many specialists, undergone a range of tests and given a variety of diagnoses. Suzanne’s an expert on epilepsy, and the unusual ways that seizures can manifest themselves, who currently works at University College Hospital in London and for the Epilepsy Society. As well as diagnosing and treating patients, Suzanne has also written books about some of her most memorable, and frankly bizarre, cases. Her first book, It’s All in Your Head, which won the Wellcome Book prize in 2016, describes many of her case studies involving patients whose illnesses are psychosomatic. But, she argues that this is an area of medicine that has not been studied deeply enough yet. After all, for the patients themselves, these debilitating symptoms are all too real.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Restraint 45 mins – “This episode of Whistlestop travels back to Nov. 9, 1989, when East and West Berliners took sledgehammers to the Berlin Wall and President H.W. George Bush showed restraint in not making grandiose statements about American-style democracy. Whistlestop is Slate’s podcast about presidential history. Hosted by Political Gabfest host John Dickerson, each installment will revisit memorable moments from America’s presidential carnival.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Professions Future 60 mins – “This week, we’re thinking about how rapidly advancing technology will change our future, our work, and our well-being. We speak to Richard and Daniel Susskind about their book “The Future of Professions: How Technology Will Transform the Work of Human Experts” about the impacts technology may have on professional work. And Nicholas Agar comes on to talk about his book “The Sceptical Optimist” and the ways new technologies will affect our perceptions and well-being.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Richard Dawkins 54 mins – “Today’s guest is internationally best-selling author, speaker, and passionate advocate for reason and science as against superstition Richard Dawkins. From 1995 to 2008 Richard Dawkins was the Charles Simonyi Professor of the Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University.  Among his many books are The Selfish Gene, the God Delusion, and his two-part autobiography: An Appetite for Wonder and A Brief Candle in the Dark. His latest is a collection of essays, stories, and speeches called Science in the Soul, spanning many decades and the major themes of Richard’s work. In this episode, which Dawkins described as “one of the best interviews I have ever had,” Richard and Jason talk about whether pescatarianism makes any sense, where morality should come from (since, as Hume says, “you can’t get an ‘ought’ from an ‘is’), the greatness of Christopher Hitchens, and the evils of nationalism.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rosanne Cash 60 mins – ““She Remembers Everything” is the name of the latest Rosanne Cash album, the 14th of her amazing career. Rosanne and her husband and musical collaborator, John Leventhal, sit down with Broken Record’s Bruce Headlam to play songs from the album, talk about songwriting, her musical family and how “She Remembers Everything” grew out of today’s politics. They also perform cover versions of two American classics, “Long Black Veil” and “Farewell Angelina.” At the link left-click “Share” at the sound bar, then right-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ruby Ridge Incident 26 mins – “In this second episode of Standoff, our new narrative miniseries on the story of Ruby Ridge, host Ruth Graham breaks down what led to a shootout on the Weaver family property on Aug. 21, 1992, that left three people dead.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seed Industry 28 mins – “There’s no time better than after a holiday of feasting to remember where we get our food. Ultimately, most of our complex recipes begin with the simple seed. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to author and environmental journalist Mark Schapiro to discuss the current state of agribusiness and his book Seeds of Resistance. We take a look back at his last book, Carbon Shock, to see how it has weathered the past five years of increased climate change-related events, discuss the unlikely feud over corn nuts and examine some of the valuable work of leading seed advocates around the globe.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shackleton Legacy 52 mins- “…. the writer David Grann joins us to share the remarkable and inspiring story of Henry Worsley. A devoted husband and father and a former British special forces officer, Worsley was obsessed with the legacy of Ernest Shackleton. He yearned to walk in Shackleton’s footsteps, both figuratively and literally. In his attempt to walk across Antarctica alone, Worsely battled life-threatening exhaustion and the unforgiving polar landscape. He also redrew the boundaries of human courage and endurance.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Silk Road Countries 72 mins – “Today’s guest Peter Frankopan is a historian at Oxford University, where he is Director of the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research. He works on the history of the Mediterranean, Russia, the Middle East, Persia, Central Asia and beyond, and on relations between Christianity and Islam. Peter’s new book The Silk Roads: A New History of the World, is an international bestseller, described by William Dalrymple as a ‘historical epic of dazzling range, ambition and achievement’. At an anxious moment in Western history, Frankopan encourages us to take a historical perspective, understanding how change happens in societies and how people typically react to it. This conversation unpacks the fascinating and dense history of the Silk Road countries and digs deep into the economic and social forces that shape our lives.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sport Injuries 49 mins – “You can’t talk about sports without talking about injuries. They’re an occupational hazard on every level from weekend warrior to elite professional athletes. If you’re an athlete in any capacity, it’s likely at some point you’ll be injured. On this episode of Playing with Science, hosts Chuck Nice and Gary O’Reilly investigate the world of sports injuries and the science of recovery. They are joined by Dr. Joshua Dines, physician for the New York Mets and New York Rangers, and, Dr. Jim Taylor, sports psychologist. Find out what the most common injuries are in sports. Explore how technology has advanced the field enough to drastically shorten the recovery timeline on what used to be career-ending injuries. Gary gives us a player’s perspective throughout the episode as he describes his experiences dealing with serious injury during his playing career. You’ll hear how the culture has developed, and stayed the same, around player injuries. Chuck and Joshua recreate a typical conversation between doctor and general manager that demonstrates the cold-blooded and honest nature of teams dealing with long-term injuries. Chuck tells us why he could never coach. We discuss how the balance of rest and physical exercise constitute a good recovery. You’ll learn about the dangers of re-injury, and how injuries can vary depending on the player. Joshua tells us the three main areas he sees surgical procedures progressing. Find out more about the use of stem cells to rebuild ligaments. We discuss if high-level surgical procedures ever make their way to the general public. You’ll hear why wearing braces for extended periods of time might weaken strength. Jim takes us inside the brain of an athlete and explains why an injury to the body is also an injury to the mind. Discover the steps of mental rehabilitation and the cognitive dissonance that can occur after a major injury. You’ll also learn why the best option for recovery is always to stick with the program. All that, plus, we investigate the best ways to prevent injuries.” At the link you can sign up to listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included in the blog archive.

Ultra Marathoners 49 mins – “50, 100, 200 miles and more – ultramarathons are no joke. On this episode of Playing with Science, hosts Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice catch up with ultramarathon runner and world record breaker Ann Trason and Shawn Bearden, a.k.a. Dr. Ultra, as we pull back the curtain on endurance racing.  We define ultrarunning and explore how the definition can change depending on who you’re asking. Find out about the longest classified road race – the Sri Chinmoy Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race. Discover more about how runners plan their schedules around events in which they will compete during the year. Dr. Ultra breaks down “bioenergetics” and how the body functions during endurance running. Learn how diet and physical behavior can help a runner’s efficiency in performance and how recovery is a vital part of training. Investigate why certain recovery techniques are over-hyped and unnecessary. We also discuss the law of distinguishing return during endurance running. Dr. Ultra tells us the single most important thing in training. Find the connections between mentally preparing for ultra-running and mindfulness and meditation. You’ll also learn simple ways to prevent injuries and the impact of the placebo effect, and why Dr. Ultra’s soccer past has helped his performance as an ultra-runner….” At the link you can sign up to listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included in the blog archive.  

Voting Opposition 7 mins – “Negro Queue in Mississippi Is Symbol of Frustration in Voter Registration Drive; SPEED-UP DOUBTED UNDER RIGHTS BILL; Few Applicants Succeed in Getting Names on Books Despite Long Effort” At the link find the title, “Election Eve Rebroadcast (In Line), Nov 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Struggle in America 52 mins – “…we’re talking about the modern struggle to vote in America. When it was passed in 1965 the Voting Rights Act was meant to enfranchise racial minorities long denied the ballot. But has it really worked out like that? Not according to investigative journalist Ari Berman. Having studied the past 50 years of electoral history, Berman says that a “committed group of counterrevolutionaries” have fought to undermine the VRA and shatter the achievements of the civil rights movement.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vulcanologist 27 mins – “Clive Oppenheimer has, more than once, been threatened with guns (a Life Scientific first?). He’s dodged and ducked lava bombs and he’s risked instant death in scorching and explosive eruptions.
He studies volcanoes; science that by necessity, requires his presence at the volcanic hotspots of the world. It was at the lip of a bubbling lava crater on one of the earth’s most active volcanoes, Mount Erebus in Antarctica, that he met the film and documentary maker Werner Herzog. The two became friends and went on to make a volcano movie together. Clive, who’s Professor of Volcanology at the University of Cambridge, tells Jim academics and film makers share the same complementary skill set: thorough research, slick location recording and a familiarity with rejection as 9 out of 10 film pitches (or grant proposals) are turned down! As well as a forensic fascination with the dramatic impact of ancient and modern volcanism on the landscape, Clive discusses how multiple scientific disciplines are now needed to understand the complex historical, archaeological, climatological and environmental impacts of the earth’s volcanic eruptions. He wades into the bitter academic row about what did it for the dinosaurs 65 million years ago: meteorite or volcanism? And he details the importance of Mount Pinatubo’s 1991 eruption in the Philippines for our deeper understanding of anthropogenic climate change.
” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wendell Wilkie 60 mins – “Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer David Levering Lewis recalled the life of Wendell Wilkie, a midwestern businessman turned politician, who unsuccessfully ran as the Republican nominee for president in 1940. David Levering Lewis was joined in conversation by author and editor Lewis Lapham.” At the link right-click “Q&A with David Levering Lewis,” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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Mining Digest 372 – Jan 4, 2019: 11th and 21st Amendments, Agriculture in New York City, AI in Medicine, AIRA Options, American Disintegration, Anthropologist View, Banksy Artwork Shredder, Canadian Oil Production, Canadian Postal Strike, Climate Exchange and Children, Climate Warming, Climate Warming in Congress, Critical Thinking, Dark Age of Injustice, Data for Social Good, Educational Technology Room, Environmentalism Failure, Fascism in America, Female Engineers, Food Safety Forensic DNA Uses, Freedom Defined, Future Threats, God and Guns Documentary, Hand Dexterity Declines, Harry’s Last Stand, Hate Confrontation, Heat Wave Impact, HIV Vaccines, Interpol Crisis, Job Preparation, Jonestown Deaths, Kids Abducted for Sex, Majority Tipping Point, Medical Device Risks, Meditation and Mindfulness, Microbes in Chernobyl, Midterm Election Impact, MOOC Impact, Nazi Facism, Parkinsons Increase, Personalized Learning, Plastic Recycling, Populism Increases, Psychological Espionage, School Bullying, Shirley Chisholm Bio, Snapchat Thief, Success Academy in NYC, Sustainable Development Goals, Vaping Problem, Video Gaming Income, White Supremacists in America

Exercise your ears: the 90 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 545 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 23,756 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 157GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 496 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

11th and 21st Amendments 42 mins – “This season, More Perfect is taking its camera lens off the Supreme Court and zooming in on the words of the people: the 27 amendments that We The People have made to our Constitution. We’re taking on these 27 amendments both in song and in story. This episode is best listened to alongside 27: The Most Perfect Album, an entire album (an ALBUM!) and digital experience of original music and art inspired by the 27 Amendments. Think of these episodes as the audio liner notes. The 25th and 26th Amendments– ratified in 1967 and 1971, respectively– are some of the newest additions to our founding document. However, they tackle some pretty basic questions: who gets to rule, and who gets to vote? If a president dies or is incapacitated, who takes over? And how old do you have to be in order to participate in American democracy? In recent months, the 25th Amendment has swirled in and out of news cycles as Americans debate what it takes to declare a president unfit for office. But this episode looks back, even before the 25th Amendment was ratified: a moment in 1919 when President Woodrow Wilson became bedridden by stroke, and his wife, Edith Wilson, became our country’s unofficial first female president. The 26th Amendment is best encapsulated in a Vietnam-era slogan: “Old enough to fight, old enough to vote.” Eighteen-year-olds at the time argued that if they were old enough to be drafted to fight in the War, they were old enough to have a voice in our democracy. But what about today, when even younger Americans are becoming victims of gun violence and finding themselves at the center of national political debates? Does it mean we should lower the voting age even further?…” At the link find the title, “The Most Perfect Album: Episode 7 , Nov 2018,” right-click “MEDIA ENCLOSURE: https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/moreperfect/moreperfect112118 themostperfectalbumep7.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

12th – 17th and 20th Amendments 34 mins – “This season, More Perfect is taking its camera lens off the Supreme Court and zooming in on the words of the people: the 27 amendments that We The People have made to our Constitution. We’re taking on these 27 amendments both in song and in story. This episode is best listened to alongside 27: The Most Perfect Album, an entire album (an ALBUM!) and digital experience of original music and art inspired by the 27 Amendments. Think of these episodes as the audio liner notes. This week, More Perfect takes a look at three amendments on the more obscure end of the spectrum. The 12th, 17th, and 20th Amendments made fine-tune adjustments to the way we pick our leaders. More Perfect is here to prove these three are more interesting than you think they are. For starters, the 12th Amendment is the secret star of the hit musical Hamilton. The Election of 1800 and the kerfuffle between Aaron Burr and Thomas Jefferson was one of the reasons we passed the 12th Amendment, which made it so that presidential and vice presidential candidates run alongside each other on a single ticket. It was meant to avoid awkward situations where political opponents suddenly had to be partners in government. But Radiolab’s Rachael Cusick reflects on the Clinton-Trump race and the ways the 12th Amendment may have polarized politics. Then, listen to Octopus Project’s original song about the 12th Amendment.  The idea for the 20th Amendment, which shortened the “lame duck” period for outgoing presidents and members of Congress, was first proposed around the same time as the 12th, but it took years to get political momentum to pass it. That momentum came in part from infamous president, Warren G. Harding, whose missteps ignited a movement to pass it. Huey Supreme wrote an original song about the 20th Amendment from the perspective of a lame duck. Then, More Perfect skips back to the 17th Amendment, which made the election of U.S. senators more democratic. Our state legislatures used to hand-pick Senators, but the 17th made it so the people elect their Senators directly. More Perfect reflects on whether direct democracy is all it’s cracked up to be. Listen to original songs about the 17th amendment by Stef Chura and Donny Dinero (of Mail the Horse).” At the link find the title, “The Most Perfect Album: Episode 8 , Nov 2018,” right-click “MEDIA ENCLOSURE: https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/moreperfect/moreperfect113018_themostperfectalbumepisodeeight.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Heritage Return 27 mins – “Some people are applauding a report urging France to return cultural artifacts held in western museums to the former African colonies they were taken from. But one expert says, as long as they were traded legally, they should stay where they are.At the link find the title, “Should western museums return artifacts looted from former African colonies?” right-click “Download Should western museums return artifacts looted from former African colonies?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture in New York City 26 mins – “Nave Strauss is an arborist and the Director of Street Tree Planting for NYC Parks. His primary function is to make sure New York City and its surrounding areas are equipped with the right combination of trees and plants that can help sustain both public and environmental health. He obtained a degree in Environmental Studies with an emphasis in Forestry from St. Lawrence University in Canton, NY in 2008 and has worked with NYC Parks since 2009. He and his team aim to become the best tree planting program in the world. Nave joins me today to share his passion for trees and environmental sustainability. He explains what an arborist is, what they do, and how they participate in various programs involving nature and trees. He also discusses the considerations made when assessing locations and trees to be planted and explains how they aim to improve soil health by way of enhancing soil microbiome as well as how they make use of biochar.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI in Medicine 33 mins – “Machines that can learn and correct themselves already perform better than doctors at some tasks, but not all medicine is task based – but will AI doctors ever be able to have a therapeutic relationship with their patients? In this debate, Jörg Goldhahn, deputy head of the Institute for Translational Medicine at ETH Zurich thinks that the future belongs to robot doctors – but Vanessa Rampton, Branco Weiss fellow at McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy, says they’ll never be able to emulate the empathy required.” At the link find the title, “HAL will see you now, Nov 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AIRA Options 46 min – “Greg Stilson, Director of Product Management at Aira, joins Pete and Jeff in the Blind Abilities studio and talks about the new plans and opportunities available to everyone. From the Guest plan, where anyone downloading the Aira App, can use the Aira Access at a growing number of sites in the Aira Access Network. To the Intro plan, where you can get 30 minutes a month for $29 a month. And the Standard plan, which I like myself, you get 120 minutes for $99 per month. And if you want the Horizon Kit, it will be $124 per month as the $600 Horizon Kit is divided up over a 2-year period. The advance Plan gives you 300 minutes per month for $199 and $224 respectively if you want the Horizon Kit acvantage. Join Greg, Pete and Jeff in this informative cast and learn about all the new Aira Access points and opportunities created by the Aira team. Seems like the value keeps growing and growing as their team and recognition keeps growing as well. Hear about the latest news and the Time Magazine recognition for Ara being one of the best 50 inventions in 2018. You can find out more about Aira on the web at www.Aira.io” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, then select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

American Democracy Status 55 mins – “The U.S. midterm elections have been billed as a referendum on the presidency of Donald Trump. And many think the elections will chart the future course of American democracy at a time when anger, xenophobia, chaos and bitter partisanship and polarization have led people to despair for the future of liberal democracy.” At thelink find the title, “The Enright Files: The state of American democracy in the age of Trum” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Disintegration 55 mins – “Christopher Hedges believes that America may well be in its last act. Addiction, income disparity and hollowed-out towns and cities are becoming the norm, he argues, while the political and financial sectors increasingly merge with each other to the exclusion of anyone else’s interests or needs. His vision is dark, and sobering. Its only salvation, he concludes in this illustrated conversation with guest host Rachel Giese, is mass resistance.” At the link find the title, “Christopher Hedges: Farewell America,” right-click “Download Christopher Hedges: Farewell America< right-click “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Anthropologist Views 54 mins – “In our age, many societies look like they’re hurtling towards disorder and disunity. For all of our technological sophistication, the centre isn’t holding, great civilisations seem less united than ever. Wade Davis thinks we need to pay more attention to the values, the voices, and the concerns of Indigenous peoples. We have a lot to learn by listening more carefully. Wade Davis in a discussion with Paul Kennedy, with excerpts from a lecture at the Ontario Heritage Trust.” At the link find the title, “Wade Davis: Light at the edge of the world (Encore January 23, 2018),” right-click “Download Wade Davis: Light at the edge of the world (Encore January 23, 2018),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apple Watch for Fitness 33 mins – “The Apple Watch was intended to be a health and fitness device from the beginning. Now, these gadgets have the ability to capture our heart rates and even take our blood pressure. You may even be wearing one right now. And while there are plenty of smartwatches to choose from, the Apple Watch has always seemed to be in a league of its own.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Internet 31 mins – “Melbourne, 1989. Two teenagers hack Australia’s recently established internet connection, and infiltrate some of the world’s most secure computer networks.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Banksy Artwork Shredder 21 mins – “Banksy posted an update video showing more of the prank build and the shredding mechanism. But he’s still trolling us!” At the link left click “Download: podcast” to get the video file. The audio portion is included in the blog archive.

Beaver History 54 mins – “Four centuries of fur-trade trapping nearly wiped beavers off the North American map. Now they’re back, big time, and we’re discovering that sharing the landscape with such tenacious ecosystem engineers isn’t always easy. We’re also learning that there are compelling reasons to try to coexist with this iconic species. Contributor Frances Backhouse explores how two control freaks – humans and beavers – can get along.” At the link find the title, “Rethinking the Beaver: Why beavers and humans have to learn to get along,” right-click “Download Rethinking the Beaver: Why beavers and humans have to learn to get along” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Oil Production 19 mins – “Alberta Premier Rachel Notley says the temporary cut in oil production may be a short-term stopgap for what she has called a “crisis” on oil prices, but she’s promising upgrades and more pipelines as long-term solution.” At the link find the title, “Oil production cuts are part of a bigger plan, says Rachel Notley,” right-click “Download Oil production cuts are part of a bigger plan, says Rachel Notley” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Podcasts 53 mins – “Our interactive, variety show-style episode live from the Hot Docs Podcast Festival features storytellers from across Canada. Featuring: First Day Back, Nobody Cares (Except for Me), Tai Asks Why, Personal Best, Red Man Laughing. Plus, Ryan McMahon shares details about his new show with the Canadaland Network, Thunder Bay.” At the link find the title, “Podcast Playlist Live!,” right-click “Download Podcast Playlist Live!and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Postal Strike 20 mins- “The federal government is threatening striking Canada Post workers with back-to-work legislation as the holidays loom. But with job demands changing, and the volume of parcels becoming larger and heavier, one Canada Post worker says the job has simply become “unsafe.” At the link find the title, “I wasn’t believed’: Injured Canada Post employee describes unsafe workplace,” right-click “Download ‘I wasn’t believed’: Injured Canada Post employee describes unsafe workplace” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carrot History 39 mins – “Thousands of years ago, in what’s now Afghanistan, people unearthed the tangled, gnarled roots of Queen Anne’s Lace—a ubiquitous, hairy-stemmed plant with a spray of tiny white flowers. These fibrous, twisted roots were white and bitter-tasting, but they had an appealing spicy, pine-y, earthy aroma. This was the unpromising ancestor of one of America’s most popular root vegetables (second only to the mighty potato): today, it’s mostly consumed in the form of two-inch orange slugs, marketed under the label “baby carrots.” So how did this white, woody root become orange, as well as purple and yellow and even red? Listen in now to find out—and hear the story of the invention of the baby carrot.” At the link find the title, “How the Carrot Became Orange, and Other Stories,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Death of 1956 46 mins – “Ron Moffatt was wrongfully convicted of murder in 1956, when he was 14 years old. After months in jail, he was released when the real serial killer, Peter Woodcock, was caught. The judge recommended police should no longer interrogate minors without a guardian or lawyer present, but six decades later they still do.” At the link find the title, “Arrested youth should not be interrogated alone, says man wrongfully convicted of murder,” right-click “Download Arrested youth should not be interrogated alone, says man wrongfully convicted of murder,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change and Children 55 mins – “Young couples face a complicated decision at a time when the dire consequences of climate change are becoming clearer, is it ethical to bring a child into the world? Science journalist Britt Wray talks with parents, prospective parents, ethicists and children on this thorny question.” At the link find the title, “What to expect when you’re expecting …. Climate Change,” right-click “Download What to expect when you’re expecting …. Climate Change” right-click “Select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming 25 mins – “In the late 1980s, Bill McKibben was a young environmental reporter who was writing about the greenhouse effect. Climate change was a new idea back then, but today it’s everywhere. McKibben joined us to discuss that 30-year trajectory, and why decades of climate change discussion hasn’t turned into decisive action.” At the link find the title, “Youth would be better leaders in fight against climate change, says veteran environmentalist,” right-click “Download Youth would be better leaders in fight against climate change, says veteran environmentalist,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming in Congress 53 miins – “The White House tried to bury a devastating climate assessment on Black Friday; this week, On the Media documents how TV talk shows gave climate change deniers a platform to spin the report for their own ends. We look back on Fox News’ coming-of-age under Roger Ailes and we consider what comes next for the company amidst pressure, transition and unprecedented proximity to power. Plus, a pro-migration video goes viral in Honduras for all the wrong reasons.” At the link right-click Download” and select”Save Link As”from the pop-up menu.

Coelacanth Fish Discovery 27 mins – “The first Coelacanth was discovered by a woman in South Africa in 1938. The find, by the young museum curator, was the fish equivalent of discovering a T- Rex on the Serengeti, it took the Zoological world by storm. Presenter Adam Hart tells the story of this discovery, and the steps taken by Coelacanth biologists in the decades since to find more fish, in other populations, and record them for science. Adam hears personal accounts from a deep diver who swam with Coelacanths, Eve Marshall, conservationist Dr Mark Erdman, and geneticist Professor Axel Meyer.“ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Hacking History 36 mins – “Before WikiLeaks, there was the Wank Worm. In this week’s episode, we tell you the story of how Australian hackers infiltrated NASA, just months after the country was hooked up to the internet in 1989. Joel Werner, host of Sum of All Parts, helps us tell this story, along with cybersecurity researcher Dr. Suelette Dreyfus. …UPDATE 12/07/18: An earlier version of this episode stated that Galileo’s engines ran on nuclear power. We’ve removed this line, as it was Galileo’s electrical systems, not the propulsion system, which ran on nuclear power. Selected references:  The original Sum of All Parts episode about Phoenix and Electron;Suelette’s book, written with the help of Julian Assange, about the early Australian hacking movement, Underground; An in-depth reference on Hacktivism. Thanks to our sponsor, Cole Haan. You can hear more of Wendy and other Gimlet hosts in conversation at ExtraordinariesOnTheMic.com, produced in partnership with Cole Haan.” At the link find the title, “The Wank Worm: How NASA Got Hacked, Dec 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Critical Thinking 34 mins – “What if the internet isn’t just a resource, but actually an extension of the mind? A cognitive brain enhancement tool that is transforming the way humans think? Some experts are quick to defend that notion. Others believe that technology is dumbing us down, making us lazy and incapable of thinking for ourselves.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Dark Age of Injustice 55 mins – “For more than 40 years, Gareth Peirce has fought to expose and overturn miscarriages of justice and free the wrongfully accused. Based in London, she was instrumental in freeing members of the Guildford Four, who were falsely convicted of carrying out the IRA bombing of a British pub. More recently, she has been representing members of the new suspect community – Muslims falsely accused of being terrorists. Peirce warns eroding human rights under the questionable guise of national security, is a profound attack on democracy.” At the link find the title, “Human Rights Under Attack: Gareth Peirce on The New Dark Age,” right-click “Download Human Rights Under Attack: Gareth Peirce on The New Dark Age,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data for Social Good 55 mins – “We live in a glut of data. Individually we produce vast amounts of information about ourselves simply by living our lives: where we go, what we like, where we shop, our political views, which programs we watch. Each day we produce 2.5 quintillion bytes of data and the rate is growing. In the last two years alone we’ve generated about 90% of the data that’s out there. IDEAS contributor Anik See looks at this tremendous amount of data and how some people are harnessing it, not for surveillance or selling, but rather for the public good.” At the link find the title, “Data for Social Good,” right-click “Download Data for Social Good” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dead Celebrities in Movies 16 mins – “Cool or creepy? The entertainment industry is spending millions to resurrect dead celebrities. They’re doing it with sophisticated digital technology that will ensure that iconic figures like Michael Jackson, Tupac Shakur, Carrie Fisher and Audrey Hepburn live on forever. Could this technology replace real life actors? And what are the moral ramifications of this amazing technology? In this Komando on Demand podcast, Kim speaks with some of the digital wizards who work major movie magic to bring deceased actors and entertainers back to the big screen and concert stages.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diane Ladd 90 mins – “Oscar-nominated actress Diane Ladd pays a visit to the studio to talk about her favorite movie directors, her days as a “Copa Girl,” the importance of homegrown film production and the joys of collaborating with daughter Laura Dern and ex-husband Bruce Dern. Also, Barbara Stanwyck sends flowers, John Carradine opens doors, Robert Duvall turns on the charm and Diane drops by the set of “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.” PLUS: Making “Chinatown”! Celebrating Roger Corman! The genius of Tennessee Williams! Martin Scorsese encourages improvisation! And Diane indulges Gilbert’s obsession with “Carnosaur”! “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop- menu.

E. coli Contamination of Lettuce 20 mins – “If you hate eating your vegetables, you may be off the hook – at least when it comes to lettuce. One writer argues salad is hard on the environment, and isn’t all that nutritious.” At the link find the title, “Is salad a luxury food? One writer argues it’s time to rethink leafy greens,” right-click “Download Is salad a luxury food? One writer argues it’s time to rethink leafy greens,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Technology Room Ep 113 65 mins – “Welcome to episode 113 of the EdTech Situation Room from November 7, 2018, where technology news meets educational analysis. This week Jason Neiffer (@techsavvyteach), Wesley Fryer (@wfryer) and special guest Jason Kern (@jasonmkern) discussed the past week’s technology news through an educational lens. Topics for the show included virtual reality in the classroom, the use of social media worldwide to radicalize politics, hardware updates from Apple’s special event last week, and our need for media literacy everywhere. Anya Kamenetz’ excellent response article, “What the Times got wrong about kids and phones” was also highlighted. Professional courtesy with cell phones at meetings and in the classroom, the NetFlix documentary “The Eighties,” and Flickr’s important announcement about free and pro accounts rounded out the show. Geeks of the week included free “Unity” software licenses for schools, Raspberry Pi projects, the browser extension “OneTab,” and the “Pulse” SMS app on Android.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Educational Technology Room Ep 115 65 mins – “Welcome to episode 115 of the EdTech Situation Room from November 21, 2018, where technology news meets educational analysis. This week Jason Neiffer (@techsavvyteach) and Wesley Fryer (@wfryer) discussed the past week’s technology news through an educational lens. Topics for the show included the recent outages of cloud services including Microsoft’s Azure Active Directory and LastPass Password Manager, and multiple signs of “The Technology Correction.” These included calls for regulating Facebook, surveys showing many young computer scientists do not want to work for Facebook, and Facebook’s apparent inability to regulate / fix itself. Processor upgrades to the Samsung Chromebook Plus, the enduring value of Google Pixelbooks, and Black Friday week deals on Pixelbooks were also discussed. On the security front, a new, stealthy Russian hacking tool, a phishing test tool, the first amendment and Facebook, and student protests over Facebook’s sponsored learning management system “Summit Learning” were also discussed. The use of streetlight concealed cameras by US security agencies and the viability of the iPad Pro as a laptop replacement were topics rounding out the show. Geeks of the week included T-Mobile’s One Plus Plan (great for international travel) and a technique for bypassing news website free article limits with browser incognito mode.

Environmentalism Failure 54 mins – “Environmental problems are well-known and have been for decades, but we still appear to be edging towards a global catastrophe. Why? Environmentalist Graham Saul believes that part of the problem is environmentalism itself. He believes it has a message problem – mainly because it doesn’t have a single, coherent, unified message that people can grasp. Graham Saul has been on the forefront of environmental thought and activism for over 25 years. In this lecture, he parses the problem and points towards a step with potential planet-saving implications.” At the link find the title, “Why Environmentalism is Failing,” right-click “Download Why Environmentalism is Failing,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fascism in America 54 mins – “We’ve heard it so much that it’s almost become a cliché: America is on the road to fascism. The debate over that claim continues, but renowned scholar Henry Giroux argues that “Donald Trump is not just some impulsive rich guy who marketed his way into politics through empty Kardashian-style consumer culture”. Trump needed followers. And he got them. Now what?” At the link find the title, “Flirting with Fascism: America’s New Path?,” right-click “Download Flirting with Fascism: America’s New Path?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female and Male Speech Patterns 54 mins – “PhD graduate Laura Hare taught herself Biblical Hebrew so she could analyse male and female speech patterns in the original text of the Hebrew Bible (or Old Testament). She found the women characters consistently using language that shows deference to men. Some of these signs of deference exist in women’s speech today in North American English. The only female biblical character who fully speaks ‘like a man’ also became an archetype of evil – Queen Jezebel. ‘Ideas from the Trenches’ producers Tom Howell and Nicola Luksic find out what Laura Hare’s discoveries mean for the present day.” At the link find the title, “The Jezebel Problem: What ‘bossy’ women should know about language,” right-click “Download The Jezebel Problem: What ‘bossy’ women should know about language,” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Engineers 25 mins – “Gina Parvaneh Cody graduated from Concordia with her PhD in engineering the same year as the École Polytechnique massacre. She talks to Anna Maria Tremonti about how she donated $15 million to her alma mater to “make a future where women are allowed in engineering.” At the link find the title, “The École Polytechnique massacre ‘left a scar,’ says first woman to have engineering school named after her,” right-click “Download The École Polytechnique massacre ‘left a scar,’ says first woman to have engineering school named after her” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Safety P1 30 mins – “Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Deborah Blum talks about her book The Poison Squad: One Chemist’s Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the 20th Century. Part 1.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Food Safety P2 30 mins -”Pulitzer Priz​e–winning journalist Deborah Blum talks about her book The Poison Squad: One Chemist’s Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the 20th Century. Part 2.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Ford CEO Interview 54 mins – “The Ford Motor Company is ditching its legacy sedans, doubling down on trucks, and trying to steer its stock price out of a long skid. But C.E.O. Jim Hackett has even bigger plans: to turn a century-old automaker into the nucleus of a “transportation operating system.” Is Hackett just whistling past the graveyard, or does he see what others can’t?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic DNA Uses 29 mins – “Forensic DNA analysis has been used by law enforcement for years to help solve some of the biggest crimes. But with the rise of DNA analysis and forensic genealogy companies such as 23andMe, Ancestry, and Genomelink, some ethical questions must be answered. In this episode of Komando on Demand, Kim explores how law enforcement uses forensic DNA analysis to solve notorious criminal cases as well as the ethics and privacy issues of DNA data banks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freedom Defined 55 mins – “What does it mean to be free? All societies place restrictions on what citizens can do, but some restrictions (speed limits) may be more important than others (limiting the right to vote.) But one-size freedom doesn’t really fit all: “democracy” has many faces, and ideas of freedom are shaped by culture. A discussion from the Stratford Festival with the Munk School of Global Affairs: Randall Hansen, Joseph Wong and Lama Mourad.” At the link find the title, “In Search of Global Freedom,” right-click “Download In Search of Global Freedom” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future Threats 58 mins – “Richard A. Clarke joins us to discuss his new podcast Future State and his recent book Warnings: Finding Cassandras to Stop Catastrophes.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GM Decline in Canada 21 mins – “The GM decision to shut down operations in Oshawa highlights the rapid change brought about by technological change and shifting trade conditions. As industries change, will there be a political fallout from the communities these companies have supported for generations?” At the link find the title, “‘A deep sense of betrayal’: Oshawa GM plant closure could spark political fallout, warns prof, “ right-click “Download ‘A deep sense of betrayal’: Oshawa GM plant closure could spark political fallout, warns prof” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

God and Guns Documentary 55 mins – “The U.S. midterms are yet another prompt for many Americans – and people around the world – to reflect on what America actually is now, politically, socially and culturally. Contributor David Zane Mairowitz is originally from New York, and has been living in Europe for over 50 years. He returned to the U.S. in the spring of 2017 to travel through six southern states, where he recorded his encounters with everyday people at restaurants, churches – and gun shows. His aim: to gain insight into an America he’s now struggling to comprehend.” At the link find the title, “Travels through Trump’s America (Encore January 19, 2018),” right-click “Download Travels through Trump’s America (Encore January 19, 2018)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hand Dexterity Declines 22 mins – “A prominent British surgeon says he’s concerned that medical students don’t have the same manual dexterity as their predecessors. Have we turned our backs on our hands?” At the link find the title, “U.K. surgeon gives thumbs down to medical students’ lack of dexterity,” right-click “Download U.K. surgeon gives thumbs down to medical students’ lack of dexterity” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Harry’s Last Stand 28 mins – “Harry Leslie Smith has inspired countless people with his fight for equality. Now the 95-year-old activist and podcaster is in hospital, battling pneumonia. According to his son John, “the battle Harry is fighting now is for his life.” At the link find the title, “Harry Leslie Smith, 95-year-old activist and podcaster, critically ill in hospital,” right-click “Download Harry Leslie Smith, 95-year-old activist and podcaster, critically ill in hospital” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Confrontation 15 mins – “My inbox is full of hate mails and personal abuse and has been for years. In 2010, I started answering those mails and suggesting to the writer that we might meet for coffee and a chat. I have had hundreds of encounters. They have taught me something important that I want to share with you.” At the link left-click the “Share” square, left-click “Download” right-click “Download audio” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Research 54 mins – “Although he’s not yet officially eligible to collect his pension, Dr. David Naylor is already President Emeritus of the University of Toronto – having occupied the office itself for eight turbulent years from 2005 – 2013. Before that, Naylor was Dean of Medicine at U of T, and Chair of the National Advisory Committee on SARS. Right now, he’s interim head of the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. And he was recently awarded the 2018 Henry G. Friesen Prize for Health Science Research. David Naylor talks with Paul Kennedy about his life and work, and about his recent Friesen Prize Lecture at the University of Ottawa.” At the link find the title, “Talking with Doctor David Naylor: Winner of the 2018 Friesen Prize,” right-click “Download Talking with Doctor David Naylor: Winner of the 2018 Friesen Prize” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heat Wave Impact 23 mins – “A new study found male beetles exposed to heat waves suffered issues with fertility and produced fewer offspring, but also passed sperm-count and life-expectancy issues on to those they did have. Could that news include a climate change warning to humans?” At the link find the title, “Heat waves are damaging beetle sperm, and that could be bad news for the entire planet,” right-click “Download Heat waves are damaging beetle sperm, and that could be bad news for the entire planet” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV Vaccines 48 mins – “A very small proportion of people infected with HIV do not develop AIDS. Mark Connors talks about 2 patient populations that his lab studies, the elite controllers and the elite neutralizers, who control HIV infection with their respective T cell or B cell responses. Connors hopes his work on killer T cells and broadly neutralizing antibodies will help scientists develop better HIV therapies or an effective HIV vaccine. Links for This Episode: Mark Connors labsite at NIAID ; Immunity article: Identification of a CD4-binding-site antibody to HIV that evolved near-pan neutralization breadth. ; Immunity commentary: Class II-restricted CD8s: New lessons violate old paradigms. ; Science article: Trispecific broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies mediate potent SHIV protection in macaques. ; Imagining an HIV-Free Future (Smithsonian Worlds AIDS Day Event (Live Dec 4th at 6:45pm) ; HOM Tidbit: 12 Diseases that Changed Our World ;MTM Listener SurveyAt the link find the title, “096: HIV interaction with the immune system with Mark Connors, Nov 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homicide Cases Podcasts 54 mins – From drug lords to killer surgeons: producers keep making more and more true crime podcasts, and audiences just keep on listening.Thunder Bay, Chapo: Kingpin on Trial, Uncover: Bomb on Board, Death in Ice Valley and Dr. Death.” At the link find the title, “Podcasts for those who love true crime and mystery,” right-click “Download Podcasts for those who love true crime and mysteryand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hotel History 54 mins – “A guest checks into a Las Vegas hotel suite, and makes it a fortress, staging a mass shooting on the city below. It’s a horrific act that seems to subvert the very ethos of hotels – places of hospitality and calm. Yet hotels contain multitudes. They are sites of fantasy and functionality, pleasure and trouble. Their spaces are public and private, workplace and bedroom. They exist to house us temporarily, in luxury or in squalor. IDEAS producer Lisa Godfrey explores hotels, both in reality and the imagination, with hotel workers, designers, and writers – to reveal how hotels reflect private desires and social truths.” At the link find the title, “The Accommodating Space: A Hotel Check-In,” right-click “Download The Accommodating Space: A Hotel Check-In” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous Artists 55 mins – “IDEAS contributor Sean Foley explores the landscapes of Algonquin Park, Ont., which inspired Tom Thomson’s work – while also examining Indigenous artists’ perspectives of the same landscapes that Thomson and the Group of Seven may have missed.” At the link find the title, “Tom Thomson: 100 Years from Now, Part 2,” right-click “Download Tom Thomson: 100 Years from Now, Part 2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interpol Crisis 20 mins– “A former U.S. ambassador to Russia says he is “appalled” at the prospect a Russian could soon be the leader of Interpol, arguing the country should instead be kicked out of the international policing organization.” At the link find the title, “Expel Russia from Interpol, former U.S. ambassador suggests ahead of election,” right-click “Download Expel Russia from Interpol, former U.S. ambassador suggests ahead of election” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Preparation 17 mins – “There is a lot of talk these days about robots replacing humans in the workforce, but those conversations remain largely abstract. For students in school today, however, the issue is urgent, research shows. What if the job they aspire to today is no longer an option when it comes time to graduate? How can they train for jobs that don’t even exist yet? On the other side of that equation are educators, who often draw from their own learning experiences in K-12 and higher education to inform their instruction. What responsibility do they have in preparing today’s students for a future none of them can really envision? EdSurge recently sat down with Karen Cator, the CEO of Digital Promise, to get her take. Cator is a former director of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Educational Technology who has been championing digital learning since long before the term “digital learning” was being thrown around—back when she was still a classroom teacher in Alaska. Of all the issues and trends in edtech these days, she says automation is one of the most pressing—and one that all educators should be thinking about.” At the link click the square with three dots, left-click, select “Save File” and “OK” (may have to establish a Soundcloud account) to download the podcast.

Jonestown Deaths 25 mins – “Jackie Speier was shot five times as she tried to help defectors leave the Jonestown commune in Guyana in 1978, on the same night that more than 900 people died after drinking Flavour Aid laced with poison. On the 40th anniversary of the massacre, Speier reflects on the effect that looking death in the eye has had on her life.” At the link find the title, “Jackie Speier was shot five times during the Jonestown massacre. She says it made her fearless,” right-click “Download Jackie Speier was shot five times during the Jonestown massacre. She says it made her fearless” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kids Abducted for Sex 42 mins – “Kids run away in search of love only to be held captive by sex traffickers, hate groups, and terrorists. Every 40 seconds, a child goes missing in the United States. Learn how innocent-looking apps and recruiters are luring our kids in this can’t miss Komando on Demand episode. It might just save a life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Little Prince Documentary 55 mins – “And now here is my secret, a very simple secret: it is only with the heart that we see correctly; what is most important is invisible to the eye.” The Little Prince was first published in 1943. And since then, it’s sold 200 million copies, in 300 languages. And we’re still trying to figure out what it is: a children’s fable, or philosophical tale, or even an autobiography of its author, Antoine de Saint Exupe?ry? Danny Braun of Radio-Canada presents his documentary about the enduring magic of this deceptively simple classic.” At the link find the title, The Little Prince: The Child Philosopher,right-click Download The Little Prince: The Child Philosopher,” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Majority Tipping Point 11 mins – “Do you have to wait for more than 50% of the group to agree with a minority opinion before it can take over? It turns out, you need far less than that. Read the transcript at https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/science/the-science-of-tipping-points-how-25-can-create-a-majorityAt the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy is included in the blog archive.

Marie Colvin Journalist 24 mins – “War correspondent Marie Colvin reported the plight of the helpless from conflicts in the world’s most dangerous places, with a tenacity that eventually cost her her life. Lindsey Hilsum, her friend and fellow war correspondent, tells us about Colvin’s life – a life lived on the edge.” At the link find the title, “How famed war correspondent Marie Colvin lost her eye in an ambush in Sri Lanka,” right-click “Download How famed war correspondent Marie Colvin lost her eye in an ambush in Sri Lanka,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Device Risks 31 mins – “A new investigation led by CBC/Radio-Canada, the Toronto Star and the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists found concerns in the way medical devices are approved and monitored in many countries, and patients who have suffered as a result.” At the link find the title, “New investigations reveals implanted medical devices approved in Canada despite risks,” right-click “Download New investigations reveals implanted medical devices approved in Canada despite risks” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation and Mindfulness 33 mins – “Trouble sleeping? Anxious? Depressed? You’re not alone. What if the relief you needed was right at your fingertips? Mobile meditation apps have been popping up and many are turning to them for relief. But are they really worthwhile and effective? In this Komando On Demand podcast, Kim will share some valuable insight to decide whether these apps are worth checking out – and why.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbes in Chernobyl 22 mins – “This month, we spoke with Dr Alexandre de Menezes, soil microbiologist. Last year, Dr de Menezes went to the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone to see how the nuclear disaster is impacting the microbes in the soil, over 30 years later. We will cover what the soil microbiome is, why is it important and how microbes are affected by radiation” At the link left-click “Download Episode,” select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Midterm Election Impact 59 mins – “In a tweet on Tuesday night, political analyst Amy Walter dubbed the 2018 midterms the “‘choose your own narrative’ election”—meaning that voters on all sides could find cause for celebration or disappointment. Katie and Brian talk with Amy about what the results mean, what we’ve learned about the electorate, and how the elections might shape both parties’ strategies in 2020. Presidential historian Doug Brinkley also joins Katie and Brian to discuss how this week’s election compares to midterms past—and he shares his thoughts on how President Trump will react to the new opposition Congress. Plus, we take your calls!” At the link find the title, “83. 2018 Midterms: Where Do We Go from Here?,” right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Caravan Tear Gassing 20 mins – “The use of tear gas on child migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border drew condemnation from groups such as Amnesty International, and a rebuttal from President Trump that it was a “a very minor form” of tear gas. We look at what happened at the border, and what the substance does to the human body.” At the link find the title, “Use of tear gas a ‘good public relations move’ for police forces, says expert,” right-click “Download Use of tear gas a ‘good public relations move’ for police forces, says expert,” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MOOC Impact 21 mins – “MOOCs have gone from a buzzword to a punchline, especially among professors who were skeptical of these “massive open online courses” in the first place. But what is their legacy on campuses? MOOCs started in around 2011 when a few Stanford professors put their courses online and made them available to anyone who wanted to take them. The crowds who showed up were, well, massive. We’re talking 160,000 people signing up to study advanced tech topics like data science. The New York Times later declared 2012 as the ‘year of the MOOC,’ and columnists said the virtual courses would bring a revolution. But in the rush of public interest that followed, skeptics wondered whether online courses could help fix the cost crisis of higher education. Was this the answer to one of the nation’s toughest problems? The answer, it turns out, is, no. Actually these days you don’t hear much about MOOCs at all. In the national press there’s almost a MOOC amnesia. It’s like it never happened. But these courses are still around, and they’ve quietly evolved. Dhawal Shah, founder and CEO of Class Central, has been tracking MOOCs closely and steadily ever since he was a student in one of those first Stanford open courses. Shah is our podcast guest this week, and he argues that MOOCs are having an impact, but mainly for people who are enrolling in MOOC-based degrees, where they can get a credential that can help them in their careers without having to go back to a campus. Of course, that’s a very different outcome than the free education for the underserved that was originally promised.” At the link click the square with three dots, left-click, select “Save File” and “OK” (may have to establish a Soundcloud account) to download the podcast.

Movie Producer 16 mins – “How does Hollywood choose what stories get told on-screen? Too often, it’s groupthink informed by a narrow set of ideas about what sells at the box office. As a producer, Franklin Leonard saw too many great screenplays never get made because they didn’t fit the mold. So he started the Black List, an anonymous email that shared his favorite screenplays and asked: Why aren’t we making these movies? Learn the origin story of some of your favorite films with this fascinating insider view of the movie business.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, double click “Download audio,” on the pop-up menu, then right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nazi Facism 38 mins – “Kristallnacht was a massive act of antisemitic violence that was named for the shards of glass left littering the streets in more than a thousand cities and towns in the German Reich. NOTE: This episode is not appropriate for young children.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included inthe blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Parkinsons Increase 61 mins – “What would you say if we told you the number of people diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease will double by the year 2040? In a previous Third Thursdays Webinar, moderator Dave Iverson is joined by panelists Ray Dorsey, MD, professor of neurology at the Center for Health and Technology at the University of Rochester’s Medical Center and Bastiaan Bloem, MD, PhD, medical director and professor of neurology at Radboud University, co-authors on a paper published earlier this year on the estimated rise in Parkinson’s cases. The three dive into the hour discussing: Why the population of Parkinson’s patients has doubled since 1990 and will possibly double again to 13 million by 2040,  What immediate actions the PD community can take to prevent this global rise and contend with it, and Ways we can increase access to and affordability of care.” At the link right-click “Download Audio File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pension Gamble 57 mins – “FRONTLINE investigates the role of state governments and Wall Street in driving America’s public pensions into a multi-trillion-dollar hole. Marcela Gaviria, Martin Smith, and Nick Verbitsky go inside the volatile fight over pensions playing out in Kentucky, and examine the broader consequences for teachers, police, firefighters and other public employees everywhere.” At the link find the title, “The Pension Gamble, Nov 2018,” right-click “MEDIA ENCLOSURE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FrontlineAudiocastPbs/~5/DXSFOzA5Fl8/526146357-frontlinepbs-the-pension-gamble.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Personalized Learning 26 mins – “In the education technology business, Larry Berger is considered—if not the smartest guy in the room, then certainly one of the wiser ones. With more than 20 years in the industry, Larry has seen the ups and downs, twists and turns. In 2000 he co-founded Wireless Generation, which pioneered the use of data, digital diagnostics and assessments to support students. It was bought in 2010 by News Corporation, which invested more than $1 billion into the company and rebranded it as Amplify. News Corp’s commitment proved to be a short-lived, however. The media giant sold Amplify to private investors five years later. Today, Larry Berger leads Amplify as its chief executive. The company is no longer as high-profile—or as big—as it once was. So what is Amplify today? What have the past years taught him, and where is the company going? EdSurge recently sat down with Berger for an update on what Amplify’s up to, along with his thoughts on how the curriculum business is evolving. He also talked about the challenges facing edtech companies today, including his skepticism towards what he calls an “engineering” model of personalized learning.” At the link click the square with three dots, left-click, select “Save File” and “OK” (may have to establish a Soundcloud account) to download the podcast.

Plastics History 27 mins – “Plastic waste and pollution have become a global problem but is there any sign of a global solution? And how did we allow this to happen in the first place? Materials scientist and broadcaster, Professor Mark Miodownik, explores how we fell in love with plastic, why we’ve ended up with oceans of waste blighting the environment and what science and society can do about it. …We may not be on speaking terms right now. But we do have a love affair with plastic, in fact it can be all consuming. Adaptable, lightweight, cheap and hygienic – fantastic plastics started to win our affection back in the late 19th century. Bakelite was an early plastic invented to replace expensive wood. Celluloid was one of the earliest plastics, failing to replace ivory in billiard balls, but revolutionising the world as movie film. Plastic really did change our world. Plastic radar insulation played a role in helping the Allied forces win the Second World War and after the conflict, factories start to churn out cheap, mass-produced goods in the new synthetic polymers. But some of the key virtues of plastic may now have paradoxically poisoned the relationship. Being virtually indestructible, has led to a build-up of toxic micro-plastic in the oceans and environment. We’ve grown to regard many plastics as cheap and disposable, we take it for granted, rely on it too much, value it too little and are too ready to cast it aside after one single use.“ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plastic Recycling 27 mins – “Plastics are fantastically versatile materials that have changed our lives. It is what we do with them, when we no longer want them, that has resulted in the global plastic crisis. Mark Miodownik explores our love hate relationship with plastics. …Plastic waste has been a global crisis waiting to happen. To date it’s estimated that around 8.3 billion tonnes of waste plastic exists. That’s 25 Empire State Buildings or 1 billion elephants. Incredibly around half of this has been generated in just the last 14 years, despite mass production having begun in the 1950s. Events such as China’s recent refusal to take any more “foreign rubbish” from the west and Sir David Attenborough’s graphic portrayal of the devastation that plastic waste is causing in our oceans, has prompted political and media discussion like never before. We are at a critical moment where, if we’re to turn the tide on plastic pollution, it will require science and society to come together to create real change. But it won’t be easy. One major area that needs an overhaul is recycling. In the UK only 14% of plastic collected is recycled. Europe tends to burn our waste for energy, and plastic has a calorific value similar to that of coal. But proponents of the circular economy say we should never consider plastic as waste at all and we should think of it as ‘Buried Sunshine’ – a resource that needs conserving – by reusing and recycling again and again.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plastic Recycling Problems 27 mins – “Plastic waste and pollution have become a global problem but is there any sign of a global solution? And how did we allow this to happen in the first place? Materials scientist and broadcaster, Professor Mark Miodownik, explores how we fell in love with plastic, why we’ve ended up with oceans of waste blighting the environment and what science and society can do about it. …Roland Pease hears from Kenya where one of the most stringent bans on plastic bags has been in force for nearly two years, from the US where the reuseable cup has taken off and from Sweden where reverse vending machines give you money back when you return your plastic bottles. And he looks at places where plastic is the best material for the job.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Populism Increases 55 mins – “Authoritarian populists have won elections across a large swath of western liberal democracies. Populist leaders have formed government through free and (mostly) fair elections by riding a wave of popular disaffection with the status quo. But once in power, these governments have gone on to dismantle the very institutions and conventions that help keep liberal democratic principles in place. So how are we to confront this paradox wherein liberal democracy serves a growing and undemocratic illiberalism? A conversation with political scientist Yascha Mounk.” At the link find the title, “The People vs Democracy,” right-click “Download The People vs Democracy,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychological Espionage 62 mins – “Self sovereignty is something that we’ve been thinking about and learning to practice for a long time. Self sovereignty means the ability to choose the direction of one’s own life, and being the exclusive authority over one’s own body and mind. Other synonyms for it are personal freedom, self determination, and liberty. It’s a subject we have talked a lot about with our podcast guests as well. In this episode, it’s just Mike and Euvie, and we discuss a fundamental aspect of self sovereignty – sovereignty of mind. We share some of our stories of successes and failures in learning to practice self sovereignty. We also suggest some ideas, techniques and exercises from our own experience that others can try if they want to gain more sovereignty in their lives. Ultimately, self sovereignty is a deeply personal thing, and something that each person figures out for themselves. We invite you to explore this important concept in order to better understand and navigate today’s world.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ribosome Structure and Function 19 mins – “Nicola Davis sits down with Nobel prize-winning scientist Sir Venki Ramakrishnan to discuss the competition he faced in the race to discover the ribosome – AKA the gene machine. Is competition good for science, or would a collaborative approach be better?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School Bullying 25 mins – “Teenage bullying and violence has made headlines in recent weeks. One expert says we should accept that if people can be kind, they also have the capacity to be cruel.” At the link find the title, “Youth see bullying as ‘paying off for some people’ in today’s world, says expert,” right-click “Download Youth see bullying as ‘paying off for some people’ in today’s world, says expert” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shirley Chisolm Biography 39 mins – “From her college years, Chisolm was politically active. Her drive and desire to make positive change led her to many political firsts, including being the first black woman elected to the U.S. Congress.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included inthe blog archive.

Smart Airports 23 mins- “Are you dreading holiday travel this year? From mile-long security lines to taking off shoes and going through humiliating security scanners, holiday travel can be stressful. But, airports are getting major upgrades that will help travelers navigate the terminal more efficiently. In this episode of Komando on Demand, Kim looks at how airports are trying to make things easier on travelers in order to alleviate stress during the holidays.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Snapchat Thief 72 minsThis week, a new Super Tech Support: after Lizzie’s Snapchat gets hacked, things start getting really creepy. Alex investigates. Michael Bazzell’s Podcast – The complete Security and Privacy Podcast Steps Michael Bazzell Gave Alex to Protect Himself – How to port your phone number; Password Manager; Google Authenticator; Yubikey; Michael’s workbook to freeze your credit and remove yourself from public records websites; Sudo Stories about Sim Swapping and OGUsers by Vice/Motherboard – By Lorenzo Francheschi-Bicchierai – The SIM Hijackers; How to Protect Yourself From SIM Swapping Hacks; ‘TELL YOUR DAD TO GIVE US BITCOIN:’ How a Hacker Allegedly Stole Millions by Hijacking Phone Numbers; How Criminals Recruit Telecom Employees to Help Them Hijack SIM Cards; Alleged 19-Year-Old SIM Swapper Used Stolen Bitcoin to Buy Luxury Cars; Cops Arrest Infamous SIM Swapper Who Allegedly Stole $14 Million in Cryptocurrency By Joseph Cox – ‘I Could Ruin Your Business Right Now’: Listen to a SIM-Jacking, Account-Stealing RansomAt the link find the title, “#130 The Snapchat Thief, Nov 2018,” right-click “Playand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Success Academy Concept in NYC P1 43 mins – “Eva Moskowitz wants to fix a really big problem. There are over a million kids in New York City’s public schools. Most can’t read or do math at grade level. Many won’t graduate on time. And it’s largely poor, black and brown kids who are stuck in the lowest performing schools. Eva’s the founder and CEO of Success Academy, the subject of this season of StartUp. And she’s actually making progress. Her school network is growing at lightning speed, and her students get among the highest standardized-test scores in the city, beating out schools in some of the wealthiest districts. And the education world is watching. But not everyone likes what they see. In this season, we ask how exactly Success is doing what it’s doing, and why does it have so many critics? Today, on the first of our six-part series about Success, we meet a mother, Sherisse, who desperately wants her son to get into Success, so that he can have opportunities she never had herself. And we go inside a Success classroom on the first day of school, to see what parents like Sherisse are clamoring for.” At the link find the title, “Success Academy 1: The Problem, Nov 2018” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

Success Academy in NYC P2 59 mins – “It’s no mystery that Success Academy has high expectations — not just for its teachers, but also for its parents and students. Having a high bar is the key to Success’ amazing results. But the charter network’s expectations can make life hard for families and kids who don’t quite make the mark. In this episode, we will hear from two families who ran headlong into Success Academy’s high expectations.” At the link find the title, “Success Academy: Expectations,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Success Academy Growth in NYC P4 57 mins – “Success Academy has grown quickly — in just 12 years, the network has gone from one school in Harlem to 47 schools across New York City. In order to do this, Success has had to hire many inexperienced teachers, and move them up the ranks quickly. Amidst all this growth, there is a lot of pressure on the staff to continue performing at incredibly high levels. And Success has managed to keep crushing the state tests. In episode 4 of the series, we examine how growth has changed Success for better, and for worse.” At the link find the title, “Success Academy P4: Growth, Dec 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Success Academy Startup in NYC P3 46 mins – “Success Academy’s state test results are truly remarkable — their students score in the top one percent in New York State, often beating out kids from the wealthiest districts. And the network’s reputation is built on these results — it’s a big part of how they attract new students, win over donors, and get approval to open school after school. To find out how Success gets these scores, we go inside their test-taking machine. There are puppies and toys, “pump-up” songs, and a crazy event at the 19,000-seat Barclays Center called Slam the Exam. And, of course, there’s lots of test prep. We’ll hear from students and teachers who’ve grown skeptical of all the time devoted to getting good scores. We’ll see how significant passing the state test can be for a student who’s struggled. And we’ll hear Eva Moskowitz defend her school’s intense focus on test prep, which she prefers to call “mastery.” At the link find the title, “Success Academy 3: The Test, Nov 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainable Development Goals 15 mins – “We are living in a world that is tantalizingly close to ensuring that no one need die of hunger or malaria or diarrhea,” says economist Michael Green. To help spur progress, back in 2015 the United Nations drew up a set of 17 goals around important factors like health, education and equality. In this data-packed talk, Green shares his analysis on the steps each country has (or hasn’t) made toward these Sustainable Development Goals — and offers new ideas on what needs to change so we can achieve them.” At the link left-click the “Share” square, left-click “Download” right-click “Download audio” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Termite Megalopolis 25 mins – “Researchers have discovered a network of 4,000-year-old termite mounds in Brazil that are so big, they can be seen from space. We hear all about the discovery, and how the much-maligned termite could teach humans a lot about biofuels and even robotics. “ At the link find the title, “‘Just unbelievable’: Termite mound network the size of Great Britain discovered in Brazil,” right-click “Download ‘Just unbelievable’: Termite mound network the size of Great Britain discovered in Brazil” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaping Problem 28 mins – “David Hammond was picking out an Archie comic for his kids when he noticed a poster for vaping behind the corner store counter. Then, he spotted vaping products above the candy.” At the link find the title, “More can be done to curb vaping among Canadian youth, professor says,” right-clickDownload More can be done to curb vaping among Canadian youth, professor says,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Viagra and CRISPR 27 mins – “Viagra’s effects on men were first discovered as an unexpected side-effect during trials for a medication meant to help patients with a heart condition. CRISPR cas– 9 is now a tool that can be used to modify and replace genes – but it was first noted as a random collection of genes. In the first of three episodes about the genius of accidents in science, Professor Adam Hart explores how, sometimes, the results you’re looking for are not as important as those that appear unexpectedly.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Gaming Income 34 mins – “Want to make a living playing video games? You can possibly make thousands or even millions, but it’s not easy money. Esports is now a proven career option, but do you have what it takes to get in the game? In this episode of Komando on Demand, Kim looks at everything you need to know about how to succeed at being a professional gamer, straight from today’s top players and nerd culture journalist Jessica Roar.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White Supremacists in America 57 mins – “In the wake of the deadly anti-Semitic attack at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, FRONTLINE and ProPublica present a new investigation into white supremacist groups in America – in particular, a neo-Nazi group, Atomwaffen Division, that has actively recruited inside the U.S. military. Continuing FRONTLINE and ProPublica’s reporting on violent white supremacists in the U.S. (which has helped lead to multiple arrests), this joint investigation shows the group’s terrorist objectives and how it gained strength after the 2017 Charlottesville rally.At the link find the title, “Documenting Hate: New American Nazis, Nov 2018,” right-click “MEDIA ENCLOSURE:http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FrontlineAudiocastPbs/~5/EyalDq1ZG3g/535768305-frontlinepbs-documenting-hate-new-american-nazis.mp3and select “Save Link As” as from the pop-up men.

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Mining Digest 371 – Dec 28, 2018: AI Requirements, Alan Alda, Alan Rushbridger Journalist, Algonquin Controversy, Belief Systems, Bitcoin Power Demands, Black Youth Dangers, Brexit Problems, Broadband in Dalton Georgia, Broadband Mapping, Campus Sexual Assaults, Canadian Auto Bailout, Canadian Indigenous Women Protection, Cancer Immunotherapy, Childrens’ Teeth Problems, Climate Change Blueprint, Climate Psychology, Co-housing Arrangement, Colored Girls, CRISPR Discussion, Cyber Attacks Up 9 Percent, Deception and Truth Erosion, Domestic Workers, Ebola Returns, Estate Planning, Extreme Weather, Fake News Spread, Federal Sentencing Laws, Female Engineers, Football Deaths, French Turmoil, Geothermal Energy Resources, Gratitude, Great Lakes Imperiled, Ground Sinking, Gun Control Activities, Hand Surgery, Havana Syndrome, Huawei Controversy, Impact Investing, Implant Deaths, Index Funds Trends, Iraqi Refugees in Canada, Jonestown Survivor Story, Journalism War, Kilgallen Death Case, Last Watchman of Old Cairo, Lean In Pushback, Less Harmful Products, Levulinic Acid, Machine Metaphor Escape, Marijuana Research, Meaningful Conversations, Metabolic Health, Minimalist Living, Musician Gender Pay Gap, Myanmar’s Hidden Genocide, Neuromorphic Computer, Oysters Affected by Early Freeze, Political Polarization, Pollution Art, Republican Refugees, Rwanda Reconciliation, Satchel Paige, Sugar Expose, Supreme Court Problems, Trump Supporter, Undocumented Citizen, Venezuelan Crisis, Veterans Dental Issues, Walmart CEO Interview, Wetlands Value, Women Politician Winners, World War One Impact, Yemen Famine

Exercise your ears: the 135 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 780 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 23,525 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 150GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 496 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

AI and Chatbots 29 mins – “What makes a chatbot or a conversational interface actually work? What kind of work does one need to do to get a chatbot to do what one wants it to do? These are pivotal questions and questions that for most business leaders are still somewhat mysterious, but that’s exactly what we’re aiming to answer on this episode of the AI in Industry Podcast. This week we speak with Madhu Mathihalli, CTO and co-founder of Passage AI. We speak specifically about what kinds of tasks conversational interfaces are best at, what kinds of word tracks, what kind of questions and answer are they suited for and which are a bit beyond their grasp right now. In addition, we speak about what it takes to train these machines. In other words, how do we define the particular word tracks that we want to be able to automate and determine which of them might be lower hanging fruit for applying a chatbot or which of them might not?” At the link find the title, “How to Get a Chatbot to do What One Wants in Business Nov 2018,” right-click “Direct download: AI in Industry-Madhusudan Mathihalli-Mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI and Inventory Optimization 21 mins – “This week we talk to Alejandro Giacometti, the data science lead at a company called EDITED, based in London. The company claims to help retailers with inventory optimization, and we speak with Alejandro about how artificial intelligence can be used to search the web for the product clusters and individual products of major retailers to help inform other retailers on what products might be popular. There are two primary takeaways from this episode. The first is the broad capability of monitoring the competition with artificial intelligence, something that can be applied across industries, not just in retail. The second is that EDITED is generating information from what is freely available on the web, and so it would seem their software doesn’t require businesses to integrate it into inventory management systems in order to train the algorithm behind it. I’m not necessarily lauding the company; I haven’t used their product nor read all of their case studies. That said, it’s worth noting simply because its approach is fundamentally different than most AI vendors.” At the link find the title, “How AI Can Help Retailers With Inventory Optimization, Dec 2018,” right-click “Direct download: AI_in_Industry-Alejandro_Giacometti-Mixdown_1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Predictions 69 mins – “If anyone can make provocative predictions about technology and its impact on business and our everyday lives, it is Tom Siebel. One of Silicon Valley’s most successful entrepreneurs for more than four decades, he remains at the forefront of enterprise software, big data, cloud, the Internet of things (IoT), artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning—formerly at Oracle and Siebel Systems and, most recently, as founder and CEO of C3. Siebel explores the far-ranging impact that AI and digital innovation will have on every aspect of life and how this step function change in technology—fueled by AI and IoT—continues to disrupt critical industries from agriculture, health care, manufacturing, defense, financial services and energy.  Siebel will discuss the societal and ethical implications of AI, exploring both the dangers and the opportunities where AI can have the greatest impact. Given AI is being rapidly applied to virtually all societal domains, the urgency of working together to mitigate the adverse consequences has never been greater. Leading researchers suggest it is only a matter of time before rival states, criminals and terrorists use AI’s scale and efficiency to launch finely targeted and highly efficient attacks. In this rapidly evolving climate, Siebel argues that the benefits of AI are substantial, but the potential costs are significant. He advocates that the balance between the two lies in regulation, private and public sector collaboration, and a clear focus on issues such as privacy and cybersecurity to protect us—as consumers and citizens. Join one of technology’s most preeminent leaders for a night of insightful conversation on the shaping of society by the exponential—and unstoppable—rise of AI.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

AI Requirements 19 mins – “Some businesses are going to require a sea change in the way that their computation works and the kinds of computing power that they’re leveraging to do what they need to do with artificial intelligence. Others might not need an upgrade in hardware in the near term to do what they want to do with AI. What’s the difference? That’s the question that we decided to ask today of Per Nyberg, Vice President of Market Development, Artificial Intelligence at Cray. Cray is known for the Cray-1 supercomputer, built back in 1975. Cray continues to work on hardware and has an entire division now dedicated to artificial intelligence hardware. This week on AI in Industry, we speak to Nyberg about which kinds of business problems require an upgrade in hardware and which don’t.” At the link find the title, “When to Upgrade Your Hardware for Artificial Intelligence, Nov 2018,” right-click “Direct download: AI in Industry-Per Nyberg-Mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alan Alda 105 mins – “Gilbert and Frank welcome a sought-after guest, writer-director-actor Alan Alda, who discusses (among other topics) growing up in Burlesque theaters, working with his father Robert Alda, coping with the pressures of sudden fame and learning to live life “in the moment.” Also, Buster Keaton does a backflip, Mickey Rooney “hails a cab,” Sarah Silverman forms an unlikely friendship and Alan remembers M*A*S*H colleagues Harry Morgan, Wayne Rogers and McLean Stevenson. PLUS: The Great Blackstone! “The Beast with Five Fingers”! Revisiting “Crimes and Misdemeanors”! Beetlepuss rescues Bela Lugosi! And Alan shares the stage with Red Buttons, Phil Silvers and Mae West!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alan Rusbridger Journalist 25 mins – “Anna Maria Tremonti speaks to Alan Rusbridger, the former editor of the Guardian whose 20-year tenure involved explosive investigations and ushering the newspaper in the digital age.” At the link find the title, “Journalism must be remade to rebuild public trust, says veteran editor of The Guardian,” right-click “Download Journalism must be remade to rebuild public trust, says veteran editor of The Guardian” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Algonquin Controversy 19 mins – The newly opened O Condos building is part of the $1.5-billion Zibi development, which has divided Algonquin First Nations because of its proximity to the Chaudière Falls.” At the link fnd the title, “Reconciliation or betrayal? First residents of controversial development in Ottawa-Gatineau move in,” right-click “Download Reconciliation or betrayal? First residents of controversial development in Ottawa-Gatineau move in” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Antarctica Crossing 47 mins – “Cold, alone and at the bottom of the world. We’ll hear the stories of the men who’ve sought to walk, unaided, across Antarctica.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Belief Systems 21 mins – “People will find a way to defend their beliefs even when faced with contradictory evidence, says psychologist James Alcock. He talks to Anna Maria Tremonti about why we believe what we believe, and how evolution played a role.” At the link find the title, “‘Evolution didn’t work on truth, it worked on survival’: A psychologist explains why we cling to our beliefs,” right-click “Download ‘Evolution didn’t work on truth, it worked on survival’: A psychologist explains why we cling to our beliefs” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin Power Demands 10 mins – Bitcoin creation requires considerable amounts of electrical power. The podcast isn’t available for download from Wired Spoken Edition, but is in the blog archive.

Black Youth Dangers 47 mins – “A black teenager sees a friend killed by a white police officer. That’s the storyline of the new film “The Hate U Give.” The director and young activists tell their stories.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Impact 95 mins – “In this IPR Public Lecture, Anthony Barnett explores the concept of the ‘Will of the People’ and asks; who are ‘the people’? Do they have only one ‘will’? Is it unchangeable? Is it an expression of democracy or an anti-democratic device? These are the key questions at the heart of Brexit. This IPR Public Lecture took place on 20 November 2018.” At the link find the title, “Anthony Barnett: What is the ‘Will of the People’? England and Brexit., Nov 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Problems 21 mins – The political turmoil and rioting in Britain and France highlight a fault line in Western democracies. Voters have seized on a ‘generalized’ rebellion against ‘thriving’ elites, according to one expert.” At the link find the title, “Throwing a wrench in political system led to chaos in Britain and France, says expert,” right-click “Download Throwing a wrench in political system led to chaos in Britain and France, says expert,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Chicopee Maine 30 mins – “By the time a local community is ready to light up their municipal fiber optic network, they’ve already invested several years’ worth of debate, investigation, and energy. While deploying a network is certainly a complicated task, educating the community, growing support, and helping elected officials determine the best approach is equally difficult. What’s it like in the early stages for those visionaries who feel that their city or town needs a publicly owned option? This week we find out from Chicopee’s Joel McAuliffe, Councilor for Ward 1. He’s been advocating for a municipal broadband network for several years and his message is growing. In addition to working to educate his fellow council members about the need for local high-speed Internet access, Joel has reached out to folks in the community. Last fall, he encouraged citizens to sign an online petition supporting the proposal and to contact their elected officials to urge them to move forward on the matter.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Dalton Georgia 28 mins – “Dalton, Georgia’s OptiLink has served the community for around 15 years, making it one of the first citywide Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) municipal networks. In this interview, Chief Technical Services Officer of OptiLink and for Dalton Utilities Hank Blackwood talks with Christopher about the past, the present, and the immediate future of OptiLink. Hank describes the original purpose for bringing fiber into the community. From utilities to businesses to residents, city leaders realized that Dalton needed better connectivity and that the best source was a hometown utility that cared about subscribers. In addition to economic development, advancing telehealth, and inspiring entrepreneurs, the OptiLink network has allowed the community to celebrate its diverse culture….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Ontario California 19 mins – “This week, Christopher presents the last of the interviews he conducted while at the 2018 Broadband Communities Economic Development Conference in Ontario, California, in October. As long as he was in the Golden State, he decided to check in with Jory Wolf, Vice President of Digital Innovation at Magellan Advisors. Jory may work in the consulting field now, but he’s known by the MuniNetworks.org audience as the man behind Santa Monica CityNet. When he retired from his position as CIO at the city after 22 years, Jory didn’t settle for the slow lane. Now he’s working with communities all over California and in other states find ways to improve their local connectivity….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Portland Oregon 38 mins – “This week on the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, we hear from Russell Senior and Michael Hanna from Portland, Oregon. Russell is President of the Personal Telco Project and Michael is a Data Engineer for Multnomah County; both are on the Board of the Municipal Broadband Coalition of America. In this interview Christopher, Russell, and Michael discuss the goals of the Coalition and their current work grassroots organizing in Portland and across and Multnomah County for the Municipal Broadband PDX initiative. In addition to hearing how Portland and the surrounding county has reached a point where residents and businesses are ready for better connectivity, we also find out how these two organizers became involved in the efforts.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Mapping 33 mins – “Whether it’s a local government or ISP that chooses to invest in fiber optic infrastructure accurate, dependable, mapping is critical before, during, and after initial deployment. This week’s guests deliver that service through VETRO FiberMap. CEO Will Mitchell and COO Sean Myers join Christopher to discuss their mapping platform, the creative ways they use it, and their expectations for the future of fiber networks. Will and Sean explain how in working with ISPs and local communities interested in providing better connectivity, they’ve found that they’ve been able to adjust FiberMap to deliver specialized services. FiberMap has provided the information needed to not only deploy, expand, and manage fiber networks, but it has also allowed companies and publicly owned networks to develop marketing plans and expand their future visions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

California Wildfires 71 mins – “Wildfires have always been part of life for the state of California. However, in the past year the state has seen 7 of its 20 most destructive wildfires ever, including the recent Camp Fire in Butte County, which directly impacted the Bay Area for days, and the Woolsey Fire in Malibu outside of Los Angeles. Combined, both fires cost hundreds of lives and caused billions of dollars in damage. Coming one year after last year’s Tubbs Fire in Santa Rosa, it is clear that the state has reached a new abnormal and is at a critical juncture in how it plans and prepares for the inevitability of future fires—ones that could be more destructive and costly than what we have already faced. But what is causing these fires? What can be done to improve preparation and fighting them, and who is responsible for doing it?  To address some of these critical and urgent questions, please join The Commonwealth Club for a special free town hall on California’s fires and what can be done in the short and long term to prepare for them. The Club has invited some of the region’s leading wildfire experts for an essential and honest discussion about the new abnormal and the pressing need to better prepare for the future. The town hall will also address how technology is shaping fire prevention and firefighting. Guests are invited to participate and share their experiences, thoughts and recommendations. Some of the state’s top fire experts will also be seated in the audience.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campus Sexual Assaults 47 mins – “A narrower definition of sexual harassment, strengthening the rights of the accused. We’ll get reaction to Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’ proposed new regulations on campus sexual assault.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Auto Bailout 27 mins – “In the wake of General Motors’ decision to close its facility in Oshawa, Ont., McMaster University professor and former Unifor economist Jim Stanford argues the company is more concerned about Wall Street shareholders than the Canadian workers it employs.” At the link find the title, “GM cuts an ‘old-style, greed-driven’ decision, argues former Unifor economist,” right-click “Download GM cuts an ‘old-style, greed-driven’ decision, argues former Unifor economist” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Indian Schools 25 mins – “Witnesses to testimony at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada have been motivated to build a better country, says the commission’s chair Senator Murray Sinclair. He’s seen firsthand who suffers most when the truth is sidelined.” At the link find the title, “Residential school survivors’ stories motivated people to make Canada better, says Murray Sinclair,” right-click “Download Residential school survivors’ stories motivated people to make Canada better, says Murray Sinclair,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Indigenous Women Protection 22 mins – Senator Lillian Dyck is proposing harsher sentences for those who commit violent crimes against Indigenous women, such as sexual assault, manslaughter or murder. But some advocates argue that Bill S-215 could have unintended consequences that actually harm those it seeks to protect.” At the link find the title, “Bill to curb violence against Indigenous women could hurt those it aims to protect, warns lawyer,” right-click “Download Bill to curb violence against Indigenous women could hurt those it aims to protect, warns lawyer” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Immunotherapy 25 mins – James Allison is an immunologist who rejected scientific orthodoxy early in his career, but has earned the Nobel Prize for Medicine for his revolutionary work on cancer treatment. Not all scientists who go rogue reap the rewards however, so where’s the line between confidence and stubbornness?” At the link find the title, “James Allison won a Nobel for defying scientific orthodoxy. What about the mavericks that don’t succeed?” right-click “Download James Allison won a Nobel for defying scientific orthodoxy. What about the mavericks that don’t succeed?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Tax Debate 21 mins – “As COP24 gets underway in Poland, the question of putting a price on carbon is back in the spotlight. The idea divides conservatives in Canada; some argue it’s the best way to fight climate change, while others say it’s a surefire way to kill jobs. Is there a conservative case for carbon taxes? We hear from voices on both side of the debate.” At the link find the title, “Why does the idea of a carbon tax divide conservatives in Canada?” right-click “Download Why does the idea of a carbon tax divide conservatives in Canada?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childrens’ Teeth Problems 59 mins – “There is a serious hidden epidemic just now being discovered by the public health community. It’s most obvious symptom is the growing frequency of children with crooked teeth wearing braces, but it includes children snoring, keeping their jaws hanging open, frequently afflicted with stuffy noses, children and adults with disturbed sleeping at night (sleep apnea) often unrecognized, attention and behavioral problems, and a general decline of physical appearance. Those symptoms indicate a building medical emergency that lies in the collection of serious diseases connected mouth breathing and disturbed sleep — a collection that includes heart disease, cancer, ADHD, depression, schizophrenia, suicide, asthma and perhaps Alzheimer’s disease. Disturbed sleep is an extremely serious stressor of the human mind and body; among other things, it tends to depress the immune system, making an individual much more vulnerable to a wide variety of diseases, and modifications of the brain that are manifest in many ways only partially understood. Add to this the large contributions of sleep deprivation to highway accidents, medical mistakes and poor performance at work and in school, and it’s easy to see how important this unrecognized public health emergency is. Come learn what causes this problem and many solutions. ‘Forwardontics’ will be discussed with clear explanations. Sandra Kahn, D.D.S., M.S.D., is a graduate from the University of Mexico and the University of the Pacific.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil Rights Movement 53 mins – “This week, we have a lecture presented by the Boston University African American Studies Program, titled “The Mississippi Civil Rights Movement, 1960 to 1964.”  Our speaker is author, James Marshall.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Agenda Goals 25 mins – “As industries change around plans to cut greenhouse emissions, will the “green jobs” that replace them match the pay and benefits of the fossil fuel sector?” At the linkf ind the title, “Some jobs in new energy industries come with a pay cut of $50K: coal miner,” right-click “Download Some jobs in new energy industries come with a pay cut of $50K: coal miner” an select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Blueprint 23 mins – “As part of The Current’s special edition on climate change, we talk to two experts about the level of commitment needed to tackle the problem – and why that action isn’t taking place.” At the link find the title, “Activist urges WWII-level global effort to fight climate change,” right-click “Download Activist urges WWII-level global effort to fight climate change” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change in Arctic 46 mins – “Warming in Arctic raises fears of a “rapid unraveling” of the region. Reindeer numbers crash by half. We’ll confront the climate emergency in the Arctic. At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Solutions 11 mins – “What can environmentalists learn from the civil rights movement? We talk to Dr. Rev. Gerald Durley, a civil rights worker turned climate justice activist.” At the link find the title, “What can environmentalists learn from the civil rights movement?” right-click “Download What can environmentalists learn from the civil rights movement?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Psychology 49 mins – “We all know about the environmental and physical effects of climate change. But what about its impact on our mental health? Therapists report that their patients are exhibiting symptoms of what they call “climate anxiety” – loss of sleep, changes in appetite, feelings of grief, anger and hopelessness. How do we maintain our optimism in the face of a global existential crisis? And how do we talk with others about our fears without turning them off – or freaking them out? Three climate psychologists discuss how to cope with mounting anxiety brought on by climate change.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Co-housing Arrangements 47 mins – “Real-life “Golden Girls.” Senior citizens getting roommates to ease financial pressures and fight loneliness. It’s a growing trend.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Colored Girls 75 mins – “Donna Brazile, Yolanda Caraway, Leah Daughtry and Minyon Moore have worked behind the scenes of some of the country’s most influential and historic presidential campaigns in history, all four beginning their careers with the Rev. Jesse Jackson and eventually working with the likes of Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Barack Obama and, most recently, Hillary Rodham Clinton. Together they form a political supergroup they like to call “The Colored Girls,” and, like many other women of color in politics, they are unsung heroes of public service who have dedicated their lives to demanding diversity in American politics. Brazile, Caraway, Daughtry and Moore paved the way for many women and people of color currently in the political arena, and they will visit The Commonwealth Club on the heels of an exciting midterm election where the topic of diversity was at the forefront. Join us as the four women discuss For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics, their new book, which chronicles their incredible stories, sheds light on their successes and offers insight on the many hurdles they faced in getting there.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Conversation Importance 49 mins – “Playing for Team Human today Adah Parris. Adah is here to help reorient us to ourselves and steer us to a better, more human future. Adah wears many hats. She is a tech Futurist, a transformation coach, storyteller, public speaker, consultant, and artist. Comfortable in such diverse roles, Adah brings a unique perspective to the team, having influenced both individuals and corporations to adopt a more connection-centered ethos. In this candid and open conversation with Douglas, Adah brings her empathy, insight, and creativity to the table. She reminds us of the power of putting down our smartphones, looking into one another’s eyes, and engaging in the “Art of Conversation.” At the link find the the title, “Ep. 91 Adah Parris “The Art of Conversation” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CRISPR Discussion 58 mins – “The gene-editing technology known as CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) is transforming everything, from pharmaceutical research to agriculture to the process of making yogurt (really). It is a disruptive technology that allows people to edit genomes, changing the genetic code of life. In some cases, it’s also raising complicated global questions about risk, regulation and even human values. So, should we be excited or afraid? Come discuss these questions and more with science writer Jennifer Kahn, who gave a 2016 TED talk on CRISPR.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Attacks Up 9 Percent (first item) 37 mins – “The impact of cyber attacks on the economies of the world’s largest cities is up by 9% this year. Researchers from the Centre for Risk Studies at Cambridge Judge Business School say they do not want to be alarmist but hope their work will help governments, councils, companies and organisations to use their findings modelling like they would for instance flood modelling and then be able to plan for potential cyber attacks or data breaches. Cyber Sex- Can tech make our emotional and sexual experiences better? Author and academic Dr Kate Devlin, who has just published her book Turned on; Science, Sex and Robots, believes it can. She recently organised two sex-tech hackathons to see if we can get away from the current image that we have of pornographic sex robots that satisfy the needs of computer geeky men. Security flaws in widely used data storage devices – Researchers at Radboud University in the Netherlands have discovered that widely used data storage devices with self-encrypting drives do not provide the expected level of data protection. A malicious expert with direct physical access to widely sold storage devices can bypass existing protection mechanisms and access the data without knowing the user-chosen password. Beam me up Roland – Lecturers at Imperial College, London have a new star quality – they are getting the Michael Jackson treatment – being turned into holograms. The school has decided this will help connect their students around the world. Wanting a taste of the glory Roland Pease went to the college while they were testing out the system.” At the link you can download for a limited time; however, a copy is also included in the blog archive.

Cyber Hacker Threat 23 mins – “A new government report says hackers are increasingly targeting smart home devices, from thermostats to security cameras.” At the link find the title, “‘Crazy’ to expect consumers to guard against smart device hacks: cybersecurity expert,” right-click “Download ‘Crazy’ to expect consumers to guard against smart device hacks: cybersecurity expert,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deception and Truth Erosion 28 mins – “Anna Maria Tremonti speaks with a journalist and a technologist about how technology is being deployed to undermine truth in the modern world, and whether technology could also be used to fight back.” At the link find the title, “‘It’s an arms race’: Technology amplifies fake news, but could it also hold the solution?” right-click Download ‘It’s an arms race’: Technology amplifies fake news, but could it also hold the solution” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital News vs Newspapers 69 mins – “Playing for Team Human today is Eli Pariser, author of The Filter Bubble, former director of MoveOn.org and current chief executive of Upworthy.com.  Eli uses media to make what’s important popular, rather than the other way around. Upworthy.com is a story-driven website focused on magnifying meaningful conversations that encourage positive social change. On today’s episode, Eli and Douglas mine our reality tunnels, looking at how perspective shapes meaning and what strategies we might employ to ground democracy in greater consciousness and empathy.” At the link find the title, “Ep. 88 Eli Pariser “The Ground Under Our Feet,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Domestic Workers 64 mins – “Playing for Team Human today is Palak Shah, Social Innovations Director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA). Palak will be enlightening us about America’s hidden labor force, the value they create, and how we can support her efforts to give them the voice and dignity they deserve. While domestic work has long been viewed as something less than “real work,” Palak explains how this invisible labor is actually the backbone of both our society and the economy. Together, Palak and Douglas look at how our perceptions of domestic work are so deeply influenced by biases of gender, race, and class. Shah also looks at how the legacy of slavery and decades of immigration policy continue to influence domestic work in today’s economy. As the economy goes digital and the labor force increasingly moves online to platforms and apps, Shah and the NDWA are working to shape the way technology and the on-demand economy intersects with care work. It’s a conversation that brings us back to fundamental Team Human questions – Who is going to care for our children, our sick, and our elderly? Who’s going to care for our caregivers?” At the link find the title, “Ep. 93 Palak Shah “Who’s Gonna Care?” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dreaming Value 47 mins – “Why do we dream? To defrag the brain? Unbound our unconscious? There’s new science on the purpose of our nightly journeys.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Returns 25 mins – “A Congolese humanitarian aid worker says the latest Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo could be disastrous for the East African nation if it is not dealt with properly, and armed conflict in the country is making things worse.” At the link find the title, “Congo’s armed conflict is stopping Ebola patients from getting help, says aid worker,” right-click “Download Congo’s armed conflict is stopping Ebola patients from getting help, says aid worker,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Donations 8 mins – Justin Trudeau’s $50 million tweet to Trevor Noah caused consternation among his opponents this week – but where is the money actually going? We speak to Yasmine Sherif, director of Education Cannot Wait.” t the link find the title, “Canada’s $50 million pledge will educate 350,000 children, says global fund director,” right-click “Download Canada’s $50 million pledge will educate 350,000 children, says global fund director,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

EPA Corruption 63 mins – “E.G. Vallianatos will discuss his book Poison Spring, which documents in detail the EPA’s corruption and misuses of science and public trust. In its half century of existence, the EPA has repeatedly reinforced the chemical industrial complex by endorsing deadly chemicals, botching field investigations, turning a blind eye to toxic disasters and swallowing the claims of the industry. Come find out from an insider about how the EPA has allowed our lands and waters to be poisoned with more toxic chemicals than ever.” At the link find the title, “Metabolic Syndrome and Mental Health,” left-click the square with three dots, right-click “Download/Open” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Estate Planning 67 mins – “Deciding how to structure your estate plan often presents daunting ethical and emotional challenges. As you ponder how to distribute your assets, you may struggle to design a plan that seems fair not just to you, but also to your heirs. Often, different family members have radically disparate needs, and there may be worthy causes that you would like to support. How can you create a legacy that honors your personal values without provoking family disputes or hurt feelings among those you leave behind?At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Extreme Weather 28 mins – “A new report argues that climate change is having a measurable impact on our physical and mental health, and policymakers need to plan accordingly.” At the link find the title, “Fears around climate change are causing some people to seek out support groups,” right-click “Download Fears around climate change are causing some people to seek out support groups” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News Spread  28 mins – “Anna Maria Tremonti speaks with a journalist and a technologist about how technology is being deployed to undermine truth in the modern world, and whether technology could also be used to fight back.” At the link find the title, “‘It’s an arms race’: Technology amplifies fake news, but could it also hold the solution?,” right-click “Download ‘It’s an arms race’: Technology amplifies fake news, but could it also hold the solution?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fascia and Soffits 9 mins – “Soffits and Fascia are parts of the house that don’t often get a lot of thought or attention from homeowners planning to build their dream homes.  But they’re important not only as design elements for your home but also because they protect your house.   And choosing the right materials for your fascia and soffits can reduce the required maintenance for your home. This week we’ll briefly talk about soffit and fascia options so you can make the best choice for your home.  Let’s start by establishing exactly what and where soffits and fascia are.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Sentencing Laws 47 mins – “President Trump throws his support behind a rewrite of federal sentencing laws. What’s brought us to this point where politicians from both sides of the aisle are pushing for criminal justice reform?At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Engineers 25 mins- “Gina Parvaneh Cody graduated from Concordia with her PhD in engineering the same year as the École Polytechnique massacre. She talks to Anna Maria Tremonti about how she donated $15 million to her alma mater to “make a future where women are allowed in engineering.” At the link find the title, “The École Polytechnique massacre ‘left a scar,’ says first woman to have engineering school named after her,” right-click “Download The École Polytechnique massacre ‘left a scar,’ says first woman to have engineering school named after her,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Film Critic Leonard Maltin P2 99 mins – “Gilbert and Frank welcome back author, film critic and Hollywood historian Leonard Maltin, who shares his expertise on a number of topics, including the death of fanzines, the disappearance of movie theaters, the charm of “The Maltese Falcon” (both versions) and the appeal of New York-set films of the 1970s. Also, Zeppo breaks up the act, Laurel and Hardy bring down the house, Steve Allen plays Benny Goodman and Gilbert and Leonard remember their dear friend James Karen. PLUS: Keefe Brasselle! “The Buster Keaton Story”! In praise of “Ed Wood”! (and “Going in Style”!) Al Pacino remembers “Scarecrow”! And Leonard spends a day with Burgess Meredith” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fish Feel Pain 25 mins – “For centuries, the consensus has been that fish don’t feel pain. A growing body of research suggests to some scientists that fish can indeed feel pain, but not everyone in the field agrees.” At the link find the title, “Do fish feel pain? Scientists are divided on the answer,” right-click “Download Do fish feel pain? Scientists are divided on the answer,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Football Deaths 47 mins – “The University of Maryland reverses course and fires the football coach in the wake of a player’s death. We’ll look at big-time sports and the costs of too big to fail.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

French Turmoil 47 mins -”France rocked by violent demonstrations against a fuel tax hike and economic woes. Will President Emmanuel Macron’s promise of relief be enough?” At the link right-click the down-pointing button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gen Stanley McChrystal 68 mins– “In an era where strong leadership qualities, for everyone from young college applicants to accomplished CEOs, are seemingly valued above all else, retired four-star General Stanley McChrystal offers his own experienced perspective on leadership. McChrystal has observed his fair share of successful and failed leaders—from his training at West Point to his service as top commander in Afghanistan under President Obama. In his most recent book, Leaders: Myth and Reality, McChrystal digs deeper into the legacies of famed leaders to better understand how particular environments determine what type of leader is needed. Join us for a thoughtful analysis of well-known leaders and a discussion about personal application with one of today’s most decorated military leaders.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geothermal Energy Resources 28 mins – “The heat contained in the top 3km of the Earth’s crust could power the planet thousands of times over. Despite that, less than 1% of the world’s electricity comes from geothermal energy. That may be about to change. Near Redruth in Cornwall a 3 mile deep hole is being dug- it will be the deepest in the UK. Cold water will be pumped down to the 200 degrees hot rocks below, the hot water returning will drive turbines to provide electricity for thousands of homes. Nearby, the Eden Project and the seawater lido in Penzance are building their own geothermal plants. But Cornwall is just the tip of the iceberg. Geothermal electricity was first produced in 1904 at Larderello in Tuscany. Today Enel Green Power supply a third of the region’s electricity from natural steam and they have plans to get much bigger, exploiting an extraordinary bit of chemistry. When water goes above 374 degrees centigrade and 221 bars of pressure it becomes a supercritical fluid. This contains five times as much energy as 200 degree water, transfers energy twice as efficiently and has a lower viscosity. Overall, you can theoretically get ten times more energy than from a similar conventional borehole. The new technology also promises more efficient geothermal energy in regions far away from geological hot spots like Iceland and Italy. The only fly in the ointment is that some techniques involve creating bigger fractures in the rocks. Experiments at Basel in Switzerland provoked an earthquake. So can the incredible potential of new-gen geothermal be exploited without provoking protests?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GimKit Creator 36 mins – “Josh Feinsilber began creating GimKit while a sophomore in high school. Now a senior, Josh continues to improve the online quiz game and operate the website. He is an inspiration to us all. Sign up to host a GimKit game at http://www.gimkit.com This episode of the Bedley Bros is sponsored by Global School Play Day, celebrated by schools around the world on the first Wednesday in February every single year. Learn more at http://www.globalschoolplayday.comAt the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Problems Solutions 56 mins – “Naveen Jain is an entrepreneur driven to solve the world’s biggest challenges through unique innovation. He is the founder of several successful companies including Moon Express, Viome, Bluedot, TalentWise, Intelius and InfoSpace. Naveen is a trustee of the board at the XPRIZE Foundation where he is focused on using incentive prizes to find solutions to many of the societal challenges. He recently launched a million-dollar Women Safety XPRIZE to empower the women around the world. We recorded this episode of Bulletproof Radio, live and in person, at the XPRIZE event.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gratitude 47 mins – “Just in time for Thanksgiving, we’ll look at the science of gratitude and the evidence that it really does improve our lives.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gratitude 49 mins – “A.J. Jacobs (@ajjacobs) takes over the show for a special episode. A.J. is a kindred guinea pig of self-experimentation who chronicles his shenanigans in books that seem to keep winding up as New York Times best sellers. The Know-It-All was about his quest to learn everything in the world. In The Year of Living Biblically, he tried to follow all the rules of the Bible as literally as possible. Drop Dead Healthy followed his well- (and ill-) advised experiments to become the healthiest person alive. My Life as an Experiment is about exactly what it sounds like, and It’s All Relative aimed to connect all of humanity in one family tree. His latest book, Thanks a Thousand: A Gratitude Journey, chronicles his journey around the world to personally thank everyone along the supply chain who makes his morning cup of coffee a possibility: the farmer of the coffee beans, the barista, the designer of the logo for the coffee, the truck driver who transported the coffee beans, the guy who painted the yellow lines on the road so the truck wouldn’t veer into traffic, the inventor of the cardboard sleeve that goes around the coffee cup (aka the paper zarf) so you don’t burn your fingers, and on and on. At the link right-click “Click to listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Great Lakes Imperiled 46 mins – “Erie, Huron, Michigan, Ontario and Superior. We’ll explore the allure of the Great Lakes – and the perils facing them.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ground Sinking 19 mins – “We hear from scientists who are saying we need to pay more attention to something called subsidence, or sinking ground, because they say is being exacerbated by climate change.” At the link find the title, “Parts of Tehran are sinking into the ground at 25cm a year, says scientist,” right-click “Download Parts of Tehran are sinking into the ground at 25cm a year, says scientist,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Control Activists 20 mins – “Survivors of the Parkland school shooting started a political movement in the U.S. to increase youth voter participation. It’s unclear how successful they will be.” At the link find the title, “After Parkland shooting, students ‘marched for their lives’: Now they’re urging youth to vote in U.S. midterms” right-click “Download After Parkland shooting, students ‘marched for their lives’: Now they’re urging youth to vote in U.S. midterms” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hand Surgery 47 mins – “The concept of microsurgery is fairly new in the history of surgery. Microsurgery is a technique that allows the surgeon to repair one millimeter blood vessels and nerves using an operating room microscope and suture finer than the human hair. In the mid-1960s, Gregory Buncke’s father, Harry Buncke, M.D., recognized that, with the right tools, technique and equipment, he could replant amputated fingers, make a thumb from the big toe or reconstruct post traumatic or large defects. However, those tools and techniques did not exist at that time. Starting nearly from scratch, Buncke began designing and creating microsurgical instruments and microsurgical suture. Most of his early work was done at his home in San Francisco. He created a research surgical suite in his garage, performing rabbit ear replantation and toe to thumb transplants in the Rhesus monkey. Buncke was eventually given the title, “father of microsurgery,” for his commitment to educating thousands of surgeons.  Greg Buncke has continued in his father’s footsteps, advancing microsurgery both in training and innovation. His group has pushed the envelope in reconstruction of the mutilated hand, for example, restoring all fingers and thumbs with toe transplantation. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy can now preformed using only abdominal or thigh tissue, without the need for an implant. Facial reconstruction can happen as a one-stage operation immediately after cancer resection. Transgender males can undergo phalloplasty microsurgically and can obtain an erection, urinate and have sexual sensation. Limbs that were once amputated after trauma can be salvaged and restored to nearly normal function. Peripheral nerve injuries with large gaps can be microsurgically reconstructed with allografts, avoiding the need for sacrificing nerves from other parts of the body. The future of reconstructive microsurgery is wide open. New reconstructive indications are being created on a daily basis. Join us, and come learn more about these exciting advances.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Havana Syndrome  20 minsAre energy weapons behind mystery injuries in Cuba? Unlikely, but they do exist: author. A Canadian diplomat’s reported brain injury is fueling the mystery around the so-called “Havana Syndrome,” allegedly caused by a high-pitched, cricket-like sound heard by embassy workers and family members in Cuba. Could an unusual weapon be responsible?” At the link find the title, “Are energy weapons behind mystery injuries in Cuba? Unlikely, but they do exist: author,” right-click “Download Are energy weapons behind mystery injuries in Cuba? Unlikely, but they do exist: author” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Huawei Controversy 21 mins – The Arrest of tech exec Meng Wanzhou is underlining worries that her company, Huawei, could use its position in Canada as a means for espionage or retaliation against the government.” At the link find the title, “Concerns percolating over Huawei’s ‘leverage’ over Canadian cybersecurity,” right-click “Download Concerns percolating over Huawei’s ‘leverage’ over Canadian cybersecurity” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Hibernation 21 mins – “We look at how the fat-tailed dwarf lemur could hold the secret to human hibernation, and whether that could be the key to deep-space travel.” At the link find the title, “Lemurs could hold the key to human hibernation, says scientist,” right-click “Download Lemurs could hold the key to human hibernation, says scientist,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Rights Abuses 64 mins – “There are a greater number of forcibly displaced people in the world today than at any time since the end of World War II, and the Bay Area has welcomed many of these individuals. Hear from clinicians working directly with Bay Area refugees and asylum seekers about how they are restoring health and awakening hope in response to human rights abuses.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impact Investing 76 mins – “How did we come to separate our understanding of economic/financial value from social/environmental value? How did we come to think of ourselves as being separate from our neighbors, community and planet? By crafting a new, holistic understanding of ourselves and our relationship to one another, we are able to approach a deeper, more significant understanding of the purpose of capital, which may then anchor our definition of the purpose of capital, how we understand the nature of returns (both financial and extra-financial) and a deeper understanding of the meaning of money.  In a fireside chat, Donna Morton and Jed Emerson will explore these ideas—history and culture—connecting those within the current trend toward impact investing and sustainable finance as vehicles to generate financial returns with social and environmental impacts and the creation of a more just world for both human and nonhuman communities. The audience will come away with a new mindset for a future that is clean, just and regenerative for people and planet. Asking new questions—how can the people left out of the economy become our greatest assets—financial activism could unite Occupy and Wall Street, the 99 and the 1 percent. Movements such as Black Lives Matter, sanctuary cities, intersectional feminism and climate justice are the edges and opportunities for finance. Beyond divestment, the speakers will discuss moving finance from harm to healing.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Implant Deaths 31 mins – “A new investigation led by CBC/Radio-Canada, the Toronto Star and the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists found concerns in the way medical devices are approved and monitored in many countries, and patients who have suffered as a result.” At the link find the title, “New investigations reveals implanted medical devices approved in Canada despite risks,” right-click “Download New investigations reveals implanted medical devices approved in Canada despite risks,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Implant Problems 24 mins – “A new investigation led by CBC/Radio-Canada, the Toronto Star and the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists found concerns in the way medical devices are approved and monitored in many countries, and patients who have suffered as a result.” At the link find the title, “New investigations reveals implanted medical devices approved in Canada despite risks,” right-click “Download New investigations reveals implanted medical devices approved in Canada despite risks” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Index Funds Trend 49 mins – “Sounding the alarm on index funds. How their runaway success has reshaped power and accountability in boardrooms and on Wall Street.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inside Your Gut 56 mins – “Naveen Jain is an entrepreneur driven to solve the world’s biggest challenges through unique innovation. He is the founder of several successful companies including Moon Express, Viome, Bluedot, TalentWise, Intelius and InfoSpace. Naveen is a trustee of the board at the XPRIZE Foundation where he is focused on using incentive prizes to find solutions to many of the societal challenges. He recently launched a million-dollar Women Safety XPRIZE to empower the women around the world. We recorded this episode of Bulletproof Radio, live and in person, at the XPRIZE event.” At the link right-click “Download” in the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iraqi Refugees in Canada 23 mis – “Western society doesn’t understand what trauma survivors can achieve, says Dr Jan Kizilhan, a Kurdish-German psychologist who helps Yazidi survivors of ISIS sexual slavery.” At the link find the title, “Trauma survivors ‘can change society,’ says psychologist helping Yazidi survivors of ISIS,” right-click “Download Trauma survivors ‘can change society,’ says psychologist helping Yazidi survivors of ISIS,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Japan’s WW II Biological Research 64 mins – “During World War II, Japan’s biological warfare research group, referred to as Unit 731, carried out some of the most inhumane research experiments ever recorded. They also supplied the biological weapons used in the most destructive attacks in human history, killing tens of thousands of Chinese civilians. After the war, the Soviet Union tried, convicted and imprisoned several of the researchers as war criminals. As documentary filmmaker Paul Johnson reminds us, the United States instead made a deal with the Unit 731 leaders under their jurisdiction, agreeing not to prosecute them in exchange for the data they had developed from their human experiments. Johnson will discuss what he considers to be one of the darkest chapters of Cold War realpolitik.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jonestown Survivor Story 67 mins – “Jackie Speier was 28 when she joined congressman Leo Ryan’s delegation to rescue defectors from cult leader Jim Jones’ Peoples Temple in Jonestown, Guyana. Ryan was killed on the airstrip tarmac, and Speier was shot five times at point-blank range. While recovering from what would become one of the most harrowing tragedies in recent history, Speier had to choose: Would she become a victim or a fighter? The choice to survive against unfathomable odds empowered her with a resolve to become a vocal proponent for human rights. From the formative nightmare that radically molded her perspective and instincts to the devastating personal and professional challenges that would follow, her memoir, Undaunted, reveals the perseverance of a determined force in American politics. Deeply rooted in Speier’s experiences as a widow, a mother, a congresswoman and a fighter, hers is a story of true resilience, one that will inspire other women to draw strength from adversity in order to do what is right—no matter the challenges ahead.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism War 20 mins – “Maria Ressa, named among Time Magazine’s ‘Person of the Year,’ says the Philippines is a warning to the world about the power of social media to spread misinformation. She wants platforms like Facebook to take more responsibility.” At the link find the title, “‘In the middle of a battle,’ journalist Maria Ressa, named among Time’s Person of the Year, won’t back down,” right-click “Download ‘In the middle of a battle,’ journalist Maria Ressa, named among Time’s Person of the Year, won’t back down,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kilgallen Death Case 78 mins – “Mark Shaw’s Denial of Justice adds the final chapter to The Reporter Who Knew Too Much, the bestselling murder mystery about “What’s My Line” TV star and investigative reporter Dorothy Kilgallen. The Reporter Who Knew Too Much detailed the life and times of Kilgallen who, according to Shaw, came too close to the truth about the JFK assassination. In his new book, Shaw presents incriminating evidence about the main suspect in Kilgallen’s death from the suspect’s family members, detailing the disturbing conduct by FBI agents on the day Kilgallen died. Shaw also includes government documents never published before that may change the way you perceive the JFK assassination. Readers can find out more at thedorothykilgallenstory.org.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Last Watchman of Old Cairo 64 mins – “Michael David Lukas, who attended The American University in Cairo and was a Fulbright scholar in Turkey, will discuss his critically acclaimed multigenerational novel, The Last Watchman of Old Cairo. Lukas weaves an intriguing tale, using real and fictional characters from old and modern Cairo; Victorian England; and Berkeley, California. The novel follows Joseph (the son of a Muslim father and Jewish mother) as he traces his forefather’s role in guarding Cairo’s historic Ibn Ezra Synagogue and the ties that bind his family. Lukas’ last book, The Oracle of Stamboul, has been translated into more than a dozen languages.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lean In Pushback 47 mins – “Five years ago Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg told women to “lean in.” Now, many women, including Michelle Obama, say it just doesn’t work. We look at the pushback against lean in.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Less Harmful Products 66 mins – “Playing for Team Human today, recorded live on the floor at the Personal Democracy Forum 2018, are Moira Weigel and Ben Tarnoff. Moira and Ben will be showing us how the tech industry’s promise to build less harmful products and programs is just capitalism’s way of proving that love means never having to say, “I’m sorry.” Moira and Ben co-wrote the brilliant feature article in the Guardian, Why Silicon Valley Can’t Fix ItselfJust last week, Ben’s exposé and interview with an anonymous worker/organizer at Google revealed the internal fight led by workers against Google’s contracting with the Pentagon on Project Maven, a weaponized use of Google’s AI and cloud computing technology. The interview, published June 6th, can be found at Jacobin magazine: Tech Workers Versus the Pentagon Ben’s articles in the Guardian and Jacobin have been disrupting tech industry gospel for the past decade. He is also the author of The Bohemians. Moira Weigel is a postdoc at the Harvard Society of Fellows. Her recent book Labor of Love; The Invention of Dating looks at the commodification of courtship under consumer capitalism.  Moira and Ben are editors of Logic, a print and digital magazine which features thought provoking journalism on technology. Like Team Human, Logic strives to host a “better conversation” about technology…” At the link find the title, “Ep. 90 Moira Weigel and Ben Tarnoff “Humane Tech or Capitalism Rebranded?” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Levulinic Acid 7 mins – “Thousands of football fans throughout Europe will remember the name Mathieu Flamini. The French mid-fielder played for his country and prestigious clubs such as Arsenal and AC Milan. What fans did not know when he was scoring goals was that he had a secret which he kept from his team mates and even his parents. In 2008, Flamini met Italian entrepreneur Pasquale Granata. The two bonded over shared concerns about global warming and decided to team up to help tackle environmental damage. They secretly established a company to produce carbon-containing chemicals from biomass. They called the company GFBiochemicals, the G standing for Granata and F for Flamini. Over the next few years they worked in partnership with researchers at the Polytechnic University of Milan and the University of Pisa to develop technology for the production of levulinic acid, an organic compound also known as 4-oxopentanoic acid. In 2004, the United States Department of Energy had identified the acid as one of 12 platform chemicals for the development of green industrial chemical processes. These processes rely on biomass as a raw material rather than non-renewable fossil sources for the production of organic chemicals and fuels. In 2015, Flamini revealed his secret to the public by announcing that GFBiochemicals had begun producing levulinic acid at its plant in Caserta, an Italian city some 40 kilometres north of Naples. It was the first company to mass produce the acid and it did so at a rate of 2,000 tons a year. …Other companies are now developing technologies to produce the compound on a commercial scale. For example, in March 2017 the Italian companies Bio-on and Sadam Group launched a joint project for sustainable low-cost production using by-products from the sugar industry as a raw material. A Bio-on press release noted that: ‘Levulinic acid is one of the key elements of the sustainable chemical industry of the future. It is used mainly in agriculture, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, but also to make bioplastics and biofuels. …The development of low-cost processes for the large-scale production of levulinic acid is still in its infancy. But companies such as GFBiochemicals are confident that the acid has a big future. Its notes on its website that: ‘Levulinic acid is a platform chemical with significant potential to replace petroleum-based products in the chemical and biofuel sectors.’ The company anticipates that its annual production with rise to up to 50,000 tons between 2020 and 2025. Its competitor, Bio-on, is similarly optimistic. It estimates that market demand will grow 150 to 200-fold over the next seven to eight years. …” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Machine Metaphor Escape P1 60 minsOn July 9th 2018 Team Human partnered with Virtual Futures for an evening of connection and conversation at JuJu’s Bar and Stage in London. Joining Douglas on stage, science fiction, fantasy, and horror writer Pat Cadigan followed by biologist, author, and TED outlaw Rupert Sheldrake. Presented here is Part One of the program, featuring Douglas in conversation with Pat Cadigan. Pat and Douglas take a winding path through topics including virtual reality, identity, and telling the future. Inspired by Pat’s vivid and clairvoyant imagination Rushkoff asks his audience to use the term “future” as a verb, exclaiming, “We can future together!” Opening the show, Rushkoff digs deeper into his recent, now viral essay, “Survival of the Richest.” Rather than succumb to the notion that the future is something we must insulate ourselves from, what if we both imagined and committed to building a future that amplifies connection and mutual aid?” At the link find the title, “Ep. 94 Team Human w/ Virtual Futures Live in London Part 1: Pat Cadigan,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Machine Metaphor Escape P2 75 mins – “In July 2018, Team Human partnered with Virtual Futures for an evening of connection and conversation at JuJu’s Bar and Stage in London. Joining Douglas on stage, science fiction, fantasy, and horror writer Pat Cadigan followed by biologist, author, and TED outlaw Rupert Sheldrake. Presented here in Episode 95 is Part Two of this live event featuring Douglas in conversation with Rupert Sheldrake, followed by a group conversation and audience question and answer session. If you missed part one with Pat Cadigan, find it here. Douglas and Rupert discuss science, materialism, spiritualism, and how we might break free from the machine metaphor that programs so many of our assumptions about human consciousness. In a unique impromptu treat, Rupert’s wife Jill Purce joins the stage to demonstrate the power of resonance.” At the link find the title, “Ep. 95 Team Human w/ Virtual Futures Live in London Part 2: Rupert Sheldrake,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maria Callas Documentary 47 mins – “We talk with the director of a new documentary about the life of Maria Callas, to this day one of the most electrifying singers in opera.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Research 10 mins – Various aspects of marijuana research are presented. The podcast isn’t available for download from Wired Spoken Edition, but is in the blog archive.

Mars Landing (first item) 39 mins – “Kate Arkless Gray tells Click about the technology on the latest Nasa Mars lander InSight and how this will work now that it is safely on the Red Planet’s surface. Detecting unknown drones – Aviation and drone experts have been carrying out drone trials near a major airport in the UK to trial new software designed to detect unauthorised drones and see if it can alert planes to potential danger. Gareth Mitchell went along to see how the technology works. Wikipiano – Imagine if you went to a concert and perhaps thought the music that was being played there wasn’t quite to your taste, or that the performance could be improved – would you want to change it? Well if the piece being performed is a webpage – one which anyone can access – you can make changes and see them implemented at the next show. Jack Meegan reports on his experience of Wikipiano. Reading a book millions of times – Would you read the same story over a million times? New technology developed by the BBC will allow you to listen to a story in millions of combinations – the chapters are the same, just played in a different order. We hear more about B.S. Johnson’s “The Unfortunates.” At the link no downloads are possible; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Meaningful Conversations 69 mins – “Playing for Team Human today is Eli Pariser, author of The Filter Bubble, former director of MoveOn.org and current chief executive of Upworthy.com. Eli uses media to make what’s important popular, rather than the other way around. Upworthy.com is a story-driven website focused on magnifying meaningful conversations that encourage positive social change. On today’s episode, Eli and Douglas mine our reality tunnels, looking at how perspective shapes meaning and what strategies we might employ to ground democracy in greater consciousness and empathy. On the theme of reality, Douglas opens with the viral craze over the “Yanni/Laurel” audio clip. Can we really say that everything is just a matter how you hear it?” At the link find the title, “Ep. 88 Eli Pariser “The Ground Under Our Feet,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Metabolic Health 69 mins– “Modern health means metabolic health. The main pathway to chronic diseases today is the breakdown of our finely tuned metabolic machinery inside, due to processed food, lifestyle and – mental health? Stress and depression have potent effects on our behavior and creating imbalance of hormones such as glucose, insulin and inflammation. Poor mental health contributes to the metabolic syndrome, a cluster of common maladies including a large waist, high lipid levels and blood pressure, breakdown of the balance between insulin and glucose, and the most invisible to all, a fatty liver. You will hear from four experts in this area on the important topics of nutrition, optimal daily habits and how to prevent depression and the cascade of dysregulation that manifests as the metabolic syndrome.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Midterm Election Prospects 60 mins – “Is this the last stand for American democracy? That’s what many of Donald Trump’s opponents believe. The upcoming US midterm election is the last chance to prevent the United States from becoming a truly authoritarian state. That fear has the Democrats campaigning hard. But the Republicans are scared too: If Democrats sweep the House and Senate, they could kill off Trump’s legislative agenda and gain new investigative powers to hit Trump hard over Russia, alleged obstruction of justice and the numerous allegations of influence-peddling at Trump’s businesses. And then there’s the Mueller investigation, which is due to conclude next year: if the special counsel finds evidence of criminal wrongdoing by the President, Democrats could begin impeachment proceedings. This may truly be the impeachment election. So what future awaits America in this historic election? Will Justice Kavanaugh’s acrimonious confirmation lead to a pro-Trump surge or will a wave of women voters sweep Republicans out of office? And in this hyper-partisan atmosphere, is there any chance to repair America’s fractured political landscape? We were joined by professor at Columbia University and leading expert on constitutional law Philip Bobbitt, Chair of Republicans Overseas UK Sarah Elliott and renowned American author and historian Timothy Snyder. The event was chaired by Guardian columnist, broadcaster and author Jonathan Freedland.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Midterm Elections Impact 37 mins – “Tuesday night was a good night for progressive Democrats, John Nichols argues—and Democratic control of the House will bring an epic change to Washington politics—starting with a return to Constitutional principles and an insistence that the president is subject to the rule of law. Also: women won unprecedented victories in the midterms.  Joan Walsh analyzes the feminist insurgency that will bring almost a hundred women to the House of Representatives in January—including the first two Muslim women (Michigan’s Rashida Tlaib and Minnesota’s Ilhan Omar); the first Native American women (New Mexico’s Deb Haaland and Kansas’s Sharice Davids), Texas’s first two Latina congresswomen (Veronica Escobar and Sylvia Garcia); plus three young black women (Massachusetts’s Ayanna Pressley, Connecticut’s Jahana Hayes, and Illinois’s Lauren Underwood). Plus: Brazil last week elected Jair Bolsonaro.  Our man in Rio, Andy Robinson, says he is “worse than Donald Trump,” and “as close to fascism as you will get in the world today, despite a growing number of contenders.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Minimalist Living 25 mins – In a world of stuff, there’s a movement that sells the idea of space as a path to happiness. But some critics see this lifestyle trend as self-centred, and say it includes its own kind of consumerism that only people with money can afford.” At the link find the title, “Minimalism: Upper-class luxury or liberating lifestyle?” right-click “Download Minimalism: Upper-class luxury or liberating lifestyle?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Musician Gender Pay Gap 24 mins – “A journalist covering an ongoing gender discrimination lawsuit launched against the Boston Symphony Orchestra by its principal flutist says the case could have broader implications for classical musicians.” At the link find the title, “How a lawsuit over gender-equal pay could change the classical music industry,” right-click “Download How a lawsuit over gender-equal pay could change the classical music industry” and select “Save Lin As” from the pop-up menu.

Myanmar’s Hidden Genocide 63 mins – “his past August marked the 30th anniversary of Myanmar’s pro-democracy uprising in 1988. At the same moment, accusations of ethnic cleansing against the Rohingya Muslims and widespread human rights abuses across the Southeast Asian nation have prompted the United States to impose new sanctions, specifically on four military and police commanders and two army units. These recent actions by government forces taking place in Rohingya communities within Myanmar suggest that the promises of democracy have been betrayed. The responsibility, according to Azeem Ibrahim, rests on Nobel Peace Prize winner and de facto leader of the country, Aung San Suu Kyi, and her party as much as anyone else. Come hear this startling story. Ibrahim’s global analytical work has been praised by the likes of Secretary Madeleine Albright and former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown. Ibrahim received his doctorate from Cambridge University and has previously been appointed an International Security Fellow at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and a World Fellow at Yale University. Outside academia, Ibrahim has been a reservist in the 4th Battalion, Parachute Regiment (the U.K.’s elite airborne infantry reserve) and an award-winning entrepreneur. He was named a young global leader by the World Economic Forum.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Myers-Briggs Controversy 25 mins – “Using the Myers-Briggs personality test is a way to engineer a workforce while appearing to care about employees’ self fulfillment, says Merve Emre, the author of The Personality Brokers: The Strange History of Myers-Briggs and the Birth of Personality Testing.” At the link find the title, “Myers-Briggs tests in the workplace help the employer, not the employee, says author,” right-click “Download Myers-Briggs tests in the workplace help the employer, not the employee, says author,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neoliberalism Failure 68 mins – “Playing for Team Human today is activist, Guardian columnist, and author of Out of the Wreckage: A New Politics for an Age of Crisis, George Monbiot. Monbiot and Rushkoff discuss the abysmal failure of neoliberalism, a narrative that figures humans as self-interested, competitive, and greedy creatures. Monbiot offers compelling evidence, both from his own on the ground experience reporting on people’s movements in Indonesia and Brazil, as well as recent findings in neuroscience and anthropology that break the neoliberal myth. But it’s not enough to merely break a myth with facts and figures. Monbiot argues that we must offer a new, engaging story. Can we harness our “narrative instinct,” to amplify participation in a politics centered on belonging, community, and restoring power back into the hands of team human? Rushkoff opens thinking about the medium of podcasting itself. Is the podcasting landscape in danger of being overrun by cookie-cutter, corporate funded content factories? Is there still room for the quirky DIY show?” At the link find the title, “Ep. 89 George Monbiot “Beyond Salvation and Disaster” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuromorphic Computer (first item) 27 mins – “Largest neuromorphic supercomputer The world’s largest neuromorphic supercomputer has just been switched on. Called the Spiking Neural Network Architecture or SpinNNaker, it’s built to work like the human brain and can complete more that 200 million million actions per second, making it the fastest of its kind in the world. First AI medical app in Swahili – Ada, an AI powered health platform, is launching in Swahili, making its health assessment technology available to more than 100 million people in Sub-Saharan Africa. The app uses data from real medical cases as well as knowledge from doctors and scientists. But how useful will it be if access to the internet or a decent smart phone is limited? Coding with the Flying Scotsman – The UK has the lowest percentage of female engineers in Europe. To increase these figures the UK government has embarked on a “Year of Engineering” campaign. Our reporter Jack Meegan has travelled to the National Railway Museum in York – the home of the world famous Flying Scotsman locomotive – to find out more about the Future Engineers event designed to get girls into technology and engineering. Is Uber in the US? – Is the question that Yinka Adegoke was asked once when he hailed an Uber in Nairobi. Yinka is the Africa Editor for the Quatrz news website and he’s just published a piece about how the gig economy, pushed on by technology like Uber, AirBnB and other apps, is becoming increasingly vital to many African economies.” At the link no downloads are possible; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Oysters Affected by Early Freeze 10 mins – “An early freeze is causing havoc for oyster farmers in P.E.I.[Prince Edward Island], where more than 1,000 people are employed in the industry. We spoke to one oyster grower about the challenges they’re facing.” At the link find the title, “Earliest freeze ‘in nearly 30 years’ is causing problems for P.E.I. oyster farmers,” right-click “Download Earliest freeze ‘in nearly 30 years’ is causing problems for P.E.I. oyster farmers” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Philanthropy 64 mins – “Is philanthropy, by its very nature, a threat to democracy? Though we may laud wealthy individuals who give away their money for society’s benefit, Rob Reich shows how such generosity not only isn’t the unassailable good we think it is, but it might also undermine democratic values. Big philanthropy is often a conversion of private assets into public influence—a form of power that is largely unaccountable and tax-advantaged. And small philanthropy, or ordinary charitable giving, can be problematic as well. These outcomes are shaped by the policies that define and structure philanthropy. Reich asks: What attitude and what policies should democracies have concerning individuals who give money away for public purposes? Differentiating between individual philanthropy and private foundations, Reich suggests that the goal of mass giving should be the decentralization of power in the production of public goods, such as the arts, education and science. For foundations, the goal should be long-term horizon innovations that enhance democratic experimentalism. Reich concludes that philanthropy, when properly structured, can play a crucial role in supporting a strong liberal democracy.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Podcasting College Classes 35 mins – “This episode contains CJ’s presentation from the Sound Education podcast conference held at the Divinity School of Harvard University in November, 2018. Join CJ as he discusses: The differences he’s noticed (for both teacher & learner) between a conventional classroom setting on the one hand, and podcasting on the other; His belief that these differences are largely due to the fact that a typical classroom setting is less voluntary and revolves around extrinsic motivations, whereas something like podcasting is purely voluntary (for both teacher & learner) and revolves around intrinsic motivations, and why the latter is superior in most important ways to the former” At the link you can listen, but not download; however a copy is included in the blog archive.

Political Polarization 25 mins – “Heated rhetoric in the U.S. midterm campaign has increased divisions between voters, including among families and friends.” At the link find the title, “Voters and families remain divided as congress splits in U.S. midterm results,” right-click “Download Voters and families remain divided as congress splits in U.S. midterm results” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pollution Art 28 mins – “Climate change is hard to depict. Polar bears on melting ice caps are far away from everyday life and the data is often complex and confusing. So could art in its broadest sense help us to understand the implications of global warming and environmental degradation? Tom Heap takes a look at how the creative community is responding to what is arguably the biggest threat of our time and asks if art can succeed in eliciting a response where science has failed. Music and visual arts which make climate data sets tangible, clothing which make pollutants visible and artists who make their creative response a form of protest. These are just a few of the ways in which artists are responding to environmental issues but it remains to be seen if these visions can impact our collective beliefs and behaviours.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Populism and Democracy 53 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, and the Center for the Study of Europe.  Our speaker is Sheri Berman, Professor of Political Science at Barnard College, Columbia University.  Professor Berman’s lecture is titled “Populism and the Future of Liberal Democracy in the West.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Positive Social Media 69 mins – “Playing for Team Human today is YouTube phenomenon, Netflix comedian, and writer and director of the movie Eighth Grade, Bo Burnham. Bo and Douglas consider the other, positive side of social media — how it still gives young people a way to test and share social strategies and express themselves. A conversation with many inspired tangents, Douglas and Bo also look at the ways social media pressures us to live our lives like a performance in a movie, the tragedy of becoming trapped in metanarratives, and how to get ahead of a self-satirizing internet.  Today’s conversation references Douglas’s Frontline documentaries Generation Like and The Merchants of CoolAt the link find the title, “Ep. 96 Bo Burnham “The Movie of Your Own Life Does Not Suck” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Republican Refugees 46 mins – “When it comes to politics, Texas is a big deal. With a population approaching 30-million and an economy bigger than Canada’s, Texas plays an outsized role in Washington. In the lead-up to the pivotal U.S. midterm elections, Anna Maria Tremonti visits the Lone State to hear from Texans.” At the link find the title, “As Goes Texas’: The Current digs deep into the political divide of the Lone State,” right-click “Download ‘As Goes Texas’: The Current digs deep into the political divide of the Lone State” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rev Jesse Jackson 70 mins – “The Rev. Jesse Jackson is one of America’s foremost civil rights, religious and political figures. For more than five decades, from working with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to his own two presidential campaigns and beyond, Jackson has played a pivotal role in virtually every movement for empowerment, peace, civil rights, gender equality, and economic and social justice. On August 9, 2000, President Bill Clinton awarded Jackson the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. As America grapples with polarization and increased threats of violence against social and political leaders, various ethnic groups, and the media, is it still possible for Americans to lessen the heated rhetoric and bridge divides? Come for a conversation with a man who has been called the “conscience of the nation.” Jackson will discuss the possibilities for America to be inclusive and to find common ground across lines of race, culture, class, gender and belief.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rwanda Reconciliation 57 mins – “Twenty-four years after the genocide against the Tutsi, a process of reconciliation and redevelopment has helped Rwandans transcend many of the divisions that tore their nation apart. The process of reconciliation today is embodied by government initiatives intended to erase the old colonial construct of operation along ethnic identities. This event will discuss Rwanda’s history and how its people were able to heal the wounds of genocide and harness a shared spirit to challenge the forces that tore the country apart.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Satchel Paige 48 mins – “Soon after Leroy “Satchel” Paige arrived at spring training in 1937 to pitch for the Pittsburgh Crawfords, he and five of his teammates, including Josh Gibson and James “Cool Papa” Bell, were lured to the Dominican Republic with the promise of easy money to play in a baseball tournament in support of the country’s dictator, Rafael Trujillo. But the money wasn’t so easy. Paige and his friends soon found themselves under the thumb of Trujillo, known by Dominicans for murdering those who disappointed him. At first the Ciudad Trujillo all-star team floundered—Paige and his friends spent their nights carousing and their days dropping close games. Desperate to restore discipline, Trujillo tapped the leader of his death squads to become part of the team management. Afraid they might be shot, Paige and his teammates rallied to win. This barely registered with Trujillo, who just months later ordered the killings of 15,000 Haitians at the border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic. When Paige and his teammates returned home, they were banished from the Negro leagues. Despite this, they continued to play baseball, barnstorming across America as the “Trujillo All-Stars” team. Author Averell “Ace” Smith tells an extraordinary story of race and politics and of some of the greatest baseball players ever as they played high-stakes baseball for one of the Caribbean’s cruelest dictators.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Driving Car Revolution 47 mins – “There’s now an app to hail a self-driving taxi. We’ll look behind the wheel at the technology and safety concerns.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Justice 60 mins – “Best-selling Bay Area author Adam Hochschild is back with a varied collection of essays on ideas and concerns that have spurred his career, with a particular focus on issues related to social justice and the people who have fought for it, the toll and aftereffects of colonialism, and the dangers of government surveillance. Hochschild was moved to collect and curate these essays (more than two dozen in all) by a sense that these issues matter more than ever in Trump’s America. The pieces in his new volume range from a day on the campaign trail with Nelson Mandela to walking through construction sites with an ecologically pioneering architect near the southern tip of India. Many of the pieces evince a personal angle: visits to Finnish prisons, exploration of former gulag areas in Siberia, his own dealings with the CIA when talking about new revelations of the agency’s control of ostensibly independent organizations in the ’50s and ’60s. As always, Hochschild’s journalistic skills, deep historical knowledge and activist leanings illuminate each essay. A longtime lecturer at the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley, Hochschild is the author of numerous books. His writings have appeared in The New YorkerHarper’s MagazineThe Atlantic, The New York Times MagazineThe Nation and other publications.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sugar Expose 68 mins – “The eighth annual Lundberg Institute Lecture focuses on Gary Taubes’ groundbreaking exposé, which makes the convincing case that sugar is the tobacco of the new millennium: backed by powerful lobbies, entrenched in our lives and making us very sick. Diabetes is more prevalent today than ever among Americans; obesity is at epidemic proportions. Nearly 10 percent of children are thought to have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The excessive consumption of sugar is at the root of these and other critical health problems.  Taubes delves into Americans’ history with sugar: its uses as a preservative, as an additive in cigarettes, and more recently its overuse in the form of high-fructose corn syrup. He presents the arguments against sugar, corrects misconceptions about the relationship between sugar and weight loss, and provides the perspective necessary to make informed decisions about sugar as individuals and as a society.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Future 66 mins – “With the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy and the appointment of Brett Kavanaugh, the Supreme Court is at a turning point. From privacy and free speech to affirmative action and immigration, how will the court and the Constitution change as a result? Join noted constitutional scholar Jeffrey Rosen for an examination of the most hotly contested constitutional questions of our time and what they bode for the future of the country. In addition to heading the National Constitution Center and teaching at George Washington University, Rosen is also a contributing editor of The Atlantic and former legal affairs editor of The New Republic. The Los Angeles Times has called him “the nation’s most widely read and influential legal commentator.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Problems 70 mins – “David Kaplan takes us inside the secret world of the Supreme Court and shows us how nine justices have subverted the role of the other branches of government—and how we’ve come to accept this at our peril. The court is so crucial that some voters in 2016 selected a presidential candidate based on who that candidate would likely appoint. Donald Trump picked Neil Gorsuch and now Brett Kavanaugh, both potential swing votes on social policies such as abortion, same-sex marriage, gun control, campaign finance and voting rights. Kaplan asks: Is that really how democracy is supposed to work?  Based on exclusive interviews with the justices and their law clerks, Kaplan will provide fresh details about life behind the scenes—Clarence Thomas’s simmering rage, Antonin Scalia’s death, Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s celebrity. Kaplan presents a sweeping narrative of the justices’ aggrandizement of power over the decades, and he demonstrates that the arrogance of the court isn’t partisan: Conservative and liberal justices alike are guilty of overreach.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tech Industry Leadership 76 mins – “Join New York Times technology editor and renowned Silicon Valley journalist Pui-Wing Tam to discuss one of the thorniest issues in tech: how to build the next wave of industry leadership. What qualities do leaders need to move beyond an era of cultish corporate command to create fair and functional work environments? How do you keep workers and investors happy? Tam will talk about these and other concerns with: Bridget Frey, chief technology officer at Redfin—one of the few female executives in that role; Tina Sharkey, an American entrepreneur and advisor and co-founder of Brandless; Wayne Sutton, a long-time diversity and inclusion advisor and strategist; and Josh Reeves, chief executive officer and co-founder of Gusto and a longtime champion of bettering work life.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technological Philospher 57 mins – “Playing for Team Human today is interdisciplinary thinker and technology philosopher Damien Williams. In this episode, Williams and Rushkoff look at the embedded biases of technology and the values programed into our mediated lives. How has a conception of technology as “objective” blurred our vision to the biases normalized within these systems? What ethical interrogation might we apply to such technology? And finally, how might alternative modes of thinking, such as magick, the occult, and the spiritual help us to bracket off these systems for pause and critical reflection? This conversation serves as a call to vigilance against runaway systems and the prejudices they amplify.” At the link find the title, “Ep. 74 Damien Williams “We Built It From Us,” right-click “Download “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tibetan Buddhism 52 mins – “Our lecture this week is titled “Interdependent Personhood and Relational Ethics: A Tibetan Perspective” and features Sarah Jacoby, Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Northwestern University.  This weeks’ lecture presented by the Boston University Institute for Philosophy and Religion, and the Boston University Center for Humanities.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tom Hanks Interview 48 mins – “We’ll talk with actor Tom Hanks on his career, his book and his love affair with the typewriter.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender by Law 65 mins -”The Trump administration recently unleashed what’s been criticized as another attack on transgender Americans by calling for the Department of Health and Human Services to redefine sex as biological under Title IX, which prevents gender-based discrimination. In response, LGBTQ communities and allies have mobilized community actions calling out the administration for what they’re calling a blatant attempt to erase trans and gender nonconforming communities. Join us for an informational discussion with community experts on strategies to address this latest attack and the impact of the upcoming November 6 election. Learn more on what this memo means, what people can do next.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Opposition 69 mins – ““I’d give us an A.” ―President Donald Trump, on his first 100 days in office. Bill Press, a popular radio host and former California Democratic chair, argues the opposite: that every day that Trump stays in office, he diminishes the United States and its people. In his new book, Trump Must Go, Press offers 100 reasons why he believes Trump needs to be removed from office, whether by impeachment, the 25th Amendment or the ballot box. Ranging from banning federal employees’ use of the phrase “climate change” to making disparaging comments about African nations and countries such as Haiti and El Salvador, Press lists his reasons why he believes the president is unfit for office. Press says that Trump’s calendar is marked with extensive “executive time” so he can tweet, golf and watch TV. But, in a political climate where the world has learned to expect the unexpected, Press will also offer a twist: one reason not to ditch Donald Trump.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Supporter 59 mins – “Sebastian Gorka served as deputy assistant to President Donald Trump for much of 2017 and continues to be an outspoken supporter of the president’s agenda. Currently, Gorka works as a national security strategist for Fox News. Since his emergence on the political stage, his controversial nationalist views have seen a resurgence across the western world. In his book Why We Fight, Gorka asserts that if America wants to succeed in the war on terror, we need a clear, unifying doctrine. He believes willful ignorance about our adversary—whether it’s Russia, China or the global jihadi movement—has crippled America and our will to fight outside threats. Join us for a conversation with this provocative figure who worked for Trump and continues to influence global affairs.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

UN Climate Change Summit 20 mins – “As the UN talks on climate change are extended in Poland, Green Party leader Elizabeth May tells us that those expecting decisive action will be disappointed.” At the link find the title, “‘Do we want to survive or not?’: Elizabeth May says climate change talks too focused on technicalities,” right-click “Download ‘Do we want to survive or not?’: Elizabeth May says climate change talks too focused on technicalities” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undocumented Citizen 68 mins – “In Jose Antonio Vargas’ own words, his story as an undocumented citizen is “only one of an estimated 11 million in the United States.” While the details differ, they all have common threads—a feeling of homelessness in place you call home and the ever-looming fear of an uncertain future. Vargas argues that the psychological trauma attached to those experiences is often felt for generations. Join the Pulitzer Prize-winning writer as he chronicles his journey in becoming arguably the most recognizable undocumented figure in the United States and how he also became the voice of those displaced by a highly hostile, anti-immigrant culture. He will also offer insight into the everyday life of those living on the fringes of a society that does not welcome them and the unwavering spirit and generosity that perseveres in that community.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuelan Crisis 19 mins – As a former diplomat, Ben Rowswell witnessed populist politics has taken hold in recent years, and the impact that had on countries like Venezuela. Now he’s urging citizens to organize and fight back against the threat – and he’s got an app for that.” At the link find the title, “Citizens must become leaders in order to combat populism, says former diplomat,” right-click “Download Citizens must become leaders in order to combat populism, says former diplomat” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Veterans Dental Issues 32 mins – “The mission of Dentists Organized for Veterans is to enhance lives by providing free, on-going, high-quality dental services in the first private, stand alone, full-service dental clinic in the United States wholly devoted to veterans who do not qualify for dental services from the Veterans Administration and who cannot afford dental care. a significant portion of veterans, many of whom cannot afford dental insurance, suffer through extremely poor oral health and dental neglect. The dental professionals at DOV, over seen by Clinical Director Angela Bayat, DDS, seek to address this appalling circumstance and provide the same standard of care and variety of services found in any modern, private practice at no cost to the veteran. Dr. Bayat has lived all over the world and brings a global perspective on patient care and health. Beginning her professional career as a Pharmacy student, Dr. Bayat eventually pursued dentistry as a field that would give her more personal contact with patients. Fluent in three languages, she has a natural talent not only as a practitioner but a trusted caregiver who listens to and addresses the specific concerns of her patients.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Violinist Lucia Micarelli 47 mins – “Violinist Lucia Micarelli defies the limits of what music can be played on a violin. She’s with us.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Walmart CEO Interview 61 mins – “Doug McMillon (IG: @dougmcmillon) is president and chief executive officer of Walmart, a company that, if it were a country, would be the 25th largest economy in the world. Walmart serves 265 million customers weekly in 27 countries across more than 11,000 stores and online, and the company employs roughly 2.2 million associates worldwide, which would equate to the second largest army in the world (behind China) if it were tasked with defending that 25th largest economy. 75 percent of Walmart’s store management team began as hourly associates, and Doug is no exception. He started out in 1984 as a summer associate in the Walmart distribution center, and in 1990 while pursuing his MBA, he rejoined the company as an assistant manager in Tulsa before moving to merchandising as a buyer trainee. He worked his way up, and from 2005 to 2009 he served as president and CEO of Sam’s Club (owned and operated by Walmart) with sales of more than $46 billion annually during his tenure. From February of 2009 to 2014, Doug served as president and CEO of Walmart International, a fast-growing segment of Walmart’s overall operations. He has served on the board of directors for Walmart since 2013 and is currently the chair of the executive and global compensation committees. In addition, he serves on the board of directors of the Consumer Goods Forum, the US-China Business Council and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. He also serves on the executive committee of the Business Roundtable and the advisory board of the Tsinghua University School of Economics and Management in Beijing, China. This episode was recorded live at the Heartland Summit in Bentonville, AR, surrounded by the jaw-droppingly mind-blowing Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Please enjoy!” At the link right-click “Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.” from below the sound bar.

Wetlands Value 27 mins – “What have wetlands ever done for us? Apart from providing fresh water, carbon storage, flood mitigation, wildlife habitat and much more….they are said to be critical to human and planetary life. But a recent report claims despite this these ecosystems are disappearing three times faster than forests. Around 35% of the worlds wetlands were lost between 1970 and 2015 – but the UK lost most of its before then. So why don’t we care? Are a ‘bunch of bogs and ditches’ less valued than a romantic forest? Tom Heap finds out what wetlands are and what they do for us and if policy makers and decision-makers need to value them more highly, should we too? The positive news is wetlands can be created and improved – both on a large scale and in our own gardens and neighbourhoods. Is it time to make some noise for the wonders of wetlands?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wine Harvest 2018 59 mins – “Join our distinguished vintner and winegrower panelists as they share their year-long journey toward the 2018 vineyard harvest and their commitment to a healthier environment, stronger communities and vibrant businesses. Following the program, continue the conversation with our panel and celebrate the holidays with a tasting of their outstanding wines.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women Politician Winners 47 mins – “A record number of women ran for office. We look at how they did and how they might lead.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One Impact 47 mins – “The 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. Reflections from the homefront and Europe.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yemen Destruction 59 mins – “Since 2015, a Saudi-led coalition, supported by Britain and the United States, has waged a devastating war on Yemen, resulting in a humanitarian disaster largely ignored by the world’s media. Isa Blumi, a noted historian, senior lecturer and associate professor at Stockholm University (specializing in Ottoman history, Albania and Yemen) will discuss his latest book, Destroying Yemen: What Chaos in Arabia Tells Us About the World, published by UC Press.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yemen Famine 24 mins – With over 60 per cent of the population living on the brink of famine and an estimated 85,000 children dead from malnutrition, the war has propelled the country into a devastating humanitarian crisis.” At the link find the title, “‘Fighting is easier than peace’: Ending war in Yemen will require global effort, says expert,” right-click “Download ‘Fighting is easier than peace’: Ending war in Yemen will require global effort, says expert,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Youth Connecting with Family 26 mins – “Youth who find themselves at an emergency youth centre in St. Catherine’s, Ont., have been taking part in a unique program in which staff scour government records and databases to find family members who have gone missing from the teens’ lives.” At the link find the title, “How youth support staff are using their sleuthing skills to connect teens with family,” right-click “Download How youth support staff are using their sleuthing skills to connect teens with family” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Zero Visions 49 mins – “Stabilizing the climate will require going for big zeroes—a zero-carbon grid, zero-emission vehicles, zero net energy buildings and zero-waste manufacturing. Achieving these audacious goals will require dramatically remaking the way we get around, operate buildings and make products. Will these net-zero visions require massive technological breakthroughs or deployment of existing technologies? Is there a shortage or a surplus of funding to power these opportunities—and where should it be directed to maximize impact? Join us for a conversation about the policy and technologies needed to drive us toward the zeros necessary for achieving a low-carbon future.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

 

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