Mining Digest 379 – Feb 22, 2019: 99 Percent Shorts, Antarctic Research, Behavioral Economics, Blind Tech Show, Brokovich and Glyphosate, Camping Equipment, Census Process, Cognitive Neuroscience, College Admission Process, CRISPR Ethics, Dakota War in Wisconsin, Drug Epidemic Control, Economic Meltdown, Freakonomics Live in NYC, Free Speech Battle, Games and Winning, Immigration Legislation, Infrastructure by Trump, Intellectual Property, Judge Appointments, Maker Girl, Mall Secret Apartment, Manafort Investigation, Medical MSTP Program, Medical School SAD, Medicine in Rural America, Memphis Urban Sprawl, Migrant Reintegration, NAD Use, Networking, Obstruction of Justice, Onate’s Foot, Opiate Pain Control, Orphan Drug History, Science Mangling, Sepsis, Urban Agriculture, Venezuelan Exodus, Welfare Reform, White Women Voters

Exercise your ears: the 67 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 582 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,198 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 157GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 496 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

99 Percent Shorts 48 mins – “Continuing 99pi’s year-end tradition of bringing you a collection of short stories our staff came across throughout the year, this installment includes a hodgepodge of European architecture, nearly useless gadgets, the power of blue light,  and a fiery holiday tradition.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antarctic Research 24 mins – “Prof Dame Jane Francis knows Antarctica better than most: she’s spent the majority of her career researching this icy landscape. Ian Sample talks to her about what it’s like to camp in Antarctica and what her findings can tell us about our future on this planet .Prof Jane Francis was made a dame in 2017 for services to diplomacy and polar science. As you might expect, Francis has spent much of her career in Antarctica. What you might not expect is that she did so in the hope of finding fossilised plants. Millions of years ago, Antarctica was covered in luscious forests and had very little snow. Francis’s work has shed light on some of the reasons for this Antarctic paradox. ” At the link right-click “Download” and select ‘save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anthony Scaramucci 46 mins – “In this episode of the Intelligence Squared podcast we were joined by Anthony Scaramucci, the former White House Director of Communications for a whopping 11 days. He was interviewed by Josh Lowe, Deputy Editor of Apolitical, for a wide-ranging and often outrageous discussion on the Trump presidency this far.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astrophysics Discussion 56 mins – “…On this episode of StarTalk Radio, Neil deGrasse Tyson investigates what the future might bring with comic co-host Maeve Higgins and Sir Martin Rees, astrophysicist, cosmologist, Astronomer Royal of the United Kingdom since 1995, and both the former Master of Trinity College at Cambridge and former President of the Royal Society (a position held by Sir Isaac Newton himself), and author of On The Future: Prospects for Humanity. …Find out why people should listen to astrophysicists, not futurists, when trying to predict the future. Ponder what we may be able to predict with some certainty by 2050. Learn why we should keep our minds open to science fiction. Discover how science fiction can be used to make sure a dystopic future doesn’t happen. Martin tells us his fears about the misuse of bio- and cyber-tech and how each could undermine governments – and already have begun to influence the world.  Next, we dive into fan-submitted Cosmic Queries. We discuss whether or not a globally unified science organization is in our future, and how science functions as a global culture already. You’ll hear if scientists are ever competitive and secretive with information. We debate how future generations will react to the current generations’ handling of the climate crisis, and whether certain climate disasters have to occur in order for people to understand the seriousness of climate change. You’ll find out if space travel will be accessible for everyone in the future. Learn why it’s dangerous to think human problems can be solved by Martian colonization. Explore the future of space travel: will it be a private or public venture? Will NASA become a spaceport service for private vessels? Will NASA become obsolete? Who will be the first people on Mars? How important is science literacy for moving us into the future? What might be the next “big thing” in science – could it be dark energy? You’ll learn more about the Large Hadron Collider and if some of the science being created at CERN can protect us from solar radiation when traveling through space. Martin tells us about witnessing the discovery of a pulsar firsthand. Finally, we question whether the Golden Record was a good idea, and whether interdimensional travel more plausible than faster than light travel….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Behavioral Economics 60 mins – “You wouldn’t think you could win a Nobel Prize for showing that humans tend to make irrational decisions. But that’s what Richard Thaler has done. The founder of behavioral economics describes his unlikely route to success; his reputation for being lazy; and his efforts to fix the world — one nudge at a time.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Tech Show 69 mins – “That Blind Tech Show TBTS, has a new Facebook Group! Check them out on Facebook groups, That Blind Tech Show. Who knew the blind were missing out on Cyber flashing? Starbucks to block porn watching at all of its storescome January British Cops are building an AI.that flag people for crimes that have not happened yet! The Malware of the future will have A.I.Super Powers. Are we prepared and doing enough to protect ourselves? Flying for the holidays why not track your flight in i-Messages? You can now say Hey Siri to launch ok Google Apple Music is now coming to Alexa Amazon TechTractcould it be the future of OCR Instagram adds new features for the visually impaired. Do you care?” At the link left-click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Discussion 45 mins – “As Theresa May gets closer to putting her Brexit deal before parliament, we discuss the chances of success. Was this really the best deal available? What will MPs be weighing up when they get their chance to vote on it? Have its opponents missed their chance? Plus we try to make sense of the choices facing the DUP and we consider the larger question of what this version of Brexit would mean for the future of the Union. With Kenneth Armstrong, author of Brexit Time, Helen Thompson and Chris Bickerton.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brockovich and Glyphosate 16 mins – “On December 6, 2018 environmental advocate Erin Brockovich published a high-profile opinion piece in The Guardian.  The piece was laced with scientific inaccuracies and inflammatory rhetoric about glyphosate, indicating in no uncertain terms that it causes cancer and is present in just about all food. None of these claims are supported by peer-reviewed literature.  Further examination shows that Brockovich is a consultant for the law firm that is managing the class action against one company that manufactures the compound. In this week’s podcast Rob Saik and Kevin Folta sit down and discuss the piece and the sad tale of a powerful voice for environment and consumer protection selling out to non-scientific interests.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Camping Equipment 33 mins – “Our guest this week is Maggie Tokuda-Hall. Maggie is the author of the Parent’s Choice Gold Medal winning picture book, Also an Octopus. Her debut young adult novel, The Mermaid, The Witch, and The Sea is due out in Fall 2019. She is the host of the Drunk Safari podcast.” At the link left-click the square with three dots, left-click “Download File,” left click “Save File” and then “OK” to get the podcast.

Census Process 38 mins – “The Trump Administration wants to ask people about their citizenship status on the 2020 Census. Why are Democrats fighting this?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Cognitive Neuroscience 37 mins – “BS 151 is a discussion of The Neuroscience of Emotion: A New Synthesis by Ralph Adolphs and David J. Anderson. We talk about key ideas from the book and relate them to several previous episodes about emotion including interviews with Jaak Panksepp, Lisa Feldman Barrett and Luis Pessoa.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

College Admission Process 34 minsThe ins and outs of applying for admission to college. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

CRISPR Ethics 38 mins – “Carl Zimmer is a New York Times columnist and author of 13 books about science. We talked to him about his latest book, She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity, which was recently named The Guardian’s Best Science Book of 2018.” At the link find the title, “She Has Her Mother’s Laugh, Dec 2018, right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dakota War in Wisconsin 64 mins – “Growing up in Mankato, Minnesota, John Biewen says, nobody ever talked about the most important historical event ever to happen there: in 1862, it was the site of the largest mass execution in U.S. history. Thirty-eight Dakota Indians were hanged after a war with white settlers. John went back to Minnesota to figure out what really happened 150 years ago, and why Minnesotans didn’t talk about it much after.” At the link you can listen, but must pay to download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Dinosaur Discovery 44 mins – “We talk to paleontologist, professor, expeditioner, and science communicator Ken Lacovara about his book Why Dinosaurs Matter. Ken has unearthed some of the largest dinosaurs ever to walk our planet, including the super-massive Dreadnoughtus, which at 65 tons weighs more than seven T. rex.” At the link find the title, “What It’s like to Discover a Dinosaur, Nov 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Epidemic Control 28 mins – “How much power does the president have to solve a crisis that kills so many Americans? Reporter Scott Higham takes us on a deep dive into The Post-60 Minutes investigation of the pharmaceutical industry’s influence on America’s opioid epidemic.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Economic Meltdown 28 mins – “Farewell to America, or just to this year? This week, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Chris Hedges explains why President Donald Trump is just the predictable end of a long sad history of American avarice and greed. Then, Reverend Billy celebrates the season with not buying, but boisterous singing. Hear what happened when he and his partner Savitri D. did bid farewell to America and took their riotous rituals to Europe. Support theLFShow, 10 Years of Making Power Through Media!” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freakonomics Live in NYC 58 mins – “Celebrity chef Alex Guarnaschelli joins us to co-host an evening of delicious fact-finding: where a trillion oysters went, whether a soda tax can work, and how beer helped build an empire. Washington Post columnist Alexandra Petri is our real-time fact-checker. At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar, then right-click “Save Link As” on the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Free Speech Battle 60 mins – “Many would argue that these are the fundamental goals of a good education. So why has Cambridge University taken to warning its students that the sexual violence in Titus Andronicus might be traumatic for them? Why are other universities in America and increasingly in Britain introducing measures to protect students from speech and texts they might find harmful? Safe spaces, trigger warnings and no-platforming are now campus buzzwords – and they’re all designed to limit free speech and the exchange of ideas. As celebrated social psychologist Jonathan Haidt argues in his forthcoming book The Coddling of the American Mind, university students are increasingly retreating from ideas they fear may damage their mental health, and presenting themselves as fragile and in need of protection from any viewpoint that might make them feel unsafe.The culture of safety, as Haidt calls it, may be well intentioned, but it is hampering the development of young people and leaving them unprepared for adult life, with devastating consequences for them, for the companies that will soon hire them, and for society at large. That, Haidt’s critics argue, is an infuriating misinterpretation of initiatives designed to help students. Far from wanting to shut down free speech and debate, what really concerns the advocates of these new measures is the equal right to speech in a public forum where the voices of the historically marginalised are given the same weight as those of more privileged groups. Warnings to students that what they’re about to read or hear might be disturbing are not an attempt to censor classic literature, but a call for consideration and sensitivity. Safe spaces aren’t cotton-wool wrapped echo chambers, but places where minority groups and people who have suffered trauma can share their experiences without fear of hostility. On November 19th Haidt came to the Intelligence Squared stage to discuss and debate these ideas. Joining him were the former chief rabbi Jonathan Sacks, who believes that educating young people through debate and argument helps foster robustness, author and activist Eleanor Penny, and sociologist Kehinde Andrews, one of the UK’s leading thinkers on race and the history of racism.” At the link left-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Games and Winning 55 minsGames are as old as civilization itself, and some people think they have huge social value regardless of whether you win or lose. Tom Whipple is not one of those people. That’s why he consulted an army of preposterously overqualified experts to find the secret to winning any game.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grass Fed Beef 67 mins – “Mike Salguero is CEO and founder of ButcherBox, the first delivery service dedicated to providing 100 percent natural, grass-fed beef, organic chicken and heritage pork to consumers. ButcherBox began in 2015 and today, delivers natural, organic meats directly to consumers’ doors nationwide through a simple monthly subscription service. All ButcherBox products align perfectly with a Bulletproof diet because they are humanely raised and free of antibiotics, hormones, and GMOs. Mike is on this episode of Bulletproof radio to discuss the mission of the company and how they plan to make natural, organic meats available to everyone.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Homosexuality 60 mins – “In 1973, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) declared that homosexuality was not a disease simply by changing the 81-word definition of sexual deviance in its own reference manual. It was a change that attracted a lot of attention at the time, but the story of what led up to that change is one that we hear today, from reporter Alix Spiegel. Part one of Alix’s story details the activities of a closeted group of gay psychiatrists within the APA who met in secret and called themselves the GAYPA…and another, even more secret group of gay psychiatrists among the political echelons of the APA. Alix’s own grandfather was among these psychiatrists, and the president-elect of the APA at the time of the change….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Recovery 31 mins – “Six years ago Superstorm Sandy hit, Lorena Giron and Brendan Martin of The Working World, an organization focused on starting and sustaining cooperatives in low-income communities, reports on the WORC’s [Western Organization of Resource Councils] that emerged out of the devastation. And noted Marxist geographer and anthropologist, David Harvey.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Enforcement 33 mins – “What does Trump hope will happen in Congress? With white house reporter David Nakamura, we talk to John Sandweg, former Immigration and Customs Enforcement acting director about policy. Plus, a dreamer in the DACA program shares her story.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Immigration Legislation 29 mins – “What does Trump hope will happen in Congress? With white house reporter David Nakamura, we talk to John Sandweg, former Immigration and Customs Enforcement acting director about policy. Plus, a dreamer in the DACA program shares her story.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Infrastructure By Trump 31 mins – “So far, there’s no $1.5 trillion infrastructure package. But Trump is still having a significant effect on how America funds and prioritizes its most significant transportation projects.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Intellectual Property 36 mins – “Beware the legal-industrial copyright complex” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Iran Nuclear Agreement 32 mins – “President Trump’s decision could unilaterally kill the landmark agreement — and his unconventional foreign policy approach could have widespread repercussions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Judge Appointments 29 mins – “Supreme Court reporter Robert Barnes weighs in on presidential influence on the federal courts system. Plus, we talk to a political science professor about the demographic breakdown of Trump’s nominees and how it differs from that of presidents past.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Kusher in White House 25 mins – “On this week’s episode, we talk about presidential family members, and about Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and embattled senior adviser. What happens when a president’s own children wield influence in the White House?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Machine Bias 54 mins – “Now that algorithms are everywhere, helping us to both run and make sense of the world, a strange question has emerged among artificial intelligence researchers: When is it ok to predict the future based on the past? When is it ok to be biased? “I want a machine-learning algorithm to learn what tumors looked like in the past, and I want it to become biased toward selecting those kind of tumors in the future,” explains philosopher Shannon Vallor at Santa Clara University.  “But I don’t want a machine-learning algorithm to learn what successful engineers and doctors looked like in the past and then become biased toward selecting those kinds of people when sorting and ranking resumes.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maker Girl 30 mins – “According to a recent report by Microsoft, girls and young women remain less likely to pursue education and careers in science, technology, engineering, and math; in short, STEM. In that regard, the lack of representation of women in STEM-related careers continues to grow as an area of focus. Mary Hadley from MakerGirl talks about their Girl STEM Education and mentorship program. MakerGirl is an organization that started in 2014 at the University of Illinois that introduces young girls in the Champaign-Urbana area to the exciting world of STEM fields through 3D printing sessions and creative activities. They have over 3,000 girls that have gone through their program since then. Their goal is to show girls that they can be both analytical and creative in one space.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar, then right-click “Save Link As” on the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Mall Secret Apartment 42 mins – “…Townsend’s daily running route took him past the construction site, and he watched as the building slowly took shape. There was one particular part of the building that kept catching his eye. Amidst all the bustle of construction, there seemed to be a spot where nothing was going on….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Manafort Investigation 26 mins – “Pulitzer Prize-winner Carol Leonnig explains the complexities of Manafort’s involvement in the Mueller investigation. Plus law professor Jimmy Gurulé on where Manafort’s actions may cross a legal line. Can Manafort walk away from this unscathed?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Map Making History 34 mins – “We talk to journalist, geologist, and author Betsy Mason about her latest book, co-authored with Greg Miller, All Over the Map: A Cartographic Odyssey.” At the link find the title, “The Beauty and Utility of Maps: A Cartographic Odyssey, 6 Nov 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mattress Stores 39 mins – “Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is called “Are We in a Mattress-Store Bubble?.” You’ve seen them — everywhere! — and often clustered together, as if central planners across America decided that what every city really needs is a Mattress District. There are now dozens of online rivals too. Why are there so many stores selling something we buy so rarely?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical MSTP Program 47 mins – “Listener Renee writes in to ask Aditi Patel, Maddie Mix, Nick Lind, and guest Dr. John Pienta whether she can legitimately hope for admission to an MD/PhD program without a strong science background.  Luckily, Maddie rolls MSTP style, so she helps us answer.  Another listener, Sarah, wrote to us hoping for some suggestions on how to prepare and strategize for her physician shadowing experiences.  And Ellen writes to give us some feedback on a recent episode.” At the link right-click “Download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical School SAD 54 mins – “Madeline called to ask: it’s finals week and you’re stricken with seasonal depression–what’s a med student to do?  We feel you, Madeline.  Luckily, Aline Sandouk, Nick Lind, Derek Bradley, and Hillary O’Brien are ready to throw open the curtains on their ideas to help.  And Jeannet-tello hit us up on our Instagram to find out what she should do about impostor syndrome.At the link right-click “Download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicine in Rural America 63 mins – “This past week, the Carver College of Medicine hosted its 12th annual Examined Life Conference.  Our featured presenter, journalist and memoirist Sarah Smarsh, grew up in a family of farmers and teen mothers in Kansas.  Her family, laborers trapped in a cycle of poverty, made the kinds of choices that poor people must make in rural America–whether to eat or seek medical attention, for instance.  Decades of inattention–and scorn–from politicians and the media have widened this class divide, and have sent the inexorable message that their voices don’t matter.  Ms. Smarsh’s recent book, Heartland: A Memoir of working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth, tells the tales of her family’s struggles with poverty, addiction, workplace injuries, and family violence that many economic and political elites don’t have the background or will to truly understand.At the link right-click “Download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memphis Urban Sprawl 32 mins – “For decades, Memphis grew by bringing its suburbs into the city limits. City officials thought this suburb-gobbling policy would be an economic boon– that it would bring in tax revenue. Instead, the policy was an economic disaster, especially for the majority black neighborhoods in the city’s core. In this episode, we’ll tell you about the consequences of Memphis’ sprawl, and the city’s plan to fix its past mistakes.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Reintegration 62 mins – “In December 2018 in Marrakech, UN Member States are scheduled to adopt the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration. Among the compact’s many groundbreaking ambitions is a commitment to facilitate the return, readmission, and reintegration of migrants that recognizes the priorities of both origin and destination countries. Implementing this commitment may, however, prove extremely challenging.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

NAD Use 65 mins – “Caspar Szulc is the co-founder and president of Innovative Medicine—a company that has been dreaming big for over a decade, making a positive change in people’s lives by going against conventional health-care industry thinking. The mission of Innovative Medicine is to go beyond the mainstream approach to incremental change and take a vertical leap toward exponential progress by leading the way in unifying and personalizing the field of medicine. In this episode, Caspar dives into some interesting ideas and products including Nadovim, which is the first physician-formulated and comprehensive NAD+ supplement for focus, concentration and cognitive function.” At the link right-click “Download: and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Networking 46 mins – “This week, we speak with Karen Wickre. Karen is a Silicon Valley veteran. She worked at Google for a decade and moved to Twitter as the Editorial Director. She is a member of the Board of Visitors for the John S. Knight Journalism Fellowships at Stanford University, and serves on the boards of the International Center for Journalists, the News Literacy Project, and the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. She has also been a featured columnist for Wired. Karen’s new book is, Taking the Work Out of Networking: An Introvert’s Guide to Making Connections That Count.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nunes Memo 19 mins – “The House Intelligence Committee publicly released a memo Friday, and it has Washington D.C. in a whirlwind. National security reporter Matt Zapotosky explains what’s in the memo, why it’s been so controversial and what happens next.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Obstruction of Justice 30 mins – “What are the limitations of a president’s influence on the Justice Dept? Reporter Devlin Barrett offers the latest news, fact checker Glenn Kessler unpacks Uranium One, and a once dep. special counsel explains risks for politicizing the Justice Dept.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Office Configuration History 41 mins – “It began as a post-war dream for a more collaborative and egalitarian workplace. It has evolved into a nightmare of noise and discomfort. Can the open office be saved, or should we all just be working from home? Feeling stressed from working in a noisy open office? Tell your boss that working from home increases worker productivity by 13 percent!” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Onate’s Foot 48 mins – “On January 7th, 1998, an envelope landed on the desk of Larry Calloway, a columnist with the Albuquerque Journal. Inside the envelope were some typewritten pages and a polaroid photo of a bronze Spanish riding boot. The note hinted that the bronze foot came from an equestrian statue of Juan de Oñate — part of a monument on the side of a rural highway near where Oñate founded the first Spanish colony in New Mexico way back in 1598. Calloway figured this was probably a hoax, so he handed the tip off to the newsroom to check it out. But when a reporter called up the visitor center at the Oñate monument, they discovered that, sure enough: the foot was missing…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opiate Pain Control 19 mins – “Another great episode with Justin Interviewing Brad Morgans with some great questions every medic should have the answers for concerning opioid pain control.” At the link “Listen now by clicking here”.

Orphan Drug Act History 30 mins – “,,,Unfortunately, nobody from the pharmaceutical industry showed up. Hardly any elected representatives showed up either. “Nobody was there except in the very, very last row in the room,” says Meyers, “a young man was sitting there and I had no idea who he was.” This young man turned out to be a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, and he published a very short story article buried in the middle of the paper where nobody was likely to read it. Except somebody didThe Orphan Drug Act of 1983  mandated that when the FDA designates a proposed treatment as an “orphan drug” (e.g. treats a condition that affects fewer than 200,000 people), the developer of that drug qualifies for special incentives, like subsidies for clinical trials. The biggest incentive, however, is that the first drug company to receive FDA approval for a certain type of treatment gets market exclusivity. Basically, that one company gets a monopoly on the drug and no one else can market an equivalent drug in the U.S. for seven years….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pharmacology Principles 11 mins – “In this great podcast Justin introduces the principals of pharmacology that have served him well over the years and have done far more for him than simply keeping him out of trouble. He also introduces Brad Morgans CRNA who is a wealth of knowledge and experience in not only combat and austere theaters but also in working with and relating to, SOF medics and the challenges we face. This is the first with more episodes in the series to come so listen, download, read and understand the principals that, if heeded, can make the lives of you and your patients’ safer and more comfortable. These principals should challenge you and spur you along to learn more about the drugs in the magic, locked narc box and the effects they will have on your patient. If you are a medic and haven’t had the chance to push the same drugs you carry in a controlled setting, what can you do to help make that happen? If you are a medical director, have you done everything in your power to give the medics who practice under your license (without your oversight) the opportunity to see the effects of these drugs first hand?…” At the link “Click Here to Listen to Episode 4: 12 Principals of Pharmacology and Intro to The Pharm Series “.

Presidential Ceremonies 27 mins – “With chief correspondent Dan Balz, we answer: Can a president fail to participate in tradition? Plus, we learn how President Reagan handled similar events and we talk to a former White House Social Secretary about planning these moments.” AT the link you can listen, but must pay to download; however, a copy is included int eh blog archive.

School Shootings Reaction 24 mins – “In this week’s episode, Post reporters John Woodrow Cox and Wesley Lowery talk about their experiences covering school shootings — and why the outraged message from South Florida teens might get some traction with lawmakers, and with Trump.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

School Uses 34 mins – New ways to apply school concepts to improve student performance later in life. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Science Mangling 44 mins – “In this episode, science journalist Dave Levitan talks about his new book: Not a Scientist: How Politicians Mistake, Misrepresent, and Utterly Mangle Science. In the book, Levitan takes us through 12 repeating patterns that politicians fall into when they talk about scientific research. Some are nefarious and intentional, some are based on ignorance, and some are just part of the normal business of politicians managing their public image or trying to appeal to their base. Not only do they often get the science wrong, they sometimes fail to communicate the nature of scientific inquiry and the goals of the scientific process itself.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sepsis 45 mins – “You have probably treated someone with an infection and likely even with someone with SIRS criteria at some point in your career.  At what point does a simple infection become concerning to the point that you should call for a teleconsult? When does it become emergent or life threatening, demanding intervention and treatment? How can you prevent an infection from getting to that point? Once it becomes systemic how can you best manage a patient that meets SIRS criteria? When can you send a guy back to his room and when should you keep a close eye on him so that he doesn’t suddenly crash and die after discharge? At what point does sepsis turn into septic shock and become a life threatening emergency?” At the link “Click here to download the episode now”.

Time Travel 63 mins – “Time is of the essence! Or, is it? Is time travel possible? Can we change the past? On this episode of StarTalk Radio, Neil deGrasse Tyson explores the wibbly wobbly, timey wimey nature of time itself with theoretical physicist Brian Greene, comic co-host Chuck Nice, and Impractical Joker James “Murr” Murray. Join us on a pop culture adventure, from the TARDIS of Doctor Who, to the shrinking capabilities of Ant Man and the Wasp, to the Upside Down parallel universe of Stranger Things. Explore if the laws of physics allow time travel to be possible. You’ll learn how the physics of time travel differs depending on whether you’re going into the future or the past. We discuss wormholes and what happens when you place a wormhole next to a black hole. Find out about the “chronology projection conjecture,” a concept first introduced by Steven Hawking. Ponder the logic paradox that occurs when you travel into the past. You’ll find out if other species process time similar to the way humans do. We also venture into the fourth dimension as we explore the TARDIS and it’s capabilities. Next, we move from time travel to the Quantum Realm as we discuss the shrinking science of Ant Man and the Wasp. You’ll learn what the laws of physics say about shrinking. Discover more about the empty space inside atoms. Investigate “molecular disequilibrium,” quantum entanglement, and what Einstein called the “spooky action.” Neil gives praise to the movie A Bug’s Life on its ability to represent the microscopic (besides the obvious error in ant anatomy). Lastly, we take a trip to the Upside Down as we investigate parallel universes. Find out more about string theory and the “brane” idea. Explore the idea of a “gravity phone” used to send out vibrations in space time rather than vibrations through air. Unlock the possibilities of the Many-Worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics and learn more about the “order of infinites.” All that, plus Neil offers an emotional, poignant happy birthday message to his birthday buddy, NASA.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” the pop-up menu.

Tools from a Venture Capitalist 31 mins – “Our guest this week is M.G. Siegler. For the past 5-plus years, M.G. Siegler has been a general partner at GV — Google’s venture capital arm. Before that, he helped start a seed fund called CrunchFund. And before that, he was a tech reporter for a number of years at publications such as TechCrunch and VentureBeat. Way back when, he was a front-end web developer.” At the link left-click the square with three dots, left-click “Download File,” left click “Save File” and then “OK” to get the podcast.

Trump and Medicare 27 mins – “In a setback for the president, a vote on the GOP health care overhaul plan was delayed Thursday. How does it affect Trump’s promises to voters? The Post’s Mike DeBonis explains the politics, and we talk to Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) about what’s next.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Trump and Press Corps 32 mins – “How unusual is Trump’s behavior toward the media? Media columnist Margaret Sullivan weighs in on that question and on what’s at risk for democracy. Plus, WHCA president Jeff Mason shares what it’s really like to be a member White House press corps.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Trump Emoluments 27 mins – “The Post’s award-winning David Fahrenthold breaks down Trump’s many businesses, his complex foreign ties and the Emoluments Clause.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Trump Investigation and Flynn 63 mins – “A judge’s shock over Michael Flynn’s crimes destroys right-wing conspiracy theories, Trump is forced to shut down his fraudulent charity, Trump may get his government shutdown after all, and a criminal justice reform bill just may become law. Then CNN’s Van Jones talks to Jon and Dan about what’s in the First Step Act, and how a bipartisan coalition got it done.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ‘Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Ultra Marathons 50 mins – “50, 100, 200 miles and more – ultramarathons are no joke. On this episode of Playing with Science, hosts Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice catch up with ultramarathon runner and world record breaker Ann Trason and Shawn Bearden, a.k.a. Dr. Ultra, as we pull back the curtain on endurance racing. We define ultrarunning and explore how the definition can change depending on who you’re asking. Find out about the longest classified road race – the Sri Chinmoy Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race. Discover more about how runners plan their schedules around events in which they will compete during the year. Dr. Ultra breaks down “bioenergetics” and how the body functions during endurance running. Learn how diet and physical behavior can help a runner’s efficiency in performance and how recovery is a vital part of training. Investigate why certain recovery techniques are over-hyped and unnecessary. We also discuss the law of distinguishing return during endurance running. Dr. Ultra tells us the single most important thing in training. Find the connections between mentally preparing for ultra-running and mindfulness and meditation. You’ll also learn simple ways to prevent injuries and the impact of the placebo effect, and why Dr. Ultra’s soccer past has helped his performance as an ultra-runner.  Next, dive into the psychology of ultra-runners and how you can “train your gut.” Ann tells us how she managed her nutrition intake during races. You’ll hear about one of Ann’s most memorable races in South Africa. Explore the importance of terrain training when preparing for an event. We also discuss the reasons runners do not finish races and the dangers of over-preparation. All that, plus, Ann tells us why people run and why running to beat the competition may not be the best way to bring out the champion in yourself At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. . .

University Research Conflict of Interest 34 mins – “The term “Conflict of Interest” is thrown around a lot these days, mostly to sully reputations or cast doubt on quality research. That perception of what a conflict of interest is, is quite different than what it actually is.  Dr. Chris MacDonald is an expert in Conflict of Interest, disclosure and transparency at Ryerson University.  We had a great discussion about what a conflict of interest is, how to avoid them, and how to operate in a climate where the term is so frequently misapplied.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban Agriculture 30 mins – “Food — from where it grows, to where it goes, all of it matters to our bodies and our communities. A conversation about how farmers are creating equitable food systems inside cities, from urban agriculture to worker-owned cooperatives. Guests: Susan Chin-Design Trust, Karen Washington-Rise & Root Farm and Ysanet Batista-Woke Foods. “ At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuelan Exodus 69 mins – “In recent years, more than 3 million Venezuelans have fled in response to the deepening political and economic crisis in their country, becoming one of the largest and fastest outflows anywhere in the world. More than 80 percent of these migrants and refugees have settled in other Latin American countries or in the Caribbean. For the most part, countries in the region have opened their doors to the Venezuelans, finding creative ways to incorporate them into local economies and societies by regularizing their status and giving them access to public services. Still, this generous welcome is being tested amid growing recognition these arrivals will be more than short-term guests. In this webinar, Felipe Muñoz, Advisor to the President of Colombia for the Colombian-Venezuelan Border; Francisco Carrión Mena, Ambassador of Ecuador to the United States; and Frieda Roxana Del Águila Tuesta, Superintendent of Peru’s Migration Agency—representatives from the governments of Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, which are home to more than half of the Venezuelan migrants and refugees—discussed their countries’ responses to the sudden arrival of hundreds of thousands of newcomers. Andrew Selee, MPI’s President, and Feline Freier, Professor of political science at Universidad del Pacífico in Peru, talked on the broader trend across the region and the prospects for future policy responses.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Welfare Reform 28 mins – “Recent Trump executive actions are part of an effort to curb the number of people who rely on the government-funded “social safety net.” How will these new restrictions affect low-income Americans?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

White Women Voters 32 mins – “Looking back on the midterm elections, we ask the tough questions about white women voters and race, then get introduced to the hi-pinky salute across the border. We meet the co-founders of SURJ, Showing up for Racial Justice, and speak with Grammy Award Winner Arturo O’Farrill. Music spotlight “Line in the Sand” from “Fandango at the Wall: A Soundtrack for the United States, Mexico and Beyond” by Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra. Support theLFShow, 10 Years of Making Power Through Media!” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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