Media Mining Digest 318 – Dec 15, 2017: African Small Business, AR and VR Training, Balkan Instability, Behavioral Economics, Bosnia War Crime, Brain Implants, Carbon Neutral London, Cellulosic Biofuels, Central Park Five Case, Childhood PTSD, Civilization Key Traits, Climate Warming Impact, Cruise Line Impact, Democracy in Trouble, DNA Testing, Econtalk Founder, Educational Technology, Expertise in Medicine, Fake News, Farming Seven Successful Traits, Female Employment Trends, Feminism, Fetal Brain Activity, First Amendment, Freakonomics Thinking, Genetic Research, Government Surveillance, Homelessness, Human Beliefs, Inner City Schools, Internet Censorship, ISIS Child Theft, Mass Shooter Illness, Meditation Teacher, Mycology Breakthroughs, Net Neutrality, Network Power, North Korea Cyberwarfare, Option B, Political Homelessness, Poverty and Health, Presidential Removal, Privacy vs Data Collection, Ransomeware, Saudia Arabia and Educational Endowment, Sex Worker Interview, Smart Phone Searches, Taxation Power, Terrorism Discussion, Tesla Batteries, Thinking Tools, Tim O’Reilly Interview, Troll Farm, Vietnam Heroin Use, Wisdom of Elders

Exercise your ears: the 111 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 646 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 18,700 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 118GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 440 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

African Small Business 7 mins – “Niti Bhan studies business strategy for Africa’s informal markets: the small shops and stands, skilled craftspeople and laborers who are the invisible engine that keeps the continent’s economy running. It’s tempting to think of these workers as tax-dodgers, even criminals — but Bhan makes the case that this booming segment of the economy is legitimate and worthy of investment. “These are the fertile seeds of businesses and enterprises,” Bhan says. “Can we start by recognizing these skills and occupations?” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AR and VR Training 38 mins – “…I’m talking with Taylor Freeman of Upload.io. They are a company that are in San Francisco and Marina del Rey that has these amazing classes that are teaching virtual reality, augmented reality, mixed reality, X reality. It’s just an amazing company that is building the University of the Future. They have the coolest space. I’ve got a little sneak preview from Taylor. I am now going to take Tom and we’re going to go up there in the next months because it is just such a cool space to look at but such cool tools to play with. I just really thought that you would find this really interesting and really start talking about how the skills that you might be building over in 3D design really translate themselves into becoming virtual reality designers, augmented reality designers, really build this future of this idea of marketing all the way through to product, through 3D printed on-demand end results. I love that idea. I really thought you should hear this. Let’s go to my interview with Taylor Freeman.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arctic Energy Supply 60 mins – “This week we’re looking at how alternative energy works in the arctic. We speak to Louie Azzolini and Linda Todd from the Arctic Energy Alliance, a non-profit helping communities reduce their energy usage and transition to more affordable and sustainable forms of energy. And the lessons they’re learning along the way can help those of us further south.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save” and “OK” to get the file.

Astrophysics Questions 56 mins – “Delve into this mashup of Cosmic Queries as Neil deGrasse Tyson and an ensemble of comic co-hosts explore the vast wonder of the cosmos including double star systems, black holes, dark matter and antimatter, the Hubble constant, tidal friction, ET, and much more.” At the link right-click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Balkan Instability 29 mins – “Preventing the Unraveling of the Balkans Peace Agreements, Nov, 2017.” At the link find the title with the same words, right-click “Media files T001_20171106_ed.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Behavioral Economics 63 mins – “Michael Lewis is one of the most successful non-fiction authors alive. He has been acclaimed as a genius by Malcolm Gladwell and as the best current writer in America by Tom Wolfe. In a series of titles that have sold 9 million copies worldwide, he has lifted the lid on the biggest stories of our times, enthralling readers with his knack for humanising complex subjects and giving them the page-turning urgency of the best thrillers. Liar’s Poker is the cult classic that defined Wall Street during the 1980s; Moneyball was made into a film with Brad Pitt; Boomerang was a breakneck tour of Europe’s post-crunch economy; and The Big Short was made into a major Oscar-winning film starring Christian Bale, Ryan Gosling and Steve Carell. In November 2017 Lewis came to the Intelligence Squared stage, where he was joined by Stephanie Flanders, former economics editor at the BBC. Discussing the themes of his latest book, The Undoing Project: A Friendship that Changed the World, they explored the extraordinary story of the relationship between Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky – a collaboration which created the field of behavioural economics. This is the theory which shows that human beings are not the rational creatures we imagined ourselves to be, and has revolutionised everything from big data to medicine, from how we are governed to how we spend, from high finance to football. It won Kahneman the Nobel Prize in economics in 2002 – the first time the award had gone to a psychologist.” At the link find the title, “Michael Lewis On How Behavioural Economics Changed The World, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Man in Berlin 28 mins – “Peter White explores Berlin through the sounds of a city that is finding new and imaginative ways to mark its troubled past and plan for its fast expanding future. He is struck by how much it is still haunted by the past. He idles on street corners to absorb the voices around him and he is struck by a familiar lament: people worrying about how much longer they will be able to afford to live in a city with fast rising property prices prompted in part by an influx of foreign investors. His guide is a fellow blind-man, entrepreneur Erich Thurner, who shares the concerns as he contemplates his own future in Berlin.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Tech Show 60 mins – “That Blind Tech Show Rolls Again. Bryan brings Allison and Jeff back to the sho to talk about some of the latest Tech news, gidgets and gadgets and the latest from Sonos. We are proud to announce that Twitterrific for the Mac is Back, Downcast just got an update and AOL Messenger is no longer. Jeff gives us an update on the fire that hit Enchanted Hills Camp above Napa, CA and how we can all contribute and support #RebuildEHC.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bosnia War Criminal 28 mins – “Mark Urban returns to Bosnia to examine the impact Serb General Ratko Mladic had on the lives of thousands of people.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Implants 28 mins – “This week we hear stories on what to do with experimental brain implants after a study is over, how gene therapy gave a second skin to a boy with a rare epidermal disease, and how bone markings thought to be evidence for early hominid tool use may have been crocodile bites instead, with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. [and] Sarah Crespi interviews Gary King about his new experiment to bring fresh data to the age-old question of how the news media influences the public. Are journalists setting the agenda or following the crowd? How can you know if a news story makes a ripple in a sea of online information? In a powerful study, King’s group was able to publish randomized stories on 48 small and medium sized news sites in the United States and then track the results.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Carbon Neutral London 51 mins – “Could London be the first carbon neutral city? Listen to this exciting debate hosted by Intelligence Squared. Gadget guru Jason Bradbury is the chair, plus guests including award winning actor and broadcaster Richard Ayoade.” At the link find the title, “Can innovation transform London into a carbon neutral city? Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cellulosic Biofuels P1 29 mins – “This episode begins a three-part series on cellulosic ethanol and other cellulosic biofuels. What if we could take one of the most prolific, abundant, renewable, and sustainable items on the plant – Cellulose – and make fuel from it?  Well, we can! Sounds fantastic, but there are, of course, challenges. It’s expensive, the conversions aren’t as great as we’d like them to be, there is a lot of work that needs to be done to improve the processes in order to make cellulosic biofuels a widespread reality.  This is the first part of the three-part series where we explore these opportunities and challenges with cellulosic biofuels. Dr. Brown describes a future where farmers can produce biomass that is specifically bred to be processed into fuels that can go directly into an engine. This would, of course, take collaboration between seed companies, farmers, ethanol plants, and fuel manufacturers and retailers.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Central Park Five Case 26 mins – “Presidents don’t usually weigh in on criminal cases. In fact, it’s critical to the integrity of the criminal justice system that the executive not try to influence the outcome of cases. But Trump can’t help himself. President Trump has called the US criminal justice system “a joke.” At the link find the title, “13- Criminal Justice and the POTUS, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files TCL_ep_13_Criminal Justice and the POTUS_part_01.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood PTSD 27 mins – “Why do asylum-seeking children in Sweden withdraw from the world & how can they recover?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civilization Key Traits 60 mins – “Niall Ferguson is the most brilliant British historian of his generation. In this talk from February 2011, based on his book ‘Civilisation: The West and the Rest’, he asks how Western civilization came to dominate the rest of the world. His answer is that the West developed six “killer applications” that the Rest lacked: competition, science, democracy, medicine, consumerism and the Protestant work ethic. The key question today is whether or not the West has lost its monopoly on these six things. If it has and the Rest of the world can successfully download these apps, we may be living through the end of Western ascendancy.” is the preeminent historian of the ideas that define our time. He has challenged how we think about money, power, civilisation and empires. Now he wants to reimagine history itself. On October 4th, Ferguson came to the Intelligence Squared stage to unveil his new book, ‘The Square and The Tower’. Historians have always focused on hierarchies, he argued – on the elites that wield power. Economists have concentrated on the marketplace – on the economic forces that shape change. These twin structures are symbolised for Ferguson by Siena’s market square, and its civic tower looming above. But beneath both square and tower runs something more deeply significant: the hidden networks of relationships, ideas and influence. Networks are the key to history. The greatest innovators have been ‘superhubs’ of connections. The most powerful states, empires and companies have been those with the most densely networked structures. And the most transformative ideas – from the printing presses that launched the Reformation to the Freemasonry that inspired the American Revolution – have gone viral precisely because of the networks within which they spread. ‘When we understand these core insights of network science,’ says Ferguson, ‘the entire history of mankind looks quite different.’” At the link find the title, “Niall Ferguson on History’s Hidden Networks, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Skeptic 46 mins – “In a joint production with Stevie Lepp and the Reckonings podcast we hear from Jerry Taylor, a former professional climate change skeptic who switched sides entirely.” At the link right-click “Media files 964c4ba3-3154-42c5-b364-234a7bbbef04.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming Activism 15 mins – “The biggest obstacle to dealing with climate disruptions lies between your ears, says psychologist and economist Per Espen Stokes. He’s spent years studying the defenses we use to avoid thinking about the demise of our planet — and figuring out a new way of talking about global warming that keeps us from shutting down. Step away from the doomsday narratives and learn how to make caring for the earth feel personable, do-able and empowering with this fun, informative talk.” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming Impact 8 mins – “Military leaders have known for millennia that the time to prepare for a challenge is before it hits you, says scientist and retired US Navy officer David Titley. He takes us from the humanitarian catastrophe in Syria to the icy shores of Svalbard to show how the military approaches the threat of climate change, in a refreshingly practical, nonpartisan take on climate preparedness. “The ice doesn’t care who’s in the White House. It doesn’t care which party controls your congress. It doesn’t care which party controls your parliament,” Titley says. “It just melts.” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Counterculture 65 mins – “Is there a New Counterculture movement?  If so, what is it?  Can we define it, or at least describe it?  Might you be a part of it, even if in a small way, even if you don’t realize it? Join Prof CJ as he discusses: Why cultural, artistic, and/or intellectual movements are often hard to identify without hindsight (either after they’ve fizzled out entirely, or at least jumped the shark); What the Old Counterculture was, and its problems; Defining what the New Counterculture is (as CJ sees it) by describing a nonexistent, archetypal New Counterculturalist individual in terms of his or her age, religiosity, career, political views, lifestyle, etc.; CJ’s take on the degree to which he himself (at least somewhat) fits the mold; Reasons why the New Counterculture has more potential to achieve lasting, positive change” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cruise Line Impact 51 mins – “What is the fastest growing sector in tourism? It is cruise ship holidays, increasing exponentially and globally. Twenty-five million cruise vacations were taken this year and that will double very soon. International cruise lines want remote, pristine and idyllic places to satisfy the appetite of passengers to be somewhere beautiful, especially in the Pacific. In a remote, tiny community in the southern tip of Vanuatu in the South-West Pacific, a village is earning more than ever through hosting gleaming white giant cruise ships that regularly appear over the horizon. Most months more than 25,000 visitors step ashore. The attraction is Inyeug, marketed to tourists as Mystery Island – a tiny offshore reef-ringed island, fringed by a beautiful beach and surrounded by sparkling clear turquoise shallow water. Susie Emmett listens to villagers as they prepare souvenirs and village tours. She asks the captain of a cruise ship about the effects of the ships on the environment. And she joins tourists as they explore and meets the teams dealing with the debris after their departure.” At the link right-Click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy in Trouble 60 mins – “In September 2014, Professor Francis Fukuyama came to the Intelligence Squared stage to square up with one of Britain’s most brilliant political thinkers, David Runciman, to assess how democracy is faring in 2014. We certainly haven’t attained the rosy future that some thought Fukuyama was predicting in his book ‘The End of History and The Last Man’ in 1992: authoritarianism is entrenched in Russia and China, in the last decade the developed democracies have experienced severe financial crises and rising inequality, and Islamic State militants are wreaking havoc in Iraq and Syria. Is religion becoming the new politics? How will the technological revolution continue to impact our politics? And in the West are we in danger of becoming complacent about the challenges to democracy that we face?” At the link find the title, “Francis Fukuyama with David Runciman – Democracy: Even the Best Ideas Can Fail, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Testing 10 mins – “262 – How Well Do Ancestry DNA Tests Actually Work?” At the link find the title with the same words, right-click “Media files ede_262-as3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Use Excess 58 mins – “Consumer Reports recently had a cover story on “Too Many Meds? America’s Love Affair with Prescription Medication.” It turns out that half of American adults take at least one prescription drug. Actually, the average number of prescriptions is four. That’s a lot more pills than people in other countries, and it is more than we Americans used to take. Are we taking too many prescriptions? How Can You Tell If You Are Taking Too Many Prescriptions? Very often, prescriptions start to pile up almost before you notice it. If your sleeping medicine gives you heartburn, you may end up with a prescription to treat that symptom. Sometimes the second medication will then cause symptoms for which the doctor prescribes a different drug. This is one way people end up taking three, four or five different pills. The problem is that using too many prescriptions increases your risk of side effects. And taking all those different pills means that they may interact with one another. There were more than 1 million emergency department visits due to adverse drug effects in 2014. More than 100,000 people died from those reactions. And, of course, paying for all those pills is also hard on the budget. That is why Consumer Reports declared October 21st National Check Your Meds Day. They recommend a “brown bag” review of everything you are taking. That means you ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice on whether you are taking anything you might not need. Be sure to ask exactly how to discontinue it, if that is the advice. Some drugs should not be stopped abruptly.” At the link left-click the “Download MP3,” select “Choose MP3,” add it to the cart and download it (for free).

Earth Poles and Spin 27 mins – “No one knows why the Earth’s magnetic North and South poles swap. But polar reversals have happened hundreds of times over the history of the Earth. John Turk emailed curiouscases@bbc.co.uk to ask, “when is the next pole swap due and what will happen to us?”
Featuring Prof Lucie Green from Mullard Space Science Laboratory and Dr Phil Livermore from the University of Leeds. Plus, astronaut Terry Virts, author of The View from Above, describes his experiences of a strange magnetic glitch in the earth’s magnetic field, known as The Bermuda Triangle of Space. The World That Turns – “Why does the Earth spin?” asks Joe Wills from Accra in Ghana. Hannah quizzes cosmologist Andrew Pontzen about the birth of the Solar System. BBC weatherman John Hammond describes the curious things that would happen if the Earth spun the opposite way.”
At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Offsets 69 mins – “Financial Times columnist and author Tim Harford talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Harford’s latest book, Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy. Highlights include how elevators are an important form of mass transit, why washing machines didn’t save quite as much time as you’d think, and the glorious illuminating aspects of light throughout history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Econtalk Founder 55 mins – “The host of Econtalk provides his take on our ep. 174 on The Wealth of Nations, and explores with us the idea of emergent economic order. As preparation, we all listened to a June 2017 episode of Econtalk that featured Russ, Mike Munger, and Don Boudreaux, so you should too! For a graphic introduction to this idea, see wonderfulloaf.org. Is the economy profitably thought of as a machine? Like the behavior of a natural system like a liquid or gas whose behavior can be described using simple laws and perhaps manipulated? As a garden? A rainforest? Are the unplanned results of mass economic activity always good? Russ leans libertarian but has a nuanced view honed through over 600 episodes of Econtalk, where he’s talked to economists of all stripes. Like Smith, Russ recognizes that wealth is not the only good, that the economy is not going to serve all human needs, and that government regulations and infrastructure can be helpful and even necessary. We talk through what “invisible hand” really means, tariffs and trade policy for less-developed countries, dehumanizing labor, self-interest, how Adam Smith’s picture in The Wealth of Nations relates to his account of moral judgments in The Theory of Moral Sentiments (discussed on PEL and at great length on Econtalk), how to induce changes in popular mores, and whether Smith’s moral concepts can handle the progressive character of morality (e.g., how people figured out over time that slavery was bad).” At the link find the title,”Episode 177: Guest Russ Roberts on Adam Smith and Libertarian Economics (Part One),” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Technology 64 mins – “Welcome to episode 74 of the EdTech Situation Room from November 24, 2017, where technology news meets educational analysis. This week Jason Neiffer (@techsavvyteach) and Wes Fryer (@wfryer) discussed recent news articles addressing Apple’s MacBook in our post-PC computing environment, net neutrality and the FCC’s upcoming plan to roll it back, as well as various security news reports from the past two weeks. These included WikiLeaks release of CIA cyber weapon source code, the reported impersonation of Kaspersky by CIA hackers, Uber’s $100,000 cover-up of a large cyber breach, and the dangers posed by a WiFi Pineapple. The 10th birthday of the Amazon Kindle was also discussed, including its history of iterative design and function improvements. Geeks of the week included What’s App (from Wes) and fakespot.com (from Jason), a helpful website to identify fake product reviews on Amazon, Yelp, TripAdvisor and the Apple App Store. Refer to our podcast shownotes for all referenced news articles and links. Please follow us on Twitter @edtechSR to stay updated, and join us LIVE for a future show at 9 pm Central / 8 pm Mountain most weeks on Wednesday night. Check all our shownotes on http://edtechSR.com/linksAt the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Europe On Edge 61 mins – “What’s happening to Europe? The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 was seen as a triumph for liberal democracy. True, the ‘end of history’ narrative didn’t play out across the world as many predicted. But in Europe political liberalism seemed unshakable, supported as it was by international business and transnational organisations such as the EU and NATO. But now Europe stands at a precarious moment. Anti-establishment and anti-EU political parties are on the rise. Brexit and the presidency of Donald Trump add to the uncertainty. Europe seems to face a near near-constant threat of terrorist attacks. And while Marine Le Pen didn’t sweep to victory in the recent French presidential election, the new president Emmanuel Macron faces an uphill battle to fix the French economy and reform the EU’s institutions. If he fails, Le Pen could be well set to win the presidency in 2022. How can we account for this surge of support for far-right and populist parties in Europe? Conventional wisdom has it that it is only in times of economic hardship and high unemployment that these groups begin to gain ground. That may be true of France, which took a serious knocking in the 2008 crash and has a high rate of joblessness. But the Dutch sit comfortably high in all the OECD rankings for income levels, employment and life satisfaction. And look at Poland, a country initially seen by the west as a post-communist success story. Although it has been largely unaffected by the Eurozone crisis and has no immigration as such, a xenophobic, authoritarian government is now in charge. In this major Intelligence Squared event, we brought together a star panel to explore the reasons behind the rise of populism in Europe and to discuss where the continent is heading next. Are terrorist attacks the new normal in Europe? How will the continent deal with the effects of continuing large-scale immigration and its entrenched economic woes?” At the link find the title, “Europe on the Edge, Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Expertise in Medicine 22 mins – “After Podcast 211 with Anders Ericsson, I promised my thoughts on deliberate practice and expertise…” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 61 mins – “There are lies, damn lies, and then there’s fake news. Manipulating the facts for political gain is as old as politics itself, but due to the rise of social media and search engine algorithms false stories can now spread like wildfire. In the run-up to the US presidential election, more people on Facebook engaged with fake news than they did with fact-checked media outlets. And according to a study by Stanford University, fabricated news items favouring Donald Trump were shared 30 million times during the campaign. In the recent French elections, a quarter of the political stories shared on Twitter were based on deliberate misinformation. Fake news was even broadcast live on television during the second-round debate, when Marine Le Pen alluded to a false online story that her rival Emmanuel Macron had an offshore bank account in the Bahamas. Welcome to the world of ‘alternative facts’, where conspiracy theories, false claims and dodgy statistics proliferate. This phenomenon doesn’t just undermine the work of the mainstream media: it may have devastating consequences for democracy itself. Our system depends on citizens making electoral decisions based on facts. What happens when people don’t know what to believe? Fake news – often linked to Russian interests – has become an increasingly effective instrument of propaganda to create chaos and weaken the public’s trust in democratic institutions. Can anything be done to combat the new post-truth politics? Tech giants such as Google, Facebook and Twitter are hosting, propagating and monetising ‘clickbait’ stories. Will they eventually come to acknowledge that they are no longer neutral platforms directing traffic to news sites and admit that they are media organisations with all the responsibilities that implies?” At the link find the title, “Fake News: The Facts, May, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Pasture Management 98 mins – “Todays show will take another look at the topic of farmsteading, when I talk to farmers and authors of the book The Independent Farmstead Shawn and Beth Dougherty. Their journey into farmsteading started out romantic and then got real. In their words… “When we bought the Sow’s Ear in 1996 and began the process of turning it into a family smallholding we followed the usual path of the neophyte homesteaders: we put in a garden, bought chickens, and acquired goats. We picked up how to books on animal husbandry and organic vegetable growing. We ate a lot of tomatoes, collected a lot of eggs from our flock and drank goats milk. It was fun, and our diets underwent a significant improvement, but we began to be conscious of a vague unease. Was what we were doing really farming? Something told us, as we lugged sack after sack of laying mash and sweet feed from the station wagon to the barn, that this importation of concentrated nutrients, was not farming, not as we remember our grandparents doing it.” Fast forward ahead and they found the answer, and it was grass. “The puzzle was coming together, grass, the solar collector, ruminants, the convertors, joined by chickens and pigs as batteries, self-reproducing storage units of surplus solar energy. Here at last was the secret of Grandfather’s farm.” Their story has evolved over the 20 years on the farmstead as their focus has shifted more and more towards rotational grazing… As they say: “Our goal is to rejuvenate a parcel of land while we produce food for our home and our farm, so the level of exactitude necessary is much lower than for operations whose success is measure by monetary profit. We are trying to manage our animals for the conversion of sunlight into forage, forage into milk, meat, and manure to build a homestead where energy cascades from organism to organism with a net gain for the ecosystem as a whole – and we want the system to feed us while we do it.” In this episode we touch on a variety of topics from have a homestead milking cow, to rotational grazing and establishing a pasture, to what to look for when purchasing land.” At the link find the title, “ GFL 79,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in Kansas 38 mins – “How does a 30,000 acre farm operate with just 9 employees? Lon Frahm shares with Tim how he has grown his row crop operation to over 30,000 acres, and how he uses economies of scale such as self-insuring and storing his own grain, to develop advantages over other farmers. Lon has a very impressive story. He took over his family’s farm upon his father’s death when he was just 28 years old. He has lead the operation to tremendous growth over the past 30 years and has experiences very little employee turnover. Lon knows the value in keeping good people on the team, learning quicker than your competition, and networking with peers in the industry. Whether you are a farmer, in agribusiness, or not in any related field, there are still some business gems in this episode.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Farming in Ohio 83 mins – “Corinna and Kurt Bench raise a little under ten acres of certified organic vegetables at Shared Legacy Farms in Elmore, Ohio. With 400 CSA shares and a 78% retention rate, Corrina and Kurt have created a values-based business on family land that is supporting them in their tenth year of business. We take a deep dive into how Corinna and Kurt create a connection with and market to their CSA members – a system that has resulted in them being 94% sold out seven months before their CSA program starts. We get some great insights into their focus on just five delivery sites, the customer research they’ve done to identify the mindset and practices of their long-term CSA membership, and how they’ve used that information to create a marketing system that attracts dedicated and highly qualified prospects to their CSA program. Then, we learn how they’ve created a system to provide new and renewing members with a roadmap to CSA success.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Microgreens 72 mins – “Chris Thoreau has grow microgreens for over 10 years, but he recently reached the point where he Chris realized it was time to do something else and move on. Find out what changed and why Chris is changing with it.” At the linkf ind the title, “The 10 Year Evolution of a Microgreen Farmer – Life and Business, Business and Life (FSFS121), Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files FSFS_121_2017_ChrisT.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Post Harvest Processing 54 mins – “Michael Kilpatrick joins me to talk about some of the issues that he sees on farms that struggle with post harvest processing and how most farms can improve that part of the process.  He will also touch on the role that new food safety regulations will play on vegetable farms and how famers can start preparing for that.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Seven Success Traits 68 mins – “Over the past few years I have interviewed over one hundred different farmers.  During the course of our conversations I have noticed quite a few trends – some which lead to struggling farms and some which lead to successful farms.  Today I am going to share 7 of the traits that I have noticed that successful farms and farmers exhibit.  Regardless of whether you are a vegetable farmer or a livestock farmer, I think these traits are universal and apply across the board. 1. Efficiency and equipment is everything; 2. Money controls the pace; 3. Ideology will be sacrificed; 4. You’ll do a lot you don’t want to do, and put in long hours doing it; 5. You’ll wear multiple hats; 6. No matter how much you learn, you need to go do it; 7. You’ll need intense grit” At the link find the title, “GFL 81,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female CEO’s 46 mins – “Is it a myth that women can have it all, all of the time? Or do the rising numbers of female executives in Hong Kong and around the world suggest otherwise? Does the glass ceiling exist as a barrier to the boardroom, or is the only limitation to a woman’s professional success her personal ambition? To celebrate International Women’s Day this year, Intelligence Squared Asia brought together four experts to ask whether a good mother has time to be a good CEO. In this debate, which took place in Hong Kong on 3 March 2014, award-winning journalist and author Allison Pearson and author of “Wonder Women: Sex, Power, and the Quest for Perfection” Debora Spar proposed the motion. CEO of Newton Investment Helena Morrissey and CEO of SOHO Property Zhang Xin opposed the motion.” At the link find the title, “The Hand that Rocks the Cradle Cannot Rock the Boardroom, Apr, 2014,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Employment Trends 69 mins – “Leading international institutions and private sector corporations have concluded that women’s economic participation is critical to global growth and prosperity. However, today nearly 90 percent of nations still have laws on the books that impede women’s work, thereby undermining economic development. Diana Farrell and Jody Heymann discuss the legal barriers that women face, with particular focus on workplace discrimination. Heymann presents findings from a new global study of 193 countries showing that more than 81 million working women do not have legal protections against gender-based employment discrimination. This meeting is part of a high-level series, in collaboration with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, to explore the economic effects of inequality under the law” At the link find the title, “How Workplace Discrimination Impedes Economic Growth, Dec, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171026_Workplace_Discrimination.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feminism 59 mins – “A year ago, you could have been forgiven for thinking that gender equality was on an unstoppable trajectory. America stood poised to elect its first female president. On this side of the Atlantic, members of the political and cultural establishment proudly sported ‘This Is What a Feminist Looks Like’ T-shirts. Had you told a Hillary Clinton supporter or one of those T-shirt campaigners that a year later the US president would be Donald Trump, a man with an abysmal record of sexually harassing women, and that women over the world would be defending their basic rights, including access to abortion, they would have barely believed it. How did we end up here? Has feminism become trapped, as some claim, in its own elitist ‘lean-in’ bubble? The recent Women’s Marches may have seen millions take to the streets in a tide of popular outrage. But some feminist commentators argue that the marches only demonstrated just how much middle-class liberal aspirations have become over-represented in the gender equality movement. Feminism, for these critics, has failed ‘ordinary’ women by focusing almost exclusively on the advancement of women at the top. According to a new report, while female CEOs’ salaries are rising, the gender pay gap across the globe is actually wider today than it was in 2008. If the gender equality project is to move beyond the needs and concerns of the so-called ‘elite’, what are the blindspots it needs to address? What can feminism do to expand the conversation beyond the ‘politically correct’ classes? How can we bring men into the conversation, and involve them in a project that stands to benefit everyone? To explore how gender equality can be made more accessible, Intelligence Squared is bringing together a brilliant panel to put forward their practical solutions. Speakers will include Jess Phillips, the outspoken MP described as ‘Labour’s future red queen’, and Catherine Mayer, bestselling author and co-founder of the Women’s Equality Party. They will be joined by writer and TV star David Baddiel, and teenage activist and journalist June Eric-Udorie, named one of the BBC’s 100 Women of 2016. Join us on March 8th, International Women’s Day, hear the arguments, and put your questions to our speakers.” At the link find the title, “Feminism Is For Everyone” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fetal Brain Activity 35 mins – “We talk to pediatric neuroscientist Moriah Thomason about her research into what we can learn by imaging the brains of fetuses before they’re born.” At the link find the title, “What’s Going on in the Brain of a Fetus? Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 1329d54e-617c-4c23-81ed-26991eb912b5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Amendment 26 mins – “From “taking a knee” to refusing to salute the flag, the US has a rich history of public dissent, a right guaranteed by the Constitution. But you’d be surprised to learn that the Supreme Court has taken drastically different stands on this right, and now that Trump has tweeted his opposition to certain public displays of dissent, it’s a good time to explore the history of this principle of the First Amendment.” At the link find the title, “12- Right to Dissent, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files TCL_ep_12_Take a Knee_part 01.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Amendment Cake Case 38 mins– “As the high court continues through its unprecedented session, Dahlia speaks with Adam Liptak who covers the Supreme Court for the New York Times and knows the ins and outs of the Masterpiece Cakeshop case. And he gives his insight on what a jaw-dropping brief from the Solicitor General’s office means for relations between the Court and the Trump administration. Plus, a look into how the Supreme Court Justices seem to be the last grown-ups left in Washington.” At the link find the title, “Why the Cakeshop Case is So Delicious, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY6309201689.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flood Plain Maps 30 mins – “The Federal Emergency Management Agency maps flood plains across the country. The maps are intended to show which areas are likely to flood so that local governments can better plan for disasters. They also determine who must buy flood insurance, and at what rates. But there are problems: Many of them are outdated and don’t take into account the anticipated effects of climate change. And if you have enough money and enough political power, you can get your condo or your city moved off the map, even if you are in the eye of a storm. Host Jimmy Williams talks to two experts on why these maps don’t tell the true story of where floods are happening now and in the future.” At the link find the title,”211: The problem with FEMA’s flood maps,” right-click “Media files c982a5d1-dd70-49f8-9283-d34183dd5476.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freakonomics Thinking 60 mins – “The books ‘Freakonomics’ and ‘SuperFreakonomics’ have been worldwide sensations, selling tens of millions of copies. They have come to stand for challenging conventional wisdom using data rather than emotion. Questions they examine are typically: Which is more dangerous, a gun or a swimming pool? How much do parents really matter? Why is chemotherapy prescribed so often if it’s so ineffective? Now the books’ two authors, Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner, have turned what they’ve learned into a readable and practical toolkit for thinking smarter, harder, and different – thinking, that is, like a Freak. On 28th May they came to Intelligence Squared to discuss their new Frequel, ‘Think Like a Freak’. By analysing the plans we form and the morals we choose, they showed how their insights can be applied to help us make smarter decisions in our daily lives.” At the link find the title, “How to Think Like a Freak: Learn How to Make Smarter Decisions with the authors of “Freakonomics” May, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Manipulation 60 mins – “Genetics has revolutionised not just how we think of biology but how we think of ourselves. We are, in the words of one geneticist, the first organism that has ‘learned to read its own instructions’. Now, with the breakthrough of gene-editing technology — whose precision allows us to alter a single letter of DNA — we can now not only decipher but rewrite our genetic code. We may soon be able to treat diseases such as cancer not simply with drugs, but with genetic manipulation. Yet behind this medical revolution lies the prospect of something altogether more worrying. Already, we possess the technology to add to our genetic code at will, and thus create the world’s first generation of ‘transgenic’ humans. As we intervene genetically on ourselves with ever more accuracy, do we risk changing what it means to be human? In a potential quest for the genetically ‘normal’, will we risk annihilating the very diversity and mutations on which evolution depends? These are some of the questions that the Pulitzer…” At the link find the title, “The Gene: Unlocking the Human Code, with Siddhartha Mukherjee, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Surveillance 27 mins – “We react against the idea of surveillance, but it turns out that we’ve invited it into our homes through devices like digital assistants, connected toys, and baby monitors. Are you comfortable with the idea that someone might be watching you or listening to you right now? IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org. Struck by the idea that toys made for kids may have prying eyes (and ears)? For more on connected devices and surveillance, head over to our blog. And, check out the Surveillance Self-Defense Kit mentioned in this episode, developed by the Electronic Frontier Foundation.” At the link find the title, “IRL5 – “I Spy With My Digital Eye, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Enclosure: https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/6547098/62690553.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Control and Refugees 69 mins – “In the wake of another American mass shooting, Dahlia speaks with Adam Skaggs, Chief counsel at the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence about the Second Amendment. And as this week marks the one year anniversary of Donald Trump’s election to office, Becca Heller, co-founder of the International Refugee Assistance Project, joins to talk about how her job changed after the election.” At the link find the title, “Guns in America and the Travel Ban that Went Unnoticed, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY8298476342.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homelessness 14 mins – “What do you think would happen if you invited an individual with mental health issues who had been homeless for many years to move directly from the street into housing? Loyd Pendleton shares how he went from skeptic to believer in the Housing First approach to homelessness — providing the displaced with short-term assistance to find permanent housing quickly and without conditions — and how it led to a 91 percent reduction in chronic homelessness over a ten-year period in Utah.” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Beliefs 53 mins – “Jason Gots: As far back as we’re able to peer into human history, way past the written or pictoral record, into the gravesites of our most ancient ancestors, there’s evidence of what you might call spiritual or religious belief. From the idea of a separate soul to animal spirits, to the anthropomorphization of trees and natural elements, pantheons of superhuman gods, and ultimately the inscrutable, sometimes indivisible gods of Monotheism, we’re Homo Credulous…creatures hardwired to believe in a reality that transcends the evidence of our senses. In his new book God, a Human History, my guest Reza Aslan looks at this history of belief, asking not so much why but how we’ve made and remade God in our own image since our very beginnings.” At the link find the title, “125. Reza Aslan (author) – Deus Ex Hominem, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP4446010570.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hungarian Democracy 28 mins – “Hungary is becoming an “illiberal democracy”, in the words of its Prime Minister Viktor Orban. The government has changed the constitution, electoral law, and refused to take its EU-allocated quota of refugees, while warning of a “Muslim invasion”. The European parliament is so concerned about the perceived breaches of EU values that it has launched a procedure that could culminate in Hungary’s EU voting rights being withdrawn. Yet Hungary feels it is on the right path, a path that others should follow.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impact Investing 42 mins – “…When we put our money in a bank (or a mutual fund, pension plan, endowment, etc.) it doesn’t just sit there, it is put to use. It is invested in the economy, and it has power. But have you ever stopped to wonder what your money is being invested in? Is it supporting the causes and communities you care about? Or is it being used to further the cause of individuals, organizations, or governments that you disagree with. It is time to recognize that we are all investors, and that it is up to us to make sure we are adding more value than we extract and that the risk and returns are balanced between our investments and the communities. This is the basis for impact investing. Impact investing is the support of social and environmental projects with a financial return, and it has become a hot topic in the world’s philanthropy and development circles. In the next decade, it is poised to eclipse traditional aid by ten times. Yet for all the excitement, there is work to do to ensure it actually realizes it’s potential. This week on the show we are interviewing an expert in this field, Morgan Simon. Morgan is the author of the brand new book, Real Impact: The New Economics of Social Change….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Influenza Research 49 mins – “Stacey Schultz-Cherry explains the selection process to choose the influenza virus strains to include in the annual influenza vaccine. Schultz-Cherry also discusses her research on the influence of obesity on the course of disease and vaccine efficacy.” At the link find the title, “070: Influenza vaccine and susceptibility with Stacey Schultz-Cherry,” right-click “Media files MTM070.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the p op-up emnu.

Inner City Schools 78 mins – “In this DHP episode, CJ talks to Mike K., a DHP listener and former teacher with extensive knowledge of inner-city education based on both research and firsthand, real-world experience. Join CJ & Mike as they discuss many topics related to education, including: Mike’s background, including his studies in education (through the Ph. D. level) and 10 years of experience teaching in an inner-city school; The particular challenges of teaching in these sorts of schools, and how they compare to more ‘typical’ American public schools; A bird’s eye perspective of the evolution of schooling in America since the Antebellum period; De jure desegregation, followed by de facto resegregation; Comparing poor urban schools to poor rural schools, which face some of the same challenges, but also some different ones; The problems of over-diagnosing and over-prescribing psychiatric medication for children; The degree to which building real relationships with students based on mutual respect is a key to effective teaching; How real, effective teaching often requires a teacher to routinely flout rules in the current American education system, which is a dehumanizing system to both teachers & students; Teaching as a craft; The importance of teaching genuine critical thinking; Possible ways to cope with the current system, whether one is fully outside of it or not; The problems of NCLB & standardized testing, and the degree to which education is a racket; Possible things individuals can do with their own children or in their local community to try to improve things in some way” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Access 27 mins – “What is life like without fast Internet, and how does life change once a person has it? Should Internet access be a right, rather than a luxury? Veronica Belmont explores these questions as she talks to people about joining the digital economy. Inspiring stories of access are surfaced by members of a small Minnesota community and by a Syrian refugee who found hope in Amsterdam. IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org The more voices, perspectives, languages, and people contributing to the Web, the richer the experience for everyone. But the Internet is not yet accessible to all. Find out how you can make a difference. And, find out how libraries, in particular, are evolving to meet digital demand and address patrons’ connectivity issues.” At the link find the title, “All Access Pass, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Enclosure: https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/6676819/037277dd.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Censorship 38 mins – “In our final episode of season 1, we break from our usual format to host a big conversation. Recent events like the Charlottesville, VA rally have revealed the Internet’s role in helping spread IRL threats and violence. Leaders in the tech world have represented varying positions on both protecting free speech and also reducing hate speech online. Should tech companies regulate who says what on the Internet? Brandi Collins of Color of Change, Anil Dash of Fog Creek Software and Jillian York of the Electronic Frontier Foundation address this question and more with Veronica Belmont. IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org. Freedom of speech is important, online and off. And, it’s also important that free speech not infringe on the freedom of others. Tell us: what can regular internet citizens do to address this issue? How can we all accelerate the pace of change for a more free, civil and healthy Internet? Leave a rating or review in Apple Podcasts so we know what you think.” At the link find the title, “Free Speech, Limited?, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Enclosure: https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/6823925/a3d1c6fb.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intuition Pumps 62 mins – “Daniel Dennett is one of the world’s most original and provocative thinkers. A philosopher and cognitive scientist, he is known as one of the ‘Four Horseman of New Atheism’ along with Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris and the late Christopher Hitchens. In 2013 he came to Intelligence Squared to share the insights he has acquired over his 40-year career into the nature of how we think, decide and act. Dennett revealed his favourite thinking tools, or ‘intuition pumps’, that he and others have developed for addressing life’s most fundamental questions. As well as taking a fresh look at familiar moves – Occam’s Razor, reductio ad absurdum – he discussed new cognitive solutions designed for the most treacherous subject matter: evolution, meaning, consciousness and free will.” At the link find the title, “Daniel Dennett on Tools To Transform Our Thinking, Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Child Theft 27 mins – “In Iraq, thousands of children held captive by so-called Islamic State are now being reunited with their families– but many are still missing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jefferson vs Adams 43 mins – “The relationship between Thomas Jefferson and John Adams largely shaped the course of the newly-formed United States of America. Historian Gordon Wood examined this relationship and its effect on America’s future in his new book “Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.” Last week, Benjamin Wittes interviewed Wood on his book to discuss the friendship and disagreements between Jefferson and Adams, America’s perilous position in the 1790s, and the ways in which the Founding Fathers forged the country’s national security policy.” At the link right click “Direct download: Gordon Wood final mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jellyfish 49 mins – “Jason Gots: What happens in your brain when I say the word “Jellyfish”? If you’re not a marine biologist, and if going to the beach almost anywhere in the world is a part of your life, the word probably makes you wince. Maybe you remember getting stung. Maybe you remember someone putting meat tenderizer on it (is it good for anything else?) But as my guest today, Juli Berwald, knows, Jellyfish are neither a fish, nor the cartoon villains we make them out to be. They’re a fascinating, complex, diverse lifeform whose tentacles are tangled up in all of our lives in ways we’re only dimly aware of. Juli Berwald is a science writer with a PHD in Ocean Science. Her new book is Spineless: The Science of Jellyfish and the Art of Growing a Backbone.” At the link find the title, “124. Juli Berwald (writer) – Our Jellyfish Overlords,” right-click “Media files PP8282984320.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Karl Marx 60 mins – “We can’t say Karl Marx didn’t warn us: capitalism contains the seeds of its own destruction. In their chase for ever higher profits, the capitalists shed workers for machines. The higher return on capital means that the share of profits rises and the share of wages falls, and soon the mass of the population isn’t earning enough to buy the goods capitalism produces. And that’s exactly what’s been happening over the past four years of the Great Recession: ever increasing income inequality, leading to ever weaker aggregate demand – temporarily disguised by an unsustainable credit binge – leading to collapse. You don’t have to be a communist to see that this is so. We should all be Marxists now. Or should we? Every time capitalism hits an inevitable bad patch, Marx’s name is invoked with wearisome regularity. But no serious economist or political thinker – with the possible exception of Gordon Brown – has ever suggested capitalism can break free of booms and busts. Once bust, as we’ve seen time and again, the…” At the link find the title, “Karl Marx Was Right, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lyndon Johnson Tapes 32 mins – “This week: The LBJ tapes- President Lyndon Baines Johnson and the audio recordings made during his presidency. We spoke with presidential historian and author Michael Beschloss. He’s the author of two books examining the recordings, “Taking Charge: The Johnson White House Tapes, 1963-1964” and “Reaching for Glory: Lyndon Johnson’s Secret White House Tapes, 1964-1965.” At the link find the title, “Episode 37: Michael Beschloss on the LBJ Tapes,” right-click “ Media files SBBES1121.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Magna Carta 60 mins – “June 2015 will see the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta, the ‘Great Charter’ which was signed at Runnymede by King John to resolve a political crisis he faced with his barons. Buried within its 69 clauses is one of immeasurable importance. This is the idea that no one should be deprived of their freedom without just cause, and that people are entitled to fair trial by their peers according to the law of the land. At the time Magna Carta did nothing to improve the lot of the vast majority of English people, and all but three of its provisions have been repealed. Yet Magna Carta has come to be seen as the cornerstone of English liberty and an international rallying cry against the arbitrary use of power. But Where does Magna Carta stand today? In a time of secret courts in Britain and the Guantanamo gulag, the threat to rights from terror laws and state surveillance of our online activities, do we need to reaffirm its basic principles? Should we take things even further, as Tim Berners-Lee has suggested…” At the link find the title, “Magna Carta: Myth and Meaning, Feb, 2015,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Margarine History 21 mins – “It’s one of the most bizarre episodes in American food history: when butter and margarine were at war. What you choose to spread on your toast might seem like a boring subject, but it turns out to be fascinating and sometimes hilarious. Margarine’s history began with French emperor Napoleon III, a French chemist, and some sheep’s stomachs and went on to include heated courtroom debates, our first federal laws regulating food, and outlaws smuggling faux butter across state lines. The spreads have competed for more than a hundred years, and public preferences shift each time our understanding of health science changes. In this episode of Distillations we learn about the history of butter and margarine and explore the distinctly American debates they inspired involving food, health, science, and regulation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, click “Save File” and “OK” to save the file.

Mass Shooter Illness 24 mins – “Last Sunday, a gunman walked into a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas and opened fire on the congregation — killing more than two dozen people. The next day, President Donald Trump told reporters the mass shooting wasn’t a “guns situation,” and instead blamed it on “mental health.” Politicians have linked mental illness and mass shootings after virtually every mass shooting. In this week’s episode, Jimmy talks to The Atlantic’s Olga Khazan, who looked into that link… and found that it doesn’t exist.” At the link find the title, “219: Fact checking the link between mental illness and mass shootings,” right-click “Media files 5a4fde09-0b0c-41d5-8015-726501bdd869.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation Teacher 76 mins – “Sharon Salzberg (@SharonSalzberg) is a central figure in the field of meditation, a world-renowned teacher, and New York Times bestselling author of Real Happiness: The Power of Meditation: A 28-Day Program. Sharon has played a crucial role in bringing meditation and mindfulness practices to the West and into mainstream culture since 1974, when she first began teaching. She is the co-founder of the Insight Meditation Society in Barre, MA, and she has written ten books — from her seminal Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness to her latest, Real Love: The Art of Mindful Connection. Sharon offers a secular and modern approach to Buddhist teachings, making them more accessible. She is a regular columnist for On Being, a contributor to Huffington Post, and the host of her own podcast: The Metta Hour.” At the link find the title, “Sharon Salzberg, World-Renowned Meditation Teacher, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 505397f9-8b1b-4747-b509-06cb97ab28f5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microsoft CEO 60 mins – “Satya Nadella is one of the world’s most inspirational business leaders, as much a humanist as a technologist and executive. On September 28th, he comes to the Intelligence Squared stage to discuss his personal journey from a childhood in India to becoming CEO of Microsoft, the culture change that he has driven inside his legendary technology company, and the transformation that is coming to all our lives as we face the most disruptive wave of technology humankind has experienced: artificial intelligence, mixed reality, and quantum computing. While many people worry about the negative impact of exponential digital growth – from automation taking over our jobs to the increasing power that algorithms are having over our lives – Nadella will proffer his optimistic vision of the future, which he sets out in his forthcoming book Hit Refresh. He will argue that, as technology upends the status quo, the very human quality of empathy will become increasingly valuable. And he will explain how people, organisations and societies must transform in their quest for new energy, new ideas, relevance and renewal.” At the link find the title, “Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on hitting refresh and seizing the opportunity of the digital revolution, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mycology Breakthroughs 116 mins – ““Radical Mycology is a movement and social philosophy based on accessibly teaching the importance of mushrooms and other fungi for personal, societal, and ecological health. Radical Mycology differs from classical mycology in that classical mycology generally focuses on taxonomy, identification, mycophagy (eating mushrooms), and the more personal benefits of working with fungi while Radical Mycology is about using fungi for the benefit of larger communities and the world. As a concept, Radical Mycology is based on the belief that the lifecycles of fungi and their interactions in nature serve as powerful learning tools for how humans can best relate to each other and steward the world they live in.” Mushroom Cultivation for Remediation – This introductory text guides you through the core skills and concepts needed to begin cultivating large quantities of mycelium for the purposes of fungal remediation (aka mycoremediation) work. This text covers some of the simplest, cheapest, and quickest ways to grow vigorous mycelium with a minimum of sanitary precautions. The techniques covered are also explored and elaborated upon in a 3-part video entitled Mushroom Cultivation for Remediation.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Napoleon 60 mins – “How should we remember Napoleon, the man of obscure Corsican birth who rose to become emperor of the French and briefly master of Europe? In 2014, as the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo approached, Intelligence Squared brought together two of Britain’s finest historians to debate how we should assess Napoleon’s life and legacy. Was he a military genius and father of the French state, or a blundering nonentity who created his own enduring myth? Was his goal of uniting the European continent under a common political system the forerunner of the modern ‘European dream’? Or was he an incompetent despot, a warning from history of the dangers of overarching grand plans? Championing Napoleon was historian Andrew Roberts, author of, among other books, ‘Napoleon the Great’, ‘Napoleon and Wellington’, and ‘Waterloo: Napoleon’s Last Gamble’. Opposing him was fellow historian Adam Zamoyski, author of, among other books, ‘1812. Napoleon’s Fatal March on Moscow’ and ‘Rites of Peace. The Fall of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna’.” At the link find the title, “Napoleon the Great? A debate with Andrew Roberts, Adam Zamoyski and Jeremy Paxman, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Net Neutrality 25 mins – “The Internet (at least in the US) is at a crossroads as the FCC is considering rolling back the net neutrality regulations it adopted in 2015. If net neutrality is abolished, the Internet could shift from an essential service that all consumers can access to a product that can be packaged and sold to the highest bidders. Get to know the potential winners and losers on both sides of the issue. IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.orgAt the link find the title, “IRL 6 – The Neutral Zone: The Future of Net Neutrality, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Enclosure: https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/6384460/0cb629a8.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Network Power 62 mins – “Have historians misunderstood everything? Have they missed the single greatest idea that best explains the past? Niall Ferguson is the preeminent historian of the ideas that define our time. He has challenged how we think about money, power, civilisation and empires. Now he wants to reimagine history itself. On October 4th, Ferguson came to the Intelligence Squared stage to unveil his new book, ‘The Square and The Tower’. Historians have always focused on hierarchies, he argued – on the elites that wield power. Economists have concentrated on the marketplace – on the economic forces that shape change. These twin structures are symbolised for Ferguson by Siena’s market square, and its civic tower looming above. But beneath both square and tower runs something more deeply significant: the hidden networks of relationships, ideas and influence. Networks are the key to history. The greatest innovators have been ‘superhubs’ of connections. The most powerful states, empires and companies have been those with the most densely networked structures. And the most transformative ideas – from the printing presses that launched the Reformation to the Freemasonry that inspired the American Revolution – have gone viral precisely because of the networks within which they spread. ‘When we understand these core insights of network science,’ says Ferguson, ‘the entire history of mankind looks quite different.’” At the link find the title, “Niall Ferguson on History’s Hidden Networks, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nigeria Movie Industry 29 mins – “Award-winning screen director Tope Oshin celebrates a new generation of Nigerian women film-makers who are currently reinventing Nollywood, the largest and most prolific film industry in Africa. She explores their distinctive approach to telling screen stories that better represent women’s lives and aspirations in Nigeria today.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Cyberwarfare 33 mins – “In this episode of Malicious Life, we take a look at one of the oldest forms of criminal activity on the web- the spam empires of the 90’s and 2000’s. Find out how these multi-million dollar industries operated, how they served as a half step towards the organized online crime groups of the modern age, and what price was paid by those who tried to stop them. With special guest- Stephen Cobb.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Option B 60 mins – “I learned about the depths of sadness and the brutality of loss. But I also learned that when life sucks you under, you can kick against the bottom, break the surface and breathe again.’ – Sheryl Sandberg Sheryl Sandberg is the COO at Facebook and international bestselling author of ‘Lean In’. In 2015 disaster struck when her husband, Dave Goldberg, died suddenly at the age of 47. Sheryl and her two young children were devastated, and she was certain that their lives would never have real joy or meaning again. Just weeks later, Sandberg was talking with a friend about the first father-child activity without a father. They came up with a plan for someone to fill in. ‘But I want Dave,’ she cried. Her friend put his arm around her and said, ‘Option A is not available. So let’s just kick the shit out of Option B.’ Everyone experiences some form of Option B. We all deal with loss: jobs lost, loves lost, lives lost. The question is not whether these things will happen but how we face them when they do. Sandberg’s new book, ‘Option B’, weaves her experiences of coping with adversity with new findings from her co-author, the award-winning psychologist Adam Grant, and other social scientists. The book features stories of people who recovered from personal and professional hardship, including illness, injury, divorce, job loss, sexual assault and imprisonment. These people did more than recover – many of them became stronger. In this special Intelligence Squared event on June 24th, Sandberg was joined by Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl who was shot by the Taliban for speaking up for women’s education. She refused to be silenced, and her recovery, bravery and stoicism have made her an international role model. In 2014 she became the youngest ever winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. Sandberg and Yousafzai, in conversation with Grant, will explore how even after the most devastating events, we can learn to find deeper meaning and appreciation in our lives and rediscover joy. They will discuss how we can help others in crisis, raise strong children, and create resilient families, communities, and workplaces. Many of these lessons can be applied to our everyday struggles, allowing us to brave whatever lies ahead.” At the link find the title, “Option B,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physical Activity 27 mins – “Millions of people wear electronic step-counting bracelets or use apps on their phones – aiming for ten thousand steps a day. Claudia Hammond asks whether this routine motivates her – or if it’s actually setting her up for failure. Some experts applaud the bar charts and graphs which track progress as proof of healthy activity. But can the constant checking take away the pleasure of exercise? American scientists found that after the novelty wore off people did less because the competitive nature of step counting undermined their intrinsic motivation. Claudia looks for evidence behind the daily target of 10,000 steps. It dates back to the 1964 Tokyo Olympics when a Japanese company produced the “manpo-kei” pedometer (literally “ten thousand steps meter”) to boost activity – though the evidence to support the 10k target appears weak. Measuring activity has now moved into the workplace. One Dutch company gave free Fitbits to workers to track their steps, calories burned and sleep. Although drop-out rates were high, stress levels did fall. Some insurance companies now offer discounts for the most active – but steps counters ignore factors like age, stride length and speed. And who’s to say you haven’t given the step counter to your dog, running around the park?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Polish Democracy 28 mins – “Is Poland sliding towards autocracy, or just on a different democratic path? The government has been accused of a “systemic threat to the rule of law” and of undermining other democratic values which it signed up to when it joined the European Union in 2004. Earlier this year thousands took to the streets to protest over government plans to reform the judiciary. Critics say the independence of the courts is under threat but the governing Law and Justice Party argues it is simply clearing out the old order, left over from Communist times.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Homelessness 62 mins – “Is Britain facing an identity crisis? The traditional dividing lines of left and right seem to be dissolving into new political tribes – metropolitan liberals versus the culturally rooted working classes, graduates versus the uneducated, the young versus the old. In June’s general election, traditional Labour heartlands like Mansfield went Conservative, while wealthy areas such as Kensington swung to Corbyn. Britain seems utterly confused about its politics. As the far left and Eurosceptic right have gained strength, much of the country has been left feeling politically homeless. So what’s going on? How will these new alignments play out as the country faces the historic challenge of leaving the EU and forging a new relationship with the rest of the world? Are the Conservatives really up to the job, as they bicker over what kind of Brexit they want and jostle over who should succeed Theresa May? Is it now unthinkable that Jeremy Corbyn could be the next prime minister? Looming over the current turmoil is the biggest question of all: What kind of Britain do we want to live in? What are the values that should hold our society together? We were joined by Ken Clarke, the most senior Conservative voice in Parliament; Hilary Benn, Labour MP and Chair of the Brexit Select Committee; and Helen Lewis, deputy editor at the New Statesman and prominent voice on the left. Alongside them was David Goodhart, author of one of the most talked about analyses of post-Brexit Britain, and Anand Menon, a leading academic thinker on Britain’s fractious relations with the EU. The event was chaired by Stephen Sackur, one of the BBC’s most highly regarded journalistic heavyweights.” At the link find the title, “The Great Realignment: Britain’s Political Identity Crisis,, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Trends 60 mins– “What is going on in the Western democracies? From Britain’s vote for Brexit, to Donald Trump’s election victory in America and the growth of populist movements across Europe, voters are expressing their dissatisfaction with the status quo. Economic anxieties go some way to explain the phenomenon, but as with the Brexit decision, people are voting in ways that seem – at least to their critics – likely to harm their own material interests just to give the establishment a bloody nose. In this special Intelligence Squared event, renowned American social psychologist Jonathan Haidt and politician Nick Clegg will examine the complex web of social, moral and political concerns that are driving the unrest. How can we explain the new illiberalism that is growing on both left and right, as authoritarian trends spread across campuses throughout the Anglosphere (the no-platforming of speakers being a typical example)? How should we understand the new ‘culture war’ emerging in Britain, America and elsewhere between the ‘globalists’ and ‘nationalists’? As deputy prime minister during the Coalition government, Clegg witnessed the upheaval in British politics from the inside. Haidt, author of the acclaimed bestseller ‘The Righteous Mind’, has long been studying the moral and cultural drives that divide people into different political camps.” At the link find the title, “The Rise of Populism and the Backlash Against the Elites, with Jonathan Haidt and Nick Clegg, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty and Health 42 mins – “This week, Ian Sample and Nicola Davis explore the complex relationship between poverty, stress, and life expectancy” At the link find the title, “How does socioeconomic position affect our health? – Science Weekly podcast, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 01-46908-gnl.sci.171101.ms.markers_of_inequality.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Removal 8 mins – “Dahlia Lithwick speaks with Representative Jamie Raskin about the Republican remedy for Trump’s unfitness for office: The 25th Amendment. Plus, she speaks with ProPublica’s Ryan Gabrielson about his recent reporting which revealed that the high court tends to make staggering errors of fact in opinions.” At the link find the title, “The 25th Amendment, What’s That? Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY1358409664.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Privacy vs Data Collection 27 mins – “You’ve heard the expression, “When something is free, you’re the product.” And, while you may think it’s no big deal to give away your personal data in exchange for free online services, how can you know that what you get for what you give is a fair trade? Meet some of the people determined to shape the reality (or lack thereof) of privacy online.” At the link find the title, “IRL 1 – “All Your Data Are Belong To Us, Jun, 2017,” right-click “Enclosure: https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/6384461/52b4d81c.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ransomeware 26 mins – “Have you been hacked, or been the victim of malware or ransomware? Humans make the internet vibrant, but we’re also the weakest link — we’re predictable and often easily fooled. This episode of IRL focuses on our internet insecurity. Meet the unsung heroes fighting to keep us safe. IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org. Stay safe online! Here’s more on how to not be a ransomware victim. And, if you’d like to learn a bit more about the PATCH Act mentioned in our episode, go here.” At the link find the title, “IRKL 3 – “Hack Jobs, Jul 2017,” right-click “Enclosure: https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/6384459/558fffa7.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Republican Grassroots 21 mins – “Phyllis Henderson is a state representative in South Carolina, and she is worn out by the state of political discourse. We spoke with her right after the 2016 election, and she had some reservations. Now we check back in with her to see how she thinks the GOP is doing — and what she thinks about the tone of American politics.” At the link find the title, “220: A Republican has some advice for the GOP, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 73ecfdd7-8a4c-4a2a-8bda-d720884c1fec.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Church 50 mins – “The Russian Revolution of 1917 brought a radical political change. But at the same time, a lesser-known group of religious reformers were busy plotting a better future for Russia’s souls – and a new, more democratic, Orthodox Church, closer to the people. Caroline Wyatt explores whether they were simply being used by the Bolsheviks, or was there a chance that the Revolution’s answer to Martin Luther could prompt a real Russian Reformation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Far East 48 mins – “Putin’s government is often painted as an all powerful, centralized regime. But, in reality, it’s far from that: in Russia’s Far East, Moscow is either resented or disregarded by many, and the security services are the only agents fully loyal to Moscow. This week, special guest host Alina Polyakova interviewed Arkady Ostrovsky, the author of “The Invention of Russia: The Rise of Putin and the Age of Fake News” and the Russia and Eastern Europe editor at the Economist, on life Russia’s wild Far East, the tensions between the Kremlin and its far flung provinces, and what it all means for the limits of Putin’s power and his deepest fears. This is the second podcast in a new series with Alina Polyakova to shed light on Russian politics and society in an effort to understand the Kremlin’s intentions toward and engagement with the West.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Edited Final Alina Arkady mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Revolution P1 29 mins – “After the multinational force sailed away from Arkhangelsk, it was payback time for the Whites. Once the Red Army arrived in February of 1920, the mass executions of those who sided with the Allies began. Lucy Ash visits a 17th Century convent outside Arkhangelsk where thousands of so called counter revolutionaries were slaughtered during the Red Terror.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Revolution P2 29 mins – “Back in the Soviet era, boatloads of day-trippers went to the island of Mudyug in the White Sea, to visit a museum. It was based around the remains of a prison camp – and one that is very different from the decaying Gulag camps scattered across north Russia and Siberia. For one thing, it was set up as far back as 1918. Even more remarkably, many jailors were not Russian. They were foreign troops. Bizarrely one French officer at the camp later created the world’s most famous scent, Chanel No 5, inspired by his experiences in the Russian Arctic.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Arabia 22 mins – “This week we take a look at the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with Bruce Riedel. He is a senior fellow and director of the Brookings Intelligence Project at the Brookings Institution. He’s also the author of “Kings and Presidents: Saudi Arabia and the United States Since FDR.” At the link find the title, “Episode 36: Bruce Riedel on Saudi Arabia,” right-click “Media files SBRIE1117.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Arabia and Educational Endowments 54 mins – “Felix Salmon of Fusion, Slate Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann, and political-risk consultant Anna Szymanski discuss: Corruption in Saudi Arabia” At the link find the title, “The Well-Endowed Edition, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM8128270392.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Worker Interview 146 mins – “Alice Little (@thealicelittle) is considered the #1 top-earning legal sex worker in the United States. She is a 4’8″ legal sex worker at Nevada’s world famous Moonlite Bunny Ranch. This episode is definitely not suitable for work (NSFW). In this wide-ranging episode, we cover a lot of ground, including: Technical sex tips; How Alice puts people at ease, including adult virgins; BDSM and power play; Threesome do’s and don’ts, plus the “Big KO” finishing move; Her music playlist for getting people into the erotic zone; Misconceptions about sex workers and the realities; Why “The Girlfriend Experience (GFE)” is her most popular offering; How she works with couples who want to explore new boundaries. Alice is also a vocal advocate for legal sex workers and the founder of the political movement “Hookers for Healthcare.” Featured on ABC’s Nightline, Alice is no stranger to the conversation of sex surrogacy and seeks to shift America’s perceptions of sex workers and sex work.” At the link right-click “Media files 94e42944-29a2-4028-9cdc-866fdb84cd12.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smart Phone Searches 69 mins – “Alex Abdo of the Knight First Amendment Institute and Orin Kerr of George Washington Law debate whether warrantless searches and seizures of cellphone records violate the Fourth Amendment in a special podcast hosted at the National Press Club. In late November, the Supreme Court will tackle a very modern question about the venerable Fourth Amendment: Does it allow police to see where you’ve been for the past four months by looking at your cellphone data without a warrant? In Carpenter v. United States, which will be argued on November 29, cell number data placed a robbery suspect, Timothy Ivory Carpenter, near the scenes of several crimes, and at about the same time as those crimes happened. The phone information was used as evidence leading to Carpenter’s conviction on robbery charges and he is serving a long prison sentence. The Carpenter case has spurred a flurry of activity among Fourth Amendment scholars. Carpenter’s lawyers believe modern cellphone records are fundamentally different than traditional phone records cited in a 1979 Supreme Court decision at permits such searches without warrants. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit ruled against Carpenter and said the Fourth Amendment’s search warrant requirement only protects what was actually said in phone conversations. And it upheld a third-party doctrine that the phone records belong to the phone company, they aren’t private information. Note: Audio for this podcast was recorded at an October 26, 2017 live event at the National Press Club sponsored by the American Constitution Society and The Federalist Society and presented with the generous support of the Bernstein Family Foundation.” At the link find the title, “The future of digital privacy, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP6668366567.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smart Tech Trends 53 mins– “There was a lot of small news this week including updates to the Google Home/Assistant ecosystem that Kevin and I discuss on this week’s podcast. I share my feelings on the Google Mini and then we segue into a conversation about Google’s new AI framework for embedded devices that launched this week. We also discuss the push by smart home and lock companies to give delivery or service people access to your home. SmartThings gets local control for some devices this week. Kevin reviews the Wink Lookout security bundle and we take a listener question about what to look for in a smart home camera.Our guest this week is awesome. I speak with Michael Sherwood, Director of Technology and Innovation City of Las Vegas, about plans for a traffic light that detects pollution and can send cars along before it builds up, and what it really means to build a smart city. Sherwood shares a lot of good insights about the challenges of building a smart city that we don’t often see. It’s a good show.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Sugar Question 60 mins – “…How is it that some people can eat absolutely anything and stay slim, while others on a ‘healthy’ diet get fat? Why is it that Cubans are much healthier than Americans, despite eating on average twice the amount of sugar? …Sugar has recently replaced saturated fat as the nutritional enemy number one. The theory is that it messes with our metabolism and causes heart disease, obesity and diabetes. Arguing that sugar is the tobacco of the new millennium in our event was acclaimed science writer Gary Taubes, whose new book The Case Against Sugar has been making waves on both sides of the Atlantic. …A different explanation lies in a subject that has been getting a lot of attention recently – our gut microbiome. This is made up of the trillions of bacteria that inhabit our intestines and help digest our food and keep us healthy. …Research indicates that, rather than any single foodstuff being to blame for the rise of obesity and other modern diseases, the root of the problem lies in our depleted microbiomes. Setting out the new research on our gut bacteria and debunking many popular myths about diet was Tim Spector, an award-winning scientist who runs the British Gut project. What makes the subject even more fascinating is that we all have a very individual cocktail of bacteria in our gut, and research shows that the way we respond to food relates more to our own specific set of microbes than the calories in the food itself. Joining us was Eran Segal, one of world’s leading scientists in this field, who will explain how his lab can wire you up and predict precisely which carbohydrates you should and shouldn’t eat so as to prevent weight gain and be healthy. The results can be surprising. In 60% of cases, they show that you can enjoy sugary ice-cream but should avoid rice….” At the link find the title, “The Bittersweet Truth About What We Eat, Feb, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suggestibility 39 mins – “This episode we travel to a future where you can choose to turn off your ability to deceive yourself. Are you now a perfectly clear eyed genius? Or a perpetually depressed misanthrope? Maybe both? This episode was suggested by my mom. It begins with two tales of self deception, one from Jacquelyn Gill, an assistant professor of paleo-ecology at the University of Maine and the host of a podcast about climate change called Warm Regards, and the other from Beth Duckles, a writer, researcher, ethnographer and social scientist. Then we talk to Zoë Chance, an assistant professor of marketing at the Yale School of Management and an expert on self-deception. After that, we go to therapy, and Chamin Ajjan, a clinical psychotherapist and author of Seeking Soulmate: Ditch the Dating Game and Find Real Connection explains what she does when she sees a case of self-deception in her office. And finally, Erik Vance, science journalist and author of Suggestible You: The Curious Science of Your Brain’s Ability to Deceive, Transform, and Heal helps us understand what might really happen if we could truly turn off this ability to deceive ourselves.” At the link find the title, “Deceptible Me, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Survivalism 19 mins – “The combined market capitalization of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google is now equivalent to the GDP of India. How did these four companies come to infiltrate our lives so completely? In a spectacular rant, Scott Galloway shares insights and eye-opening stats about their dominance and motivation — and what happens when a society prizes shareholder value over everything else. Followed by a Q&A with TED Curator Chris Anderson. (Note: This talk contains graphic language.)” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Survivalism 19 mins – “The combined market capitalization of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google is now equivalent to the GDP of India. How did these four companies come to infiltrate our lives so completely? In a spectacular rant, Scott Galloway shares insights and eye-opening stats about their dominance and motivation — and what happens when a society prizes shareholder value over everything else. Followed by a Q&A with TED Curator Chris Anderson. (Note: This talk contains graphic language.)” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tax Reform 20 mins – “With Republicans pushing ahead on their plan to overhaul taxes for the first time in 30 years, we revisit an episode of DeocodeDC that explained how that reform 30 years ago actually came together. Jimmy speaks with two major players in that effort – Pam Olsen of Pricewaterhouse Coopers and former Congressman Bill Archer.” At the link find the title, “Revisiting how tax reform really works, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 6832f2ce-8d81-413c-bcb6-bed77b0e79c6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taxation Power 52 mins – “Joseph Fiskin from the University of Texas at Austin Law School and Steven Willis from the University of Florida, Levin College of Law join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to look at potential constitutional issues related to tax reform measures under debate at Congress.” At the link find the title, “Tax reform and the Constitution, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP3181673095.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Discussion 62mins – “…Again and again, after every attack, our media react by giving the terrorists exactly what they want – maximum publicity. Of course, the public should be told that an atrocity has taken place. …In addition, the wall-to-wall news coverage creates a climate of fear and fuels the more authoritarian and xenophobic strands of our politics. …Over a thousand foreign fighters have recently returned from Syria to Europe, and are highly likely to pose a risk to our security. It’s vital that our media and authorities keep the public fully aware about the terrorist threat and encourage everyone to be vigilant. Honest reporting is absolutely crucial, especially when society itself is under attack. …Does publicising terrorism play into the hands of the perpetrators or does it help keep us on the alert against further attack?” At the link find the title, “Don’t give them what they want: Terrorists should be starved of the oxygen of publicity, Mar, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tesla Batteries 85 mins – “Elon Musk is considered by many to be a technological visionary. In this, the third in a series of shows about Elons projects, we look at Tesla, its history, its cars the practicalities of what Elon’s trying to achieve.” At the link right-click Download it” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thinking Tools 60 mins – “Daniel Dennett is one of the world’s most original and provocative thinkers. A philosopher and cognitive scientist, he is known as one of the ‘Four Horseman of New Atheism’ along with Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris and the late Christopher Hitchens. In 2013 he came to Intelligence Squared to share the insights he has acquired over his 40-year career into the nature of how we think, decide and act. Dennett revealed his favourite thinking tools, or ‘intuition pumps’, that he and others have developed for addressing life’s most fundamental questions. As well as taking a fresh look at familiar moves – Occam’s Razor, reductio ad absurdum – he discussed new cognitive solutions designed for the most treacherous subject matter: evolution, meaning, consciousness and free will.” At the linkk find the title, “Daniel Dennett on Tools To Transform Our Thinking, Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tim O’Reilly Interview 144 mins – “Tim O’Reilly (@timoreilly) is one of the most fascinating polymaths I’ve ever encountered. Wired has called him “the trend spotter” in the world of tech and macrotrends. Tim is the founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media, Inc. His original business plan was pretty simple: “interesting work for interesting people,” and that’s worked out pretty well. His company has generated hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue doing everything from online learning, book publishing, running conferences, urging companies to create more value than they capture, and trying to change the world by spreading and amplifying the knowledge of innovators. …Tim has now turned his attention and is very focused on Artificial Intelligence (AI) and its implications, the on-demand economy, and other technologies that are transforming the nature of work and the future shape of the business world. His new book is WTF?: What’s the Future and Why It’s Up to Us. Enjoy!” At the link right-click “Media files 00ba562c-2ed1-4258-93c2-04d525c75349.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tipping Problem 66 mins – “Why does tipping persist? Despite the efforts of some restaurants to stop tipping, it remains a healthy institution and has recently spread to Uber. Political scientist Anthony Gill of the University of Washington talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about why tipping persists and what it achieves despite there being no formal way of enforcing this norm.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Troll Control 27 mins – “Trolls. You’ll find them in every corner of the Internet. During this episode, explore the landscape of trolling online, its impact on individuals, and its impact on the Web. Some people are fighting back in new and tasty ways. Baked goods included.” At the link find the title, “IRL 4 – “The Care and Feeding of Your Troll, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Enclosure: https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/6431718/f4d354b4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Troll Farm 42 mins – “In 1989, a message was found in a virus: “Eddie Lives…Somewhere in Time!”. ‘Eddie’ was a particularly nasty virus, and its discovery led a young Bulgarian security researcher down a rabbit hole, on a hunt for the prolific creator of the Eddie virus: The Dark Avenger. With special guests: Vesselin Bontchev, Graham Cluley.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam Heroin Use 60 mins – “CJ is joined in this episode by Professor Alfred McCoy, who holds a Ph. D. from Yale University in Southeast Asian history, and currently holds the Harrington Chair in History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is the author of many books, including The Politics of Heroin, Policing America’s Empire, and A Question of Torture, among others. His most recent book is In the Shadows of the American Century: The Rise and Decline of US Global Power.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wisdom of Elders 62 mins – “Independent, free now from the constraints of office, with a wealth of experience and the ability to open doors at the highest level, The Elders are helping tackle some of the world’s most intractable problems. Brought together by Nelson Mandela in 2007, The Elders use their collective experience and influence to promote peace, justice and human rights worldwide, using private advocacy and public diplomacy. They include the former holders of some of the world’s most important and demanding posts, as well as individuals with an extraordinary track record on peace-making, reconciliation and driving social change. To celebrate the group’s fifth anniversary, in July 2012 Intelligence Squared hosted three of the Elders on stage in London at the Barbican Centre. We were joined by Former President of the United States Jimmy Carter, the first female president of Ireland and former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson, and Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town, Nobel Peace Laureate, and Chair of The Elders Desmond Tutu. Chairman of Virgin Group Richard Branson and Singer and songwriter Peter Gabriel, whose original vision of The Elders was translated into reality by Nelson Mandela, made a special guest appearance at the beginning of this event. It was chaired by Channel 4 News presenter Jon Snow.” At the link find the title, “The Elders in conversation with Jon Snow (Pres. Jimmy Carter, Archbp. Desmond Tutu & Mary Robinson), Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women on the Move 23 mins – “Leah Chase’s New Orleans restaurant Dooky Chase changed the course of American history over gumbo and fried chicken. During the civil rights movement, it was a place where white and black people came together, where activists planned protests and where the police entered but did not disturb — and it continues to operate in the same spirit today. In conversation with TED Women Curator Pat Mitchell, the 94-year old Queen of Creole Cuisine (who still runs the Dooky Chase kitchen) shares her wisdom from a lifetime of activism, speaking up and cooking.” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Farms 34 mins – “If there’s one thing Jagpaul Badhesha learned as a farmer, it’s that you don’t take money for granted. While Jag wouldn’t trade his family’s 1,000-acre operation – or the personal satisfaction of a hard day’s work – for the world, it comes with incredible amount of responsibility and massive financial pressure.” At the link find the title, “The Farmer’s Almanac: Jagpaul Badhesha, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY5353090711.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Politics 62 mins – “‘America first!’ Donald Trump hammered out this message over and again in his inauguration speech a week ago today. He promised tariffs, a crackdown on immigration, and a restoration of American military might. He entered the White House as the least popular incoming president in 40 years. Not every liberal thinker, however, is in a state of despair. Jeffrey Sachs was recently ranked by The Economist as one of the world’s most influential political scientists. No Trump supporter himself, he came to the Intelligence Squared stage to explain why there may be silver linings to the Trump cloud, and to set out a new world order. Take trade. Trump has threatened to tear up Nafta and slam huge taxes on Mexican imports, and has already withdrawn the US from the Trans-Pacific Partnership to bring jobs back to the heartlands of America. While this strikes fear amongst free-trade supporters, there is a case to be made that globalisation has been moving faster than is politically sustainable, dividing rich from poor. Or take Trump’s proposal to invest $1 trillion in infrastructure. Sachs has described this promise to rebuild America’s decrepit inner cities, highways, schools and hospitals as ‘a valid, indeed uplifting perspective’, provided it is done in a smart and fair way. Trump’s programme could be viewed as a Keynesian fiscal policy to boost competitiveness and job creation. It may, Sachs believes, be Trump’s great legacy. And then there’s foreign policy. As Sachs pointed out, Trump has filled his administration not just with protectionists but also with business people like himself, who enjoy making a buck (in fact, billions of them) and who have profitably invested for years in Russia, China, and other emerging economies. So while the rhetoric may be all about American primacy and trade protection, we shouldn’t rule out some friendly deal-making with other countries. And while Trump’s future relations with Vladimir Putin remain obscure, would it necessarily be a dangerous move if he pursues a conciliatory line with Russia? From a Russian perspective, America’s meddling in Ukraine and its attempts to bring that country into NATO, which would take the US-led military alliance right up to Russia’s border, look like aggression in its own historical sphere of influence. Isn’t it time there were a better understanding between both countries? Sachs argued that we are entering not a new tripolar world, dominated by the US, China and Russia, but what he calls ‘the World Century’, in which the rapid spread of technology and the sovereignty of nation states mean that no single country or region will dominate the world. For Sachs, the great foreign policy challenge will be to manage cooperation among regions, and face up to our common environmental and health crises. The idea that one place or people should have primacy over any other should be as antiquated as slavery or empire, and guard us against the senseless descent into violence.” At the link find the title, “Jeffrey Sachs on America and a New World Order, Mand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One and Britain 60 mins – “The First World War is not called the Great War for nothing. It was the single most decisive event in modern history, as well as one of the bloodiest: by the time the war ended, some nine million soldiers had been killed. It was also a historical full stop, marking the definitive end of the Victorian era and the advent of a new age of uncertainty. By 1918, the old order had fallen: the Bolsheviks had seized power in Russia; the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman empires had been destroyed; and even the victorious Allied powers had suffered devastating losses. It was supposed to be the war to end all wars. And yet barely two decades later, the world was again plunged into conflict. Little wonder then that historians still cannot agree whether Britain’s engagement was worth it. For some, the war was a vitally important crusade against Prussian militarism. Had we stayed out, they argue, the result would have been an oppressive German-dominated Europe, leaving the British Empire isolated and doomed to decline. And by fighting to save Belgium, Britain stood up for principle: the right of a small nation to resist its overbearing neighbours. For others, the war was a catastrophic mistake, fought at a catastrophic human cost. It brought Communism to power in Russia, ripped up the map of Europe and left a festering sense of resentment that would fuel the rise of Nazism. We often forget that, even a few days before Britain entered the war, it seemed likely that we would stay out. H. H. Asquith’s decision to intervene changed the course of history. But was it the right one?…” At the link find the title, “Britain Should Not Have Fought in the First World War, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Written Language History 26 mins – “How has written language changed over time? Do the way we read and the way our eyes work influence how scripts look? This week we hear a story on changes in legibility in written texts with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. [and] Sarah Crespi also interviews Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel on her story about detecting signs of psychosis in kids and teens, recruiting at-risk individuals for trials, and searching for anything that can stop the progression.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zimbabwe Coup 37 mins – “On Wednesday, Zimbabwe’s military placed President Robert Mugabe under house arrest and took over state institutions in what is largely considered a military coup. Naunihal Singh, author of “Seizing Power: The Strategic Logic of Military Coups” and professor at the Naval War College, joined Benjamin Wittes for a lively discussion on current events in Zimbabwe and the nature of coups in general. They discussed the defining elements of a military coup and its modern history, the politics surrounding Zimbabwe’s situation and much more.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Zimbabwe Coup mixdown final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 317 – Dec 8, 2017: Arctic GMO Apple, Autism Center, Banana Parasites, Ben and Jerry Founders, Bitcoin Investing, Bobby Kennedy Book, Canadian Road Development, Central African Republic Massacre, Chinese Book of Changes, Climate Change Impact on Health, Coal Waste Disaster, Communication Skills, Congressional Controversy, Corporation History, Corruption in Washington, Crime as a Disease, Democratic Processes, Education Improvement, Farming in Montana, Fiji Water, Food Bank Network, Gene Therapy in Pets, German Coal Production, Harry’s Last Stand, Homeless Hepatitis Epidemic, Impeachment Guide, Indigenous Science Fiction, Ketogenic Diet and Longevity, Low Wage Earners, Marvin Kalb on Russia, Monkey Sues Man, Puerto Rico Telephone Restoration, Refugee Students, Rohingya Conflict, Russian Security Service, Saudi Arabia Trends, Sex Assault of Teens, Sexual Harassment in Congress, South Sudan Problem, Suffragette Movement, Teaching Impoverished Refugees, Teamwork and Leadership, Turkey and the West, Walmart Discrimination Problem, Wildfire Impact, Working Moms, Workplace Discrimination Against Women, WWII Beginnings, Yemen War, Zimbabwe Crisis, Zulu Nation

Exercise your ears: the 128 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 607 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 18,500 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 118GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 440 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Actress Joyce Van Patten 90 mins – “Gilbert and Frank welcome veteran stage, film and television actress Joyce Van Patten, who shares fond memories of working with some of Hollywood’s most iconic figures, including Lucille Ball, Jack Benny, Danny Kaye, Dean Martin and Peter Sellers (to name a few). Also, Joyce dines with Vincent Price, tours with Tony Randall, treads the boards with Al Shean and remembers the late, great Herb Edelman. PLUS: Mr. Big converts! Rod Serling stops by the set! Joyce praises Martin Balsam! Andy Griffith hates on Jack Lord! And Bob Denver adopts a monkey!” At the link find the title, #181 Joyce Van Patten,” right-click “Media files 7eaabcda-008e-4a79-8303-4136d1a8f5c2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Education of Girls P1 60 mins – “On November 8, the Center for Universal Education at Brookings (CUE) hosted the 2017 Girls’ Education Research and Policy Symposium: Reaching the Most Marginalized. Each year, CUE convenes policymakers, practitioners, and stakeholders in the girls’ education arena to discuss the most pressing issues as identified by the Echidna Global Scholars, a group of global leaders in girls’ education who spend 5 months in-residency at Brookings.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Education of Girls P2 120 mins – “On November 8, the Center for Universal Education at Brookings (CUE) hosted the 2017 Girls’ Education Research and Policy Symposium: Reaching the Most Marginalized. Each year, CUE convenes policymakers, practitioners, and stakeholders in the girls’ education arena to discuss the most pressing issues as identified by the Echidna Global Scholars, a group of global leaders in girls’ education who spend 5 months in-residency at Brookings.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Air Pollution 15 – “”I shudder to think what kind of toxic and harmful long term effects it will have on the lungs of children who are being born in this city.” At the link find the title, “Nov 13 | New Delhi’s toxic smog poses serious health threat, warns doctor, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171113_29635.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alabama Politics 41 mins – “The legendary journalist Howell Raines reports from Alabama on the continuing Republican support for Roy Moore; Adam Shatz talks about Trump’s place in the system to control nuclear weapons; and Corey Robin talks about Trump’s place in the tradition of reactionary political thought.” At the link find the title, “Can the Democrats Beat Roy Moore in Alabama? Howell Raines; plus Adam Shatz on Trump and the Bomb, and Corey Robin on Trump’s Reactionary Mind, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 9031d146.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Allied Bombing of German Cities 58 mins – “No one doubts the bravery of the thousands of men who flew and died in Bomber Command. The death rate was an appalling 44%. And yet until the opening of a monument in Green Park in 2012 they had received no official recognition, with many historians claiming that the offensive was immoral and unjustified. How can it be right, they argue, for the Allies to have deliberately targeted German cities causing the death of hundreds of thousands of civilians? Even on a strategic level the offensive failed to bring about the collapse of civilian morale that was its intention. Others, however, maintain that the attacks made a decisive contribution to the Allied victory. Vast numbers of German soldiers and planes were diverted from the eastern and western fronts, while Allied bombing attacks virtually destroyed the German air force, clearing the way for the invasion of the continent. Arguing for the motion were AC Grayling, philosopher and author of ‘Among the Dead Cities: Is the Targeting of Civilians in War Ever Justified?’; and Richard Overy, Professor of history at Exeter University who has published extensively on World War II and air power in the 20th century. Arguing against them were Antony Beevor, award-winning historian and author of the No. 1 international bestseller ‘The Second World War’; and Patrick Bishop, historian and author of ‘Bomber Boys’. The debate was chaired by Jeremy O’Grady, Editor-in-chief of The Week magazine and co-founder of Intelligence Squared.” At the link find the title, “The Allied bombing of German cities in World War II was unjustifiable, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazonian Innovation 39 mins – “In this episode we’re joined by Tyler Gage, co-founder of the organic tea company Runa, and author of the book, Fully Alive: Using the Lessons of the Amazon to Live Your Mission in Business and Life. Tyler shares how his immersion into life in the Amazon guided him in building a socially responsible business able to thrive in the hyper-competitive soft drinks segment. What Was Covered – How Tyler’s interest in peak performance led him to indigenous elders in the Amazon and how life there inspired him to build a business The parallels to be found from the Amazonian concept of wisdom and modern business and entrepreneurship Discovering strength in vulnerability and how admitting what we don’t know creates an environment to learn from others…” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Politics Transformation 66 mins – “The 1968 U.S. presidential election fundamentally shaped modern American politics, and it was a transformative event in the life of a young Lawrence O’Donnell. Nothing went according to plan: Incumbent President Lyndon B. Johnson believed he would easily defeat Richard Nixon, former Republican vice president and California senator, until anti-war protests forced his withdrawal. The upstart Democratic candidate Robert F. Kennedy quickly secured the national spotlight, only to be tragically assassinated in Los Angeles that June. While Nixon remained the front-runner, Hubert Humphrey, the last remaining cog of the Democratic political machine, was closing in. To defeat him, Nixon pulled off one of the greatest dirty tricks in American political history. 1968 set the tone for Watergate and all else that has followed in the new era of modern politics. For decades, O’Donnell has been a pioneer in the field of political commentary and entertainment. As both a producer of The West Wing and as the host of his own MSNBC show, “The Last Word,” he has served as a voice of wisdom and integrity throughout the evolution of our political sphere. His new book, Playing With Fire, tells the story of a country coming apart at the seams in real time; it is a master class in the electioneering that took advantage of the chaos.” At the link find the title, “MSNBC’S Lawrence O’Donnell: Playing with Fire, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171115_Lawrence Odonnell Podcast.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Revolution 30 mins – “After Saratoga the French joined the war, the British changed strategies and Washington’s army spent a miserable winter at Valley Forge.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 25- Valley Forge.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arctic GMO Apple 7 mins – “On the last Monday of September, 32 field workers stepped onto a 15-acre experimental plot in an undisclosed part of Washington and made apple harvest history. The fruits they plucked from each tree were only a few months old. But they were two decades and millions of dollars in the making. And when they landed, pre-sliced and bagged on grocery store shelves earlier this month, they became the first genetically modified apple to go on sale in the United States.” At the link find the title, “Would You Put the Genetically Modified Arctic Apple in Your Pie? Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files audio-1af6277b-c5fc-4e2b-b1c3-0ff36b146885-encodings.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Articles of Confederation 27 mins – “As the newly independent United States trasitioned from war to peace, it was tripped up by the ineffective Articles of Confederation.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 29-_The Articles of Confederation.mp” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Center 29 mins – “How far would you go to help one of your coworkers? For Bernie Marcus, the co-founder and former CEO of Home Depot, the answer is: farther than most would ever imagine. In this episode, you’ll hear about the incredible personal philosophy that drove Marcus to build the Marcus Autism Center and go so far as to commit more than $100 million of his own money to the cause. All told, Bernie and his wife Billi, through the Marcus Foundation, have donated more than $1 billion to address some of the nation’s most pressing health issues, including stem cell research, spinal cord issues and brain injuries. But while he’s a man who’s donated richly, Marcus didn’t come from a background of wealth. In this show he also shares how he grew up poor in Newark, New Jersey and worked until his 50s before he reached his big breakthrough. He also offers insight into his personal ethical code—the one that made sure that, when he did find success, he was going to share it with others, especially the people who’d helped him succeed.” At the link find the title, “Entrepreneurial Philanthropy, “ right-click “Media files Crazy Good Turns Marcus Autism Center.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Banana Parasites 38 mins – “In this week’s podcast Dr. Jonnny Dalzell guest hosts from Tanzania. He visits with scientists from IITA that are helping devise solutions to nematodes. Nematodes are microscopic soil worms that are difficult to control and require substantial chemical inputs that are not always available and can be hazardous. Uncontrolled nematodes lead to damaged crops, and damage is not always apparent until it is too late. Dr. Dalzell speaks to IITA Kenya scientists Dr. Nessie Luambano, Dr. Danny Coyne, and Dr. Leena Tripathi. They discuss the problem of nematodes, some of the proposed solutions, and some of the frustrations of having good work stalled because of a lack of funding and political will to move them forward.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ben and Jerry Founders 60 – “In the mid-1970s two childhood friends, Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield decided to open an ice cream shop in Burlington, Vermont. Their quirky little shop packaged and sold unusual flavors like Honey Coffee, Mocha Walnut, and Mint with Oreo Cookies. In 1981, the regional brand spread across the country after Time magazine called it the “best ice cream in America.” Today, Ben & Jerry’s is one of the top selling ice cream brands in the world. And, like the original founders, the company doesn’t shy away from speaking out on social issues.” At the link find the title, “Ben & Jerry’s: Ben Cohen And Jerry Greenfield, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171117_hibt_bj.mp3” and select “Sve Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin in Canada 36 mins – “Anthony is the CEO and Founder of Decentral – a Toronto-based innovation hub focused on disruptive and decentralized technologies. In early 2016, they created Jaxx – one of the top multi-cryptocurrency wallets on the market. Anthony is also one of the founding members of Ethereum and the Bitcoin Alliance of Canada. In this episode, we discuss: – Anthony’s epic journey to Cryptocurrency. From real estate, to the family patio door business, to geothermal drilling, and finally, to a serendipitous discovery of Bitcoin that eventually led to millions – How he became one of the original 5 founders of Ethereum – And of course, since he invented one of the most popular cryptocurrency wallets in the space, we discuss the inevitable consequences of the current ICO bubble” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin Investing 43 mins – “Lisa Cheng is the Founder and Head of Research & Development for the Vanbex Group. Vanbex is a full stack professional services and development company specializing in Blockchain and Cryptocurrency. Lisa is also an advisor for emerging tech startups and has expertise in business development and product strategy. Her background includes Fortune 500 companies, enterprise sales, big data, and SaaS. In this episode, we discuss: How Lisa got let go from several jobs and was on unemployment before working for organizations like the Ethereum Foundation and Mastercoin (now known as Omni) How she became the Founder of the Vanbex Group And how Vanbex’s Etherparty project raised $30 million in its ICO pre-sale” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save” and “OK”.

Bitcoin Speculation 18 mins – “With phenomenal value appreciation, users are divided over the future of the digital currency, with some hoping to go mainstream, and others vehemently resistant to selling out.” At the link find the title, “Nov 17 Betting on bitcoin: Why the hyped digital currency is also causing concern, 2017,” right-click “Nov 17 Betting on bitcoin: Why the hyped digital currency is also causing concern, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171117_98337.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoins First User 64 mins – “In this episode of The Blockchain Show, astrologer Robert Phoenix breaks down the charts for bitcoin and ethereum, demystifying our beautiful solar system, and expanding our horizons.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Wood Workers 19 mins – “The Wood Working for the Blind #WW4B Series is about Blind wood workers honing their craft or just getting interested in the art of wood working. We are also bringing awareness to the #RebuildEHC to gain support for rebuilding Enchanted Hills Camp and Retreat. The largest fire in California history did not spare EHC and the spirit has not been broken. Rebuilding EHC for future generations is the goal this year and next year and that is what is going to make this time so memorable. You can support the #RebuildEHC by going to www.Lighthouse-SF.org/enchanted-hills/rebuilding/” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bobby Kennedy Book 63 mins – “Chris Matthews, Author, Bobby Kennedy: A Raging Spirit…This program is part of our Good Lit series, underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation. This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on November 14, 2017.” At the link find the title, “MSNBC Host Chris Matthews, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171114_Chris Matthews Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Discussion 60 mins – “Is Britain facing an identity crisis? The traditional dividing lines of left and right seem to be dissolving into new political tribes – metropolitan liberals versus the culturally rooted working classes, graduates versus the uneducated, the young versus the old. In June’s general election, traditional Labour heartlands like Mansfield went Conservative, while wealthy areas such as Kensington swung to Corbyn. Britain seems utterly confused about its politics. As the far left and Eurosceptic right have gained strength, much of the country has been left feeling politically homeless. So what’s going on? How will these new alignments play out as the country faces the historic challenge of leaving the EU and forging a new relationship with the rest of the world? Are the Conservatives really up to the job, as they bicker over what kind of Brexit they want and jostle over who should succeed Theresa May? Is it now unthinkable that Jeremy Corbyn could be the next prime minister? Looming over the current turmoil is the biggest question of all: What kind of Britain do we want to live in? What are the values that should hold our society together?” At the link find the title, “The Great Realignment: Britain’s Political Identity Crisis, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 27 mins – “NC Hearts Gigabit is a grassroots group recently launched in North Carolina that aims to dramatically improve Internet access and utilization across the state. We caught up with Economic Development Consultant Christa Wagner Vinson, CEO of Open Broadband Alan Fitzpatrick, and Partner of Broadband Catalysts Deborah Watts to discuss what they are doing. We discuss their goals and vision for a more connected North Carolina as well as their organizing methods. Given my experiences dining in that state, I’m not surprised that they have often organized around meals – good stuff! NC Hearts Gigabit offers an important model for people who feel left out of the modern political system…” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from here.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Washington State 23 mins – “Grant County’s Public Utility District was, along with some nearby PUDs, among the very first deployers of Fiber-to-the-Home networks shortly after the turn of the millennium. And per Washington’s law, they built an open access network that today has more than twenty service providers. Grant County PUD Project Specialist Russ Brethrower joins us for Community Broadband Bits podcast 279, a live interview from the Broadband Communities Economic Development Conference in Atlanta. We discuss the history of the network and other observations from Russ, who has more direct experience in these networks than the vast majority of us that regularly speculate on them. We also talk about the experiences of open access over 16 years and how they financed the network.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from here.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Housing 24 mins – “The 10-year plan includes the introduction of a housing benefit for families, and the building of 100,000 new affordable housing units.” At the link find the title, “Nov 23 ‘Absolutely historic’: Federal government launches ‘human rights-based’ housing strategy, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171123_99772.mp3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Military Homosexuals 19 mins – “Next Tuesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will be apologizing to LGBTQ military and government employees for losing their jobs, dignity and privacy, because they were gay.” At the link find the title, “Nov 24 ‘A small victory’: LGBTQ Canadians ‘purged’ from military and public service await apology, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171124_94443.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Road Development 15 mins – “”I hardly slept during the night … it’s such an exciting day,” says Tuktoyaktuk Mayor Darrel Nasogaluak of the new road that officially opened.” At the link find the title, “Nov 15 New Tuktoyaktuk road life-changing for Arctic community, 2017” right-click “Media files current_20171115_89353.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Reduction Project 6 mins – “As an environment reporter for The World, I spend a lot of time reporting on climate change as an international policy issue. I spend less time thinking and learning about what it would actually look like to live in a country that’s weaned itself largely off carbon. Would everyone drive electric cars? Would we all have to live closer to where we work? How much of our energy would have to come from solar and wind power? Will nuclear energy have a resurgence? When I heard about an Excel spreadsheet that Harvard professor, Dan Schrag, uses to help his environmental science students model a low-carbon future for the US economy, it intrigued me. I liked the idea of working out our energy future in black and white….” At the link click the down-pointing arrow, right-click “Save File” option on the pop-up menu, and “OK”.

Career Moves 57 mins – “Amy Chang had accomplished a lot in her eight years at Google, helping launch and then lead Google Analytics to 70 percent market share. But then she left to launch her own tech startup, a relationship-intelligence platform called Accompany. In conversation with Matt Harvey of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, Chang talks about getting out of one’s comfort zone and laying the groundwork for a successful career.” At the link find the title, “Entrepreneurs Keep Pushing – Amy Chang (Accompany), Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files a.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Central African Republic Massacre 7 mins – “A war zone can pass for a mostly peaceful place when no one is watching, says investigative journalist and TED Fellow Anjan Sundaram. In this short, incisive talk, he takes us inside the conflict in the Central African Republic, where he saw the methodical preparation for ethnic cleansing, and shares a lesson about why it’s important to bear witness to other people’s suffering. “Ignored people in all our communities tell us something important about who we are,” Sundaram says. “A witness can become precious, and their gaze most necessary, when violence passes silently, unseen and unheard.” At the link click the “Share” button and right-click “Download Audio” from the pop-up menu.

Che Guevara 98 mins – “Dr. Thoreau Redcrow is an American academic with a Ph.D. in Conflict Analysis with a concentration in Global Conflict. Thoreau is a researcher who specializes in studying armed guerrilla movements, and who has over a decade of experience studying the life and legacy of Che Guevara. His prior investigations into Che’s biography have taken him to Cuba to speak to those who knew and fought alongside Che, as well as to other arenas around the world which have been influenced by Che Guevara’s armed struggle. Brett sits down with Dr. Redcrow to discuss the Argentine Marxist revolutionary; including an entire segment of the podcast dedicated to debunking many of the right-wing and anti-communist lies about him. Topics Include: Che’s childhood, the political context out of which Che emerged, the Cuban Revolution, Fidel Castro, debunking lies and slander about Che, The Bay of Pigs, Anti-Imperialism, “Guevarism”, Marx, Lenin, and much, MUCH more!” At the link click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save” from the pop-up menu, then “OK”.

Child Well-being 6 mins – “The long-term success of a nation depends in large part on how well families and society care for their children. Child well-being can be measured through various indicators that reflect a child’s family, physical, and social environments, health, and education. This report examines what is known about the state of child well-being and discusses selected experts’ views on what policymakers could consider when addressing it. While many factors influence a child’s well-being, poverty—particularly early in life—can have long-term consequences in many areas, such as the ability to be successful in school and work. In 2016, about 18 percent of children in the United States lived in poverty, with some groups faring worse than others.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childlessness 15 mins – “One in five women in the United States will not have a biological child, and Christen Reighter is one of them. From a young age, she knew she didn’t want kids, in spite of the insistence of many people (including her doctor) who told her she’d change her mind. In this powerful talk, she shares her story of seeking sterilization — and makes the case that motherhood is an extension of womanhood, not the definition.” At the link find the title, “Nov 2017 Christen Reighter: I don’t want children — stop telling me I’ll change my mind,” right-click “Medium” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Book of Changes 45 mins – “Although covered before in an old China History Podcast episode, Laszlo takes the Yi Jing (I Ching, sometimes called the ‘Book of Changes’) off the shelf for a total makeover and freshening up. In this brief detour along the history timeline, Laszlo picks the Yi Jing apart and offers up both a history of this timeless classic as well as a brief intro about how it works and the role it plays in the life of some people. The Yi Jing is a book with a lot of staying power and has been kept as a handy reference guide for hundreds of millions of people over the millennia. Listen to what it’s all about and see for yourself if the Yi Jing can serve you:” At the link click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save” from the pop-up menu, then “OK”.

Climate Change Impact on Health 21 mins – “Nick Watts and Elizabeth Robinson discuss their findings from the 2017 report of The Lancet Countdown: Tracking Progress on Health and Climate Change” At the link find the title, “Lancet Countdown 2017: The Lancet: October 30, 2017,” right-click “Media files 30october_countdown.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change in Cities and States 59 mins – “Following the U.S. federal government’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement, individual cities and states are actively seeking to shape their own climate policies.” At the link find the title, “The Foreign Policy of Cities and States: Municipalities Take the Lead on Climate, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171120 The Foreign Policies of Cities and States_0.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Private Responses 6 mins – “In the US, and throughout the globe for that matter, the private sector is increasingly being looked to as a source of leadership for combating climate change. And many companies are stepping up, especially with the lack of leadership coming from Washington.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow, right-click “Save File” option on the pop-up menu, and “OK”.

Clothes Dryer Selection 15 mins- “Since we compared front load washers and top load washers in last week’s mini-lesson, it only makes sense that we cover dryers this week. We’ll talk about gas versus electric dryers and cover some of the more popular dryer options, such as steam and moisture sensors. Plus we’ll go over some best practices for installing the dryer vent system— practices that will decrease your risk of a dryer fire.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Coal Waste Disaster 38 mins – “In 1966, a mining disaster in Aberfan, Wales, killed 144 people. It was a completely preventable tragedy and 116 of the victims were children.” At the link find the title, “The Aberfan Disaster, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-11-22-symhc-aberfan-disaster.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Columbia Wars 12 mins – “Joe Parkin Daniels, author of a new World Report on a military hospital in Bogota, joins us to discuss the nuances of peace and conflict in Colombia since the FARC peace deal, and the challenges still facing healthcare in the country.” At the link find the title, “Conflict in Colombia: The Lancet: Oct, 2017” right-click “Media files 26october_colombia.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comic Writer David Zucker 98 mins – “Writer-director-producer David Zucker (“Airplane!,” “The Naked Gun,” “Kentucky Fried Movie”) sits down with Gilbert and Frank for a fascinating, hour-plus conversation about the rules of comedy, the challenges of parody, the uniqueness of “Who’s on First?” and the greatest hits (and misses) of the Marx Brothers. Also, Peter Graves takes offense, Vincent Price takes a pass, Woody Allen boxes a kangaroo and “ZAZ” lifts a plot from Charles Bronson. PLUS: “Top Secret!” “A Fistful of Yen”! In praise of Chevy Chase! John Byner sends up Robert Stack! And David remembers his old friend Leslie Nielsen.” At the link find the title, “#182 David Zucker,” right-click “Media files 79786cf1-197a-4ebc-bf0b-c43c54448bc6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-u menu.

Communication Skills 12 mins – “When your job hinges on how well you talk to people, you learn a lot about how to have conversations — and that most of us don’t converse very well. Celeste Headlee has worked as a radio host for decades, and she knows the ingredients of a great conversation: Honesty, brevity, clarity and a healthy amount of listening. In this insightful talk, she shares 10 useful rules for having better conversations. “Go out, talk to people, listen to people,” she says. “And, most importantly, be prepared to be amazed.” At theh link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Confucianism 48 mins – “In this second helping of Laszlo’s overview of the history of Chinese philosophy, the Great Sage himself is the center of focus. Arguably China’s most famous citizen of all time, Confucius (and his disciples) created an ideology and political system that had incredible lasting power. Part two examines the stories surrounding Confucius’s life growing up and operating in the State of Lu during the last decades of the Spring and Autumn period of the Zhou Dynasty. In addition to the trials and tribulations faced by Master Kong in his day, the basic tenets of Confucianism are introduced.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save” from the pop-up menu, then “OK”.

Congressional Controversy 63 mins – “Dan, Tommy and Lovett discuss the allegations against Senator Franken, the Republicans trying to use tax reform to take health care from people, and the latest in the ever expanding Roy Moore scandal. Favreau is out of town, so Dan talks one-on-one with Senator Tammy Duckworth (D-IL). Plus, Tommy has a new puppy!” At the link find the title, “”Say what it takes to heal a culture.” Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 69313138-d51d-46b5-b28b-cf02d3ded0a6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Construction Cool Tools 27 mins – “Our guest this week is Matt Velderman. He’s a DYIer, an engineer, inventor, and he leads Stanley Black & Decker’s Breakthrough Innovation Group.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corporation History 91 mins – “On November 15, Brookings convened several of the editors and contributors to the book “Corporations and American democracy” for a conversationon what the corporation’s place is in American society, and on what risks and opportunities corporations pose to democracy.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow, right-click “Save File” option on the pop-up menu, and “OK”.

Corruption in Washington 49 mins – “With allegations of corruption flying on both sides of the aisle in Washington, Brian, Joanne, and Nathan return to our episode on how Americans have wrestled with political corruption.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Counterfeit vs Fake Money  21 mins – “There’s a scene in the buddy cop movie Rush Hour 2, starring Jackie Chan and  Chris Tucker, that takes place in a crowded Las Vegas casino. After some tense action, a small bomb goes off near one of the roulette tables and money flies everywhere. A company named ISS Props had provided the money for that scene (and several others) to the filmmakers. The fake money amounted to nearly a billion dollars in fake bills — and the company was surprised when one day, during the filming, two men from the Secret Service showed up to their office. The Secret Service was there because some of the fake cash had gone missing from the set and had started turning up on the Las Vegas strip. CEO of ISS Props, Gregg Bilson Jr., was now facing a serious charge: counterfeiting.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crime as a Disease 49 mins – “In moments of anger, it can be hard to take a deep breath or count to ten. But public health researcher Harold Pollack says five minutes of reflection can make all the difference between a regular life and one spent behind bars. This week, we visit a Chicago program that helps young men learn how to pause and reflect. Plus, we ask whether we should think of violence as a disease, similar to a blood-borne pathogen in its ability to spread from person to person.” At the link find the title, “Radio Replay: Crime As A Disease” right-click “Media files 20171117 hiddenbrain_hb_crime as a disease-radio replay-0d6e9c2e-956e-4d85-aed9-bb6c67830ccc.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democratic Processes 65 mins – “Playing for Team Human today are Frances Moore Lappé and Adam Eichen from the Small Planet Institute. Lappé and Eichen are out on the road with a mission to reinvigorate “civic courage” and inclusive participation in democracy. Their latest book Daring Democracy Igniting Power, Meaning, and Connection for the America We Want offers a diagnosis of what has come to ail our democracy and recommends the necessary cures, offering concrete examples of ballot initiatives, reforms, and collective organizing happening across the country. Counter to a despairing narrative on the current state of democracy in the U.S., Lappé and Eichen argue that people are indeed rising to take the reigns. Inspired by examples of deep organizing and the convergence of movements in places such as Democracy Spring, Democracy Awakening, and Occupy Wall Street, Lappé and Eichen see power shifting back into the people’s hands. Their analysis of how we got to where we are, coupled with their passion and optimism for change, is both contagious and empowering. In this Team Human conversation, Lappé and Eichen join Douglas to make a case for hope, courage, and optimism in this moment of turmoil and division. Rushkoff begins today’s show with a monologue on the theme of democracy inspired by this conversation. Though it may have been easy to have lost faith in democracy after the 2016 election, perhaps election day is the wrong place to look if we really see democracy in action. It’s a monologue that asks: where does democracy begin for team human?… and lucky for us, today’s guests Frances Moore Lappé and Adam Eichen are ready with the answer.” At the link find the title, “Ep. 63 Frances Moore Lappé and Adam Eichen “The Thrill of Democracy” right-click “Media files 5a0c3583a3f222e723b55e02.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Double-Speed YouTube 33 mins- “[Third item.] Our guest this week is A.J. Jacobs. A.J. is the author of four New York Times best sellers including The Year Of Living Biblically, and The Know-It-All. CBS will be airing a sitcom based on The Year Of Living Biblically this winter. He is a contributor to Esquire and NPR.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Improvement 15 mins – “The most important infrastructure we have is educated minds, says former Tunisian government minister Amel Karboul. Yet too often large investments go to more visible initiatives such as bridges and roads, when it’s the minds of our children that will really create a brighter future. In this sharp talk, she shares actionable ideas to ensure that every child is in school — and learning — within just one generation. Amel Karboul nurtures and inspires a new generation of responsible leaders, teams and organizations to create breakthroughs in their thinking, to transform themselves and to work towards a just and sustainable future. Together with the Education Commission team, she has played a leading role in a major global initiative engaging world leaders, policymakers and researchers, and she has developed a renewed and compelling investment case and financing pathway for achieving equal educational opportunity for children and young people. Karboul has also built The Maghreb Economic Forum (MEF) as a non-partisan think- and do-tank, and with her team she has engaged a new type of conversation between public and private audiences and nurtured new solutions for education (including de-radicalisation), employment, leadership and gender equality. She also co-lead the establishment of first democratic society in Arab nation, began economic reform and created and deployed effective pioneering digital media engagement between government and citizen on very limited budget as cabinet minister. Karboul published her book, Coffin Corner, outlining a new leadership culture suited to the complexity and dynamics of the 21st century. Nominated as one of ten leading young African politicians, her professional brand is first and foremost that of a highly intelligent, well connected, creative and inspirational go-getter with a track record of making things happen.” At the link click the “Share” button and right-click “Download Audio” from the pop-up menu.

Education Methods 43 mins – “In what might be our most thought-provoking episode of all time, Craig Barton, maths instructor from Northern England, talks about his transformation from a constructivist to a teacher who strongly believes in explicit instruction. Craig rejects the idea that students learn best when they discover truths on their own. He is well-read, articulate, and very engaging so quit reading this description and start the show!” At the link find the title, “The pitfall of inquiry based learning with Craig Barton, May, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-05-13T17_46_48-07_00.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Research 26 mins – “John Hattie is the author of many popular education books including several on Visible Learning. He is a highly sought after speaker and researcher. Dr. Hattie shares how we educators can know which research to trust, what IS learning, and who are some good go-to researchers in the field of education.” At the link find the title, “Which research do I trust? with John Hattie, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media fil” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Entitlement Programs 46 mins – “…Entitlement programs are as old as the Republic, according to John Cogan, former deputy director of the US Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and a Hoover Institution senior fellow. Cogan joins Peter Robinson to discuss his latest book, The High Cost of Good Intentions,on the necessity for entitlement reform in the United States. Currently there are a bevy of entitlement programs in the United States, each costing a large percentage of the federal budget each year. These programs are open-ended and hard to estimate into the budget because people with the average number of benefits vary greatly from year to year. These programs have become complex and bloated over the many years since they’ve been instated and are in dire need of reform. According to John Cogan, entitlement programs such as pensions, Medicaid, and Social Security have been a part of US history since the Revolutionary War when Congress first created pensions for all the soldiers who had served the Republic during the war. Congress then went on to expand entitlement programs after the Civil War to include soldiers who had fought in the war. Entitlements remained restricted to only those who had served the Republic until the New Deal when entitlements were extended to all citizens above a certain age (Social Security). This was the first time that entitlements were given to citizens who had not served. This was also the first time that entitlements were granted to everyone until the end of time.” At the link find the title, “The High Cost of Good Intentions Featuring John Cogan, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171116-cogan-uk.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in Montana 89 mins – “Dylan Strike has been the owner of Strike Farms in Bozeman, Montana, since 2014. In 2017, he increased production from four acres to fourteen in order to edge out national produce players in his local grocery stores. Strike Farms also markets through a CSA throughout the greater Bozeman region. We dig into the nuts and bolts behind the dramatic expansion at Strike Farms, including how Dylan financed the expansion and associated land purchase. Dylan gets real as he discusses the challenges of putting together the financial package, managing staff and systems through the expansion, and the impact of what Dylan says was the “worst weather year imaginable.” We also dig into the changes in equipment and production approaches, and the administrative systems that allowed Strike Farms to grow, as well as crop rotations, distribution strategies, and breaking into new grocery accounts.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fiji Islands and Climate Change 7 mins – “Elisabeth Holland’s office at the University of the South Pacific in Fiji looks like a museum. There are woven palm leaf fans, wooden canoe replicas, a handmade Fijian cloth with a turtle design — all artifacts from her life here in the Pacific Islands. But she grew up far from here — in New Mexico. “I came from the desert,” Holland says. “I first saw the ocean when I was 16.” These days, the ocean is central to her work as director of the climate change program at the University of the South Pacific. Based for years in Colorado, she once devoted herself to researching how the Earth’s atmosphere affected ecosystems.These days, Holland is more focused on helping communities cope with extreme weather and rising seas. “Some of Fiji’s communities will become uninhabitable,” she says. “It is truly an existential crisis. A third of our communities will need to be moved. The social dimensions of that are huge.” This week, climate change negotiators are meeting in Bonn, Germany, for high-level international talks at the COP 23 summit. The Pacific island nation of Fiji is presiding over negotiations, and Holland is standing by their side. Holland brings her acute scientific knowledge to the table. Last year, when Cyclone Winston roared through Fiji, she went straight to work trying to forecast the storm surge.

Fiji Water 4 mins – “…”When I talk to big audiences about water I always ask: ‘How many people in the room think the water in the bottle is really from Fiji?’” said Charles Fishman, author of “The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water.” “And almost no one in the audience thinks the water actually comes from Fiji.” But the bottled water does come from Fiji. Fishman visited the company’s plant a few years back. “My impression of Fiji water when I got to Fiji was much different than the impression you would have trying to understand it from back here in the United States where we’re the largest market by far,” Fishman said. “Fiji Water is a little bit of a ridiculous product. No-one ever needs it. It’s a pure indulgence. But in Fiji it has a tremendous economic impact.”

Food Bank Network 18 mins – “A while back, the charity Feeding America was a mess. It was sending pickles to food banks that wanted produce, and potatoes to Idaho. So they called some economists, and a free food market was born.” At the link find the title, “#665: The Free Food Market, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171122_pmoney_pmpod665rerun.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

G Suite and Math Instruction 35 mins – “What is the best Google app to use with mathematics instruction? Listen to the latest Bedley Bros interview with Google Guru Alice Keeler to find out. Learn more from Alice by visiting her website http://www.alicekeeler.com…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gene Editing 32 mins – “Gene editing has been the center of attention, affecting everything from plants, to mushrooms, to livestock, to human medicine. However, when we discuss gene editing we typically describe the CRISPR Cas9 system.  Such tools have grabbed recent limelight.  But churning in the background, the other gene editing methods have been making progress for for years, and products are moving rapidly through pipelines toward approval.  Such products will soon be available from Calyxt Corporation. Calyxt Chief Science Officer Dr. Dan Voytas discusses how TALEN, a custom sequence-specific nuclease, functions in gene editing. He contrasts it with the Cas9 system and then describes the company pipeline, with products soon to be on the market. He also discusses regulation of the products derived from TALEN technology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gene Editing Hazard 9 mins – “To get to work in the morning, Omar Akbari has to pass through a minimum of six sealed doors, including an air-locked vestibule. The UC Riverside entomologist studies the world’s deadliest creature: the Aedes aegypti mosquito, whose bite transmits diseases that kill millions each year. But that’s not the reason for all the extra security. Akbari isn’t just studying mosquitoes—he’s re-engineering them with self-destruct switches.” At the link find the title, “This Gene-Editing Tech Might Be Too Dangerous To Unleash, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files audio-1b9aec47-d419-47bb-a01a-71a5366fb666-encodings.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gene Therapy in Pets 37 mins – “The promises of gene therapy have been slow to reach the public for many reasons. Technologies conceived in the 1980’s had a substantial regulatory and proof-of-concept road ahead of them, leading to slow development and deployment. One of the major issues is that these therapies were designed for humans, where ethics concerns and regulation are a challenge to navigate. However, it is possible to demonstrate efficacy in animals. Emily Mullin is the Associate Editor at MIT Technology Review. She recently covered the application of gene therapy to animals, and now describes its application in veterinary capacities where regulation is much lower than in human therapy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

German Coal Production 6 mins – ““Germany is not the greenest country in the world,” says a climate activist who refers to himself as Tom. Germany has long pushed stronger global action to fight climate change. But Tom — who uses a pseudonym over fears of being targeted by police — says the reality is quite different. “It’s one of the biggest CO2 producers in the world,” he says. “What we have here basically is the best country in greenwashing.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Graphic Design in Movies 29 mins – “When a new movie comes out most of the plaudits go to the director, the producer and the lead actors, but there are so many other people involved in a film, and a lot of them are designers. There are costume designers and set designers, but also graphic designers working behind the screens on all of the designed objects that shape a film’s aesthetic and help tell its story.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Haitian Revolution 39 mins – “Done at the headquarters of Gonaives, the first day of January 1804, the first year of independence.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 4.17a-The Haitian Declaration of Independence Master.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Harry’s Last Stand 26 mins – “Harry Leslie Smith says he’s seen humanity at its best — and worst. The 94-year-old has lived through poverty, war and the Great Depression and warns a younger generation to heed his message: Don’t let my past be your future.” At the link find the title, “Nov 21 94-year-old podcaster Harry Leslie Smith says he’ll ‘drop dead’ before he stops fighting for equality, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171121_27390.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hitler Resistance 21 mins – “During World War II, the Nazi party did not tolerate dissent, but some Germans did attempt to resist Hitler’s government.” At the link find the title, “SYMHC Classics: The White Rose and Nazi Germany, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-11-04-symhc-classic-white-rose.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless Hepatitis Epidemic 9 mins – “It wasn’t just that people were getting sick—it was who. And how many. Hepatitis A is a viral disease that primarily attacks the liver, and if it gets serious—as it can in the elderly and immune-compromised people—it can be fatal. But the graph of cases in the US over time looks like the second, fun half of a roller coaster ride. In the early 1970s, nearly 10,000 people a year got it. By the mid-1980s, the number was half that.” At the link find the title, “California’s Hepatitis A Outbreak Is the Future Poking Us in the Face, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files audio-4fced995-2132-45f5-8253-186cac8d3d40-encodings.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment Guide 50 mins – “Discussion on impeachment has intensified since Donald Trump assumed office this January, but what do we know about impeachment’s constitutional design and history? Cass Sunstein, professor at Harvard Law School, recently wrote an accessible account of impeachment to separate myth from history. Last week, Benjamin Wittes interviewed Sunstein on his new book “Impeachment: A Citizen’s Guide.” They discussed the Framers’ intent behind impeachment, what “high crimes and misdemeanors” actually means, the appropriate situations for which impeachment is called, and much more.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Cass Sunstein mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

Indigenous Science Fiction 29 mins -”As soon as you can dream about the future, you have hope as well instead of despair.” At the link find the title, “Nov 14 How Indigenous and black artists are using science fiction to imagine a better future, 2017,” right-click “Media files current 20171114_44960.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Instagram Founders 34 mins – “We’re hard at work planning our upcoming live shows, so we bring you this favorite from the last year: Instagram. Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger launched their photo-sharing app with a server that crashed every other hour. Despite a chaotic start, it became one of the most popular apps in the world.” At the link find the title, “Instagram: Kevin Systrom & Mike Krieger, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171109_hibt_instagramrepeat.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Instrument of Government 26 mins – “The Instrument of Government was the first written constitution in English history.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 013-The Instrument of Government.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ketogenic Diet and Longevity 69 mins- “ …In part one of Dawn’s interview, listeners learned about Ken’s childhood and his years as a rock and roll promoter back in the ‘70s. Ken even shared an interesting story about how he went from being a philosophy major to a computer scientist. He also talked about his work in AI and the creation of IHMC and the pioneering work underway at the institute. If you missed episode 49, be sure to check it out. Part two of Ken’s interview focuses more on his research and personal experience with the ketogenic diet, ketone esters, exercise and ways to extend health span and perhaps longevity. Dawn and Ken also discuss the nature of technical progress As listeners learned in part one, Ken has a varied background. … He also is the author of hundreds of scientific papers and six books. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Tulane University. He is a Fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, a charter Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, and a member of the Association for Computing Machinery, the IEEE Computer Society, and the National Association of Scholars. …Links: IHMC website: https://www.ihmc.us Ken Ford web page: https://www.ihmc.us/groups/kford/ Florida Inventors Hall of Fame website: http://www.floridainvents.org Outside magazine story on Ken Ford and ketogenic diet: https://www.outsideonline.com/2113406/high-carb-low-fat-ketone-diet Blood Flow Restriction Device. 15% discount code: IHMC https://www.gobstrong.com/what-is-b-strong/ BhB Ketone Ester https://hvmn.com Powerdot Muscle Stimulator https://www.powerdot.com/products/powerdot-muscle-stimulator Papers: Suppression of Oxidative Stress by b-Hydroxybutyrate, an Endogenous Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor https://www.ihmc.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Verdin_2013.pdf Ketone Bodies as Signaling Metabolites https://www.ihmc.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/TEM-Ketone-bodies-as-signaling-metabolites-2014.pdf Ketogenic Diet Reduces Midlife Mortality and Improves Memory in Aging Mice https://www.ihmc.” At the link find the title, “Episode 50: Ken Ford talks about ketosis, optimizing exercise, and the future direction of science, technology, and culture,” right-click “Media files 050_STEM-Talk_KenFord2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Longevity Research 34 mins- “You may like the idea of living to be a 100, but only about 8,000 Canadians can call themselves centenarians. How do they reach this milestone?” At the link find the title, “Nov 13 Want to live to 100?: What centenarians in a Nova Scotia county can teach us about aging, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171113_59774.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Low Wage Earners 7 mins – “According to GAO’s analysis of data in the Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey (CPS), on average, low-wage workers worked fewer hours per week, were more highly concentrated in a few industries and occupations, and had lower educational attainment than workers earning hourly wages above $16 in each year GAO reviewed—1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, 2015 and 2016. Their percentage of the U.S. workforce also stayed relatively constant over time. About 40 percent of the U.S. workforce ages 25 to 64 earned hourly wages of $16 or less (in constant 2016 dollars) over the period 1995 through 2016. The combination of low wages and few hours worked compounded the income disadvantage of low-wage workers and likely contributed to their potential eligibility for federal social safety net programs. About 20 percent of families with a worker earning up to the federal minimum wage (currently $7.25 per hour), 13 percent of families with a worker earning above federal minimum wage to $12.00 per hour, and 5 percent of families with a worker earning $12.01 to $16 per hour were in poverty in each year GAO reviewed (see figure).The extent of poverty varied considerably by the type of family in which a worker lived. For example, single-parent families earning the federal minimum wage or below comprised a higher percentage of families in poverty. In contrast, married families with no children comprised the lowest percentage of families in poverty, and generally had family incomes at or above the poverty line.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marvin Kalb on Russia 58 mins – “1956 was an extraordinary year in modern Russian history. It was called “the year of the thaw”—a time when Stalin’s dark legacy of dictatorship died in February only to be reborn later that December. This historic arc from rising hope to crushing despair opened with a speech by Nikita Khrushchev, then the unpredictable leader of the Soviet Union. He astounded everyone by denouncing the one figure who, up to that time, had been hailed as a “genius,” a wizard of communism—Josef Stalin himself. Suddenly, this once unassailable god was being portrayed as a “madman” whose idiosyncratic rule had seriously undermined communism and endangered the Soviet state. In 1956, Marvin Kalb was a young American diplomatic attaché at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow who would go on to become an award-winning diplomatic correspondent. He recalls this tumultuous year, and the years that brought him there, in a new memoir: “The Year I Was Peter the Great: 1956—Khrushchev, Stalin’s Ghost, and a Young American in Russia.” On November 9, the Brookings Book Club hosted Kalb in discussion with New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman.” At the link right-click “Download the audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Business Concerns 40 mins – “Medical school definitely hasn’t made a priority of teaching about how medicine works as a business.  MDs who get involved in that side of healthcare typically learn on the job. But recent caller Ryan is interested in that topic, and wanted to hear from us about what CCOM students are learning about it. A couple years ago, M4 Joe Nellis and some other students founded the Healthcare Management and Delivery Science Distinction Track.  One reason was that their families had questions they couldn’t answer about the topic.  They also knew that decisions about healthcare delivery and outcomes evaluation were being made without MDs having a clear idea (or even input on) how and why.  Joe and M2s Philip Huang and Amanda Manarot got together with Dave to talk about what they’ve learning on issues like teamwork, e-health, data and decision-making. And while the healthcare leaders of tomorrow still have to learn much of the biz after they leave medical school, having a fuller grasp of the forces that affect how medicine is practiced is key, especially as the private practice of medicine gives way to employment in hospitals and other organizations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexican Wall Documentary 32 mins – “Missed the Meet the Press Film Festival with AFI? Meet three of the filmmakers behind the inaugural event, and watch a special digital showcase at nbcnews.com/mtpfilm, download the NBC News app on Roku or Apple TV, or search the on-demand player in your set top cable box.” At the link find the title, “Meet the Filmmakers: Meet the Press Film Festival with AFI, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files df3a7f60-3832-45ca-8f5b-2cf1734c126e.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Families 85 mins – “On November 16, the Center on 21st Century Security and Intelligence convened a panel of experts to discuss modern understanding of 21st century military families and an increase in civilian-military engagement.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow, right-click “Save File” option on the pop-up menu, and “OK”.

Military Readiness 93 mins – “On November 13, the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence convened a panel of experts, including from several branches of the military, to address the readiness debate.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow, right-click “Save File” option on the pop-up menu, and “OK”.

Money Management 69 mins – “Dan Ariely and Jeff Kreisler explore the hidden motivations that are secretly driving our choices about money. They explain why our irrational behavior often interferes with our best intentions when it comes to managing our finances. Ariely and Kreisler cut through our unconscious fears and desires to help improve our spending habits. They offer tangible advice and lessons when it comes to credit card debt, household budgeting and holiday spending. Learn how to make better financial choices by saving and spending smarter.” At the link find the title, “Dan Ariely and Jeff Kreisler: Money Myths, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171116_Money Matters Dan Ariely And Jeff Kreisler_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mongolian Mining 5 mins – “The narrow, black tunnel at the bottom of a 70-foot dirt shaft about two hours north of Mongolia’s capital, Ulaanbaatar, is so small that you can’t stand up. But there are three men down here using headlamps to illuminate a section of rock where they’ve been digging for gold. It’s grueling work, but it provides some of the few jobs available around here, and it’s important for the whole country. Together, Mongolia’s small and large gold mines produce about 10 tons of the precious metal annually, helping propel a mining industry that’s one of the largest drivers of its emerging economy. But much of that gold has come at a cost far beyond the taxing physical labor. Until about a decade ago, many of Mongolia’s gold operations used mercury to extract the gold from the ore. And that was a big problem.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monkey Sues Man 59 mins – “This week, blurring the line between animal and human” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mugabe Resigns 19 mins – “For now we are happy, but it’s guided optimism.” At the link find the title, “Nov 22 Mugabe resigns: What’s next for Zimbabwe? 2017,” right-click “Media files current 20171122_38265.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Naturalist Profession 98 mins – “Today’s episode features field biologist Roger Smith, the founder and chair of the Teton Raptor Center, a rehabilitation facility in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, that annually cares for more than 130 injured birds. …Roger has spent his entire professional career in the natural sciences and environmental education. After high school, he headed off to the University of Montana and started his life as a field biologist researching grizzly bears in northwestern Montana in 1977. He continued to study grizzly and black bears in Alaska, Maine and Colorado before completing his secondary science degree in 1984. After teaching high school science in Montana, he moved to Jackson Hole in 1985 and joined the resident faculty at the Teton Science School. At the school, he designed and implemented a field-oriented natural science curriculum for adults and children. In 1987, he joined the field staff at the National Outdoor Leadership School and led courses in Wyoming, Texas, Mexico and Kenya. In 1994, Roger completed his Master’s degree in Wildlife Biology and Physiology at the University of Wyoming. Roger’s research has focused on raptors and ravens of the Grand Teton National Park. His research and papers have been published in a number of peer-reviewed professional journals. In 1994, he helped initiate and manage the professional residency in environmental education program at the Teton Science School, and was on the faculty there until 1999. He managed all aspects of independent research, including grant and proposal writing. Roger founded the Teton Raptor Center in 1996 and became the Resident Naturalist at 3Creek Ranch in 2002….” At the link find the title, “Episode 51: Roger Smith talks about bears, raptors, and life as a field biologist,” right-click “Media files 051_STEM-Talk_RogerSmith.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obamacare Bailouts 26 mins – “From the beginning of American politics, politicians have been using the term “bailout” as a political cudgel. In this week’s podcast, Jimmy speaks with two experts who explain the what, when, why, where, and how of government bailouts.” At the link find the title, “217: When politicians scream “bailout,” what do they really mean?” right-click “Media files dbb3b530-101d-4c5d-8923-9c44f19da77d.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online Justice 56 mins – “eBay resolves 60 million disputes a year and Alibaba 100 million. How do they do that? At the other less impressive extreme, in 2015 the IRS hung up on telephone callers 8.8 million times without making contact. Are there online solutions for that? Disputes are a “growth industry” on the internet, an inevitable by-product of innovation but often harmful to individuals. Drawing on his recent book, Digital Justice: Technology and the Internet of Disputes, (co-authored with Orna Rabinovich), Professor Katsh considers opportunities for online dispute resolution and prevention in ecommerce, health care, social media, employment, and the courts.” At the link find the title, “Digital Justice: Technology and the Internet of Disputes, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 356846606-berkmanklein-digital-justice-technology-and-the-internet-of-disputes.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Epidemic Control by Medicare 5 mins – “More than 14 million people received opioid prescriptions in 2016 through the Medicare drug benefit program, Part D. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services delegate monitoring of these beneficiaries to the private organizations that implement the Medicare Part D benefit. These organizations follow CMS monitoring criteria. While these criteria identify beneficiaries at the greatest risk of harm from opioid use, we found that it does not capture data on an even larger population of beneficiaries potentially at risk of harm from high doses of opioids. We recommended three actions to improve oversight.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peru History 43 mins – “Lord Thomas Cochrane turned out to be the key to Peru.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 5.20-The Sea Wolf Master.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Puerto Rico Telephone Restoration 27 mins – “AT&T is experimenting with a drone called a Flying COW (Cell on Wings) in Puerto Rico to help re-establish internet connectivity after the destruction by the recent hurricane. Other drones have also been widely used in the region to map the damage, and to direct aid. Click talks to Art Pregler, a specialist in drones at AT&T and also to Ellie Mackay who has experience of using drones after disasters. [then] The Raspberry Pi was designed to re-introduce programming and electronic “tinkering” among young people in countries where technology is already largely present. Since 2011, a local team have set up three computer rooms in Togo. The third one, installed last summer, demonstrates how the Raspberry Pi, powered by Linux, is a perfect alternative to conventional computers. Click talks to Dominique Laloux whose goal is to raise the necessary funds to install one new room in one other Togolese school each year. Professor Philip Howard from the Oxford Internet Institute is about to give a key note address on the current state, future and implications of the Internet of Things (IoT). Ahead of the talk he joins Click to outline the pros and cons of the IoT.”At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Students 64 mins – “This webinar marks the release of a Migration Policy Institute report that explores some of the responses made by school districts to bring immigrant and refugee newcomer students up to speed in English and basic academic skills, all while focused on the educational system’s ultimate goal of high school completion with the skills necessary for today’s college and career demands. During the webinar, the author, Julie Sugarman, summarizes findings based on insights from interviews and activities conducted for MPI’s Learning Network for Newcomer Youth Success, a private network that brings together administrators and practitioners in the education, social services, and health and mental health fields who are engaged in providing services to immigrant and refugee newcomers ages 12 to 21. The discussion focuses on how schools create and expand systems around the identification of students’ immediate and ongoing academic and socioemotional needs, and how they design programs and curricular pathways to balance these needs with state policy constraints. Also in this webinar, two practitioners illustrate specific responses to serving newcomer youth. Nicole Mitchell discusses the efforts of Los Angeles Unified School District’s School Enrollment Placement & Assessment Center to address the academic and socioemotional needs of incoming newcomer students. Marguerite Lukes discusses how educators in schools supported by the Internationals Network for Public Schools create systemic supports, such as team teaching, to ensure quality instruction for Els.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees and Politics 44 mins – “This week we talk to former Foreign Secretary David Miliband about his new book Rescue: Refugees and the Political Crisis of our Time. He explains what the refugee crisis tells us about the state of world politics and why it is both so essential and so hard to tackle it. We also talk about climate change, Brexit, the failures of the Blair government and the fate of social democracy in the new ‘age of extremes’. David Miliband is currently Chair and CEO of the International Rescue Committee (IRC).” At the link find the title, “David Miliband, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rohingya Conflict 19 mins – “”People are going to have to be held to account … these are absolutely unacceptable breaches of people’s human rights and human dignity.” At the link find the title, “Nov 13 | Canada’s Special Envoy to Myanmar: ‘We have to try to engage Aung San Suu Kyi’ 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171113_45668.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Security Services 52 mins – “Matters Russia have been prevalent in U.S. politics since news of the Kremlin’s meddling in the 2016 elections first surfaced. It’s time to pay some serious attention to the Russian surveillance apparatus. Andrei Soldatov, a Russian investigative journalist and co-author of the book, “The Red Web,” brings a unique interpretation of the Kremlin’s actions as an independent reporter in the very country Americans find so confusing. Special guest host Alina Polyakova, David M. Rubenstein fellow in Brookings’s Foreign Policy Program, interviewed Soldatov last week to discuss Russia’s perspective on the 2016 election meddling, the Kremlin’s surveillance operations, Edward Snowden, and much more. This is the first podcast in a new project between in which PolyakovaT will shed light on Russian politics and society on the Lawfare Podcast in an effort to understand the Kremlin’s intentions toward and engagement with the West.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Alina Polykova Andrei Soldatov Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Trolls 5 mins – “When Micah White, the co-creator of the Occupy Wall Street movement, received an email from a freelance reporter requesting an interview for the website BlackMattersUS, he didn’t think much of it. It wasn’t until the interview itself, with a reporter going by the name Yan Big Davis, that White became skeptical. On its website, BlackMattersUS describes itself as a “nonprofit news outlet that delivers raw and original information on the most urgent issues important to the African-American community in America.” As a prominent activist and — at the time — author of a new book (“The End of Protest: A New Playbook for Revolution”), White was accustomed to such requests and agreed to a phone interview. “The interview was strange,” White said. “It sounded like … he was calling from a long distance. The call quality was bad.” White was also struck by the man’s accent. “At the time I [thought], ‘He must be an African in America,’” White said. “‘He’s a black African in America, and that’s why he’s interested in racism in America.’ I created this whole mental justification in my head as to why he was not a native English speaker.” Davis was more likely Russian and working for the Kremlin-linked Internet Research Agency….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Arabia Trends 88 mins – “On November 21, Brookings Senior Fellow Bruce Riedel discussed his new book, “Kings and Presidents: Saudi Arabia and America Since FDR” (Brookings Institution Press), in light of the rapidly changing scene in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow, right-click “Save File” option on the pop-up menu, and “OK”.

Schizophrenia Treatment 30 mins – “What role might the immune system play in mental illness? And how might this challenge long-held beliefs about the divide between body and brain?” At the link right-click “Healthy body, healthy mind: a new approach for mental disorders – Science Weekly podcast, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 21-63801-gnl.sci.171122.ms.healthy body healthy mind.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Abuse by Polygamist 26 mins – “How Rachel Jeffs broke free from her father and a life of polygamy.” At the link find the title, “Nov 16 | Daughter of polygamist Warren Jeffs speaks out on her father’s abuse, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171116_57945.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Abuse by Priests 19 mins – “There are now 56 alleged cases of sex abuse before the courts in the province involving priests— and the church is concerned it no longer has the money to compensate all the victims coming forward.” At the link find the title, “Nov 20 N.B. Catholic Church says there may be no money left to compensate sex abuse victims, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171120_73248.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Assault by Franken 21 mins – “Their first defence is: ‘We’re all comics. It’s a joke.” At the link find the title, “Nov 17 ‘It’s not a joke. It’s not OK’: Female comics speak out against sexual harassment, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171117_85028.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Assault of Teens 24 mins – “There is no acceptable version of the story. Teenagers can’t consent to a relationship with a grown adult.” At the link find the title, “Nov 14 Social media campaign #MeAt14 talks age of consent after Roy Moore allegations, 2017,” right-click “Media files current 20171114_95731.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment in Congress 5 mins – “A bipartisan group of lawmakers, including House Representative Annie Kuster, have introduced legislation to prevent and respond to sexual harassment in Congress. The Me Too bill would require more transparency and provide better support for victims and whistleblowers. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Congresswoman Kuster by phone about the bill.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep and Health 36 mins – “What does the song “Satisfaction” by The Rolling Stones have in common with the periodic table of elements? Both are the products of dreams. The sleeping brain is far more active than we realize, argues neuroscientist Matthew Walker in this second part of our series on sleep.” At the link find the title, “Eyes Wide Open: Part 2, “ right-click “Media files 20171113_hiddenbrain eyes wide open part_2 final_mix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South American Revolutions 44 mins – “in 1810 Simón Bolívar brought Francisco de Miranda home.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 5.08-The Patriotic Society Master.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Sudan Problem 19 mins – “In South Sudan, there is a kind of money that works even through bank failures and unstable governments. But when war struck, it upended a whole economy: the economy of cows.” At the link find the title, “#805: War And Peace And Cows, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171115_pmoney_pmpod805v3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stigmatized Groups 52 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Center for the Study of Europe in the Pardee School of Global Studies, and is titled “Addressing the Recognition Gap: Destigmatization Strategies and the Production of Inequality.” Our speaker is Michèle Lamont, Robert I. Goldman Professor of European Studies, and Professor of Sociology and of African and African American Studies at Harvard University.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suffragettes Movement 39 mins – “In November 1917, guards at the Occoquan Workhouse assaulted and terrorized 33 women from the National Woman’s Party.” At the link find the title, “Suffragists’ Night of Terror at the Occoquan Workhouse, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-11-08-symhc-suffragettes night of terror.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teaching Impoverished Refugees 29 mins – “2015 National Teacher of the Year, Shanna Peeples, shares how educators can impact students in poverty. She has some powerful stories and an excellent focus. Connect with Shanna on Twitter https://twitter.com/ShannaPeeples or visit her website http://http://www.shannapeeples.com. The Bedley Bros are sponsored by Rockin’ the Standards, edurock music for grades 2 through 6. Learn more by visiting their website http://www.rockinthestandards.com” At the link find the title, “Students in Poverty with 2015 NTOY Shanna Peeples, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-08-12T02_00_00-07_00.mp3” and selec “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teamwork and Leadership 39 mins – “Over my career, twice I found myself part of what I would consider high performance teams. These are teams that achieved far beyond expectations. Once you’ve been a part of a high performance team, you will do everything in your power to find another team just like it. What I struggled with was unlocking why some teams are high performing others were so bad I did everything in my power to get off of them. This begs the question: Is there a formula or set of rules to creating and maintaining high performance teams? Yes – per the authors Linda Adams and Audrey Epstein, of The Loyalist Team: How Trust, Candor and Authenticity Create Great Organizations. In their book, they establish the framework that there are four types of teams. Saboteur: Team members are working actively to sabotage the project and team members. Benign Saboteur: Depending on the the situation and personal goals, team members will throw others under the bus with no commitment to the success of the team and its projects. Situation Loyalist: Team members support the team and its members depending on the situation and personal objectives. Loyalist: Team members are fully committed and have each others back. Compared to saboteur teams, loyalist teams are 2000x more likely to be viewed as highly effective by their stakeholders.” At the link find the title, “Can You Create High Performance Teams? S13 Ep36, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files Can You Create High Performance Teams, S13_Ep36.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tetranitromethane 6 mins – “Brian Clegg introduces a failed rocket fuel oxidiser with a very tricky structure” At the link find the title, “Tetranitromethane: Chemistry in its element, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files Ciie_tetranitromethane.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and Wikileaks 10 mins – “”WikiLeaks is supposed to be this transparency organization that’s about justice. It’s like, ‘What are you doing hopping into bed with these people?'” At the link find the title, “Nov 15 ‘Assange trying to curry favour with Donald Trump’s inner circle,’ suggests journalist on WikiLeaks messages, 2017” right-click “Media files current_20171115_51385.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump’s First Year Analyzed 56 mins – “Longtime political analyst Norm Ornstein joins Katie and Brian to reflect on the upcoming anniversary of Donald Trump’s election. They discuss the “seeds of Trumpism,” the changing Republican Party and the future of American civic life. Plus, Ornstein opens up about his late son’s struggle with mental illness and his push for mental health policy reform.” At the link find the title, “42. E-Day, One Year Later (w/ Norman Ornstein), Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files a325c164-c2b8-4b8f-8840-98ac5afcf34e.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkey and the West 90 mins – “The end of the Cold War heralded a singular moment: NATO and the European Union (EU) expanded into formerly communist Central and Eastern Europe, democracies and liberal market economies emerged across the globe, and humankind seemed destined to embrace an international liberal order spearheaded by the U.S. and its allies. With the rise of the Justice and Development Party (AKP) in 2002, Turkey was thought to be in line with this trend. As a Muslim-majority country pursuing EU membership, closer cooperation with trans-Atlantic partners, and a domestic agenda based on securing individual freedoms and strengthening the rule of law, Turkey was deemed a model partner and economic success story. Today, Turkey projects a different image—rolling back democracy, rule of law, individual freedoms, and the separation of powers. The EU accession process, trans-Atlantic commitments, and shared values are in jeopardy. Yet, this is not an isolated incident—it follows an international trend that has seen the emergence of “strongmen leaders,” whose illiberal actions and rhetoric are punctuated by populism and anti-globalism. The EU and the United States are not exempt from elements of this trend. The global economic crisis, terrorism, and migration are closely interrelated with these tendencies. This state of affairs is starkly different from what was envisioned at the end of the Cold War. So, what happened?  Can this common challenge be addressed?” At the link click “Audio only,” right-click “Download the audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Viagra 6 mins- “Kat Arney takes a long, hard look at the story behind those famous little blue pills” At the link find the title, “Sildenafil: Chemistry in its element, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files Ciie_sildenafil.mp3” and select “save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virginia Political Rally 95 mins – “The Virginia race, the DNC and Brazile-gate, and the possibility of a shutdown for Dreamers. Lt. Governor Ralph Northam, Justin Fairfax, Attorney General Mark Herring, and Symone Sanders join Jon, Jon, Tommy, and Dan on stage live from Richmond, Virginia.” At the link find the title, “”Don’t Hiss. Vote.” (LIVE from Richmond), Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 8ec7727f-0589-4c80-813e-49349155b5a3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

VR History 27 mins – “Dawn of the New Everything by Jaron Lanier is a history and exploration of virtual reality, the term that he coined for the pioneering technology that he was instrumental in creating. The book is a hybrid of memoir and philosophy and gives a compelling account of the origins and development of the digital revolution. Lanier joins Click to discuss his journey through virtual reality. [then] A network of wildlife sanctuaries in New Zealand has led to the reintroduction of nearly twenty native bird species, and now machine learning software could be an important tool in monitoring the survival. [finally] Click’s Simon Morton reports from Victoria University of Wellington. pureLiFi pioneers LiFi technology that aims to revolutionise the future of wireless networks. Roland Pease reports on their latest product and its capability to open up thousands more additional channels for wireless communications than traditional Wi-Fi routers.”At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Walmart Discrimination Problem 60 mins – “Walmart owns popular feminist retailer ModCloth. This Black Friday, we unpack why they might not want consumers to know that.” At the link find the title, “The Women of Walmart (and Modcloth), Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-11-24-smnty-walmart-final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White House Photographer 69 mins – “Kenneth Walsh, Chief White House Correspondent, U.S. News & World Report; Author, Ultimate Insiders: White House Photographers and How They Shape History Joseph Tuman; Professor of Communication Studies, San Francisco State University—Moderator. This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on November 13, 2017.” At the link find the title, “White House Correspondent Kenneth Walsh: An Insider’s Look at the Presidency, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171113_Kenneth Walsh Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Impact 10 mins – “By any measure, the fires that tore through Northern California were a major disaster. Forty-two people are dead, and 100,000 are displaced. More than 8,400 homes and other buildings were destroyed, more than 160,000 acres burned—and the fires aren’t all out yet. That devastation leaves behind another potential disaster: ash. No one knows how much. It’ll be full of heavy metals and toxins—no one knows exactly how much, and it depends on what burned and at what temperature.” At the link find the title, “After the Napa Fires, a Disaster-in-Waiting: Toxic Ash, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files audio-01fa0eeb-cd5c-4f24-9f7b-9b2705af329b-encodings.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Moms P1 60 mins – “Discrimination against mothers in the workplace is illegal but it still happens every day. We launch our four-part series, It’s A Real Mother, with YOUR stories of discrimination. Plus, we meet a mom who faced discrimination from… the entire country. See our video and find out how you can help at itsarealmother.com. And share YOUR stories using #itsarealmother.” At the link find the title, “#141 It’s A Real Mother, Part 1: Governor Mom,” right-click “Media files c44bd88e-55ab-4b0f-b854-68e0c7b2c21a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Moms P2 43 mins – “Why do stock images of working moms look frazzled, while stock images of working dads just look like… guys at work? Author Brigid Schulte gets to the heart of why discrimination against working moms is so deeply embedded in our culture—and what we can do to change it.” At the link find the title, “#142 It’s A Real Mother, Part 2: Ideal Worker,” right-click “Media files b1eb122d-c68a-4b89-b084-28783f4fe57e.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Moms P3 43 mins – “Hillary tells her own story about becoming a working mom, and the career cliff she faced as a result. Then, we travel to a company that’s flipping the ideal American workplace totally upside down… by inviting screaming, pooping infants into the office.” At the link find the title, “#143 It’s A Real Mother, Part 3: The Cliff,” right-click “Media files 41ee9e63-e270-473e-84fb-1a6c080cc8bf.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Workplace Discrimination Against Women 63 mins – “Surprise! Katie offers up a bonus takeover episode from The Longest Shortest Time, another podcast in the Stitcher network. Former Massachusetts Governor Jane Swift describes what it was like to be the first U.S. governor to give birth while in office. Plus, moms today share their own stories of discrimination in the workplace. This episode is the first in a four-part Longest Shortest Time series on working moms.” At the link find the title, “42.5 Longest Shortest Time Takeover: It’s A Real Mother,” right-click “Media files 126cc008-c072-4995-83c9-81b73958c8ed.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII Beginnings 104 mins – “World War II Leadership Victor Hanson, a professor emeritus of Classics at California State University, Fresno, lectured to a history class on masters and commanders during World War II. In this fall seminar in classical and military history Professor Hanson examined how leaders, both civilian officials and generals on the battlefield, conducted themselves in wartime. That day’s class focused on Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill and how those very different American and British leaders learned to work together to defeat Nazi Germany.” At the link you can watch the video and pay for an audio download; however, a copy of the audio file is included in the blog archive.

Yemen War 18 mins – “”We have in Yemen the world’s largest food security crisis.” At the link find the title, “Nov 14 ‘Humanitarian catastrophe’: UN warns Saudi blockade could starve millions in Yemen, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171114_95178.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yukon Hunting Tools 24 mins – “”That whole idea of eliminating First Nations’ history is disappearing with this tactile, tangible way of actually seeing your culture come back out of the ice.” At the link find the title, “Nov 16 How Yukon’s melting ice reveals human artifacts and Indigenous history, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171116_93766.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zimbabwe Conflict 19 mins – “”If you have a man in military uniform taking over the state broadcasting station and reading out a statement at 4 a.m – that’s a coup.” At the link find the title, “Nov 16 ‘It’s a coup’: Zimbabwe journalist on military takeover and President Mugabe’s house arrest, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171116_14663.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zulu Nation 33 mins – “Great Britain’s efforts to control southern Africa eventually led to war with the Zulu Kingdom.” At the link find the title, “The War Between Great Britain and the Zulu Kingdom, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-11-20-symhc-war gb zulu kingdom.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 316 – Dec 1, 2017: 3D Printing Glass, African Female President, AI Trends, Amputee Travis Mills, Atheist Comedian, Authority to Wage War, Bitcoin Primer, Blind Paralympic Athlete, Bolivian Agriculture, Bone Marrow Transplant Story, Brain Problem Drug, Climate Change and Civil Rights, CRISPR Kits, Cyber Security and Police, Deep Listening, Doctor Burnout, Dog Noses, Farming in Alaska, Financial Fitness, Fourth Amendment Discussion, Genocide on Trial, Gun Shows Impact, Guns in Canada, Happiness vs Pleasure, Holocaust Story, Human Augmentation, Indigenous Journalism, Insomnia, ISIS Sex Slaves, Kamikaze Pilots, Mass Shooting and the Media, Muslim Politicians, Nitrogen Production, North Korea and Shipping, Paradise Papers, Paralyzed Vets of America, Polish Solidarity Movement, Populism, Protests in America, Putin vs U.S., Racism History in U.S., Refugee Legal Aid, Sex Assaults on Campus, Sexual Harassment Impact, Smart Phone Tracking, Syrian War Progress, Traumatic Brain injury, Trump Election Dissected, Vaccine War, Wartime Journalism, Whistleblowers Graphic Novel, Wildfire Control, Zero Carbon on Trial

Exercise your ears: the 135 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 519 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 18,500 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 118GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 440 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Print Ecosystems 39 mins – “Today, I’ve got a really interesting conversation to share with you that I had recently with Arden Rosenblatt of PieceMaker.com. This is a company that has really dealt with how to bring 3D printing to mass market retail. They’ve dealt with all of the systems involved in that. It’s really fascinating. I’ve often talked with a lot of different people that are working on different pieces of the puzzle. This is a company that really has had to create an end-to-end solution, dealing with content to how would people interface and interact with it then actually having it printed right there for them at a physical location in a museum gift shop or retail store. They’ve also gone on to do other kinds of solutions, a little more business to business, but it’s really all centered around the same thing. How to help companies, especially big brands, take advantage of the opportunities that additive manufacturing, in particular 3D printing, offers. I hope you really will enjoy it. Let’s go to the interview with Arden and then I’ll talk to you a little bit more on the other side.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

3D Printing Glass 29 mins – “We’re going to take a real journey down a very old and really ancient material that has been used on this earth, manipulated by men for thousands of years and learn how one company is actually harnessing it and has now been able to control it through 3D printing. It’s actually very exciting. The company is MICRON3DP and they’re a company out of Israel. I’m going to have an interview with Eran Gal-or who is one of two partners in this company. Technically, he’s an industrial designer but he’s the CTO. They came up with the seed of this idea many years ago. The company is now been in existence for two years. It’s impressive what they have done.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Female President 19 mins – “Ameenah Gurib-Fakim has been an academic, an entrepreneur and is now the president of Mauritius — the first Muslim female head of state in Africa. In a wide-ranging conversation with journalist Stephanie Busari, Gurib-Fakim discusses the humble beginnings of her political career, what it’s like to be both a person of faith and a scientist and why we need to value traditional African knowledge, among much more. “I don’t think you should take yourself seriously,” she says. “You need to have trust in what you can do, have confidence in yourself and give yourself a set of goals and just work towards them.” At the link find the title, “Ameenah Gurib-Fakim and Stephanie Busari: An interview with Mauritius’s first female president, 2017” right-click “Low” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Trends 52 mins – “This podcast features a recording of Dr. Wesley Fryer’s breakout session at G Camp OKC on November 4, 2017, titled “Teaching and Learning in an AI First World.” Referenced slides are available on http://wfryer.me/aifirst and include all referenced videos, including those mentioned but not shown during the presentation. Please refer to the podcast shownotes for a complete list of referenced articles and videos from the presentation.” At the link find the title, “Podcast 456: Teaching and Learning in an AI First World, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-11-04-speedofcreativity.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Algonquin Story 24 mins – “”Indigenous ways of knowing really embraces subjectivity and experience and personal truth.” At the link find the title, “Nov 9 How author Lynn Gehl reclaimed her Indigenous roots, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171109_36240.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amputee Travis Mills 22 mins – “Some people are strong. Some are tough. Some seem unstoppable. And then there’s Travis Mills of the Travis Mills Foundation, who will redefine all of those words for you. He’ll tell you that he’s like anyone else. He just had a bad day at work. But Mills’s job at the time was Staff Sergeant for the U.S. Army’s 82nd Airborne Division. And that bad day—April 10, 2012—took away both his arms and his legs. Today Mills is a quadruple amputee—one of five U.S. servicemen to lose all of his limbs to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. But ask and he’ll tell you that he doesn’t consider himself a wounded warrior. Why?” At the link find the title, “A Quadruple Amputee Helps Injured Vets Heal, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files Crazy Good Turns – Travis Mills Foundation.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atheism 53 mins – “Tuesday, Doug is live with Uncle Dan and Uncle Mark, hosts of a new podcast called The How-To Heretic. It might surprise you that another atheist podcast Dan co-hosts from right here in Salt Lake City is really popular around the globe. So what do former Mormons have to teach the world about life without God? We’ll talk about their stories, where atheists fit in American society today, and about teaching people skills for a post-religion lifestyle, like avoiding logical fallacies and swearing. Find the podcasts: The How-To Heretic, A Users Guide to Life Beyond Religion, hosted by Uncle Dan and Uncle Mark Thank God I’m Atheist, Conversations about current events through an atheist lens, hosted by Frank and Dan.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atheist Comedian 57 mins – “Today’s guest Ari Shaffir is a stand-up comic and the host of Skeptic Tank – a super popular weekly podcast that’s on its 299th episode (at this writing). Ari grew up orthodox Jewish, spent two years in a yeshiva in Israel, and then turned into an atheist comedian who did an outrageous web video series called “The Amazing Racist” and runs a yearly “Shroomfest” where he’s like a benevolent Dionysus, presiding over a worldwide three-day celebration of psilocybin mushrooms. He co-created and hosts Comedy Central’s storytelling series “this is not happening”. And he’s got a very funny, two part comedy special on Netflix called “Double Negative”. Ari and Jason talk about outrageousness in comedy, bipartisan e-rage on social media, growing up and growing out of bad habits, the transgender bathroom debate, and much, much, much more.” At the link find the title, “111. Ari Shaffir (Comic) – The Golden Age of Trolling,” right-click “Media files PP9971540246.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Science Research 60 mins – “CSIRO CEO Dr Larry Marshall addresses the National Press Club on the topic ‘Building tomorrow’s industries from today’s science’.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Larry Marshall, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files NPCc LarryMarshall, 0811_” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Authority to Wage War 48 mins – “Bruce Ackerman and Chris Fonzone join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to discuss a lawsuit challenging several congressional actions used to authorize United States military actions against ISIS and other terror groups.” At the link find the title, “Is the fight against ISIS legal? Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP8906549885.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battle of Hue Vietnam 36 mins – “’Hue 1968′ Revisits An American ‘Turning Point’ In The War In Vietnam” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biological Threats 52 mins – “Gigi Kwik Gronvall talks to MTM about the importance of biopreparedness. Gronvall discusses her work in creating policies around potential natural, accidental, and man-made pandemics. She describes her experiences running pandemic thought exercises that help researchers, public health workers, and governmental officials apply preparedness ideas to real-world simulations. Host: Julie Wolf- Julie’s biggest takeaways: Thought exercises and scenarios work well for people to understand how technology, communications, human behaviors can affect the spread of infectious disease. Many after-action reports after major biosecurity breaches, such as the Dugway contamination event, where inactivated Bacillus anthracis was accidentally shipped without being inactivated. These involve reports on what went wrong, who made mistakes, and how to prevent repeats of these errors going forward. International groups such as the Global Health Security Alliance work with governments and institutions around the world to run dialogs and talk about biosecurity issues, safety issues, pathogen management issues. Comparing notes across countries helps to harmonize policies and find gaps that need addressing. Bringing scientists into the policy-making meetings is the best way to write regulations in a way to protect the public, the scientists, and the research itself. Crafting good recommendations for governance prevents writing regulations that can be hard to remove.” At the link find the title, “069: Biopreparedness and biosecurity with Gigi Kwik Gronvall, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media Files MTM069.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin Primer 36 mins – “The digital currency’s value has gone from zero to $120 billion in nine years. Digital Gold author Nathaniel Popper says major banks are looking into the possibilities of its decentralized network.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Paralympic Athlete42 mins – “AT&T and Aira Present: Lex Gillette – World Record holder, 4 time World Champion, 4 time medalists, Ted XTalk Speaker, Mentor, and much more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain AI Robots29 mins – Dubai takes to the air, by Ian Woolf, Ben Goertzal talks about his blockchain Artificial Intelligence platform and emotionally expressive robot Sophia….” At the link right-click right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Nuggets 42 mins – “This week we have another exciting and informative interview for you as Mark braves the November cold snap and talks to Alastair Johnson and Seema Khinda Johnson, the dream team behind Nuggets. We talk identity theft, their upcoming token sale and casually exchanging emails with Vitalik Buterin. We also talk about diversity in blockchain tech, fintech startup and challenger banks and how meetups like Women In Blockchain are starting to address the balance.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Protection 33 mins – “After a short break where we’ve all been doing important other stuff (check out Ethan’s announcement near the end!) we’re back with a banging interview from Ethan with Alex Bessonov from BitClave. Alex is the founder of BitClave, an active search ecosystem that protects users’ data with blockchain technology to allow direct customer-to-businesses interactions without the need for middlemen. With their service the days of being monitored and sold by Google or Facebook algorithms are over, putting you in control of who sees your searches and even in a position to get paid. Their ICO fundraiser starts very soon. Read the white paper here.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bolivian Agriculture 47 mins- “Bolivia shares farming similarities with other South American countries.  They have diverse land races and native crops that they wish to preserve. At the same time some wish to take advantage of modern genetic tools.  Cecilia Gonzalez was a skeptic, someone that didn’t trust multinational corporations and certainly didn’t trust their technology.  As time went on she learned more about the technology and now is an outspoken educator in the area of genetic engineering.  Bolivia is at a crossroads.  They have an opportunity to become larger producer, and currently are importing corn and other GE crops from Argentina and other South American countries.  Activists offer fear of harming land races to stop adoption of the technology.  Because of their inability to deregulate GE varieties Bolivia unfortunately cannot compete with other countries, and their farmers suffer the consequences. You can sense Cecilia Gonzalez’s frustration and her love of her country, and the conflict that comes from a desire to implement affordable, sustainable farming to help Bolivians.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bolshevik Revolution in Russia 55 mins – “One hundred years ago, Vladimir Lenin and his Bolshevik Party seized power in a revolution that would change the world. They would establish the world’s first Marxist state, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, a few years later. As the 20th century wore on, the USSR became the United States’s chief military and ideological foe. On this episode of BackStory, Brian, Joanne, and Nathan explore how that distant revolution had an immediate impact in the United States.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bone Marrow Transplant Story 61 mins – “You never know what might happen when you sign up to donate bone marrow. You might save a life… or you might be magically transported across a cultural chasm and find yourself starring in a modern adaptation of the greatest story ever told. One day, without thinking much of it, Jennell Jenney swabbed her cheek and signed up to be a donor.  Across the country, Jim Munroe desperately needed a miracle, a one-in-eight-million connection that would save him. It proved to be a match made in marrow, a bit of magic in the world that hadn’t been there before.  But when Jennell and Jim had a heart-to-heart in his suburban Dallas backyard, they realized they had contradictory ideas about where that magic came from. Today, an allegory for how to walk through the world in a way that lets you be deeply different, but totally together.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Problem Drug 31 mins – “So you think Ambien is a snore? You probably wouldn’t say that if you were the family member of a car accident victim in a multi-year coma who was brought back to wakefulness by this…sleep aid.  It’s counterintuitive, but there are a number of oddball case reports where Zolpidem (better known by its Ambien trademark) has seemingly produced unexpected and beneficial effects from people dealing with neurological disorders ranging from Parkinson’s Disease to long-term vegetative states. When Dr. Nick Bomalaski, a Brain Injury Fellow at the University of Washington, heard enough of these one-off incidents, he took it upon himself to conduct a review of the Zolpidem literature on neurological, arousal and motor functions. Ambien is a well-known sleep aid, with over 40 million annual prescriptions in the US alone. It is not, however, a one-trick pony. Dr. Nick Bomalaski describes his review of numerous odd (and encouraging) examples of Ambien’s effects on various neurological disorders.” ” At the link find the title, “#205 – Ambien Off-Label,” right-click “Media files SDS205.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brick Theft 31 mins – “…By the time Sam Moore became alderman in 2007, brick theft had already been going on for decades. But there hadn’t been much of an effort by the city to stop it. So Moore set out to figure out who was stealing bricks — and how. To start, he did what any detective would: he went on some stakeouts. He followed thieves, watching them steal bricks and then observing as they sold them to brickyards.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the first photo and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Politics 65 mins – “In this IPR ‘in conversation’ event distinguished politician and peer Lord Blunkett discusses the changes that he has observed in Britain’s political landscape during his eventful career, and shares some of the wisdom that has come with his experience. This IPR ‘in conversation’ event took place on 14 September 2017, as part of the symposium Politics, Fake News and the Post-Truth Era” At the link find the title, “Lord Blunkett: In Conversation”, Nov, 2017,” right-click “ Media files 351900863-uniofbath-lord-blunkett-in-conversation.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Ohio 30 mins – “As an increasing number of communities invest in and explore the advantages of publicly owned networks, Christopher finds himself making more trips to cities and towns across the country. In addition to sharing what we discover about all the communities we research, he absorbs what he can from others who also document the way local folks are optimizing connectivity. Sometimes, he’s able to interview people like this week’s guest, Dana McDaniel from Dublin, Ohio. Dana is City Manager of Dublin home of the Global Institute for the Study of the Intelligent Community, part of the Intelligent Community Forum. In addition to discussing the purpose and principals of the Forum and the Institute, Dana describes how the both use data they collect to share knowledge.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from here….” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

California Irrigation 29 mins – “With all the false claims about “fake news” and verifiable lies being proffered as facts by the president and others, it’s quite refreshing to be reminded that there is still some fantastic journalism taking place in this country. This week on Sea Change Radio, host Alex Wise speaks to Desert Sun energy reporter Sammy Roth about his investigative piece on the Imperial Irrigation District (IID). Roth’s work exposed deep conflicts of interest at this district, tucked away in a remote section of southeastern California. We talk about the dramatic impact Roth’s reporting has had at IID, and more generally about how good journalism can be a force for rapid social change.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Salesmanship 76 mins – “We spend a month at a Jeep dealership on Long Island as they try to make their monthly sales goal: 129 cars. If they make it, they’ll get a huge bonus from the manufacturer, possibly as high as $85,000 — enough to put them in the black for the month. If they don’t make it, it’ll be the second month in a row. So they pull out all the stops.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Into Soil 57 mins – “This new book describes how the food you eat can reverse climate change, heal your body, and ultimately, save our world. Throughout this revolutionary book, Tickell teaches how to become an agent in humanity’s single most important and time sensitive mission and how to save the world through the choices you make. He also highlights tangible, real world examples of people and landscapes that are becoming healthier together. KISS THE GROUND, the book, concludes with a point-by-point “how-to” for transforming your grocery list, your kitchen, your diet and ultimately the planet. Tune in as we talk with Josh about this fantastic must-read!” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

City Development 18 mins – “Worldwide, violence is on the decline, but in the crowded cities of the global south — cities like Aleppo, Bamako and Caracas — violence is actually accelerating, fueled by the drug trade, mass unemployment and civil unrest. Security researcher Robert Muggah turns our attention toward these “fragile cities,” super-fast-growing places where infrastructure is weak and government often ineffective. He shows us the four big risks we face, and offers a way to change course.” At the link find the title, “Robert Muggah: The biggest risks facing cities — and some solutions, Nov 2017,” right-click “Low” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change and Civil Rights 56 mins – “While solar panels and electric cars are typically associated with upper-class white people, the transition to clean energy is also a civil rights issue. Communities of color often live closest to factories and refineries that spew toxic pollution. That’s one reason why polls show more African-Americans and Latinos, compared to non-Hispanic whites, say climate change is a serious concern. Rev. Gerald Durley works with preachers and activists across the country advocating for a cleaner and more inclusive economy. Join us for a conversation about the climate and civil rights movements.” At the link find the title, “Oppressive Heat: Climate Change and Civil Rights, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171112_cl1_OppressiveHeat.mp3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Resistance in U.S. 30 mins – “It’s a year since President Trump was elected. In that time he has appointed a climate sceptic as head of the Environmental Protection Agency, he has insisted that he will bring the coal industry back, and he still has not appointed a science advisor. Roger Harrabin travels to the USA to meet those spearheading the resistance to President Trump’s climate policies. In California he meets Governor Jerry Brown. Jerry is determined that California pushes ahead towards a cleaner future. He visits the world’s largest battery storage plant near San Diego, and travels to the San Gorgonio Pass, the site of one of the world’s largest wind farms. Heading east from California to Ohio, and coal country, Roger meets Bob Murray, head of the Murray Energy Corp. Bob is determined to see coal jobs protected, but even he believes that coal’s heyday has passed, but he remains bullish. Roger also meets form science advisor to President Obama, Dr John Holdren. John thinks that economics should ensure that the USA remains on a path to cleaner energy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Confederate Memorials Issue 26 mins – “Speaking this week on Fox News, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly warned against the removal of Confederate monuments on the grounds that it would erase important history. But the statues in question have never been about preserving a neutral version of history but rather about perpetuating a series of narratives and myths about slavery and the Civil War. Earlier this year we spoke to Malcolm Suber, historian and co-founder of the group Take ‘Em Down NOLA, about the significance of removing monuments to white supremacy. And we spoke to Bryan Stevenson, director of the Equal Justice Initiative, about his work documenting the thousands of lynchings that took place in the South from 1877 to 1950, and the significance of remember and reckoning with the realities of our shameful past.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in Namibia 27 mins – “David Grossman on the trail of Namibia’s missing tax millions revealed in the massive leak of financial data known as the Paradise Papers “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Courtroom Operations 16 mins – “In halls of justice around the world, how can we ensure everyone is treated with dignity and respect? A pioneering judge in New Jersey, Victoria Pratt shares her principles of “procedural justice” — four simple, thoughtful steps that redefined the everyday business of her courtroom in Newark, changing lives along the way. “When the court behaves differently, naturally people respond differently,” Pratt says. “We want people to enter our halls of justice … and know that justice will be served there.” At the link find the title, “Victoria Pratt: How judges can show respect, Nov 2017,” right-click “Low” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cranberries 42 mins – “It’s nearly Thanksgiving, which, for most Americans, marks the one time a year their dinner table is adorned with jewel-like cranberries, simmered into a delicious sauce. But hundreds of years ago, cranberry sauce was a mainstay of daily meals, all around the U.S. How did this acidic, tannic berry, so hard to love in its raw form, become one of the most popular fruits in America, and how did it fall so deeply out of fashion? Meanwhile, as cranberry sauce was relegated to Thanksgiving, cranberry juice became a popular drink—and mixer. But why is the juice so widely believed to combat urinary tract infections, and does science support that claim? Join us this episode for all that, plus a tour of the cranberry bog of the future.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity 46 mins – “Jason Gots: It’s 150,000 years ago. You’re a Homo sapiens, hanging out in a really cozy clearing protected from behind by a cliff wall. It’s a great spot. Temperate, isolated, pretty safe. Lots of good fruits and tubers nearby. Should you just hang out here forever? Well…you could…but something’s nagging at that medial frontal cortex of yours. There’s a hill in the distance. What’s beyond it? Something different, maybe! Something new and shiny! Maybe today you’ll just take a quick look. My guest today is neuroscientist David Eagleman. In The Runaway Species, How Human Creativity Remakes the World, David and his co-author Anthony Brandt explore that ancient tension between mastery and curiosity – the known and the unknown. And how the human imagination exploits it to make new things.” At the link find the title, “122. David Eagleman (neuroscientist) – Your Creative Brain,” right-click “Media files PP9428029163.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CRISPR Kits 55 mins – “Mail order CRISPR, Circadian injuries, Daydream Believers, One thing about science, Quark bomb” At the link find the title, “Mail order CRISPR, Circadian injuries, Daydream Believers, One thing about science, Quark bomb, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files quirksaio 20171111_77396.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security and Police 46 mins – “Technology presents both consumer convenience and risk, creating a conflict between security and privacy as government agencies seek to weaken the protections that consumers want heightened. Cybersecurity expert and advocate of liberal encryption policy, Susan Landau, explores this challenge and the need for maintaining cybersecurity in her new book “Listening in: Cybersecurity in an Insecure Age.” Last week at the Hoover Book Soiree, Benjamin Wittes and  Susan Landau discussed the issues behind encryption, whether law enforcement can manage without signals content, the impact of end-to-end encryption on security, and much more.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Susan Landau Listening In mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dealing with Jerks 51 mins – “Our guest Wednesday has written a book with a slightly off-color title: The A–hole Survival Guide. Robert Sutton is a Professor of Organizational Behavior at Stanford University, and his book is a how-to for dealing with the jerks in your own life. And the problem isn’t just them. Sutton says research shows that if you work with a jerk, there’s a good chance you might become one. Robert Sutton joins Doug live to talk about identifying, outwitting, and disarming the a-holes around you. Robert Sutton is Professor of Management Science and Engineering and Professor of Organizational Behavior (by courtesy) at Stanford University. His 2007 book The No A$$hole Rule [Indie bookstores|Amazon|Audible] was a New York Times bestseller. His new book is The A$$hole Survival Guide” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death Rituals 52 mins – “There are death rituals around the world that might strike you as morbid, disrespectful, or downright gross. In Japan, survivors pick through their loved one’s cremated ashes with chopsticks to find bone fragments. In Tibet, bodies are eaten by vultures. Tuesday, mortician Caitlin Doughty joins us to talk about the rituals she chronicles in a new book. Doughty says these traditions give families time and space to mourn, something she argues is sorely missing in American culture today. Caitlin Doughty is the author of Smoke Gets in Your Eyes and her new book From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep Listening 50 mins – “Chris Gethard describes how Beautiful/Anonymous satisfies his craving for human connection. Plus: therapy with Esther Perel, poetry with Versify, and a podcaster who invites strangers to his home.” At the link find the title, “Chris Gethard and the Art of Deep Listening, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171109_biglisten ep_4 pod_lufs-a187598a-41bf-4420-b4e8-e665b7946fe4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doctor Burnout 27 mins – “Health professionals are hurting like never before. Studies show close to half of Canada’s doctors are burned out and the numbers are going up.” At the link rind the title, “Doctor Burnout, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files whitecoat_20171111_79015.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dogs Noses 31 mins – “Dogs can sniff out people, drugs, bombs, cancer and much more. In her book Being A Dog, Alexandra Horowitz explores the mysteries and mechanics of canine noses. Originally broadcast Oct. 4, 2016.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Donna Brazile 69 mins – “In July 2016, just four months before Donald Trump’s stunning victory, the Democratic Party was in shambles. Its computer systems had been infiltrated by a mysterious and seemingly unstoppable hacker. Leaked emails suggested that ousted former party leader Debbie Wasserman Schultz and several of her top aides had machinated behind the scenes to tip the scales during the primary in favor of Hillary Clinton. Bitter internal rivalries and power struggles had ground Democratic staffers’ work to a near halt, all while Republicans leveled broadside after broadside against “Crooked Hillary” and her progressive agenda. In desperation, the Democrats turned to the only person they could trust to stabilize their flailing operation: veteran political strategist Donna Brazile, who shepherded the Democrats through one of the most turbulent general elections in history. During her time at the helm of the Democratic National Committee, Brazile weathered some of the most difficult challenges of any party leader in American history—from bomb threats called in to Democratic headquarters to cyberattacks suspected to be orchestrated by Russian intelligence to a brutal personal Twitter feud with Donald Trump. Now, Brazile is speaking out about her time as the leader of the Democratic Party. Join her for an unfiltered conversation about the 2016 election and the chaotic battlefield of American politics.” At the link find the title, “Donna Brazile: The Hacking of an American Election, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171109_Donna Brazile Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone with Tilt Rotors 151 mins – “Quantum Systems designs, builds and sells unmanned air vehicles for professional use. Their particular specialty is VTOL designs, i.e., UAVs that take off and land vertically, but then switch to airplane mode for airplane-like speed and range. In this episode we chat with Quantum’s CEO Florian Seibel about their primary drone, the Tron. We focus on the motivation for developing the aircraft, the use cases, as well as design decisions and technical aspects. An inflight video. Another one in 360 degrees. The main product page also contains nice videos. Finally, the Lynx landing on a ship video.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 File Directly” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eating Disorders 59 mins – “What could be more natural than eating when you are hungry and stopping when you are full? That simple approach is far from easy for many people. Hunger and eating get disconnected in eating disorders. How can these complex problems be recognized and treated? Many people think of anorexia nervosa as the classic eating disorder. But while anorexia is potentially deadly, it is the least common. The most common eating disorder? Binge eating, in which the person feels out of control. Tendencies towards these problems can set in surprisingly early, affecting young children as well as teens. Growing older does not confer immunity to eating disorders. Middle-aged people and even geriatric patients may develop difficulties matching what they eat to what their bodies need. Such eating problems have both metabolic and psychiatric dimensions.” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eileen Fisher Fashions Founder 49 mins – “In 1983, Eileen Fisher signed up for a fashion trade show with no experience, no garments, no patterns or sketches – nothing but a few ideas for a women’s clothing line focused on simplicity. Within three weeks, she came up with 12 pieces, a logo, and a name: Eileen Fisher. Today, the Eileen Fisher brand is still known for its elegant and minimalist designs, but it has grown to more than 60 locations and makes over $300 million in annual revenue. PLUS for our postscript “How You Built That,” how Louisiana butcher Charlie Munford is helping popularize wild boar meat.” At the link find the title, “Eileen Fisher: Eileen Fisher, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171103_hibt_eileen.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elizabeth Smart Abduction 51 mins – “15 years ago Elizabeth Smart was kidnapped by religious fanatic Brian David Mitchell, and a new film tells the story of her months in captivity. Friday, we’re rebroadcasting our conversation with Smart about the ordeal and faith, family, and survival. Elizabeth Smart is the founder of The Elizabeth Smart Foundation, a non-profit focused on preventing abductions and educating children and families. Her memoir is called My Story.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook and Russia 30 mins – “ProPublica reporter Julia Angwin talks about how Russia used Facebook to send political ads to influence Americans during the 2016 election. Axios’ David McCabe then joins us to talk about congressional hearings on Russia’s use of the ads.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Julia Angwin, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.489244.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in Alaska 91 mins – “Marja Smets and Bo Varsano raise an intensive three-quarters of an acre of vegetables at Farragut Farm, located across a lot of water from Petersburg, Alaska. Selling vegetables for eight years in what may be the most remote and difficult-to-access vegetable farm in the country, Marja and Bo make a living moving their vegetables to market on a boat when the tide is high. We dig into the details of farm management when local amendments are the only real option, and when you get 120 inches of rain a year because you farm in a temperate rainforest. Bo and Marja provide details of the mobile high tunnel system in their high-wind environment, dealing with Alaskan wildlife, and farming off of the electrical grid. Marja and Bo also share how they maximize produce sales with visits to town on an irregular schedule, and how they are working to address food insecurity in Petersburg.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Life 34 mins – “If there’s one thing Jagpaul Badhesha learned as a farmer, it’s that you don’t take money for granted. While Jag wouldn’t trade his family’s 1,000-acre operation – or the personal satisfaction of a hard day’s work – for the world, it comes with incredible amount of responsibility and massive financial pressure.” At the link find the title, “The Farmer’s Almanac: Jagpaul Badhesha, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY5353090711.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Reserve Run by Teens – “Once a year, teenagers from across the country team up and compete to run the U.S. Federal Reserve.” At the link find the title, “#369: If Teens Ran the Fed, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171103 pmoney pmpod369rerunvfinal_1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Basics 53 mins – “This piece was produced for my 2012 “Financial Fitness After 50” PBS contributors premium package. Investors are challenged by what forces are controllable and what forces are out of their control. At a minimum investors should make sure they take advantage of the forces that are under their control. In this video Paul discusses 10 guarantees every investor should know.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Fitness 55 mins – “Of course there is no such thing as a perfect investment, but what would it look like if all your investment wishes could come true? This podcast is from a series, “Financial Fitness After 50,” that Paul recorded for Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) in 2011 as a premium for those who donated to their local stations during that pledge period. An updated 2016 video “Financial Fitness Forever” is available free at his website, and the book by the same name is available by clicking here.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fourth Amendment Discussion 69 mins – “As the debate about out-of-control policing continues, come hear a provocative discussion about threats to constitutional rights involving the use of force and surveillance by law enforcement agencies and how those threats can be kept in check. Panelist Barry Friedman, a noted authority on constitutional law, argues that the problem is not so much the policing agencies as it is the rest of us. He says we allow these agencies to operate in secret and to decide how to police us, and that it’s time for citizens to take responsibility for governing those who govern us. San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón established a blue-ribbon panel on transparency, accountability and fairness in law enforcement as an advisory body in 2015. What should be the parameters of policing? Bring your questions.” At the link find the title, “Policing in America: Force, Surveillance and the Future, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171106_Policing in America Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fraternity Hazing 46 mins – “Florida State comes down hard after a fraternity death. We’ll look at the ongoing problems with Greek life.” At the link find the title, “Fraternity Pledge’s Death At FSU Prompts Crackdown, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_563117801.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Speech 36 mins – “Should you be able to say and do whatever you want online? And if not, who should police this? More Perfect hosts a debate at WNYC’s Jerome L. Greene Performance Space about online hate speech, fake news, and whether the First Amendment needs an update for the digital age.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Genealogical Trees 53 mins – “You’ve probably got that one family member who just drives you crazy. Maybe it’s their politics or their constant talk about their cat’s eating habits, but you put up with it because their family, right? Well, experimental journalist A.J. Jacobs wants you to think more broadly, because the way he sees it, we’re all cousins. His latest book is a dive into genealogy and the new ways we’re understanding the human family. He’s coming to Utah, and joins us to talk about the world’s family tree.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genocide on Trial P1 64 mins – “A call to action for our times, Payam Akhavan’s 2017 CBC Massey Lectures is a powerful survey of some of the major human rights struggles of our times. Lecture 2, “In Pursuit of Global Justice”, was recorded in front of an audience in Vancouver, British” At the link find the title, “Lecture 2: “In Search of a Better World” by Payam Akhavan (2017 CBC Massey Lectures),” right-click “Media files ideas_20171107_89515.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genocide on Trial P2 64 mins – “A call to action for our times, Payam Akhavan’s 2017 CBC Massey Lectures is a powerful survey of some of the major human rights struggles of our times. Lecture 3, “The Will to Intervene”, was recorded in front of an audience in Montreal, Quebec.” At the link find the title, “Lecture 3: “In Search of a Better World” by Payam Akhavan (2017 CBC Massey Lectures),” right-click “Media files ideas_20171108_18226.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genocide on Trial P3 68 mins – “A call to action for our times, Payam Akhavan’s 2017 CBC Massey Lectures is a powerful survey of some of the major human rights struggles of our times. Lecture 4, “The Oneness of Humankind”, was recorded in front of an audience in St. John’s, Nfld.” At the link find the tile, “Lecture 4: “In Search of a Better World” (The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures),” right-click “Media files ideas_20171109_63257.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genocide on Trial P4 68 mins- “A call to action for our times, Payam Akhavan’s 2017 CBC Massey Lectures is a powerful survey of some of the major human rights struggles of our times. Lecture 5, “The Spirit of Human Rights”, was recorded in front of an audience in Toronto.” At the link find the title, “Lecture 5: “In Search of a Better World” by Payam Akhavan (The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures),” right-click “Media files ideas_20171110_84152.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Shows Impact 17 mins – “Highlights of new articles published in Annals of Internal Medicine.” At the link right-click “Issue Summary November 7, 2017,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guns in America 28 mins – “This week we look at the history of guns in America with Author William Doyle. He’s the written a number of books including, “American Gun: A History of the U.S. in Ten Firearms,” which he co-wrote with the late Chris Kyle of “American Sniper” “ At the link find the title, “Episode 35: William Doyle on the History of Guns in the U.S., Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files SBDOY1110.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guns in Canada 21 mins – “Canada would actually rank fourth in terms of gun homicide rates compared to Europe, according to Iain Overton.” At the link find the title, “Nov 8 Canada has a gun problem, says firearms author, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171108_97569.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Happiness vs Pleasure 84 mins – “What is the difference between pleasure and happiness? These two positive emotions are often confused with each other, yet they couldn’t be more different. Lustig says that pleasure is short-lived, visceral, usually experienced alone, achievable with substances. Happiness, by contrast, is often the opposite—long-lived, ethereal, often experienced in social groups and cannot be achieved through substances. Pleasure is taking, while happiness is giving. Pleasure relies on dopamine, while happiness relies on serotonin. These too emotions involve two different neurotransmitters, regulatory systems and pathways in the brain. But why should we care? Dopamine downregulates its own receptor: You get a hit, a rush—and then the receptors go down. Next time, you need more and more. Anything that generates pleasure can lead to addiction. Conversely, serotonin does not downregulate its own receptor, so you cannot overdose on too much happiness. There is one thing that does downregulate serotonin though: dopamine. The more pleasure we seek, the less happy we become. In the last 45 years—in order to sell us their junk—Wall Street, Madison Avenue, Las Vegas and Silicon Valley have conflated pleasure with happiness so that we don’t know the difference anymore. Congress and the Supreme Court have codified corporate behavior, leaving us addicted and depressed. In the process, society has become fat, sick, stupid and broke. The only way to reverse this is by understanding the science of these two ostensibly “positive” emotions—how they interact and how to modulate them. Otherwise, those who abdicate happiness for pleasure will end up with neither.” At the link find the title, “The Hacking of the American Mind, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171109_The Hacking of the American Mind Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hedge Funds 45 mins – “Sheelah Kolhatkar is a staff writer at the New Yorker and a former “risk arbitrage analyst” for two hedge funds in New York City. For the New Yorker, Sheelah writes about Wall Street, Silicon Valley, economics and national politics, among other things. Her latest book is the New York Times bestseller Black Edge, about the largest insider trading investigation in history and the transformation of Wall Street and the U.S. economy. This week’s episode is a departure for us – a deep dive into the personalities, culture, and ideas driving the big banks and the hedge funds of Wall Street. Jason and Sheelah talk about what it was like for her as a woman in that male-dominated industry, how hedge funds have reshaped the whole Wall Street landscape and with it, the global economy, and why billionaire investors are almost required to collect Picassos.” At the link find the title, “109. Sheelah Kolhatkar (Writer, Former Hedge Fund Analyst) – The Most Dangerous Game,” right-click “Media files PP2757439156.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

History of the World 72 mins – “Today’s guest Peter Frankopan is a historian at Oxford University, where he is Director of the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research. He works on the history of the Mediterranean, Russia, the Middle East, Persia, Central Asia and beyond, and on relations between Christianity and Islam. Peter’s new book The Silk Roads: A New History of the World, is an international bestseller, described by William Dalrymple as a ‘historical epic of dazzling range, ambition and achievement’. At an anxious moment in Western history, Frankopan encourages us to take a historical perspective, understanding how change happens in societies and how people typically react to it. This conversation unpacks the fascinating and dense history of the Silk Road countries and digs deep into the economic and social forces that shape our lives.” At the link right the title, “110. Peter Frankopan (historian) – You Can’t Stop the Clock,” right-click “Media files PP4346682845.mp3” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Holocaust Story 29 mins – “”My new discovery reveals very likely why Miriam survived,” says historian Max Wallace, who met Holocaust survivor Miriam Ziegler while promoting his new book In The Name of Humanity.” At the link find the title, “Nov 10 ‘That’s me on the picture’: How a book cover brought a Holocaust historian and Auschwitz survivor together,” right-click “Media files current 20171110_38060.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Augmentation 57 mins – “Exoskeleton suits, brain implants, tiny people, AI, and more! Adam Savage and Neil deGrasse Tyson investigate human augmentation from the main stage at NYCC 2017 with comic co-host Chuck Nice and NYU bioethics professor and philosopher Matthew Liao.” At the link right-click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Rights 24 mins – “”What is my freedom in Canada worth if it is wasted on mediocrity?” At the link find the title, “Nov 7 How the death of an Iranian girl pushed former UN prosecutor Payam Akhavan to fight for human rights, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171107_90097.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous Journalism 12 mins – “When Covering Indian Country Becomes Headline News In early September, Indian Country Today Media Network called it quits — a startling revelation to all who either patronized the website and magazine or were contributing writers. That’s because ICTMN told no one that they were having financial problems, forcing their sudden “hiatus”. Since then, there has been a steady dialogue that has emerged in the absence of ICTMN, a publication that many agree was imperfect, but also, was better than what currently exists in the media ecosphere: a mostly aggregated climate of news content generated from outside journalists explaining the Indigenous narrative. In this special relaunch of Still Here, we’re taking a look at the State of Indigenous Journalism. It’s in trouble.” At the link find the title, “Journalism and the Indigenous Narrative, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files RELAUNCH.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Insomnia 26 mins – “Randy Gardner broke a world record in 1963, when he was only 17 years old. His feat? Going 11 days without sleeping. Randy, now 71, shares his wisdom about staying up past your bedtime — and why none of us should attempt to recreate his teenage stunt — on this week’s Hidden Brain.” At the link find the title, “Eyes Wide Open: Part 1, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171106 hiddenbrain eyes wide open part_1 final mix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Risks 38 mins – “Risk is not limited to the pain of a big bear market. Sometime a risk can be a mistake of omission rather than commission. Join Paul [Merriman] to learn about 15 real investment risks that need to be managed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iowa and Trump 48 mins – “Tom is in Ames, Iowa, last stop on the show’s year-long national listening tour, talking with Iowans about the country’s way ahead.” At the link find the title, “On Point Listens From Iowa: The Way Ahead For America, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_563342056.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Sex Slaves 24 mins – “Meet a woman who helps Yazidi women and girls captured by ISIS fighters find a way back into their communities.” At the link find the title, “Nov 8 Life after ISIS: ‘It is very difficult for these women and children to be accepted’ 2017” right-click “Media files current 20171108_10996.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jane Goodall 15 mins – “Staff writer Kaleigh Rogers sits down with renowned anthropologist and conservationist Dr. Jane Goodall and director Brett Morgen ahead of the release of “Jane,” a new documentary about her life and work.” At the link find the title, “Jane Goodall on chimps, feminism and Donald Trump, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kamikaze Pilots 28 mins – “Mariko Oi meets two of the very last surviving men to have been trained to fly their airplanes straight into enemy ships, ensuring certain death. Ninety-one-year-old Keiichi Kuwahara says “I kept looking back, thinking that it was the last time I would see the land. And as I was doing so, the sun came out and made the horizon shine light pink. And I thought that I have to go in order to defend this beautiful land. That was what I told myself.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kidnap Conspiracy 65 mins – “The Wall Street Journal this morning broke a major story: Special Counsel Robert Mueller is investigating President Trump’s former national security advisor, Gen. Michael Flynn, for allegedly plotting with Turkish officials to arrange the extrajudicial removal of Fethullah Gulen from the United States in exchange for a boatload of money. We put together an emergency podcast with Shane Harris, one of the reporters on the story, Ryan Evans of War on the Rocks, and Lawfare’s Benjamin Wittes, Susan Hennessey, Paul Rosenzweig, and Steve Vladeck to cover all the angles. What does it mean? And where does it go from here? Warning: the audio quality is a little rough in spots, recorded conference calls being what they are.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Emergency Podcast 11_10_17 mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Library Politics 17mins – “Election Day this past Tuesday saw Democrats and Republicans on ballots across the country. Along with all the politicians, libraries were on the ballots, too. For the most part, they came out winners, reports Andrew Albanese, Publishers Weekly senior writer. “John Chrastka at EveryLibrary, the library lobbying organization, identified and tracked 37 library measures in 16 states. It appears that 27 ballot measures passed, only three lost, and results for the other six are still being tallied,” Albanese says. “Among the big winners was a statewide New Jersey Library Construction Bond – a $125 million authorization for state matching funds for local construction projects. John Chrastka also reports that Denver, Dallas, and Houston passed major citywide building bonds that will help move multiple facilities into the next generation,” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Longevity 66 mins – “In our fast-paced world, how do we live longer, healthier lives? New York Times best-selling author Dan Buettner seems to have discovered the secret. He believes we must embrace the lifestyles of those in “blue zones,” geographic areas where people live the longest. In his new book, The Blue Zones of Happiness: Lessons From the World’s Happiest People, Buettner reveals the surprising secrets of the world’s happiest places—and gives us the tools to achieve true happiness and longevity in our lives. Buettner is a National Geographic fellow and New York Times best-selling author. His visit will offer practical steps to improve our happiness and change our lives for the better.” At the link find the title, “Dan Buettner: Secrets of the Happiest Places on Earth, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171108_Dan Buettner Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lumbering in New Hampshire 8 mins – “President Donald Trump was elected last year with a promise to put America first: to renegotiate or possibly scrap trade deals he argues aren’t benefiting the United States. In northern New Hampshire, where the state bumps against the Canadian border, those policies are now playing out in the lumber industry, leaving loggers and sawmills on both sides of the border adjusting to a new economic landscape.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Shooting and the Media 21 mins – “We would see a one-third decrease in mass shootings if the media agreed to adopt the ‘Don’t name them, don’t show them’ type of campaign.” At the link find the title, “Nov 7 Focus on lives lost, not the killer, say critics on mass shooting news coverage” right-click “Media files current_20171107_25957.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Materials Science 29 mins – “Javier Read de Alaniz is an Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Associate Director of the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) at the University of California Santa Barbara. Dr. Alaniz is interested in a wide range of fundamental and applied chemistry that extends from the development of new synthetic transformations to the creation of a novel class of organic photochromic material. His particular interest, however, is in harnessing the synthetic utility of highly reactive intermediates for development of new bond-forming reactions used in synthesis and material science.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Micro Fiction 49 mins – “Today on Team Human, we share a conversation with author, musician, humorist, and culture hacker Hugh Gallagher. Gallagher began his professional writing career thanks in part to a college entrance essay that went viral in the 90s, earning the distinction of being an early, if not the first, internet comedy meme. With lines like, “I am a dynamic figure, often seen scaling walls and crushing ice… I can pilot bicycles up severe inclines with unflagging speed, and I cook Thirty-Minute Brownies in twenty minutes…” Gallagher broke the mold, winning a national writing award, a beer with John Kennedy Jr., and a gig writing for Rolling Stone. Douglas and Gallagher look back on Gen X culture hacking, discuss the professional career landscape for creatives, and talk about the inspiration behind Hugh’s latest novel Lifted, a work of digital fiction available via Radish Fiction. It’s a freewheeling Team Human conversation that embraces stepping out of binaries and defaults, and embracing the fringes.” At the link find the title, “Ep. 62 Hugh Gallagher “An Outsider’s Approach”, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 5a02e69eab5fafe41b610d9d.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mississippi Cold Case Murder 9 mins – “David Ridgen delves back into his investigation of the Mississippi cold case in season 3 of Someone Knows Something. He says the issues raised surrounding white supremacy and the American justice system makes this case very relevant today.” At the link find the title, “Nov 7 David Ridgen revisits Mississippi cold case in SKS Season 3,” right-click “Media files current_20171107_89157.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mormon Wealth 63 mins – “The LDS Church may have been founded by an uneducated, 19th century tenant farmer, but historian D. Michael Quinn estimates its 2010 tithing income at $33 billion dollars. And that’s to say nothing of the Church’s investments, business holdings, and “seemingly endless capital.” To understand the Church’s economic history, Quinn says you have to understand God as the ultimate CEO of the Church and its business on earth. He joins us to talk about his new book on Mormon “Wealth and Corporate Power.” D. Michael Quinn is an independent historian and the author of The Mormon Hierarchy series. His new book Wealth and Corporate Power is the third and final installment.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Online History 56 mins – “When a group of college kids in Florida set out to change the music industry, they did not anticipate how disruptive they would be. Their mission was a noble one: bring an end to online piracy by offering cheap, convenient, and legal access to music. Their execution, however, was less than thorough. And when you’re dealing with protective music labels, forgetting to dot an “i” or cross a “t” can mean being one lawsuit away from the swift and unceremonious collapse of your company. This is the story of Grooveshark, the people who built it, and the relationships that were tested during its rocky road to growth—and its eventual demise.” At the link find the title, “Dear Music Fans… (Season 3, Episode 4), Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT8184996869.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muslim Politicians 30 mins – “It’s election season in America and Muslims all around the country are turning up to run for public office, from big (Michigan governor) to small (local city council). But even though the candidates are running on local issues like housing rights and minimum wage, the national conversation about Muslims, national security, and terrorism have trickled down into their campaigns. We talk to BuzzFeed News’ own Talal Ansari about his reporting on these candidates with Hannah Allam. We also call up Abdul El-Sayed, who’s running for governor of Michigan, and Zainab Baloch, who recently ran for Raleigh City Council.” At the link find the title, “Episode 41: Running, Not Hiding,” right-click “Media files PPY5961166868.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Native Americans of 1800’s 76 mins – “Middle Tennessee State University professor Ashley Riley Sousa teaches a class on Native Americans and capitalism in early 19th century California.” At the link find the title, “California Native Americans and Early 1800s Capitalism, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.474270.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nitrogen Production 7 mins – “November 08, 2017 – A little more than a hundred years ago, the world’s fast-growing population was outstripping humanity’s ability to feed itself. Mass starvation was only averted when a pair of brilliant German scientists developed a new chemical process to snatch nitrogen gas from the air and use it to make modern fertilizers. As science writer Thomas Hager explains in this episode of Science Elements, it’s a story of wars, greed, bird droppings and a discovery that continues to dramatically shape our lives today.” At the link find the title, “Stop and Smell the Guano: How Fertilizers Saved the World – Episode 837,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements Nov8_2017.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea and Shipping 18 mins – “”The Kims are quite content to be a hermit kingdom, to be isolated from the popular world and still have their shadowy networks of commerce and trade.” At the link find the title, “Nov 7 North Korea circumvents sanctions through maritime trade, says professor,” right-click “Media files current_20171107_31338.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Diamond Batteries and the Internet 28 mins – “Nuclear diamond batteries by Ian Woolf, Ben Eggleton explains the science behind the internet.” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oliver Sacks Journey 36 mins – “There’s nothing quite like the sound of someone thinking out loud, struggling to find words and ideas to match what’s in their head. Today, we are allowed to dip into the unfiltered thoughts of Oliver Sacks, one of our heroes, in the last months of his life. Oliver died in 2015, but before he passed he and his partner Bill Hayes, in an effort to preserve some of Oliver’s thoughts on his work and his life, bought a little tape recorder. Over a year and half after Oliver’s death, Bill dug up the recorder and turned it on. Through snippets of conversation with Bill, and in moments Oliver recorded whispering to himself as he wrote, we get a peek inside the head, and the life, of one of the greatest science essayists of all time. The passages read in this piece all come from Oliver’s recently released, posthumous book, The River of Consciousness. Special thanks to Billy Hayes for letting us use Oliver’s tapes, you can check out his work at http://www.billhayes.com/” At the link right-click “Download’ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opiate Supplies 50 mins – “On Reveal, we share how the government failed to stop the flow of millions and millions of pills that fuelled the national painkiller epidemic. A Washington Post/60 Minutes partnership with Reveal tells the story of a DEA insider who tried to stop drug distribution companies from flooding America with truckloads of pain pills. His effort was met with backlash from his own agency, the pharmaceutical industry and Congress.” At the link find the title, “Too Many Pills, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 342-Reveal_FullMix_PODCAST_A_WAPO-18-128.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Case Study 27 mins – “The story of Kirk Foat, who shocked his doctors by coming up with his own successful plan to wean himself off prescription opiods. And a Toronto doctor who has become an expert in “de-prescribing’ patients like Kirk, who want off opioids.” At the link find the title, “Getting to Zero, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files whitecoat_20171103_27894.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Problem 50 mins – “As the opioid crisis in America rages, the government struggles to react. A look at how a 2016 bill weakened the Drug Enforcement Agency and why nobody noticed. Also, how painkillers took off in America, thanks to industry-sponsored junk science; the power of addict death notices to spread understanding about the depths of the crisis; and inside a new report exposing the exploitation faced by many senior citizens. ” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Orwell and Big Brother 27mins – “”If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.” The words of George Orwell, writer, journalist, critic and for a few years, a BBC producer. On the 7th November at Broadcasting House in London, the BBC erected a statue to the author of ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’, with the words “Liberty” engraved on it. Orwell wrote of webcams, mass surveillance and the death of privacy in his dystopian classic, many of his ideas resonate to this day. So why is his work still relevant and what can it teach us about our relationship with our privacy and technology? The Future of Surveillance – Nearly seventy years ago, Orwell gave us his satire of a possible post-privacy surveillance future. Well now we are in that future – well some kind of version of it, what next? What of surveillance in the years and decades ahead? And how about the idea that if we have nothing to hide then we have nothing to fear. Some say that is lackadaisical at best, downright dangerous at worst. LAPD – Right at the beginning of Nineteen Eighty-Four, our protagonist Winston is in his flat, pen poised, about to write in his diary. When, in the distance, he notices a helicopter hovering “like a bluebottle”, it was a police patrol “snooping into people’s windows”. Was Orwell anticipating police surveillance drones? Well in Los Angeles, California the LAPD has just approved a one-year pilot programme to evaluate drones in law enforcement.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panhandling 52 mins – “What do you do when a panhandler approaches you? Do you give money? Do you give food? Maybe you don’t give the person anything. Maybe you donate to a homeless services organization, or volunteer at the soup kitchen instead. But what should you do? That’s what we’re asking on Monday’s show. Our guests work closely with Utah’s homeless population, and they all agree, there are no easy answers when it comes to the ethical questions around panhandling.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paradise Papers 24 mins – “The Paradise Papers keep delivering. A trove of leaked documents on the world’s elite. The commerce secretary. Apple. More. We’ll dive in.” At the link find the title, “Paradise Papers Roil The World’s Elite, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_562858592.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paradise Papers 46 mins – “The Queen, Trudeau’s chief fundraiser and Trump’s commerce secretary among the names revealed in documents.” At the link find the title, “Nov 6 Paradise Papers: Massive leak of secret documents reveals global elite’s hidden wealth,” right-click “Media files current_20171106_93024.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paralyzed Vets of America 60 mins – “Sherman Gillums, executive director of Paralyzed Veterans of America and a retired U.S. Marine Corps officer, talks about his own paralysis and the work his organization does to help veterans.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Sherman Gillums, “ right-click “Media files program.489242.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Polish Solidarity Movement 49 mins – “Five Solidarity members reflect on the movement that ended communist rule in Poland” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Populism 43 mins – “Political polarization, inequality, and corruption during the period 146 to 78 BC gravely weakened the Roman Republic in the years before its collapse. In his new book “The Storm Before the Storm: The Beginning of the End of the Late Republic,” podcaster Mike Duncan explores this period and how Rome’s politics, which emerged from Rome’s success, subsequently led to the republic’s downfall. Benjamin Wittes interviewed Duncan on his new book to discuss ancient and modern populisms, the parallels between the late Roman Republic and current American politics, and the impact of demagoguery on government.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Mike Duncan mixdown final.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protests in America 24 mins – “”Activists are transitioning from street protests to trying to figure out some sort of electoral solution.” At the link find the title, “Nov 8 ‘Street protest is broken’: What’s become of large-scale demonstrations against Trump? 2017” right-click “Media files current_20171108_20125.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Putin vs U.S. P1 58 mins – “The inside story of how Vladimir Putin came to see America as an enemy.” At the link find the title, “Putin’s Revenge: Part 2, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 351941210-frontlinepbs-putins-revenge-part-2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Putin vs U.S. P2 58 mins – “The inside story of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s conflict with the United States.” At the link find the title, “Putin’s Revenge: Part 1, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 351940106-frontlinepbs-putins-revenge-part-1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism History in U.S. 53 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University African American Studies Program, and is titled “The Dark Races of the Pacific World: Reading Race, Immigration, and Empire in Pauline Hopkins and the Colored American Magazine.”  Our speaker is Edlie Wong, Professor of English at the University of Maryland.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Legal Aid 52 mins – “Becca Heller likes to say that she leads an army. But her soldiers don’t battle with guns. They’re lawyers and law students. They use the law to protect the legal and human rights of refugees seeking shelter and assistance, and their work has never been easy. It only got more difficult with the election of Donald Trump and his efforts to enact a travel ban. Heller is in Utah this week, and she joins us Thursday to talk about America’s immigration policies and the challenges of refugee resettlement. Becca Heller is the director and co-founder of the International Refugee Assistance Project and a visiting clinical lecturer at Yale Law School.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rorschach Ink Blots 52 mins – “No idea from psychology has saturated popular culture as thoroughly as Hermann Rorschach’s inkblots. Rorschach designed the ten amorphous, symmetrical inkblots as a means to probe the human mind. He believed that what you see is who you are. He died less than a year after publishing his test, and the inkblots became a kind of sorcerer’s apprentice, influencing the world without his guidance. In a new biography, writer Damion Searls chronicles Rorschach’s life and the influence of his iconic creation.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Propaganda 14 mins – “Russian spy tactics have gotten an upgrade since the Cold War. This week how they work now: bad actors, active measures, advanced persistent threats. Cyberwar has its own vocabulary. So we got ourselves a tutor. Join Manoush and information warfare expert Molly McKew, who puts the fun in fundamental assault on democracy.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Russian Totalitarianism 52 mins – “Thursday, we’re talking about what happened to Russia. The fall of the USSR was followed by a period of liberalization, and the country appeared to be on the path towards democracy. Then Vladimir Putin rose to power. He invaded neighboring countries. He led a crackdown on political opposition. He’s waging war on the concept of Western democracy. But where has his regime left Russia and its people? Journalist Masha Gessen joins us Tuesday to share what she’s learned about how totalitarianism reclaimed Russia. Masha Gessen is a staff writer at The New Yorker. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, The New York Review of Books, Vanity Fair, among many other publications. She’s the author of several books. Her newest is called The Future is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Assaults on Campus 53 mins – “Wednesday, we’re talking to journalist Vanessa Grigoriadis, whose controversial new book looks at sex and sexual violence on college campuses. Grigoriadis interviewed more than 100 students, as well as parents and college administrators, to try to understand how sex, power, and consent work on campus these days. The answer is really complicated with good and terrible sides to the story. There’s also a lot of what she calls the mushy middle. Her book is called Blurred Lines.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment 16 mins – “Former Fox News host Gretchen Carlson discusses sexual harassment in the workplace. She is interviewed by Sally Quinn.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Gretchen Carlson, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.488417.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment 54 mins- “Since the news about Harvey Weinstein’s sexual predations, allegations have surfaced against other powerful men. We look back at the early days in the fight against sexual harassment with the woman who coined the term. Plus: journalist Matt Taibbi examines the life, death and legacy of Eric Garner; and the release of new JFK files brings the mother of all conspiracy theories back into the spotlight. 1. Lin Farley, author of The Sexual Shakedown: The Sexual Harassment of Women On the Job, talks about the term she coined in the mid-70s: ‘sexual harassment’. 2. Matt Taibbi [@mtaibbi], journalist and author of I Can’t Breathe: A Killing on Bay Street, discusses his exploration of Eric Garner’s life and death in the media. 3. Ron Rosenbaum [@RonRosenbaum1] talks about his long-time interest in the JFK assassination and how the conspiracy theories changed “the landscape of the American mind.” 4. Sara Fishko [@FishkoFiles] reports on how TV anchors used the new medium to cover the JFK assassination, the president’s funeral, and the attack on Lee Harvey Oswald in real time.” At the link find the title, “Chokehold, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files otm171027pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment 15 mins – “When Gretchen Carlson spoke out about her experience of workplace sexual harassment, it inspired women everywhere to take their power back and tell the world what happened to them. In a remarkable, fierce talk, she tells her story — and identifies three specific things we can all do to create safer places to work. “We will no longer be underestimated, intimidated or set back,” Carlson says. “We will stand up and speak up and have our voices heard. We will be the women we were meant to be.” At the link find the title, “Gretchen Carlson: How we can end sexual harassment at work, 2017,” right-click “Low” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment Impact P1 50 mins – “How does owing money change the way we act and feel? On this episode we look at the connection between debt and mental health, how sexual harassment claims are changing the way investors choose stocks, and the five things you should ask any financial planner. Plus, we dive into the dos and don’ts of food at work. Food seems like such a small thing, so why does it cause so much workplace drama? Those stories and more on Marketplace Weekend.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment Impact P2 51 mins – “On this episode, we look at the financial effect of workplace sexual harassment, dig into the details of the GOP’s new tax plan and examine the economics of boycotts. Plus, we join fans on the hunt for Hamilton tickets with a scavenger hunt in Los Angeles. And, Imagine Dragons takes the Marketplace Quiz.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shanghai Battle P5 22 mins – “The Japanese Expeditionary forces set the stage for a much larger attack, once their reinforcements arrive. The plan is to cut Shanghai off from any assistance. Meanwhile, Chiang Kai-Shek has taken personal command of the 3rd War Zone.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode 208-11417_9.50 PM.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smart Phone Tracking 21 mins – “Timothy Carpenter stole cell phones. Then his phone sold him out to the Feds. Now the Supreme Court has to decide how private our cell phone data should be.” At the link find the title, “#804: Your Cell Phone’s A Snitch, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171108_pmoney pmpod804.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Interaction Value 49 mins – “Discussions about healthy living usually revolve around diet and exercise. Social interaction is often left out of the conversation, even though research shows that it’s critical to our well-being. On this week’s radio replay, we’ll explore research on the extremes of social interaction: from the consequences of constant connection, to the high cost of solitary confinement.” At the link find the title, “Radio Replay: Prisons of Our Own Making, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171103_hiddenbrain_hb_rad04_prisons of our own making-radio replay-93f678d7-7b27-4e7b-a048-e289cdb7bab5.mp3” and select “Save Lin As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Psychology 50 mins – “Psychologist Dave Pizarro of the Very Bad Wizards joins us to discuss Stanley Milgram’s “Behavioral Study of Obedience” (1963; read it), Philip Zimbardo’s “Interpersonal Dynamics in a Simulated Prison” (1973; read it), and John Doris’s “Persons, Situations, and Virtue Ethics” (1998). Do difficult situations make good people act badly? Are there really “good” and “bad” people, or are we all about the same, but put in different situations? Situationism is supported by Milgram’s experiment, where most subjects could be easily pressured into delivering shocks to an innocent person (really an actor… punked!). A more immersive example was provided by The Stanford Prison Experiment, where students took on the roles of guard and prisoner, and quickly became sadistic and passive respectively. John Doris argues that situationism is a direct attack on virtue ethics, that really there is no such thing as a virtue like “bravery” or “generosity” that cuts across all sorts of situations. While there are of course consistent personality traits, these don’t map against the virtues as depicted by Aristotle and our common cultural notions. Rather, they’re more context-dependent, specific to certain types of situations….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sound Libraries 52 mins – “We had a listening party with Raina Douris. Today’s episode is all about music and sound. Featuring: Planet Money, Surprisingly Awesome, Twenty Thousand Hertz, Still Processing, I Only Listen to the Mountain Goats, Ways of Hearing, The Imposter.” At the link find the title, “Exploring Podcasts About Music and Sound with Raina Douris,” right-click “Download Exploring Podcasts About Music and Sound with Raina Douris,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian War Progress 15 mins – “The CBC’s Adrienne Arsenault has just returned from Raqqa and shares first hand the devastation of a city destroyed by ISIS.” At the link find the title, “Nov 6 ‘So many dead’: Adrienne Arsenault inside Raqqa’s ruins,” right-click “Media files current_20171106_39707.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technonomics 38 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by digital and marketing entrepreneur, John Straw, who describes himself as a “technonomist” – someone exploring the cutting edge of technology and looking to understand where it fits from both an economic and commercial perspective.. John is a Senior Advisor at McKinsey and IBM, as well as an author, speaker and investor with over 30 years of experience in IT and digital transformation. What Was Covered – The journey John sees towards “programmatic enterprises” in which the availability of data and artificial intelligence allow for organizational control on a totally different level than possible today; How this journey takes us from decision making via experience and intuition to experience augmented by data to data augmented by experience to simply by data. And how, as per previous major shifts (think of the introduction of the PC) this happens not as a “big bang” but as a more gradual or “stealthy” process; The advice that John uses when personally investing in new technology businesses and his two-part rule which he advises business leaders to use in renovation and innovation implementation Key Takeaways and Learnings –How companies are using “layered” data to improve their renovation and innovation activities; How new technologies, and the pace of their development, provide opportunities for scale for all companies’ renovation processes; Why transformational innovation activities (“breaking” the existing business) need to go “in the garage”, away from the innovation “killers” of process and politics” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Traumatic Brain Injury 38 mins – “Andrew Maas and David Menon, lead authors, discuss The Lancet Neurology Commission on traumatic brain injury and outline the worldwide burden.” At the link find the title, “Traumatic Brain Injury: The Lancet Neurology: Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files laneur_061117_tbi.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Administration Reaction 56 mins – “This week marked the launch of the Texas National Security Review, a new publication from the University of Texas and War on the Rocks. At the recent launch event of the journal, War on the Rocks editor-in-chief Ryan Evans moderated a conversation with Benjamin Wittes, Kori Schake, distinguished research fellow at the Hoover Institution and Nora Bensahel, defense policy analyst and Atlantic Council scholar. Panelists discussed how countries are responding to the Trump administration and what strategies they should consider in the future, the relationship between domestic and international order, and how we should feel about the state of American democracy ten months into the new administration.” At the link right-click “Direct download: War_on_the_Rocks_Event_mixdown2.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Election Day Reflections 21 mins – “It’s now a year since Election Day 2016, and a year since we gathered in our office the day after Election Day to figure out what exactly had happened. The mood was tense, and our Executive Producer Katya Rogers seized the opportunity to offer listeners some ultra transparency, documenting a moment when Brooke and Bob were at their most doubting. The result: a raw podcast extra, in which the hosts argued about what had gone down and how the show should cover the Trump administration. Flash forward to this summer, when Bob and Brooke re-listened to their November conversation and then turned on the mics to reflect on their thoughts and speculations from eight months earlier. Both conversations are collected here for this weeks podcast extra.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Election Dissected 51 mins – “Donald Trump celebrated a remarkable Presidential election victory a year ago on 8 November 2016. Anthony Zurcher revisits that dramatic night – and asks could he do it again in 2020?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccine War 27 mins – “Vaccine hesitancy means that 11 per cent of Canadian 2 year olds are not fully immunized against measles, and 23 per cent don’t have all the recommended doses for diphtheria, whooping cough and tetanus.” At the link find the title, “Outbreak of doubt, Oct, 2017,” right—click “Media files whitecoat_20171026_78175.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Veterans Issues in New Hampshire 46 mins – “In the past few months, the Manchester VA Medical Center met with scandal, disaster, and a full helping of public outcry. Today on Word of Mouth, NHPR’s Peter Biello looks back on the summer’s news and tells the story of one woman’s effort to improve hospital facilities for survivors of military sexual trauma. Also on this week’s episode, New Hampshire remains” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virology in Indiana 66 mins – “From Indiana University, Vincent and Kathy speak with Tuli Mukhopadhyay, John Patton, and Adam Zlotnick about their careers and their work on alphaviruses, hepatitis B virus, and rotaviruses.” At the link right-click “Download TWIV 466” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wartime Journalism 16 mins – “President Trump ordered the firing of 59 Tomahawk cruise missiles on Syria in retaliation against the chemical attack allegedly committed by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad against his own people. The coverage of the strikes appeared to present a stark choice between good and evil, rather than a Gordian knot of geopolitics, regional politics, domestic politics, and the proliferation of terror. But is it really that easy? Bob speaks with Stephen Kinzer, Senior Fellow at the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs at Brown University and a columnist at the Boston Globe, who argues that the public is being presented with a deceptively simple version of reality because the media aren’t asking the right questions.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whistleblower Graphic Novel 71 mins – “Want to get the full story on post-9/11 American electronic surveillance … in the form of a graphic novel? Follow journalist Pratap Chatterjee and illustrator Khalil Bendib through their new book, Verax: The True History of Whistleblowers, Drone Warfare, and Mass Surveillance: A Graphic Novel, which blends Chatterjee’s sleuth journalism with Bendib’s comic illustrations for a uniquely visual perspective on a complex issue. Chatterjee and Bendib explain the many ways that governments track individuals and countries, highlighting the complicity of tech giants such as Apple, Verizon and Google in these covert operations. They also share the stories of the journalists and whistleblowers such as Julian Assange and Edward Snowden, who blew the lid off electronic surveillance operations and exposed them for the entire world to see. Finally, Chatterjee and Bendib will predict the future of electronic surveillance practices and those who choose to resist them, asking: Whose side are you on?” At the link find the title, “Whistleblowers, Drone Warfare and Surveillance: A Graphic History, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171107_Inforum Whistleblowers Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Control 14 mins – “Megafires, individual fires that burn more than 100,000 acres, are on the rise in the western United States — the direct result of unintentional yet massive changes we’ve brought to the forests through a century of misguided management. What steps can we take to avoid further destruction? Forest ecologist Paul Hessburg confronts some tough truths about wildfires and details how we can help restore the natural balance of the landscape.” At the link find the title, “Paul Hessburg: Why wildfires have gotten worse — and what we can do about it,Nov 2017,” right-click “Low” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zero Carbon on Trial 27 mins [first item] “What is the danger to scientific discourse when scientists sue other scientists? News that a scientist in the US is suing a fellow scientist, and the National Academy of Sciences, for libel, is worrying the science publishing community. Will litigation spoil the usual, fair and open exchanges that drive scientific progress? [then] Transgenic Skin Transplant – Clinicians have created transgenic stem cells to produce replacement skin for a child with a devastatingly debilitating skin disease. The team grew enough skin to transplant 80% of the child’s body with the genetically ‘fixed’ skin. [then] Karlie Noon – As part of this week’s BBC 100 Women season, shining a spotlight on inspiring women in science, indigenous Australian astronomer Karlie Noon tells us about the Aboriginal astronomy knowledge she has been collecting. And her journey as an indigenous woman in physics. [finally] Analysing the York Gospels – A medieval illuminated manuscript, over one-thousand years old, is still in used in religious ceremonies in the UK today. Like many illuminated manuscripts, the York Gospels is exquisitely decorated and bound, providing important historical and artistic value. But new bio-archaeological analysis has shone light on the biological value of the book. The team have revealed which animal skins went to make the parchment and other fascinating discoveries about the biology contained beneath its covers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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Media Mining Digest 315 – Nov 24, 2017: AIDS Reduction in Africa, Arctic Climate Warming, Basic Income Concept, Batteries, Brain Cancer Research, Canadian Reactor Accident, Chemical Regulation by EPA, Chinese Trade, Chronic Disease Treatment, Citizens United Case, Climate Change Impact, Cramps Cure, Cyber Security, Death and Dying Concerns, Democratic Party Activists, Dental Innovation, Domestic Violence Prevention, Elite Impact, Emoluments Clause, Ferguson Team Sports, Financial Abuse, Hispanics in North Carolina, Hog Farm Discrimination, Home Power Trends, Human Rights Law, Immigrant Backlash, Keystone XL Pipeline, Land Mine Removal, Lebanon War, Middle Class Voices, Military Detention, Music Payment Trends, North Korean Politics, Puerto Rico Power Repair, Quackery, Rohingya Refugees, Russian Adoptions, Seeing White, Sex Assault Reduction, Sleep Needs Discussion, Ten Emerging Technologies, Terrorism Finances, Terrorism Response, Tesla, Trump Resistance, Undercover Terrorist, Wild Fires and Climate

Exercise your ears: the 127 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 564 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 18,500 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 118GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 440 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Organ Printing 33 mins – “This episode we take on a future full of bioprinted replacement organs. You asked for more hopeful futures, this is about as hopeful as they get! We start by hearing a bit about what the current organ donation market is like from Christine Gentry, who donated a kidney to a stranger. Then we talk to Dr. Anthony Atala,  the Director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and of the world’s leading regenerative medicine specialists. Dr. Atala has implanted organs grown from the cells of patients themselves in clinical trials. Then Kelly and Zach Weinersmith join us to talk about what they learned while writing a chapter about bioprinting for their new book Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That’ll Improve and/or Ruin Everything. And finally, we get an impassioned indictment of 3D printing file formats from Meghan McCarthy, Project Lead for the NIH 3D Print Exchange.” At the link find the title, “Easy Bake Organs, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Adam Smith P1 58 mins – “On the foundational, 1776 text of modern economics. How does the division of labor and our instinct to exchange lead to the growth of wealth? Is the economy sufficiently machine-like to enable us to manipulate its output, or at least to tell us how not to screw it up?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Adam Smith P2 68 mins – “Continuing on the foundational text of economics. Is Smith’s position the equivalent of “greed is good?” (No.) What’s the deal with the “invisible hand? We talk about Smith’s picture of the (sort of) self-regulating economy, and why he thinks we shouldn’t have tariffs or guilds or other restrictions on the mobility of goods, workers, or capital. We rant a bit in ways that will hopefully be cleared up in ep. 177, when Russ Roberts from EconTalk joins us to discuss economics and Adam Smith further. Stay tuned!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AIDs Reduction in Africa 18 mins – “Grandmothers in Africa raising grandchildren orphaned by AIDS have come together to combat the deadly virus and change the future for the next generation.” At the link find the title, “Oct 23 Grandmothers in Africa fight for an AIDS-free future, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171023_64616.mp3” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon Services 46 mins– “Mighty Amazon strikes again. Getting the key to your front door, making moves into the prescription drug business and more. Will Amazon take over our lives?” At the link find the title, “Amazon’s Bold Moves Into Our Homes And Lives,right-click “Media files npr_560912357.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anne Frank Legacy 18 mins – ““The more that [Anne Frank] has been, in a sense, used as a way of communicating the Holocaust in a variety of media … the more she becomes — if you will — a prime target for exploitation.” At the link find the title, “Oct 27 Anne Frank’s image ‘prime target for exploitation,’ says professor, 2017” right-click “Media files current_20171027_65814.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Architect Frank Gehry P1 54 mins – “Canadian-born Frank Gehry has been called the greatest architect of our time. And yet he’s still a rebel in his field. IDEAS producer Mary Lynk a rare chance to talk with him in California. Part 1 of a 2-part series.” At the link find the title, “Master of his own design: Frank Gehry, rebel architect (Part 1), Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20171025 42881.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2 (54m) with “Media files ideas_20171013_57729.mp3”.

Arctic Climate Warming 51 mins – “Climate One goes to the front line of climate change – the high Arctic – to hear from the people there how their economies, communities and culture are changing due to global warming.” At the link find the title, “Deep Dive Into The Arctic, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171029_cl1_Deep_Dive_Arctic_PODCAST.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Author Nnedi Okarafor 9 mins – ““My science fiction has different ancestors — African ones,” says writer Nnedi Okorafor. In between excerpts from her “Binti” series and her novel “Lagoon,” Okorafor discusses the inspiration and roots of her work — and how she opens strange doors through her Afrofuturist writing.” At the link find the title, “Nov 2017 Nnedi Okorafor: Sci-fi stories that imagine a future Africa,” right-click “Medium” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Basic Income Concept 15 mins – “Machines that can think, learn and adapt are coming — and that could mean that we humans will end up with significant unemployment. What should we do about it? In a straightforward talk about a controversial idea, futurist Martin Ford makes the case for separating income from traditional work and instituting a universal basic income.” At the link find the title, “Oct 2017 Martin Ford: How we’ll earn money in a future without jobs,”right-click “Medium” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Batteries 60 mins – “This week on Science for the People we take a deep dive into modern batteries: how they work now and how they might work in the future. We speak with Gerbrand Ceder from UC Berkeley, about the most commonly used batteries today, how they work, and how they could work better. And we talk with Kathryn Toghill, electrochemist from Lancaster University, about redox flow batteries and how they could help make our power grids more sustainable.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Behavioral Change 45 mins – “Academic studies are nice, and so are Nobel Prizes. But to truly prove the value of a new idea, you have to unleash it to the masses. That’s what a dream team of social scientists is doing — and we sat in as they drew up their game plan.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Tech Trends 48 mins – “New York Times’ tech columnist Farhad Manjoo warns that the “frightful five” — Amazon, Google, Apple, Microsoft and Facebook — are collectively more powerful than many governments. Film critic Justin Chang reviews ‘The Square.’” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Cancer Research 12 mins – “Speaker at the 2017 Andrew Olle Media Lecture Associate Professor Kerrie McDonald from UNSW describes how brain cancer kills more children and young adults than any other disease. Despite this, there has been no substantial dedicated funding for research until now. A $100 million fund to fight brain cancer was announced by the federal government last week. There have been no breakthroughs in treatment in ten years. Now Kerrie McDonald’s group has developed a model for lab work which will allow testing of potential new therapies. Kerrie introduces Shalom Andrews who describes the challenge and uncertainty of living with brain cancer.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California 1800’s Culture 63 mins – “San Francisco Opera’s world premiere of “Girls of the Golden West,” set during the 1850s California Gold Rush, was created by the renowned team: composer John Adams and director/librettist Peter Sellars. Sellars and San Francisco Opera general director Matthew Shilvock will discuss the production and its mix of wildness, optimism, greed, violence, humor and racial prejudices in the stories of three Gold Rush women whose lives intersected in a small mining community in the Sierra Nevada mountains in 1850. “Girls of the Golden West” is based on factual events and persons.” At the link find the title, “John Adams, Peter Sellars and Girls of the Golden West, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171030_John Adams Peter Sellars Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Reactor Accident 21 mins – “Almost 60 years ago, a group of AECL workers put on protective gear and took turns stepping into a chamber brimming with radioactive material. Now they are fighting for compensation.” At the link find the title, “Nov 1 Retired workers want compensation for cleaning up nuclear spills at Chalk River in 1950s, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171101 74334.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Catalon Independence 21 mins – “Now that Madrid has invoked Article 155 in the Constitution — allowing the country to take control over Catalonia’s public institutions — many civil servants are worried.” At the link find the title, “Oct 30 ‘Talking politics in television in Catalonia is a risky sport’: Public broadcaster fears Spain takeover, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171030_32997.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chemical Regulation by EPA 47 mins – “A chemical industry insider now has a top job at the EPA and is rolling back rules on toxic chemicals. Is safety being compromised?” At the link find the title, “Chemical Industry Insider Rolls Back Rules At EPA, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_559849147.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Trade 32 mins – “This week we look at the history of on U.S.-China relations from President Nixon’s historic visit in 1972 through today. We get the perspective of Ambassador Gary Locke, who served as the United States’ envoy to China from 2011 to 2014. President Trump visits the country this week as part of a five-nation Asian tour. Follow C-SPAN Radio on Twitter and join the conversation using the hashtag “CSPANSidebar”. Like, rate, and review us wherever you listen to podcasts. Every C-SPAN podcast is available on the FREE C-SPAN Radio App for Apple and Android devices.” At the link right-click “Episode 34: Ambassador Gary Locke on China and the U.S.,” right-click “Media files SBLOC1103.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Disease Treatment 62 mins – “This week we have my good friend Chris Kresser on the show. Chris is a well known leader in the fields of ancestral health, Paleo nutrition, functional and integrative medicine, and one of the smartest guys I know. Listen in as we chat about functional medicine, the state of health care, eliminating chronic disease, and Chris’s new book Unconventional Medicine.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Citizens United Case 60 mins – “Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission is one of the most polarizing Supreme Court cases of all time. So what is it actually about, and why did the Justices decide the way they did? Justice Anthony Kennedy, often called the “most powerful man in America,” wrote the majority opinion in the case. In this episode, we examine Kennedy’s singular devotion to the First Amendment and look at how it may have influenced his decision in the case.” At the link click the circle witht three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Civil Discourse 60 mins – “America today seems divided into increasingly polarized factions. Political parties, industries, activists, nonprofit organizations, and ethnic and religious groups not only disagree vehemently but also doubt one another’s intellect, values and sincerity. It’s hard to imagine reaching consensus on the issues that divide us if we can’t even have civil discourse. Fortunately, there are proven approaches to getting competing players not only to talk but also to reach meaningful agreement. Since 2009, Convergence has convened people and groups with divergent views to build trust, identify solutions and form alliances for action on critical national issues. … Convergence president Rob Fersh will discuss the organization’s origins, its impact so far, its “special sauce” for bridging divides, and its vision for a more collaborative, civil and productive society. Fersh is president and founder of Convergence. He brings a 40-year track record addressing major national problems, including forging bipartisan legislation on controversial issues while serving on the staffs of three congressional committees.” At the link find the title, “Bridging Our Divides: A Practical Approach to Intractable Issues, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171027_Bridging_Our_Divides_Podcast.mp3” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Impact 49 mins – “Author Jeff Goodell says that American cities are under threat from extreme weather, rising sea levels and lax enforcement of environmental regulations. His new book is ‘The Water Will Come.’ Also, comedian and ‘Fresh Air’ commentator Zahra Noorbakhsh talks about how the rise in hate crimes has made her more cautious onstage.At the link find the title, “Rising Seas and Sinking Cities, Oct 2017,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Science 57 mins – “Bill Nye is back to lead the fight against climate change and answer questions about the future of climate science. He’s joined by Columbia University climate scientist Dr. Radley Horton, and comic co-host Chuck Nice.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clothes Washers 27 mins – “Too often I hear homeowners talking about washers if they are solely decorative items. I’ll often hear questions like “Do you like the Burgundy or the navy blue washer better?” Listen, I like beautiful appliances as much as anyone else, but I think it’s also important to strongly consider functionality and performance when purchasing an appliance that’s as hard working as a washer. This week we’ll compare traditional top-loading washers with front-loading washers and I’ll tell you about the pros and cons of each.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Common Sense with Dan Carlin 51 mins – “Dan is finding is hard to operate in a Black and White, Good and Evil cultural environment where everyone is outraged all the time about everything and where Americans hate each other. Where’s the Common Sense?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cramps Cure 58 mins – “For years, we’ve been hearing from listeners who swallow a shotglass of pickle juice or a spoonful of yellow mustard to make a muscle cramp disappear. They often report relief within a few minutes. How could such a weird remedy work so quickly to alleviate muscle contraction? Muscle Cramps Strike at Sea: Neurobiologists Rod McKinnon (a Nobel Prize winner) and Bruce Bean were kayaking miles off Cape Cod when they were struck with muscle cramps. Neither of them was dehydrated or depleted of electrolytes. So why did cramps strike at such an inopportune time? Once they got back to land, the pair started investigating the hypotheses of why muscle cramps happen and what can be done to reverse them. Dr. Bean explains on the show how they came up with an alternate hypothesis. Their exploration led them to test a remedy they came up with that they call Hotshot. It is now available to the general public at teamHotShot.com  and through Amazon.” At the link you can download a free copy of the MP3 file. A copy is also included in the blog archive.

Cyber Security 62 mins – “We are at war: cyberwar. Cyber attacks are becoming the weapon of choice for states, terrorists and criminal organisations. Through the fragile, interconnected structure of the web, anything can be hacked – from national infrastructure to an individual’s identity. The recent worldwide Ransomware epidemic, for example, affected more than 200,000 computers in 150 countries, targeting individuals and global companies including Fedex. The nightmare scenario of an entire city’s physical infrastructure being brought down by cybercriminals is well within the realms of possibility. As tensions escalate, will they explode into traditional military conflict? Or – almost as frightening – will countries wall off their internets to protect themselves, bringing the dream of an global, open worldwide web to an end? To discuss this pressing topic, Intelligence Squared brought together a panel of the world’s top intelligence professionals and cyber experts: Jeh Johnson, former Homeland Security Secretary under President Obama, who led the agency during Russia’s cyber attack on the 2016 election and Jamie Bartlett, renowned digital technology expert and author who presented the recent BBC series “Secrets of Silicon Valley”, and Angela Sasse, a cyber security expert with a special interest in how humans interact with technology. Chairing the discussion was Radio 4’s Today presenter and former BBC political editor Nick Robinson. How should the West respond to cyber aggression from hostile states? In the new fog of cyberwar, terror, crime and state hostility are all intermingled on the same battlefield. How do governments and international institutions set about regulating this complex new landscape?” At the link find the title, “Warfare: The New Rules – The Cyber Threat to States, Businesses and All of Us, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death and Dying Concerns 23 mins – “It waits for us all. A lot of people want to think about death as little as possible. Others want to dive right in and explore the mystery. Two short docs on the Big D.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Compromised 21 mins – “During the presidential campaign, Daily Beast executive editor Noah Shachtman opened up Twitter, saw all the vitriol and fake news and conspiracy theories, and thought ‘Man, is this really my country?’ Then Noah and his team started to investigate Russian interference in the election. Videos made in Russia, purporting to be from the American South. Activist groups invented in Russia, prompting Americans in Idaho to attend real-life protests. Is this his country? Yes. Also, maybe no. As Facebook, Twitter and Google’s parent company Alphabet sit down before the Senate Intelligence Committee, Note to Self is separating conspiracy from reality. Connecting the dots without turning the office into a scene from Homeland. …Plus, a look back at what we knew all along. We started in November 2016 with tech under the Trump administration. In March, we questioned Facebook’s responsibility for fake news with former ad executive Antonio Garcia Martinez. Exploring the Trump campaign’s use of psychometrics, we interviewed the chief product officer of data-profiling company Cambridge Analytica. April brought a foray into the alt-right corners of Reddit, and the origins of the word cucked. And in May, we talked to Phil Howard, an Oxford University professor among the first to research the armies of Russian bots spreading garbage and confusion on Twitter.” At the link click the circle witht three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democratic Party Activitists 48 mins – “Divided Democrats. GOP splits have made headlines, but Democrats have a lot to work out themselves.” At the link find the title, “Democrats Divided Over Future Of Party, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_561380278.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dental Innovation 18 mins – “Thirty years ago, a young dental researcher discovered a protein in dairy milk that repairs and strengthens teeth. Today, that protein, sold as Recaldent, is used by millions of people every day as they chew gum and visit the dentist. The inventor, Eric Reynolds, now leads the University of Melbourne’s dental school and travels the world, working with Australian and global businesses to create new products to further improve oral health. Products using Recaldent have generated sales of over $2 billion to-date, and it has been estimated they’ve saved over $12 billion in dental treatment costs worldwide. But he’s not finished on his mission to save the world’s teeth. His team have also developed a test and vaccine for severe gum disease which are now being commercialised by CSL and their partners.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow next to “MP3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Diversity Panel Discussion 57 mins – “At the annual conference of the STM Association [Scientific, Technical, Medical Association] in Frankfurt last week, Copyright Clearance Center CEO Tracey Armstrong moderated a panel discussion examining how the pursuit of diversity promises to improve all aspects of scholarly research, from the lab to the library. “When I spoke with the various panel members in advance of our discussion, everyone stressed that increasing diversity is a critical objective for their organizations and for our entire profession,” Armstrong said. “Diversity and inclusion are worthy pursuits in their own rights – but they are also business imperatives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Domestic Violence Prevention 72 mins – “Recent campaign scandals and celebrity arrests have brought discussions on gender equality and domestic violence to the forefront in the news. But for many Californians, domestic violence is not just a news story. In fact, a staggering 40 percent of female Californians report having been victims of domestic violence in the past. How can we understand this devastating societal issue and seek to address its root causes? Join our discussion as we talk about new studies on domestic violence in California and discuss shocking new findings on racial disparities and perceptions of gender roles.” At the link find the title, “Defeating Domestic Violence: Perspectives for Societal Change, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171030_Defeating_Domestic_Violence_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Edgar Allen Poe 69 mins – “Who was the real Edgar Allan Poe? One of America’s most iconic writers, his name and reputation are synonymous with the horror and the macabre. But he also invented the detective story and refined the sci-fi genre. And Poe’s popular image as a shadowy misanthrope toiling on the cultural margins bears little resemblance to the magazine editor and influential critic. In a new documentary, filmmaker Eric Stange explores the real story of the notorious author and the life of tragedy that inspired him….” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elderly Terrorists 19 mins – “Things can get really murky when you try to fix a clear line between empty threats and concrete criminal plans. And that uncertainty is precisely what makes this story feel so unnerving on the one hand, and weirdly ridiculous on the other. We begin with Tom Junod, a writer for Esquire, who tells us about a headline story that caught his eye back in November, 2011. As Tom explains, four men had been caught on tape trying to buy explosives to blow up federal office buildings in Atlanta, Georgia. But what struck Tom most wasn’t what the men were plotting–it was something unusual about the men themselves: they were senior citizens, all over 60, and they’d been caught after meeting (among other places) at neighborhood chains like Waffle House and Shoney’s. We’re left wondering how seriously to take these guys–are they really would-be terrorists, or just trash-talking senior citizens? US Attorney Sally Yates weighs in, and Dina Temple-Raston, counterterrorism correspondent for NPR, tries to help us get our bearings, but in the end, we’re left with an unsettling question: does catching men like this really make us feel any safer?” At the link right-click “Downlod” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elite Impact 46 mins – “Jason Gots: I want to tell you a story. It’s November 5, 2016, a few days before Election Day. I’m staring at Facebook, promising myself I’m going to delete the app once and for all from my phone, today. Enough of the political echo chamber. Enough of the ranting. Then I’m sucked into a video, because that’s what happens. It’s CNN’s Van Jones sitting in the living room of a family in Pennsylvania. Unlike me and most every other liberal coastal elite I know, he’s talking to people who support Donald Trump for President. Listening. Trying to understand. And pulling no punches in expressing his own anger and anxiety over where our country might be headed. In the year leading up to this moment, I had seen nothing like it. And it gave me hope. I’m so happy to welcome CNN Contributor and former Obama Administration adviser Van Jones to Think Again. His new book is Beyond the Messy Truth: How We Came Apart, How We Come Together.” At the link find the title, “121. Van Jones (social entrepreneur) – Blind Spots & Sore Spots,” right-click “Media files PP8671903291.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emmett Till Murder 45 mins – “Facts can be ignored by the powers that be and still ignite a movement. An interview with Tim Tyson, author of the new book, The Blood of Emmett Till. Tyson was the first historian or journalist to interview the former Carolyn Bryant, the woman in whose name Emmett Till was murdered in 1955.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emmett Till Play 16 mins – “There’s a long and painful history in the U.S. of white men killing black men and boys without punishment. In this episode, we listen in on “Dar He,” the one-man play by Mike Wiley that brings to life the story of Emmett Till.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emoluments Clause 39 mins – “Oral arguments were recently heard in the Southern District of New York about a novel case involving the President and the Constitution. The Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (or CREW) believes President Trump has violated the Foreign and Domestic Emoluments Clauses of the Constitution due to his failure to divest his business holdings in Trump hotels and other private enterprises. The Department of Justice on behalf of President Trump wants the district court to dismiss the case for various reasons, including CREW’s lack of standing to sue.” At the link find the title, “The Emoluments Clause in court, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP4216157782.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

End of Life 58 mins – “Why is it so hard to talk about our own mortality, especially with doctors and people we love? The more death is medicalized, the more a conspiracy of silence seems to reign over these vital discussions. As a culture, we have become far more at ease at talking about how to ward off death than how to prepare for a peaceful one. As a result, many families have distressing end-of-life experiences. They wind up wishing that key conversations had been more realistic—or that they had happened at all. Whether you’re a patient or doctor, spouse or adult child, each of us has different reasons for avoiding this difficult issue. This program will explore how to break the conspiracy of silence and begin to have honest, meaningful and even reassuring conversations about what matters most near life’s end. Katy Butler, a memoirist and investigative reporter, became fascinated by the medical-industrial complex after she witnessed her parents’ deaths—one swift and timely, the other agonizingly prolonged by medical technology. An advocate for medical reform and founder of the Slow Medicine Facebook group, she is currently writing a guide to navigating what she calls a “broken” medical system through old age and chronic illness to death itself. Her writing has appeared in The New York TimesThe New Yorker, and The Wall Street Journal. Dr. Haider Warraich’s experience in internal medicine and cardiology inspires his writing on the convergence of science and medicine, culture and morality, and medical advances and end-of-life care. An expert on the ways that modern medicine has changed death, Warraich has advocated for more truthful conversations between physicians, patients and families,”….” At the link find the title, “Can We Talk? Breaking the Silence Between Patients, Families and Physicians Near the End of Life, Oct, 2017, right-click “Media files cc_20171024_Can_We_Talk_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Famine Food 37 mins – “The Moringa tree is considered a “famine food.” This is true in many parts of the world where it grows — always in the tropics. It looks a little like a Dr. Seuss drawing of a tree, with a strangely thick trunk topped with comparatively small patches of leaves. But those leaves are protein-rich and phytochemical-packed, and a renewable source of nutrition in many parts of the world where nutrition is not always easy to achieve. (The Moringa tree is now the official tree of the Philippines.) Dr. Jed Fahey, director of the Cullman Chemoprotection Center at Johns Hopkins Medical School, is a longtime researcher into plant-based nutrition, as well as a vocal advocate of making the best use of underexploited food resources.  Moringa oleifera fits his criteria perfectly: It is a resilient tree that can survive and produce its nutritious leaves (and fruit) in tough environmental conditions. It is also endemic in many of the world’s poorest areas, where local food production is at a premium to avoid reliance on international food distribution systems that can’t be guaranteed.” At the link find the title, “#203 – Moringa with Dr. Jed Fahey, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files SDS203.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Carbon Footprints 30 mins – “When Anna Jones was growing up, the air was clean and the grass was lush. She lived on a farm in Shropshire, and phrases such as ‘greenhouse gas emissions’ and carbon footprints were associated with towns and cities – factories, cars and aerosols. Not anymore. We now know that 10% of the UK’s greenhouse emissions come from farms, and there is a concerted effort to encourage farmers to reduce their carbon footprint. But in a world where the idea of stewardship has only recently taken hold, how do you communicate the importance of carbon emissions to a farmer? Anna starts with her father, Tony, first. The programme also features contributions from two other farmers – Ian Pigott and Rob Richmond, one arable, one dairy – who have both changed their ways; and Becky Willson, project officer with the Farm Carbon Cutting Toolkit, travels to Tony Jones’ Shropshire farm to measure his carbon footprint.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Regulation 34 mins “Donald Trump, the business man president, isn’t the first politician to rail on government regulations. In 1979 Jimmy Carter, the Democrat peanut farmer president, told a crowd: “It should not have taken 12 years and a hearing record of over 100,000 pages for the FDA to decide what percentage of peanuts there ought to be in peanut butter.” That really happened. It’s one of the most ridiculed, infuriating and misunderstood moments in American history, and it all started with one Virginia housewife. Ruth Desmond, or “Peanut Butter Grandma,” as she came to be known, first traveled to Washington, D.C., to learn about dangerous food additives. She ended up taking on corporations, and tipping the U.S. into a regulatory state. This is her story. Welcome back to The Uncertain Hour. Where the things we fight the most about are the things we know the least about.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow above the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ferguson Team Sports 26 mins – “More from suburban St. Louis, post-Ferguson, on the popular notion that sports unites communities. Can the camaraderie of a team sport make race and class status “disappear” for the kids involved or their parents? Scene on Radio host and producer John Biewen hangs with a girls’ high school basketball team to test the idea.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fetal Cells in Mothers 20 mins – “Mother’s day is nigh. Sort of. Anyway, without knowing it, you might have already given your mom a pretty lasting gift. But whether it helps or hurts her, or both, is still an open question. In this Radiolab short, Robert updates us on the science of fetal cells — one of the first topics he covered as an NPR science correspondent. Six years ago, wearing his NPR science-correspondent hat, Robert presented listeners with this question: what if we told you that legions of fetal cells hang out inside a mother for decades after she gives birth — and might even help heal her when she’s sick or hurt? Back then he described this as a “too dangerously beautiful idea” for the scientists researching fetal cells. They wanted to believe it, but the evidence wasn’t there yet. One of those scientists was Kirby Johnson at Tufts University, who explained that the cells might also hurt the mother. He wasn’t sure which. “I think that that’s something that we’re going to see within the next five years or less,” Kirby said. So, Robert thought it was high-time to call Kirby for an update, and to ask once again about Kirby’s personal stake in the work he’s doing.

Financial Abuse 49 mins – “Almost 70% of millennial women have experienced financial abuse. In today’s episode, E&B interview financial educator Tonya Rapley to break down the importance of the f*** off fund.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu..

Gorbachev 67 mins – “Brothers William and Philip Taubman know Russia well. William Taubman’s Khrushchev won the Pulitzer Prize, and his new book, Gorbachev, is already being critically praised as a riveting story of how the leader of “the evil empire” forged a peaceful partnership with the United States. It is also a compelling history of the Soviet Union and Russia. Philip Taubman worked for The New York Times as a reporter and editor for nearly 30 years, specializing in national security issues, including intelligence and defense policies. Come for a unique conversation about Russia then and now and what William Taubman terms “the importance of leaders who understood that the value of power is its ability to create a better world.” At the link find the title, “One Russia, Two Taubmans, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171026_One_Russia_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the poop-up menu.

GPS Impact 24 mins – “Manoush is a nice human being. Polite, punctual, present. But man, is she a rude robot. Recently, Manoush attended a conference as a telepresence robot. (Imagine an iPad, on top of two brooms, with a Roomba as the base.) And she careened around interrupting conversations, sideswiping people and disrupting panels. Literally an out-of-body experience. We lose track of our bodies every day now. We spiral into some Instagram stalking mid-commute and bump into someone on the street. We surface from a text at dinner to a peeved friend, still waiting the end of our sentence. We follow the blue ribbon of our GPS right off a cliff. This week, the big and small ways we’ve put ourselves on autopilot. What we gain, and what we’ve lost. Because there was a time when humans were guided by the stars, not the satellites. With researchers Allen Lin, Johannes Schöning, and Brent Hecht, who have their own embarrassing robot stories. And Greg Milner, author of Pinpoint: How GPS is Changing Technology, Culture, and Our Minds. The problem with GPS isn’t the machines, guys. It’s you.” At the link click the circle witht three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Electronics 56 mins – “The 2017 Guide to Greener Electronics (the Guide) was recently released by Greenpeace USA, with rankings of seventeen of the world’s leading consumer electronics companies on sustainable manufacturing and design of IT products. Companies were evaluated based on their transparency, commitment, performance and advocacy efforts in three critical areas: reduction of greenhouse gases through renewable energy; use of recycled materials; and elimination of hazardous chemicals. Tune in as we talk with Gary Cook, Senior IT Campaigner at Greenpeace USA, about how the electronics companies you support ranked.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gut Researcher 14 mins- “Ever wonder how we poop? Learn about the gut — the system where digestion (and a whole lot more) happens — as doctor and author Giulia Enders takes us inside the complex, fascinating science behind it, including its connection to mental health. It turns out, looking closer at something we might shy away from can leave us feeling more fearless and appreciative of ourselves.” At the link find the title, “Nov 2017 Giulia Enders: The surprisingly charming science of your gut,” right-click “Medium” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hiroshima 34 mins – “The word “Hiroshima” may bring to mind a black-and-white image of a mushroom cloud. It’s easy to forget that it’s an actual city with a million people and a popular baseball team. How did the cataclysm of 1945 reverberate in the place where it happened? Hearing Hiroshima is a production of Minnesota Public Radio, from American Public Media.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hispanics in North Carolina 36 mins – “Siler City, North Carolina used to be a typical Southern town. Everybody was white or black. Now the town’s population is half Latino. One community’s journey through the “five stages of grief” – all the way to acceptance? By John Biewen and Tennessee Watson. Music by Blue Dot Sessions and Lucas Biewen.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hog Farm Discrimination 51 mins – “For Eddie Wise, owning a hog farm was a lifelong dream. In middle age, he and his wife, Dorothy, finally got a farm of their own. But they say that over the next twenty-five years, the U.S. government discriminated against them because of their race, and finally drove them off the land. Their story, by John Biewen, was produced in collaboration with Reveal.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Home Power Trends 88 mins – “Recently a listener sent me a video presentation by Tony Seba called Clean Disruption – Energy & Transportation.  It really causes one to think a great deal watching this. I want to point out today that I don’t feel this guys is 100% right, in fact early in today’s presentation I am going to read a quite harsh criticism by our own John Pugliano on this presentation. I tend to fall somewhere in the middle on the three things Mr. Seba Brings up in the presentation between Seba and Pugliano. These four factors are the cost and availability of Cost and efficiency of solar electric generation; Cost and efficiency of power storage (batteries); Cost and efficiency of electric vehicles; Cost and efficiency of autonomous vehicles. For my analysis of what this all means today I will consider that Mr. Seba is 50% wrong. Still that makes what is coming in the next 20 years, absolutely earth shattering.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

House Contractors 25 mins – “I’ve spent more time away from the internet and library this month and done more research out in the field. At the beginning of the month, I went to the Kansas City Parade of Homes and this past week I had some time off from work and ventured out to different homebuilding job sites in an attempt to gather names and contact information for some subcontractors who I could potentially hire for my project. So this episode will cover some lessons that I’ve learned this past month.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Rights Law 54 mins – “Should the U.S. Supreme Court be the court of the world? In the 18th century, two feuding Frenchmen inspired a one-sentence law that helped launch American human rights litigation into the 20th century. The Alien Tort Statute allowed a Paraguayan woman to find justice for a terrible crime committed in her homeland. But as America reached further and further out into the world, the court was forced to confront the contradictions in our country’s ideology: sympathy vs. sovereignty. Earlier this month, the Supreme Court heard arguments in Jesner v. Arab Bank, a case that could reshape the way America responds to human rights abuses abroad. Does the A.T.S. secure human rights or is it a dangerous overreach?” At the link click the circle witht three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Backlash 58 mins – “Socially dangerous views on immigration were once confined to the margins of political discourse. Now, in the wake of refugee crises and terrorist attacks, these sentiments have become politically more acceptable, helping propel Donald Trump to the White House, influence the vote on Brexit and make Marine Le Pen popular in France. Go Back to Where You Came From explains how we got here and why the extreme Right has grown stronger in countries that have historically been defenders of human rights and models of tolerance. By combining narrative history and on-the-ground reporting, including interviews with refugees, alt-right activists, the rising stars of the new Right and the intellectuals who enabled them, Sasha Polakow-Suransky shows how this phenomenon has quickly reshaped the political landscape.” At the link find the title, “The Immigration Impasse, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171026_Immigration Impasse Podcast.mp3” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Keystone XL Pipeline 52 mins – “Amy Goodman has built a career on covering movements that highlight solutions and catalyze change. She has explored how grassroots activism and general muckraking can give a voice to those otherwise ignored. Goodman does not shy away from difficult issues and is not afraid to take on powerful industries when bringing a story to the public. As the president of Union for Concerned Scientists (UCS), Kenneth Kimmell has the same tenacity as Goodman in terms of getting to the bottom of things. Under Kimmell’s leadership, UCS has led the charge in exposing the relationship between oil companies, climate change and climate denial.” At the link find the title, “A Conversation with Amy Goodman and Kenneth Kimmell, Nov, 2017,” right-click “ Media files cc_20171105_cl1_Goodman Kimmell_PODCAST.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Land Mine Removal 6 mins – “Fifty years of armed conflict in Colombia has left the countryside riddled with land mines that maim and kill innocent people who happen across them. To help keep communities safe from harm, TED Resident Carlos Bautista is developing an app to track land mines — and direct travelers away from them. Learn more about how this potentially life-saving tool could promote peace in countries plagued by land mines once conflicts end.” At the link find the title, “Oct 2017 Carlos Bautista: The awful logic of land mines-and an app that helps people avoid them TED Residency,” right-click “Medium” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Learning Crisis 15 mins – “The most important infrastructure we have is educated minds, says former Tunisian government minister Amel Karboul. Yet too often large investments go to more visible initiatives such as bridges and roads, when it’s the minds of our children that will really create a brighter future. In this sharp talk, she shares actionable ideas to ensure that every child is in school — and learning — within just one generation.” At the link find the title, “Nov 2017 Amel Karboul: The global learning crisis — and what to do about it,” right-click “Medium” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lebanon War 22 mins – “Functioning as a state within the Lebanese state, Hezbollah has accumulated more rockets than many European militaries. But it is also an irregular army that uses terrorism as a strategic weapon against adversaries at home and abroad. Today, the conflicts in Syria and Iraq have reconfigured Hezbollah and other forces in ways that could lead to a new war, one far more destructive than previous Middle Eastern conflicts. In this episode, we’ll hear from three senior European military leaders who have just published a detailed report on the growing likelihood of Hezbollah aggression against Israel, the devastating course such a conflict would take, and what Western governments can do now to prevent renewed bloodshed.” At the link click the squre with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leonardo da Vinci by Author Walter Isaacson 69 mins – “In his profiles of great innovators, biographer Walter Isaacson, author of Steve Jobs, explores how humanism can inspire scientific achievement. With a new biography of Leonardo da Vinci, the original Renaissance man, Isaacson revives a pivotal moment in history in which people felt encouraged to question authority and investigate their surroundings. He explores how da Vinci’s variegated studies of anatomy, mathematics, archaeology, ornithology, botany, geology, weaponry, painting and theater were actually facets of a larger project. Isaacson introduces his readers to da Vinci’s high-flying imagination with vividness and clarity that is sure to inspire the polymath in us all. Isaacson is a professor of history at Tulane University. His work as a historian is rooted in his previous career in journalism as chairman of CNN and editor of Time. Additionally, he served as CEO of the nonprofit Aspen Institute of Humanistic Studies for 14 years. Isaacson also has a distinguished record in government, leading disaster recovery in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and fostering business partnerships between the United States and the Muslim world. Come hear from a writer with both a brilliant, historical mind as well as a progressive, innovative outlook on the world.” At the link find the title, “Walter Isaacson: Cracking Leonardo da Vinci, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171025_Walter_Isaacson_Podcast.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Lukemia Patient 32 mins – “It happens. A happy, healthy young person suddenly gets a grave diagnosis. What does not usually happen: The patient rolls tape. By Ibby Caputo.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malware Report 150 mins – “This week we examine the source of WannaCry, a new privacy feature for Firefox, Google’s planned removal of HPKP, the idea of visual objects as a second factor, an iOS camera privacy concern, the CAPTCHA wars, a horrifying glimpse into a non-Net Neutrality world, the CoinHive DNS hijack, the new Bad Rabbit crypto malware, a Win10 anti-crypto malware security tip, spying vacuum cleaners, a new Amazon service, some loopback Q&A with our listeners and another look at the Reaper botnet.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-p menu.

Medical Student Case Study 47 mins – “Dr. Richard Beddingfield is a cardiothoracic anesthesiologist and author of Med School Uncensored: The Insider’s Guide to Surviving Admissions, Exams, Residency, and Sleepless Nights in the Call Room. We talk about his journey and what he learned along the way. Richard was a nontraditional premed student. He only found out later in the game that he wanted to be a physician. Right now, he’s a practicing cardiothoracic anesthesiologist in Wisconsin….” At the link find the title,”257: Author of Med School Uncensored Talks About his Journey, right-click “Media files PMY257.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Middle Class Voics 47 mins – “We’re in Atlanta on our national listening tour, taking stock of what it means to be middle class today and how the middle class fares under President Trump.” At the link find the title, “On Point In Atlanta On The Middle Class, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_560464395.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Detention 43 mins – “We are back, one day after dropping episode 43, with an emergency podcast discussion the legal consequences of the horrific attack that occurred in New York City yesterday.  The need for the podcast flows from the President Trump’s statements to the press today regarding the possibility of taking the perpetrator to Guantanamo,  his criticisms of the criminal justice process, and statements from Senator Graham emphasizing the need to interrogate the perpetrator without counsel.  Meanwhile, a military commission judge has held the JAG General who heads the defense operation there in contempt, confining him to quarters based on an episode in which the civilian defense team for al-Nashiri has withdrawn with his approval.  It’s a complicated situation all around, but Professors Chesney and Vladeck are here to walk through it all in this special episode.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Payment Trends 42 mins– “Machine-to-machine communication is the ideal scenario if we want to enable on a global scale, with as little friction as possible and at a reasonable cost, the licensing of works and the payment of royalties to rightsholders.  That at least is the stated premise for a recent discussion at the annual RightsTech Summit conference. But how far have we come?  How close are we to achieving a digitized business environment for rights and royalties that is as fully realized as we see today in media distribution and consumption? Until code entirely does away with contracts will human beings will continue to add a value that no machine ever can? “I think all of this starts with a human being. No matter what technology we apply to these systems, if a person doesn’t know how to interact or create the data that they need to disseminate, it’s just not going to get there,” said Michael Shanley of Music Reports. Technology evolves all the time, and I think we’re getting to great places in technology.  But education and information is, I think, paramount.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Politics 64 mins – “It has become clear: North Korea not only has nuclear weapons but is also developing intercontinental missiles with the capacity to strike the continental United States. What are the latest facts about North Korea’s weapons and the political situation? How does this crisis affect South Korea, Japan and other countries throughout Asia? How does it affect the United States? What are the possible ethical and policy responses to the current situation? Professor William J. Perry and Professor Jeffrey Lewis, two of the leading American experts on nuclear weapons and related defense policy, and Kathleen Stephens, former U.S. ambassador to South Korea, will address this nuclear crisis and its broader implications.” At the link find the title, “North Korea, Nuclear Weapons and the Threat of War, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171030_North_Korea_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nova Scotia Native Dispute 26 mins– “Canada’s Métis population is spiking – at least on paper. So what’s behind the dramatic rise and why are some Métis leaders not happy about it?” At the link find the title, “Nov 1 Canada’s Métis population on the rise: why some Métis leaders find this ‘very concerning’ 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171101_31131.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obama Presidency 26 mins – “Author Ta-Nehisi Coates says the foundation of Donald Trump’s presidency is based on the repudiation to Barack Obama’s legacy.” At the link find the title, “Oct 23 How white supremacy during Obama era helped Trump become president: Ta-Nehisi Coates, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171023_57431.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oliver Sacks Celebration 68 mins – “Oliver Sacks, scientist and storyteller, was one of the most talented minds of our time. He offered us some of the most compelling and seminal ideas on evolution, consciousness, creativity and more, with passion and honesty. Sacks was instrumental in introducing autism, Tourette’s syndrome and schizophrenia to a general audience. A true polymath, Sacks explored many other topics both scientific and poetic, and he frequently turned his inquisitive mind onto his own experiences. 

Sacks’ book, The River of Consciousness, is a posthumous collection of essays that reveals Sacks’ ability to make unexpected connections while also showing Sacks’ sheer joy in knowledge and uncovering his unceasing, timeless project to understand what makes us human. Join Bill Hayes, New York Times writer and photographer; Steve Silberman, science writer; and Victoria Sweet, associate clinical professor of medicine at UC San Francisco, in celebrating the extraordinary life and work of Oliver Sacks.” At the link find the title, “Celebrating the Life and Work of Oliver Sacks, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171101_Celebrating_Oliver_Sacks_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Online Harassment 46 mins – “Bill O’Reilly’s $32 million sex settlement shocker. Harvey Weinstein. A reckoning for non-disclosure agreements. Is it time to stop buying silence?” At the link find the title, “Gretchen Carlson On Buying Silence From Harassment Victims, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_560065045.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioids by Sackler Brothers 47 mins– “The untold story of the family that made billions off of America’s opioid flood, knowing the risks and pushing the product.” At the link find the title, “One Family Reaped Billions From Opioids, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_559858059.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Organ Printing 33 mins – “This episode we take on a future full of bioprinted replacement organs. You asked for more hopeful futures, this is about as hopeful as they get! We start by hearing a bit about what the current organ donation market is like from Christine Gentry, who donated a kidney to a stranger. Then we talk to Dr. Anthony Atala,  the Director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and of the world’s leading regenerative medicine specialists. Dr. Atala has implanted organs grown from the cells of patients themselves in clinical trials. Then Kelly and Zach Weinersmith join us to talk about what they learned while writing a chapter about bioprinting for their new book Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That’ll Improve and/or Ruin Everything. And finally, we get an impassioned indictment of 3D printing file formats from Meghan McCarthy, Project Lead for the NIH 3D Print Exchange.” At the link find the title, “Easy Bake Organs, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parasitoids 30 mins – “Hi there bug lovers and welcome to our Halloween special! Today, Jody and Jonathan are featuring parasitoids, one of the most fascinating groups of insects! Their life cycles lend themselves to Halloween discussion as they are often reminiscent of the Alien in Alien, devouring victims from the inside out. In the show we discuss the differences between parasites and parasitoids but here are some easy definitions if you are curious:  Parasites: lives off another’s (host) benefits by deriving nutrients at host’s expense giving nothing in return Some examples External: leech, lice, fleas, ticks, mites Internal: tapeworm, protozoan that transmits Malaria via mosquito vector, horsehair worms Parasitoid: Usually insects that undergo complete metamorphosis such as wasps and flies, where the female lays eggs in or on the host and the larvae behaves like an internal parasite, developing using the host’s body for nutrients, but eventually kills the host by through the developmental process.” At the link find the title, “Arthro-Pod Episode 33: The Horror of Parasitoid Insects!” right-click “Play Now “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Placenta Eating 24 mins – “Despite a scarcity of research to support its claims of benefit and doctors warning against it, the practice of placentophagia — saving your placenta after birth and eating it — continues.” At the link find the title, “Oct 26 Eating placenta offers no proven benefit to mother, says medical researcher, 2017,” right-click “Media files current 20171026 41748.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poison from Frogs 60 mins – “Pictures of poison frogs are a popular form of home decor. Tiny size, bright colors, super deadly, they’ve got it all. But how exactly do poison frogs avoid poisoning themselves? This week we talk with Rebecca Tarvin and Cecilia Borghese, two scientists who studied how poison frogs survive their own toxins. And we speak with Sandra Goutte, a herpetologists who studies frog ears, how they work, and whether one tiny, adorable pumpkin toadlet can hear itself talk. This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.” At the link find the title, “#446 Frogs From the Skin In, Nov 2017” right-click “Play Now” and select ‘save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Populism 39 mins – “This week, as one of our LRB author specials, we talk to regular LRB contributor Jan-Werner Müller about populism, Trump and the state of democracy. Jan has long argued that populism is not just an election winning strategy, it’s also a governing philosophy. We ask whether Trump’s first year in office bears that out. Does he have a governing philosophy? How does it compare with other populists, from Berlusconi to Modi? And what difference does it make that he has a nuclear arsenal at his disposal? With Helen Thompson and Chris Bickerton.” At the link find the title, “Jan-Werner Müller on Populism, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Comments 47 mins – “President George W. Bush breaks a nine-year silence to deliver a powerful rebuke to a sitting President. President Obama’s talking too. We’ll think about their critiques and President Trump.” At the link find the title, “George W. Bush’s Stunning Rebuke Of Donald Trump, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_559576301.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Professional Wrestler 13 mins – “You are more than you think you are, says former pro wrestler Mike Kinney — you just have to find what makes you unique and use it to your advantage. For years Kinney “turned up” the parts of himself that made him special as he invented and perfected his wrestling persona, Cowboy Gator Magraw. In a talk equal parts funny and smart, he brings his wisdom from the ring to everyday life, sharing how we can all live more confidently and reach our full potential.” At the link find the title, “Oct 2017 Mike Kinney: A pro wrestler’s guide to confidence,” right-click “Medium and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Puerto Rico Power Repair 46 mins – “Puerto Rico is still in the dark after Hurricane Maria. Now, questions about a tiny company that landed a $300 million contract to fix its power system.” At the link find the title, “Firm With Trump Cabinet Ties Scores $300M Puerto Rico Power Contract, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_560243818.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quackery 26 mins – “Arsenic, mercury, and goat testicles — just a few of the terrible ideas peddled successfully by “quacks” through the ages.” At the link find the title, “Oct 27 From arsenic to goat glands: A history of the world’s worst medical cures, 2017,” right-click “Media files current 20171027 77494.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rohingya Refugees 24 mins – ““I would almost say 100 per cent are suffering from dehydration, heat exhaustion, heat stroke,” says Dr. Nabiha Islam on treating Rohingya refugees.” At the link find the title, “Oct 24 ‘I have no right to look away’: Doctor says world needs to know plight of Rohingya refugees, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171024_94184.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Adoptions 26 mins – “When Russia banned the adoption of children to any country that recognized same-sex marriage, the consequences were far-reaching, devastating couples already in the process of adopting and forcing people to flee for their safety.” A the link find the title, “Nov 2 How Russian law affects Canadians trying to adopt orphans, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171102_70671.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sears Bankruptcy 19 mins – “Advocates for retirees are pushing for legislative change as Sears Canada’s bankruptcy is once again leaving pensioners still fighting for payout.” At the link find the title, “Oct 26 ‘Pensioners are our most vulnerable’: Better protection needed for retirees, says advocate, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171026_47021.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seeing White 600 mins (14 parts) – Introduction Part 1 (17m) – “Events of the past few years have turned a challenging spotlight on White people, and Whiteness, in the United States. An introduction to our series exploring what it means to be White. By John Biewen, with special guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.” Whiteness Discovered 1 Part 2 (29m) – “For much of human history, people viewed themselves as members of tribes or nations but had no notion of “race.” Today, science deems race biologically meaningless. Who invented race as we know it, and why? By John Biewen, with guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.” Whiteness Discovered 2-Part 3 (34m) – “Chattel slavery in the United States, with its distinctive – and strikingly cruel – laws and structures, took shape over many decades in colonial America. The innovations that built American slavery are inseparable from the construction of Whiteness as we know it today. By John Biewen, with guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.”Whiteness Defined Part 4 (37m) – “’All men are created equal.’ Those words, from the Declaration of Independence, are central to the story that Americans tell about ourselves and our history. But what did those words mean to the man who actually wrote them? By John Biewen, with guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.” Native Massacres Part 5 (63m) – “Growing up in Mankato, Minnesota, John Biewen heard next to nothing about the town’s most important historical event. In 1862, Mankato was the site of the largest mass execution in U.S. history – the hanging of 38 Dakota warriors – following one of the major wars between Plains Indians and settlers. In this documentary, originally produced for This American Life, John goes back to Minnesota to explore what happened, and why Minnesotans didn’t talk about it afterwards.” Lynchings Part 6 (40m) – “When it comes to America’s racial sins, past and present, a lot of us see people in one region of the country as guiltier than the rest. Host John Biewen spoke with some white Southern friends about that tendency.” Being Black and White Part 7 (14m) – “How attached are you to the idea of being white?” Chenjerai Kumanyika puts that question to host John Biewen, as they revisit an unfinished conversation from a previous episode.” Skull Types Part 8 (46m), – “Scientists weren’t the first to divide humanity along racial – and racist – lines. But for hundreds of years, racial scientists claimed to provide proof for those racist hierarchies – and some still do.” White Mobs Part 9 (29m) – “When it comes to America’s racial sins, past and present, a lot of us see people in one region of the country as guiltier than the rest. Host John Biewen spoke with some white Southern friends about that tendency.” Asian Immigrants Part 10 (38m) – “The story of Bhagat Singh Thind, and also of Takao Ozawa – Asian immigrants who, in the 1920s, sought to convince the U.S. Supreme Court that they were white in order to gain American citizenship. Thind’s “bargain with white supremacy,” and the deeply revealing results.” White on Black Violence Part 11 (46m) – “For hundreds of years, the white-dominated American culture has raised the specter of the dangerous, violent black man. Host John Biewen tells the story of a confrontation with an African American teenager. Then he and recurring guest Chenjerai Kumanyika discuss that longstanding image – and its neglected flipside: white-on-black violence.” Affirmative Action Part 12 (48m) – “When it comes to U.S. government programs and support earmarked for the benefit of particular racial groups, history is clear. White folks have received most of the goodies.” Transformation Part 14 (44m) – “The concluding episode in our series, Seeing White. An exploration of solutions and responses to America’s deep history of white supremacy by host John Biewen, with Chenjerai Kumanyika, Robin DiAngelo, and William “Sandy” Darity, Jr.” At all of the links find and right-click “Download,” the select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Assault Economics 53 mins – “Felix Salmon of Fusion, Slate Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann, and political-risk consultant Anna Szymanski discuss: Sexual harassment; Saudi Arabia’s $500 billion city NEOM; Trading cryptocurrencies” At the link find the title, “The Tiran and Sanafir Edition, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM1398730754.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Assault Reduction 55 mins – “The Harvey Weinstein story has unleashed a veritable tsunami of sexual assault and harassment claims. And there’s a huge gender gap at work: overwhelmingly, men are the accused perpetrators; women, the victims. Part 2 of a 2-part series.” At the link find the title, “Sex, Truth and Audio Tape, Part 2: What does consent really mean? Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20171101_17514.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Identification 55 mins – “What are we to make of today’s sexual landscape, where we see the most diverse range of orientations and expressions of sexuality in history? Part 1 of a 2-part series.” At the link find the title, “Sex, Truth and Audio Tape: Shifting identities on a changing sexual landscape, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20171025_86877.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sierra Club Operation 59 mins – “Founded in 1892, the Sierra Club has evolved into the most effective grassroots environmental advocacy organization in the United States. Over 125 years in action, the Sierra Club started as a group tasked with protecting the Sierra Nevada. The club expanded to work on climate change, environmental justice, gender equity, green jobs and sustainable trade, food and agriculture as well as ecosystems protection and restoration. Over the years, the club has been a major force in efforts to support sustainability and the environment. Most recently, the club has rallied to head off attempts by the Trump administration and others to dismantle years of environmental work, heritage and progress. Join us to celebrate all that the Sierra Club has done and will continue to do to protect the environment, health, safety and future of our people, land, water and air in the United States and around the world.” At the link find the title, “The Sierra Club at 125 Years: From Yosemite to Climate Justice, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171026_The Sierra Club at 125_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep Needs Discussion 63 mins – “Sleep is one of the most important but least understood aspects of our lives. It affects our wellness and longevity, and yet questions about why we sleep and its purpose have only recently been answered. Neuroscientist and sleep expert Matt Walker provides a new understanding of sleep and how it affects our ability to learn, memorize and make logical decisions. Walker also answers a variety of questions about dreaming, sleep patterns, aging and disease prevention.” At the link find the title, “Matthew Walker: Why We Sleep,Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171026_Matthew_Walker_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stalin’s War on the Ukraine 24 mins – “When he was appointed to be Trump’s campaign manager, I wrote an article saying this could bring the Ukrainization of American politics.” At the link find the title, “Oct 31 Why Washington Post’s Anne Applebaum warned of the ‘Ukrainization of American politics’ 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171031_35494.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stalin’s War on Ukraine 49 mins – “In the early 1930s Stalin orchestrated a famine to suppress the nationalist movement in Ukraine, and strengthen Russian influence. Millions of people died. Anne Applebaum says, “so much of why the Ukrainian famine was possible was because of the way in which the Soviet Union used disinformation, propaganda, and what we would now call hate speech to encourage people to do terrible things.” Her book is ‘The Red Famine.’ Applebaum also discusses Russian interference in recent elections. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the short story collection ‘The Obama Inheritance.’” At the link find the title, “Stalin’s War On Ukraine, Oct 2017” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Steinbeck’s Travels P1 22 mins – “First in a three-part journey into the soul of America, through the eyes of working people who happen to be artists. In this episode, David Slater in Sag Harbor, New York, and Kalamu ya Salaam in New Orleans. Retracing the 1960 journey by writer John Steinbeck for his book, Travels with Charley in Search of America. Produced by John Biewen.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Steinbeck’s Travels P2 21 mins – “The second in a three-part series, journeying into the soul of America through the eyes of artists, while following in the footsteps of Nobel Prize-winning writer John Steinbeck who drove across the country in 1960 for his iconic book, Travels with Charley. In this episode, photographer Wayne Gudmundson in eastern North Dakota, and Yurok basket weaver Susan “Tweet” Burdick in Humboldt County, California. Produced by John Biewen.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Steinbeck’s Travels P3 24 mins – “The last in our series exploring the spirit of America in the footsteps of one of its greatest writers, John Steinbeck. At key spots on Steinbeck’s 1960 journey across the country, we team up with artists to explore how things have changed, or not, and to talk back to Steinbeck across the years. In this episode, visits with theater director Troy Nickerson in Spokane, Washington, and poet Diana Garcia in Monterey, California.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Steve Forbes 68 mins – “Should Americans be optimistic or pessimistic about the state of the country heading into 2018? Come hear from one of America’s leading conservative pundits. Steve Forbes is chairman of Forbes Media, which publishes Forbes magazine. Forbes has a circulation of nearly 1 million readers domestically and 5 million worldwide. In both 1996 and 2000, Forbes campaigned vigorously for the Republican nomination for the presidency. Key components to his platform included a flat tax, medical savings accounts, a new Social Security system for working Americans, parental school choice, term limits and a strong national defense. Forbes continues to energetically promote this agenda. Bring your questions.” At the link find the title, “Steve Forbes: The Economy, Stocks, Taxes and Health Care—What’s Next? Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171031_Steve_Forbes_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sydney Brenner Biography 27 mins – “Sydney Brenner was one of the 20th Century’s greatest biologists. Born 90 years ago in South Africa to impoverished immigrant parents, Dr Brenner became a leading figure in the biological revolution that followed the discovery of the structure of DNA by Crick and Watson, using data from Rosalind Franklin, in the 1950s. Brenner’s insights and inventive experiments laid foundation stones for new science of molecular biology and the genetic age in which we live today, from the Human Genome Project to gene editing. Sydney Brenner talks to biologist and historian Matthew Cobb of the University of Manchester about this thrilling period in biological science, and Dr Brenner’s 20 year-long collaboration with DNA pioneer Francis Crick: a friendship which generated some of their most creative research.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian War Child 24 mins – “Meet Bana Alabed, a seven-year-old girl who became a social media sensation, tweeting about family life inside Aleppo, when the city was under siege.” At the link find the title, “Oct 31 7-year-old Syrian girl who tweeted from Aleppo shares her story in new book, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171031_49844.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taxidermy Art 26 mins – ““We’re working with animals that were part of the food chain that maybe never got to see a life past that food chain.” At the link find the title, “Oct 25 Dead animals into art? Meet these women ‘rogue taxidermists’ 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171025_89545.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tech Giant Regulation 48 mins – “Congressional calls for more regulation, oversight of Facebook. Google, Amazon, Apple also getting scrutiny. Is it time?” At the link find the title, “Reining In The Tech Giants, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_559582292.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ten Emerging Technologies 38 mins – “We talk to cartoonist and author Zach Weinersmith about his latest book, Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That’ll Improve and/or Ruin Everything, co-written with his wife, parasitologist Kelly Weinersmith.” At the link find the title, “Ten Emerging Technologies That’ll Improve and/or Ruin Everything, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files d34e7aed-4cdd-49dd-b667-9e400cac937c.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Fianances 26 mins – “Author and academic Aisha Ahmad says the key to understanding militant Islamist groups’ success is through local business support.” At the link find the title, “Oct 23 | Follow the money to understand why Islamist groups succeed, says Jihad & Co author, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171023_56864.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Response 48 mins – “Do we have to accept life with soft target attacks?” At the link find the title, “Terrorism Hits NYC Again; How Do We Protect Soft Targets? Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_561618747.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tesla P1 101 mins – “Elon Musk is considered by many to be a technological visionary. In this, the first in a series of shows about Elons projects, we look at Hyperloop and The Boring Company and the practicalities of what Elon’s trying to achieve. With John Chidgey & Vic Hudson.” At the link find the title, “Tesla 81: Boring Loops, Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files Pragmatic-E081-Boring-Loops.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tesla P2 85 mins – “Elon Musk is considered by many to be a technological visionary. In this, the second in a series of shows about Elons projects, we look at Tesla, its history, its cars the practicalities of what Elon’s trying to achieve. With John Chidgey & Caleb Elston.” At the link find the title, “82: Tesla Part One, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files Pragmatic-E082-Tesla-Part-One.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thelonious Monk 21 mins – “A South Sudanese refugee and the music that cuts his heart to pieces. Thelonious Monk’s North Carolina roots. Music and home. Pieces by Nusaibah Kofar-Naisa and John Biewen.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Resistance 64 mins – “CNN political contributor Van Jones has been hailed as one who tries to “fight the right way.” He draws on his years of activism and political analysis to take aim at the failures of both parties and to show the nation how to focus on practical answers to problems that affect us regardless of region or political ideology. Join us as Jones shares his blueprint for the fight we must wage as a nation. He asks us to abandon the politics of accusation and set fire to the traditional ways of political problem-solving. Jones will challenge us to change the way we think about politics so we can all get down to the vital business of solving—together—some of our nation’s toughest problems.” At the link find the title, “Van Jones: Beyond the Messy Truth, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171023_Van Jones Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Typewriter History 8 mins – “Each year since 1959, the ABC has sparked conversation about critical ideas with the Boyer Lectures. In 2017, presenter Genevieve Bell addresses the role of technology in building our future, and what it means to be human, and Australian, in a digital world. In this excerpt from her third lecture, Genevieve Bell traces the economic and social changes brought on by one key piece of technology – the typewriter.” At the link right-click “Dwnload audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ukraine Role in Russia 24 mins – “Jacob Weisberg talks to the writer and historian Anne Applebaum about the historical context of the Trump-Russian scandal.” At the link find the title, “Ukrainian Politics in America, -up menu. Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM9643747396.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undercover Terrorist 24 mins – “Tamer Elnoury is a member of a very small club: FBI undercover agents who are Muslim, speak Arabic and are willing to try to infiltrate suspected terrorist groups.” At the link find the title, “Oct 27 How a Muslim undercover FBI agent foiled Via Rail terror plot in Canada, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171027_24869.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela el Sistema 55 mins – “’Playing for Their Lives’ – a documentary by Philip Coulter about El Sistema: a radical music education programme in Venezuela designed to get young people off the streets founded by Juan Antonio Abru.” At the link find the title, “El Sistema: How the power of music helped change Venezuelan lives, right-click “Media files ideas 20171023 92689.mp3“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wild Fires and Climate 29 mins – “Most of us associate Napa and Sonoma counties with delicious wine and rolling hills. But this year those hills were ablaze. Dozens lost their lives, thousands were displaced, and millions of people suffered from the fire’s noxious fumes. This week on Sea Change Radio our guests are journalist Jeremy Miller whose recent article about the fires appeared in the New Yorker magazine, and Ed Struzik who just published a book chronicling the connection between wildfires and climate change.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wolf Reintroduction 48 mins – “The wolves of Yellowstone. They’re back. They’re still wolves. It’s complicated.” At the link find the title, “Wolves Of Yellowstone Are Back, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_561388162.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wood Heating 95 mins – “Ben developed Whole Systems Design, LLC as a land-based response to biological and cultural extinction and the increasing separation between people and elemental things. Life as a designer, builder, ecologist, tree-tender, and back country traveler continually informs Ben’s integrative approach to developing landscapes and buildings. His home landscape and the WSD studio site in Vermont’s Mad River Valley serve as a proving ground for the regenerative land developments featured in the projects of Whole Systems Design. Ben has studied architecture and landscape architecture at the graduate level and holds a master’s degree in land-use planning and design. He has conducted more than 300 site development consultations across the US and abroad, and has facilitated dozens of courses on property selection, permaculture design, and resilient systems…. He joins us today to discuss Winter preparations, firewood processing and storage, heating your home and domestic water with WOOD. Like why isn’t everyone doing this?  We also chat about his permaculture site in year 14 – huge fruit year here despite cool rainy summer.  About 20 types of fruit and another 50 varieties within that.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 314 – Nov 17, 2017: 3D Bioprinting, African Agriculture, Aged Care in Australia, American Troops in Africa, Astronaut Kelly, Autonomous Cars, Ayn Rand, Bee Dieoff, Black Hat Conference, Black Lives Matter Founder, Blind College Student, Broadband in New Mexico, Captain Khan’s Father, Checklist Creation, China’s Leadership Change, Chinese Investing, Disaster Recovery, Discrimination Problems, Ebola and Eye Disease, Farming Business, Farmland Zillow, Fire in Large Buildings, Fish Farms on Land, Gravity Wave Detection, Greek Prime Minister, Gun Violence, Head Transplants, Microbiome Research, Migrant Health Issues, Ocean Acidification, Oysters in New York, Puerto Rico Hurricane Recovery, Racism on Campus, Ruminant Revolution, Russia Sports Doping, Science Cool Tools, Sex Activity by the Handicapped, Sexual Violence, Sharing Cities, Simpsons, Soldiers of Fortune, Soviet Female Sniper Corps, Technology Change Resistance, Teen Angst, Teen Anxiety Crisis, Terrorism Control in U.S., Testing New Medicines, Trump Dissected, UFO’s, Uganda Bananas, Unemployment Rates, Wine Country Wildfires, Women Motorcyclists, Workplace Relations

Exercise your ears: the 109 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 441 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 18,030 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 86GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 400 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Bioprinting 33 mins – “This episode we take on a future full of bioprinted replacement organs. You asked for more hopeful futures, this is about as hopeful as they get! We start by hearing a bit about what the current organ donation market is like from Christine Gentry, who donated a kidney to a stranger. Then we talk to Dr. Anthony Atala, the Director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and of the world’s leading regenerative medicine specialists. Dr. Atala has implanted organs grown from the cells of patients themselves in clinical trials. Then Kelly and Zach Weinersmith join us to talk about what they learned while writing a chapter about bioprinting for their new book Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That’ll Improve and/or Ruin Everything. And finally, we get an impassioned indictment of 3D printing file formats from Meghan McCarthy, Project Lead for the NIH 3D Print Exchange.” At the link find the title, “Easy Bake Organs, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Advertisement Tracking 35 mins – “This year we’ve gotten one question more than any other from listeners: is Facebook eavesdropping on my conversations and showing me ads based on the things that I say? This week, Alex investigates.” At the link find the title, “#109 Is Facebook Spying on You?” right-click “Media files GLT8773340180.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Agriculture 43 mins – “In today’s podcast we speak with science journalist and author Mark Lynas. Mark has been a central figure in the discussion of biotechnology, particularly in regard to its role in ensuring food security in the Developing World. In the 1990’s and early 2000’s you could find Mark destroying test plots of genetically engineered crops. Later he would reconsider his view, and support the technology, especially as it can be applied to help issues of food security. Mark discusses the situation on the ground in Africa, the various threats to production, the innovations that can address them, and the resistance toward adoption of new technology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aged Care in Australia 60 mins – “Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt addresses the National Press Club on the topic ‘Australia’s New Age of Opportunity’” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Ken Wyatt, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files NPCc_KenWyatt 2510_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Brain 66 mins – “Dr. John Medina has spent his career in bio-engineering, but he also has a deep interest in how the brain works. In his latest book Brain Rules for Aging Well: 10 Principles for Staying Vital, Happy, and Sharp, he presents our knowledge brain aging in an engaging manner that can be enjoyed by readers of all backgrounds. This month’s episode of Brain Science (BS 138) we discuss some of the most important principles for nourishing brains as we age. He describes what he calls the “dopamine lollipop,” which is the surge of dopamine created by activities such as teaching and physical activities like dancing. Some of his ideas reinforce what we have discussed in previous episodes, but there are new ideas that are relevant to listeners of all ages.” At the link right-click “FREE audio mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agriculture Investing 39 mins – “Chris Narayanan is a US Marine Corps veteran, and the President & CEO of GA Capital, a veteran-owned investment banking firm that provides services to both companies and investors linked to the agribusiness supply chain. Chris obtained hands-on experience in the agricultural industry by being a ranch hand in his youth and working at investment banks that had agribusinesses as one of their largest clients. Because of his experience, Chris has developed extensive knowledge in valuing different types of agricultural companies and enterprises to measure investment suitability. In this episode, Chris shares his experience working on Wall Street as an investment banker. He talks about his background in agriculture and how he ended up founding his own investment banking company that primarily services that business category. He also shares tips and ideas regarding investment banking as well as his insight on the future of agricultural business investments.” At the link find the title, “Future of Agriculture 076: Investment Banking in Agriculture with Wall Street Cowboy Chris Narayanan of GA Capital Final,” right-click “Media files 07620Investment20Banking20in20Agriculture20with20Wall20Street20Cowboy20Chris20Narayanan20of20GA20Capital20Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Background 53 mins – “On the eve of Ken Ford’s induction into the Florida Inventor’s Hall of Fame, co-host Dawn Kernagis convinced IHMC’s director and CEO that it was the perfect time to have the chairman of STEM-Talk’s double secret selection committee take a turn as a guest on the podcast. Today’s show features part one of Dawn’s two-part interview with her STEM-Talk co-host Ken Ford. …In this episode, Ken will share some of the pioneering work underway at IHMC. Dawn also asks Ken about highly vocal critics of AI such as Elon Musk. Episode 50, the second part of Dawn’s interview with Ken, will transition to a conversation about Ken and IHMC’s research into human performance. Their conversation will cover exercise, the ketogenic diet and ketone esters with the goal of extending health span and perhaps longevity. In terms of background, Dr. Ken Ford is a co-founder of IHMC, which has grown into one of the nation’s premier research organizations with world-class scientists and engineers investigating a broad range of topics. Ken is the author of hundreds of scientific papers and six books. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Tulane University. He is a Fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, a charter Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, and a member of the Association for Computing Machinery, the IEEE Computer Society, and the National Association of Scholars.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Object Recognition 26 mins – “Deep learning can seem like magic. But behind that magic there’s often drudgery — painstakingly labeled data is key to many deep learning projects. “It’s something that has slowed down our industry because the reliance on human annotated data … it’s physically slow,” says Matt Scott, co-founder and CTO of Malong Technologies in a conversation with AI Podcast host Noah Kravitz. New techniques promise to free humans from this task, and set deep learning loose on a far broader set of problems — like automatically recognizing the products in our shopping carts — Scott explains. Founded in 2014, Malong — based in China — developed an AI algorithm that learns from the web’s own data, allowing it to classify images that are both “noisy” and unlabeled. “That’s sort of the context of the problem space we’re working in — how can we access this large-scale data that exists on there on the web, for example,” Scott said. Earlier this year, Scott and his team entered the WebVision challenge hosted at the CVPR computer vision conference. Competing against more than 100 companies and academic labs, Malong emerged victorious, achieving a 94.78 percent recognition rate. By contrast, human recognition clocks in at 95 percent. The platform Malong has built on this technology, Product AI, can take a small photo of a product, and then apply deep learning to parse through images and identify what it’s looking at. “To get to the next level, we’re going to have to break past the barrier of human annotation,” said Scott. “Now we are in this new area where we are not limited.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

al-Shabaab in Somalia 29 mins – “Somalia’s information minister says the Somali people are more united than ever before to fight al-Shabaab.” At the link find the title, “Oct 25 Mogadishu attack unites Somalis against al-Shabaab, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171025_28517.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon HQ Relocation 83 mins – “On Thursday, October 19, the Metropolitan Policy Program and CityLab co-hosted an event to address the implications for all cities beyond Amazon’s HQ2 transaction, and delve into what cities can learn from Amazon’s wish list concerning preparation for the disruptive nature of tech and retail, investment in local talent, quality infrastructure, and place-making.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Troops in Africa 48 mins – “The four American Green Berets who died in Niger. We’ll look at the mission, and the uproar over President Trump’s comments on their deaths.” At the link find the title, “Questions Swirl After 4 U.S. Troops Die In Niger, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_558816241.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronaut Kelly 46 mins – “Former astronaut Scott Kelly joins us to talk his out-of-this-world year in space, and where we might be headed next – think Mars.” At the link find the title, “Astronaut Scott Kelly’s View From Space, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_558608953.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autonomous Cars 29 mins – “On the last episode of StartUp, we followed the government-sponsored desert race that launched the self-driving car industry. This week, we see what the industry looks like today. You’ve probably heard that Google, Uber, and Tesla are pumping resources into developing autonomous vehicles. But there are plenty of smaller, younger companies in the space. What are they doing to keep up with the major players?” At the link find the title, “The Race for a Driverless Future (Season 6, Episode 8), Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT8784603782.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ayn Rand 65 mins – “Jennifer Burns of Stanford University and the Hoover Institution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about her biography of Ayn Rand, Goddess of the Market. They discuss Rand’s philosophy, her influence, her relationship with the conservative movement, and the intersection of her personal life with her philosophical principles.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bee Dieoff 33 mins– “What is killing the bees? And will we have enough food to eat if the bee-pocalypse becomes worse? We speak to Dave Goulson, Professor of Biology and Bumblebee ecologist at the University of Sussex, Judy Wu-Smart, Research Entomologist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and Steve Ellis, a beekeeper in Barrett, Minnesota.” At the link find the title, “The Bee-pocalypse, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT5815367896.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Behavioral Economics 19 mins – “Why do smart people make dumb decisions? Figuring that out won Richard Thaler a Nobel Prize.” At the link find the title, “#803: Nudge, Nudge, Nobel,” right-click “Media files 20171101_pmoney_pmpod803.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Hat Conference 39 mins – “The Communicators interviews four researchers at the Black Hat Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, about cybersecurity and how hackers operate.” At the link find the title, “Communicators at the Black Hat Cybersecurity Conference, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.485389.MP3-STD.mp3“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Lives Matter Founder 64 mins – “Co-founder of Black Lives Matter Patrisse Cullors, and founder of its international arm Rodney Diverlus address the National Press Club in Canberra.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Black Lives Matter founders, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files NPCc_BlackLives_0111_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind College Student 21 mins – “In this SSB Success Story Leah Martinson talks about how she navigated the transition from high school to college and to the workplace. How the services at SSB assisted her decision making and helped support her goal of owning her own business as an Integrative Health Coach. Leah graduated high school and became a Massage Therapist and realized that she wanted more, and she pursued her college career at the University of Minnesota and became a Certified Health Coach and now provides services to students within the very same program. Leah also works with an organization and balances her time between work and home. Becoming a mom has changed her life and Leah is always looking for that creative solution as her business she says is always going to be a work in progress….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Michigan 29 mins – “After being told by the large telephone incumbent that he could pay a nominal fee in rural Michigan to get phone service, John Reigle built a home. And when the telephone company changed its mind after quoting an outrageous price, he created a cooperative that is building fiber networks in a very rural region of Michigan. General Manager Ron Siegel of Allband Communications Cooperative joins us for episode 276 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast. We talk about the realities of connecting the most rural unconnected, while fighting for what meager support is available from state and federal sources. Along the way we talk about how the cooperative grew up and where its future lies in an uncertain time for local networks as the federal government showers money on the biggest incumbents that aren’t really investing in rural America.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from here.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in New Mexico 26 mins – “The Kit Carson Electric Cooperative serves rural north central New Mexico and has been an early investor in a fiber-optic network that has brought high quality Internet service to a state largely stuck with 90’s era DSL from incumbent CenturyLink. Luis Reyes, CEO of Kit Carson, joins us for episode 277 to discuss how the utility is ensuring its members all have high-quality Internet access available and some of the lessons they have learned in building the network. They have seen population growth and a rise in small businesses, especially people who can work from home. One of they key lessons is how to manage sign-ups. They have a significant waiting list, from a combination of greater demand than expected and the challenges of managing the home install process. Finally, we talk about how Kit Carson is working with another local cooperative to expand that high-quality access in New Mexico.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from here.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burr Conspiracy 19 mins – “We’re revisiting an episode from previous hosts! In March of 1805, Burr left the political sphere and moved west, but his story doesn’t end there.” At the link find the title, “SYMHC Classics: A Conspiracy Starring Aaron Burr, Oct , 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-10-20-symhc-classic-burr-conspiracy.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Indigenous Native Rights – “Why has inequality for Indigenous women been a part of law for more than 140 years?” At the link find the title, “Nov 2 | ‘This is our birthright’: Indigenous senators call on PM to end discrimination against women in Indian Act, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171102_81572.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Captain Khan’s Father 24 mins – “We all need to be heartened that the majority of America, majority of the world stands with fairness” At the link find the title, “Oct 24 ‘I know what it feels like to live under authoritarian regimes’: Khizr Khan, father of slain U.S. soldier, 2017” right-click “Media files current_20171024_35337.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Change My View 72 mins– “For computer scientist Chenhao Tan and his team, the internet community called Change My View offered something amazing, a ready-made natural experiment that had been running for years. All they had to do was feed it into the programs they had designed to understand the back-and-forth between human beings and then analyze the patterns the emerged. When they did that, they discovered two things: what kind of arguments are most likely to change people’s minds, and what kinds of minds are most likely to be changed.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 112-Change My View_rebroadcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Checklist Creation 51 mins – “The simple “to-do” list may be one of humanity’s oldest tools for keeping organized. But checklists are also proving essential in many modern-day workplaces, from operating rooms to the cockpits of jumbo jets. This week, we explore the power of the humble checklist to help us stay on track and focus on what’s important, particularly when pressure is intense and the stakes are high.” At the link find the title, “Check Yourself, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171030_hiddenbrain_hb_pr_86-5_checklists.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China’s Leadership Change 132 mins – “On November 2, the John L. Thornton China Center at Brookings hosted a two-part event to analyze the outcomes of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) 19th Party Congress “ At the link Double-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Investing 21 mins– “A Chinese company pays millions of dollars for a failing hotel in a small, rural town. We follow the trail of money, and it explains the world economy.” At the link find the title, “#802: The Hotel at the Center of the World,” right-click “Media 20171027_pmoney_pmpod802.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chipotle Founder 52 mins – “In 1992, Steve Ells was a classically trained chef working in a high-end restaurant in San Francisco. But after eating a burrito at a local taqueria, he got an idea: to sell burritos and earn enough money to open his own gourmet restaurant. The first Chipotle opened in Denver the following year. Bringing his culinary training to taqueria-style service, Steve Ells helped transform the way we eat fast food. PLUS for our postscript “How You Built That,” how Alexander Harik turned his mom’s recipe for za’atar spread—a fragrant Middle Eastern condiment—into Zesty Z: The Za’atar Company.” At the link find the title, “Chipotle: Steve Ells, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171027_hibt_newchipotle.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coincidences 51 mins – “Coincidences can make the everyday feel extraordinary. But are they magical, or just mathematical? On this week’s Radio Replay, we explore our deep fascination with these moments of serendipity. New research suggests they reveal important things about how our minds work, and have a far more powerful effect on our lives than any of us imagine. We’ll also explore the phenomenon of “implicit egotism” — the idea that we’re drawn to people and things that remind us of ourselves.” At the link find the title, “Radio Replay: What’s In It For Me? Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171027_hiddenbrain_hb_radio_replay_what_s_in_it_for_me_-5cb71c4e-43ac-4b1c-93c5-b50e793929fb.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conservative Erickson 46 mins – “Big red state conservative voice Erick Erickson joins us to talk Trump, White House stability, and the country.” At the link find the title, “Erick Erickson Talks America Now, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_558346102.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DARPA Grand Challenge 46 mins – “In 2004, the U.S. government held a race unlike anything that had come before it. It was called the DARPA Grand Challenge, and it followed a 150-mile route through the rugged Mojave Desert. The participants were cars, trucks, ATVs, and one motorcycle. The catch? Each vehicle was required to drive itself—no remote control, no human intervention. Dozens of engineers and robot enthusiasts worked relentlessly to make it happen. The Carnegie Mellon team was a favorite, but every team faced hurdles—from smashed sensors and exploding toilets to poorly placed tumbleweeds. Was the Grand Challenge too grand for its time?” At the link find the title, The Grand Challenge (Season 6, Episode 7), Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT5217659928.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dinosaurs with Feathers 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the development of theories about dinosaur feathers, following discoveries of fossils which show evidence of feathers. All dinosaurs were originally thought to be related to lizards – the word ‘dinosaur’ was created from the Greek for ‘terrible lizard’ – but that now appears false. In the last century, discoveries of fossils with feathers established that at least some dinosaurs were feathered and that some of those survived the great extinctions and evolved into the birds we see today. There are still many outstanding areas for study, such as what sorts of feathers they were, where on the body they were found, what their purpose was and which dinosaurs had them.At the link find the title, “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Recovery 12 mins– “Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico on September 20 and caused unprecedented damage affecting the island’s 3.4 million inhabitants (see Figure 1Figure 1Streets in Puerto Rico Blocked by Debris from Hurricane Maria.). Though no one in Puerto Rico was spared at least some impact, the poor and vulnerable were disproportionately affected. Loss of communication and electricity, scarcity of water, isolation of some residents, slow coordination of the aid that has been sent, and the magnitude and scope of the necessary repairs all merit a call for help from and the engagement of the global community. Indeed, Puerto Ricans and U.S. Virgin Islanders are U.S. citizens and expect the same federal aid and support during natural disasters as the rest of the United States. In contrast to sudden disasters, hurricanes often allow officials and populations a window of opportunity to prepare, evacuate people, and update emergency plans. Yet our infrastructure, including the health care infrastructure, was already in crisis, and the much milder hit from Hurricane Irma 2 weeks earlier had caused a partial collapse of the power system. In addition, the island’s economic situation, causing concerns about lack of income or reductions in wages, fueled a sense of uncertainty and despair among many Puerto Ricans, as we were faced with the most powerful hurricane to hit Puerto Rico in nearly a century. We prepared for the worst while hoping for the best — and we got the worst.” At the link right-click “Download” from under the author’s picture and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Discrimination Problems 53 mins – “Let’s examine our complicated relationship with legacy. Featuring: Revisionist History, Fresh Air, Code Switch, The Secret Life of Canada, Cosby Unraveled, Stuff You Missed in History Class.” At the link find the title, “From Cosby to Wonder Woman: complicated legacies,” right-click “Download From Cosby to Wonder Woman: complicated legaciesand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doug Wilder 24 mins – “Former Virginia Governor Doug Wilder (D) explains to Chuck Todd why he is withholding his endorsement in the tightening race for governor.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola and Eye Disease 27 mins – “[First of three items.]Around a quarter of survivors of the Ebola outbreak that started back in 2014 in West Africa have developed eye problems, including uveitis and cataracts. Dr Jessica Shantha and Dr Steven Yeh, both assistant professors of ophthalmology at Emory University in Atlanta US talked to Claudia Hammond about how they’ve been studying and treating the conditions. Loneliness is a huge problem amongst carers. Connecting via social media is a solution for some, but not everyone is comfortable with the technology. Roland Pease has been to Bath University to meet a team working on a project using a simple radio-like box to connect up carers so they can talk to each other. The microbiome, our personal mixture of bacteria and other microbes, varies a lot between individuals and still no one knows what’s ideal. Greg Gloor, Professor of Biochemistry at Western University in Canada and colleagues have been studying 1000 people in China from the age of three to over a hundred, including an impressive two hundred over 95 year olds. Could their microbiome hold the secrets to a long and healthy life?” At the link find the title, “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Technology 48 mins – “This podcast is a reflection by Dr. Wesley Fryer on some of the educational technology related challenges as well as aspirations he currently has as a school director of technology, technology integration coach, and after-school “STEAM Studio” co-teacher. These challenges include cultivating a school learning culture supportive of creativity, innovation, whimsy, and cross-curricular connections. They also include helping students transition into and succeed within a comparatively open-ended and less structured after-school learning environment, where they are invited to create, play, and express themselves while developing both digital literacy as well as artistic skills. Last of all, the challenges and aspirations include more “geeky” topics like planning for school infrastructure fiber optic line upgrades, managing bandwidth on a network with increasing numbers of IP-based surveillance cameras, learning about traffic and packet analysis tools, and firewall access reporting. Refer to the podcast shownotes for links to many of the referenced resources from this podcast including Dr. Mitch Resnik’s new book, “Lifelong Kindergarten: Cultivating Creativity through Projects, Passion, Peers, and Play” and the upcoming (October 2017) free online class “Learning Creative Learning” by the MIT Lifelong Kindergarten Group.” At the link find the title, “Podcast455: EdTech Struggles and Aspirations , Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-09-21-speedofcreativity.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Business 80 mins – “Today we’re digging back into the archives for one of my favorite interviews, our very first episode of the Farmer to Farmer Podcast, with my good friend Liz Graznak. This one was recorded in early October of 2014. In 2014, Liz was farming a little over seven acres of ground in central Missouri, and selling her certified organic produce through a CSA, farmers market, and to restaurants and grocery stores. In her fifth year of running her farm, Liz reflects on the challenges and rewards of running a business, managing employees, and doing all of the other stuff that isn’t farming, but is absolutely integral to it. We dig into some post-harvest handling, talk about winter production, and discuss how her two-year-old has changed life on her farm. Liz also shares her experience becoming part of her very conventional rural neighborhood.” At the link right click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in New York 79 mins – “Wendy and Asher Burkhart-Spiegel raise about twelve acres of vegetables at Common Thread CSA in Madison, New York, in the central part of the state. With twenty years of experience doing CSA, Wendy and Asher have continued to emphasize CSA in their current operation, with additional sales at farmers markets and to wholesale accounts. At Common Thread, Wendy and Asher maintain a community-focused vision for the farm. Prior to Common Thread, Wendy and Asher managed a non-profit CSA farm in Poughkeepsie, and we talk about how moving to their own farm had an impact on the experience of engaging with the community, as well as other aspects of their farming experience. We dig into their programs for subsidizing shares, their education-focused apprenticeship program, and the realities of an increasing minimum wage in New York. Out in the field, Wendy and Asher share their development of a tractor-scale permanent raised bed system, and how they’ve sourced and modified tools to support that system. We also talk about the solutions they’ve found for successfully cultivating in their raised bed system, season extension in the field and the cooler, and the planning they do for CSA program that includes boxed deliveries and free-choice on-farm pickup.” At the link right click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Smart 69 mins – “Farmer Jenny Quiner of Dog Patch Urban Gardens in Des Moines, Iowa talks about farm startup, growth, and unique ways to sell your product.” At the link find the title, “FSFS119: Starting and Growing an On Site Farmstand and Farm with Jenny Quiner of Dog Patch Urban Gardens,” right-click “Media files FSFS_119_2017_Jenny.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farmland Zillow 61 mins – “Steven Brockshus is the CEO and Founder of TERVA, an online real estate marketplace dedicated to empowering farmland professionals with knowledge, insights, and data. They aim to build a marketplace not only to educate, but to also connect with people looking to buy and sell farmland. He aims to bring the agricultural real estate industry online to shift the industry and how people interact and think about farmland. In this episode, Steven shares his story on how he started TERVA as well as the moments and people in his life that inspired him to do so. He talks about what it can do now and what it sets to do for farmers in the future, and why TERVA is a great resource for those planning to retire on the countryside.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Fire in Large Buildings 24 mins – “Fire is a rare but persistent danger in tall buildings. There have been several major high rise fires around the world in recent years, notable among them the 2017 Grenfell Tower fire in London that killed at least 80 people. That event highlights the risks that may be presented by the materials used in construction and rehabilitation. To explore the connection between building materials and fire risk, we talk with Robert E. Solomon, Division Manager for Building Fire Protection of the National Fire Protection Association.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fish Farms on Land 30 mins – “A new study suggests farmed fish could be key to feeding a growing global population. Fish are an efficient source of protein and already over half the fish we now eat are farmed. However, this phenomenal growth in the production of salmon and other popular seafood has had a detrimental effect on their wild cousins. Wild salmon numbers have fallen and conservationists blame the fish farms for the spread of disease, sea lice and the pollution of habitats. Most farmed fish also require a diet which includes smaller wild fish in order to help them create Omega-3 which has well documented health benefits for us all. This too has an impact on the wild fish stocks with many key species now under pressure. Tom Heap investigates the dramatic and novel approaches which the industry may need to adopt in order to keep up with our appetite for fish suppers and it seems the best solution for the health of our oceans might be to take the fish we eat and the food we need to feed them out of the sea altogether.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Forward 27 mins – “On paper it doesn’t make any sense. One out of every six people in the United States lack access to sufficient food, yet 40 percent of the food produced in this country goes to waste. These statistics may be staggering, but they aren’t unique to the U.S. According to the new documentary WASTED: The Story of Food Waste, more than 1.3 billion pounds of food gets thrown away across the globe each year, while 800 million people worldwide go hungry. But Rick Nahmias wasn’t thinking about these stunning figures while walking through his neighborhood in Valley Glen, California in January 2009. He was a photographer who’d worked extensively with the state’s migrant workers, but on that day he was just trying to get some exercise for his dog, Scout. Glancing at the citrus trees in the yards around him, he realized that most of the fruit — food that could feed otherwise hungry people — would fall to the ground and go to waste unless someone did something. So he did. With the help of just one other person, Nahmias set to work picking tangerines from a single backyard. By the end of the day, they’d harvested more than 100 pounds of fruit. And Nahmias knew he’d stumbled onto an idea with enormous potential. Nahmias used that idea to launch Food Forward. During the past 8 years, Food Forward has rescued more than 42 million pounds (over 140 million servings) of produce. The organization has moved beyond just harvesting backyard fruit trees and today works with public orchards and farmers markets to take food that would otherwise be wasted and use it to help hunger relief agencies across eight Southern California counties. Each month, food recovered by Food Forward feeds more than 100,000 people. And Nahmias says it’s just the beginning. Tune in and learn more about his two-birds-one-stone solution for fighting hunger and food waste.” At the link find the title, “Feeding Others by Fighting Waste, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files Crazy_Good_Turns_Food_Forward.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Funeral Costs 16 mins – “Today on the show: death. We have four stories about how people prepare for death and what they leave behind for the living.” At the link find the title, “#801: The Death Show Friday, October 20, 2017, right-click “Media files 20171020_pmoney_pmpod801v2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genocide 49 mins – “Recorded on February 14, 2017 Norman Naimark, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and an expert on Eastern Europe and genocides throughout history, brings his considerable expertise to Uncommon Knowledge to discuss the history of genocides from ancient to modern times. Peter Robinson sits down with Naimark to discuss his latest book, Genocide: A World History….” At the link find the title, “Genocides: A World History featuring Norman Naimark, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171011-naimark.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gorbachev 59 mins – “Author and professor emeritus at Amherst College William Taubman discusses his biography of Mikhail Gorbachev, the last man to lead the Soviet Union.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with William Taubman, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.486360.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gravity Wave Detection 7 mins – “There was a new announcement from LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, recently. Gravitational waves were first predicted by Einstein. They’re ripples in the fabric of space that move at the speed of light, created by huge events – like colliding stars or black holes. Despite the magnitude of these events, Einstein thought it would impossible to observe them. However, 100 years later, scientists did find them. Two black holes collided, creating gravitation waves that were picked up by LIGO. This week, they announced a fifth detection. But this one is different, as Astronomer Royal, Professor Lord Martin Rees explained to Graihagh Jackson. …The announcement was made last Monday and the lead paper has 3,000 authors which is, I think, a record at least for astronomy, and those are the 1300 authors involved in the LIGO experiment and the gravitational wave experiment called VIRGO in Italy. Plus also the many hundreds involved in the other observatories which have looked in all other wavebands for evidence of this follow-up. They’ve been observing this object, which is in a galaxy about 100 million light years away for the last couple of months – it was actually detected on August 17th.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greek Prime Minister 74 mins – “On Wednesday, October 18, Foreign Policy at Brookings and Brookings’s Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy hosted Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras of Greece for an Alan and Jane Batkin International Leaders Forum.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence 29 mins – “This week on The Bookshelf, author Joe Hill of Exeter, N.H. joins Peter Biello in studio. Hill’s new book, Strange Weather, is a collection of four short novels. In one, the sky rains needles that rip to pieces anyone unlucky enough to be outside. In another, a skydiver gets stuck on a cloud. And in a story without any supernatural connection, people with easy access to guns use them to devastating effect. Joe Hill is the author of many works, including the novels Horns, NOS4A2, and The Fireman.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gut Microbiome 56 mins – “Gut Revolution seeks to sort the facts from the faeces in an observational series that follows two people with debilitating gut issues on their quest for better health. Garry has tried it all to lose weight, from the Biggest Loser to meal replacement shakes. And despite temporary victories, the kilos always pile back on. Are Garry’s gut bacteria keeping him fat and can the Gut Revolution help him? Nutrition scientist Dr Joanna McMillan and her team of experts explore new and controversial science that suggests gut bacteria might just be affecting our appetites and moods.” At the link right-click “Download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Head Transplants 28 mins – “Stephen Juan talks with Lachlan Whatmore and Ian Woolf about keeping a severed head alive , Head transplants – HEAVEN? by Ian Woolf, RE: Your brains by Jonathan Coulton.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Humanitarianism 49 mins – “Information communication technologies and the data they produce are transforming how natural and manmade disasters alike unfold. These technologies are also affecting how populations behave and organizations respond when these events occur. In this talk, Nathaniel Raymond — founding Director of the Signal Program on Human Security and Technology at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI) of the Harvard Chan School of Public Health – addresses the ethical, legal and technical implications of this pivotal moment in the history of humanitarianism.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infidelity 66 mins – “Ten years ago therapist and author Esther Perel took a big turn in her career. She was a psychotherapist known for her clinical work with intercultural and interfaith couples. She has since turned her attention to relationships and sex. In 2007 she wrote a book titled Mating in Captivity: Unlocking Erotic Intelligence. In 2013 she did a TED Talk, The Secret to Desire in the Long Term Relationship, which has been viewed more than ten million times. Two years ago, she gave another popular TED talk, Rethinking Infidelity. That talk led to a new book, The State of Affairs: Rethinking Infidelity. Debbie talks to Esther about marriage, polyamory, and adultery. “Many affairs, if they were not discovered and they were left alone, they would die a natural death.” At the link find the title, “Esther Perel, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files Esther-Perel.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Outside Silicon Valley – “During some recent travels, I started noticing the comments and suggestions that “being part of Silicon Valley must be exciting”. As I paid more attention, it came across as almost hero worship of Silicon Valley and the companies its has launched. It’s like people believe that innovation outside Silicon Valley is a rare if not impossible occurrence. Innovation can come from anywhere such as the result Hurricane Katrina, a taxi drive in NYC working on new medical innovations and the solution to predictors killing livestock in Africa. While many of these innovations start out as solutions to immediate hyper local issues, they can and do turn into products and services that we all benefit from….Remember that innovation does not equal technology. There are an unlimited number of ways to apply innovation to what you do….” At the link find the title, “Innovation Outside Silicon Valley S13 Ep34, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files Innovation Outside Silicon Valley_S13_Ep34.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. At the link find the title, “Innovation Outside Silicon Valley S13 Ep34,” right-click “Media files Innovation_Outside_Silicon_Valley_S13_Ep34.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran Nuclear Deal 48 mins – “On Friday, President Trump came out swinging, rhetorically, on the Iran nuclear deal. Said he won’t certify Iran’s complying, even though everybody basically says they are. Said it’s terrible. Said Congress needs to fix it. Said he could still pull the US out. Now what? European allies are not buying what Trump’s selling. His own administration is divided. Critics say he’s risking war. This hour, On Point: Beyond North Korea. President Trump goes after Iran.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jimmy Fallon, etc 48 mins – “Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week: Jimmy Fallon On The School Of ‘SNL’ And His Tendency To Smile Too Much: “There was a report card from kindergarten and the comment from the teacher was, ‘Jimmy smiles too much,’ ” Fallon says. “I think I would smile even when I was getting yelled at.” On The Centennial Of His Birth, A Look Back At Thelonious Monk’s Jazz Legacy: The jazz legend would have turned 100 today. Critic Kevin Whitehead says Monk’s music is “universally beloved, by jazz musicians across the stylistic spectrum who might agree about little else.” A Scholar And His Octogenarian Dad Take On Homer’s ‘Odyssey’: A few years ago, scholar Daniel Mendelsohn’s dad made an unusual request: He wanted to take his son’s seminar on Homer’s Odyssey. Mendelsohn looks back on that experience in his new memoir.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language Learning 77 mins – “Many of us have studied a foreign language in school at some point, but far fewer of us seem to actually speak a foreign language as adults. What gives? Well, there are many potential reasons — it could be that conversation isn’t emphasized as the much-easier-to-grade reading and writing assignments, it could be the poor choice of languages that depend on your school, or it could be that we don’t always see quick enough growth to stay motivated. A classroom still can be a good place to start learning a language, but it’s clearly not without its drawbacks. Luckily for us language nerds, we have the internet now, and with it come nearly limitless choices on how to move forward.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Learning Process 30 mins – “In one of the most important, surprising and foundational podcast episodes a teacher can listen to, Dr. Robert Bjork from UCLA shares what research teaches us about how we learn. What are teachers doing wrong? How can we get our students to retain what we teach them? Don’t miss this episode with Tim and Scott. The Bedley Bros recommend ListenWise for every classroom. Curated NPR stories for the classroom with comprehension questions. Sign up for free today at http://www.listenwise.comAt the link double-click “Download Episode” and select “Save File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leonardo da Vinci 47 mins – “Leonardo da Vinci was the most creative genius in history, says historian Walter Isaacson in a big new biography, and it’s hard not to believe. The man who painted the Mona Lisa was a volcano of inquiry and creativity in anatomy, mechanics, art, optics, music, birds, flying machines, geology, weaponry, the human heart. He reached across disciplines like no one before and few since. Science, art, humanities, technology. This hour, On Point: Walter Isaacson lights up Leonardo da Vinci.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Listenwise Founder 29 mins – “Tim and Scott chat with innovator and entrepreneur Monica Brady-Myerov as she shares about the power of Listenwise, a free resource for teachers to use with their classes. Listenwise curates NPR podcasts and organizes them by subject and teaching standards. And check out the quizzes! Visit http://www.listenwise.com to sign up for free! Be sure to register your class for Global School Play Day and join the world-wide movement to return unstructured play back to this generation of youngsters. It’s free and it’s powerful. Visit http://www.globalschoolplayday.comAt the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Manafort Arrest 19 mins – “What do developments in the Mueller investigation mean for Trump? Are indictments proof that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia to sway the 2016 election? Reporter Matt Zapotosky answers these questions on a special break-in episode.” At the link find the title, “Special episode: Trump’s associates have been indicted. Can Trump himself emerge unscathed?, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 59f7cc0de4b0dc47945919f3_1351620000001-300040_t_1509411864278_44100_128_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mediatization 58 mins – “[5 mins poor sound at start]Social and communication theorists Nick Couldry and Andreas Hepp draw on their recent book “The Mediated Construction of Reality” (Polity 2016) to explore what happens to the concept and practice of ‘social order’ in the era of datafication. Today we are living in an era not just of mediatization, but deep mediatization where every element of social process and social life is composed of elements that have already been mediated. This shifts the question of media’s ‘influence’ on the social into a higher-dimensional problem. Datafication is a good example of this, and its tension with classical forms of social phenomenology will be discussed in detail in the talk. Developing particularly the social theory of Norbert Elias (and his concept of ‘figuration’), Couldry and Hepp explore how social theory can help us grasp the deep conflicts that exist today between our material systems of interdependence (particularly those focussed on information technology and data processing systems) and the normative principles such as freedom and autonomy. Such conflicts as legal theorists such as Julie Cohen note are crucial to the life of democratic subjects and the orders (democratic or not) that they inhabit.” At the link find the title, “https://soundcloud.com/berkmanklein/deep mediatization social order in the age of datafication?” right-click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Microbiome Research 43 mins – “Jack Gilbert talks about his studies on microbiomes of all sorts. He describes the origin of the Earth Microbiome Project, which has ambitions to characterize all microbial life on the planet, and talks more specifically about the built microbiome of manmade ecosystems such as hospitals. Gilbert explains how advances in scientific techniques have driven past microbiome-related discoveries and will continue to do so in the future.” At the link find the title, “068: Microbiomes everywhere with Jack Gilbert,” right-click “Media files MTM068.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Health Issues 58 mins – “ In Iowa and many other states, migrant workers are a big part of the economy. Many of these people don’t have time for and can’t afford regular medical care. But leaving them without care isn’t an option, either. Fortunately, there are organizations which engage with this population. The Carver College of Medicine, for instance, has a very strong emphasis on learning through serving the medically underserved. By setting up migrant health clinics where those workers live–in their often temporary and extremely basic housing communities–students can learn about the practice of medicine outside a doctor’s office or hospital while bringing badly needed healthcare to those who’d otherwise forgo it. Second-year med student Jesse White suggested a show on working with these populations. Joined by fellow second-year Erin Steele and retired Physician Assistant Peg Bouska, we discuss the non-ideal world of practicing medicine without the right spaces, equipment, systems, and tools…and what students learn about medicine by doing so.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Acidification 24 mins – “People in two communities – one in Alaska, one in New York State – wrestle with questions about energy and the environment. We listen in on democracy close to home. Stories by John Biewen and Jon Miller, edited by Deb George.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oysters in New York 48 mins – “…In 2013, the federal government launched its Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force and staged an architectural competition called Rebuild by Design. Orff’s firm SCAPE submitted an oyster-centric proposal called Living Breakwaters.The project received 60 million dollars of funding and will be carried out by the New York Governor’s Office of Storm Recovery. Now SCAPE is in the process of designing artificial oyster reef breakwaters off the south coast of Staten Island, which was once an epicenter of the city’s oyster economy and was also hit particularly hard during Sandy.The design has evolved a lot from the original rope-based proposal. The plan now is to build a necklace of offshore breakwaters out of large rocks and stones, and seed them with oysters so they grow into reefs.Much like a natural oyster reef, the Living Breakwaters are designed to  break up dangerous waves before they reach the shore. These will reduce coastal erosion, build beaches, and make storms less dangerous, but they won’t keep flood water out altogether.This project also aims to enhance the coast by reviving its ecosystem. In addition to reducing waves and filtering water, the living breakwaters will provide some of the habitat that oyster reefs once did. With the help of marine scientists, the landscape architects designed pockets within the breakwater structure they call “reef streets,” that provide shelter for juvenile fish. Of course, to realize this vision, Living Breakwaters is going to need a lot of oysters….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Accommodation 31 mins – “Things in Britain are changing rapidly. In Scotland the MacAlpin dynasty is rising, and with it comes the merging of the Scottish and Pictish cultures. A similar blending is happening in the Anglo Saxon regions. As we’ve see in the last few episodes – cities are changing, economies are emerging. And the sudden appearance of new placenames – some which are Danish and others that are a blend of Danish and Old English – tell us that cultures are changing too.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

President Pence 43 mins – “Though President Trump ran as an outsider, New Yorker writer Jane Mayer describes his vice president as “the connective tissue” between Trump and the billionaire donors in the Republican party.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Puerto Rico Hurricane Recovery 19 mins – “We need power as soon as possible. Otherwise, this is going to become a time bomb.” At the link find the title, “Nov 2 Puerto Rico still without power more than a month after Hurricane Maria, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171102_90496.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism on Campus 21 mins – “Racism, free speech, disciplinary decisions and the controversy engulfing Dalhousie University.” At the link find the title, “Oct 30 | ‘I have sex. Get over it’: Disability activists call for sex education, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171025_86738.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ruminant Revolution 37 mins – “Dr. Peter Ballerstedt is a Doctor of Animal Nutrition and is an expert in forage and ruminant nutrition in agriculture. He stepped out of the agriculture industry for some time and ventured in the tech world for many years. He came back because he realized a fantastic source of health could be found through leveraging animal agriculture, specifically ruminants. A stern believer in grass-based animal nutrition, Peter calls this – the potential of ruminants to lead the way towards healthier diets – the Ruminant Revolution. In this episode, Peter discusses what his Ruminant Revolution is all about. He addresses the need for ruminants and why it’s one of the best sustainable options to support an ever-growing human population. He also dives in on some facts regarding cultivable lands and current innovations in the ruminant agriculture industry.” At the link find the title, “Future of Agriculture 077: A Ruminant Revolution with Dr. Peter Ballerstedt,” right-click “Media files 07720FOA20A20Ruminant20Revolution20with20Dr.20Peter20Ballerstedt20Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian and the West 57 mins – “Panelists discuss the history of Russian foreign policy, and how themes seen through the last century of Russia’s relationship with the West might affect present and future U.S.-Russia relations.” At the link find the title, “Russia and the West: A Historical Perspective,, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171025 Russia and the West.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russia Sports Doping 60 mins – “On Thursday, Oct. 19, director Bryan Fogel, visited Washington for a screening of “Icarus” hosted by Governance Studies at Brookings. After the screening, Fogel joined a panel alongside “Icarus” producer Dan Cogan, Brookings Senior Fellow Benjamin Wittes, Brookings President Strobe Talbott, and The Atlantic’s Julia Ioffe to discuss the similarities between Russia’s doping scandal and compromise of the 2016 U.S. election, as well as the societal implications of these corruptions.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Cool Tools 46 mins – “Our guest this week is Simon Quellen Field. Simon is a chemist and former Google software engineer and is the author of over a dozen books, including Gonzo Gizmos, Return of Gonzo Gizmos, Culinary Reactions, Why is Milk White, Elements Vault, Why There’s Antifreeze In Your Toothpaste, Electronics for Artists and, most recently, Boom!: The Chemistry and History of Explosives. He’s the author of the science toy website SciToys.com and several novels.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Activity by the Handicapped 36 mins“People don’t know how to understand disabled bodies as desirable.” At the link find the title, “Oct 30 | ‘I have sex. Get over it’: Disability activists call for sex education, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171030_92687.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Assaults on Campus 51 mins – “The origins of the viral anti sexual harassment campaign” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harrassment Stories 48 mins – “With two short words, women around the world are shining a light on the pervasive nature of sexual harassment and assault.” At the link find the title, “#MeToo: Women Share Stories Of Sexual Harassment, Assault, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_558587763.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Violence 21 mins – “If we are too careless with our language, we trivialize the real assault problems and the victims of real assault.” At the link find the title, “Oct 24 ‘Unfair to men’: Margaret Wente criticizes #MeToo campaign for ramping up outrage, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171024_78908.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharing Cities 49 mins – “Playing for Team Human today is Neal Gorenflo from Shareable.net. Neal joins Douglas to spread the word about Shareable’s latest resource, Sharing Cities: Activating the Urban Commons. Sharing Cities is an inspiring collection of 137 case studies and policies across a wide spectrum of issues that show how empowered communities are building citizen-run, democratic solutions using commons thinking. Whether it be the grassroots artist organization Club Cultural Matienzo (CCM) that formed in Buenos Aires to build a cultural commons for the local arts scene in wake of a tragic nightclub fire, or land stewardship activists in Brooklyn reclaiming public space for urban farming and community gardening, Sharing Cities is filled with projects and policies ready to replicated and implemented in your community. You can Contribute to Shareable for a hard copy or E-Book copy, or download a free pdf of Sharing Cities from Shareable.net:…With the backdrop of worsening income inequality, climate change, and fiscal challenges, the growth of self-organized, democratic, and inclusive means for city dwellers to meet their own needs by sharing resources couldn’t be more relevant. These cases and policies taken together offer a new vision for cities that puts people – not the market, technology, or government – at the center, where they belong. More than that, the book represents a claim on the city run by people – a claim increasingly being made by city-residents the world over. This book was written for a broad audience, but may find special resonance with those who share this people-first vision of cities and want to act on it. Written by a team of 15 fellows with contributions from 18 organizations around the world, “Sharing Cities: Activating the Urban Commons” not only witnesses a movement, but is a practical reference guide for community-based solutions to a range of challenges cities face such as affordable housing, sustainable mobility, and more.” At the link find the title, “Ep. 60 Neal Gorenflo “Sharing Cities” right-click “Media files 59ea2c218a8698db4cadfd9d.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Simpsons P1 54 mins – “For our 999th and 1,000th episodes, we go down the rabbit hole on a TV show that quite literally altered popular culture as we know it. The Simpsons has been around since Josh and Chuck were in grade school, and is still cranking out episodes today. Join us for two very special episodes as we pay tribute to The Simpsons, and celebrate a milestone of our own – numbers 999 and 1,000!” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Simpsons P2 64 mins – “Today concludes our two part celebration of one of the greatest TV shows of all time – The Simpsons! It also officially marks our 1,000th episode. Can you believe it? We sure can’t. So join us today as we wrap up our tribute to America’s favorite TV family and hit the 1,000 mark.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soldiers of Fortune 54 mins – “An estimated 200 American volunteer soldiers have joined the fight against the Islamic State. They’re part of a much longer tradition of freelance fighters, like early 19th century American privateers who fought in Latin America’s wars of independence and those who participated in the Spanish Civil War. On this episode, Ed, Brian and Joanne explore when and why Americans signed up to fight for other countries’ causes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soviet Female Sniper Corps 54 mins – “Dr. Lyuba Vinogradova discusses her research and the resulting book that covers the young women of Stalin’s USSR, who are conscripted to the Sniper Corps.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_206-102017_8.40_PM.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spanish Civil War with Picasso 43 mins- “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the context and impact of Pablo Picasso’s iconic work, created soon after the bombing on 26th April 1937 that obliterated much of the Basque town of Guernica, and its people. The attack was carried out by warplanes of the German Condor Legion, joined by the Italian air force, on behalf of Franco’s Nationalists. At first the Nationalists denied responsibility, blaming their opponents for creating the destruction themselves for propaganda purposes, but the accounts of journalists such as George Steer, and the prominence of Picasso’s work, kept the events of that day under close scrutiny. Picasso’s painting has gone on to become a symbol warning against the devastation of war.” At the link find the title, “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Story Telling 38 mins – “One of the most effective ways to change people’s minds is to put your argument into a narrative format, a story, but not just any story. The most persuasive narratives are those that transport us. Once departed from normal reality into the imagined world of the story we become highly susceptible to belief and attitude change. In this episode, you’ll learn from psychologist Melanie C. Greene the four secrets to creating the most persuasive narratives possible.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 113-Narrative_Persuasion.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Policy 44 mins – “In his recent book Beyond Snowden: Privacy, Mass Surveillance, and the Struggle to Reform the NSA, civil liberties activist and former intelligence official Timothy Edgar calls for a renewed conversation on mass surveillance reform in the global and digital age. This month, Benjamin Wittes interviewed Edgar on his new book at the Hoover Institution’s regular book soiree. They discussed Edgar’s work as both an ACLU lawyer and an intelligence official in the Bush and Obama administrations, the substantive reform agenda Edgar envisions for mass surveillance, the nuances of protecting privacy in a global landscape, and much more.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Hoover Event mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syria’s Fall and ISIS Appearance 36 mins – “Panelists will discuss National Geographic Documentary Films’ Hell on Earth: The Fall of Syria and the Rise of ISIS, as well as the Syrian war and its political and social consequences.” At the link find the title, “Documentary Screening and Discussion of ‘Hell on Earth: The Fall of Syria and the Rise of ISIS’, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171025 Screening of Hell on Earth.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian War Reporter 36 mins – “Panelists will discuss National Geographic Documentary Films’ Hell on Earth: The Fall of Syria and the Rise of ISIS, as well as the Syrian war and its political and social consequences.” At the link find the title, “Documentary Screening and Discussion of ‘Hell on Earth: The Fall of Syria and the Rise of ISIS’, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171025 Screening of Hell on Earth.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teacher Training 46 mins – “This podcast features a recording of Dr. Wesley Fryer’s opening keynote address at the 2017 KVATE (Kaw Valley Academy of Technology and Education) Conference on July 24, 2017, in St. Marys, Kansas. The title of the keynote was, “Inspiring Student Creativity with Media.” In addition to highlighting examples of “WOW work” by students (borrowing a wonderful term from Seesaw professional development coordinator Angela Gadtke @MrsGadtke) the keynote also included a “digital magic trick” demo using the new iOS app by Microsoft, “Seeing AI.” Google Slides shared during this keynote, including links to all referenced student examples and other resources, are available in the podcast shownotes or directly using the shortened web link http://wfryer.me/kvate2017. Check out the podcast shownotes for additional KVATE resources and links. If you listen to this podcast, please provide feedback to Wes either with a comment on this post or by sending a Twitter reply to @wfryer. Thanks for listening to Moving at the Speed of Creativity podcasts! Please subscribe using PocketCasts or in your own favorite podcatcher application.” At the link find the title, “Podcast454: Inspiring Student Creativity with Media #KVATE2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-07-25-speedofcreativity.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tech Impact 45 mins – “Net impresario Tim O’Reilly now recognizes how the short-term focus of digital business is draining the real economy. Its algorithms have been programmed to extract value from us all. For O’Reilly, however, the solution is not to eliminate algorithms, but to write better ones. If there’s an argument to made for technosolutionism, O’Reilly makes as good a case as there is. Rather than confronting O’Reilly on their differences, Rushkoff engages him, pushes gently, finds common ground, and looks to develop a shared approach to our economic woes. Also, Rushkoff opens the show with a question: while the advance of technologies and our eagerness for the new may be inevitable, where in the process of on-boarding might we fold in human values?” At the link find the title, “Ep. 61 Tim O’Reilly “Solving for Economic Inequality?” right-click “Media files 59f94a91d845458729b3212f.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Change Resistance 4 mins – “….The history of technology is filled with inventions that looked good, then got put on hold until we caught up with them. Take feedback control: Hellenistic engineers invented all kinds of liquid-level controllers during the last few centuries BC. They created devices to control the level of oil in a lamp or the flow of liquid into a water clock. They invented a bowl that refilled itself automatically as guests ladled wine from it. Then the Romans took over Egypt (where all this invention was going on), and feedback control vanished from the human scene for two millennia. It could’ve served all kinds of needs, but it disappeared. Imperial Rome didn’t want the control of anything out of imperial hands. Not until the extraordinary epoch of 18th-century revolution could this radical idea resurface to regulate liquid levels in steam boilers and to keep windmills facing into the wind….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teen Angst 51 mins – “Debbie talks to author and researcher Brene Brown about belonging, courage, and vulnerability.” At the link find the title, “Brené Brown,” right-click “Media files Brene-Brown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teen Anxiety Crisis 46 mins – “American teens are suffering record anxiety. We’ll look at why. And what helps?” At the link find the title, “Teen Anxiety On The Rise, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_558827150.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Control in U.S. 29 mins – “Reporter David Nakamura helps us answer: Can Trump keep us safe from terror attacks? We talk to an expert to learn how terrorist groups recruit. Plus, we examine how much power presidents have to influence counterterrorism policy.” At the link find the title, “How much power does a president have to prevent terrorist attacks? Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 9fbdd4be4b0a1537114fb4b_1351620000001-300040_t_1509678422706_44100_128_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Testing New Medicines 49 mins – “Clinical trials to evaluate new drugs are typically built around one design, the randomized controlled trial, but this method has come under scrutiny in recent years for being expensive, lengthy, and cumbersome. In this podcast you’ll hear from experts asking if alternative designs would be better for determining the safety and efficacy of new therapies. This podcast was produced following a conference on this topic held in partnership between the NYU School of Medicine and the Academy. It was made possible with support from Johnson and Johnson.” AT the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Travel Podcast 49 mins – “We adventure with the overlanding couple behind Let’s Not Panic, talk traveling while black and female with Aminatou Sow, and hear tales of survival from the Outside Podcast. Plus, a National Geographic explorer tells us her podcast picks for trekking to far-flung locales.” At the link find the title, “Adventure Times! Podcasts Celebrating Travel and Exploration (Encore), Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171102_biglisten_ep_31_repod-7d92f83b-22db-44df-a8c6-32410defa4ab.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Debate with Gingrich 98 mins – “Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-GA) and Kimberly Strassel debate E.J. Dionne and Andrew Sullivan at the bi-annual Munk Debates in Toronto. The topic of the debate is the Trump presidency and its effect on the future of American democracy.” At the link find the title, “E.J. Dionne and Newt Gingrich Debate Future of American Democracy, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.488866.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Dissected 38 mins – “Republicans and Trump, after the indictments: Michelle Goldberg, op-ed columnist at The New York Times, looks at why some Senate Republicans have broken with Trump—and why the rest have not, even after special counsel Robert Mueller has made it clear he’s just getting started with criminal charges against Trump’s associates. Also: Tony Schwartz knows a lot about Trump—in fact, he wrote Trump’s bestselling memoir The Art of the Deal. That classic of modern literature spent forty-eight weeks in 1987 on the Times best-seller list, and more than a million copies have been sold. When Mueller’s prosecutors close in on Trump, will he become more cautious and careful? Schwartz’s answer is a short one: “Not a chance in hell.” Plus: The arrest of Trump’s campaign chief Paul Manafort on Monday on multiple felony charges is only the beginning of the results of the work of special counsel Robert Muller. The political implications for Trump are ominous. Bob Dreyfuss explains.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the bog archive.

UFO’s 64 mins – “On this week’s episode, Nathan, Brian and Ed discuss things in the sky we can’t explain – unidentified flying objects. What the heck are they? And what do they say about American history?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uganda Bananas 54 mins – “Uganda is at an interesting precipice.  They have invested in biotech solutions to solve problems in their central food staples, namely the matooke. The matooke is a starchy banana, and while a cornerstone of the diet, it is threatened by disease.  Most people are farmers, and tend to ‘gardens’ of 2-3 acres, these are subsistence farmers that use the gardens to feed their families. Xanthamonas bacterial wilt can destroy entire stands of trees.  But scientists in Uganda have used breeding and genetic engineering to generate genetic lines that stop major diseases. The sad part is that the improved plants are not allowed to be distributed due to the lack of a national biosafety law.  The second part of the podcast is an interview with Dr. Clet Masiga. He is a trained crop scientist, but also a farmer, and I spoke to him on his farm about the needs of Ugandan farmers, changes in policy, and broken down cars. Most of all, you need to understand that providing the best technology to people in need is simply justice. Justice.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Unemployment Rates 7 mins – “According to GAO’s analysis of data in the Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey (CPS), on average, low-wage workers worked fewer hours per week, were more highly concentrated in a few industries and occupations, and had lower educational attainment than workers earning hourly wages above $16 in each year GAO reviewed—1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, 2015 and 2016. Their percentage of the U.S. workforce also stayed relatively constant over time. About 40 percent of the U.S. workforce ages 25 to 64 earned hourly wages of $16 or less (in constant 2016 dollars) over the period 1995 through 2016. The combination of low wages and few hours worked compounded the income disadvantage of low-wage workers and likely contributed to their potential eligibility for federal social safety net programs. About 20 percent of families with a worker earning up to the federal minimum wage (currently $7.25 per hour), 13 percent of families with a worker earning above federal minimum wage to $12.00 per hour, and 5 percent of families with a worker earning $12.01 to $16 per hour were in poverty in each year GAO reviewed (see figure).The extent of poverty varied considerably by the type of family in which a worker lived. For example, single-parent families earning the federal minimum wage or below comprised a higher percentage of families in poverty. In contrast, married families with no children comprised the lowest percentage of families in poverty, and generally had family incomes at or above the poverty line.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Links As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Game Value 28 mins – “If you’ve ever played video games, or swapped tiles around on Candy Crush, you know the feeling of winning. Like a light in your brain, a mental fist pump. But you probably also know that guilty feeling after realizing you’ve spent 30 minutes plugged in. That worry, when your kid spends hours on the console. Jane McGonigal, game researcher and futurist, is here to take away some of that guilt. She’s a champion of gaming as a form of self-help. Because, Jane says, that light you feel when you unlock a level – that’s your mind being altered. Slightly.

Wine Country Wildfires 48 mins – “Toting up the damage and lessons learned from the deadly, devastating California wildfires.” At the link find the title, “California Fires Leave Dozens Dead, Communities In Ruins, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_559091725.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women Motorcyclists 38 mins – “Ana Carrasco recently became the first woman to win a world championship motorcycle race, sparking a conversation about the rising numbers of women riding motorcycles for sport and leisure. E&B look at the future, present, and past of women who ride.” At the link find the title, “Motorcycle Mavens, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-10-25-smnty-motorcycling-final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women’s Right to Vote 4 mins – “. Following an arduous, decades long effort by suffragists, in 1919 the U. S. Congress passed the nineteenth amendment giving women the right to vote. But the battle wasn’t over. The amendment still had to be ratified by three-fourths of the states. And there remained strong pockets of opposition, primarily in the South….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Workplace Relations 62 mins – “In today’s work environment, our success is heavily dependent on our ability to consistently deliver strong results. And although there are multiple inputs that lead to our results, there is one secret weapon that outweighs everything else. The key to success ultimately lies in the strength of our relationships. You may be thinking to yourself, “But wait, we are talking about business! With all of the demands on my time, I don’t have the luxury to think about something soft and fuzzy like relationships.” But the truth of the matter is, given the complex and global nature of business, almost everything we accomplish happens with and through other people. So how do you improve these relationships and leverage them to create a true competitive advantage for your organization? This week on the podcast we answer this question and more as we talk with Todd Davis, author of the brand new book, Get Better: 15 Proven Practices to Build Effective Relationships at Work.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII Shanghai Battle P4 33 mins – “The Chinese Nationalist forces have pulled back from the coast, yet are determined to establish their own Maginot Line. But as both sides have reinforcements in route, the fighting around Shanghai will continue. Thus giving the world, its first large clash, using modern weapons within a civilian population, five years before Stalingrad.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_207-103017_7.31_PM.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 313 – Nov 10, 2017: 3D Printing for the Blind, Addiction Story, African History, al Shabab, Altruism, Antiviral Drugs, Arthritis Control, Bitcoin World, Blindness for Beginners, Bounty Hunter, Catastrophe Reporting, Celiac Disease, Chickens and Antibiotics, Decision Making, Diet and Hunger, Digital Transformation, Drug Testing of Hair, Education Stratification, Elderly Exercise, Farmsteading, Federal Court Judge Appointments, Government Digital Access, Gravity Waves, Gut Microbiome, Honey Bee Impact, Immune Cell Cancer Treatment, Koch Brothers Christmas Story, Koch Brothers Mystery Hour, Korean Spy, MalwareBytes Founder Interview, Medical Education Technology, Medical Stewardship, Migrant Worker Conditions, Navajo People, Neurogastronomy, New Hampshire Drinking Water, Pace Trial Controversy, Palliative Care, Puerto Rico Hurricane Recovery, Race and Politics, Recycling Effectiveness, San Francisco Sea Rise, Sex Assaults by Leaders, Solitary Prison PTSD, Teenage Suicides, Vagina Creation, Voting Rights Law, War Declaration Powers, Water Potability, Whistle Blowers, Wine Tainted by Smoke, Worker Relations

Exercise your ears: the 96 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 562 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 18,030 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 86GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 400 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Print Hacking 32 mins – “We are going to talk about hacking and making today. It’s hacking in a general sense. It’s a definition. Broadly used hacking is the way we’re talking about it today; involved in everything from real hackers in makerspaces to even also incubator-level hacking with software and life hacking. Anil Pattni who I got to meet at the FREECon, the Freelance Conference in Austin, Texas which we went to. It was so interesting to meet him. It was ironic because he started doing some of the first OC Maker Faire stuff here in Orange County, California and yet we met him in Austin, Texas which is where he is now. It was like, “How did we not meet you before?” that kind of thing. He’s been running a lot of Meetups. He did 200 Meetups. They were one of the first hacker Maker Faire things that happened on MeetUp.com. Those really all happened in Southern California. They happened all in Orange County here….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

3D Printing for the Blind 18mins – “Caroline Karbowski is a senior in high school with a passion for 3D imaging that led her to a 2nd place finish in the Tech Olympics. Her project is called See3D, which creates 3D images for the blind to feel and understand more clearly the shape and construct of something they never could have conceived without the added information the 3D image offered. Caroline somehow had a passion for Braille and taught herself so she could read in the car without getting dizzy, and later she came up with See3D and although this may seem like a natural progression, Caroline is not Blind, nor visually impaired. Caroline has pursued her passion and is now taking SEE3D to another level and bringing more opportunities for others to get involved in the See3D project. And you can too! Go to her web site at www.See3D.org and find out more and how you can request a model or how you can become part of the See3D providers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Activist Mckesson 68 mins – “DeRay Mckesson, Host, “Pod Save the People”; Civil Rights Activist and Organizer Dan Pfeifferwith Co-Host,”Pod Save America”; CNN Contributor; Former Senior Advisor for Strategy and Communications for President Barack Obama—Moderator This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on October 19, 2017.” At the link find the title, “DeRay Mckesson: Power of the People, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171019_DeRay Mckesson_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Adam Smith Economics 58 mins – “On Adam Smith’s An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. We discuss the foundational text of modern economics, first published in 1776. How does the division of labor and our instinct to exchange lead to the growth of wealth? Is the economy sufficiently machine-like to enable us to manipulate its output, or at least to tell us how not to screw it up? …For more on Smith’s moral views, listen to our ep #45. For a longer treatment, Econtalk recorded a six-part series on The Theory of Moral Sentiments. We also covered economics in our ep #123. For some potential alternatives to the stupefying effects of the division of labor, check out ep #83 on New Work and ep #103 on Thoreau.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Addiction Story 24 mins – “As Ontario earmarks over $200 million to battle the opioid crisis, some doctors say this money should go directly to treatment, not harm reduction.”Oct 16 Opioid crisis needs treatment not harm reduction, says addiction specialist, 2017,” right-click “Media files current 20171016_31811.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African History 20 mins – “In the vast sweep of history, even an empire can be forgotten. In this wide-ranging talk, Gus Casely-Hayford shares origin stories of Africa that are too often unwritten, lost, unshared. Travel to Great Zimbabwe, the ancient city whose mysterious origins and advanced architecture continue to confound archeologists. Or to the age of Mansa Musa, the ruler of the Mali Empire whose vast wealth built the legendary libraries of Timbuktu. And consider which other history lessons we might unwittingly overlook.” At the link find the title, “The powerful stories that shaped Africa Gus Casely-Hayford, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files GusCaselyHayford_2017G.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

al Shabab 7 mins – ““I’d be very surprised if this is not an attack by al-Shabab,” former CSIS analyst Phil Gurski says about the Mogadishu bombing which killed over 300 people.” At the link find the title, “Oct 16 Extremist group al-Shabab likely behind Somalia bombing, predicts terror expert, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171016_77258.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Altruism 30 mins – “When you think of the values emblematic of politics in the Occident, does the term “altruism” come to mind? Probably not lately. Our guest today on Sea Change Radio believes that a participatory culture with altruism at its core will be key to digging ourselves out of the mess that is our current political climate. This week we are speaking with one of the world’s leading environmental voices, George Monbiot. Acclaimed author, journalist, and activist, Monbiot talks to host Alex Wise about his latest book, “Out Of The Wreckage: A New Politics In The Age Of Crisis.” He discusses what he sees as lessons from the 2016 U.S. presidential election, why a growth-orientation on both right and left are incompatible with sustainability, and how we can infuse more altruism into our culture and politics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antiviral Drugs 18 mins – “In this episode of Contagious Thinking Elihu and Connor talk with Steve Polyak from the University of Washington in Seattle USA about how some drugs stop viruses from infecting us. In particular we chat about his work on a drug Arbidol that can block many viruses and is actually an over-the-counter medicine in Russia and China. All life lives in a sea of viruses, and some of those viruses can make us sick. Humans have thus developed many ways to stop these rare viruses causing illness. One major important example are vaccines. Another are a class of medicines called antivirals that stop a virus from making new viruses when they get inside our cells. Some of these antivirals can control an infection successfully for the lifetime of an individual, like with HIV and others – like for hepatitis C virus, an important long term infection – can cure an infection so that there is no more virus in your body. But have you ever wondered what it takes to make antiviral drugs? Steve gives us a glimpse of the work scientists worldwide do to understand how small molecules can mess with viruses. Steve is in the UK as a Cheney Fellow at the University of Leeds where he’s working with Professor Mark Harris and others. Steve’s lab’s investigations focuses on the important work of pinning down the mechanism by which Arbidol and other similar drugs can attack lots of different viruses. Here Steve also dishes out lots of important advice for scientists young and old. Find out more about Steve’s Arbidol work here: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26739045 And find out more about the work being carried out at the Centre for Virus Research here: www.gla.ac.uk/researchinstitutes/iii/cvr/At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow above the sound bar and select “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Arthritis Control 75 mins – “Faculty Nutritional Biochemist, Hawaii Pacific Neuroscience; Research Scientist; Author, Arthritis Relief, Understanding Fats and Oils: a Scientific Guide to their Health Effects, Vitamins and Minerals Demystified, A Nutritional Approach to Alzheimer’s Disease; Co-Author, Mosby’s Drug Guide for Nurses, 4th Edition. This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on October 17, 2017.” At the link find the title, “A Natural Approach to Treating Osteoarthritis, Oct, 2017, Steve Blake, Sc.D.,” right-click “Media files cc_20171017_A Natural Approach to Treating Osteoarthritis Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” the pop-up menu.

Author Walter Isaacson 92 mins – “Walter Isaacson (@WalterIsaacson) is a professor at Tulane University, and the president and CEO of The Aspen Institute, a nonpartisan educational and policy studies institute based in Washington, DC. …In this episode, you learn life lessons and tactics from not just one person — because Walter has lived a fascinating life — but also from Steve Jobs, Ben Franklin, Leonardo da Vinci, and more. Walter ties it all together beautifully.” At the link find the title, “Lessons from Steve Jobs, Leonardo da Vinci, and Ben Franklin, Oct, 2017,” right-click “ At the link find the title, “Lessons from Steve Jobs, Leonardo da Vinci, and Ben Franklin, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 64d6f30c-7c2c-4982-bc35-4f1d40f25190.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Behavioral Economics 60 mins – “Felix Salmon of Fusion, and political risk consultant Anna Szymanski are joined by economist Tim Harford to discuss: Richard Thaler’s Nobel prize; Tim Harford’s book, Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy; Brexit.” At the link find the title, “The Some of My Best Friends Are Petroleum Engineers Editionehavioral Economics, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM9844014680.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Benzodiazepine Use 53 mins – “In this episode, we will discuss the current state of benzodiazepine use, expected trends in prescribing, and risks associated with use. Lastly, we will discuss techniques for ensuring that a benzodiazepine taper is performed in a safe manner with lowest risk of harm.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 068-Benzo_taper.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin World 118 mins – “Ben Fitts founder of Crypto Gulch joins us today to discuss his new company and cryptocurrency in general. Ben and I have worked together in various ways since the 1990s on many projects and business ventures. So when he told me that he was launching a cryptocurrency mining service I was quick to want to learn more. Over the past few months we have worked together to determine the best path forward for Crypto Gulch from a service and pricing structure. While I have no official ownership position in Crypto Gulch Ben has been very open to my advice on some tweaks and I feel together we have set things up in a very good way. Ben is also very tied into cryptocurrency and let me know about a lot of really interesting things going on in the space during this interview. This includes some thoughts on Dubai’s new currency EM Cash and a potential new Russian coin called the cryptoruble. We also discuss another pending Bitcoin fork, wallets, exchanges and more. I am pretty sure this interview will be very informative on cryptocurrency in general and will also give those interested a better understanding of Crypto Gulch at the same time.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blindness for Beginners 30 mins – “Comedian Tom Skelton, Blogger Joy Addo and BBC journalist Mani Djazmi join Peter White to offer tips and advice for young, visually impaired people on a range of subjects including looking good, eating out, and staying safe on a night out.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bounty Hunter 96 mins [2 parts] – “Sruthi Pinnamaneni follows the world’s best bounty hunter on a peculiar case.[P2] Continued: Sruthi Pinnamaneni follows the world’s best bounty hunter on a peculiar case.[P2]” At the link find the title, “#107 The Skip Tracer, Part I, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT7804818405.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for “#108 The Skip Tracer, Part II” and “Media files GLT9226577712.mp3”.

Broadband in Garrett County, Maryland 23 mins – “Maryland may be home to our nation’s bustling, urban capital, but on the other side of the state are the Appalachians and many rural communities that struggle with poor Internet access. One of those communities is Garrett County. Residents, businesses, and institutions have limped along for years using outdated connections.  Some people don’t have any access to the Internet; all that is changing. …Cheryl, Nathaniel, and Christopher discuss the project that combines fiber, fixed wireless, and TV white space technologies in order to reach people and businesses across the county. They also talk about how a significant portion of people in the rural community simple can’t afford the high cost of satellite and how mobile Internet access just doesn’t cut it in a rural area like Garrett County. Cheryl describes how the project is an economic development initiative and Nathaniel shares more details about their need to combine technologies and the results.” At the link right-click “download this mp3 file directly from here” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Kidnapping 38 mins – “In 2008, Amanda Lindhout was kidnapped in Somalia. Her mother, Lorinda Stewart, spent 460 days doing everything in her power to bring her daughter home.” At the link find the title, “Oct 17 ‘Hope is something that I never gave up on’: A mother’s fight to free daughter Amanda Lindhout 2017,” right-click “Media files current 20171017_84198.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Catastrophe Reporting 54 mins – “Elizabeth Kolbert, Writer, The New Yorker; David Roberts, Reporter, Vox, and Greg Dalton, Founder and Host, Climate One. This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on September 22, 2017.” At the link find the title, “Elizabeth Kolbert and David Roberts: Covering Catastrophe, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171015_cl1_CoveringCatastrophe.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Celiac Disease 43 mins – “In the 1930s, a Dutch pediatrician named Willem Dicke began to study a mysterious, often-fatal disease that was afflicting his patients. Children were losing weight and becoming malnourished despite consuming plenty of calories. The symptoms were intense and widespread. Willem Dicke suspected the illness was somehow related to the children’s diet. But it wasn’t until years later that he found the proof he was looking for. It came in the form of a grotesque natural experiment produced by the Second World War. In 1940, Germany had invaded and occupied the Netherlands. In 1944, Dutch railway workers held a strike in support of the Allies. This prompted the Nazis to cut off food shipments to Dutch civilians. Some people resorted to eating grass or tulip bulbs; thousands died of starvation. But Willem Dicke noticed something strange. His pediatric patients who’d been sick before the war … That’s right, grains. Which the kids hadn’t been eating during the Hunger Winter — but now, after bread came back, they were. So Dicke ran a little experiment. And that is how our modern understanding of celiac disease came to be. Even today, it’s still somewhat mysterious. But one thing that isn’t mysterious at all is the trigger…” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chernow on Ulysses S Grant 63 mins – “Ron Chernow, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Author, Alexander Hamilton and Grant In Conversation with Roy Eisenhardt, Lecturer, UC Berkeley School of Law; Member, The Commonwealth Club’s California Book Awards Jury. This program is part of our Good Lit series, underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation. This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on October 17, 2017.” At the link find the title, “An Evening with Ron Chernow, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Historian, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171017_Ron Chernow Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chickens and Antibiotics 49 mins [2 parts] – “Award-winning journalist Maryn McKenna talks about her latest book Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World EatsAt the link right-click the arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu for Part 1. Do the same for Part 1 here.

Children and Nature 68 mins – “Richard Louv, Author, Last Child in the Woods; Chairman Emeritus, the Children & Nature Network; Twitter @RichLouv with Andrea Mackenzie, General Manager, Santa Clara Valley Open Space Authority—Moderator. This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on October 18, 2017” At the link find the title, “Richard Louv: The Hybrid Mind, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171018_Richard Louv_Podcast.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comics History 45 mins – “Before there were superheroes, a Swiss teacher inadvertently invented the first sequential art comics in the Western world.” At the link find the title, “SYMHC Live at NYCC: Rodolphe Töpffer and the First Comic Book, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-10-16-symhc-live-nyc.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creating Great Choices 60 mins – “Jennifer Riel, Adjunct Professor, the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto with Roger Martin, Acclaimed Author; Consultant; Professor; Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute, the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto. This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on October 18, 2017.” At the link find the title, “Anne-Marie Slaughter: Technology for the People, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171018_Creating Great Choices Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Decision Making 27 mins – “From the most trivial to the most serious, decisions are central to our lives. But how the brain makes up its mind about what to do remains one of neuroscience’s greatest mysteries. Step forward the International Brain Laboratory (IBL). It’s a new, ambitious project that will combine scientific expertise from 21 labs across the globe, with the express aim to bring us closer to understanding what goes on in the brain when we make decisions – big and small. But what do we already know about how decisions are made? How does the IBL hope to add to this picture? And what can these new insights in decision-making reveal about the likes of intelligence, addiction, and disease?To discuss all this and more, Ian Sample speaks with two scientists at the heart of the IBL; Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory’s associate professor Anne ChAt the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diet and Hunger 66 mins – “This week we have my good friend Mark Sisson on the show! Mark is the founder of Mark’s Daily Apple, Primal Kitchen (their mayonnaise is fantastic) author of The Primal Blueprint, The Primal Connection, Primal Endurance, and more. Listen in as we discuss what Mark has been up to, his new book, the keto diet, benefits o3f keto, electrolytes, keto supplements, and more.” At the link right-click “Download Episode Here (MP)” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Transformation 26 mins- “ Digital transformation is a journey. It is not a destination. And heading down the road to digital transformation can feel like traveling without a guide or a map. The way ahead promises renewal and reward even as it threatens turmoil and disruption. Digital transformation can shorten the lifespan of an enterprise and it can restore its vitality. But there are no guarantees. Last week at the Frankfurt Book Fair, executives from Copyright Clearance Center and its London-based subsidiary Ixxus shared how data-driven, practical solutions can accelerate digital transformation, and why knowledge engineering is the next leg of our profession’s ongoing digital transformation journey.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Testing of Hair 39 mins – “In the messy world of child protection services, the Motherisk Lab was supposed to be a pillar of objective reality — until a judge ruled their tests unreliable.” At the link find the title, “Oct 20 Motherisk investigation reveals concerns over ‘unreliable’ tests long before lab shut down, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171020_35709.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Stratification 30 mins – “The official subject matter of Sea Change Radio is environmental sustainability. This week, however, we are deviating from that to talk about a topic that we believe is inextricably linked to sustainability: stratification in education. We are talking with law professor, civil rights advocate, and educational diversity expert, Prof. John C. Brittain, about educational practices that perpetuate social, racial, and socioeconomic exclusiveness. Elite private schools were once restricted to wealthy white young men. Since the 1960s we have seen some progress at these schools – they all admit women, most have scholarship programs to make room for the non-wealthy, and they generally boast of need-blind admissions practices. But there is one hidden practice, often overlooked, which runs counter to all of that progress: the practice of legacy admissions. That is, giving preference to applicants who have a family connection to the school. The majority of elite educational institutions in this country do this. For example, in 2017, a full 41% of Harvard’s incoming freshman were legacies. Logic tells us that generation after generation, this sort of admission preference can’t be doing much for these schools’ demographic diversity. Professor Brittain and host Alex Wise discuss how legacy admission practices serve as affirmative action for the privileged, the irony that the practice thrives in the United States which holds itself up as a model meritocracy and how schools’ justifications for the ongoing use of legacy preferences don’t hold up to a reasoned analysis.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elderly Exercise 31 mins – “There’s a crisis in old age care – not just in the UK, around the world, as population demographics shift, and the proportion of older people increase – there’s a worry about who’s going to look after them, and how much is it going to cost? However, a new analysis on bmj.com says this picture need not be so gloomy – they say that encouraging exercise in older people could save billions – by keeping frailty at bay and increasing healthy life expectancy. We’re joined by two of the authors of that analysis – Scarlett McNally, consultant orthopedic surgeon at Eastbourne District General Hospital, and Muir Gray, public health doctor.” At the link find the title, “Exercise in old age – “we need kendo classes in Huddersfield” Oct, 2017, right-click “Media files 347484685-bmjgroup-exercise-in-old-age-we-need-kendo-classes-in-huddersfield.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facial Recognition Issues 28 mins – “Australian Government will target asylum seekers from space, Driver’s license database plundered for face recognition surveillance. Tim Norton from Digital Rights Watch talks about the new face recognition capability of the Australian Government.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farmers Business Network 42 mins – “Charles Baron is the Co-Founder of Farmers Business Network, an idea conceived by farmers for farmers. The company aims to gather unbiased and objective information with regards to agronomics and commodities. The idea is to pool available data from individual farmers, so every farmer in their network would benefit from them. The company started three years ago with just 3-4 farms, but through word of mouth and good service, they now have close to 4,700 farms within their network. Charles and his team plan on ultimately expanding his reach outside the U.S. and continue to improve their data interpretation and gathering services. In this episode, Charles explains the idea behind Food Business Network, what drove him to become a farmer, and the problems farmers face in the U.S. that go unnoticed. He also shares how his company managed to grow their network to what it is now, and their outlook for the future of their company.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Principles 88 mins – “When you look at a farm like Conor Crickmore’s Neversink farm which grosses around $350k on 1.5 acres, it’s not about modeling exactly what Conor does, it’s about modeling his approach, using his base principles. That’s the focus of today’s show, farming base principles with Conor Crickmore.” At the link find the title, “FSFS118: Base Principles Which Make Neversink Farm Successful with farmer Conor Crickmore, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files FSFS_118_2017_Conor.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farmsteading 105 mins – “Greg Burns joins me to talk about what farmsteading has been like this past year touching on what’s gone right and what hasn’t.” At the link find the title, “GFL77: Practical Farmsteading with Greg Burns of Natures Image Farm, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files GFL_77_2017_GregBurns.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farmsteading 105 mins – “Greg Burns joins me to talk about what farmsteading has been like this past year touching on what’s gone right and what hasn’t.” At the link find the title, “GFL77: Practical Farmsteading with Greg Burns of Natures Image Farm” right-click “Media files GFL_77_2017 GregBurns.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Court Judge Appointments 36 mins – “Dahlia is joined by Kristen Clarke, President & Executive Director of the National Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law to talk about the federal judiciary and how Donald Trump is speedily filling the vacancies on the federal bench.” At the link find the title, “The Single Most Unremarked Win of the Trump Era, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY7725440820.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freedom of the Press in Middle East 63 mins – “Janine Zacharia,;Visiting Lecturer, Stanford University; Former Jerusalem Bureau Chief, The Washington Post; Robert Rosenthal, Executive Director, Center for Investigative Reporting; Former Managing Editor, San Francisco Chronicle; Former Editor, The Philadelphia Inquirer, and Jonathan Curiel, Fulbright Scholar; Reuters Fellow, Oxford; Journalist. This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on October 16, 2017.” At the link find the title, “Deteriorating Freedom of the Press in the Middle East, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171016_Deteriorating Freedom Podcast.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Digital Access 72 mins – “Anne-Marie Slaughter, President and CEO, New America In Conversation with Megan Rose Dickey and Reporter, TechCrunch. This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on October 18, 2017.” At the link find the title, “Anne-Marie Slaughter: Technology for the People, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171018_Anne Marie Slaughter_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grandmothers 18 mins – “Baby horses and giraffes walk soon after they’re born, and they can feed and take care of themselves pretty quickly, too. A one-year-old person, on the other hand, is basically helpless. But humans go on to live much longer than most other mammals, and scientists have long been trying to piece together why this is the case. One theory, called the grandmother hypothesis, claims that grandmas are the key to why humans live so long. Unlike most other species, human females live long past their childbearing years and so can help raise their grandchildren, allowing their daughters (or daughters-in-law) to have another baby before the first one can take care of itself. As warm and fuzzy as this idea sounds, it turns out to be pretty controversial. In this episode of Distillations we explore the grandmother hypothesis and find out what the debate is all about.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gravity Wave Detection 14 mins – “257 – 6 Reasons Why LIGO’s Gravitational Wave Discovery is Important” At the link find the title by that number, right-click “Media files ede_257-ap4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gravity Waves 27 mins – “In the short window of time between the VIRGO gravitational wave detector being switched on, in Pisa in Italy, and the LIGO detector, in the US, being switched off for an upgrade, the teams detected the signal they had hoped for, but dared not expect. A space-altering gravity ripple, followed by a gamma ray burst signal and when the World’s telescopes turned to the Hydra constellation they also saw an optical flash. These signals were from two neutron stars, having danced a death spiral and crashed into one another 130 million years ago. It’s been nicknamed a ‘Bling Nova’, because this massively energetic reaction, is where lots of the gold, platinum and heavy metals in the Universe come from. Whale and Dolphin Brain-size – A large brain, relative to our size, underpins sophisticated social structure in humans. Things like language, shared goals, teaching, consensus decision-making and empathy require great intelligence. Whales and dolphins also have exceptionally large and anatomically sophisticated brains. But until recently it has been unclear whether large brain size is linked to social structure in these marine mammals. A recent study suggests that large brains might similarly have arisen to provide the capacity to learn in response to the challenges of social living” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gut Microbiome P1 57 mins – “Gut Revolution seeks to sort the facts from the faeces in an observational series that follows two people with debilitating gut issues on their quest for better health. 26-year-old mother of two Melissa has been battling a painful case of irritable bowel syndrome for the past two years. She’s seen all the doctors and had all the investigations but no one has been able to help her. Can the latest science driving the Gut Revolution provide any answers? We follow Melissa over her transformational six week journey as our team of experts design an intervention that literally changes her life.” At the link right-click “Download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Head Covering Legality 24 mins – “What do Muslim women in Quebec make of Bill 62 — the new law barring anyone with a face covering from giving or receiving public services?” At the link find the title, “Oct 20 | ‘It’s just against our Constitution’: Muslim women respond to Quebec’s Bill 62, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171020_78802.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honey Bee Impact 27 mins – “In this episode we travel to a world without bees. And not just honey bees, all bees. You’ve probably heard a lot of doom and gloom predictions about what might happen if honey bees went extinct. Mass famine! The end of coffee! World economic collapse! But is that all true? (Probably not.) And how likely is a honeybee extinction anyway? (Extremely unlikely.) Plus, what about all the other bees in the world? We ponder these questions and more in this episode. To walk us through what might happen to agriculture if bees went away, I talked to Marcelo A. Aizen, a researcher who studies plant pollinator interactions. His research suggests that the loss of honeybees might not be as dire as everybody claims. And to talk about the more neglected bees out there, I called up Elaine Evans, a professor at the University of MInnesota’s Bee Lab, and Paige Embry, the author of the forthcoming book Our Native Bees: North America’s Endangered Pollinators and the Fight to Save Them.” At the link find the title, “Buzz Off, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immune Cell Cancer Treatment 14 mins – “After decades of research and billions spent in clinical trials, we still have a problem with cancer drug delivery, says biomedical engineer Elizabeth Wayne. Chemotherapy kills cancer — but it kills the rest of your body, too. Instead of using human design to fight cancer, why not use nature’s? In this quick talk, Wayne explains how her lab is creating nanoparticle treatments that bind to immune cells, your body’s first responders, to precisely target cancer cells without damaging healthy ones.” At the link find the title, “We can hack our immune cells to fight cancer Elizabeth Wayne, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files ElizabethWayne_2017U.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Shaming 75 mins – “Author and journalist Megan McArdle of Bloomberg View talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how the internet has allowed a new kind of shaming via social media and how episodes of bad behavior live on because Google’s memory is very, very good. McArdle discusses the implications this new reality has on how we behave at work and how people protect and maintain their reputations in a world where nothing is forgotten and seemingly little is forgiven.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran-U.S. Diplomacy 26 mins – “On October 13, President Trump announced a new Iran strategy, including decertifying the 2015 nuclear deal and asking for changes from Congress and from international partners. Does this mean the end of the nuclear deal? What comes next for the executive branch and for Congress? Can the administration bring our allies on board for a comprehensive push to counter the full range of Iran’s destabilizing activities? Institute scholar and former National Security Council senior official Michael Singh joins us to dig into the details of the Trump administration’s new Iran policy, from the nuclear agreement to terrorism sanctions, and to explain how the White House can turn the broad outlines of strategy into successful policy that advances American interests. Near East PolicyCast: Conversations on Middle East issues from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.

Islamic Politics 36 mins – “Political Islam has been radically shifting in the past four years since the Egyptian coup and the emergence of ISIS, consequently challenging how we understand Islamist movements and their impact. To evaluate the evolution of mainstream Islamist groups and the obstacles they face in governance, Brookings Senior Fellows Shadi Hamid and Will McCants led an initiative to assess these movements across 12 countries, compiling field research from a group of leading specialists in their recently released book Rethinking Political Islam. Benjamin Wittes interviewed Shadi and Will on their book, discussing the scope of the volume, the common themes across the major movements, and the nuances of movements in countries like Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and Syria.” At the link right-clickDirect download: Rethinking Political Islam.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kasparov’s Arrest in Russia 56 mins – “In 1917, Russia’s tsarist dynasty was overthrown and a Communist government took power. A century later, Russia is very much the state of Vladimir Putin, who rules as a strange hybrid of tsarism, Stalinism and post-Cold War turbocharged capitalism.” At the link find the title, “The Enright Files on Vladimir Putin’s Russia, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20171017_21992.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pp-up menu.

Koch Brothers Christmas Story 14 mins – “It’s Christmas time, but our heroes Charles and David Koch are down in the dumps! With their oil empire under siege and the Wheelchair Man leaving a lump of coal in their stockings, Chuck and Davey are considering the nuclear option! Can a mysterious old windbag help the boys right the ship and get back to rolling in the green? Written By and Starring: Gary Pascal, Brad Einstein, Charles Pettitt, Shannon Noll, Libby Schreiner, Tom Fell, and Sean Sullivan” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Koch Brothers Mystery Hour 42 mins – “The liberal media is at it again, poisoning the roots of Chuck and Davey’s political network! Can the boys emerge from the shadows and win back the public’s trust? Featuring musical guest Rich Jones performing his single, “Chicagoland.” Written By and Starring: Gary Pascal Brad Einstein Charles Pettitt Shannon Noll Libby Schreiner Tom Fell Amy Thompson Sean Sullivan” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Koch Brothers Mystery Show 43 mins – “Someone’s stealing American goods and shipping them to the Other World. It sure isn’t our Koch Brothers! The astute octogenarians must seek the secrets: who could be behind behind these shrouded sales? Written by and Starring: Gary Pascal Brad Einstein Charles Pettitt Shannon Noll Libby Schreiner Tom Fell Ryan Asher Sean Sullivan” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Korean Spy 24 mins– “He was wildly brave and very clever and yet he didn’t have any moral underpinnings. He was perfectly happy sitting in on torture.” At the link find the title, “Oct 18 ‘Perfectly happy sitting in on torture’: Meet the U.S. spymaster from the Korean War, 2017,” right-click “Media files current 20171018_61759.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Korean War 32 mins – “This week author and journalist Blaine Harden joins us to discuss his book ‘King of Spies,’ and how the Korean Peninsula continues to be impacted by a war fought more than 50 years. It created the De-Militarized Zone along the 38th Parallel and tensions for every U.S. President since Harry Truman.” At the link find the title, “Episode 32: Blaine Harden on the Korean War, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files SBHAR1020.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

Kowloon Walled City 56 mins – “The infamous “Walled City of Kowloon” was once the most populous spot on the planet. With 1.2 million people per square kilometre, it was a gigantic squatter’s village. Paul Kennedy speaks with photographer Greg Girard, and urban designer Suenn Ho.” At the link find the title, “Dark tower of dreams: Inside the Walled City of Kowloon, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files ideas_20171018_17451.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linguistics 36 mins – “John McWhorter answers questions from Lexicon Valley listeners.” At the link find the title, “Whence Baby Mama? Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM1814999036.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malware Bytes Founder Interview 68 mins – “Malwarebytes – Michael Sherwood and Alex Smith” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Education Technology 48 mins – “Carle Illinois is hoping to change the way medicine is taught, focusing on engineering and medicine together. This is our discussion with the dean, Dr. King Li” At the link find the title, “256: A Look at Carle Illinois College of Medicine with Dean Li, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files PMY256.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Stewardship 44 mins – “Who better to kick off a series on all things health and evidence than the exceptional and erudite Editor-in-Chief of The BMJ, Dr Fiona Godlee. In this episode, Fiona chats to Ray about the BMJ’s ongoing and often controversial campaigns to change medicine – and broader society – for the better. She also looks to a future that addresses the distorting influence of industry funding on health evidence and outcomes, and let’s us in on what drives and inspires her to achieve so much in her influential role at the helm of one of the world’s oldest, most popular and prestigious journals.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Worker Conditions 54 mins – “Blanca A. Bañuelos, Co-Director, Migrant Unit at California Rural Legal Assistance Inc.; Gabriel Thompson, Author, Chasing the Harvest: Migrant Workers in California Agriculture, and Greg Dalton, Founder and Host, Climate One. This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on September 19, 2017.” At the link find the title, “Chasing the Harvest in the Heat, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171022_cl1 ChasingHarvest.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mole Day 9 mins – “It’s Mole Day! Celebrated on October 23, Mole Day recognizes Avogadro’s number (6.02 x 10^23), which is a basic unit of measurement in chemistry. We discuss mole day, reminisce on how we have celebrated it, and celebrate the founder of the National Mole Day Foundation: Maurice Oehler (a Wisconsin Science Teacher).” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Native Indian Legal System 42 mins – “Today on the NativeTalk.net Radio program, we begin with a few fun items on how the gender of your children affects how fathers specifically interact with daughters vs sons, and a crazy man in Kentuky who has built a life size replica of Noah’s Ark somehow believes Noah included dinosaurs in the list of animals he brought on board. …Then Cliff goes over a subject that has always bothered him, which is the lack of justice on Native reservations and how non-members are essentially able to get away with not murder, but pretty much everything else. The rule of law is discussed, as well as the reasons behind why and how the problems continue to exist even to this day. In the second segment, we hear Cliff’s mother, a tribal elder, discuss her trip to the Oregon coast and her experience with a rock formation which happens to be the same one featured in todays Old Indian Legend ‘A Potlatch On The Oregon Coast.’” At the link find the title, “Native Legal System & Cliff Reads An Old Indian Legend, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files native-legal-system-cliff-reads-an-old-indian-legend.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Navajo People 51 mins – ““Growing up and not speaking the language, I felt this loss or this void,” Nanobah Becker explores what “I Speak Navajo” means today. Nanobah Becker discovered that the voices of her grandfather and great-grandfather were among a collection of recordings in the ethnomusicology department, while she was studying at Columbia University. Knocking on the door that day and asking for them back began a process of cultural realisation for her whole family. Nanobah is a Navajo film maker who didn’t learn Navajo. For her parents generation, those who did speak their own language at school were beaten, had their mouths washed out with soap and forced to wear signs around their necks, “I speak Navajo”. Today though, “I speak Navajo” is a sign of honour. This resurgence of Navajo culture has created a new pride amongst the Navajo nation, but it is still in a precarious position. With the loss of speaking generations, it is now imperative that this youngest generation learn and pass on to their children to ensure the survival of the Navajo language. Those of Nanobah’s generation that are struggling the most; without their own language they are often considered “not Navajo enough” by their own clans. She travels from Albuquerque, New Mexico to Window Rock and Tahajilee in the Navajo Nation, to ask what “I speak Navajo” means to remaining generations. They meet musicians, artists and native speakers from a variety of backgrounds, learning along the way that there is real power of language and music.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neoprene 6 mins – “Neoprene: Chemistry in its element, Oct, 2017.” At the link find the title by that name, right-click “Media files Ciie_Neoprene.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurogastronomy 51 mins – “Food is understood to motivate behavior. But it’s not just hunger that does it — not just the need for physical sustenance. People who get their nutritional needs met with a bland, uninspiring diet will still have their thoughts consumed by fantasies of flavor – dreamt-of meals of smorgasbords of exotic cuisine. Few “lost in the wilderness” stories or prison sagas don’t feature food becoming a borderline obsession, even among well-fed people. Neurogastronomy is the study of flavor perception — a new, interdisciplinary field at the conjunction of psychology, neuroscience and food science. Its proponents’ interests go broader still, into areas of environmental sustainability and population-level health systems. Dr. Tim McClintock, Ph.D. and Dan (Dong) Han, Psy.D. are colleagues at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, where McClintock is a Professor of Physiology and Han an Associate Professor of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. They are each at the forefront of the ripening movement to apply (and extend) our understanding of how smell, taste, and texture combine to create flavor.” At the link find the title, “#202 – What is Neurogastronomy? Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files SDS202.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New Hampshire Drinking Water 5 mins – “A Senate advisory commission next month will choose to fund several major projects improving drinking water across New Hampshire communities.More than $200 million from a settlement with Exxon-Mobil over MTBE contamination has been set aside for funding these projects. Robert Scott is the commissioner of the Department of Environmental Services. He’s also on the Drinking Water and Groundwater Advisory Commission. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with him about issues with drinking water in the state.” At the link right-click the play button and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Access Models 22 mins – “Open Access business models are a well-established reality for scholarly publishers in 2017. Yet Open Access continues to cause disruption for all stakeholders. At research universities particularly, tracking Article Publication Charges (APCs) brings costly inefficiency to the manuscript submission workflow for authors, funders and university staff. Last week at the Frankfurt Book, Copyright Clearance Center presented an Open Access Master Class in University APCs. In a discussion with CCC’s Chris Kenneally, publishing consultant Maurits van der Graaf and Ringgold President Laura Cox discussed why business-minded application and standards can serve to streamline the workflow for everyone.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oslo Accord 57 mins – “On October 17th Intelligence Squared staged a pre-theatre discussion, ‘Can We Bring Peace Between Enemies?’ before a performance of the award-winning play Oslo. The play is a political thriller which tells the true story of two maverick Norwegian diplomats who coordinated top secret talks culminating in the groundbreaking Oslo Peace Accords. The discussion took place at the Harold Pinter theatre, and brought together James Rubin, former Assistant Secretary of State for the US State Department, William Sieghart, founder of an NGO which works with leaders from all parties on both sides of the divide in the Israel/Palestine conflict, and award-winning CNN correspondent Clarissa Ward. Chaired by Jonathan Freedland, they discussed their experience of against-the-odds peace negotiations and what lessons can be learned from the past that apply to the political climate today.” At the link find the title, “Oslo: Can We Bring Peace Between Enemies? Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pace Trial Controversy 68 mins – “David Tuller returns to discuss his efforts to expose the methodological and ethical problems with the PACE trial for ME/CFS.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV special” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Palliative Care 59 mins – “Although lifespans have been increasing, so has the burden of chronic disease. When a person is diagnosed with a serious illness such as cancer, cirrhosis, kidney disease, heart failure or Parkinson’s, medical science may not have a cure. But doctors shouldn’t say, there’s nothing more we can do. Instead, they should ask, how can we help this patient live better, if not longer? That is the goal of palliative care. What Is Palliative Care? Many people imagine that palliative care is strictly for the very end of life. But they are underestimating its usefulness in so many other situations. Helping patients focus on what is most important to them can help them live better, whether their prognosis is for a few months or for a number of years. When expected life span is limited, it may make sense for doctors to discontinue drugs that are intended to help keep patients healthy in the long run and to maintain the medicines that help people feel better, including pain medications.” At the link click “Download MP3,” and select “MP3 Version” from the shopping list to get a free download of the audio file.

Prince’s Philanthropy 22 mins – “”If you pretend it’s not happening then you actually open the door for the [Steve] Bannons and neo-Nazis and other people to kind of prey on that and make it worse.” At the link find the title, “Oct 19 The ‘whitelash’ of Trump politics: CNN commentator Van Jones, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20171019_20895.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Puerto Rico Hurricane Recovery 32 mins – “This week on the show, Patri Ramirez Gonzalez from the Puerto Rico/Detroit Solidarity Exchange Network talks about grassroots plans to save family farmers and the ecosystem in Puerto Rico, and Trishala Deb, Asia regional director for Thousand Currents, a grant-making organization with partners across the world, shares hard won lessons from grassroots activists in Asia. Then from food justice and grassroots brilliance we’ll hear from David Galarza Santa, a labor and community activist, about a Puerto Rican plan to recover, revitalize and resist calls for electricity privatization by building back different.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race and Politics 32 mins – “Jamelle Bouie talks to Cornell Belcher, president of Brilliant Corners Research & Strategies, about the Obama backlash and Trump leaning into white racial resentment. Stick around after that interview to hear Trumpcast produer Jayson De Leon chat with Slate’s Jordan Weissmann about the two health care executive orders Trump signed on Thursday.” At the link right-click “The Obama Backlash in Two Parts, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM5784445153.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recycling Effectiveness 30 mins – “Where do the contents of our bins end up? Tom Heap lifts the lid on the recycling industry to find out what happens to our waste beyond the kerbside collection. What does ‘recycling’ mean? Are bottles and tins and plastic packaging recycled when they’re collected from our homes? They might well be taken to the local MRF (Materials Recovery Facility) and separated out into different waste streams, but what happens then? Embarking on a road journey along the recycling chain, Tom Heap tracks his own domestic recycling refuse to find out how much – or how little – of it is actually recycled. “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Resilient Leaders 48 mins – “What do Rachel Carson, Frederick Douglass, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Ernest Shackleton, and Abraham Lincoln have in common, aside from being historical figures you’ve probably heard of? That’s the question my guest today tries to answer in her new book Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times. At a time when trustworthy leadership seems in short supply, it examines what real leadership is and how it comes about. Nancy Koehn is a historian at the Harvard Business School whose research focuses on how leaders, past and present, craft lives of purpose, worth, and impact.” At the link find the title, “120. Nancy Koehn (Historian) – Holdin’ on for a Hero, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP5329917651.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Richard Branson 46 mins – “Sir Richard Branson, Founder and Chairman, the Virgin Group In Conversation with Stacy Brown-Philpot, CEO, TaskRabbit. This program is part of our Good Lit series, underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation. This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on October 14, 2017.” At the link find the title, “Sir Richard Branson: Finding My Virginity, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171014_Sir Richard Branson Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Revolution 65 mins – “Gregory Afinogenov received his PhD in History from Harvard University, and is now an assistant professor in Imperial Russian History at Georgetown University. Greg sits down with Brett to discuss the October Revolution and the Soviet Union. Topics Include: Joseph Stalin, The Bolsheviks, The failures and fallacies of western liberal propaganda, the Cold War, the Space Race, George Orwell, Trotsky v. Stalin, Holodomor, The successes of the Soviet Union, what leftists of all stripes can learn from the Russian Rev, and much more!” At the link right-click the down-p9nting arrow under the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

San Francisco Sea Rise 10 mins – “When a raindrop falls in San Francisco, it has two choices: flow east into the San Francisco Bay, or west into the Pacific Ocean. A ridgeline divides the city into two, slicing through the Presidio, hugging the eastern edge of Golden Gate Park, and skirting Twin Peaks. As the land drops off in either direction, the elevation difference doesn’t just drive raindrops downhill—it also moves human waste.” At the link find the title, “Could San Francisco Get the Oil Industry to Pay for Climate Change? Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files audio-84b00ba8-e808-4741-b270-e24984929ad1-encodings.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Assaults by Leaders 24 mins – “Jacob Weisberg runs a theory by Emily Bazelon – with the election of Donald Trump is impunity for men like Trump coming to an end?” At the link find the title, “Impunity for Men Like Trump, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY4236311398.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shaming on Internet 75 mins – “Author and journalist Megan McArdle of Bloomberg View talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how the internet has allowed a new kind of shaming via social media and how episodes of bad behavior live on because Google’s memory is very, very good. McArdle discusses the implications this new reality has on how we behave at work and how people protect and maintain their reputations in a world where nothing is forgotten and seemingly little is forgiven.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Snail Control 27 mins – “This is a big story about a little snail. Biologist Helen Scales relates an epic tale that spans the globe and involves calamity, tragedy, extinction and we hope, salvation. It stars the tiny tree-dwelling mollusc from French Polynesia, Partula, a snail that has captivated scientists for centuries. Like Charles Darwin studied finches on the Galapagos, Partula became an icon of evolution because, in the living laboratories of the Pacific islands, it had evolved into multiple species. But a calamity drove Partula to extinction, when a botched biological control, the predatory Rosy Wolf Snail, was introduced. It was supposed to eat another problem mollusc, but in a cruel twist, devoured tiny Partula instead. An international rescue mission was scrambled to save a species and from just one or two rescued individuals, populations of this snail species have been built up over thirty years in captive breeding programmes in zoos around the world. And now, in the nailbiting sequel, we track Partula’s journey home.” At the link find the title, “SOS Snail, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files p05jtw0n.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solitary Prison PTSD 60 mins – “Terry Allen Kupers, M.D. Psychiatrist and Professor Emeritus, the Wright Institute Graduate School of Psychology; Author, Solitary (Forthcoming). This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on October 17, 2017.” At the link find the title, “Solitary: The Inside Story of Supermax Isolation and How We Can Abolish It, right-click “Media files cc_20171017 Solitary Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup Week 46 mins – “Design is increasingly an aspect of product management, not just product teams. More of us are familiar with user experience and its impact on design, but where does design really begin? Every true user experience expert I have talked with about this has the same answer and that’s with the user of the product or the person with the problem that we wish to solve with a product. How we actually get insights from users can be the difference between product success and failure. To explore the right way to get insights, I talked with Brian Baker at the First User Group, which is a strategic innovation firm providing business strategy and cutting-edge product design in digital, consumer electronics, and consumer packaged goods. He has delivered over 100 products to brands we would all recognize and it is likely we have encountered one or more of his products.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainable Economics 58 mins – “Joel Solomon, Chairman, Renewal Funds, In Conversation with Esther Park, CEO, Cienega Capital. This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on October 19, 2017.” At the link find the title, “The Clean Money Revolution: Reinventing Power, Purpose and Capitalism, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171019_The Clean Money Revolution Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teenage Suicides 24 mins – “Half of adolescents who die by suicide have a history of self harm. And in the UK, the rates of adolescents who commit suicide jumped from 3.2, to 5.4 per 100 000 between 2010 and 2015. The national suicide prevention strategy recently expanded its scope by aiming to reduce self harm rates as a common precursor to suicide. Therefore it’s important that we have an accurate measure of rates of self harm in the population, and new research published on bmj.com aims to do that.” At the link find the title, “70% rise in incidence of self harm in teenagers, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files 347613811-bmjgroup-70-rise-in-incidence-of-self-harm-in-teenagers.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump-Russian Connection 33 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Business Insider’s Natasha Bertrand about Trump’s tweet this morning regarding the Steele dossier and why the firm behind it refused to testify to the House Intel Committee on Wednesday.” At the link find the title, “Hello Dossier, My Old Friend, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM3257188369.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vagina Creation 60 mins – “This week, we’re looking at the social and biological science of female sex organs. We’ll talk to Dr. Anthony Atala, director of the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center Institute for Regenerative Medicine, about the creation and use of lab-grown vaginas. Biology professor Marie Herberstein exposes the bias against female genitalia in scientific studies. And science writer Emily Anthes tells us about the history and promising future of female condoms.” At the link find the title, “#444 The V-Word (Rebroadcast),” right-click “Play Now “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vienna Congress of 1815 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the conference convened by the victorious powers of the Napoleonic Wars and the earlier French Revolutionary Wars, which had devastated so much of Europe over the last 25 years. The powers aimed to create a long lasting peace, partly by redrawing the map to restore old boundaries and partly by balancing the powers so that none would risk war again. It has since been seen as a very conservative outcome, reasserting the old monarchical and imperial orders over the growth of liberalism and national independence movements, and yet also largely successful in its goal of preventing war in Europe on such a scale for another 100 years. Delegates to Vienna were entertained at night with lavish balls, and the image above is from a French cartoon showing Russia, Prussia, and Austria dancing to the bidding of Castlereagh, the British delegate.’ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voting Rights Law 62 mins – “The modern day voting rights movement was born out of the precipitous clash of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and the American legal system. Through marches and sit-ins, activists pushed America to live up to the values expressed in her Declaration, ultimately leading to the Voting Rights Act of 1965. For almost 20 years, these provisions were used to expand voting rights for black Americans in various states. Yet, their very expansiveness raised serious constitutional questions over states’ rights and the equality of states.” At the link find the title, “The evolution of voting rights, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP3850237384.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Declaration Powers 16 mins – “What does the Constitution say about the president’s ability to wage war and what is the role of Congress?” At the ink find the title, “11- War Powers,” right-click “Media files Trump Con Law_Ep_11_War_Powers_part_1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Potability 54 mins – “Our guest today is Faber Dewar, the CEO of Drink Up, a California-based company that offers a new option in clean, healthy drinking water. Tune in to learn how Drink Up’s proprietary system not only purifies tap water, but can add vitamin boosts at a fraction of the cost of bottled water. Drink Up also partners with water.org, and you will learn why Faber and the whole Drink Up team are committed to pure, affordable drinking water for everyone.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whistle Blowers 36 mins – “WikiLeaks has ushered in a new age in whistle blowing: Modern leakers such as Chelsea Manning – who’s story is the focus of our current episode – expose huge amounts of confidential information. But can these mega-leaks really influence the actions and policies of governments?” At the link find the title, “Malicious Life, episode 10: The Whistleblowers, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files ML_Se2 Ep01_The Whistle Blowers_MST.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wine Tainted by Smoke 12 mins – “Nick Goldschmidt has been lucky so far. A wildfire has burned more than 8,000 acres just north of his vineyards in Geyserville, California, but so far his vines are OK. So is his house in Healdsburg, roughly midway between Geyserville and a 36,000-acre fire that destroyed more than 2,800 homes in Santa Rosa. But now, amid the charred, empty spaces that scar northern California’s winegrowing region, under skies yellowed by smoke, Goldschmidt has a race to win.” At the link find the title, “How Climate Change and ‘Smoke Taint’ Could Kill Napa Wine, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files audio-b0e96577-09d4-4283-aea1-305773cb2be1-encodings.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Worker Relations 62 mins – “Labor’s employment and industrial relations spokesman Brendan O’Connor addresses the National Press Club in Canberra.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Brendan O’Connor, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files NPCc_Oconnor_1810_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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Media Mining Digest 311 – Oct 27, 2017: ACLU 2017 Lawsuits, AI Future, Anti-Racists Action Network, Battery Developments, Berkeley Free Speech Controversy, Bulgarian Exodus, Cancer Survirors, Climate Change Adaptation, Conservative Tribalism, Coral Reef Protection, Cultural Differences, Cyberwar, Dealing with Jerks, Democratic Republic Structure, Disinformation, Dying Process, Fertilizer Research, Food Crisis Is Coming, Gerrymandering Future, Gun Control Lobby, Hip Hop on Rikers Island, Medical Post Bac Programs, Muslim Hip Hop, NSA General Counsel, Poverty Solution, Precision Medicine, Putin Background, Ranger Bank Robber, Refugees in Bangladesh, Retina Replacement, Sectarian Violence in Britain, Solar Energy and Minorities, Spouse of Doctor, Universal Basic Income, VR Uses, War with Machines, White Supremacy Discussion

Exercise your ears: the 97 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 501 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 17,430 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 86GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 400 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

ACLU 2017 Lawsuits 51 mins – “As next week marks the opening of the 2017 term at the high court, Dahlia Lithwick speaks with David Cole, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union, about some of the cases in this upcoming term, including Trump’s travel ban, a civil rights case of gay couples versus those of religious dissenters and more. Cole also discusses how citizen activism is more alive than he’s seen is his lifetime, something he illustrates in his new book, now out in paperback, Engines of Liberty: The Power of Citizen Activists to Make Constitutional Law.” At the link find the title, “The Supreme Court Term RBG Is Calling “Momentous”, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY4272840834.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Future 71 mins – “What has artificial intelligence (AI) brought us? Where will it lead us? The story of AI is the story of intelligence—of life processes as they evolve from bacteria to humans, where life processes define their own software, to technology, where life processes design both their hardware and software. We know that AI is transforming work, laws and weapons as well as the dark side of computing (hacking and viral sabotage), raising important questions.At the link find the title, “Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170926_Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anti-Racists Action Network 68 mins – “Mic Crenshaw is a hip hop artist and co-founder of the Anti-Racist Action Network that arose and was active in the 80s and 90s. The ARA is an anti-fascist organization dedicated to community defense against organized racism and fascism. Mic joins Brett to discuss the founding of the Anti-Racist Action Network and to discuss antifascism generally. Topics Include: ARA, Mic’s experience fighting fascists, the differences between antifa then and now, the role of violence in our collective fight for liberation, the Portland train stabbings and Mic’s connection to the event and one of the victims, the link between late capitalism and the conditions that give rise to fascism, the white supremacy inherent in policing, and much more.” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotics in Farm Animals 21 mins – “…The Animal Health Institute found Levy and offered to fund a study on behalf of farm antibiotics. That was why there were tubes of poop-stained sample swabs in the Downings’ refrigerator. They were tools that would help Levy establish, or disprove, whether resistance could migrate through the environment, from animals that had received antibiotics, to animals and people who had not. Growth promoters’ proponents hoped the answer would be no….The Downings accepted the challenge—for fun and out of curiosity, and because being unconventional had never worried them before…. There was one footnote to what Levy had found, and for years it would influence efforts to control farm antibiotic use: The Downings had not gotten sick. There are many strains of E. coli, and the one that resided in the chickens’ guts and crossed to their owners was not a disease-causing one. Instead, it was a commensal, one of the range of benign bacteria that occupy the gut and pervade the world without causing illness. On the scientists’ side, this did not diminish therisk; it only made the bacterial traffic more complicated. But it would allow those who chose not to believe in the threat to downplay the danger.” At the link find the title, “How Congress Ignored Science and Fueled Antibiotic Resistance, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files audio-dab78f73-b9c2-4024-81de-66a079702dff-encodings.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Resistance 9 mins – “When Alexander Fleming came back from a Scottish vacation in the summer of 1928 to find his London lab bench contaminated with a mold called Penicillium notatum, he kicked off a new age of scientific sovereignty over nature. Since then, the antibiotics he discovered and the many more he inspired have saved millions of lives and spared immeasurable suffering around the globe. But from the moment it started, scientists knew the age of antibiotics came stamped with an expiration date. They just didn’t know when it was. …In 2013, then-director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Tom Frieden told reporters, “If we’re not careful, we will soon be in a post-antibiotic era.” Today, just four years later, the agency says we’ve arrived. “We say that because pan-resistant bacteria are now here” says Jean Patel, who leads the CDC’s Antibiotic Strategy & Coordination Unit. “Folks are dying simply because there is no antibiotic available to treat their infection, infections that not too long ago were easily treatable….” At the link find the title, “The Post-Antibiotic Era Is Here. Now What? Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files audio-ac3643ca-b551-44db-826e-f0015702de4d-encodings.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Language Threat 9 mins – “At the time of white settlement, there were hundreds of indigenous languages spoken in Australia. Today just a few dozen remain. Fifteen are being passed on to children as a first language. They are very different from each other. So how do people learn a language that is not written? Steven Bird is using technology and working with remote Aboriginal communities to preserve languages, world views and culture for future generations.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battery Developments 9 mins – “At Tesla, Peter Carlsson spent nearly five years at Elon Musk’s side, locating various parts of the Model S as the electric car company’s global supply chain manager. “The overarching goal of Tesla is to help reduce carbon emissions, and that means low cost and high volume,” Musk said back in 2006. “We will also serve as an example to the auto industry, proving that the technology really works and customers want to buy electric vehicles.” Now, as Tesla builds its Gigafactory in the Nevada desert, the company is recapitulating that mission, aiming to reduce not just the energy consumed by its cars, but the energy used to build its battery in the first place. Tesla says the factory will employ rooftop solar and wind turbines for energy, along with a closed loop water system. But Carlsson, who left Silicon Valley in 2015 for his native Sweden, wants to make his own progress toward the goal of green batteries. In May, Carlsson and fellow former Tesla executive Paolo Cerruti announced plans to build their own $4.5 billion electric battery plant to power electric cars, trucks, ships and, of course, a few Swedish snowmobiles. “We will produce a battery with significantly lower carbon footprint than the current supply chains,” Carlsson said during a September visit to his office in downtown Stockholm. His startup firm Northvolt is raising $120 million for the first phase of the plant, which Carlsson says will produce 32 Gigawatt-hours when fully running in 2023. How will they do it? Raw materials like graphite and nickel will be sourced from deposits in Sweden, while cobalt will come from a huge refiner in Finland. Renewable energy will flow from Sweden’s hydropower dams. Waste heat will be recycled to keep factory neighbors warm in the winter. Old batteries will get new life through recycling….With Carlsson, a bit of Silicon Valley’s hard-charging corporate DNA has been inserted to Sweden’s cooler corporate tech culture. Sweden is one of the greenest countries on the planet, but whether Northvolt can turn that ethos into a successful car battery might depend more on future European and American car buyers.” At the link find the title, “Can This Tesla Alum Build the World’s Greenest Battery? Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files audio-fb763dee-ee7f-4c22-bf89-185857bd8304-encodings.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battery Research 6 mins – “Many appliances used around homes and gardens run off rechargeable batteries. Typically, these cordless drills, hedge cutters, vacuum cleaners and sanders take up to 4 hours to charge then deliver their charge in 20 minutes. A new battery technology would see an end to this. The battery uses carbon nano materials and graphene, with energy stored within an electrolyte. The cells are known a C-ion cells. As well as domestic appliances, the technology has application for stabilizing electricity grids which may be fed by intermittent sources such as wind.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Berkeley Free Speech Controversy 63 mins – “During his tenure as chancellor at UC Berkeley, Nicholas Dirks navigated some of the most challenging free speech controversies in the contemporary United States. In one of the most telling episodes, a February 2017 speech by the right-wing provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos was shut down amid a riot by left-wing “antifa” protesters. In this talk, Dirks will reflect on challenges such as these as well as the ideological challenges to the liberal norm of free speech and the threat posed to universities by these contemporary disputes.” At the link find the title, “Nicholas Dirks: Free Speech and the University Under Assault, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20171002_Nicholas Dirks Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biohub Project 62 mins – “The Chan Zuckerberg Biohub has an audacious vision: to “enable doctors to cure, prevent or manage all diseases during our children’s lifetime.” This vision may sound outlandish at first. However, when one considers how far medicine has come in the past 100 years, this vision doesn’t seem so far-fetched. Co-presidents Joe DeRisi and Steve Quake will share insights into their quest to end disease, from advancing basic science and expanding humankind’s understanding of fundamental truth to building new technologies that can radically accelerate the pace of scientific discovery.” At the link find the title, “Chan Zuckerberg Biohub and the End of Human Disease, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170925_Chan Zuckerberg Biohub Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Book 74 mins- “Michael Casey is a Senior Advisor for the Digital Currency Initiative at MIT. Prior to that, he was a Senior Columnist for the Wall Street Journal. He spent 18 years covering global economic and financial trends and co-authored The Age of Cryptocurrency: How Bitcoin and the Blockchain are Challenging the Global Economic Order with Paul Vigna.  In this episode, Michael and I discuss:  His journey from the Wall Street Journal to the MIT Digital Currency Initiative His perspective on ICOs/token sales And how his co-author, Paul Vigna, became motivated to write a book on Cryptocurrency” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Rules 25 mins – “John Medina is the author of the New York Times bestseller “Brain Rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School.” His latest book is a must-read for parents and early-childhood educators: “Brain Rules for Baby: How to Raise a Smart and Happy Child from Zero to Five.” Dr. Medina is an affiliate Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Washington School of Medicine…More on John Medina and “Brain Rules” at brainrules.net.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Politics 62 mins – “Is Britain facing an identity crisis? The traditional dividing lines of left and right seem to be dissolving into new political tribes – metropolitan liberals versus the culturally rooted working classes, graduates versus the uneducated, the young versus the old. In June’s general election, traditional Labour heartlands like Mansfield went Conservative, while wealthy areas such as Kensington swung to Corbyn. Britain seems utterly confused about its politics. As the far left and Eurosceptic right have gained strength, much of the country has been left feeling politically homeless. So what’s going on? How will these new alignments play out as the country faces the historic challenge of leaving the EU and forging a new relationship with the rest of the world? Are the Conservatives really up to the job, as they bicker over what kind of Brexit they want and jostle over who should succeed Theresa May? Is it now unthinkable that Jeremy Corbyn could be the next prime minister? Looming over the current turmoil is the biggest question of all: What kind of Britain do we want to live in? What are the values that should hold our society together? We were joined by Ken Clarke, the most senior Conservative voice in Parliament; Hilary Benn, Labour MP and Chair of the Brexit Select Committee; and Helen Lewis, deputy editor at the New Statesman and prominent voice on the left. Alongside them was David Goodhart, author of one of the most talked about analyses of post-Brexit Britain, and Anand Menon, a leading academic thinker on Britain’s fractious relations with the EU. The event was chaired by Stephen Sackur, one of the BBC’s most highly regarded journalistic heavyweights.” At the link find the title, “The Great Realignment: Britain’s Political Identity Crisis, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bulgarian Population Decline 28 mins – “What’s it like to live in the country with the fastest-shrinking population in the world? Ruth Alexander reports.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

C-40 Project 7 mins – “Maybe the United States is sticking with the Paris Climate Agreement? Maybe it isn’t? But even if the US bails out of the international accord to limit climate change, well, nations aren’t the only players. If every city with a population over 100,000 stepped up, they could account for 40 percent of the reductions required. But that’s no small if. “It requires drastic action in the next three or four years,” says Michael Doust, program director for measurement and planning at C40, a coalition of 90 cities trying to fight climate change. “The decisions city leaders are going to make are really going to set the tone.” So after last year’s Deadline 2020 report, in which C40 detailed the reductions cities would have to make to keep warming below 1.5 degrees by 2050, many city leaders had one critical question: How? On Monday at “C40 Talks,” part of a series of Climate Week events in New York, C40’s steering group cities announced a step toward an answer, with plans for the leadership team—New York, Paris, Mexico City, Durban, and others—to prepare and share detailed climate roadmaps as a way to spin up everyone else….” At the link find the title, “Cities Turn to Other Cities for Help Fighting Climate Change, Sept, 2017,” right-click “M