Mining Digest 383 – Mar 22, 2019: Acne in Adults, American Disintegration, Anthroplogy and Business, Bias Impacts, Bill Clinton, Blind Instructor, Burnout Discussion, Camera Recovery Stories, Cannabidiol or CBD, Carbon Dioxide Removal, Child Predators, Climate Action, Climate Change Communication, Clinton-Lewinsky-Feminists, Computer Virus History, Congressional Violence, Democratic Freedom, Digital Culture Foundation, Economics 101, Encephalitis Lethargica, Environmental Failure, Fake News and Hoaxes, Fascism in U.S., Forensic DNA, Gen Nadja West, Hacking Young Minds Problem, Impeachment Guide, Indigenous Youth Suicides, Innovator’s DNA, Killiam Trust, Lies and Hoaxes, Linda Tripp, Mail Order Brides, Marijuana Farm in Colorado, Maxine Waters, Mind-Body Problems, Monica Lewinsky, Nonprofit Organizations, Organic Chemistry, Poor Laws in Europe, Populism Increases, Ruby Ridge, Sheldon Adelson Impact on Trump, Smart Device Impact, Sovereign Debt, Spanish Civil War, Success Academy Expectations, Success Academy, Television Inventor, Thanking People, THC Extraction, Venus, Victorian Virtual Reality Uses, Watergate Discussion, White Nationalist Conversion, Women Leaders, Wyatt Cenac

Exercise your ears: the 88 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 633 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,486 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 499 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Acne in Adults 53 mins – “Acne isn’t just a teenage rite of passage. Grown-up women with jobs and bank accounts struggle with chronic pimples as well. Cristen and Caroline examine why adult acne happens, how birth control affects it and other treatment options. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

African American Museum 46 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by Wanda Draper, who is the Executive Director at Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture to discuss her experience on the board of a museum and how museums can influence innovation. Wanda has over 40 years of experience in both broadcast and print journalism and has previously worked as Director of Programming at NBC-affiliated WBALTV, Director of Public Information for the Governor of Maryland, and as a reporter for The Baltimore Sun.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Disintegration 54 mins – “Christopher Hedges is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and the author of America: The Farewell Tour. He believes that America may well be in its last act. Addiction, income disparity and hollowed-out towns and cities are becoming the norm, he argues, while the political and financial sectors increasingly merge with each other to the exclusion of anyone else’s interests or needs. His vision is dark and sobering. America’s only salvation, he concludes in this illustrated conversation with guest host Rachel Giese, is mass resistance.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Anthropology and Business 45 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by author and journalist, Gillian Tett, to discuss the role anthropology plays in today’s business world. Gillian is the author of the award-winning book, Fool’s Gold, which analyses the origin of the 2008 financial crisis, and most recently, The Silo Effect, and is currently a columnist and US Managing Editor of The Financial Times.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artist Tom Thompson P1 59 mins – “Historian Gregory Klages describes the challenge of separating fact from fiction when it comes to the life and death of Tom Thomson. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Artist Tom Thompson P2 54 mins – “Many of us just can’t resist a good pilgrimage, whether it’s a religious one or not. The soul desires a deeper connection with whatever truly moves us. The late Canadian painter Tom Thomson has inspired many such pilgrimages. People often travel to where he’s thought to be buried, in the family plot at Leith, Ontario, or in a tiny cemetery beside Canoe Lake, in Algonquin Park, where he died under mysterious circumstances in 1917. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Asteroid Visitor 13 mins – “In October 2017, astrobiologist Karen J. Meech got the call every astronomer waits for: NASA had spotted the very first visitor from another star system. The interstellar comet — a half-mile-long object eventually named `Oumuamua, from the Hawaiian for “scout” or “messenger” — raised intriguing questions: Was it a chunk of rocky debris from a new star system, shredded material from a supernova explosion, evidence of alien technology or something else altogether? In this riveting talk, Meech tells the story of how her team raced against the clock to find answers about this unexpected gift from afar.At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bee Gees 91 mins – “Those falsettos, those white suits, those toothy smiles—you think you know the Bee Gees. But their story goes back much further than the ’70s, and it’s full of twists. From their roots as an eclectic harmony band in Australia and their first wave of Beatlesque fame, through their domination of the disco revolution and their years as a punchline, the Bee Gees stayed alive because of the Gibb brothers’ harmonies and especially their impeccable songs. This month, Hit Parade traces the influence of the Brothers Gibb on virtually every popular genre, from pop to R&B, rock to easy listening, country to … yes, even hip-hop.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Bias Impacts 12 mins – “What shapes our perceptions (and misperceptions) about science? In an eye-opening talk, meteorologist J. Marshall Shepherd explains how confirmation bias, the Dunning-Kruger effect and cognitive dissonance impact what we think we know — and shares ideas for how we can replace them with something much more powerful: knowledge.At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bill Clinton 40 mins – “Cliff Jackson insists that he never hated Bill Clinton. Here’s what he said about it when I interviewed him earlier this year: CLIFF JACKSON: With all my reservations about his character, I still thought that he had the potential to be one of the greatest presidents we’ve ever had. Jackson said pretty much the same thing back in 1994, when it was clear that he was doing everything he could to weaken Clinton’s presidency: CLIFF JACKSON: I am not an enemy of Bill Clinton. Enemy, to me, implies personal animus. Personal animosity. And I don’t have that. That’s not why I’m doing what I’m doing. You’ll hear about what Cliff Jackson was doing, and why, in just a second. First, I want to tell you the story of how he and Clinton met.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Blind Instructor 18 mins – “Please welcome Teen correspondent, Simon Bonenfant, as he steps into the interviewer role for Blind Abilities. While attending and presenting at the Pennsylvania NFB convention, Simon pulled out his recorder and went to work. Conducting 5 interviews from vendors and presenters. In this interview, Simon talks to Retired Teacher of the Visually Impaired/Orientation and Mobility Instructor Keith Ford. They talk about the importance of braille and how modern technology is changing the way teachers teach and Keith gives us some insight into the field of a Teacher of the Visually Impaired along with some tips for Transition age students. Join Simon and Keith in this brief look back at the journey Keith has gone through and his optimistic view of the future of technology and training.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Veterans 19 mins – “On the centenary of Armistice Day, over 100 blind veterans assembled at Horse Guards Parade in London. Some were blinded in action. However, most started to lose their sight well after their service had ended. Reporter Dave Williams went to talk to them as they assembled for this historic event – we hear just some of their stories. Also, Peter White visits 97-year-old blind veteran Peter Van Zeller. He is a resident at a Blind Veteran’s UK care home, and shares the story of when he first discovered a previously-unknown family connection to the home, and the charity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burnout Discussion 56 minsThe Story Over the last few months, we’ve been busy raising capital, hiring employees, launching shows, building a studio, and getting this business off the ground. But a few weeks ago, pretty much overnight, everything changed. During the holidays, while Alex was out of town, the workload became overwhelming, and Gimlet learned its first lessons about startup burnout. But it wouldn’t be a StartUp episode if that burnout wasn’t documented. While Alex is away, a new Gimlet employee picks up a recorder and captures the fallout on tape. Thanks to everyone who took our audience survey last week. To see the results, follow this link:  https://hearstartup.typeform.com/report/ofUGcO/wheUAt the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the soundbar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Camera Recovery Stories 22 mins – “If you’ve ever lost anything of sentimental value, you’ll relate to the stories in this podcast. This Komando on Demand episode shares surprising tales about lost cameras and valuable photos that were returned to their owners — sometimes years later — and how technology and social media reconnected them. Listen to these incredible stories, and you can’t help but smile.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cannabidiol or CBD 30 mins – “CBD mania is in full swing and people are using it for just about anything, but what is this chemical in cannabis? In this week’s episode, we tell you unlikely origin story of CBD and if the science backs up the hype. We speak to Paige Figi, neuroscientist Prof. Kent Hutchison, clinical researcher Dr. Mallory Loflin, and Josh and Joel Stanley.At the link you can listen, but not download however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

Carbon Dioxide Capture 14 mins – “Our planet has a carbon problem — if we don’t start removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, we’ll grow hotter, faster. Chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox previews some amazing technology to scrub carbon from the air, using chemical reactions that capture and reuse CO2 in much the same way trees do … but at a vast scale. This detailed talk reviews both the promise and the pitfalls.At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Predators 42 mins – “Kids run away in search of love only to be held captive by sex traffickers, hate groups, and terrorists. Every 40 seconds, a child goes missing in the United States. Learn how innocent-looking apps and recruiters are luring our kids in this can’t miss Komando on Demand episode. It might just save a life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Action 56 mins – “Environmental problems are well-known and have been for decades, but we still appear to be edging towards a global catastrophe. Why? Environmentalist Graham Saul believes that part of the problem is environmentalism itself. He believes it has a message problem — mainly because it doesn’t have a single, coherent, unified message that people can grasp. Graham Saul has been on the forefront of environmental thought and activism for over 25 years. In this lecture, he parses the problem and points towards a step with potential planet-saving implications. We are running out of time. According to the 2018 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, the overwhelming consensus in the scientific community is that we have just over a decade to turn things around to minimize the impact of global warming. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog

Climate Change and Having Children 54 mins – “Young couples face a complicated decision at a time when the dire consequences of climate change are becoming clearer, is it ethical to bring a child into the world? Science journalist Britt Wray talks with parents, prospective parents, ethicists, scientists, and children on this thorny question. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Climate Change Communication 17 mins – “How do you talk to someone who doesn’t believe in climate change? Not by rehashing the same data and facts we’ve been discussing for years, says climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe. In this inspiring, pragmatic talk, Hayhoe shows how the key to having a real discussion is to connect over shared values like family, community and religion — and to prompt people to realize that they already care about a changing climate. “We can’t give in to despair,” she says. “We have to go out and look for the hope we need to inspire us to act — and that hope begins with a conversation, today.,At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clinton-Lewinsky-Feminists 46 mins – “Today it’s conventional wisdom that all feminists hypocritically turned their backs on Monica Lewinsky. In fact, the scandal provoked an intense debate within the feminist movement about sex, power, and consent. For some, it was obvious that Clinton had victimized Lewinsky and needed to be thrown overboard. For others, it was just as obvious that the scandal was part of a political war in which Clinton was the good guy. In the seventh episode of our series on Clinton’s impeachment, Leon Neyfakh excavates the arguments and ideas that divided liberals—and feminists in particular—at the height of the scandal.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Computer Virus History 36 mins – “Before WikiLeaks, there was the Wank Worm. In this week’s episode, we tell you the story of how Australian hackers infiltrated NASA, just months after the country was hooked up to the internet in 1989. Joel Werner, host of Sum of All Parts, helps us tell this story, along with cybersecurity researcher Dr. Suelette Dreyfus.” At the link you can listen, but not download however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

Congressional Violence 56 mins – “On this episode of Live at Politics and Prose, Joanne B. Freeman discusses her book The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War at Politics and Prose.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Conservation Scientist 46 mins – “When you think about the types of jobs at an art museum, scientist probably doesn’t spring to mind. But as it turns out, science plays a big part in the art world. As a senior conservation scientist at MoMA, Chris McGlinchey uses the latest scientific techniques to conserve the collection and study the art. Chris tells Jordan about all the complex machines he uses, the extremely tiny scale conservators work on, and figuring out how to fill the museum with sugar cane that won’t rot. At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Democrat Surge and Demonstrations 41 mins – “Orange County, California, was the political starting point for Nixon, for the Barry Goldwater presidential campaign, and for Reagan—as Republican as any place in America. But starting in January, not a single Republican will represent Orange County in the House. It’s solid blue. Gustavo Arellano will explain how it happened—he’s a weekly columnist for the Los Angeles Times, and wrote the legendary column “Ask a Mexican.” Also: Mass demonstrations in America, from the 1963 March on Washington to the 2017 Women’s March. What protests do when they work, and why: L.A. Kauffman explains. Her new book is How to Read a Protest: The Art of Organizing and Resistance….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Democratic Freedom 54 mins – “What does it mean to be free? All societies place restrictions on what citizens can do, but some restrictions (speed limits) may be more important than others (limiting the right to vote). But one-size “freedom” doesn’t really fit all: democracy has many faces, and ideas of freedom are shaped over place and time. Many people in the West may find it difficult to look at more theocratic Middle Eastern countries where a priestly class has huge influence in politics, and consider them to be democratic, and their people to be “free”. For their part, these countries might look on our secular societies as profoundly morally corrupt and unfree. Similarly, we may look at a country with a single political party, such as China, and wonder how free anyone might feel in such a situation- even though many Chinese obviously do. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Dickens on Tour 29 mins- “This episode revisits the story of Charles Dickens on tour, featuring previous hosts Sarah and Deblina. Dickens is best known for chronicling life in London, but he also wrote about the United States – and not in a flattering light. When touring the U.S. and Canada with his wife, Dickens found many American customs repugnant. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Digital Culture Foundation 15 mins – “In the early days of digital culture, Jaron Lanier helped craft a vision for the internet as public commons where humanity could share its knowledge — but even then, this vision was haunted by the dark side of how it could turn out: with personal devices that control our lives, monitor our data and feed us stimuli. (Sound familiar?) In this visionary talk, Lanier reflects on a “globally tragic, astoundingly ridiculous mistake” companies like Google and Facebook made at the foundation of digital culture — and how we can undo it. “We cannot have a society in which, if two people wish to communicate, the only way that can happen is if it’s financed by a third person who wishes to manipulate them,” he says.At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics 101 38 mins – “On this week’s edition of Slate Money, host Felix Salmon of Fusion, Slate’s Jordan Weissmann, and Cathy O’Neil of Mathbabe devote the entire episode to a letter from Nathan Connelly, a teacher who emailed us to ask the following question: If you were to teach high school economics—comprised of mostly 16- to 18-year-olds—today, what would be the top three pieces of knowledge/insight/concepts each student should graduate taking with them for years after? To put it another way: What do you wish you would have learned in high school about the economic system?…Great question, but Slate Money always goes big. Instead of discussing a mere list of three, Felix, Jordan, and Cathy each came up with three, for a grand total of nine essential economic economics concepts for the high school crowd. In fact, Felix claims it’s really a list of 10: 1. Supply and demand 2. Sunk costs 3. Inflation 4. The “invisible hand” 5. The “tragedy of the commons” 6. Causality 7. Opportunity costs 8. Comparative advantage (video supplement) 9. Income inequality 10. Models versus reality Don’t see your favorite concept? Got a bone to pick with us? Send us an email at slatemoney@slate.com.”

Encephalitis Lethargica 33 mins – “From 1916 to about 1927, a strange epidemic spread around the world. It caused unusual symptoms, from drastic behavior changes to a deep, prolonged sleep that could last for months. Between 20 and 40 percent of people who caught the disease died. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Environmental Failure 48 mins – “Environmental problems are well-known and have been for decades, but we still appear to be edging towards a global catastrophe. Why? Environmentalist Graham Saul believes that part of the problem is environmentalism itself. He believes it has a message problem — mainly because it doesn’t have a single, coherent, unified message that people can grasp. Graham Saul has been on the forefront of environmental thought and activism for over 25 years. In this lecture, he parses the problem and points towards a step with potential planet-saving implications. We are running out of time. According to the 2018 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, the overwhelming consensus in the scientific community is that we have just over a decade to turn things around to minimize the impact of global warming. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog

Fake News and Hoaxes 22 mins – “Just after Kevin Young handed in the manuscript of his magnum opus on American hucksterism, Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News, his publisher had to send it back to him. Young—a noted poet, the newly appointed poetry editor of the New Yorker, and director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at the New York Public Library—has a theory that most hoaxes have a racial subtext (that is, when race isn’t the overt text). So when the Rachel Dolezal scandal broke, of course he had to weigh in on that, and back to the keyboard he went. Bunk conveys the sense that Young might have gone on writing it forever, frantically trying to keep up with the real world’s ever more screamingly on-the-nose illustrations of his theme. After Dolezal came Melania Trump’s speech on the first day of the Republican National Convention in July 2016, which may provide even better proof of Young’s point. Married to a man whose political fortunes depend on his promise to shore up white privilege and on his repudiation of the nation’s first black president, Melania plagiarized her speech from Michelle Obama. You can’t make this stuff up. At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Fascism in U.S. 54 mins – “We’ve heard it so much that it’s almost become a cliché: America is on the road to fascism. The debate over that claim continues, but renowned scholar Henry Giroux argues that “Donald Trump is not just some impulsive rich guy who marketed his way into politics through empty Kardashian-style consumer culture”. Trump needed followers. And he got them. Now what? At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog

Forensic DNA 32 mins – “Forensic DNA analysis has been used by law enforcement for years to help solve some of the biggest crimes. But with the rise of DNA analysis and forensic genealogy companies such as 23andMe, Ancestry, and Genomelink, some ethical questions must be answered. In this episode of Komando on Demand, Kim explores how law enforcement uses forensic DNA analysis to solve notorious criminal cases as well as the ethics and privacy issues of DNA data banks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gen Nadja West 33 mins – “What’s it like to be the woman who runs the United States Army Medical Command?* On this episode of Women in Charge, Julia Turner talks to Army Surgeon General Nadja West. West speaks about being born into a military family, choosing medicine, and discovering her place as a leader. She also talks about the increasing openness in the military and her personal view on the importance of kindness in positions of power.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Hacking Young Minds Problem 17 mins – “Writer and artist James Bridle uncovers a dark, strange corner of the internet, where unknown people or groups on YouTube hack the brains of young children in return for advertising revenue. From “surprise egg” reveals and the “Finger Family Song” to algorithmically created mashups of familiar cartoon characters in violent situations, these videos exploit and terrify young minds — and they tell us something about where our increasingly data-driven world is headed. “We need to stop thinking about technology as a solution to all of our problems, but think of it as a guide to what those problems actually are, so we can start thinking about them properly and start to address them,” Bridle says.At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Research 54 mins – “Although he’s not yet officially eligible to collect his pension, Dr. David Naylor is already President Emeritus of the University of Toronto — having occupied the office itself for eight turbulent years from 2005 – 2013. Before that, Naylor was Dean of Medicine at U of T, and Chair of the National Advisory Committee on SARS. Right now, he’s interim head of the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. And he was recently awarded the 2018 Henry G. Friesen Prize for Health Science Research. David Naylor talks with Paul Kennedy about his life and work, and about his recent Friesen Prize Lecture at the University of Ottawa. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Hotel Uses 54 mins – “A guest checks into a Las Vegas hotel suite, and makes it a fortress, staging a mass shooting on the city below. It’s a horrific act that seems to subvert the very ethos of hotels – places of hospitality and calm. Yet hotels contain multitudes. They are sites of fantasy and functionality, pleasure and trouble. Their spaces are public and private, workplace and bedroom. They exist to house us temporarily, in luxury or in squalor. IDEAS producer Lisa Godfrey explores hotels, both in reality and the imagination, with hotel workers, designers, and writers – to reveal how hotels reflect private desires and social truths. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Impeachment Discussion 44 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to CNN contributor and impeachment attorney Ross Garber about the recently unsealed Watergate “Road Map,” and what it could imply for any reports issued by Special Counsel Robert Mueller.Further Reading:The Watergate “Road Map” and the Coming Mueller ReportGrand jury report and recommendation to the House ” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment Guide 37 mins – “Jacob Weisberg talks to Harvard Law School’s Cass Sunstein about his new book, Impeachment: A Citizens Guide, and what it takes to remove a president from office.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous Youth Suicides 54 mins – “Prize-winning journalist Tanya Talaga (author of Seven Fallen Feathers) explores the legacy of cultural genocide against Indigenous peoples in her 2018 CBC Massey Lectures series, titled All Our Relations: Finding the Path Forward. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Innovator’s DNA 47 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by Hal Gregersen, author of The Innovator’s DNA, to discuss his latest book, Questions are the Answer. Hal is a Senior Lecturer in Leadership and Innovation and the Executive Director of the Leadership Center at MIT, and has previously taught at Dartmouth College, The World Economic Forum, and the London Business School. What was covered – Why Hal believes most CEOs have trouble asking questions and how to pivot from answer-centric to question-led leadership. How to be a better leader by asking the ‘different, better question’ and using the ‘power of the pause’. How Hal’s question-first process of reframing of challenges can help us discover the winning solution.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

James Comey 36 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to analyst Mieke Eoyang, vice president of Third Way’s national security program, about all things James Comey, including his testimony, takes on his role and righteousness, and what we would want to hear from him. Plus, Rex Tillerson, the new U.N. ambassador and how Trump elects women to his Cabinet, and more Trump-Russia.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Killam Trust 54 mins – “The Killam Trusts were established in 1965 after the death of Mrs. Dorothy J. Killam, the widow of Izaak Walton Killam, a Canadian financier, for a time the wealthiest man in Canada. He died intestate in 1955, but before his death he and his wife discussed in extensive detail the scholarship plan on which the Killam Trusts were founded. Approximately one half of his estate went to the government as inheritance tax. It was used to found the Canada Council, along with similar funds from the estate of Sir James Dunn, also from Nova Scotia). The rest of Mr. Killam’s estate was inherited by his widow, Dorothy J. Killam. In the ten years between his death and hers, she doubled the Killam fortune. Upon her death at Villa Leopolda, her estate in France, her lawyer Donald N. Byers, QC put into motion the plans the Killams had discussed during their lifetimes. Having no children of their own, the Killams decided to leave their fortune to further post-secondary education in Canada at the graduate studies level. The Killam benefactions went to five Canadian universities: University of British Columbia, University of Calgary, University of Alberta, Montreal Neurological Institute at McGill University and Dalhousie University. The Canada Council for the Arts also received Killam funds. The Council’s Killam Research Fellowships are open to professors from all Canadian universities. The Council’s $100,000 Killam Prizes in health sciences, natural sciences, engineering, social sciences and humanities, recognize lifetime contributions. The five Killam Prize Winners will travel to “Killam” universities each year to give a public lecture. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Kleptomania 33 mins – “Why are two-thirds of diagnosed kleptomaniacs women? Cristen and Caroline explore the 19th-century rise of retail consumerism, shoplifting and how kleptomania was invented to help keep wealthy women out of prison. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Language Impact 54 mins – “PhD graduate Laura Hare taught herself Biblical Hebrew so she could analyze male and female speech patterns in the original text of the Hebrew Bible (or Old Testament). She found the women characters consistently using language that shows deference to men. Some of these signs of deference exist in women’s speech today in North American English. The only female biblical character who fully speaks ‘like a man’ also became an archetype of evil — Queen Jezebel. Ideas from the Trenches producers Tom Howell and Nicola Luksic find out what Laura Hare’s discoveries mean for the present day. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Lies and Hoaxes 22 mins – “It may feel like disinformation is at an all-time high, but hoaxes, lies, and yellow journalism are age-old.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Linda Tripp 46 mins – “Aside from Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky, the most pivotal player in the Clinton-impeachment saga may have been Linda Tripp—an ordinary person who made extraordinary choices that precipitated the entire crisis. In perhaps the deepest and most intimate interview she’s ever given, Tripp talks to Leon Neyfakh about what she did, and why….” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Mail Order Brides 41 mins – “Six Impossible Episodes: Deja Vu in the U.S. and Canada, Dec 10, 2018 – Several times over the past few years, we’ve done an episode on something from U.S. history, and afterward we’ve gotten notes from listeners about the same thing happening in Canada – although this episode starts with one that’s the reverse. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Makeup History 33 mins– “We’re revisiting an episode from 2014 about makeup, which has a rich and lengthy history that spans the globe and crosses cultures. From 10,000 B.C.E. to the 20th century, people have been using cosmetics to enhance their looks — sometimes with unintended side effects. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Marijuana Farm in Colorado 50 mins – “In this episode, Jordan goes back to Green Dragon in Denver to talk with Ryan Milligan, the company’s co-owner and head of cultivation. He quickly learns that the hardest part of farming marijuana definitely isn’t growing the plant.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Maxine Waters 47 mins – “Slate Money talks about all the ramifications from this week’s midterms elections; Maxine Waters and big banks, Puerto Rico, the minimum wage, and cannabis on this week’s episode with Felix Salmon, Anna Szymanski, and Emily Peck.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mind-Body Problems 76 mins – “Science journalist and author John Horgan talks about his book, Mind-Body Problems, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Horgan interviewed an array of scientists, philosophers, and others who have worked on consciousness, free-will, and what it means to be human. Horgan argues that no single solution to the problems in these areas is likely to be established by science and that our perspective on these questions is inevitably colored by our personal experiences rather than by scientific evidence. Horgan concludes by making the case for personal and intellectual freedom and the need to embrace subjective interpretations of mind-body issues in ways that bring meaning to our lives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mirabal Sisters 30 mins – “There were four Mirabal sisters — Minerva, Patria, Maria Teresa, and Dede. The sisters are national heroes in the Dominican Republic, but they weren’t very well-known elsewhere until 20 or so years ago when they became the subject of the historical novel “In the Time of the Butterflies” by Julia Alvarez. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Monica Lewinsky 36 mins – “For 11 hours, Monica Lewinsky faced off against federal prosecutors who threatened her with decades in prison if she refused to help them take down the president.” At the link find the title, “EPISODE 1: DEAL OR NO DEAL, left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Nonprofit Organizations 64 mins – “The nonprofit sector is made up of 74 percent women, but men tend to fill organizations’ highest ranks. This classic episode looks at all the ins and outs of nonprofit’s not-so-generous gender dynamics and burnout-prone working conditions. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Organic Chemistry 16 mins – “Jakob Magolan is here to change your perception of organic chemistry. In an accessible talk packed with striking graphics, he teaches us the basics while breaking the stereotype that organic chemistry is something to be afraid of.At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poor Laws in Europe 50 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the 19th century legislation intended to discourage poor people from seeking relief instead of work, with handouts replaced by the workhouse.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Populism Increases 59 mins – “Once relegated to the political fringes, political populism has exploded across the world in recent years. Most of the populist leaders who have emerged so far — figures like Matteo Salvini and Marine Le Pen — have been defined, in part, by their xenophobic rhetoric. Some populist parties, like the Sweden Democrats, even have roots in Neo-Nazism. But what if ultra-nationalism and xenophobia aren’t necessarily a part of populism’s DNA? What if populism is actually a logical, if at times convoluted, response to decades of frustration with our democratic institutions? Political scientist Matthew Goodwin thinks it is. Contrary to the belief held by many “progressive” intellectuals, Goodwin argues populism is not simply an attempt by a generation of older, white men to cling to their social and political power. Instead, he argues that the rise of populism is the result of a citizenry who are thoroughly disenfranchised with traditional political ideologies, on both the left and the right. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Productive Disagreement 15 mins – “Some days, it feels like the only thing we can agree on is that we can’t agree — on anything. Drawing on her background as a world debate champion, Julia Dhar offers three techniques to reshape the way we talk to each other so we can start disagreeing productively and finding common ground — over family dinners, during work meetings and in our national conversations.At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reagan and Tip O’Neal 49 mins – “This episode of Whistlestop visits 1981, when Republican President Ronald Reagan, after surviving an assassination attempt, received a warm visit from the Democratic Speaker of the House, Tip O’Neill.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Robert Bork Nomination 50 mins – “This episode of Whistlestop travels back to Sept. 15, 1987 and into the Kennedy Caucus Room where was Associate Justice nominee Robert Bork begins his five days of testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Ruby Ridge 2 30 mins – “In this second episode of Standoff, our new narrative miniseries on the story of Ruby Ridge, host Ruth Graham breaks down what led to a shootout on the Weaver family property on Aug. 21, 1992, that left three people dead.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Ruby Ridge 3 30 mins – “In the third episode of Standoff, our narrative miniseries on the story of Ruby Ridge, host Ruth Graham describes what happens for the bulk of the 11-day siege on the Weaver family property. As the surviving Weavers stayed holed up inside their cabin, their story attracted droves of supporters and rabble-rousers to rural Idaho.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Ruby Ridge Discussion 44 mins – “…Graham talks to Slate’s Chau Tu about the making of the first episode and the history of white separatist groups in America. Then, we hear an interview with Idaho State University professor emeritus James Aho, author of The Politics of Righteousness, about the Order, a violent criminal group that formed out of the Church of Jesus Christ-Christians, Aryan Nations in the 1980s.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

San Francisco Cable Cars 38 mins – “Cable cars are an iconic part of San Francisco, and San Francisco’s cable cars are the last working system of their kind. The reason they haven’t been completely replaced by more modern modes of transportation is largely the advocacy of women, in particular, Friedel Klussmann, who was known as the Cable Car Lady. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Sheldon Adelson Impact on Trump 30 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Justin Elliott, a reporter at Pro Publica, about his new report on Sheldon Adelson, his donations to Donald Trump, and the influence he’s gained within the administration.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Silicon Valley History 46 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by writer and speaker, Adam Fisher, to discuss his latest book, Valley of Genius: The Uncensored History of Silicon Valley (As Told by the Hackers, Founders, and Freaks Who Made It Boom). Adam has previously worked as a freelance journalist for a variety of prestigious publications and as Features Editor of New York Magazine and Wired Magazine.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smart Device Impact 9 mins – “Once your smart devices can talk to you, who else are they talking to? Kashmir Hill and Surya Mattu wanted to find out — so they outfitted Hill’s apartment with 18 different internet-connected devices and built a special router to track how often they contacted their servers and see what they were reporting back. The results were surprising — and more than a little bit creepy. Learn more about what the data from your smart devices reveals about your sleep schedule, TV binges and even your tooth-brushing habits — and how tech companies could use it to target and profile you. (This talk contains mature language.)At the link left-click the “Share” box, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sovereign Debt 66 mins – “On this week’s episode, Felix Salmon, Anna Szymanski, Mitu Gulati, and Lee Buchheit nerd out about sovereign debt in the past (Ecuador, Argentina, Greece), present (Venezuela, Puerto Rico), and future (Italy).” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Spanish Civil War 39 mins – “We’re taking a look at Francisco Franco and the Spanish Civil War. We’ve talked about Spain’s parliament voting to exhume the remains of dictator Francisco Franco and relocate them to a state-funded mausoleum, and we’re giving that entire situation more context. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Success Academy 44 mins – “Eva Moskowitz wants to fix a really big problem. There are over a million kids in New York City’s public schools. Most can’t read or do math at grade level. Many won’t graduate on time. And it’s largely poor, black and brown kids who are stuck in the lowest performing schools. Eva’s the founder and CEO of Success Academy, the subject of this season of StartUp. And she’s actually making progress. Her school network is growing at lightning speed, and her students get among the highest standardized-test scores in the city, beating out schools in some of the wealthiest districts. And the education world is watching. But not everyone likes what they see. In this season, we ask how exactly Success is doing what it’s doing, and why does it have so many critics? Today, on the first of our six-part series about Success, we meet a mother, Sherisse, who desperately wants her son to get into Success, so that he can have opportunities she never had herself. And we go inside a Success classroom on the first day of school, to see what parents like Sherisse are clamoring for.” At the link you can listen, but not download however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Success Academy Expectation 59 mins It’s no mystery that Success Academy has high expectations — not just for its teachers, but also for its parents and students. Having a high bar is the foundation for Success’ amazing results. But the charter network’s expectations can make life hard for families and kids who don’t quite make the mark. In this episode, we will hear from two families who ran headlong into Success Academy’s high expectations.

Television Inventor 35 mins – “If you watch “Futurama” or “Warehouse 13,” you’ve probably heard the name “Farnsworth.” (And if you’re a “Warehouse 13” fan and an iPhone person, you may even have the old iOS app to turn your iPhone into a virtual Farnsworth device.) Philo T. Farnsworth essentially invented television in his head when he was still a teenager, and he started filing patent applications for his invention in 1927. But, in a story similar to the invention of the sewing machine, what came after involved legal land-grabs and some shady business. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Thanking People 41 mins – “Author AJ Jacobs embarked on a quest with a deceptively simple idea at its heart: to personally thank every person who helped make his morning cup of coffee. More than one thousand “thank yous” later, Jacobs reflects on the globe-trotting journey that ensued — and shares the life-altering wisdom he picked up along the way. “I discovered that my coffee would not be possible without hundreds of people I take for granted,” Jacobs says.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

THC Extraction 37 mins – “Our series on workers in Colorado’s legal cannabis industry keeps on burning. This week, Jordan talks with Max Platt, a cannabis-extraction technician at Denver’s Concentrated Love about the physically demanding art of making professional-grade hash for a living.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

The Little Prince 55 mins – “”And now here is my secret, a very simple secret: it is only with the heart that we see correctly; what is most important is invisible to the eye.” The Little Prince was first published in 1943. And since then, it’s sold 200 million copies, in 300 languages. And we’re still trying to figure out what it is: a children’s fable, or philosophical tale, or even an autobiography of its author, Antoine de Saint Exupe?ry? Danny Braun of Radio-Canada presents his documentary about the enduring magic of this deceptively simple classic. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog.

Transgender 45 mins – “Recently we’ve been hearing a lot about transgender identity. That made us wonder… what makes us the gender that we are? And what should you do if your kid doesn’t fit the mold? To find out, we talked with endocrinologist Dr. Joshua Safer, psychologist Dr. Laura Edwards-Leeper, and psychologist Dr. Colt Keo-Meier.At the link you can listen, but not download however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

USO History 46 mins – “Fifty years ago this week, one of the Army’s most famous soldiers reported for duty. He turned up at Fort Hood, Texas, sporting a fresh GI buzz cut. The Army assigned him to a tank battalion, but he did his best-known work outside the tank. His name? Elvis Presley. Elvis, who rose to the rank of sergeant, still has fans among the troops. But today’s men and women in uniform also want other sounds, USO President and CEO Ned Powell tells NPR’s Liane Hansen. The heavy metal band Drowning Pool, for example, has made two USO-sponsored concert tours to Iraq. For 67 years, the United Service Organization has been putting on concerts and other events to boost the morale of American troops stationed around the globe. During World War II, Bob Hope was a favorite. Elvis didn’t perform at any USO events – though Powell thinks The King probably did take advantage of USO coffee and doughnuts. These days, the USO produces shows by bands, football players and comics – like Robin Williams, who performed at Camp Arifjan in Kuwait in December 2007. In the middle of Williams’ routine, a trumpet sounded and his entire audience turned their backs to him to salute a U.S. flag as it was lowered. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Venus 50 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Earth’s neighbouring planet, once thought very similar but now known to be extremely volcanic with a surface temperature of 450C.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Victorian VR 30 mins – “In the Victorian era, plaster casts became a way to preserve important artifacts in 3D. Now, virtual reality promises to preserve places and experiences. But who decides what gets preserved? And is the technology an accurate re-creation of the experience, or does it fool us into thinking we’ve encountered the real thing when we’ve done nothing of the sort? Guests include Jaron Lanier, VR pioneer; Nonny de la Peña, VR artist; and Tristram Hunt, director of the Victoria and Albert Museum.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Virtual Reality Uses 31 mins – “Though most commonly used for playing games, there are so many more productive aspects to virtual reality and augmented reality that you may not be aware of. From real estate to education, virtual reality technology is changing the world. Are we ready? In this episode of Komando on Demand, Kim looks at the technology behind virtual and augmented reality and how it is shaping the reality around us.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Watergate Discussion 53 mins – “Join us in NYC for a special Slow Burn live show. Host Leon Neyfakh leads a conversation with journalist Bob Woodward, whose groundbreaking investigation into Watergate for the Washington Post won the Pulitzer Prize in Public Service, Mary DeOreo and Marc Lackritz, who worked on the investigative staff of the Senate Watergate Committee as the hearings captivated the nation, award-winning author Gail Sheehy, and contributing editor at WIRED and cohost of Slate’s Trumpcast Virginia Heffernan.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

White Nationalist Conversion 28 mins – “On The Gist, the Kavanaugh hearing. By all accounts, Derek Black was supposed to become the next David Duke. He was the man’s godson, after all, and his father, Don Black, had founded Stormfront, the world’s first and biggest white nationalist website. But then Derek went to New College of Florida, where—as told by the Washington Post’s Eli Saslow—he was shunned by many of his peers for his racist views, and embraced by a few despite them. Saslow’s book is Rising Out of Hatred: The Awakening of a Former White Nationalist. In the Spiel, more on the Kavanaugh hearing, and Trump’s continuing belief that 52 percent of women voted for him.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Women Leaders 54 mins – “What makes a good leader — someone with the ability to get others to follow, sometimes into the unknown? Shakespeare had something to say about all that. Julius Caesar and Coriolanus, two fantastically successful military leaders, both stumble and fall catastrophically when it comes to political leadership. So, being a leader seems to depend somewhat on context. Or is leadership, then, perhaps more of an art? And what about men vs. women as leaders? Since the dawn of time, men have generally worn the pants — as CEO’s, world leaders. Power, authority and influence have not been distributed equally in society; gendered stereotypes and sexist attitudes have played a large role in the absence of women leaders. Many of the arguments in Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s book, Lean in: Women, Work and the Will to Lead, ring true. Women are considered bossy when they are aggressive while men are praised for the same behaviours. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog

Workplace Environments 24 mins – “In this episode, we are joined by Amy C. Edmondson to discuss her latest book, The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation, and Growth. Amy is the Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management at the Harvard Business School and is the world expert on psychological safety, a topic recently made famous by the findings of Google’s Project Aristotle, the quest to build the perfect team. What Was Covered – How leaders can create psychologically safe environments in the workplace, in service of innovation and profitable growth. The ‘fearless’ organization, and why fear-based leadership strategies are a recipe for failure. How leaders leverage approaches from indigenous cultures to deal with some of the worlds more pressing VUCA challenges.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wyatt Cenac 56 mins – “Wyatt Cenac on Mentor Colin Quinn, and Negin Farsad on Death Threats and Blackout Boning At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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