Mining Digest 397 – Jun 28, 2019: AI and Human Interaction, AI Helps Doctors, Anxious in America, Autonomous Aircraft, Black Radio Stations, Capitalism Problems, Climate Change and Nuclear Power, CRISPR Food, Death Penalty Discussion, End of Life Care, Extremism and Online Harassment, Factory Operations, Free Range Kids, Gerrymandering, Golden State Killer, Hamilton vs. Madison, Hasidic Jews, Hate in Media, John Bogle, Ken Feinberg, Language and Thinking, Muller Report, Nature vs Nurture, Nigerian Farming, Paris Review Magazine, Presidential Power, Rape Kit Uses, Reproduction Rights, Surgical Safety Checklist, Tech Companies Collapse, Working with Intelligent Machines

Exercise your ears: the 43 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 733 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,442) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

AI and Human Interaction 17 mins – “Many artificial intelligence researchers expect AI to outsmart humans at all tasks and jobs within decades, enabling a future where we’re restricted only by the laws of physics, not the limits of our intelligence. MIT physicist and AI researcher Max Tegmark separates the real opportunities and threats from the myths, describing the concrete steps we should take today to ensure that AI ends up being the best — rather than worst — thing to ever happen to humanity.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Helps Doctors 47 mins – “Artificial intelligence will utterly transform medicine. Better diagnoses, but also privacy concerns. But one doctor says if done right, AI could put the “care” back in health care.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anxiety in America 47 mins – “In a New York Times Op-Ed last week, Ruth Whippman wrote: “After a couple of decades of constant advice to ‘follow our passions’ and ‘live our dreams,’ for a certain type of relatively privileged modern freelancer, nothing less than total self-actualization at work now seems enough. But this leaves us with an angsty mismatch between personal expectation and economic reality. Almost everyone I know now has some kind of hustle, whether job, hobby, or side or vanity project. Share my blog post, buy my book, click on my link, follow me on Instagram, visit my Etsy shop, donate to my Kickstarter, crowdfund my heart surgery. It’s as though we are all working in Walmart on an endless Black Friday of the soul.” Modern anxiety cuts across national borders and social classes, but in America right now its artisanal flavor is a blend of soaring, media-driven dreams and dwindling probabilities of making a living while pursuing them. And nobody’s more eloquent or wickedly funny about this reality than Ruth Whippman, the author of AMERICA THE ANXIOUS. I’m genuinely, sustainably happy that she’s here with me today.“ At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aristotelian Thinking 58 mins – “Classicist Edith Hall reminds us that Aristotle’s “virtue ethics” was a sophisticated, subtle approach to the pursuit of lifelong happiness a couple millennia before Oprah thought of inviting us to live our best life.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autonomous Aircraft 8 mins – “Flight is about to get a lot more personal, says aviation entrepreneur Rodin Lyasoff. In this visionary talk, he imagines a new golden age of air travel in which small, autonomous air taxis allow us to bypass traffic jams and fundamentally transform how we get around our cities and towns. “In the past century, flight connected our planet,” Lyasoff says. “In the next, it will reconnect our local communities.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Radio Stations 42 mins – “Before 1970, the most popular radio stations in the U.S were run by white people. But that all changed when Percy Sutton helped to form Inner City Broadcasting with the mission of putting black programming in the hands of black people. Together he and his son Pierre—and later Pierre’s daughter, Keisha—built a radio empire. But it was about more than just entertaining listeners; together they changed the culture and radically influenced how radio stations and record labels treated black artists. Alex talks with Pierre and Keisha about the unlikely rise—and heartbreaking fall—of their family business.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Business Startups 46 mins – “For many businesses, it’s all about looking forward. New trends, new brands, new verticals. But Sharon Price John sees a different path: one that involves looking to the past. She has made a career of reinvigorating forgotten and failing brands, including Nerf, Stride Rite, and Barbie Fashions. But her career hasn’t been all success all the time. Alex talks to Sharon about a bet she made that went very wrong, and about her biggest turnaround yet, as the CEO and President of Build-a-Bear Workshop.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Capitalism Problems 56 mins – “The evidence is in: if the earth is to survive catastrophic climate change, the economies of the world can’t continue to grow infinitely. Maintaining the status quo makes ecological viability impossible. But imagining a world without capitalism also seems to be impossible. Doing so would require fundamentally rethinking our idea of prosperity and how we value work. In lecture and conversation, mathematician and philosopher David Schweickart asks whether there is another way forward for capitalism, one in which the choice isn’t between the economy and life itself.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Climate Change and Nuclear Power 47 mins – “You say we have to tackle climate change. Fine. But can you do it without nuclear power? It’s a hot-button issue for environmentalists. And the Green New Deal sidesteps it.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comic Artist Jessica Abel 63 mins – “My guest today is Jessica Abel. She’s an accomplished artist herself—a graphic novelist who did a kind of graphic docu-novel called OUT ON THE WIRE about how some of the greatest radio shows and podcasts are made, including Snap Judgment, Radiolab, and This American Life. In the course of figuring out how to steer her own creative ship she’s learned invaluable lessons about how to help others do the same. Her most recent book GROWING GILLS and her Creative Focus Workshops offer creatives a personalized process for figuring out what they want to make and how to balance those goals with the rest of their busy lives.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CRISPR Food 12 mins – “Vegetables engineered with the gene-editing technology Crispr are moving closer to supermarket shelves. But will these genetically altered foods carry labels to alert consumers? Or is gene editing, as some scientists argue, just a way to speed up evolution?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Death Penalty Discussion 49 mins – “Is it constitutional to execute an inmate who doesn’t remember the crime he committed? Or a person who might suffer excruciating pain during execution? These questions were raised by cases that came before the Supreme Court this term; joining host Jeffrey Rosen to debate them are John Bessler of the University of Baltimore School of Law and Richard Broughton of the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law. These two scholars consider the death penalty’s past and present, find points of agreement between death penalty abolitionists and supporters, and predict what the new makeup of the Court will mean for the future of capital punishment.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dyslexia 48 mins – “For a learning disability that everyone seems to know about, dyslexia is maybe the most commonly misunderstood and controversial cognitive difficulty there is. Some people think it’s a gift, some people think it doesn’t even exist.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

End of Life Care 38 mins – “Barbara Coombs Lee worked as a nurse, nurse practitioner and physicians assistant for more than 25 years. Her time in clinics and hospitals led her to the conclusion that the way our society thinks about death, and the way the medical community works to avoid it, can make the experience of dying more stressful – and painful – than it needs to be. Coombs Lee eventually transitioned into the role of advocate, pushing for access to hospice services and education regarding options for end-of-life care. She has also been a leading voice in the “medical aid in dying” movement, an issue that Diane advocates for, as well. Coombs Lee has now written a book called “Finish Strong: Putting Your Priorities First at Life’s End.” It outlines what she thinks we, as a society, get wrong about death, and explains how we can do it better.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Epidemics in Hong Kong 27 mins – “The city of Hong Kong is shaped by epidemics – from the plague of 1894 to the outbreak of SARS in 2003. Visible signs of the lessons learned are found on the Taipingshan Medical Heritage trail, including Blake Garden, the Tung Wah Hospital and the Hong Kong Museum of Medical Sciences, previously the first pathology lab on the island. Faith Ho, former Professor of Pathology at the University of Hong Kong and one of the founders of the museum, explains how crowded living conditions in the 19th century helped the plague to spread quickly while we hear some of the personal stories of the staff and patients affected by the SARS epidemic which killed nearly 300 people. At that time medical scientist and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioner Chris Chan took his exams wearing a face mask. He describes how in one trial Chinese medicine helps to delay kidney deterioration in his diabetic patients. And signs of the integration of TCM and westernised medicine are discovered in a beautiful herb garden surrounding the museum. Rose Mak – a retired developmental paediatrician and now chief gardener and Chris Chan describe some of the 250 plant species and their usage including periwinkle and Chinese artmesia.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Extremism and Online Harassment 14 mins – “Can technology make people safer from threats like violent extremism, censorship and persecution? In this illuminating talk, technologist Yasmin Green details programs pioneered at Jigsaw (a unit within Alphabet Inc., the collection of companies that also includes Google) to counter radicalization and online harassment — including a project that could give commenters real-time feedback about how their words might land, which has already increased spaces for dialogue. “If we ever thought that we could build an internet insulated from the dark side of humanity, we were wrong,” Green says. “We have to throw our entire selves into building solutions that are as human as the problems they aim to solve.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Factory Operations 52 mins – “Historian Joshua Freeman joins us to talk about the history of factories, which is really interesting when you consider the lives of the people who’ve worked in them and how they’ve shaped our world. Look around the room and you’ll be hard-pressed to find something that wasn’t created in a factory. The products are ubiquitous and modern life would grind to a halt without them. Tuesday, we’re considering the factory with historian Joshua Freeman. At times we’ve thought about industrialization as a symbol of morality and progress; at others, they’ve been a stand-in for exploitation and dehumanization. We’ll talk with Freeman about how we live and work, and how the factory has shaped our world.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm to Table 16 mins – “Restauranteur Kimbal Musk wants to feed America with hyper-local produce and robot-equipped kitchens. Anya Fernald, CEO of Belcampo, is rethinking the way animals are raised and slaughtered. We asked them how we’ll be eating in the years ahead.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Free Range Kids 53 mins – “Free range parenting is all about giving your child the freedom to play and explore life on their own. Are there benefits? Sure. Do some people hate the concept? Yes! Listen and learn right here.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Gerrymandering 51 mins – “The Supreme Court heard two partisan gerrymandering cases—one from North Carolina and another from Maryland—this week: Lamone v. Benisek and Rucho v. Common Cause. Examining those cases and how the Court might rule, host Jeffrey Rosen sits down with Nick Stephanopoulos, one of the attorneys in the North Carolina case and a law professor at the University of Chicago, an…d Hans von Spakovsky, manager of the Election Law Reform Initiative at the Heritage Foundation. These scholars debate whether or not the Supreme Court should be involved in examining partisan gerrymandering claims, and discuss what the Constitution says about gerrymandering.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gladys Knight 38 mins – “Motown legend and seven-time Grammy winner Gladys Knight reflects on coming of age in the music business, the harsh reality of touring during the 1950s in the segregated South, and finding her own voice late in her career. Gladys also explains how she’s finally come to understand now, with her fourth husband, what marriage truly means. In 1996, Gladys Knight & the Pips were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Gladys is on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “100 Greatest Singers of All Time.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Golden State Killer 45 mins – “Paul Holes was starting out in the field of criminology when, one day in 1994, he spotted a filing cabinet in the library of the crime lab where he was working. He opened a drawer, pulled out some files, and discovered the cold case that he would spend his entire career trying to solve. He did it through a trial and error process that involved old-fashioned detective work, new technology, and countless wrong turns before he finally found himself at the Golden State Killer’s front door.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Hale County This Morning 52 mins – “In his film Hale County This Morning, This Evening, director RaMell Ross abandons the traditional documentary form for a kind of lyrical portraiture, weaving together images and scenes from the lives of two young men in modern Alabama. It’s a documentary, but it’s also a visual poem about the historical South and the people who call it home. The film is nominated for an Academy Award, so we’re taking the opportunity to rebroadcast our conversation with Ross.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hamilton vs Madison 15 mins – “The divisiveness plaguing American politics today is nothing new, says constitutional law scholar Noah Feldman. In fact, it dates back to the early days of the republic, when a dispute between Alexander Hamilton and James Madison led the two Founding Fathers to cut ties and form the country’s first political parties. Join Feldman for some fascinating history of American factionalism — and a hopeful reminder about how the Constitution has proven itself to be greater than partisanship.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hasidic Jews 52 mins – “But in a couple of Brooklyn neighborhoods, people are still dressing and living in many ways like it’s the 18th century, and adhering to laws that date back centuries, even millennia earlier. I’m talking about Hasidic Judaism, and particularly, today, about Borough Park, Brooklyn, where this community thrives. And even more particularly about one woman—Rachel “Ruchie” Frier—who, in spite of being religiously observant as most humans would define it has nonetheless become a thorn in the side of the more conservative elements of this already deeply conservative community. The all-female volunteer ambulance corps she started was a radical move for Borough Park, and it’s the subject of 93Queen, a new documentary by Paula Eiselt.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate in Media 52 mins – “Rolling Stone reporter Matt Taibbi has new a book that he describes as an “insider’s guide to the pressures at work in media.” He says we’re exploiting people’s desire to root for their own team and hate the rest. Friday, we’re asking why it is you might hate the media. Not why you hate journalism, but the system that’s supposed to deliver the journalism. Our guest is Rolling Stone reporter Matt Taibbi. He’s written a book that he describes as an “insider’s guide to the pressures at work in media,” and he’s pretty critical. He says we’re basically exploiting people’s desire to root for their own team and hate the rest. Taibbi’s book is called Hate, Inc.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

John Bogle 44 mins – “With the passing of 89-year-old John Bogle, many writers who have covered Bogle’s work wrote thoughtfully about his life and the impact as the creator of the first index mutual fund.  For 10 years, Tom Cock, Don McDonald and I interviewed him annually on our “Sound Investing” radio show on KVI in Seattle Washington. It was interesting how his views regarding asset allocation changed during those years. On this podcast I recall some of the relevant history of his business activities in the mutual fund industry, as well as 10 ways index funds have had an impact on your investments.  While everyone knows about the long-term advantages of low expenses, there are other reasons, some rarely discussed, why I think index funds have made you wealthier while giving you more peace of mind.  Finally, I discuss the impact John Bogle had on the work I am doing to help investors build more productive portfolios.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ken Feinberg 39 mins – “In the days after September 11, 2001, Kenneth Feinberg took on an unenviable task. Congress had created the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, and it was his job to figure out who should receive money and how much they should get. But much of his time was spent doing something else: listening to people’s stories. Nearly two decades later, he’s still the person we turn to in the wake of our worst catastrophes.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Language and Thinking 14 mins – “There are about 7,000 languages spoken around the world — and they all have different sounds, vocabularies and structures. But do they shape the way we think? Cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsky shares examples of language — from an Aboriginal community in Australia that uses cardinal directions instead of left and right to the multiple words for blue in Russian — that suggest the answer is a resounding yes. “The beauty of linguistic diversity is that it reveals to us just how ingenious and how flexible the human mind is,” Boroditsky says. “Human minds have invented not one cognitive universe, but 7,000.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Movie Stars 88 mins – “Gilbert and Frank (aided by guest co-host Michael Weber) pay loving tribute to some of the artists and performers we lost in 2018, including John Mahoney, Barbara Harris, Tab Hunter, Margot Kidder and Bill Daily as well as former GGACP guests Ken Berry, Will Jordan, Charlotte Rae and Chuck McCann. Also in this episode: Laverne DeFazio makes good, Jerry Van Dyke breaks through, Burt Reynolds turns down 007 and Connie Sawyer opens for Sophie Tucker! PLUS: Marty Allen, war hero! The last surviving Munchkin! The magic of Ricky Jay! The villainy of Hal 9000! And Gilbert remembers his dear friend James Karen!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mueller Report 51 mins – “After years of waiting, journalists finally began digging into the redacted version of the Mueller report. On this week’s On the Media, how the special counsel’s findings confirm years of reporting about turmoil within the White House. Plus, what the Notre Dame fire and the Sacklers show us about the dark side of philanthropy, and how the Justice Department stopped prosecuting executives. And, an undercover investigation shines a light on the NRA’s PR machinery.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nature vs Nurture 53 mins – “Original broadcast date: August 25, 2017. How much of who we are is biology? How much is learned? And how much can we change? This hour, TED speakers on how genes and experience collaborate — and compete — to make us who we are. TED speakers include neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky, epigeneticist Moshe Szyf, pediatrician Nadine Burke Harris, and psychologist Brian Little.” At the link left-click the rectangle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nigerian Farming 11 mins – “Africa’s youth is coming of age rapidly, but job growth on the continent isn’t keeping up. The result: financial insecurity and, in some cases, a turn towards insurgent groups. In a passionate talk, agricultural entrepreneur Kola Masha details his plan to bring leadership and investment to small farmers in Africa — and employ a rising generation.

Paris Review Magazine 46 mins – “A seismic shake-up at a venerable literary gatekeeper. Shallow and not-so-shallow consumerism. The Paris Review’s new editor on old ghosts, new voices, and what’s worth keeping.,,,This summer, Emily Nemens was named the new editor of The Paris Review. She’s a poet, short story writer, essayist and illustrator who previously co-edited the Southern Review. At 34, she’s a fresh new steward for the this venerable old literary gatekeeper. And it’s an opportune moment to ask, or re-ask the questions: who is a literary magazine for, what is it supposed to do, and how can it do that better?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Power 50 mins – “Now that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has submitted the findings from his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, many are wondering, what will happen next? John Yoo of Berkeley Law School and Steve Vladeck of University of Texas Law School detail the possible scenarios and examine how the president and Congress might respond—focusing on potential executive privilege claims by President Trump. They also consider how President Trump might claim executive privilege in other contexts—like the House obstruction inquiry, a possible impeachment probe, attempts to prevent release of notes from his Helsinki meeting with Vladimir Putin, or in pending civil lawsuits against him. Jeffrey Rosen hosts. Note: This podcast was recorded on Wednesday, March 20th, before the news broke (on Friday) that the Mueller report was completed.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rape Kit Uses 53 mins – “Rape kits are simple forensic evidence collection kits used when someone is sexually assaulted. But the story is deeper than this. Learn all about rape kits, the sad backlog problem, and what you can do to help, in today’s episode.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.  

Reproductive Rights 58 mins – “The increasing number of new laws restricting abortion recently passed in numerous states around the country has some wondering: is Roe v. Wade and the constitutional right to abortion at risk? On this episode, we dive into landmark abortion precedent from Griswold v. Connecticut and Roe v. Wade through Planned Parenthood v. Casey and Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt, tracing the evolution of abortion jurisprudence under the Constitution. We also discuss the variety of new laws aimed at restricting access to abortion, and how current justices may rule on upcoming challenges to these laws—whether they will be upheld or struck down. Host Jeffrey Rosen is joined by Kathryn Kolbert, a reproductive rights lawyer who argued on behalf of Planned Parenthood in the Casey case, and Clarke Forsythe, Senior Counsel at Americans United for Life.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robots in Supermarkets 46 mins – “There are robots roaming the aisles of Walmart and other grocery stores. Monitoring inventory, cleaning up spills and potentially replacing workers. Automation is coming to a supermarket near you.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surgical Safety Checklist 27 mins – “Health Check has been following the progress of the World Health Organisation (WHO) Surgical Safety checklist since 2006 and it’s now the 10th anniversary of the first big evaluation of it. The Surgical Checklist is a list that surgical staff go through right at the start of an operation to make sure they are operating on the right person, in the right way, with the right staff and the right equipment. They also check whether the patient has any allergies, whether they have been given the right kind of antibiotics to prevent infection and that they have not had anything to eat since the night before. Another part of the ethos of the checklist is that any member of staff, however junior, is encouraged to speak up if they are worried about anything being amiss. It is now used in more than a hundred hospitals globally. Michelle White is a consultant anaesthetist at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, who through the organisation Mercy Ships has been training staff around the world. Dr Nina Capo-Chichi, a first year paediatric surgeon at the national hospital in Benin, took part in the training sessions. Some people find that winter affects their mood and they even experience depression and find themselves withdrawing socially every winter, while in summer they feel fine. It is known as seasonal affective disorder or SAD, and can be far more serious than simply feeling a bit miserable in the winter. A team of researchers at the University of South Wales, in the UK, wanted to know why some people get SAD and others do not. They studied the latitude where people live and whether they have SAD, and also something more curious; their eye colour. Professor of Psychology Lance Workman explains more to Claudia.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Tech Companies Collapse 43 mins – “During the dot-com bubble, Henry Blodget was making millions of dollars as a top analyst on Wall Street. But when that bubble burst, his fortunes changed. He became the public face of a Wall Street corruption investigation that ended with the SEC banning him from the securities industry — for life. Henry tells Alex about the supreme shame of that moment, and about how he eventually started over by founding a new venture, Business Insider.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Tiny Houses and Homelessness 29 mins- “Shelter is on the first rung of renowned psychologist Abraham Maslow‘s hierarchy of needs. And yet, as a society, we have not cracked the code for how to house people in a way that is equitable and sustainable. While millions consume cubic acres of carbon heating and cooling their McMansions, others combat housing insecurity on a daily basis. This week on Sea Change Radio, we discuss two different facets of the housing puzzle. First we take a look at the tiny homes movement with two builders, Fatih and Deniz Saat. They describe what the target customer base is for their Lilliputian locales, their design inspiration, and how these itty bitty domiciles could potentially transform communities of the future. Next, we hear from San Francisco Supervisor Rafael Mandelman to learn about his unique journey into politics and to talk about the issue of homelessness in America.” At the link left-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wolf Research 54 mins -”How much should humans try to “fix” nature? That question gets at the heart of our relationship with the entire natural world. Contributor Brad Badelt travels to isolated Isle Royale National Park in Lake Superior, where a controversial decision has been made to relocate wolves from the mainland to help sustain the island’s dwindling pack. The world’s leading wolf researchers and environmental thinkers debate that decision — and what our idea of wilderness means.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.  

Working with Intelligent Machines 10 mins – “The path to skill around the globe has been the same for thousands of years: train under an expert and take on small, easy tasks before progressing to riskier, harder ones. But right now, we’re handling AI in a way that blocks that path — and sacrificing learning in our quest for productivity, says organizational ethnographer Matt Beane. What can be done? Beane shares a vision that flips the current story into one of distributed, machine-enhanced mentorship that takes full advantage of AI’s amazing capabilities while enhancing our skills at the same time.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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