Media Mining Digest 334 – Apr 6, 2018: AI Impact, Air Quality Forecasting, Algorithm Problems, AlphaGo Zero, Alzheimers Impact, Amazing Grace Creator, Appalachia, Assisted Death Case, Autistic Employees, Blockchain Women, Blood Mining in Sierra Leone, Congressional Review vs Legislative Veto, Conspiracy Theories, Cultural Evolution, Defamation Discussion, Degree Mills, Democratic Challenges, Disabled Child Care, Dixie Song History, Elderly in Japan, Empathy, Exercise and Thinking, Federal Government vs States, Flu Virus Researcher, Free Speech Online, Gun Culture, Heroin Usage, Impeachment Process, Intelligence Analysts, Internet Women, Islamaphobia, Mental Illness Treatment, Military Courts Martials, Murder in Charleston WV, Oprah Winfrey, Oxycontin Story, Pornography and Teenagers, Republican at Vassar, Robert Reich on Politics, Russian Troll Farm, Senior Care in Japan, Sex Education for Adults, Stonewall Hill Demonstration, Textbook War in Texas, Timing Impact, Trump’s Year of Tweets, Unreasonable Searches, Venezuela Violence, Vitamin A Supplement Value, Wildlife Contraband, Womens March

Exercise your ears: the 112 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 701 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 20,387 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 118GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 440 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Aboriginal Health Program 27 mins – “’The big “H” sign for the hospital signals safety to most patients. But many Indigenous Canadians have a different reality. The San’yas Indigenous Cultural Safety Training Program uses blunt talk to confront racial biases in medicine in a bid to make heath care safer and more accessible.” At the link find the title, “The hardest conversation we can have’: The San’yas Indigenous Cultural Safety program confronts racism in health care, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files whitecoat-mTGyjec8-20180222.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Afghanistan Mental Health Crisis 27 mins – “In a small cold courtyard in Herat in Afghanistan, two former enemies sit chained together. One is a former warlord, the other a Taliban fighter. Both men are dangerous. Both men are suffering from severe psychiatric conditions. The courtyard is where all 300 inmates of Afghanistan’s only secure psychiatric spend their day; men and women who are too dangerous to be treated in a general hospital. Nearly four decades of war have left a terrible legacy of mental health problems in Afghanistan. In a country where mental illness is often viewed with suspicion and stigma, the challenges of dealing with it are immense. For Assignment, Sahar Zand, gains unprecedented access to the institution, the only one of its kind in the country, where she meets the medical staff trying to deal with Afghanistan’s mental health emergency and the patients, traumatised by decades of conflict.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Centenarian 28 mins – “This is an affectionate portrait of Elizabeth Gathoni Koinange – a woman who celebrated her 117th birthday last year. Her story, and that of her family, is told by Elizabeth’s own great granddaughter Priscilla Ng’ethe. The joy of family life is captured when many generations come together.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Impact 44 mins – “Our final mini-series episode asks what impact might AI have on society – and who decides when to turn it off?” At the link find the title, “Questioning AI: does artificial intelligence need an off switch? – Science Weekly podcast, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files 24-63263-gnl.sci.180124.ms.questioning ai does ai need an off switch.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Air Quality Forecasting 9mins – “Driving in Johannesburg one day, Tapiwa Chiwewe noticed an enormous cloud of air pollution hanging over the city. He was curious and concerned but not an environmental expert — so he did some research and discovered that nearly 14 percent of all deaths worldwide in 2012 were caused by household and ambient air pollution. With this knowledge and an urge to do something about it, Chiwewe and his colleagues developed a platform that uncovers trends in pollution and helps city planners make better decisions. “Sometimes just one fresh perspective, one new skill set, can make the conditions right for something remarkable to happen,” Chiwewe says. “But you need to be bold enough to try.” At the link left-click the Share circle, right-click “Download audio” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Algorithm Problems 30 mins – “From Google search to Facebook news, algorithms shape our online experience. But like us, algorithms are flawed. Programmers write cultural biases into code, whether they realize it or not. Author Luke Dormehl explores the impact of algorithms, on and offline. Staci Burns and James Bridle investigate the human cost when YouTube recommendations are abused. Anthropologist Nick Seaver talks about the danger of automating the status quo. Safiya Noble looks at preventing racial bias from seeping into code. And Allegheny County’s Department of Children and Family Services shows us how a well-built algorithm can help save lives. Algorithms aren’t neutral. They’re really just recipes; expressions of human intent. That means it’s up to us to build the algorithms we want. Read more on how we can make algorithms more accountable.” At the link right-click “https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/8459340/afafa89f.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alien Life 43 mins – “In 1950, the great physicist Enrico Fermi posed a question that people have been puzzling over ever since: Where is everybody? The universe has been around for billions of years, so why haven’t we seen any signs of alien civilizations? This episode features physicist Stephen Webb, who describes some of the potential solutions to the puzzle. Stephen and Julia also discuss questions such as: What evidence have we gotten so far that helps us answer the Fermi problem? How do we estimate how rare/difficult it is for human-level intelligence to evolve? And why does it matter what the answer to Fermi’s question is?” At the link right-click “Download Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AlphaGo Zero 33 mins – “In this episode of our new mini-series, Ian Sample explores how AI is providing insights into cancer diagnosis, intelligence, and physics” At the link find the title, “Questioning AI: what can scientists learn from artificial intelligence? – Science Weekly podcast, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files 17-41670-gnl.sci.180117.ms.questioning ai what can scientists learn from ai.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’s Impact 33 mins – “On this week’s show, we take a look at the brain and how it relates to our sense of self. Wendy Mitchell, who was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s at 58, talks about her memoir Somebody I Used to Know and what changes her dementia has caused in her personality, tastes and everyday life. Neurologist Dr Jules Montague explains the science of Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, and talks about her new book Lost and Found, a philosophical look at the human brain and the impact conditions and chemistry can have on our sense of self.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazing Grace Creator 25 mins – “Everyone knows the song “Amazing Grace.” People who don’t even consider themselves spiritual or religious find it meaningful. And while John Newton penned the hymn to connect with Christians, it has transcended that and become a folk song and an anthem for civil rights. But the origins of the song are just a bit more complicated…On this week’s episode of the “Us & Them” podcast: the hymn from a slave trader that eventually became the anthem for civil rights.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Appalachia 52 mins – “ I grew up in Appalachia. Okay, I didn’t come from the kind of Appalachia that’s often associated with the stereotype of ignorant, welfare check-collecting “hicks” living “up the holler.”  I grew up in Charleston, WV, which is and was much like “Suburban Anywhere, USA.” Even so, I’ve always been sensitive about the “dumb hillbilly” stereotype.  I remember the first time I traveled outside of my region and heard people tease me about my hillbilly accent.  This is a big reason you don’t hear much of a ‘mountain twang’ in my speech anymore. To this day, I still wince when I hear the jokes about toothless rednecks swilling moonshine and shacking up with their kinfolk.  I politely smile when I hear this, but truthfully, I often find some people’s attitudes about Appalachia to be cruel and condescending. That’s how I feel based on my suburban Appalachian experience.  Imagine how people feel who live in “real Appalachia.” Back in August, my West Virginia Public Broadcasting colleagues Jessica Lilly and Roxy Todd, who produce the program Inside Appalachia, put out a wonderful episode that focused on what happens when strangers with cameras go to Appalachia. This show gets into these hillbilly stereotypes and how some Appalachians feel the outsiders view them like animals they see on a safari or even worse, human oddities at a carnival freak show.  The way that Jessica and Roxy focus on this gets right to the heart of what we try to consider with Us & Them.  I liked it so much I just had to share it with our show’s growing audience.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Assisted Death Case 27 mins – “In our second show exploring the impact of Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID)[MedicalAssistanceInDying] we speak to Clifford Campbell. His wife Noreen was among the first to be approved for and to receive MAID. He tells Brian what it’s like to be the witness to suffering, party to assisted death, and the spouse left behind.” At the link find the title, “One year after MAID: A husband talks about being the spouse left behind, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files whitecoat-lyz3hBaLBKOEH40.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Assisted Death Case 27 mins – “‘Tim Regan had a medically assisted death on Dec. 12, 2017. Dr. Brian Goldman spoke to him the day before he died.” At the link find the title, “I’m going out with my boots on’:Tim Regan used his last days to lobby for a clearer path to assisted death, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files whitecoat-h0SkFJP9kp6abaN.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autistic Employees 27 mins – “Not every podcast episode will make you look at the world differently. This one might. Why? Because in this show you’ll learn about a concept that’s changing the way people view the autism spectrum. The idea is called “neurodiversity.” While neurodiversity may sound complex, the idea behind it is as simple as it is true: people are wired differently. People on the spectrum are neurodiverse, while those who are not on the spectrum are known as neurotypical. In this episode, you’ll learn more about how it works, and meet a company that’s using the idea to create jobs.” At the link find the title, “This Company Will Change How You Look at Autism, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files The Precisionists – Crazy_Good_Turnsmp3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bail System Reform 50 mins – “If you’re accused of a crime in this country, you have a right to be released until your trial. Nearly 90% of people arrested though don’t have the few hundred bucks to pay a bail bondsman. Tuesday, we’re talking about making bail. If you’re accused of a crime in this country, you have a right to be released until your trial, but nearly 90% of people arrested don’t have the few hundred bucks to pay a bail bondsman. Legal scholar Shima Baradaran Baughman says bail has become unfair, unconstitutional, and an oppressive tool against minorities and the poor. Baughman’s new book looks at the history of bail, how we got to this point, and what can be done to reform the system. Shima Baradaran Baughman is a professor at the University of Utah‘s SJ Quinney College of Law. Her book is called The Bail Book: A Comprehensive Look at Bail in America’s Criminal Justice SystemAt the link right-click the play button and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Balkan Countries Unrest 23 mins – “Tensions are rising in the Balkans and the risk of renewed violence is growing, but the United States can help preserve peace and stability in the region. As part of the Center for Preventive Action’s Flashpoints Roundtable Meeting Series, speakers Daniel P. Serwer, academic director of conflict management at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, and Hoyt Brian Yee, deputy assistant secretary for European and Eurasian affairs, discussed the risk of violence and political instability in the Balkans and what U.S. policymakers can do to prevent it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.  

Battery Research 28 mins– “Next time you swear at the battery in your mobile phone, spare a thought for the chemist, Clare Grey. Having developed a new way of looking inside solids (using nuclear magnetic resonance), her interest in batteries was sparked by a man from Duracell who asked her a question at an academic conference, and charged up by some electrochemists she met playing squash. For the last twenty years she has sought to understand the precise chemistry of the rechargeable lithium ion battery. And her insights have led to some significant improvements. In 2015 she built a working prototype of a new kind of battery for electric cars, the lithium air battery. If this laboratory model can be made to run on air not oxygen, it could transform the future, by making electric cars more energy efficient and considerably cheaper. Clare talks to Jim Al-Khalili about the years she has spent studying rechargeable batteries, seeking to understand, very precisely, the chemical reactions that take place inside them; and how this kind of fundamental understanding can help us to make batteries that are fit for the 21st century. Producer: Anna Buckley.” At the link find the title, “Clare Grey on the Big Battery Challenge, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files p05zwpzt.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Birth Control Implant 27 mins – “American women are changing up their birth control. The use of IUDs and implants has increased 6000% in the United States since 2002. That’s the result of specific policy choices made in Washington and in state houses. These policies have reduced the teen pregnancy rate. They have cut the abortion rate. But they’re also at risk right now. In this episode, we’re going to tell you how those policies came to be, how they’re helping women access birth control — and why, at this very moment, they are facing serious threats.” At the link find the title, “This robotic pelvis reduces teen pregnancy, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 7ac50fe3-f36c-4d00-827e-3e71db48f4ab.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Safety Talk to Kids 39 mins – “How old were you when you first learned that police may think of you as a threat? You’ve never been told that? Chances are you’re not African American. In this episode, Trey Kay examines “The Black Talk,” which is the sober conversation that many black families have with their teenage kids – particularly teenage boys – about how they should conduct themselves when stopped by the police. Spoiler alert: Black parents, like any parent, want their kids to come home alive.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Blockchain Women 69 mins – “Taylor Monahan is the Co-Founder of MyEtherWallet, one of the most popular tools of choice for crypto-investors participating in ICOs on the Ethereum Blockchain. Taylor recently launched a new venture – MyCrypto – an open-source, client-side tool for generating Ether wallets, handling ERC-20 tokens, and interacting with the Blockchain more easily. In this episode, Taylor and I discuss: How MyEtherWallet came to be. The absence of women in Crypto, and why this technology cannot go mainstream without women. James Damore, the Google Engineer who got fired for his controversial memo on women’s suitability for engineering jobs (and what that has to do with the UFC and Ronda Rousey – yes, there is a connection) . Taylor’s description of what the ideal ICO would look like. Her prediction for ICOs over the next decade (hint: it’s not what you would think)” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” right-click “OK” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blood Mining in Sierra Leone 27 mins – “In 2010, a UK-listed company began developing a mining concession in Sierra Leone it said could transform the economic fortunes of the local population. But instead of benefiting the most immediate communities, hundreds found their homes destroyed, their livelihoods uprooted. And among the people who protested, many found themselves violently beaten and detained, and in one or two cases shot at and killed. Ed Butler investigates some of the untold stories of one of west Africa’s most dramatic recent abuses of corporate power. We hear from those who suffered, investigate allegations of police brutality, and look at the supposedly well-regulated system of corporate governance which was supposed to prevent abuses taking place.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit 39 mins – “This week David and Helen chew over the big issues of British politics. How vulnerable is Theresa May? What is Philip Hammond playing at? What would be the point of a second referendum on Brexit? Lots of questions, lots of answers, not so much agreement on which answers are the right ones. You decide!” At the link find the title, “A Second Referendum? Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Church Lady 29 mins – “I speak with journalist Linda K. Wertheimer, the author of Faith Ed: Teaching About Religion In an Age of Intolerance. In her book, she has a chapter titled “The Church Lady,” where she recounts her experience of her family moving from western New York to a town in Ohio. The Wertheimers were the only Jews in that community. Linda and her brother felt confused and ostracized when a lady came to their classroom each week to lead a class that felt less like social studies and more like Sunday school. Linda recalls all of her classmates singing, “Jesus Loves Me,” but she was the only one who didn’t know the words.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Clothing Consumption 52 mins – “Friday, we’re talking about the way we dress these days. We’ve gotten pretty cheap. We buy trendy clothes that are lousy quality. It’s called “fast fashion” and the journalist Elizabeth Klein says it’s bad for the environment and our sense of style. Try to imagine 18 tons of clothes. It’s the image journalist and author Elizabeth Cline said surprised her the most while researching her book about the way Americans dress. That’s because that pile represented three-days of donations to one thrift store in one U.S. city. And what’s the impact of the cheap fashion we buy and toss on such a regular basis? Cline joins Doug to explain what it means for our economy, our environment, and for our culture. Elizabeth Cline is a New York-based journalist and author of Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion.At the link right-click the play button and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Mining 36 mins – “The “Us & Them” podcast is about seeing the same story two ways… and nothing calls out for that treatment more than coal in West Virginia. On this week’s episode of the “Us & Them” podcast: two West Virginians who see coal in completely different ways. One who believes coal has been the lifeblood of West Virginia’s workers. The other who argues coal mining is why so many people in West Virginia are poor.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Cognitive Biases 48 mins – “Social scientists have built up a wealth of knowledge about the ways the human brain reliably gets things wrong. Luckily for us – if we stay conscientious, we can work around our built-in bugs.” At the link find the title, “#220: Cognitive Fallacies with Dr. Richard E. Nisbett, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files SDS220.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Confederate Reckoning 54 mins – The tragedy in Charlottesville, VA makes us wonder if it’s possible to reconcile different versions of history. This episode features two American foreign correspondents of color who’ve sought to answer this quandary, flying from Kenya to Louisiana to report on protests over the dismantling of Confederate monuments. On this week’s episode of the “Us & Them” podcast: a rift that stems from unfinished business regarding slavery and race. Will the Civil War ever be over?” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Congressional Review vs Legislative Veto 79 mins – “President Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress rolled back a gun regulation last year that would have restricted some people with mental disabilities from buying guns. Now, this story isn’t about gun control, but the law they used to erase that rule and 14 others last year. It’s a tale that goes back decades, and it starts in Kenya in the 1960s. Along the way, we’ll meet a man in a white suit and an army of used car dealers. This story is also the last episode of our second season, all about who writes the rules, who gets to unwrite them and who gets written off.At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Conspiracy Theories 30 mins – “Author Jon Ronson on how journalists should cover Alex Jones.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, right-click :Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Corruption in Ukraine 27 mins – “The Parkovy Conference and Exhibition Centre, a huge modernist structure of concrete and glass, stands boldly on the banks of the Dnieper River in central Kiev, a helipad on the roof. It hosted the official after party for last year’s Eurovision Song Contest and was meant to be a symbol of Ukraine’s economic development. Instead, four years after President Yanukovych was overthrown by a people sick of corruption, it has become a focus of efforts to reclaim the billions of dollars said to have been stolen by the ex-president’s regime. In this edition of Assignment, Tim Whewell attempts to unpick the tangled global web of companies behind the building’s ownership. Who does the helipad actually belong to and what does it tell us about Ukraine’s attempts to bring its corrupt politicians to account?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Diplomat Illness 27 mins – “Ian Sample delves into a preliminary study of US embassy staff said to have been targeted by an energy source in Cuba. With no unifying explanation, what do scientists think happened?” At the link find the title, “What happened to US diplomats in Cuba? – Science Weekly podcast, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files 23-64611-gnl.sci.180223.sf.what was the energy source felt by us diplomats in cuba.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cultural Evolution 43 mins – “What role might culture play in intelligence? And how does human culture differ from culture found in other animals? Nicola Davis explores our evolutionary history” At the link find the title, “Culture and the mind: a new theory of human intelligence – Science Weekly podcast, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files 07-58748-gnl.sci.180207.ms.culture and the mind a new theory of human_intelligence.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DDoS Attack 123 mins– “This week we discuss some very welcome microcode news from Microsoft, ten (yes, ten!) new 4G LTE network attacks, the battle over how secure TLS v1.3 will be allowed to be, the incredible Trustico certificate fiasco, the continually falling usage of Adobe Flash, a new and diabolical cryptocurrency-related malware, the best Sci-Fi news in a LONG time, some feedback from our terrific listeners… and a truly record smashing (and not in a good way) new family of DDoS attacks.” At the link left-click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Defamation Discussion 26 mins – “Trump likes to threaten the press with libel lawsuits. What does the Constitution have to say about defamation and the press?” At the link find the title, “16- Defamation, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files TCL Defamation ep_16_pt_01.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Degree Mills 27 mins – “An investigation into one of the world’s biggest degree mills, a Pakistani company, that has sold over 200,000 bogus qualifications. IT company Axact has created hundreds of websites purporting to be online universities offering a range of academic qualifications from degrees to doctorates. However while a degree can cost just a few thousand dollars this BBC investigation has discovered customers are also being blackmailed for buying them and some have paid over more than $500,000.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democratic Challenges 60 mins Former White House speechwriter and [The Atlantic] columnist David Frum argues that the Trump presidency is damaging American democracy. He is interviewed by [Washington Post] book critic and associate editor Carlos Lozada.” At the link find the title, “After Words with David Frum, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files program.495131.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Dieting History 53 mins – “Diet dreams are splashed across magazine covers and blare from the T.V., offering tips and tricks, that will, readers and viewers are promised, make weight loss easy and fast. Diet books making similar claims can be found at the top of the best-seller list without fail, every January. But where does this obsession with losing weight to reach some kind of idealized body type come from? How long have gurus and doctors alike made millions from the West’s preoccupation with the “d” word, and why do strange fads such as chewing each bite hundreds of times stick around for centuries? This episode, we explore the history of diets, before asking a scientist: Does anything actually work?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Disabled Child Care P1 27 mins – “A day with Gilly, a teen with autism and developmental delay on the cusp of aging out of the system – and her parents who are expected to pick up the slack.” At the link find the title, “Cake and balloons (Gilly’s story), Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files whitecoat-C33E1dHT-20180208.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Child Care P2 27 mins – “Last week we told you the story of Ian and Rachelle Geddes, middle-class Canadian parents working flat-out to care to care for their 18-year-old daughter Gillian., who has low-functioning autism, meaning she’ll never be able to work or live independently. They shared their concerns about how they’ll cope as Gilly ages out of the services she’s had since she was a child, and how Gilly will cope as her parents age out of being able to care for her. This week, we meet Gilly’s siblings, who believe they will take over at some point down the line. And we speak with Dr. Yona Lumksy, Director of the Azieli Centre for Adult Neuro-developmental Disabilities, who talks about the challenges caregivers face as their special needs kids age out of programs – something she’s familiar with as the sister of a special-needs sibling herself.” At the link find the title, “Gilly’s Story – Clare and Ellery, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files whitecoat-inqK2vRC-20180216.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dixie Song History 39 mins – “In this episode, my friend Alice Moore and I visit a Confederate cemetery in Corinth, Mississippi.  Alice tells me about her love for the battle flag.In our conversation, we soon learn that you can’t talk about the flag without also talking about people’s ideas about the War and slavery and racism … and whether our ancestors were on the right side of history. This program features Cornell University history professor Ed Baptist, who has a view of the South’s history that differs from that of Alice. And we dig into another beloved southern icon – the song Dixie.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Elderly in Japan 31 mins – “Japan has the fastest ageing society in the world with more than a quarter of its population over the age of 65. It currently has 66,000 centenarians, more than any other country. Toshiko Katayose and Aki Maruyama Leggett explore some of the innovative ways in which Japanese people are adapting to living longer. For over 20 years Toshiko Katayose edited Japan’s most popular magazine for senior readers. Now 67 and facing retirement, she reveals how her generation of baby-boomers born after World War Two, are overturning stereotypes about old age and how businesses are responding to these more demanding silver consumers. She visits Japan’s first supermarket built specifically to serve older shoppers which offers everything from crystal-studded walking sticks to try-before-you-buy coffin experiences.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Empathy 30 mins – “Empathy. It’s a word we’ve heard a lot in the past year. Whether woven in the closing arguments before a jury, or from elected leaders’ appealing to the better angels within us, somebody, somewhere, is calling for empathy. Even President Barack Obama, in his first public appearance since the inauguration of Donald Trump, shared his experience of practicing empathy while running for the US Senate. Merriam Webster defines empathy as the action of understanding, being aware of, being sensitive to, and vicariously experiencing the feelings, thoughts, and experience of another…without having the feelings, thoughts, and experience fully communicated in an objectively explicit manner. With all of the calls for empathy of late, is it that we lack the reflexive response for empathy? If so, how do we get it? And are we sure we want it? On this week’s episode of the “Us and Them” podcast, we learn about the importance of empathy and how we can get there together.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Endometriosis 27 mins – “Endometriosis affects one in ten Canadian women, yet for the most part, it is invisible. It’s a condition where the uterine tissue grows outside of the uterus, resulting in severe pain, and possibly infertility for those who have it. It takes on average, eight to ten years to get a definitive diagnosis and women typically see up to ten different doctors during that time. This week, White Coat Black Art has a documentary by Danielle d’Entremont, a young woman who was recently diagnosed with endometriosis. Danielle shares her six-year journey to find out what was wrong with her, and the discoveries she made along the way about how society discriminates against women’s pain. We also hear from Dr Catherine Allaire, a gynaecologist and director of the Centre for Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis at the BC Women’s Hospital. She says family doctors need to be more aware of endometriosis and proactive in dealing with menstrual health.” At the link find the title, “Endometriosis: The painful search for answers, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files whitecoat-pseaFWW3-20180309.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

European Political Future 43 mins – “Germany finally has a government, while Italy has none. We try to make sense of the latest twists in European politics, including the extraordinary results of the Italian elections. Why is social democracy is such trouble everywhere? Can Merkel’s grand coalition survive? What is Italy for anyway? With Chris Clark, Helen Thompson and Chris Bickerton.” At the link find the title, “Italy, Germany and the Future of Europe, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exercise and Thinking 16 mins – “What’s the most transformative thing that you can do for your brain today? Exercise! says neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki. Get inspired to go to the gym as Suzuki discusses the science of how working out boosts your mood and memory — and protects your brain against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s.” At the link click the share circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Government vs States 22 mins – “The Tenth Amendment limits the federal government’s control over the states, but the interpretation of that limit is always shifting.” At the link find the title, “18- The Tenth Amendment, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files TCL 10th Amendment ep_18_part_01.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Afghanistani Politician 28 mins – “Lyse Doucet meets the redoubtable Shukria Barakzai, Afghanistan’s ambassador to Norway. Shukria was appointed a member of the 2003 loya jirga, a body of representatives from all over Afghanistan that was nominated to discuss and pass the new constitution after the fall of the Taliban. In the October 2004 elections she was elected as a member of the House of the People or Wolesi Jirga, the lower house of the National Assembly of Afghanistan. She was one of only a handful of female MPs to speak up for women’s rights, and faced death threats for her views.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Amendment on the Internet 26 minsIn this episode Lata sits down with First Amendment lawyer Floyd Abrams, author of the book “The Soul of the First Amendment”, to discuss free speech and how it applies to communications on the internet. Floyd outlines The Fairness Doctrine of 1949, delves into editorial standards in print vs. online scenarios, breaks down Europe’s Right to be Forgotten policy, and generally impresses upon us the ongoing nature of the First Amendment’s role in our day to day lives as American citizens.” At the link find the title, “Free Speech and the Internet, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files TFF-101-Master.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flu Severity Reasons 33 mins – “Hannah Devlin explores why 2018 is such a bumper year for seasonal flu and asks how scientists are trying to fight back” At the link find the title, “Why is the flu so bad this year? – Science Weekly podcast, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files 31-69263-gnl.sci.180201.ms.why is the flu so bad this_year.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flu Vaccine Effectiveness 27 mins – “The latest report on Canada’s flu vaccine shows the shot is less than 20 per cent effective against the most common strain.. Some public health officials are questioning the focus on a seasonal flu vaccine that delivers unreliable results. We speak to Dr. Danuta Scowronski, the lead for influenza at the BC Centre for Disease Control, who says it’s time for a moon shot for the flu shot. Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer responds. Matthew Miller, an assistant professor at McMaster University in Hamilton, ON talks about Canada’s role in developing a universal flu vaccine.” At the link find the title, “The Flu and You, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files whitecoat-FnYO9w2U2xn5Els.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flu Virus Researcher 29 mins – “2018 is having the worst flu season for seven years. Influenza continues to make a lot of us feel very ill, and it can of course be fatal. Wendy Barclay, Professor Virology at Imperial College London, has spent many years trying to learn everything she can about the way flu viruses behave. These microscopic infectious organisms are formidable foes – they mutate all the time, making it hard to predict which strain is going to be the one to make us sick and therefore to design effective vaccines against it. Jim al-Khalili talks to Wendy Barclay about how she uses genetics to understand how flu viruses mutate. She explains how she began her scientific career studying physical sciences but then became fascinated by viruses. Her first experience of working with viruses was when she found herself doing nasal swabs of snuffling volunteers when she did her PhD looking for a vaccine against the common cold.” At the link find the title, “Wendy Barclay and the flu virus, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files p05wjy7r.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free Speech Online 26 mins – “In this episode Lata sits down with First Amendment lawyer Floyd Abrams, author of the book “The Soul of the First Amendment”, to discuss free speech and how it applies to communications on the internet. Floyd outlines The Fairness Doctrine of 1949, delves into editorial standards in print vs. online scenarios, breaks down Europe’s Right to be Forgotten policy, and generally impresses upon us the ongoing nature of the First Amendment’s role in our day to day lives as American citizens.” At the link find the title, “Free Speech and the Internet, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files TFF-101-Master.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu..

Gentrification 36 mins – “I’m standing at 3rd Avenue and 8th Street in Brooklyn, NY. Some would call this neighborhood Park Slope, but it’s really a hike from the beautiful Prospect Park, and it’s where things don’t really “slope” anymore. The neighborhood is actually called Gowanus and it’s very close to the infamous Gowanus Canal, which is recognized as one of the most polluted bodies of water in America. I lived here for a long time in the ’80s and ’90s. Back then, it was a rough part of town. My block was a mixture of row homes and industrial warehouses. We had a crack house on our street — about three doors down. One morning, I remember stepping out on my stoop, on my way to work, and saw a man sprawled out among our garbage cans. He was sticking a needle in his arm. In the years when I lived there, they found a decapitated head in an empty lot near my place.  Looking at the neighborhood today, it’s hard to imagine any of that going on. The place still has a dingy industrial look, but there’s an upbeat vitality that’s unavoidable. It seems hipper, wealthier. The streets are a lot cleaner. There are more upscale businesses. There are cool art spaces and burgeoning underground entertainment scene. You used to have to walk several blocks to find a place to eat. Now there are tony little al fresco restaurants. There seem to be a lot of young, single folks and hipsters. Overall, it seems a lot… whiter than it was back then….” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Green Revolution 52 mins – “In about 30 years there will be 10 billion people on the planet. Most of them will probably be middle class and want things like cars, homes, and Toblerone bars. How do you provide for that many people? Well, there are basically two answers. By the year 2050, almost three billion more humans will be on the planet. But how can we feed and house and quench the thirst of 10 billion people? In a new book, the journalist Charles Mann profiles two influential thinkers with radically different answers to the question of survival. One believed in the need to limit our consumption or risk depleting Earth’s resources. The other said technological innovation will save us. Mann joins us Wednesday to discuss these dueling visions for humanity’s future.At the link right-click the play button and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Culture 72 mins – “The shooting in Parkland, Florida on February 14, 2018, reignited an increasingly familiar debate about guns in this country. Today, we’re re-releasing a More Perfect episode that aired just after the Las Vegas shooting last year that attempts to make sense of our country’s fraught relationship with the Second Amendment. For nearly 200 years of our nation’s history, the Second Amendment was an all-but-forgotten rule about the importance of militias. But in the 1960s and 70s, a movement emerged — led by Black Panthers and a recently-repositioned NRA — that insisted owning a firearm was the right of each and every American. So began a constitutional debate that only the Supreme Court could solve. That didn’t happen until 2008, when a Washington, D.C. security guard named Dick Heller made a compelling case.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Heroin Usage Changes P1 40 mins – “Something has shifted in the way our society thinks about heroin addicts these days. Could it be that smack users are seeming more like “us” and less like “them?” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.  

Heroin Usage Changes P2 37 mins – “In this episode, I reconnect with Dimitri Mugianis, a friend that I met nearly a quarter century ago when we were both playing in the New York City music scene. He was the front man of a fantastic band called “Leisure Class.”  Dimitri was a dynamic performer, charismatic, poetically eloquent and brimming with the energy of a possessed mad man.  He also had a pernicious heroin addiction. Dimitri has been the subject of several of my radio reports over the years. He was in a piece that I produced for an NPR show and more notably, was part of a This American Life story that was honored with a New York Festivals Awards Gold Medal. Subsequently, Dimitri has been written about in New York Times features, was the subject of “I’m Dangerous With Love,” a feature length documentary and appeared on HBO’s investigative documentary program VICE. With the recent resurgence in the use of heroin, I thought it might be informative to revisit Dimitri’s story and examine some of his life’s more recent twists and turns.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.  

Heroin Use P3 35 mins – “We revisit the story of “Steve,” a young New Hampshire man that we met back in the spring of 2016. In our episode called “The Changing Face of Heroin,” we followed him and his father as he reported for the last visit of a court ordered drug rehab program. As you can imagine, kicking a powerful opioid habit isn’t easy, but in many ways our guy remained committed to the program. Sometimes, it was nearly impossible and during those times the strain on his family and loved ones was immense.  For this new episode, we learn how everyone is doing more than 19 months later..” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Iceland President 28 mins “In 1980, the tiny country of Iceland did something no other nation had done. They elected a female head of state. BBC chief international correspondent Lyse Doucet travels to Reykjavik to meet Vigdis Finnbogadottir. Now 87, she was president for exactly 16 years and remains the longest-serving elected female head of state of any country to date. “That’s what I have given to the girls of this country,” she says: “If she can, I can.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment Process 31 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Ross Garber, a defense lawyer who has represented three Republican governors during impeachment proceedings, about how Trump’s lawyers could be thinking about defending their client.” At the link find the title, “What if We Never See the Mueller Report? Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files SLT3836170415.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Negotiation 33mins – “Fundamentally, product managers should be driving success for their organization. We do that by providing customers value. The source of that value may be, and perhaps should be, closer to our core capabilities than is often thought. The toy company LEGO found this to be true, only after being on the brink of bankruptcy. Other companies have also discovered this principle, which is something my guest calls innovating near the core.

Intelligence Analysts 22 mins – “Spy movies and television shows often overlook the analysts who make sense of the nation’s intelligence. That changes with the premiere of “Liberty Crossing,” a workplace comedy co-created by “Daily Show” writer Dan Radosh. In this episode, Benjamin Wittes talks to Radosh about the show’s inspiration, how Radosh researched one of the more secretive parts of the government, and much more.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Internet Women 58 mins – “We talk to Claire Evans (who last joined us on the first ever episode of Radio Motherboard!) about her new book BROAD BAND: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet. Claire joined Motherboard staff writer Kaleigh Rogers to talk about the internet past and present with Marisa Bowe, editor-in-chief of one of the first internet publications, and Stacy Horn, founder of EchoNYC, an early internet community that launched in the early 1990s and still exists today.” At the link find the title, “BROAD BAND (Live), Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islamaphobia 27 mins – “Are you afraid of Muslims? Not just those in ISIS – but the ones who live among us?One Christian friend of ours is so worried, he refused to meet with Muslims over biscuits at Bob Evans as part of our “Us & Them” podcast. “It’s indisputable that Muslims kill people who disagree with them,” he wrote. “I do not fear death, but I cannot risk my innocent loved ones suffering the repercussions of the discussion you propose.” In this episode of our podcast “Us & Them,” we face our fears and visit a mosque in South Charleston, W.Va., where we meet Dr. Hazem Ashraf. “Your loyalty is being called out, your worth and value as a person is being called out, that somehow you’re less of an American, less of a citizen, for something you have not done,” he says. Muslims have lived in West Virginia for generations. They are buried next to Christians in the cemetery. Their children go to school together. But now, Muslim parents say their kids are being questioned at school – Where are you from? Are you a terrorist? “What they’re hearing is, go back to where you came from. Well naturally, their response is, ‘We’re from West Virginia. Where do you want us to go back to?’” Ashraf says. But he says he has hope that Americans will ultimately reject Islamophobia. “You can find love and hatred in the Koran just like you can in the Bible. When I am faced with radicals and radical ideas, I remember Woody Guthrie, ‘This land is my land, this land is your land…this land is for me and you.'”” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.  

Italian Politics 38 mins – “With Italians elections coming up, we talking to the leading philosopher of democracy Nadia Urbinati about what’s going on. How is Berlusconi still in the game? What is the role of the Five Star movement? Are Italian politicians learning any lessons from Trump or Macron? Plus we address the perennial question: is Italy a good indicator of where democracy is heading?” At the link find the title, “Nadia Urbinati on Italy, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

James Webb Telescope 4 mins – “Picture the biggest telescope dish that technology can make. Next to it, a sunshield the size of a tennis court. Now, imagine folding them up like origami into a rocket and blasting them one million miles into space. This enormous engineering challenge is exactly what astronomers all across the world are facing as the James Webb telescope undergoes its final tests ahead of launch. And its aims are just as ambitious as it’s engineering. Izzie Clarke spoke to NASA’s Bill Ochs about the mission…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Left vs Right Politics 31 mins – “A blue state secular liberal and a red state Christian conservative have an unlikely friendship” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Liberian Female President 28 mins – “Lyse Doucet travels to Liberia to talk to former President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf who was the first elected female head of state in Africa.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Library of Congress 36 mins – “Founded in 1802, the Library of Congress is a rich resource for authors, researchers, and publishers in the United States and around the world. Yet the Library of Congress is much more than a library, Becky Brasington Clark told attendees of the recent PubWest Conference in Pasadena, California. Director of the Library’s Publishing Office, Clark described the Library’s fascinating publishing history and its evolution from a publisher of bibliographies and catalogs to a co-publisher of illustrated trade titles, jigsaw puzzles, calendars, and coloring books. The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library with more than 167 million items on over 800 miles of bookshelves. Its collections include books, recordings, photographs, newspapers, maps, and manuscripts. Today, its Publishing Office partners with co-publishers to create books and other products that showcase the Library’s collections and services.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Research Gender Bias 26 mins – “When Teresa Woodruff started working for a biotech company fresh out of graduate school, her employer revealed that the first studies for a new heart attack treatment had been performed on 50,000 men. “And so I kinda raised my hand and said, ‘That’s interesting. Where are all the women?” Today, Teresa is an expert in ovarian biology and a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University in Chicago. We ask her why so many prescription drugs were tested only on men for so many decades, what that’s meant for women’s health, and what’s changed. Plus, Teresa tells us about Repropedia, her encyclopedia for reproductive health, and “A New You, That’s Who” (think “Schoolhouse Rock!” but instead of conjunctions, it’s about puberty.) More info on Teresa Woodruff’s work can be found at http://www.woodrufflab.org. “ At the link find the title, “Feb, 2018 Sex, Drugs, And Singing Ovaries,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Illness Treatment 43 mins– “What is the best way to care for patients with severe mental illness? The United States has struggled with this question for decades. In 1963, President Kennedy signed a law that was supposed to transfer patients with severe mental illness out of hospitals and back into their communities — into outpatient treatment. That effort hasn’t really worked. A lot these patients end up homeless. Many are in prison or jail. One recent study found that more than half of all inmates have some kind of mental illness. Summit County, Ohio, thinks it has a solution: court-ordered outpatient treatment. It’s often called Assisted Outpatient Treatment, or AOT for short. That’s sort of what President Kennedy hoped for: treatment outside of the hospital, in the community. But the treatment is enforced by the courts — and that’s what makes it so controversial.” At the link find the title, “The black robe effect, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files e767b0a0-deb2-497d-b293-e8af5bb35285.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Patient Repatriation 28 mins – “Unlike many other nations of Europe, thousands of people with mental illness still live in asylums in Croatia. But not in Osijek… In this small city in the far east, dozens of people have moved from mental institutions into regular apartments in the community. One of the asylums has closed completely. The other has become a centre for recovery and respite, with just a few elderly residents. This process is called ‘de-institutionalisation’: a recognition that people with mental health challenges have human rights too, and are not usually dangerous maniacs who need to be locked away. In Croatia, in spite of a government commitment to change the situation for the thousands still residing in institutions, only Osijek has made this radical move. So what’s life like now for those who have been, ‘liberated’? And does life outside an asylum suit everybody?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Methane versus CO2 27 mins – “How far into the future should we be planning when it comes to the environment? 20 years? 100 years? These are vital questions with which scientists, politicians and futurists are grappling, as our icecaps melt and our seas rise. This week on Sea Change Radio, we delve into the moral dilemma policymakers face today with Daniel Kirk-Davidoff, Assistant Professor of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science at the University of Maryland. The starting point for our conversation is a soon-to-be-published paper comparing the timescale of methane versus CO2 emissions. We touch upon the science of these two greenhouse gasses, examine how long-term environmental planning and short-term planning might conflict, and try to better understand what 100 years really means.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Courts Martials 45 mins – “Lawfare contributor and University of Texas law professor Stephen Vladeck argued before the Supreme Court last week in United States v. Dalmazzi, a case concerning the appointment of military judges to the Court of Military Commission Review and the Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces. Vladeck joined Scott Anderson on the Lawfare Podcast to discuss the complexities of the case, why it matters and what it’s like arguing before the nine justices.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Steve Vladeck on Dalmazzi mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Murder in Charleston WV 28 mins – “Sunday dinner is a big deal in Deanna McKinney’s family. Deanna’s a de facto mom to her three sisters and two brothers — when she moved to West Virginia from New York City, they came too.  These Sunday dinners are to remind the siblings that someone’s always got their back. Deanna’s told the story of her son’s murder so many times, that she can recount it to me — a relative stranger with a microphone — while she picks out cornbread mix at the grocery store. His name was Tymel and his senseless death is an experience that has defined her life and informed who she is. On this week’s episode of the “Us & Them” podcast: the first of a four-part series that focuses on the West Side of my hometown of Charleston, WV.  It’s a part of town that’s struggled economically in the past few decades. It’s got the two statistics that often go together — high poverty and high crime” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Oprah Winfrey 25 mins – “Following her barn-storming speech about sexual harassment at the Golden Globe awards earlier this month, Mark Coles charts the rise of talk show host, philanthropist, media proprietor and actress Oprah Winfrey. With calls urging Winfrey to run for President, close friends and former colleagues recount their favourite moments with her on-set and at home. We learn about the woman behind the screen and her remarkable tale of rags to riches, from clothes made out of potato sacks to one of the richest black women in the world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oxycontin Story 68 minsWhen OxyContin went to market in 1996, sales reps from Purdue Pharma hit one point particularly hard: Compared to other prescription opioids, this new painkiller was believed to be less likely to be addictive or abused. But recently unsealed documents in this investigative episode shed light on how the maker of OxyContin seems to have relied more on focus groups than on scientific studies to create an aggressive and misleading marketing campaign that helped fuel the national opioid crisis.At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Panhandling 31 mins – “What do you do when a panhandler hits you up for some money? Whatever your answer is, what experiences or facts inform your policy for giving or not giving? People have strong opinions on this. With this episode we try to separate the facts, suppositions and ideology.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Pasta History 46 mins – “It’s one of food’s most beautiful relationships: pasta and sauce. But which came first—and how on Earth are you supposed to figure out which of those hundreds of shapes to serve with your pesto? With Valentine’s Day round the corner, we bring you the saucy—and occasionally scientific—history of an Italian staple. Listen in now as we take you from the very first mention of “a food of flour and water,” served “in the form of strings,” to the cutting-edge shape-shifting pasta of tomorrow.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Poisonous Tree Doctrine 18 mins – “The Russia investigation has been called a “witch hunt” by Trump and his supporters on Twitter. And they’ve invoked the legal concept “the fruit of the poisonous tree” to invalidate the investigation. What does the Fourth Amendment say about tainted investigations and does it apply to Trump?” At the link find the title, “19- The Poisonous Tree, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files TCL_Poisonous Tree_ep_19_pt_01.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Pornography and Teenagers 52 mins – “Teens are going to be curious about sex, but teaching them about it is a thorny issue. So they turn to the Internet and porn to learn. Monday we’re talking the effects of porn on kids and what can be done about it. A lot of parents are squeamish when it comes to talking with their kids about sex, and sex education in the country is lacking. Much of what kids know about sex these days they learn from online porn. Journalist Maggie Jones wanted to know how porn affects the way teens think about intimacy, sex, gender, and consent. The answers, she found out, are complicated. Jones joins us Monday to talk about the effect porn is having on kids and what can be done about it.At the link right-click the play button and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

President Jackson’s Big Cheese 9 mins – “The Memory Palace is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX, a curated network of extraordinary, story-driven shows. This special episode was originally made for a live episode of The West Wing Weekly. To hear a live version of this story (and the rest of a particularly delightful TWWW episode), visit thewestwingweekly.com.” At the link find the title, “Big Block of Cheese – Bonus episode, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files thememorypalace.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Press Freedom Declines 10 mins – “Marianne Guenot, editor of The Lancet’s World Report section, joins us to talk about the current crisis in global health journalism.” At the link find “Global health journalism, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files TL_Mar_18_journalism.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychologist Steven Pinker 32 mins – “Alongside his research into cognition, the psychologist Steven Pinker has forged a career as a bestselling science writer. His latest book, Enlightenment Now tackles 21st-century doom and gloom with a vigorous defence of reason, science and progress. According to Pinker, the idea that we’re going to hell in a handcart is an empirical claim that is just wrong – health, prosperity, peace, knowledge and happiness are all on the rise. It’s all because of the Enlightenment, he argues, and the gradual spread of the problem-solving mentality that finds its fullest expression in science. Pinker joined Richard in the studio to explain the advantages of focusing on symptoms instead of causes, how irrationality can be countered with reasons and why it’s so hard for good news to get a hearing.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radio Systems 114 mins – “Welcome, Derek Kozel of Ettus Research (a National Instruments company) and the GNUradio project! Derek recently moved to Cardiff, Wales (UK). His new house will soon be outfitted with many antennas. At university he was part of the ham radio club (W3VC), which got him into the whole industry. Repeaters Chris suggested a Baofeng as an HT (which was met with disgust). Derek uses a Yaesu VX-6 After college Derek went to work at SpaceX on sensor networks. Derek now works at Ettus Research. We had the founder Matt Ettus on the show in episode 101….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Raspberry Pi Inventor 29 mins – “When Eben Upton was in his twenties, he wanted to get children thinking about how computers think, to boost the number of people applying to read computer science at university. He dreamt of putting a chip in every classroom. The result was Raspberry Pi, a tiny gadget, little bigger than a credit card, that can be hooked up to any keyboard and monitor, to create a programmable PC. And it’s cheap. Raspberry Pi Zero, sticker price just £5, was given away free with a computer magazine in 2015. Eben tells Jim how it all began, in his loft with soldering irons and post it notes, and how, by ruthlessly pursuing a philanthropic goal he became CEO of a highly successful business enterprise. Producer: Anna Buckley.” At the link find the title, “Eben Upton on Raspberry Pi, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files p05tnsbd.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Trail through Balkans 36 mins – “The crisis of people flooding out of war torn Middle Eastern countries and taking refuge in Europe has become a hot culture war topic in America.  Should we help these people?  What about the possibility of terrorist being imbedded in this group? For this episode, we thought it’d be good to feature veteran journalist – or “cultural anthropologist” – Scott Carrier, who followed the migration of people fleeing Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan as they make their way into Europe. Carrier, best known as a regular contributor for This American Life, hosts his own podcast Home of the Brave.  In our Us & Them episode, we play one of Carrier’s podcast episodes, where he follows a large group of these displaced citizens on their trek through the “Balkan Route”— a contained route specifically for traveling refugees. It starts in Greece and ends in Germany, where they have opened their borders for those who are able to make it that far (about 4,000 a day).” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Republican at Vassar 32 mins – “Back in 2016, I produced a piece for the New Yorker Radio Hour, which featured an unlikely friendship between a professor at Vassar College and one of his students. What made this bond unusual? Well, even though Vassar — located in Poughkeepsie, NY — may be considered your typical liberal northeastern college, the student body defies categories. But even among all of this student diversity, one particular student made a strong impression on English Literature Professor Hua Hsu: 35-year-old Army veteran and self-proclaimed Texas Republican Dave Carrell. So like oil and water, here we have the makings of an “us and them” culture clash before the backdrop of a liberal college campus in New York’s Hudson Valley. But Dave Carrell, the elephant in the room — or the classroom — surprised Professor Hsu, and Hsu responded in kind. On this week’s episode of the “Us and Them” podcast: embedding yourself in the other part of America and finding common ground.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Robert Reich on Politics 78 mins – “Robert B. Reich has been one of America’s leading political thinkers since he served as Bill Clinton’s Secretary of Labor, for which Time Magazine named him one of the ten most effective cabinet secretaries of the twentieth century. A constant voice for social change, Reich is the author of 14 books, including the best-sellers Saving Capitalism and The Work of Nations. Now, he makes the case for restoring the idea of the common good to the center of our economics, our politics, and our national identity. The Common Good argues that societies undergo both virtuous and vicious cycles, and that the vicious cycle the U.S. is now undergoing can and must be reversed. Reich challenges us to weigh what really matters, and to join forces to save America’s soul.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Troll Farm 43 mins – “On Friday, Special Counsel Robert Mueller indicted thirteen Russian nationals and three Russian entities involved in efforts to interfere in the U.S. political system, including the 2016 presidential election. Lawfare‘s Benjamin Wittes discusses what the indictment means for L’Affaire Russe and U.S. national security with David Kris, Paul Rosenzweig and Matt Tait.” At th e link right-click “Direct download: Russians emergency podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Senior Care in Japan 34 mins – Could living in a home designed to deliberately demand more effort from you each day help you stay fitter and more alert in your later years? And could people living with dementia be better integrated in the community through work? Aki Maruyama Leggett examines some of the novel ideas for senior housing and social care emerging in Japan.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Education 44 mins – “Despite all the fuss about sex education in America, students get precious little of it. Jonathan Zimmerman, an education historian, tells Trey how Americans spend more time arguing about what kids should learn about human sexuality in schools than they actually do teaching anything about it.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Sex Education for Adults 17 mins – “In this program, I speak with Dr. Michael Ross, who’s chair of the University of Minnesota’s program for Sexual Health Education in the department of family medicine.  He says so much of sexual health education is devoted to adolescents and maybe a more effective way to teach young people is to better educate adults. Ross believes the best way to do this is to require health care professionals to have better training in sexual health education.  He says one of the reasons the public is poorly informed about sexual health is because healthcare professionals often have had poor training. Ross believes that only half of U.S. medical schools have an adequate sexual health education curriculum.  And that our nursing schools have an even lower rate of training.  And unless we educate the educators, we’re not going to get very far.  He is trying to build program at UM that will address this challenge and that they might become a model for the nation.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

South Africa President 25 mins – “Becky Milligan looks back at the extraordinary life of South Africa’s new president. From humble beginnings, he became a lawyer, established the country’s most powerful trade union organisation and was a key player in negotiating the end of apartheid. After losing out at an earlier attempt to become president, he turned to business and rapidly became one of South Africa’s richest men – while also attracting controversy over allegations about his role during the Marikana massacre of striking miners. As he takes power, what really makes him tick?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stonewall Inn Demonstration 30 mins – “Not that long ago, you could get locked up for being gay. A West Virginia man tells “Us & Them” host Trey Kay about being sent to a mental institution for violating sodomy laws. Standing in front of the historic Stonewall Inn in NYC’s Greenwich Village, gay activist Brendan Fay tells Trey how things have changed over the past five decades for LGBTQ people in America and around the world. On this week’s episode of the “Us & Them” podcast: the pride, progress and ongoing struggle of gay rights.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Suffragettes in Britain 51 mins – “In the 1970s, historian Sir Brian Harrison embarked on a huge project to record the experiences of women who had been part of the UK suffrage movement in the early part of the 20th Century. Now in the 100th anniversary year of women in Britain finally being granted the vote, journalist Jane Garvey listens through some of the 205 tapes to get an idea of their lives as well as the risks and sacrifices the women made in their fight for equality.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Survivalist Earns Doctorate 43 mins – “David talks to Tara Westover about her incredible new book Educated, which tells the story of how a girl brought up by survivalists in Idaho and who never went to school ended up with a PhD from Cambridge. Along the way we discuss what education means and what Tara’s journey has taught her about politics and about life. Really, this is a conversation about the important stuff.” At the link find the title, “Educated, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Textbook War 54 mins – “What should children learn in school? It’s a question that’s stirred debate for decades, and in 1974 it led to violent protests in West Virginia. People planted bombs in schools, shot at buses, and shut down coal mines. This week on Inside Appalachia, we feature Charleston native Trey Kay, the host of Us and Them. In 1974, Kanawha County was one of the first battlegrounds in the American culture wars. Controversy erupted over newly-adopted school textbooks. School buildings were hit by dynamite and Molotov cocktails, buses were riddled with bullets, journalists were beaten and surrounding coal mines were shut down by protesting miners.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.

Textbook War in Texas 30 mins – “In this episode, I dig into one of my favorite culture war subjects: the battles in Texas over education. For years, I’ve had a fascination with the fights Texans have had over education curriculum and textbooks.  This interest started with my research of the 1974 Kanawha County textbook controversy.  When researching the events in Kanawha, I saw that a Texas couple named Mel and Norma Gabler came to Charleston to lend support to the textbook protesters.  At that point, the Gablers – a Mom and Pop team from Longview, TX – had more than a decade of experience of performing intensive reviews of public school textbooks.  Overtime, the couple would have a huge impact on what got into `– not just in Texas, but around the country. The Gablers died about a decade ago, but their work to bring conservative, patriotic, Christian values into public school classrooms lives on.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “download the audio file,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the file.  

Timing Impact 52 mins – “The writer Daniel Pink says timing is a science, and knowing how it works can make us better at our jobs and more creative. It’s not just about doing the things we do, but knowing when. Timing is everything. No, really. It is. And what’s more, it isn’t an art so much as a science. The author Daniel Pink has worked his way through mountains of research, and he’s convinced that when you do something is just as important as how you do it. He’s learned that there are hidden patterns in the day, in the year, and coded in our biology that shape our decisions and our actions. Pink joins us Thursday to explore how using these hidden patterns and getting the timing right can change our lives. Daniel Pink is the author of the books Drive and A Whole New Mind. His latest book is called When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect TimingAt the link right-click the play button and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and U.S. Defense 28 mins – “Donald Trump came to office insisting he would end America’s mismanaged wars and invest in defence. In an unusual breach with past practice he chose a general to head up the Pentagon. But how far has defence policy changed in Trump’s first year? Is he likely to take US forces into new confrontations? And what of those who see Mr Trump as having a potentially irresponsible finger on the nuclear button? BBC Defence and Diplomatic correspondent, Jonathan Marcus, examines the relationship between Trump and the Generals.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Health Care 28 mins – “Donald Trump campaigned on numerous issues, but when it came time for action in the early days of his administration, healthcare reform was his top legislative priority. “Repealing and replacing” the Democrats’ Obamacare system has proven harder than it seems. Time and time again the Republican-controlled Congress was unable to pass sweeping changes. Anthony Zurcher, examines the challenges facing Donald Trump’s Administration, including efforts to replace Obamacare as well as his handling of the opioid addiction epidemic and efforts to reform the medical system for US veterans.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump State Department 28 mins – “What is happening to American diplomacy? It is the job of the State Department to explain to the world what America stands for, and manage the nuts and bolts of its international relations. But President Trump is uninterested in the diplomatic arts; he has proposed drastic cuts to the department and tweets foreign policy pronouncements seemingly on a whim. What does this mean for the way US foreign policy is run, and for American influence in the world?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Year of Tweets 50 mins – “In January it will be 12 months of tweets from Donald Trump since his inauguration last January – a year of tweeting dangerously for his opponents, and potentially for himself. The president has posted about stopping North Korea’s ‘Rocket Man’ leader from acquiring nuclear missiles. At home he has rallied his supporters and lashed out at his critics – as well as his own intelligence services. Some suggest that forthright remarks on Twitter could cause the President legal problems from on-going investigations into Russia’s involvement in last year’s election. The BBC’s Anthony Zurcher reviews a year of the president’s tweets and asks what has been the impact of the way Donald Trump has used Twitter during his first year as president. What can the tweets tell us about the Trump presidency, America and its relationship with the world?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Unreasonable Searches 21 mins – “The Fourth Amendment says that “The right of the people to be secure in their person, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” But at the border, warrantless searches are OK, even when it comes to our digital devices. With Trump’s focus on the border, this is becoming a bigger deal.” At the link find the title, “17- The 4th Amendment and the Border, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files TCL_The Fourth Amendment and the Border ep_17_pt01.mp3” and select “Save Link AS” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela Violence 28 mins – “Through the chilling testimonies of two ex-gang members and one school teacher, Margarita Rodriguez of the BBC World Service explores how criminal gangs in Venezuela use children and teenagers as young as 10 years old to fight their wars. Some kids are attracted by what gangs offer them: security, friendships, respect, motorbikes, women, and guns.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vitamin A Supplement Value 18 mins – “Up to $500m a year could be put to better use by stopping ineffective and potentially harmful supplementation programmes in poorer countries, argues John Mason, professor emeritus at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. However Keith West, professor of infant and child nutrition at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of.Medicine” At the link find the title, “Should universal distribution of high dose vitamin A to children cease? Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files 407042373-bmjgroup-vitamin-a-mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

War on Christmas 33 mins – “This podcast examines the divide between the War on Christmas, whether it exists, and where religious inclusion lies.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildlife Contraband P1 21 min1 – “When people take wildlife products over a border that is under the control of CITES. Some of it is illegal, and this is when Border Force step in, confiscating the items in question and when possible, returning them to the wild. But what do people bring through? Georgia Mills was shown the Dead Shed, by senior Border Force officer Grant Miller, a horrific stash of animal and plant products that had been confiscated at Heathrow Airport. This content may be upsetting to some people.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildlife Contraband P2 6 mins – “It’s one of the largest criminal industries in the world, worth billions and responsible for thousands of murders, but can we win the fight against the illegal wildlife trade? We speak to the foot soldiers of this battle: a scientist whose new techniques led to the capture of some dangerous criminals, a member of Border Force who intercepts ivory as it enters the country and the man with a gun facing off directly with the poachers, and hear about the animals whose time is running out. Plus, a revelation from the early Universe which might change how we do physics today, why unexpected rain was a course for celebration for some scientists and the crickets who have been found to use tools to amplify their songs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Woman’s March 58 mins– “Women’s March on Washington Co-Chair Linda Sarsour reflects on the 2017 march and what’s ahead for the movement. She is interviewed by Heather McGhee, president of Demos and Demos Action.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Linda Sarsour, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files program.494772.MP3-A13.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women’s Progress in Middle East 12 mins – “Shameem Akhtar posed as a boy during her early childhood in Pakistan so she could enjoy the privileges Pakistani girls are rarely afforded: to play outside and attend school. In an eye-opening, personal talk, Akhtar recounts how the opportunity to get an education altered the course of her life — and ultimately changed the culture of her village, where today every young girl goes to school.” At the link click the share circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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